header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-05-17 PROC 21

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1110)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Because of time constraints, I'm calling this meeting to order.

Good morning. This is meeting number 21 of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs for the first session of the 42nd Parliament. This meeting is being held in public, and it's televised.

Our business today is the main estimates 2016-17, vote 1 under the House of Commons and vote 1 under Parliamentary Protective Service, followed by a second hour, maybe, with witnesses from the United Kingdom House of Commons in connection with the study of initiatives towards a family-friendly House of Commons.

I will call vote 1 under House of Commons and vote 1 under Parliamentary Protective Service of the main estimates for 2016-17.

Our witnesses are the Honourable Geoff Regan, Speaker of the House; Marc Bosc, acting Clerk of the House of Commons; Michael Duheme, director of the Parliamentary Protective Service; Daniel Paquette, chief financial officer, Parliamentary Protective Service; and Sloane Mask, deputy chief financial officer, Parliamentary Protective Service.

I invite your opening statements. I'm sorry for the delay and the rush.

Hon. Geoff Regan (Speaker of the House of Commons):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. It's nice to be back at the procedure and House affairs committee after a number of years of absence, and in a different capacity from when I was here as a member of the committee some years ago.

I'm pleased to be joined today by Marc Bosc, the acting Clerk of the House of Commons; Daniel Paquette, the chief financial officer; Chief Superintendent Michael Duheme, director of the Parliamentary Protective Service; and Sloane Mask, the deputy chief financial officer of the Parliamentary Protective Service, or PPS, as I'll call it.

I'll be presenting the House of Commons main estimates first, followed by those of the new PPS.

We're also joined by other members of the House administration's executive management team: Stéphan Aubé, the chief information officer; Philippe Dufresne, the law clerk and parliamentary counsel; André Gagnon, the acting deputy Clerk, procedural services; Benoit Giroux, director general, parliamentary precinct operations; Patrick McDonell, deputy Sergeant-at-Arms and corporate security officer; and Pierre Parent, the chief human resources officer.[Translation]

You should all have a copy of the presentation, so I won't read it. I prefer to give you an overview, so as to leave more time for questions and answers.

(1115)

[English]

I'll begin with the House of Commons main estimates for 2016-17, which total $464 million, an increase of 4.55% over 2015-16.

I'll provide an overview of the relevant line items in the main estimates along four major themes: budgets for members, House officers, and presiding officers; House administration; electoral boundary redistribution; and the PPS.[Translation]

Let me begin with the budgets for members, House officers and presiding officers.

At its meeting of March 10, 2015, the Board of Internal Economy acknowledged an increase of 2.3%, effective April 1, 2015, to members' annual sessional allowance and additional salaries. This funding is statutory in nature and is in accordance with provisions in the Parliament of Canada Act. The increase amounts to $1.3 million for the 2016-2017 fiscal year and subsequent years.[English]

In December 2015 the Board of Internal Economy approved a one-time increase of 20% to members' office budgets and to House officers' budgets. This comes after six years of these budgets being frozen, the last increase having occurred in 2009-10. Future adjustments will be based on the consumer price index as measured in September of the previous year.

There was also a one-time increase of 5% to the members' travel status expenses account.

Following the general election, the House officers' office budgets were established, based upon the election results for all parties in accordance with the long-standing formula approved by the board. The resulting funding increase of $1.1 million is being sought for 2016-17 and subsequent years.

I should also point out that members' statutory budgets were reduced by $5 million, due in part to savings generated through the individual and corporate flight pass programs.[Translation]

Let's now look at House administration.

The first element is $3.4 million in funding for salaries of the House administration employees.

Several new and rehabilitated buildings that are part of the long-term vision and plan are opening in the coming years. This will require increased resources and funding. Two examples include the commissioning of the Sir John A. Macdonald Building, last September, and the upcoming commissioning of the Wellington Building, this fall. This funding of $5.6 million was approved for the 2016-2017 fiscal year.[English]

With the opening of these buildings, additional funding is required for salary, operating, and capital expenses to ensure continued support of the building assets transferred from Public Services and Procurement Canada as they are completed. Unfortunately—before you ask—I don't have control of office allocation.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Hon. Geoff Regan: Funding of $3 million for the 2016-17 fiscal year is being sought to support these facilities.

To support the ongoing maintenance of information technology assets and their life-cycle replacement costs associated with the long-term vision and plan, in 2014 the board approved funding on a five-year basis. This year's funding has increased by $982,000.

With regard to funding for security within the parliamentary precinct, this year saw an overall reduction of $25 million as a result of resources being transferred to the PPS, which fully integrates the protective services of the House and Senate with those provided by the RCMP. This $25-million transfer includes funding sought to continue the implementation of the Enhancing Security Across the Parliamentary Precinct project, which had been initiated by the House of Commons prior to the integration of the protective services.

Mr. Chair, this just occurred to me. I should remember what a challenge it can be for the interpreters to interpret when a witness is speaking so quickly, so I'll try to slow down a bit for them. Normally, I speak at about 200 words a minute, with gusts of up to 400.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

(1120)

[Translation]

Additionally, the House is seeking $600,000 to continue the implementation of the emergency notification system—one of our priorities.

Another strategic priority involves modernizing wireless telecommunications services by making the latest smart phones and tablets available to members and staff. A mobile work environment gives members and House administration employees much greater flexibility to carry out their activities and work. This commitment will allow the house to be more adaptable to the ever-changing demands of parliamentary work.[English]

An example of a recent change to the way we do business is of course the creation of the electronic petition system, which was launched in December. As of mid-April, 64 e-petitions had been opened, and more than 150,000 Canadians had added their signatures electronically in support of various policy initiatives. To continue to support the e-petitions system, funding of $195,000 is being requested for 2016-17 and subsequent years.[Translation]

We will now move on to funding allocated for the electoral boundaries redistribution.

Prior to the election in the fall of 2015, 30 constituencies were added. In June 2014, the board approved temporary funding of $17.6 million for 2015-2016 and permanent funding of $24.5 million for 2016-2017 and subsequent years.

This funding takes into consideration requirements for members, including pay and pension, travel, telecommunications services, office budgets, parliamentary and constituency office expenditures, and additional funding requirements to enable the House administration to support the institution and ensure the same level of services to the expanded membership.[English]

Now for the PPS, the Parliamentary Protective Service, which is one month shy of its first anniversary. It has implemented a single command oversight mechanism, formalized an intelligence unit, and is in the process of deploying a common uniform. Integrated teams now work together on a daily basis at the vehicle screening facility, the place we all know as “the car wash”.

The PPS is focused on deploying resources so as to make the best use of the expertise that already exists within the current complement of employees. I think we're all aware of the increased security presence on Parliament Hill.

In 2016-17 the main estimates for the PPS total $62.1 million, including a voted budgetary requirement of $56.3 million, as well as a statutory budget component of $5.8 million to fund the employee benefit program. The PPS's 2015-16 budget was established by Bill C-59, which transferred the unexpended physical security funds from the Senate, House of Commons, and RCMP.

It's recommended that $32.3 million be permanently transferred to the PPS from the Senate and House of Commons protective services and the RCMP A-base budget.

This would fund personnel, operations and maintenance, and full-time equivalents. This amount includes $4.7 million needed to reimburse the RCMP for the cost of physical security for operations and maintenance. A permanent increase of $14.5 million is required to sustain the current security posture and $5.1 million to sustainably support previously approved salary increases, security enhancement initiatives, and the integrated organizational structure.

The PPS requires a permanent increase of $3.9 million for the funding of an administrative team to manage this new parliamentary organization. A total of $400,000 is required in temporary funding to support the renewal of the baggage screening facility at 90 Wellington through 2016-2017.

This concludes my overview of the House of Commons and the PPS's 2016-17 main estimates. I look forward to questions from members.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and all the House of Commons staff.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Speaker, while you speak at 200 gusting to 400, as interpretation services will attest, the last time the “wordervane” tried to measure me it broke.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: First of all, what is 90 Wellington? Which building is that?

(1125)

Hon. Geoff Regan:

The building at 90 Wellington is directly across from Centre Block. It's the visitor welcome centre.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

I have a question mostly about the Parliamentary Protective Service.

We heard last winter that there was a lack of winter wear for guards standing outside. Has that been rectified?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I'll turn it over to Mr. Duheme.

C/Supt Michael Duheme (Director, Parliamentary Protective Service):

It has.

When PPS first started off, people came with the equipment that they had. I meet with the president of the association as well as with the president of PSAC on a monthly basis, and the issues are addressed. Mind you, if you have to change an order of dress for 400 people, it could take some time, but the issues are addressed.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

This was brought to my attention by members, and I appreciated it at the time. I certainly raised it with the PPS. I'm also looking forward to integration in relation to the uniform that is en route. I think there will be eight pairs of pants and eight jackets for everybody. It takes a long time to get all that from the supplier, but it's coming. We expect it in the coming weeks, hopefully.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That would be 3,200 jackets. That's a lot of jackets.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

You must be a math major.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Some members of PPS have mentioned to me that there has been a hiring freeze and there are a lot of vacancies. Is that being filled? Are there any vacancies right now?

C/Supt Michael Duheme:

There hasn't been a hiring freeze. We actually have a course going on right now, and there's another course prepared for July.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

C/Supt Michael Duheme:

There's an overall review being done of all the operational posture we have right now to determine the best way forward for the resources and for the recruiting of additional resources.

To give you an example, for the recruit program that's scheduled to take place in July, I think we're looking to process 30 individuals, and there are 500 applicants for it. We are maintaining the training and filling in the vacancies.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How is the integration of the Senate and House of Commons unions going? Are they going to be left separate?

C/Supt Michael Duheme:

As it stands, right now they're separate. We're respecting both collective bargaining agreements until we come to an understanding on the way forward. We did submit a proposal to the board in November to go to one single bargaining agreement. We're still waiting for the way forward on that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Another thing that came up in the last Parliament—I was a staffer here at the time—was the question of privilege related to access to the Hill. I think it's related to state visits. I remember Yvon Godin, and I saw that incident happen outside the window where I happened to be standing at the time.

With all the new people coming in and all the integration, are a lot of people coming on who aren't aware of privilege? How is the training going to make sure that it doesn't happen again?

C/Supt Michael Duheme:

All of them are briefed as they enter into PPS. We're putting the final touches on a little pamphlet the members can keep as a gentle reminder of what parliamentary privilege is. When there is a visit on the Hill, we'll make sure that our members are briefed and reminded of parliamentary privilege.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you have sufficient funding to provide security over the entire precinct? Is everything where you need it to be?

C/Supt Michael Duheme:

That's the discussion I'll have with the Speaker.

As I said, the budget of $62 million that was presented was the budget that existed previously at the House of Commons, the Senate, and the RCMP. It was just brought together. There is a caveat there: there is also service that the RCMP is providing that is not factored into that $62 million. As we grow, there will be additional requests for funding on the executive and the management structure.

As I said, in different committees we gave ourselves two years to finalize all the review and to state exactly how much it's going to cost.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

I have another quick question. A number of other buildings, such as 131 Queen, use a security force at the gate other than the PPS. Is that going to remain the same, or will that be changing over time and be integrated into the PPS?

C/Supt Michael Duheme:

That will be part of our ongoing reviews.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No decision has been come to at this time.

C/Supt Michael Duheme:

No. The review for that portion hasn't even started yet.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair enough. Thank you.

Do you have a quick question, Anita?

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Yes.

I noticed that there was a decrease in travel points usage, which in part led to savings of $5 million. In our committee, we've been talking about a family-friendly Parliament. One of the things we've heard is that some families with a number of children actually don't have enough travel points. How can you explain the fact that it's actually gone down?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

The first thing to understand is that the 64 travel points that members have, except for the leaders of the parties, who have a few more, have not changed. The same number of trips is still available.

If members wanted to bring forward something in relation to changing that number, I would suggest that they speak to the House leader for their party or to the members of the Board of Internal Economy from their party to propose that. I take note of what the member for Ottawa West—Nepean has said, but I'll turn to the Clerk to add to that.

(1130)

Mr. Marc Bosc (Acting Clerk, House of Commons):

I would just add—and Dan may jump in—that in fact what we find is that members don't fully utilize their points. That's the statistical analysis that we've done of it. That's what it shows.

The Chair:

There were six months because of the election....

Hon. Geoff Regan:

But this, Mr. Chair, for the overall cost, is about right. It's what I said. The total budget is based upon the fact that some members—many—don't use the full allocation, right?

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld: Yes.

Hon. Geoff Regan: But it doesn't reduce the ability of members to use their full number of points.

The question you're raising is whether or not there ought to be more points for those with young children, for instance, who are concerned about that. As I say, you might want to take that to your member of the board for discussion.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Okay. That would be part of our study.

I note that the bells are ringing, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Okay. I'm going to push the envelope.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

It would likely be because the cost of the trips has gone down, and there are members like me, of course, who live in Ottawa, who don't use the travel points.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Of course, we've always had members from the national capital region; I guess we perhaps have a few more with redistribution these days. It's more that the cost has gone down because of the flight pass system we're using, and the fact that some members don't use the full allocation of points. That has created some savings for the House.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

I appreciate all of you being here.

You mentioned the electoral boundaries redistribution and some of the costs associated with it. That has me thinking a bit towards the next election and whether there would be any changes required there. Obviously, there is discussion happening right now about potential changes to our voting system. There are going to be some consultations taking place. We're certainly hoping that there will be a referendum of Canadians.

Looking at that situation, any system that's adopted, outside the Prime Minister's preferred option of a ranked ballot or the current system we have being maintained, would require some combination of either a redistribution of the seats or a change in the number of seats, or possibly both. Obviously there would be some lead time required, especially when you're looking at increasing the number of seats, in order to get the chamber prepared for such a thing and to make sure there are enough offices for members of Parliament. I understand that we're not aware of what those changes will be, but we have to understand there's a possibility that there could be an increased number of seats or a redistribution.

In both cases, there would be some lead time required. I wonder if you could give us some sense as to what lead time would be required in order to have the chamber, members' offices, and any other changes that would be required prepared in time for the next Parliament.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

The difficulty is that this is a hypothetical question, and it could go in various directions. As Speaker, I'll be watching with great interest to see what the House decides and what Parliament decides in relation to this question. I'm optimistic that it will happen without any tie votes—

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Hon. Geoff Regan: —but we'll wait and see on that question. I'm certainly interested in seeing that. It's very hard to respond in view of the fact that we don't know what will come.

Obviously, after the last election, the 30 new seats of course entailed additional expenses, which I talked about in my comments earlier and which are accounted for, of course, in our proposals in relation to the estimates.

Do you want to add anything, Marc?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Other than administration, we are always prepared to analyze whatever proposals come forward, and we can turn that around fairly quickly as an administration. We are fairly agile. We will have to wait and see what comes of it.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I appreciate that we have to wait and see, and I appreciate that it is a hypothetical question. However, when we are contemplating such a change, we do need to understand what is possible and what can be accomplished.

I guess I will ask the question again. If the system that is brought forward calls for an increased number of seats or a redistribution, we must have some sense as to how long we would need to accomplish that.

I guess I will add to that question. We could be moving into the West Block chamber following the next election, or we may have already moved in, or we could still be in the current chamber if things are behind schedule. Could you give us some sense as to how many new seats could be accommodated in the current chamber, if necessary, and in a move to West Block, how many seats it could accommodate if that was necessary? You must have some sense as to....

We need to have that information when we are making those decisions, I think.

(1135)

Hon. Geoff Regan:

First of all, I can tell you that last Thursday, along with the House leaders and the whips of the three main parties, I had a tour of both the West Block and the Wellington Building. In the Wellington Building, the construction is basically finished. What is happening is the wiring and so forth. Getting it ready for members to move in and for committees to be meeting there is under way. That building will be used for a number of things, including 10 very nice committee rooms. How many offices for MPs were there?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

It was 70.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

There are 70 offices for MPs. Again, as I mentioned, I don't determine the allocation. We expect it will be open during the winter break. In other words, when we come back in the new year, we should be using it, I expect. That is well under way.

As for the West Block, the construction there seems to be going very well and is on schedule. It is an impressive development there, which I am sure you have heard about before. Maybe this committee wants to have a tour of it. I presume that is possible, and I encourage you to do that.

I will let Marc continue.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

To go to the rest of your question, Mr. Richards, it is very difficult for us at this stage to go any further than what we have already said. It is a completely hypothetical construct at this point.

What I will say, though, is that in the West Block the floor space—and I stand to be corrected, Stéphan—is actually larger than in the current House. My understanding is that the currently planned seats that will go into the West Block are full-size seats like the ones in the old House. Is that correct?

Yes, that is correct.

Mr. Blake Richards:

What you are saying is that we would be getting rid of those benches that are on one wall.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

That is the idea, yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Sorry to be insistent, but is there no way we can get any sense as to what number of seats that could accommodate if it was necessary? There must be some way....

Mr. Marc Bosc:

We would have to get back to you on that. I don't have the answer.

Mr. Blake Richards:

If you could, I would appreciate it.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

One of the neat things about it, of course, is that with the big dig next to the visitor centre, there are three floors that will be underground there. Also, in the middle of the West Block, what was the courtyard has been all dug out, so there will be three floors below the level of the new chamber, where there was just bedrock. It was just a slab before. They have created a lot of additional space that will be available in that building.

Mr. Blake Richards:

What do I have for time?

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Rather than move to something new, I think I will just thank you there.

The Chair:

We go to our last speaker. Go ahead, David.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thanks, Mr. Chair. Thank you, Speaker, and everyone else who is here.

I want to start with BOIE. It is my understanding that the government promised in the last election to open up BOIE, and I haven't seen anything yet. I wonder if you can give us a sense of when we are going to throw open the doors of BOIE.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I am aware that this was mentioned in the mandate letter for the government House leader. I anticipate legislation on that at some point.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Does it take legislation to open the doors?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Yes, it does.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Can you expand on that a little?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

It is in the Parliament of Canada Act, as I recall, but I am going to ask the Clerk to add to that.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

I am going to call up the law clerk, because it is a legal question.

Hon. Geoff Regan: He doesn't want a non-practising lawyer answering that.

Mr. Marc Bosc: This is Philippe Dufresne, law clerk and parliamentary counsel.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne (Law Clerk and Parliamentary Counsel):

Thank you.

Mr. Christopherson, the Parliament of Canada Act provides for the Board of Internal Economy, provides for confidentiality, and provides for an oath to be made by board members that prevents them from disclosing a whole range of matters, so opening that would require an amendment to those—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Any part of the BOIE opening would require a legislative change?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

Our view is that the confidentiality provision is quite broad, and there may be some aspects, but there are significant limits to disclosure in the act. That would be—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Fair enough. I didn't realize that. That's fine.

Can I ask, Speaker, if there are deliberations currently? I won't ask the nature of them, because it is confidential, but is there discussion in the BOIE on the kind of legislative changes we're talking about?

(1140)

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I think Philippe has just answered your question by indicating the fact that we can't—

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, he didn't, sir, because I was just asking whether there were discussions in BOIE.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

What I mean, Mr. Christopherson, is that he made it very clear that under the Parliament of Canada Act and the oath that is taken by members, the members aren't able to discuss the topics raised at those meetings.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Understood.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I can't really respond to your question is what I'm saying.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I see. Okay. Well, it's interesting; it's a catch-22. We want to get it open, but we can't ask questions about whether it's being discussed or not.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I think the important point that's taken from this is that it requires legislation, which of course the BOIE doesn't initiate.

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, no, but I would assume, having sat on BOIE at Queen's Park, that the similarities are such that if you're going to make changes to BOIE, some of those changes would start with a discussion at BOIE.

I understand that you can't say much, and that's part of the problem, isn't it? It's just too closed. Here we are at a meeting, and I can't even find out whether opening the doors at BOIE is being discussed, because the doors are slammed shut so tight.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I would suggest that you talk to the member for your party on the Board of Internal Economy with your views on the subject, but of course you may also want to talk to the government House leader, who we would expect to be the person who'd bring legislation before the House.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Right, and that tone I'll take with him. I certainly wasn't with you, Speaker.

Next I want to follow up on Mr. Graham's comment about access, because we've been here before. It's almost always after the fact, when there has been a crisis, and then we do a whole review. Monsieur Godin was one example. There have been at least two others since I've been here.

Every time we ask ahead of time we're told, “Yes, don't worry”, and then inevitably there's a problem. There was a problem the last time. I didn't raise it because it wasn't big enough and it was early in the term, but the green bus that I was on was stopped from getting to Centre Block, and we were told we couldn't go any further. Quite frankly, everybody was unceremoniously dumped. That was fine. We walked across the lawn. However, one of my colleagues—I won't mention her name—had a temporary disability and was using a cane. She still had to walk across the front lawn in order to get to Centre Block.

Speaker, I am asking, I am all but pleading, to please make sure that these things are thought through ahead of time. Identify a route that works. The last thing we want to do is risk the security of an honoured visitor to our country, but we have been emphasizing over and over, since Canada was formed, the absolute, unfettered right of parliamentarians to access Centre Block, and yet it keeps happening.

I'm asking you and I'm asking everyone there to try to get ahead of this thing. Think ahead of time, when there's a crunch, about how you get the members to the House. It is a constitutional requirement. Hearing “sorry” afterwards is getting a little frustrating. I am urging you and Monsieur Duheme to please keep in mind, as a priority, when you are putting those barriers in, how the members get to the House, given that they have a constitutional right.

I'll leave that with you.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Look, I can assure you that this is a preoccupation of mine. Privilege, when it comes to this kind of issue, is about the right of members of Parliament to be able to do their jobs on behalf of their constituents. That's what privilege means, of course, in this context. I can tell you that when I hear about proposals for events on Parliament Hill, this is something I raise on a regular basis to try to ensure that we avoid those kinds of things.

Mr. Duheme may want to add a comment.

C/Supt Michael Duheme:

I'm not quite familiar with the incident you're referring to, Mr. Christopherson. When there's a major event on the Hill, in the planning we have looked at an alternative to get the buses up toward the—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Sir, I'm sorry. I hear you say that, sir, but the fact of the matter is that we have been stopped. I'm not questioning you, but at some point your desire to have these commands carried out doesn't always work on the ground. It just seemed to me that the last time.... Again, it wasn't an incident, so you wouldn't be aware of it, but it did happen. There were other colleagues there. If need be, I could get them to say it happened, but trust me, it happened.

It was just thoroughly a lack of identifying how that green bus would get through the security maze to find its way up. That's all that was required. It didn't happen.

I hit this hard because my goal is that we never have to deal with this in this Parliament. That would be perfect, but my experience is that there's a good chance that it will happen. Maybe under the new regime we can actually make this the priority.

I hear you, Speaker. You're a man of your word, and I'm sure you are doing everything you can. Let's just hope that it doesn't happen this time.

That's my time.

Thank you, Chair, and thank you, guests.

(1145)

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Thank you, sir.

The Chair:

We will adjourn for the first 60 seconds. When we come back, we'll have the votes on these two estimates and then, in deference to our U.K. witnesses, we will have them on video conference and start as soon as we can after the vote. I'll be suspending.

Thank you very much to all the witnesses. I know you're all very busy, and we really appreciate it. We'll talk to you individually if we have other concerns.

The meeting is suspended.



(1220)

The Chair:

We're in session.

While people are getting organized, I'll go over the formalities.

In a minute, we're going to have a vote on the estimates. Before we do that, I will introduce our witnesses.

We're going to resume our study of initiatives toward an inclusive, efficient House of Commons.

Our witnesses are here by video conference from the United Kingdom's House of Commons. I would like to welcome David Natzler, Clerk of the House of Commons; Anne Foster, head of diversity and inclusion; and Joanne Mills, diversity and inclusion programme manager and nursery liaison officer.

Before we begin, I would like to thank the clerk for drawing our attention to the work of Professor Sarah Childs, who's completing her report on reforms that would make the U.K. House of Commons a more inclusive institution.

You all got a note on that from the clerk. There are some advanced points she's looking at, and we look forward to seeing her report in the interim. It's very timely. She's doing a report. Someone has full-time work looking at modernizing the House of Commons.

I'm going to call the votes on the estimates. HOUSE OF COMMONS ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$307,196,559

(Vote 1 agreed to on division) PARLIAMENTARY PROTECTIVE SERVICE ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$56,313,707

(Vote 1 agreed to on division)

The Chair: Shall I report the votes on the main estimates for 2016, less the amount voted in interim supply, to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Once again, we're sorry for our procedures holding you up. I know you're busy, and we would love to hear your opening statements. I think this will be enlightening for us.

(1225)

Mr. David Natzler (Clerk of the House, United Kingdom House of Commons):

Shall I start now?

The Chair:

Yes, please.

Mr. David Natzler:

Thank you.

We well understand from Westminster. Things here sometimes get interrupted by votes as well. Whether that's family friendly or not, I don't know.

We're honoured to be asked to give evidence and very happy to answer your questions, so I will try to keep this opening statement pretty short.

I have with me Anne Foster and Jo Mills, who can answer questions as well. As well as talking to Sarah Childs, I hope you might have the opportunity to talk to or invite evidence from some of your colleagues over here, because they know better than staff about family-friendly policies as they relate to members and their staff.

In general we are, of course, keen to be a family-friendly employer of our staff, to the extent that we can control the necessary demands made on them. That means, for example, flexible working arrangements; an openness to consider requests for compressed or special hours; part-time working; job-sharing—and we have had job-sharing in quite senior jobs—leave, despite the House sitting; and bearing down on what can be a prevalent late-work culture. On that and those subjects, I'm sure that Anne can help you further.

We don't really have much influence on the work-life balance or the family-friendliness of the staff of members. We neither employ them nor pay them. As for members, we have, I guess, even less influence on their work-life balance. They manage themselves. We are, of course, conscious of some of the strains on their lives, but again, as fellow members, you would know that better than anybody.

You asked about sittings and sitting hours. They are decided by the House, and from 40 years' experience, I can confirm that whatever is decided is alway controversial and not popular with everybody.

It used to be assumed that an earlier start and therefore an earlier end to the day was in some way better and more family friendly. Of course, it may mean that you can neither take your children to school nor collect them at the end of the day. If there are votes at seven o'clock, it's questionable if that is automatically better than votes at ten o'clock. It is a short, but very intensive, 60-to-70-hour, Monday-to-Thursday working week. It's very good for non-London-based members, but possibly not so good for London-based members.

The good thing is that our sitting patterns through the year are now more reflective of people's non-working lives. In particular, we have a break at February for school half term. What is not so good is that we normally return in October, just as the autumn half term from school beckons. We have the problem, which I don't know if you share, that in different parts of the United Kingdom there are different times for school holidays. In Scotland, school holidays start substantially earlier.

You asked about voting. Broadly speaking, voting is similar here to your system. We have no proxy voting. We have no facilities for absent voting, although there is “nodding through”, which is an informal procedure whereby members in the precincts who in some way are unable to pass through the lobbies can vote.

Infants, meaning very small children, are now permitted in the voting lobbies, but not as yet in the chamber itself. Jo is able to explain about our day care and nursery facilities. We don't have a drop-in or crèche, but there is quite a lot of demand for something like that, and we are conscious of what you are planning on that.

There is notionally something described as maternity leave for members, but it isn't, for I think obvious reasons, on the standard statutory lines. Of course, it doesn't stop those members who are on “maternity” leave from attending, speaking, or voting.

You asked about technology. I think the main advantage of technology in this context is enabling staff to work at or from home with remote links. We, of course, have an advantage over you: we're all in the same time zone.

(1230)



We have had an alternate chamber, which I know you were also asking about, since 1999, based unashamedly on the Australian practice, and it's been a huge success. I'm happy to answer questions on that.

Finally, I think I should say there is an issue here with the extent to which the members' expenses regime—that's the allowances—affects the ability of members from outside London to lead anything like an ordinary family life by having their family members with them in London. Our expenses regime is, as you may know, under the auspices of an independent authority, which is currently consulting on exactly that point and has quoted in their document the fact that MPs often suggest the authority is not supportive enough of MPs' families and of their desire to have some sort of family life, including spouses and dependent children living with them when they are in London rather than the constituency.

I hope that was helpful.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. Once again, thank you for being here. It's very helpful.

We'll start with Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you very much.

As we know, there are a number of similarities between our two Parliaments. Often we can learn lessons from one another, so I appreciate your presenting to us.

I want to ask about the alternate chamber. You said this was a grand success. What is it about it that you think makes it so successful?

Mr. David Natzler:

The measure of the success is that members attended enthusiastically. Often the debates there are at least as well attended as debates in the main chamber. There are no votes in the alternate chamber. It's not possible to vote, and if the question is opposed it has to be decided in the main chamber. In 15 years, that has never happened, because the business there can possibly be controversial but not necessarily require a decision of the House or a decision of the House on any value.

The debates proceed on an effectively procedural motion that the matter has been considered, and then the debate can take place. It also enjoys a less formal atmosphere than the main chamber. Knowing the size of your current chamber reasonably well, and indeed the one you may be moving to in the West Block, what we have is a room that takes about 60 people in a double horseshoe shape, and it is slightly less oppressive in terms of panelled wood than either our chamber or your chamber. I think that encourages members to take part in a slightly less partisan spirit, but that is also because they sit in a horseshoe shape rather than facing one another, and also because it has a modern feel to it and a less oppositional mode.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

When you say it's in a horseshoe shape, does this mean that one party and another party are still sitting separate from one another, or is it open?

Mr. David Natzler:

My answer as the clerk is that they can sit where they like, but to be truthful, they still sit by party. The minister sits on one side and the shadow minister on the other side, and members will generally sit by party.

I think the physical layout helps. It is presided over not by the Speaker, but either by one of the Deputy Speakers or more normally by one of the panel of neutral chairs we use to chair our committees on bills. It lowers the temperature while still enabling some passionate, well-attended, and interesting debates.

(1235)

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Would there still be a question-and-answer period after each speaker?

Mr. David Natzler:

No, we don't have that. There are speeches, but they can be interrupted if the member concerned gives way, so it exactly reflects the same rules as in the chamber.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

You mentioned ministers, so this is not something that's specifically just for private members. Is there actually government business being debated and are there ministers who speak in this chamber?

Mr. David Natzler:

Nowadays there's very little government business, but a member can raise a debate. They can choose a subject and make a speech. Other members, depending on the length of the slot, can also make a speech, and then the minister will respond. Otherwise it would be quite pointless.

In other words, we don't just talk, as you do. The purpose is to get a ministerial response.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Mr. Chair, I'm sharing my time with Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you.

Hello. Thank you for being with us today. We're quite intrigued, because we share a similar parliamentary style.

Could you inform us a little bit about what your sitting week looks like? That's my first question, because I don't know if you're sitting Monday to Friday or what days of the week you sit.

Mr. David Natzler:

We sit for 36 weeks in the year, Mondays from 2:30 to 10:30, Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 11:30 to 7:30, Thursdays from 9:30 to 5:30, and we sit for 13 Fridays only in the year from 9:30 to 3:00.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you.

I also have another question about gender parity in the House, male versus female, and diversity. What is the percentage for that?

Mr. David Natzler:

We can send you the exact facts. Twenty-nine per cent of the members are female, which I think means that the others are all male. Well, let's be careful; we have no transgender members.

I'd rather send you the latest ethnic minority breakdown. We have an issue.... Members, unlike staff, are not asked to self-identify, so the identification is external. I think we now have either 32 or 34 openly gay members, which for some reason I'm proud of. It is the highest of any parliament in the world.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Very good.

Also, you said that you have a maternity leave plan, but you described it as “notionally something described as maternity leave”. Could you please elaborate and explain exactly what kind of leave you provide?

Mr. David Natzler:

I'm referring to members here. Obviously, our staff enjoy the same social security benefits as everyone else, and there's a standard public sector package. Indeed, Jo—she's on my right, but I'm not sure where you see her—is about to enjoy the benefits of that package in a few weeks, so she can speak to it more.

In terms of members, because they're not employed, they don't get maternity leave in the form of a different salary arrangement or a time in which they are expected to be away, but we do have, for demographic reasons, increasing numbers of members who have children while they are members, and their parties effectively grant them something they refer to as maternity leave. I'm cautious about using that phrase, because it isn't the same as the leave their constituents get. It is both more advantageous in that they make their own arrangements, but also less advantageous in that they may feel they have to continue with some of their constituency duties very soon after giving birth. It is noticeable that most of them will go away for a short period after the birth before returning to Westminster.

We recently had a minister—and in fact, it's not the first time; it occurred in the last Parliament as well—who had her first child, so she has been given leave. I believe she continues to draw—and you can ask her—her ministerial salary, but someone is substituting for her in her ministerial role while she is away. That is, as it were, an informality. It's not a statutory form of leave.

(1240)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll move on to Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you very much for your time today. I do appreciate it.

I have a quick question to build on what you've just said. Somebody would be substituting for the minister. Is that another MP appointed by the Prime Minister? I'm just curious.

Mr. David Natzler:

Yes.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Okay.

I missed your start and finish times when the House is in session. Could you repeat that for me?

Mr. David Natzler:

You want me to repeat the starting times and the finishing times?

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Yes, please.

Mr. David Natzler:

On Mondays it's from 2:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.; on Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 11:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.; on Thursdays, 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; and on those Fridays on which we sit, 9:30 till 3.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

In terms of the alternate chamber you were talking about and the success you saw, what would the attendance typically be in that secondary chamber?

Mr. David Natzler:

It's difficult to typify. If it's a half-hour debate, it's sometimes simply attended by the backbench member who has raised it and the government minister, sometimes accompanied by a whip or a PPS—in other words, a member who helps to assist him.

In longer debates, the 60-minute or 90-minute debates, you would normally expect seven or eight, and the opposition take part in those as well. There is an opposition front-bench spokesman—a shadow—plus the third party, because, like you, we have a third party. A third party shadow also takes part.

On Monday afternoons between 4:30 and 7:30 in our parallel chamber, we have debates on e-petitions, which are electronically submitted petitions that have reached generally more than 100,000 signatures. We've had about 20 of those. It's a novelty. Those have been quite well attended and, in some cases, very heavily attended.

For some of the hour-and-a-half debates, we may get 30 or 40 members. For example, if it's on the steel industry or on a particular region or issue, then the regional members are all likely to attend and may only have three or four minutes each to speak.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Part of the concern I had with the secondary chamber was that you were basically speaking to an empty room. I'm glad to hear that in your case there is some back-and-forth and that the attendance isn't just one person speaking to himself or herself.

Mr. David Natzler:

No, that's correct.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Sometimes you can feel like that in a regular chamber, I guess.

Mr. David Natzler:

Yes, just so.

The important thing, if I may emphasize, is that a minister responds. A member can speak for 15 minutes in a 30-minute debate, but then the minister is obliged to give an answer, which is perhaps even more important than the backbench member speaking. That is his purpose in raising the debate.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

As a member of the opposition, I like that. It's good to have that direct contact with the minister or the parliamentary secretary. That's very interesting.

Going off topic, in terms of family friendly, you may not have the exact stat—and I do appreciate that—but do you know roughly, on average, how many MPs outside the greater London area bring their families to live in the greater London area?

Mr. David Natzler:

No, I don't, and I don't think it's knowable. From the IPSA document recently, I can tell you that 168 members out of 650 had, quote, “336 registered dependants”. That is a dependant for whom they might claim travel to come to London or to have people living here. Now, that doesn't mean that they do bring them and, of course, they may have a split life.

I'm looking at my colleagues. Do you have any sense of that, Anne?

(1245)

Ms. Anne Foster (Head of Diversity and Inclusion, United Kingdom House of Commons):

No, we don't have numbers, but we do know anecdotally that the fact we have an on-site nursery has given the option to our members to make a decision about whether they're going to bring their family down to Westminster or keep them in the constituency.

Mr. David Natzler:

On the on-site nursery, I think there are five members currently, and you have to book in. It isn't a drop-in facility. There are five members whose children will be here for I think the whole school year.

Can we say vaguely which constituencies they come from?

Ms. Joanne Mills (Diversity and Inclusion Programme Manager and Nursery Liaison Officer, United Kingdom House of Commons):

Not off the top of my head. I haven't brought that list with me, but it is a mixture. We have some who are London-based and others from further out.

Mr. David Natzler:

Ashford, Leicester...I think one of them brings two children—

Ms. Joanne Mills:

They're from the Midlands.

Mr. David Natzler:

— from the Midlands. Presumably he brings them on a Monday. This is a male member. He is a big nursery supporter, which is why we know him. They're here through the week.

Also, of course, London being, if I may say so, different from Ottawa, some members who are members for seats outside London have always basically lived in London. They will have a house in their constituency, so they haven't had to move to London. What they've had to do is find a place outside London in which to spend the weekends. Quite a few members have partners who are London-based because they work in London, so the partner may work in London but the member may represent a constituency in the rest of the country.

It is a very varied picture. We also know there are members who might have liked to bring their children to London if they had been more confident that they could have set up life here, but you have to remember, as I'm sure is the case in Canada, that there is a lot of pressure from the constituencies to have the members visible there in the riding, so it does cut both ways.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Absolutely.

I have some questions about travel.

The Chair:

Ten seconds.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I guess I won't be asking any question.

Thank you for your time. Hopefully we'll have time in the second round.

The Chair:

Now we move on to Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Chair.

Good news, Mr. Schmale: I only have one question. You may get more time yet.

Thank you so much for your presentation.

Mr. Jamie Schmale: It's in eight parts.

Mr. David Christopherson: No, actually it's one question, one part, straight and smooth.

It's on travel. First of all, do you have the travel point system for members travelling around the country?

Mr. David Natzler:

I don't understand the phrase a “point system”.

Mr. David Christopherson:

The answer to that would be no, then.

Let me try another approach. This may take longer than I thought.

What system do you have for members travelling within the country, and what is its reporting mechanism?

Mr. David Natzler:

Members can travel on parliamentary duties more or less where they wish. Most members' travel, which is reimbursed, is through IPSA, the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority. Therefore, it's not my responsibility, and so I have to be cautious.

Most members' travel is between the constituency and Westminster. That doesn't include select committee travel, which is paid for by the select committee budget, but if members wish to be reimbursed for travel elsewhere, it is up to them to show that it is for a parliamentary purpose, as opposed to, let us say, a party purpose. If there is some parliamentary purpose—let us say one of their constituents is in prison in another constituency—then they can, as I understand it, reclaim the costs of travelling to that place.

The vast bulk of members' travel is on the fairly simple line back and forth between the constituency and Westminster, and then travel within the constituency, which is also reimbursable.

Mr. David Christopherson:

What about family travelling with them to the capital?

Mr. David Natzler:

There are circumstances in which travel of dependants between the constituency and London is reimbursed by IPSA. Not much of it is used.

I'm looking at the costs here. It was £52,000 last year. That's—

[Technical difficulty--Editor]

(1250)

The Chair:

There we go. We're back.

Mr. David Natzler:

Sorry. We were interrupted.

The Chair:

The last words we heard were “£52,000 last year”.

Mr. David Natzler:

Right. That was one year's expenditure on dependants' travel. That's partly because the full details of all of the members' claims are immediately publicly revealed on the IPSA website. By anecdote, members are not always happy at having their family travel arrangements exposed to immediate public view.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Perfect—

Mr. David Natzler:

But IPSA—say that again?

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, you're right on the point that I was asking about. Go ahead. Please continue.

Mr. David Natzler:

Until 2009, the scheme was that 12 journeys by a spouse or dependent child to and from London were permitted. I don't know what the IPSA scheme is at the moment, but we can make those things available to you. I think it's broadly similar.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you.

The question I was asking was exactly that. We've heard from some family members, particularly when there's a young family with a number of children, that the family is somewhat reluctant to take advantage of their opportunity to travel because of the politics of the reporting. Part of what we're seized with is recognizing that dilemma and doing something about it without losing the accountability that caused the problem to rise up in the first place.

It doesn't sound as if you have any new, particularly creative ways of doing this, but it does seem to be a consistent problem in both countries.

Mr. David Natzler:

It's not a problem that I would claim to be an expert in, other than knowing members fairly well, but no, I think there is no creative way out of it.

Some travel by members is paid for by the House, and we do not publish it immediately. Some of it we publish only in total and not in detail and publish later, either quarterly, annually, or on request, although under the freedom of information regime, which I think is similar to yours, not everybody asks all the time.

I think it's the immediacy of something appearing on a website that causes people concern. Saying “Yes, in the course of the year, I got £900 so that my partner or dependent child could be with me for some days at Westminster” is less embarrassing than someone saying “Oh, I see that yesterday there was another £42 gone on bringing whomever down to London.” That's an impression I have.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I leave it with the chair. I don't know whether it's worth having our analyst follow up to see whether there's something there in the detail that we should look at.

The reason I'm riding this one is that it doesn't affect me. My experience is that it's best for those of us who aren't involved ourselves to be raising these issues.

My daughter is 24, so it doesn't apply much, and she's almost in her last year of using it, but there's got to be some method. When spouses say that the family had been reluctant because of the politics, that's the antithesis of why the travel points are there and it's the antithesis of a family-friendly parliament, so I'm hoping that we'll spend some time finding a resolution that still leaves accountability in place. No one is ever suggesting we let go of that, but we want to do something that prevents this chilling effect from stopping members from uniting with their family because of the politics of it. That should be the least of it, yet it seems to be the most of it.

Thank you so much. You've been very helpful on an important file for us.

(1255)

Mr. David Natzler:

If I may say without wishing to lead you, you might find it of value to look at other bits of the public service where there is separation, particularly in the armed forces and, in our country, the foreign office. They have family schemes whereby family members can join whoever is serving abroad or is serving in other parts of the country, again with accountability but with some privacy as well.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Very good. Thank you so much.

The Chair:

Thank you, David.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

Not surprisingly, you got to use over seven minutes with your one question.

We'll go to Ms. Petitpas Taylor.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

How much time do I have, Mr. Chair?

The Chair:

Well, taking away what David used....no, you have seven minutes.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Okay.

First and foremost, I'd like to echo the comments of my colleagues around the table. Thank you so much to all three of you for taking time out of your busy schedules. For the past few months now, we've been looking at the issue of family-friendly models and we really want to collect all the information that we can, so we appreciate your time and your comments this afternoon.

I have a few questions just to piggyback a bit on Ms. Sahota. She talked to you a bit about the issue of paternity leave or maternity leave, and I was wondering what the average length of time is that parents are taking when they do take the leave?

Mr. David Natzler:

Are we talking about people in the country generally, not members?

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

No, I'm talking about members of Parliament.

Mr. David Natzler:

Well, I have not put this well.

Members don't take maternity leave in any formal way, so it's very difficult for me to say. You would have to ask each individual member, I think, how long they think they were on maternity leave, because it's a private arrangement, in essence, between them and their party whips.

Some of them are paired during absence. In other words, they're not expected to come to Westminster to vote, and someone from the other party—if you know pairing—and possibly a different person each day, is paired with them to cover their absence.

Somebody will have an idea as to how long. I saw a member who had very recently had a child. She was sitting in the atrium here in Portcullis House, and naturally I went up to see the child. I said, “What are you doing here? I thought you were away”, and she said, “It's a keeping-in-touch day, a KIT”, which of course we have in our ordinary maternity regime for staff.

It's quite difficult—I'm sure it's different in Canada—to keep politicians away from Westminster.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Do you have a written policy when it comes to maternity leave?

Mr. David Natzler:

Do you mean in relation to members?

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Yes.

Mr. David Natzler:

No, but in relation to members, each party may have something close to a policy. I think it happens sufficiently rarely. About every nine months, we get a birth. We're very busy people. They work it out as they go along in each case. It makes a difference whether or not you're in London. It may make a difference depending on each individual's circumstances and whether it's their first child or not.

Do you have a feel for that?

Ms. Anne Foster:

No, I think it's been much along the lines of what you've said.

Mr. David Natzler:

I think it's probably ad hoc, but you could always ask the parties what they have done, and I'm sure they would happily respond to you, possibly more willingly than to me.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

You said that 29% of your parliamentarians are female. What is the average age of your female parliamentarians?

Mr. David Natzler:

I have no absolutely no idea, but that is something we can easily find out, and we can give you the mean as well as the median.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

That would be great. Thank you.

Mr. David Natzler:

There are some who are quite experienced. There's also an interesting issue with regard to age of first election, if you see what I mean. One tends to assume they'll be young, but they're not young in every case. There are women of quite a wide variety of ages entering for the first time. There was concern in 2015 because several first-term female members unexpectedly stood down and did not wish to be re-elected. I think that was from a mixture of personal circumstances, but there was also concern as to whether that suggested an unfriendly culture or a failure of our family-friendly policies in some broad perspective.

I think Professor Childs will probably be better placed to answer that.

(1300)

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Thank you.

Could you also perhaps elaborate a bit on the issue of Fridays? You've indicated, I believe, that you sit on 12 or 13 Fridays during the calendar year. Could you explain to us what is different on Fridays? Is it routine proceedings? How does that work? What does that look like?

Mr. David Natzler:

Fridays are merely for backbenchers to introduce legislation.

There's no government business, so there is no whipped business. There can be quite a lot of members here, but they don't have to be here according to their parties. On a big day, on the first Friday of the session that just ended, we had about 450 members here because there was a bill on assisted dying, which is obviously a very major subject, but I would mislead you if I suggested that was a typical Friday. On a typical Friday there's a handful of members.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

How do you deal with your private members' bills? Where do you fit that in to your calendar?

Mr. David Natzler:

We deal with it just on these 13 Fridays.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Is that all private members' bills?

Mr. David Natzler:

Yes. There's no other time that they can be dealt with.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Thank you.

I'm going to share my time with Mr. Lightbound.

Mr. Joël Lightbound (Louis-Hébert, Lib.):

I have a quick question.

You mentioned earlier that you have a voting system called “nodding through”. I am wondering if you could elaborate on what that is.

Mr. David Natzler:

Nodding through, although members may not recognize this description—I mean my members—is actually a form of proxy voting. A member is in the precinct but too infirm or uncomfortable for it to be reasonable to ask them to pass physically through the voting lobbies. We vote by passing through lobbies, past a desk at which the name is taken, and members are then counted, unlike standing in the chamber.

If you are ill or, for example, on crutches temporarily or indeed permanently and the whips of both major parties agree, they will confirm that the member is in the precinct. They will then discover which way he or she wishes their vote to be cast, and then one of the whips will act in effect as a proxy in order to cast that vote. It is pretty rare. It is mainly used, as I said, for those who are either quite seriously ill or temporarily or permanently incapacitated physically. It has, I believe, been used recently for those who are in the final stages of pregnancy or who are nursing an infant.

The Chair:

In England, you have to walk through either the “yes” lobby or the “no” lobby. You don't stand at your seat to vote, because not everyone has a seat.

Mr. David Natzler:

That is correct.

The Chair:

We're technically finished time-wise, but because we started late, does anyone have any pressing questions?

Mr. Joël Lightbound:

I have a very, very short one.

The Chair:

Okay. You learned that from David.

Mr. Joël Lightbound:

You mentioned precincts. When you say the member has to be in the precinct to nod through, what are the precincts? Can you say what that includes?

Mr. David Natzler:

I'd rather not.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Natzler: That's really a matter for the whips, and we have no formal knowledge of how they do this, but we are pretty confident that “precincts” means where the Speaker's writ runs. I think it can include an outbuilding, but the whips are supposed to go and inspect the member to make sure they're alive.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Natzler: Therefore, they're unlikely to be in an office in an outbuilding. That normally means in the palace. What can't be allowed is a member who is, let us say, 10 or 15 minutes away, communicating by email or telephone or even video conferencing. It's the physical presence of the member in the precincts that counts.

I think you have precincts as well, do you not? In other words, you have the same concept, I think, of the parliamentary precinct—

(1305)

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. David Natzler:

—and whether it would include Sparks Street or whatever is for Marc to tell you.

The Chair:

Very good.

Mr. David Natzler:

But it means being within the parliamentary area.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

At the beginning of the presentation, you were saying that you've been watching changes that we've been talking about as well.

What interests you about things that we've been discussing? Are you planning on making amendments to the way that your House operates in England?

Mr. David Natzler:

I might ask Jo very briefly to have a word about the crèche issue, which in my view is the most pressing service issue for us. You have, as I understand it, what you call a nanny system—I know it's not called that—but you can call up someone to come to help, which we don't have.

I'm in the middle of producing a paper for our procedure committee on proxy voting. That follows demands from some members—I don't know how many—for some possibilities of voting while absent beyond those that already exist.

It would also possibly avoid the need to bring in seriously ill members in order to cast a vote by, at the worst, lying in an ambulance in New Palace Yard, with someone coming to visit them. This reputationally hasn't happened for some time, but is very damaging to the House and makes us look ridiculous, as well as being dangerous. There is a prospect of some slight change there.

I'll have Jo say a word about the crèche proposition.

Ms. Joanne Mills:

What we have is a nursery, which is a full-time facility provided primarily to members of the House of Commons but also to members of the House of Lords, their staff, the House of Commons staff, and the House of Lords staff. It's open 52 weeks of the year, from Monday to Friday. However, we are now getting demands for a more ad hoc crèche service requirement, which the nursery we have in place at the moment doesn't offer.

I was interested in your Parliament and the crèche facility I believe you have, or an ad hoc child care provision you have in place and how that works and how that's benefited your members.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

That's interesting. We're working in parallel, the two Parliaments, and we'll probably have many changes to come.

Thank you, and thank you for your presentations.

Mr. David Natzler:

On the crèche, the particular issue with the crèche for me as the accounting officer is that although I'm keen that we should be family friendly and enable members of all sorts to operate fully as members, I have to be aware the public are watching and will ask, “Why should members get something that I can't get in my working life?” I think I can answer some of those criticisms—[Technical difficulty—Editor]

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'm sorry. You just cut out.

Mr. David Natzler:

That always happens when I start being controversial.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

[Technical difficulty—Editor]

The Chair:

It's MI-6.

Can you still hear us?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

They can't answer if you can't hear them.

(1310)

The Chair:

While we're waiting, committee, on Thursday we're giving instructions on our interim report. I assume the drafting instructions are normally done—

Can you hear us?

Mr. David Natzler:

Yes.

I was going on about the crèche. It's difficult to have a facility that is just there in case somebody might want to use it on a wet Monday night, because you have to have staff, you have to have a physical facility, and it could be that somebody wants to leave a child there either for a short space of time or for a longer space of time, and over widely varying age ranges.

However, I think we can be much more sensitive, including for school holidays. I don't know if this is an issue for you, but I know members here feel strongly about it. If we're sitting, quite a lot of them are joined by children during the school holidays or at half term, and they currently leave them in their offices or with their staff, which isn't ideal for either party. I'm sorry that's a long answer, but I think it describes a challenge for all of us.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. We appreciate this. You have some unique parts of your system that we'll be exploring, and we appreciate your taking the time out of your busy day. We're sorry for the technical glitches and our being late because of the vote, but it all worked out, so thank you very much.

Mr. David Natzler:

Thank you. We will send you what information we can on anything else, but Joanne will no doubt be in touch.

The Chair:

If you want to know more about our child care, or crèche, Joanne will let you know how it works.

Mr. David Natzler:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Are we doing drafting instructions on Thursday, in camera?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Is there anything else for Thursday? Is that it?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are you okay with tonight?

The Chair:

Yes, we have a meeting tonight.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We have another meeting tonight from six o'clock to eight o'clock.

The Chair:

From six o'clock to eight o'clock, it's New Zealand and Australia.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I have somebody subbing for me because I'm chairing another meeting. You threw me off, but somebody will be here for us.

The Chair:

We have New Zealand and Australia, and we are where? Right here in this same room?

Okay, that's it.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1110)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Comme le temps est limité, la séance est ouverte.

Bonjour. Il s'agit de la 21e séaliminairence du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre pour la première session de la 42e législature. La séance est tenue en public, et elle est télévisée

Aujourd'hui, nos travaux portent sur le Budget principal des dépenses 2016-2017, crédit 1, sous la rubrique Chambre des communes, et crédit 1, sous la rubrique Service de protection parlementaire, et nous accueillerons peut-être ensuite, pour la deuxième heure, des témoins de la Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni relativement à l'étude sur les initiatives visant à favoriser une Chambre des communes propice à la vie de famille.

Je mettrai aux voix le crédit 1, sous la rubrique Chambre des communes, et le crédit 1, sous la rubrique Service de protection parlementaire, du Budget principal des dépenses de 2016-2017.

Nos témoins sont l'honorable Geoff Regan, Président de la Chambre, Marc Bosc, greffier par intérim de la Chambre des communes; Michael Duheme, directeur du Service de protection parlementaire; Daniel Paquette, dirigeant principal des finances, Service de protection parlementaire; et Sloane Mask, adjointe au dirigeant principal des finances, Service de protection parlementaire.

Je vous invite à prononcer vos déclarations préliminaires. Je suis désolé pour le retard et pour la précipitation.

L'hon. Geoff Regan (Président de la Chambre des communes):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je suis heureux d'être de retour au Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre après un certain nombre d'années d'absence, et à un autre titre que celui que j'avais en tant que membre du Comité il y a quelques années.

Aujourd'hui, je suis heureux d'être accompagné par Marc Bosc, greffier par intérim de la Chambre des communes, par Daniel Paquette, dirigeant principal des finances, par le surintendant principal Michael Duheme, directeur du service de protection parlementaire, et par Sloane Mask, adjointe au dirigeant principal des finances, Service de protection parlementaire, que j'appellerai le SPP.

Je vais d'abord présenter le Budget principal des dépenses de la Chambre des communes; ensuite, je présenterai celui du nouveau SPP.

D'autres membres de l'équipe de la haute direction de l'Administration de la Chambre nous accompagnent également: Stéphan Aubé, dirigeant principal de l'information; Philippe Dufresne, légiste et conseiller parlementaire; André Gagnon, sous-greffier par intérim, Services de la procédure; Benoit Giroux, directeur général, Opérations de la Cité parlementaire; Patrick McDonnell, sergent d'armes adjoint et agent de la sécurité institutionnelle; et Pierre Parent, dirigeant principal des ressources humaines. [Français]

Vous devriez tous avoir un exemplaire du discours, alors je ne vais pas le lire. Je préfère vous en tracer les grandes lignes et ainsi avoir plus de temps pour les questions et les réponses.

(1115)

[Traduction]

Je vais commencer par le Budget principal des dépenses de la Chambre des communes de 2016-2017, qui s'élève au total à 464 millions de dollars, soit une augmentation de 4,55 % par rapport à 2015-2016.

Je vais vous présenter un aperçu des éléments pertinents du Budget principal des dépenses sous quatre grands thèmes: les budgets des députés, des agents supérieurs de la Chambre et des présidents de séance; l'Administration de la Chambre; le redécoupage des limites des circonscriptions électorales; et le SPP. [Français]

Je vais commencer par les budgets des députés, des agents supérieurs de la Chambre et des présidents de séance.

À sa réunion du 10 mars 2015, le Bureau de régie interne a pris note du rajustement de 2,3 %, prenant effet le 1er avril 2015, pour l'indemnité de session annuelle et la rémunération supplémentaire des députés. Il s'agit d'un financement législatif qui est conforme aux dispositions de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada. L'augmentation s'élève à 1,3 million de dollars pour l'exercice 2016-2017 et les exercices suivants.[Traduction]

En décembre 2015, le Bureau de régie interne a approuvé une hausse ponctuelle de 20 % des budgets de bureau des députés et des budgets des agents supérieurs de la Chambre, à compter du 1er avril 2016. Cette hausse survient après une période de gel budgétaire de six ans; la dernière augmentation avait été accordée en 2010-2011. Les ajustements annuels subséquents seront déterminés en fonction de l'indice des prix à la consommation mesuré en septembre de l'année précédente.

Il y a également eu une augmentation ponctuelle de 5 % du compte de frais de déplacement officiel des députés.

À la suite des élections générales, les budgets de bureau des agents supérieurs de la Chambre ont été établis en fonction des résultats des élections pour tous les partis, conformément à la formule de longue date approuvée par le Bureau. Cela a donné lieu à une augmentation de 1,1 million de dollars pour laquelle un financement est demandé pour 2016-2017 et pour les exercices suivants.

Je devrais également souligner le fait que les budgets législatifs des députés ont été réduits de cinq millions de dollars, notamment en raison des économies découlent des programmes de passes de vols individuelles et corporatives. [Français]

Passons maintenant à l'Administration de la Chambre.

Le premier élément est un financement de l'ordre de 3,4 millions de dollars requis pour les salaires des employés de l'Administration de la Chambre.

Plusieurs immeubles, nouvellement construits ou remis en état, ouvriront leurs portes au cours des prochaines années, dans le cadre de la vision et du plan à long terme. Cela entraînera une hausse des ressources et du financement requis. La mise en service de l'édifice Sir-John-A.-Macdonald, en septembre dernier, et la mise en service de l'édifice Wellington, cet automne, constituent deux exemples. Un financement de l'ordre de 5,6 millions de dollars a été approuvé pour 2016-2017.[Traduction]

L'inauguration de ces immeubles signifie que des fonds supplémentaires seront exigés pour payer les salaires et les dépenses de fonctionnement et d'établissement qu'entraînera le soutien continu des actifs des immeubles transférés de Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada, à mesure que leur construction s'achèvera. Malheureusement — avant que vous ne me le demandiez —, je n'ai aucune emprise sur l'attribution des bureaux.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

L'hon. Geoff Regan: Un financement de l'ordre de trois millions de dollars pour l'exercice 2016-2017 est demandé à cette fin.

Dans le but d'appuyer l'entretien continu des biens de technologie de l'information et de payer les coûts liés à leur remplacement aux termes de leur cycle de vie, lesquels découlent de la vision et du plan à long terme, en 2014, le Bureau a approuvé un financement quinquennal. Le financement de l'exercice en cours a augmenté de 982 000 $.

En ce qui concerne le financement de la sécurité dans la Cité parlementaire, une diminution globale de 25 millions de dollars a été enregistrée au cours de l'exercice en raison du transfert de ressources vers le nouveau SPP, qui intègre complètement les services de protection du Sénat et de la Chambre des communes dans les services fournis par la GRC. Ce transfert de 25 millions de dollars comprend une demande de financement visant à poursuivre la mise en œuvre du projet Renforcer la sécurité dans l'ensemble de la Cité parlementaire, qui avait été amorcée par la Chambre des communes avant l'intégration des services de protection.

Monsieur le président, je viens juste de m'en rendre compte. Je devrais me rappeler à quel point il peut être difficile pour les interprètes de faire leur travail lorsqu'un témoin parle aussi rapidement, alors je vais tenter de ralentir un peu pour eux. Normalement, je parle à un débit d'environ 200 mots par minute, avec des rafales pouvant aller jusqu'à 400.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

(1120)

[Français]

De plus, la Chambre demande 600 000 $ afin de poursuivre la mise en place du système de notification en cas d'urgence, l'une de nos priorités.

La modernisation des services de télécommunication sans fil est une autre priorité stratégique. La Chambre veut donc s'assurer qu'elle possède les téléphones intelligents et les tablettes dernier cri. Un milieu de travail mobile offre une plus grande souplesse aux députés et aux employés de l'Administration de la Chambre dans l'exercice de leurs fonctions et de leurs activités. En honorant cet engagement, la Chambre pourra mieux s'adapter aux exigences du travail parlementaire qui évolue constamment.[Traduction]

Un exemple d'un changement récemment apporté à notre façon de travailler serait bien sûr la création du système de pétitions électroniques, qui a été lancé en décembre 2015. À la mi-avril, 64 pétitions électroniques avaient été créées, et 150 000 Canadiens avaient apposé leur signature électronique afin d'appuyer diverses initiatives stratégiques. Afin de continuer à soutenir le système de pétitions électroniques, une demande de financement de 195 000 $ a été présentée pour 2016-2017 et pour les exercices subséquents. [Français]

Passons maintenant au redécoupage de la carte électorale.

Avant les élections de l'automne 2015, 30 circonscriptions ont été ajoutées. En juin 2014, le Bureau a approuvé un financement temporaire de 17,6 millions de dollars pour l'exercice 2015-2016 et un financement permanent de 24,5 millions de dollars pour l'exercice 2016-2017 et les exercices suivants.

Ce financement tient compte des besoins liés aux députés, y compris le traitement et la pension, les déplacements, les services de télécommunication, les budgets des bureaux, les dépenses pour les bureaux parlementaires et de circonscription, de même que des montants supplémentaires dont a besoin l'Administration de la Chambre pour fournir le même niveau de service à un plus grand nombre de députés.[Traduction]

Pour ce qui est du SPP — le Service de protection parlementaire —, qui est à un peu plus d'un mois de son premier anniversaire... Il a été mis en œuvre sous la forme d'un mécanisme unique de surveillance des commandes, il a officialisé une unité du renseignement, et il est en train de déployer un uniforme commun. Chaque jour, des équipes intégrées travaillent maintenant ensemble au Poste de contrôle des véhicules, l'endroit que nous appelons tous « le lave-auto ».

Le SPP se concentre sur le déploiement de ressources de façon à bien mettre à profit la vaste gamme d'expertise que lui offrent déjà ses employés actuels. Je pense que nous sommes tous au courant de la présence accrue de gardiens de sécurité sur la Colline du Parlement.

En 2016-2017, le Budget principal des dépenses du SPP s'élève au total à 62,1 millions de dollars et comprend des dépenses budgétaires votées de 56,3 millions de dollars ainsi qu'un budget législatif de 5,8 millions de dollars pour le financement du régime des avantages sociaux des employés. Le budget de 2015-2016 du SPP a été établi par le projet de loi C-59, qui prévoyait le transfert des fonds inutilisés pour la sécurité physique du Sénat, de la Chambre des communes et de la GRC.

On recommande que 32,3 millions de dollars soient transférés de façon permanente au SPP à partir des fonds des services de protection du Sénat et de la Chambre des communes ainsi que du budget de services votés de la GRC.

Cet argent servira à financer le personnel, les opérations et l'entretien ainsi que les équivalents temps plein. Ce montant comprend les 4,7 millions de dollars requis pour rembourser à la GRC les coûts liés à la sécurité physique aux fins du fonctionnement et de l'entretien. Une augmentation permanente de 14,5 millions de dollars est nécessaire pour maintenir la posture de sécurité actuelle, et un montant de 5,1 millions de dollars est requis pour financer les augmentations salariales déjà approuvées, les initiatives d'amélioration de la sécurité et la structure organisationnelle intégrée.

Le SPP a besoin d'une augmentation permanente de 3,9 millions de dollars pour financer l'équipe administrative chargée de gérer cette nouvelle organisation parlementaire. Au total, on a besoin de 400 000 $ de fonds temporaires pour soutenir le renouvellement des installations de contrôle de sécurité des bagages au 90, rue Wellington, tout au long de l'exercice 2016-2017.

Voilà qui conclut mon survol du Budget principal des dépenses de la Chambre des communes et de celui du SPP pour 2016-2017. J'ai hâte de répondre aux questions des députés.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le Président, et je remercie tout le personnel de la Chambre des communes.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le Président, même si vous parlez à des rafales de 200 à 400 mots par minute, comme les services d'interprétation pourront vous le confirmer, la dernière fois qu'on a tenté de mesurer mon débit, l'appareil s'est brisé.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David de Burgh Graham: Tout d'abord, qu'est-ce que le 90, rue Wellington? De quel immeuble s'agit-il?

(1125)

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

L'immeuble du 90, rue Wellington est situé directement en face de l'édifice du Centre. Il s'agit du centre d'accueil des visiteurs.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

J'ai une question qui porte principalement sur le Service de protection parlementaire.

L'hiver dernier, nous avons entendu dire que nous manquions de vêtements d'hiver pour les gardiens affectés à l'extérieur. Cette situation a-t-elle été rectifiée?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je vais céder la parole à M. Duheme.

Surint. pr. Michael Duheme (directeur, Service de protection parlementaire):

Oui.

Lorsque le SPP a été inauguré, les gens se sont présentés avec l'équipement qu'ils avaient. Je rencontre une fois par mois le président de l'Association ainsi que le président de l'AFPC, et les problèmes sont réglés. Remarquez que, si on doit modifier une commande de vêtements pour 400 personnes, cela peut prendre un certain temps, mais les problèmes sont réglés.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Cette situation avait été portée à mon attention par des députés, et je l'avais appréciée à ce moment-là. Il est certain que je l'ai soulevée auprès des responsables du SPP. J'ai également hâte à l'intégration relativement à l'uniforme qui est en cours de route. Je pense qu'il y aura huit pantalons et huit vestons pour tout le monde. Il faut beaucoup de temps pour obtenir tout cela du fournisseur, mais ça s'en vient. Nous attendons les vêtements au cours des semaines à venir, nous l'espérons.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela ferait 3 200 vestons. C'est beaucoup de vestons.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Vous devez avoir fait des études supérieures en mathématiques.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Certains membres du SPP m'ont mentionné le fait qu'il y avait eu un gel des embauches et qu'il y a beaucoup de postes vacants. Ces postes sont-ils comblés? Reste-t-il encore des postes vacants?

Surint. pr. Michael Duheme:

Il n'y a pas eu de gel d'embauche. En fait, nous sommes en train de donner un cours, et un autre cours sera préparé pour le mois de juillet.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Surint. pr. Michael Duheme:

On procède actuellement à un examen général de toute notre posture opérationnelle actuelle afin de déterminer la meilleure voie à suivre pour les ressources et aux fins du recrutement de ressources supplémentaires.

Pour vous donner un exemple, dans le cas du programme de recrutement qui devrait se dérouler en juillet, je pense que nous envisageons de traiter 30 personnes, et il y a 500 candidats aux postes. Nous maintenons la formation et comblons les postes vacants.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comment se passe l'intégration des syndicats du Sénat et de la Chambre des communes? Vont-ils être laissés à part?

Surint. pr. Michael Duheme:

Actuellement, ils sont à part. Nous respecterons les deux conventions collectives jusqu'à ce que nous parvenions à nous entendre sur la voie à suivre. En novembre, nous avons présenté une proposition au Bureau afin de passer à une seule convention collective. Nous attendons encore la voie à suivre à cet égard.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Un autre événement qui est survenu durant la dernière législature — j'étais attaché politique, ici, à l'époque — concernant la question du privilège lié à l'accès à la Colline. Je pense que c'est lié aux visites officielles. Je me souviens d'Yvon Grondin... et j'ai vu cet incident se produire par la fenêtre d'où je me trouvais par hasard, à ce moment-là.

Compte tenu de toutes les nouvelles personnes qui arrivent et de toute l'intégration, y a-t-il beaucoup de nouveaux arrivants qui ne sont pas au courant du privilège? Comment va-t-on s'assurer, dans le cadre de la formation, qu'une telle situation ne se reproduira pas?

Surint. pr. Michael Duheme:

Tous les nouveaux employés assistent à une séance d'information au moment où ils entrent dans le SPP. Nous mettons la touche finale à un petit pamphlet que les membres peuvent conserver comme un rappel amical de ce qu'est le privilège parlementaire. Quand il y aura une visite sur la Colline, nous allons nous assurer que nos membres seront mis au courant, et nous leur rappellerons le privilège parlementaire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Disposez-vous d'un financement suffisant pour assurer la sécurité de toute la Cité? Est-ce que tout se trouve là où vous en avez besoin?

Surint. pr. Michael Duheme:

Il s'agit de la discussion que je vais avoir avec le Président.

Comme je l'ai dit, le budget de 62 millions de dollars qui a été présenté était celui qui existait auparavant à la Chambre des communes, au Sénat et à la GRC. Il a tout simplement été fusionné. Par contre, il y a également un service que la GRC fournit, mais qui n'est pas pris en compte dans ces 62 millions de dollars. Au fil de notre croissance, il y aura d'autres demandes de financement liées à la haute direction et à la structure de gestion.

Comme je l'ai dit, dans les divers comités, nous nous sommes donné deux ans pour parachever l'ensemble de l'examen et pour déclarer avec exactitude combien cela va nous coûter.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

J'ai une autre question rapide. Un certain nombre d'autres immeubles, comme celui du 131, rue Queen, utilisent une autre force de sécurité que le SPP à l'entrée. Cette situation va-t-elle perdurer, ou bien va-t-elle changer au fil du temps et la force de sécurité sera intégrée dans le SPP?

Surint. pr. Michael Duheme:

Cela fera partie de nos examens continus.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Aucune décision n'a été prise pour le moment.

Surint. pr. Michael Duheme:

Non. L'examen relatif à cette portion n'a même pas encore commencé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est très bien. Merci.

Avez-vous une question rapide à poser, Anita?

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Oui.

J'ai remarqué qu'il y avait eu une diminution au chapitre de l'utilisation des points de déplacement, laquelle a mené en partie à des économies de l'ordre de 5 millions de dollars. Dans notre Comité, nous discutons d'un Parlement propice à la vie de famille. L'une des choses que j'ai entendu dire, c'est que certaines familles comptant un certain nombre d'enfants n'ont en fait pas suffisamment de points de déplacement. Comment pouvez-vous expliquer le fait que leur utilisation a diminué?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

La première chose qu'il faut comprendre, c'est que les 64 points de déplacement dont les députés disposent, à l'exception des chefs des parties, qui en ont un peu plus, n'ont pas changé. On offre encore le même nombre de déplacements.

Si des députés voulaient présenter une proposition relativement au fait de changer ce nombre, je leur suggérerais de s'adresser au leader de leur parti à la Chambre ou aux membres du Bureau de la régie interne de leur partie afin de présenter cette proposition. Je prends acte de ce qu'a mentionné la députée d'Ottawa Ouest-Nepean, mais je vais céder la parole au greffier afin qu'il ajoute de l'information à ce sujet.

(1130)

M. Marc Bosc (greffier par intérim, Chambre des communes):

J'ajouterais seulement — et Dan pourrait intervenir — qu'en fait, ce que nous constatons, c'est que les députés n'utilisent pas pleinement leurs points. Il s'agit de l'analyse statistique que nous avons faite de la situation. Voilà ce qu'elle montre.

Le président:

Il y a eu six mois en raison des élections...

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Mais, monsieur le président, en ce qui concerne le coût global, c'est à peu près exact. C'est ce que j'ai dit. Le budget total est fondé sur le fait que certains députés — un grand nombre — n'utilisent pas tous les points attribués, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Anita Vandenbeld: Oui

L'hon. Geoff Regan: Mais cela ne réduit pas la capacité de certains députés d'utiliser l'ensemble de leurs points.

La question que vous soulevez consiste à déterminer s'il devrait y avoir ou non plus de points pour les députés ayant de jeunes enfants, par exemple, qui sont préoccupés à ce sujet. Comme je l'ai dit, vous pourriez soumettre cette question à votre membre du bureau à des fins de discussion.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

D'accord. Cela fait partie de notre étude.

Je souligne que les cloches sonnent, monsieur le président.

Le président:

D'accord. Je vais pousser l'enveloppe.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Ce serait probablement parce que le coût des déplacements a diminué et qu'il y a des députés qui, comme moi, bien entendu, habitent à Ottawa et qui n'utilisent pas les points de déplacement.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Bien sûr, nous avons toujours eu des députés de la région de la capitale nationale; je suppose que nous en avons peut-être un peu plus, compte tenu du redécoupage, ces temps-ci. La situation tient davantage au fait que le coût a diminué en raison du système de laissez-passer aérien que nous utilisons et le fait que certains députés n'utilisent pas tous les points qui leur sont attribués. Cette situation a entraîné des économies pour la Chambre.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Richard.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie de votre présence à tous.

Vous avez mentionné le redécoupage des limites des circonscriptions électorales et certains des coûts qui s'y rattachent. Cela m'amène à penser un peu aux prochaines élections et au fait que des changements pourraient être requis à cet égard. Manifestement, des discussions sont en cours au sujet de changements qui pourraient être apportés à notre mode de scrutin. Certaines consultations vont avoir lieu. Nous espérons certes qu'il y aura un référendum auprès des Canadiens.

Compte tenu de cette situation, tout système qui serait adopté, à part l'option privilégiée par le premier ministre qu'est le scrutin préférentiel ou le mode de scrutin actuel que nous maintiendrions, exigerait une certaine combinaison de redécoupage des circonscriptions ou d'un changement du nombre de sièges, ou peut-être des deux. Manifestement, un certain délai d'exécution serait requis, surtout si on envisage d'augmenter le nombre de sièges, afin que la Chambre se prépare à une telle chose et que l'on puisse s'assurer qu'il y a suffisamment de bureaux pour les membres du Parlement. Je comprends que nous ne savons pas quels seront ces changements, mais nous devons comprendre qu'il est possible qu'il puisse y avoir une augmentation du nombre de sièges ou un redécoupage.

Dans les deux cas, un certain délai d'exécution serait requis. Je me demande si vous pourriez nous donner une idée de la longueur du délai qui serait requis afin que la Chambre, les bureaux des députés et tout autre changement qui serait requis soient prêts à temps pour la prochaine législature.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

La difficulté tient au fait qu'il s'agit d'une question hypothétique et que le cours des événements pourrait aller dans diverses directions. En tant que Président, je surveillerai la situation avec un grand intérêt afin de voir ce que la Chambre décidera et ce que le Parlement décidera relativement à cette question. Je suis optimiste quant à la probabilité que cela se passe sans qu'il y ait d'égalité des voix...

Des députés: Oh, oh!

L'hon. Geoff Regan: ... mais, nous allons attendre et voir, pour ce qui est de cette question. Je souhaite certainement voir cela. Il est très difficile de répondre à la question à la lumière du fait que nous ne connaissons pas l'avenir.

Évidemment, après les dernières élections, les 30 nouveaux sièges ont supposé des dépenses supplémentaires, que j'ai évoquées dans mes commentaires plus tôt et qui sont prises en compte, bien sûr, dans nos propositions relatives au Budget des dépenses.

Voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose, Marc?

M. Marc Bosc:

À part l'administration, nous sommes toujours prêts à analyser les propositions qui sont présentées, et nous pouvons corriger la situation assez rapidement en tant qu'administration. Nous sommes plutôt agiles. Nous allons devoir attendre pour voir ce qu'il en ressortira.

M. Blake Richards:

Je suis conscient du fait que nous devons attendre pour voir, et je comprends qu'il s'agit d'une question hypothétique. Toutefois, lorsque nous envisageons un tel changement, nous devons comprendre ce qui est possible et ce qui peut être accompli.

Je suppose que je vais poser la question de nouveau. Si le mode de scrutin qui est proposé exige une augmentation du nombre de sièges ou un redécoupage, nous devons avoir une certaine idée du temps qu'il nous faudra pour accomplir ces tâches.

Je suppose que j'ajouterai quelque chose à cette question. Nous pourrions déménager dans la chambre de l'édifice de l'Ouest à la suite des prochaines élections, ou nous pourrions déjà y avoir emménagé, ou bien nous pourrions encore être dans la chambre actuelle, si nous accusons du retard. Pourriez-vous nous donner une idée du nombre de nouveaux sièges que nous pourrions ajouter dans la chambre actuelle, au besoin, et dans le cas d'un déménagement dans l'édifice de l'Ouest, combien de sièges pourrait-il y avoir dans cette chambre, si c'était nécessaire? Vous devez avoir une certaine idée de...

Il nous faut cette information, si nous devons prendre ces décisions, selon moi.

(1135)

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Tout d'abord, je peux vous dire que, jeudi dernier, en compagnie des leaders de la Chambre et des whips des trois principaux partis, j'ai effectué une visite de l'édifice de l'Ouest et de l'édifice Wellington. Dans l'édifice Wellington, la construction est essentiellement terminée. Ce sont des travaux de câblage et, ainsi de suite, qui sont en cours. On est en train de le préparer à l'aménagement des députés et à la tenue de séances de comités. Cet édifice sera utilisé pour un certain nombre de choses, y compris dix très belles salles de comité. Combien de bureaux y avait-il pour les députés?

M. Marc Bosc:

Il y en avait 70.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Il y 70 bureaux pour les députés. Encore une fois, comme je l'ai mentionné, je ne détermine pas la distribution. Nous nous attendons à ce que l'édifice soit ouvert durant le congé hivernal. Autrement dit, quand nous reviendrons après le Nouvel An, nous devrions l'utiliser, selon moi. Ces travaux avancent bien.

Quant à l'édifice de l'Ouest, la construction semble bien se dérouler et ne pas accuser de retard. Il s'agit là d'un développement impressionnant, dont vous avez déjà entendu parler, j'en suis sûr. Peut-être que le Comité voudra le visiter. Je présume que c'est possible, et je vous encourage à le faire.

Je vais laisser Marc continuer.

M. Marc Bosc:

Pour en venir au reste de votre question, monsieur Richards, il est très difficile pour nous, à cette étape, d'aller plus loin que ce que nous avons déjà dit. Il s'agit d'un concept tout à fait hypothétique à ce stade.

Toutefois, je dirai que, dans l'édifice de l'Ouest, la surface utile — et corrigez-moi si je me trompe, Stéphan — est en fait plus importante que dans la Chambre actuelle. Je crois comprendre que les sièges qu'on prévoit actuellement installer dans l'édifice de l'Ouest sont de grande taille, comme ceux de l'ancienne Chambre. Est-ce exact?

Oui, c'est exact.

M. Blake Richards:

Ce que vous dites, c'est que nous allons nous débarrasser de ces bancs fixés sur un mur.

M. Marc Bosc:

C'est l'idée, oui.

M. Blake Richards:

Désolé d'insister, mais n'y a-t-il aucun moyen pour nous d'avoir une idée du nombre de sièges qui pourraient être installés, au besoin? Il doit y avoir une certaine façon...

M. Marc Bosc:

Nous allons devoir vous revenir là-dessus. Je ne connais pas la réponse.

M. Blake Richards:

Si vous le pouviez, je vous en serais reconnaissant.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

L'une des choses qui sont bien à ce sujet, bien sûr, c'est le fait que, compte tenu de l'importante excavation à côté du centre des visiteurs, il y a trois étages qui seront souterrains là-bas. En outre, au milieu de l'édifice de l'Ouest, ce qui était la cour intérieure a tout été excavé, alors il y aura trois étages sous celui de la nouvelle chambre, là où il n'y avait que du substrat rocheux auparavant, ce n'était qu'une dalle. On a créé beaucoup d'espace supplémentaire qui sera accessible dans cet édifice.

M. Blake Richards:

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Vous avez 30 secondes.

M. Blake Richards:

Au lieu d'aborder un nouveau sujet, je pense que je vais me contenter de vous remercier.

Le président:

Nous allons passer à notre dernier intervenant. Allez-y, David.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je remercie le Président et toutes les autres personnes ici présentes.

Je veux commencer par le Bureau de la régie interne. Je crois savoir que, lors des dernières élections, le gouvernement a promis d'ouvrir le Bureau de la régie interne, mais je n'ai encore rien vu. Je me demande si vous pouvez nous donner une idée du moment où nous allons ouvrir toutes grandes les portes du Bureau de la régie interne.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je sais que cela a été mentionné dans la lettre de mandat adressée au leader parlementaire du gouvernement. Je m'attends à ce qu'un projet de loi soit déposé à ce sujet à un moment donné.

M. David Christopherson:

Faut-il un projet de loi pour ouvrir les portes?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Oui, il en faut un.

M. David Christopherson:

Pouvez-vous nous donner un peu plus de détails à ce sujet?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

C'est dans la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada, si je me souviens bien, mais je vais demander au greffier d'ajouter quelque chose à ce sujet.

M. Marc Bosc:

Je vais demander au légiste d'intervenir, car il s'agit d'une question d'ordre juridique.

L'hon. Geoff Regan: Il ne veut pas qu'un avocat qui ne pratique pas y réponde.

M. Marc Bosc: Voici Philippe Dufresne, légiste et conseiller parlementaire.

M. Philippe Dufresne (légiste et conseiller parlementaire):

Merci.

Monsieur Christopherson, la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada prévoit le Bureau de la régie interne, elle prévoit la confidentialité, et elle prévoit le serment que doivent prêter les membres du bureau, lequel les empêche de divulguer tout un éventail d'affaires, alors l'ouverture de ce bureau exigerait l'amendement de ces...

M. David Christopherson:

L'ouverture de toute partie du Bureau de la régie interne exigerait une modification législative?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Notre point de vue est que la disposition relative à la confidentialité est très vaste, et il pourrait y avoir certains aspects, mais la loi prévoit des limites importantes à la divulgation. Il s'agirait...

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien. Je ne m'étais pas rendu compte de cela. Ça va.

Monsieur le Président, puis-je vous demander si des délibérations sont en cours? Je ne vous en demanderai pas la nature, car elle est confidentielle, mais, dans le Bureau de la régie interne, y a-t-il des discussions sur le genre de changements législatifs dont il est question?

(1140)

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je pense que Philippe vient tout juste de répondre à votre question en soulignant le fait que nous ne pouvons pas...

M. David Christopherson:

Non, il n'y a pas répondu, monsieur, puisque je demandais simplement si des discussions étaient en cours dans le Bureau de la régie interne.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Ce que je veux dire, monsieur Christopherson, c'est qu'il a affirmé très clairement qu'au titre de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada et du serment qui est prêté par les membres de ce bureau, ils ne peuvent pas discuter des sujets soulevés dans le cadre de ces séances.

M. David Christopherson:

Je comprends.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Ce que j'essaie de dire, c'est que je ne peux pas vraiment répondre à votre question.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vois. D'accord. Eh bien, c'est intéressant; il s'agit d'une impasse. Nous voulons ouvrir le bureau, mais nous ne pouvons pas poser de questions afin de savoir si cette proposition fait l'objet de discussions ou non.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Selon moi, l'élément important qui ressort de cette conversation, c'est qu'il faut un projet de loi, lequel n'est bien sûr pas déposé par le Bureau de la régie interne.

M. David Christopherson:

Non, non, mais j'aurais cru, ayant siégé au Bureau de la régie interne de Queen's Park, que les similitudes sont telles que, si on doit apporter des modifications au Bureau de la régie interne, certaines de ces modifications commenceraient par une discussion au Bureau de la régie interne.

Je comprends que vous ne pouvez pas en dire beaucoup, et cela fait partie du problème, n'est-ce pas? C'est tout simplement trop fermé. Nous voici, à une séance, et je ne peux même pas découvrir si l'ouverture des portes du Bureau de la régie interne fait l'objet de discussions, parce que les portes sont fermées très hermétiquement.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je vous suggérerais de parler au membre de votre parti qui siège au Bureau de la régie interne et de lui présenter votre point de vue sur le sujet, mais, bien entendu, vous pourriez également vous adresser au leader parlementaire du gouvernement, que nous pensons être la personne qui déposerait le projet de loi devant la Chambre.

M. David Christopherson:

Exact, et c'est le ton que j'adopterai en m'adressant à lui. Je ne l'ai certainement pas fait avec vous, monsieur le Président.

Ensuite, je veux revenir sur le commentaire de M. Graham au sujet de l'accès, car nous avons déjà abordé cette question. C'est presque toujours après coup, quand il y a eu une crise, que nous procédons à tout un examen. M. Godin était un exemple. Il y en a eu au moins deux autres depuis que je suis là.

Chaque fois que nous posons la question à l'avance, on nous dit: « Oui, ne vous inquiétez pas », puis, inévitablement, il y a un problème. Il y a eu un problème la dernière fois. Je ne l'ai pas soulevé parce qu'il n'était pas assez important et qu'on était au début du mandat, mais on a empêché l'autobus vert à bord duquel je me trouvais de se rendre à l'édifice du Centre, et on nous a dit que nous ne pouvions pas aller plus loin. Bien franchement, tout le monde a été largué sans autre forme de procès. C'était correct. Nous avons traversé le gazon à pied. Toutefois, une de mes collègues — je ne mentionnerai pas son nom — était frappée d'une incapacité temporaire et utilisait une canne. Elle a tout de même dû traverser à pied la pelouse devant l'édifice du Centre afin de s'y rendre.

Monsieur le Président, je vous demande — c'est à peine si je ne vous implore pas — de bien vouloir vous assurer que ces choses sont réfléchies à l'avance. Établissez un itinéraire qui fonctionne. La dernière chose que nous voulons faire, c'est risquer la sécurité d'un honorable visiteur dans notre pays, mais, depuis la formation du Canada, nous avons mis à maintes reprises l'accent sur le droit absolu et illimité des parlementaires d'accéder à l'édifice du Centre, et, pourtant, ces situations n'arrêtent pas de se produire.

Je vous demande, à vous et à toutes les personnes là-bas, de tenter de prendre les devants à cet égard. Réfléchissez à l'avance, en cas de situation critique, au sujet de la façon dont les députés pourront se rendre à la Chambre. Il s'agit d'une exigence constitutionnelle. Il est un peu frustrant d'entendre « désolé » par la suite. Je vous exhorte, M. Duheme et vous, de bien vouloir vous rappeler, en priorité, quand vous dressez ces obstacles, que les députés doivent avoir le moyen de se rendre à la Chambre, étant donné qu'ils ont un droit constitutionnel.

Je vais vous laisser là-dessus.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Regardez, je peux vous assurer que cette situation me préoccupe. Lorsqu'il s'agit de ce genre de problème, le privilège est une question de droit des parlementaires de pouvoir faire leur travail au nom de leurs électeurs. Voilà ce qu'on entend par « privilège », bien sûr, dans ce contexte. Je peux vous dire que, quand j'entends parler de propositions d'événements sur la Colline du Parlement, c'est un problème que je soulève régulièrement afin de tenter de m'assurer que nous évitons ce genre de situation.

M. Duheme voudra peut-être ajouter un commentaire.

Surint. pr. Michael Duheme:

Je ne suis pas vraiment au courant de l'incident auquel vous faites allusion, monsieur Christopherson. Lorsqu'un événement majeur se tient sur la Colline, dans le cadre de la planification, nous avons étudié une solution de rechange pour permettre aux autobus de se diriger vers...

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur, je suis désolé. Je vous ai entendu le dire, monsieur, mais le fait est qu'on nous a arrêtés. Je ne mets pas vos propos en doute, mais, à un certain moment, votre désir que ces instructions soient exécutées ne fonctionne pas toujours sur le terrain. Il me semblait tout simplement que la dernière fois... Encore là, il s'agissait d'un incident, alors vous n'êtes pas au courant, mais il s'est bel et bien produit. D'autres collègues y étaient. Au besoin, je pourrais leur demander de dire qu'il a eu lieu, mais faites-moi confiance: c'est arrivé.

Il s'agissait tout simplement d'un cas où on n'a pas du tout pu déterminer comment l'autobus vert allait traverser le labyrinthe de sécurité pour se rendre jusqu'en haut. C'était tout ce qu'il aurait fallu. Cela n'a pas eu lieu.

Je dénonce vivement cette situation parce que mon but est que nous n'ayons jamais à y faire face durant la législature en cours. Ce serait parfait, mais, selon mon expérience, il est fort probable que cela se produise. Peut-être que, sous le nouveau régime, nous pourrons en faire la priorité.

Je vous crois sur parole, monsieur le Président. Vous êtes un homme de parole, et je suis certain que vous faites tout votre possible. Espérons seulement que cela ne se produira pas, cette fois-ci.

Mon temps est écoulé.

Merci, monsieur le président, et je remercie les témoins.

(1145)

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Merci, monsieur.

Le président:

Nous allons ajourner la séance pour les 60 premières secondes. À notre retour, nous mettrons ces deux budgets des dépenses aux voix, puis, par égard pour nos témoins du Royaume-Uni, nous allons les accueillir par vidéoconférence et commencer dès que nous le pourrons après le vote. Le Comité va suspendre ses travaux.

Je remercie sincèrement tous les témoins. Je sais que vous êtes tous très occupés, et nous vous en sommes très reconnaissants. Nous nous adresserons à vous individuellement si nous avons d'autres préoccupations.

La séance est suspendue.



(1220)

Le président:

Nous reprenons nos travaux.

Pendant que les gens s'organisent, je veux faire un survol des formalités.

Dans une minute, nous allons mettre les budgets des dépenses aux voix. Auparavant, je vais présenter nos témoins.

Nous allons reprendre notre étude sur les initiatives visant à favoriser une Chambre des communes inclusive et efficiente.

Nos témoins comparaissent par vidéoconférence depuis la Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni. Je voudrais souhaiter la bienvenue à David Natzler, greffier de la Chambre des communes; à Anne Foster, chef de la diversité et de l'inclusion; et à Joanne Mills, gestionnaire du programme de diversité et d'inclusion et agente de liaison de la garderie.

Avant que nous ne commencions, je voudrais remercier le greffier d'avoir attiré notre attention sur le travail de Mme Sarah Childs, qui rédige son rapport sur les réformes qui feraient de la Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni une institution plus inclusive.

Vous avez tous reçu une note à ce sujet de la part du greffier. Mme Childs se penche sur certains aspects avancés, et nous avons hâte de lire son rapport. C'est très important. Elle produit un rapport. Une personne travaille à temps plein à l'étude de la modernisation de la Chambre des communes.

Je vais mettre les budgets des dépenses aux voix. CHAMBRE DES COMMUNES ç Crédit 1—Dépenses du programme........... 307 196 559 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.) SERVICE DE PROTECTION PARLEMENTAIRE ç Crédit 1—Dépenses du programme.............. 56 313 707 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Dois-je faire rapport à la Chambre sur les crédits du Budget principal des dépenses de 2016, moins les sommes votées au titre des crédits provisoires?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: Encore une fois, nous sommes désolés que nos procédures vous retiennent. Je sais que vous êtes occupés, et nous serions ravis d'entendre vos déclarations préliminaires. Je pense qu'elles vont nous éclairer.

(1225)

M. David Natzler (Greffier de la Chambre, Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni):

Dois-je commencer maintenant?

Le président:

Oui, s'il vous plaît.

M. David Natzler:

Merci.

Nous comprenons bien, car nous venons de Westminster. Nos travaux sont parfois interrompus par des mises aux voix également. Je ne sais pas si c'est propice à la vie de famille ou non.

Nous sommes honorés qu'on nous demande de présenter un témoignage et très heureux de répondre à vos questions, alors je vais essayer de m'en tenir à une déclaration préliminaire assez courte.

Je suis accompagné par Anne Foster et Jo Mills, qui pourront aussi répondre à des questions. En plus de discuter avec Sarah Childs, j'espère que vous aurez peut-être l'occasion de discuter avec certains de vos collègues ou de les inviter à témoigner, car ils en savent plus que le personnel au sujet des politiques propices à la vie de famille qui touchent les députés et leurs employés.

Bien entendu, de façon générale, nous aspirons à être un employeur favorable à la vie de famille de nos employés, dans la mesure où nous pouvons gérer les exigences nécessaires qui leur sont imposées. J'entends par là, par exemple, des modalités de travail flexibles; l'ouverture à tenir compte des demandes d'heures comprimées ou spéciales; le travail à temps partiel; le partage d'emplois — et nous avons du partage d'emplois dans le cas de postes à des échelons très élevés —; des congés, malgré la tenue de séances à la Chambre; et l'abandon de ce qui peut être une culture où le travail à des heures tardives est prévalent. À cet égard et sur ces sujets, je suis certain qu'Anne pourra vous aider davantage.

Nous n'exerçons pas vraiment une très grande influence sur l'équilibre travail-vie personnelle ou sur la conciliation entre le travail et la vie de famille des employés des députés. Nous ne les employons pas ni ne les payons. Quant aux députés, je suppose que nous avons encore moins d'influence sur leur équilibre travail-vie personnelle. Ils se gèrent eux-mêmes. Bien entendu, nous sommes conscients de certaines des tensions dans leur vie, mais, encore une fois, en tant que collègues députés, vous le savez mieux que quiconque.

Vous avez posé des questions au sujet des séances et des heures de séance. Elles sont déterminées par la Chambre, et, compte tenu de mes 40 ans d'expérience, je peux vous confirmer que, quelle que soit la décision, elle est toujours controversée, et elle n'est pas populaire auprès de tout le monde.

Autrefois, on présumait qu'un départ plus précoce et, par conséquent, une fin de journée plus précoce, était, d'une certaine manière, mieux et plus propice à la vie de famille. Bien entendu, cela peut signifier que vous ne pouvez ni amener vos enfants à l'école, ni aller les chercher à la fin de la journée. S'il y a des votes à 19 heures, il y a lieu de se demander si c'est automatiquement mieux que des votes à 22 heures. Il s'agit d'une semaine de travail courte, mais très intensive, de 60 à 70 heures, du lundi au jeudi. C'est très bien pour les députés qui n'habitent pas Londres, mais peut-être pas autant pour les députés qui y vivent.

L'élément positif, c'est que nos horaires de séance typiques, tout au long de l'année, reflètent maintenant davantage la vie des gens lorsqu'ils ne sont pas au travail. Plus particulièrement, nous avons un congé en février pour la semaine de relâche scolaire. L'élément moins positif, c'est que nous reprenons normalement nos travaux en octobre, juste avant la relâche scolaire automnale. Nous sommes confrontés au problème — et je ne sais pas si vous avez le même — lié au fait que, dans diverses parties du Royaume-Uni, les vacances scolaires ont lieu à des moments différents. En Écosse, elles commencent beaucoup plus tôt.

Vous avez posé des questions au sujet des votes. Généralement, les vôtres sont semblables à votre système. Nous n'avons aucun vote par procuration. Nous ne disposons d'aucune installation pour le vote des absents, quoiqu'il y a le « vote par assentiment », c'est-à-dire une procédure informelle par laquelle les députés qui sont dans la Cité et qui, pour une certaine raison, sont incapables de passer par les antichambres, peuvent voter.

Les nourrissons — je veux dire les très petits enfants — sont maintenant admis dans les antichambres de vote, mais pas encore dans la Chambre en tant que telle. Jo pourra vous expliquer le fonctionnement de notre service de garde et de notre garderie. Nous n'avons pas de halte-garderie ou de crèche, mais la demande est très forte pour quelque chose de ce genre, et nous sommes conscients de ce que vous prévoyez à cet égard.

En principe, il y a quelque chose qui ressemble à un congé de maternité pour les députées, mais qui ne correspond pas — pour des raisons évidentes, selon moi — aux critères législatifs standard. Bien entendu, cela n'empêche pas les députées qui sont en congé de « maternité » de se présenter aux séances, de prendre la parole ou de voter.

Vous avez posé des questions au sujet de la technologie. Je pense que le principal avantage que présente la technologie dans ce contexte, c'est qu'elle permet aux membres du personnel de travailler chez eux ou depuis leur domicile grâce à des connexions à distance. Nous avons bien sûr un avantage par rapport à vous: nous sommes tous dans le même fuseau horaire.

(1230)



Nous avons une autre chambre, et je sais que vous avez également posé des questions à ce sujet, depuis 1999; elle s'inspire, je n'ai pas honte de le dire, de la pratique de l'Australie; et c'est une véritable réussite. Je répondrai avec plaisir à vos questions à ce sujet.

Pour terminer, je crois qu'il ne faudrait pas que j'oublie de dire qu'un problème se pose au sujet de la mesure dans laquelle le régime de dépenses des députés — je parle des allocations — influe sur la capacité des députés de l'extérieur de Londres de mener une vie qui aurait toutes les apparences d'une vie familiale ordinaire en amenant leur famille vivre avec eux à Londres. Notre régime de dépenses est, comme vous le savez peut-être, régi par une autorité indépendante, laquelle mène actuellement des consultations sur cette question, justement, et a intégré à son document des citations des députés qui lui font souvent savoir qu'elle ne soutient pas suffisamment les familles des députés et ne répond pas à leurs souhaits, c'est-à-dire mener une vie qui aurait les apparences d'une vie familiale, avec leur conjoint et leurs enfants à charge vivant avec eux, lorsqu'ils sont à Londres, plutôt que dans leur circonscription.

J'espère que cela vous a été utile.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Encore une fois, nous vous remercions d'être présents. Cela est très utile.

Nous commencerons par Mme Vandenbeld.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Merci beaucoup.

Comme nous le savons tous, nos deux parlements présentent un certain nombre de similitudes. Nous pouvons souvent tirer des leçons de ce que l'autre fait, et c'est pourquoi j'apprécie que vous nous ayez présenté un exposé.

J'aimerais vous poser des questions sur l'autre chambre. Vous avez dit que c'était une véritable réussite. Qu'a-t-elle de particulier, qui vous fait dire que c'est formidable?

M. David Natzler:

La mesure de la réussite, c'est que les députés y participaient avec enthousiasme. Il arrive souvent que les débats qui s'y déroulent attirent au moins autant de gens que les débats de la Chambre principale. Aucun vote ne se tient, dans cette autre chambre. Le vote n'est pas possible, et si la question soulève des contestations, elle devra être tranchée par la Chambre principale. En 15 ans, cela n'est jamais arrivé, puisque les questions qui y sont débattues peuvent peut-être prêter à controverse, mais qu'elles n'exigent pas nécessairement une décision de la Chambre quant à l'issue ou quant à leur bien-fondé.

Les débats se déroulent conformément à une motion essentiellement procédurale, selon laquelle la question a été examinée, puis le débat peut commencer. Les députés apprécient également l'atmosphère moins officielle que dans la Chambre principale. J'ai une assez bonne idée des dimensions de votre Chambre actuelle, et aussi de celle où vous allez peut-être emménager, dans l'édifice de l'Ouest; nous disposons de notre côté d'une salle pouvant accueillir environ 60 personnes disposées sur un double rang en fer à cheval, un peu moins surchargée de lambris que notre Chambre principale ou la vôtre. Je crois que cela encourage les députés à participer aux débats dans un esprit un peu moins partisan, mais c'est aussi parce qu'ils sont assis à une table en fer à cheval plutôt que les uns en face des autres et aussi parce que la Chambre a une allure moderne et n'est pas aménagée pour favoriser les affrontements.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Vous dites que les tables ont la forme d'un fer à cheval; voulez-vous dire parce que les gens des différents partis sont assis à part ou est-ce qu'ils ont le choix?

M. David Natzler:

En tant que greffier, je vous répondrais qu'ils peuvent choisir à quel endroit ils vont s'asseoir; en vérité, ils s'assoient quand même avec les membres de leur parti. Le ministre s'assied d'un côté et le critique de l'opposition, de l'autre, et les députés s'assoient généralement avec les membres de leur parti.

Je crois que l'aménagement physique aide les choses. Cette chambre est présidée non pas par le speaker, mais soit par l'un des speakers adjoints ou, plus généralement, par un des présidents neutres auxquels nous confions la présidence de nos comités qui étudient un projet de loi. Cela modère les ardeurs tout en permettant des débats passionnés, très suivis et intéressants.

(1235)

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Y a-t-il une période de questions et réponses après chaque intervention?

M. David Natzler:

Non, nous ne procédons pas ainsi. Il y a des discours, mais ils peuvent être interrompus si celui qui parle le permet; il s'agit donc exactement des mêmes règles que dans la Chambre principale.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Vous avez parlé des ministres, donc il ne s'agit pas d'une chambre destinée aux simples députés. Est-ce que vous y débattez vraiment des affaires du gouvernement? Est-ce que des ministres prennent la parole devant cette chambre?

M. David Natzler:

De nos jours, on y traite très peu des affaires du gouvernement, mais un député peut lancer un débat. Il choisit un sujet et il prononce un discours. Les autres députés, s'ils en ont le temps, pourront également prononcer un discours, après quoi le ministre va répondre. Sinon, l'exercice serait vain.

Autrement dit, nous ne nous contentons pas de parler, comme vous le faites. Notre but est d'obtenir une réponse d'un ministre.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Monsieur le président, je partage mon temps avec Mme Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci.

Bonjour. Merci d'être avec nous aujourd'hui. Nous sommes plutôt intrigués, étant donné que nous avons un style parlementaire semblable.

Pourriez-vous nous renseigner rapidement sur le déroulement d'une semaine de séances? C'est ma première question, étant donné que je ne sais pas si vous siégez du lundi au vendredi ou quels jours de la semaine vous siégez.

M. David Natzler:

Nous siégeons 36 semaines par année, les lundis de 14 h 30 à 22 h 30, les mardis et les mercredis de 11 h 30 à 19 h 30, les jeudis de 9 h 30 à 17 h 30 et nous siégeons également 13 vendredis seulement dans l'année, de 9 h 30 à 15 heures.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci.

J'ai une autre question sur l'égalité des sexes à la Chambre, le nombre de femmes par rapport au nombre d'hommes, et sur la diversité. Quel est ce pourcentage?

M. David Natzler:

Nous pourrions vous transmettre les chiffres exacts. Quelque 29 % des députés sont des femmes, ce qui veut dire, je crois, que les autres sont des hommes. Nous devons faire attention; nous n'avons aucun député transgenre.

Je préférerais vous faire parvenir les derniers chiffres concernant la répartition par minorité ethnique. Nous avons un problème... Les députés, contrairement aux membres du personnel, n'ont pas à fournir de déclaration volontaire, ils sont donc identifiés par des tiers... Je crois que nous comptons aujourd'hui 32 ou 34 députés ouvertement gais, et j'en suis fier, pour une raison quelconque. C'est la proportion la plus élevée de tous les parlements du monde.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Très bien.

De plus, vous avez dit qu'il existait un régime de congés de maternité, mais vous l'avez décrit en ces termes: « En principe, il y a quelque chose qui ressemble à un congé de maternité pour les députées ». Pourriez-vous s'il vous plaît fournir des détails et expliquer exactement quels types de congés vous offrez?

M. David Natzler:

Je parlais ici des députés. Évidemment, nos employés ont droit aux mêmes prestations de sécurité sociale que tout le monde, et la fonction publique a droit à des avantages normalisés. En fait, Jo — elle est assise à ma droite, je ne sais pas si vous pouvez la voir — va bientôt toucher ses prestations, dans quelques semaines, et elle pourrait vous en parler davantage.

En ce qui concerne les députées, comme elles ne sont pas des employées, elles n'ont pas droit à un congé de maternité prenant la forme d'un échelonnement du traitement ou d'une période d'absence, mais, pour des motifs démographiques, nous comptons un nombre croissant de députées qui ont des enfants pendant leur terme, et les partis leur accordent en effet quelque chose que l'on appelle un congé de maternité. Je fais attention lorsque j'utilise ces termes, car il ne s'agit pas du même type de congé que celui auquel ont droit leurs électeurs. Il est à la fois plus avantageux, puisque les députées peuvent en déterminer elles-mêmes les modalités, et moins avantageux, puisque les députées ont tendance à croire qu'elles doivent quand même s'acquitter de certains de leurs devoirs dans leurs circonscriptions très tôt après avoir donné naissance. Il me faut souligner que la plupart d'entre elles vont prendre un congé de courte durée, après avoir donné naissance, avant de revenir à Westminster.

Récemment, une ministre — en fait, ce n'est pas la première fois que la situation se présente; cela s'était également passé pendant la législature précédente — a eu son premier enfant et elle a eu droit à un congé. Je crois qu'elle continue à toucher — vous pouvez le lui demander — son salaire de ministre, mais quelqu'un la remplace dans ses tâches ministérielles pendant son congé. Cela se passe en fait de façon tout à fait informelle. Il ne s'agit pas d'un congé statutaire.

(1240)

Le président:

Merci.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Schmale.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Merci beaucoup du temps que vous nous consacrez aujourd'hui. Je l'apprécie vraiment.

J'ai une petite question pour faire suite à ce que vous venez de dire. Quelqu'un doit remplacer la ministre. S'agit-il d'un autre député désigné par le premier ministre? Je suis tout simplement curieux.

M. David Natzler:

Oui.

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'accord.

Je n'ai pas pu entendre les heures de début et de fin de vos séances de la Chambre. Pourriez-vous me les répéter?

M. David Natzler:

Vous voulez que je répète les heures de début et de fin?

M. Jamie Schmale:

Oui, s'il vous plaît.

M. David Natzler:

Le lundi, c'est de 14 h 30 à 22 h 30; les mardis et mercredis, de 11 h 30 à 19 h 30; le jeudi de 9 h 30 à 17 h 30 et, le vendredi, quand nous siégeons, c'est de 9 h 30 à 15 heures.

M. Jamie Schmale:

En ce qui a trait à l'autre chambre, vous avez dit que c'était une véritable réussite; combien de personnes, en général, se réunissent dans cette seconde chambre?

M. David Natzler:

Il est difficile de donner une moyenne. Si le débat doit durer une demi-heure, il se peut que les seules personnes présentes soient le député d'arrière-ban qui a soulevé la question et le ministre concerné, qui est parfois accompagné par un whip ou un membre du Service de protection parlementaire, c'est-à-dire d'une personne qui est là pour l'aider.

Si le débat doit durer plus longtemps, 60 ou 90 minutes, on s'attend normalement à ce que sept ou huit personnes se présentent, il y aura un porte-parole de l'opposition — le porte-parole officiel — et des représentants du troisième parti, puisque nous avons, tout comme vous, un troisième parti. Le porte-parole du troisième parti sera donc également présent.

Les lundis après-midi, entre 16 h 30 et 19 h 30, dans notre chambre parallèle, nous discutons des pétitions électroniques, des pétitions transmises par voie électronique qui ont recueilli en général plus de 100 000 signatures. Nous en avons reçu jusqu'ici une vingtaine. C'est nouveau. Ces débats attirent en général de nombreuses personnes voire, dans certains cas, de très nombreuses personnes.

Les débats d'une heure et demie attirent parfois 30 ou 40 députés. S'ils concernent par exemple l'industrie de l'acier, une région ou une question en particulier, les députés de la région concernée sont tous susceptibles d'être présents et ils n'auront droit qu'à trois ou quatre minutes chacun pour se faire entendre.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Ce qui me préoccupait, quand on parle de la deuxième chambre, c'est que vous vous adressiez, en fait, à une chambre vide. Je suis heureux de savoir qu'en ce qui vous concerne, il y a du mouvement et que l'assistance ne se résume pas à une personne qui se parle à elle-même.

M. David Natzler:

Non, vous avez raison.

M. Jamie Schmale:

J'imagine que vous avez parfois l'impression d'être dans la Chambre principale.

M. David Natzler:

Oui, en effet.

Ce qu'il est important de souligner, si vous me le permettez, c'est qu'un ministre répond. Un député peut parler pendant 15 minutes, dans le cadre d'un débat de 30 minutes, mais le ministre est obligé de donner une réponse, et cet aspect est probablement plus important encore que ce qu'avait à dire le député d'arrière-ban. C'est dans ce but qu'il avait lancé le débat.

M. Jamie Schmale:

En tant que député de l'opposition, j'aime bien cela. Il est bien d'avoir un tel contact direct avec le ministre ou avec le secrétaire parlementaire. C'est très intéressant.

Changeons de sujet et revenons à la vie de famille; vous n'avez peut-être pas en main les chiffres exacts — je le comprends —, mais savez-vous à peu près, en moyenne, combien de députés dont la circonscription ne se trouve pas dans la grande région de Londres amènent leur famille vivre dans cette grande région?

M. David Natzler:

Non, je n'ai pas ces chiffres, je ne crois pas qu'on puisse les avoir. Selon un document récent de l'IPSA, je peux quand même vous dire que sur 650 députés, il y en avait 168 qui avaient inscrit « 336 personnes à charge ». Il s'agit des personnes à charge au regard desquelles les députés peuvent réclamer le remboursement des déplacements afin de venir à Londres ou qu'ils peuvent amener vivre ici. Cela ne veut pas nécessairement dire qu'ils vont les installer ici, et ils peuvent bien sûr partager leur vie en deux.

Je vais demander à mes collègues. Avez-vous une idée sur cette question, Anne?

(1245)

Mme Anne Foster (chef de la Diversité et de l’Inclusion, Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni):

Non, nous n'avons pas ces chiffres, mais nous savons cependant que, puisqu'il y a une garderie sur place, les députés ont maintenant la possibilité de décider, soit d'amener leur famille avec eux à Westminster, soit de la laisser dans leur circonscription.

M. David Natzler:

En ce qui concerne la garderie sur place, je crois qu'elle sert à cinq députés à l'heure actuelle, et ils doivent réserver une place. Ce n'est pas une halte-garderie. Elle est fréquentée par les enfants de cinq députés qui y resteront, je crois toute l'année scolaire.

Est-ce que nous avons une vague idée des circonscriptions dont ils viennent?

Mme Joanne Mills (gestionnaire du programme de diversité et d’inclusion et agente de liaison pour la garderie, Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni):

Je n'ai pas ces chiffres en tête. Je n'ai pas pris cette liste avec moi, mais c'est mélangé. Il y en a qui viennent de Londres, et d'autres, de plus loin.

M. David Natzler:

Ashford, Leicester... je crois qu'il y en a un qui amène ses deux enfants...

Mme Joanne Mills:

Ils viennent de la région des Midlands.

M. David Natzler:

... de la région des Midlands. Il les amène probablement le lundi. C'est un député. C'est un indéfectible partisan des garderies, et c'est pourquoi nous le connaissons. Ses enfants restent toute la semaine.

De plus, évidemment, puisque Londres est, si vous me permettez de le dire, différent d'Ottawa, il y a certains députés qui représentent une circonscription de l'extérieur de Londres, mais qui ont toujours en fait vécu à Londres. Ils possèdent une maison dans leur circonscription et n'ont pas eu à déménager à Londres. Mais ils ont dû trouver à l'extérieur de Londres un endroit où passer leurs fins de semaine. Il y a quand même passablement de députés dont le conjoint reste à Londres, travaille à Londres, donc il se peut qu'un député dont le conjoint travaille à Londres représente une circonscription d'une autre région du pays.

Le tableau est très diversifié. Nous savons aussi que certains députés auraient aimé amener leurs enfants à Londres s'ils avaient été convaincus qu'ils pourraient construire leur vie ici, mais il ne faut pas oublier, et je suis certain que la situation est la même au Canada, que les électeurs mettent beaucoup de pression sur leur député afin qu'il soit visible et présent; c'est une arme à double tranchant.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Tout à fait.

J'ai quelques questions au sujet des déplacements.

Le président:

Dix secondes.

M. Jamie Schmale:

J'imagine que je ne pourrai pas poser de question.

Merci de votre temps. J'espère avoir du temps pendant la seconde série.

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à M. Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Réjouissez-vous, monsieur Schmale: je n'ai qu'une seule question. Vous aurez probablement plus de temps encore.

Merci beaucoup de votre exposé.

M. Jamie Schmale: À huit volets.

M. David Christopherson: Non, il n'y a qu'une seule question, à un seul volet, qui va droit au but.

Elle concerne les déplacements. Premièrement, existe-t-il un système de points de déplacement pour les députés qui doivent traverser le pays?

M. David Natzler:

Je ne comprends pas l'expression « système de points ».

M. David Christopherson:

La réponse serait donc négative, alors.

Laissez-moi aborder la chose sous un autre angle. Cela pourrait prendre plus longtemps que je ne le pensais.

Quel système utilisez-vous dans le cas des députés qui doivent traverser le pays, quel est le mécanisme de reddition de comptes?

M. David Natzler:

Les députés peuvent se rendre à peu près partout où ils le désirent quand il s'agit de leurs fonctions parlementaires. Les déplacements de la plupart des députés sont remboursés par l'Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority, l'IPSA. Cela n'entre donc pas dans ma sphère de compétence, et c'est pourquoi je dois rester prudent.

Dans la plupart des cas, les députés font la navette entre leur circonscription et Westminster. Il faut ajouter à cela les déplacements des comités spéciaux, qui sont payés à même le budget du comité spécial, mais les députés qui demandent le remboursement de déplacement pour d'autres motifs doivent démontrer que le déplacement visait des fins parlementaires plutôt que, disons, les fins du parti. Dans le cas où le déplacement vise des fins parlementaires — disons qu'un de leurs électeurs est emprisonné dans une autre circonscription —, ils peuvent, si j'ai bien compris, demander le remboursement du déplacement qu'ils ont dû effectuer.

Dans la très grande majorité des cas, les députés font tout simplement la navette entre leur circonscription et Westminster; s'ils se déplacent à l'intérieur de leur circonscription, ces déplacements sont également remboursables.

M. David Christopherson:

Qu'en est-il des membres de leur famille qui viennent avec eux dans la capitale?

M. David Natzler:

L'IPSA rembourse le coût des déplacements des personnes à charge d'un député entre la circonscription et Londres, dans certains cas. Ce cas ne se présente pas souvent.

J'essaie de voir combien tout cela coûte. Cela s'élevait à 52 000 livres l'an dernier. C'est...

[Difficultés techniques]

(1250)

Le président:

Nous y voici. Nous sommes de retour.

M. David Natzler:

Je suis désolé, nous avons été interrompus.

Le président:

Les derniers mots que nous avons entendus étaient « 52 000 livres l'an dernier ».

M. David Natzler:

C'est cela. Ce chiffre représente les dépenses annuelles pour les déplacements des personnes à charge. C'est en partie parce que tous les détails des réclamations des députés sont immédiatement publiés sur le site Web de l'IPSA. En passant, les députés ne sont pas toujours heureux de savoir que les déplacements de leur famille sont tout de suite connus du grand public.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est parfait...

M. David Natzler:

Mais l'IPSA... pourriez-vous répéter?

M. David Christopherson:

Non, vous répondez exactement à ma question. Allez-y, s'il vous plaît, continuez.

M. David Natzler:

Jusqu'en 2009, les conjoints et les enfants à charge avaient droit à 12 déplacements entre leur circonscription et Londres. Je ne sais pas ce que prévoit actuellement l'IPSA, mais nous pourrions vous communiquer ces chiffres. Je crois que c'est en gros semblable.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

La question que j'ai posée portait exactement là-dessus. Nous avons entendu des membres de la famille, en particulier des familles jeunes comptant un certain nombre d'enfants, qui se disaient jusqu'à un certain point réticents à profiter des possibilités de déplacement en raison de la politique de reddition de comptes. Le problème avec lequel nous sommes aux prises consiste en partie à reconnaître ce dilemme et à y trouver une solution sans laisser de côté la reddition de comptes qui était d'ailleurs à la source du problème.

Il ne m'a pas semblé que vous ayez trouvé des solutions nouvelles ou particulièrement créatives, et il me semble que le problème est le même dans nos deux pays.

M. David Natzler:

Ce n'est pas un problème dont je me prétendrais un expert, et je ne peux qu'affirmer que je connais assez bien les députés, mais, non, je ne crois pas qu'il existe de solutions créatives.

La Chambre rembourse le coût de certains déplacements des députés sans que cela soit immédiatement affiché publiquement. Dans certains cas, les informations publiées sont globales plutôt que détaillées, et elles sont publiées plus tard, par exemple par trimestre, par année ou sur demande, même si, conformément au régime d'accès à l'information, qui est je crois semblable au vôtre, ce n'est pas tout le monde qui demande constamment cette information.

Je crois que c'est lorsque l'information est affichée sans délai sur un site Web que les gens s'inquiètent. Dire « Oui, pendant l'année, j'ai touché une somme de 900 livres pour que mon conjoint ou mon enfant à charge puisse passer quelques jours avec moi à Westminster », c'est moins embarrassant que d'entendre « Oh, je vois qu'hier, il en a coûté encore une fois 42 livres pour faire venir quelqu'un à Londres ». C'est l'impression que cela me donne.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vais laisser le président décider. Je ne sais pas s'il vaut la peine que notre analyste fasse un suivi pour savoir s'il n'y a pas là des détails que nous devrions étudier.

Si je pose cette question, c'est que je ne suis pas personnellement concerné. Selon mon expérience, il est toujours mieux que les questions soient soulevées par ceux qui, parmi nous, ne sont pas directement concernés.

Ma fille a 24 ans, elle n'est donc pas vraiment concernée, et c'est à peu près la dernière année où elle s'en servira, mais il doit y avoir une méthode quelconque. Lorsque les conjoints se disent réticents en raison de la politique, c'est l'antithèse de la raison pour laquelle nous avons mis en place un système de points de déplacement, c'est l'antithèse d'un parlement propice à la vie de famille, et c'est pourquoi j'espère que nous allons prendre un peu de temps pour chercher une solution qui respectera quand même les besoins redditionnels. Personne n'a jamais proposé de laisser tomber cet aspect, mais nous voulons faire quelque chose pour que l'effet dissuasif de cette politique n'empêche plus les députés de retrouver leur famille. Il me semble que c'est la moindre des choses, mais on semble en faire tout un plat.

Merci énormément. Vous nous avez été très utile dans un dossier qui est important pour nous.

(1255)

M. David Natzler:

Permettez-moi de vous dire aussi, et je n'essaie pas de vous influencer, que vous pourriez trouver utile d'examiner d'autres secteurs de la fonction publique où la séparation est forcée, en particulier les forces armées et, dans notre pays, les affaires étrangères. Ces secteurs ont élaboré des programmes pour la famille selon lesquels les membres de la famille peuvent rejoindre une personne en service à l'étranger ou dans une autre région du pays, et ces programmes prévoient une certaine reddition de comptes, mais également une certaine protection des renseignements personnels.

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien. Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci, David.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Comme on pouvait s'y attendre, vous avez pris plus de sept minutes pour poser votre seule question.

Nous passons à Mme Petitpas Taylor.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

De combien de temps est-ce que je dispose, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Eh bien, si on déduit les minutes que David a utilisées... non, vous avez sept minutes.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

D'accord.

Pour commencer, j'aimerais me faire l'écho des commentaires de mes collègues ici présents. Un grand merci à vous trois de nous avoir consacré une partie de votre emploi du temps chargé. Depuis quelques mois maintenant, nous étudions les modèles propices à la vie familiale et nous voulons réellement réunir toute l'information possible; c'est pourquoi nous apprécions le temps que vous nous avez consacré cet après-midi et vos commentaires.

J'ai deux ou trois questions pour faire suite à celles de Mme Sahota. Elle a discuté avec vous de la question des congés de paternité ou de maternité; j'aimerais savoir quelle est en moyenne la durée des congés que prennent les parents, lorsqu'ils en prennent un?

M. David Natzler:

Vous parlez des citoyens en général, non pas des députés?

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Non, je parle des députés.

M. David Natzler:

Eh bien, je me suis mal exprimé.

Les députées ne prennent pas officiellement un congé de maternité, et c'est pourquoi il m'est très difficile de répondre. Il faudrait poser la question à chacune d'entre elles, je crois, pour savoir quelle a été à leur avis la durée de leur congé de maternité, car il s'agit d'arrangements personnels, dans le fond, entre elles et le whip de leur parti.

Dans certains cas, une députée va se jumeler à un député de l'opposition pendant son absence. Autrement dit, on ne s'attend pas à ce qu'elle se présente à Westminster lorsqu'il y a un vote, et quelqu'un de l'autre parti — si vous savez en quoi consiste le jumelage —, probablement quelqu'un de différent chaque jour, sera jumelé à elle pendant toute la durée de son absence.

Il y a sûrement quelqu'un qui sait à peu près combien de temps durent ces congés. J'ai rencontré hier une députée qui venait tout récemment d'avoir un enfant. Elle était assise dans l'atrium, ici, à Portcullis House, et je me suis approché, naturellement, pour aller voir l'enfant. Je lui ai demandé: « Que fais-tu ici? Je pensais que tu étais en congé. » Elle m'a répondu: « C'est une journée qui me permet de rester en contact. » Cette journée, bien sûr, est prévue dans le régime ordinaire des congés de maternité de notre personnel.

Les politiciens ont beaucoup de difficultés — je suis certain que c'est différent au Canada — à rester éloignés de Westminster.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Est-ce que vous avez une politique écrite concernant les congés de maternité?

M. David Natzler:

Vous voulez dire pour les députées?

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Oui.

M. David Natzler:

Non, mais en ce qui concerne les députées, les partis ont probablement prévu quelque chose qui s'apparente à une politique. Je crois que la situation se présente plutôt rarement. Tous les neuf mois environ, un enfant naît. Nous sommes des gens très occupés. Les arrangements se prennent au cas par cas. C'est différent selon que vous êtes ou non à Londres. C'est différent, cela tient à la situation personnelle de chacun et aussi au fait qu'il s'agit ou non d'un premier enfant.

Avez-vous une idée à ce sujet?

Mme Anne Foster:

Non, je crois que ce que vous avez dit est, dans les grandes lignes, la réalité.

M. David Natzler:

Je crois que cela se passe probablement au cas par cas, mais vous pourriez toujours demander aux différents partis comment ils procèdent; je suis certain qu'ils vous répondront avec plaisir, et probablement plus volontiers qu'à moi.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Vous avez dit que 29 % des députés étaient des femmes. Quel est l'âge moyen des femmes parlementaires, chez vous?

M. David Natzler:

Je n'en ai absolument aucune idée, mais nous pourrions facilement trouver cette information et vous dire quel est l'âge moyen de même que l'âge médian.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Ce serait formidable. Merci.

M. David Natzler:

Certaines députées ont une assez grande expérience. Il y a un aspect intéressant, également, qui concerne l'âge qu'elles avaient la première fois qu'elles ont été élues, si vous voyez ce que je veux dire. Nous avons tendance à supposer que ce seront des jeunes femmes, mais elles ne sont pas toujours de jeunes femmes. Il y a des femmes de toutes les tranches d'âge qui entrent au Parlement pour la première fois. Nous avons eu quelques inquiétudes, en 2015, lorsque plusieurs députées qui en étaient à leur premier mandat se sont retirées, à la surprise générale, et ne se sont pas présentées aux élections suivantes. Je crois que c'était d'une part en raison de leur situation personnelle, mais on s'est également demandé si cela ne témoignait pas d'une culture inamicale ou de l'échec de nos politiques sur la vie familiale, de manière plus générale.

Je crois que Mme Childs serait probablement mieux placée pour répondre à cette question.

(1300)

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Merci.

Pourriez-vous aussi nous en dire un peu plus au sujet des vendredis? Vous avez dit, je crois que vous siégiez 12 ou 13 vendredis au cours d'une année civile. Pourriez-vous nous expliquer ce qui est différent, les vendredis? Traitez-vous des affaires courantes ordinaires? Comment est-ce que ça fonctionne? Comment les choses se présentent-elles?

M. David Natzler:

Les vendredis sont surtout réservés aux députés d'arrière-ban qui veulent présenter des projets de loi.

Il n'y a donc ni affaires émanant du gouvernement, ni affaires exigeant l'intervention des whips. Les députés peuvent se présenter assez nombreux, mais ils n'en ont pas l'obligation, selon leur parti. Quand il s'agit d'une journée importante, par exemple le premier vendredi de la session qui vient de se terminer, il y avait environ 450 députés présents, parce qu'il s'agissait d'un projet de loi sur l'aide médicale à mourir, un sujet de toute évidence très important, mais je vous mentirais si je vous laissais croire qu'il s'agissait d'un vendredi typique. Un vendredi typique, les députés se comptent sur les doigts de la main.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

À quel moment vous occupez-vous des projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire? Où sont-ils inscrits sur votre calendrier?

M. David Natzler:

Nous nous en occupons pendant ces 13 vendredis.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Ils sont tous consacrés à des projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire?

M. David Natzler:

Oui. Nous ne nous en occupons jamais les autres jours.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Merci.

Je vais partager mon temps avec M. Lightbound.

M. Joël Lightbound (Louis-Hébert, Lib.):

J'ai une petite question.

Vous avez dit plus tôt que vous aviez un système de vote appelé le « vote par assentiment ». J'aimerais que vous nous en disiez un peu plus sur le sujet.

M. David Natzler:

Ce système, même si les députés ne le décriraient pas comme je vais le faire — je parle de mes députés — est en fait une sorte de vote par procuration. Disons qu'un député est présent dans l'enceinte du Parlement, mais qu'il a une infirmité ou un malaise trop important pour que l'on puisse raisonnablement lui demander de se rendre jusqu'à l'un des vestibules de vote. Pour voter, nous traversons un vestibule et passons devant un bureau en donnant notre nom, après quoi on fait le compte des députés; ce n'est pas comme lorsque nous nous levons, en chambre.

Si un député est malade ou si, par exemple, il utilise des béquilles, de manière temporaire ou même permanente, et si les whips des deux principaux partis sont d'accord, les whips confirmeront que le député est présent sur les lieux. Ils vont ensuite lui demander de quel côté il désire voter, et l'un des whips procédera dans les faits au vote par procuration au nom de ce député. Mais cela arrive assez rarement. Cela arrive surtout, comme je l'ai dit, dans le cas d'un député qui est soit très malade, soit handicapé temporairement ou de façon permanente. Je crois que c'est arrivé, récemment, dans le cas d'une députée qui en était aux derniers mois de sa grossesse ou qui allaitait son bébé.

Le président:

En Angleterre, pour voter, vous devez traverser le vestibule du « oui » ou du « non ». Vous ne pouvez pas rester à votre siège pour voter, car ce ne sont pas tous les députés qui disposent d'un siège.

M. David Natzler:

C'est exact.

Le président:

Techniquement, nous n'avons plus de temps, mais, puisque nous avons commencé tard, j'aimerais savoir si quelqu'un a une question pressante?

M. Joël Lightbound:

J'ai une très, très petite question.

Le président:

D'accord. Vous avez pris des leçons de David.

M. Joël Lightbound:

Vous avez parlé de l'enceinte du Parlement. Lorsque vous dites que le député doit se trouver dans l'enceinte du Parlement, lorsqu'il y a un vote par assentiment, de quoi parlez-vous exactement? Pourriez-vous nous dire ce que ces mots désignent?

M. David Natzler:

Je préférerais m'abstenir.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Natzler: Ce serait vraiment plutôt aux whips de répondre, et nous ne savons pas vraiment officiellement comment ils procèdent, même si nous sommes assez certains que l'expression « l'enceinte du Parlement » englobe tous les lieux où s'applique le pouvoir du speaker. Je crois que cela pourrait inclure des espaces à l'extérieur de l'édifice, mais les whips sont supposés s'assurer que tous les députés présents sont vivants.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Natzler: C'est pourquoi il est peu probable qu'ils se trouvent dans un bureau situé dans un autre immeuble. Normalement, ils devraient se trouver au palais. Ce que nous n'acceptons pas, c'est qu'un député se trouve, disons à 10 ou 15 minutes de là, qu'il communique par courriel ou par téléphone ou même par vidéoconférence. Ce qui compte, c'est que le député se trouve physiquement présent sur les lieux.

Je crois que vous avez vous aussi une enceinte définie, non? Autrement dit, vous avez la même notion, je crois, de ce que sont les alentours de la Chambre...

(1305)

Le président:

Oui.

M. David Natzler:

... et vous sauriez si cela englobe la rue Sparks ou peu importe ce que Marc vous dira.

Le président:

Très bien.

M. David Natzler:

Mais cela veut dire que vous êtes dans les alentours du Parlement.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Au début de votre exposé, vous disiez que vous suiviez vous aussi les changements dont nous avons parlé.

Quels aspects de nos discussions vous intéressent? Est-ce que vous prévoyez modifier la façon dont votre Chambre fonctionne en Angleterre?

M. David Natzler:

Je pourrais demander à Jo de vous parler très rapidement des garderies, qui représentent à mon avis, pour nous, l'enjeu le plus pressant au chapitre des services. Si j'ai bien compris, vous avez ce que vous appelez un système de gouvernantes... — je sais que ce n'est pas le bon nom —, mais vous pouvez appeler quelqu'un et lui demander de venir vous aider; nous n'avons pas un tel système.

Je suis en train de rédiger un document sur le vote par procuration à l'intention de notre comité des procédures. C'est en réponse aux demandes de certains députés — je ne sais pas combien ils sont — qui voudraient que l'on prévoie davantage de situations où il serait possible de voter sans être présents.

Cela nous éviterait aussi, probablement, d'avoir à faire venir des députés gravement malades afin qu'ils puissent voter, dans le pire des cas couchés dans une ambulance dans la Cour du Nouveau Palais, avec quelqu'un qui vient les accueillir. Il paraît que cela fait longtemps que cela n'est pas arrivé, mais c'est très mauvais pour la Chambre, cela nous fait paraître ridicules, et c'est en outre dangereux. Il est possible que de légers changements soient apportés ici.

Je vais laisser Jo dire quelques mots sur la proposition des garderies.

Mme Joanne Mills:

Il s'agit d'une garderie, un service à temps plein qui était offert principalement aux députés de la Chambre des communes, mais aussi aux membres de la Chambre des Lords et à leurs employés ainsi qu'au personnel de la Chambre des communes et de la Chambre des Lords. La garderie est ouverte 52 semaines par année, du lundi au vendredi. Toutefois, on nous demande d'ouvrir une halte-garderie qui répondrait davantage aux besoins ponctuels, mais la garderie dans sa forme actuelle ne peut offrir ce service.

Je trouve intéressante la halte-garderie que vous avez, je crois, au Parlement, ou la disposition sur des services de garde d'enfants ponctuels, son fonctionnement et ses avantages pour vos députés.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'est intéressant. Nous travaillons de façon parallèle, votre Parlement et le mien, et nous allons probablement apporter bientôt de nombreux changements.

Merci, et merci de vos exposés.

M. David Natzler:

En ce qui concerne la garderie, le problème particulier que pose la garderie, pour moi, en tant qu'agent comptable, c'est que, même si j'aimerais beaucoup que nous soyons accueillants pour la famille et que nous permettions aux députés de toutes allégeances de jouer pleinement leur rôle de députés, je dois également tenir compte du public qui nous regarde et qui nous demandera: « — Pourquoi est-ce que les députés ont droit à cela alors que moi, qui travaille, je n'y ai pas droit? » Je crois que je peux répondre à certaines de ces critiques... [Difficultés techniques]

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je suis désolée, vous avez été coupé.

M. David Natzler:

Cela arrive tout le temps lorsque je commence à soulever une controverse.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

[Difficultés techniques]

Le président:

C'est MI-6.

Nous entendez-vous toujours?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ils ne peuvent pas répondre si vous ne les entendez pas.

(1310)

Le président:

Pendant que nous attendons, chers collègues, jeudi nous allons donner les instructions relatives à notre rapport provisoire. J'imagine que les instructions relatives à la rédaction, normalement, se font...

Pouvez-vous nous entendre?

M. David Natzler:

Oui.

Je parlais de la garderie. Il est difficile de prévoir des installations qui serviront seulement dans le cas où quelqu'un voudrait s'en servir un lundi soir pluvieux, étant donné qu'il faut prévoir le personnel, il faut prévoir les installations physiques, et il faut pouvoir répondre aux besoins d'une personne qui veut laisser son enfant pendant un court laps de temps et aux besoins d'une autre qui voudrait l'y laisser plus longtemps, et on parle en outre d'enfants d'âges différents.

Toutefois, je crois que nous devrions être beaucoup plus sensibles à cette question, y compris les jours où il n'y a pas d'école. Je ne sais pas si c'est un problème, pour vous, mais je sais que les députés, ici, s'en préoccupent beaucoup. Pendant la session, il y a un assez grand nombre de députés qui doivent s'occuper de leurs enfants pendant les vacances scolaires ou de mi-semestre; actuellement, ils doivent les laisser dans leur bureau, les confier à leur personnel, et ce n'est idéal ni pour les uns, ni pour les autres. Je suis désolé, ma réponse est longue, mais je crois que j'ai décrit le défi que cela représente pour nous tous.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Nous apprécions cela. Nous allons explorer plus à fond certains aspects uniques de votre système, et nous sommes heureux que vous ayez pris du temps pour nous parler, pendant votre journée très chargée. Nous sommes désolés des ennuis techniques que nous avons eus et nous nous excusons d'avoir été en retard en raison du vote; cependant, tout a bien fonctionné, et je vous dis un grand merci.

M. David Natzler:

Merci. Nous allons vous transmettre toute l'information possible sur les autres sujets, mais Joanne va sans aucun doute rester en contact avec vous.

Le président:

Si vous voulez en apprendre davantage au sujet de nos services de garde, de notre halte-garderie, Joanne vous expliquera comment cela fonctionne.

M. David Natzler:

Merci.

Le président:

Allons-nous commencer jeudi les instructions relatives à la rédaction, à huis clos?

M. David Christopherson:

N'y a-t-il rien d'autre de prévu jeudi? Ce serait tout?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que cela vous conviendrait, ce soir?

Le président:

Oui, nous avons une réunion ce soir.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous avons une autre réunion, ce soir, de 18 à 20 heures.

Le président:

De 18 h à 20 heues, ce sera le tour de la Nouvelle-Zélande et de l'Australie.

M. David Christopherson:

Quelqu'un va me remplacer, car je dois présider une autre réunion. Vous vous êtes débarrassés de moi, mais quelqu'un nous représentera.

Le président:

Nous recevons la Nouvelle-Zélande et l'Australie, et nous les recevons ici? Ici même, dans cette pièce?

D'accord, c'est tout.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on May 17, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.