header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-04-21 PROC 17

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (The Honourable Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

We have a very busy day today. We have witnesses right away for the main estimates; then we have another set of witnesses for our study; and then we'll be studying the plan for the question of privilege at the end.

This is meeting number 17 of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, for the first session of the 42nd Parliament. It's being held in public. Our business today is the main estimates, 2016-17, vote 1 under the Office of the Chief Electoral Officer; followed by witnesses for our study on initiatives toward a family-friendly House of Commons; and finally some committee business, primarily on the motion of privilege.

I'd like to welcome our witnesses here. Today we have a good visitor whom we see all the time, Mr. Marc Mayrand, the chief electoral officer, along with Hughes St-Pierre, chief financial and planning officer, integrated services, policy and public affairs; Stéphane Perrault, deputy chief electoral officer of regulatory affairs; Michel Roussel, deputy chief electoral officer of electoral events; and Belaineh Deguefé, the deputy chief electoral officer, integrated services, policy and public affairs.

Thank you all for coming. We can go to your opening remarks.

Mr. Marc Mayrand (Chief Electoral Officer, Elections Canada):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[Translation]

Thank you, Mr. Chair, for inviting me to discuss the 2016-17 main estimates for my office.

I am pleased to be here with my officials to meet with committee members for the first time during the 42nd Parliament, and I wish to congratulate all members on their recent election to the House of Commons. I will keep my remarks brief in order for committee members to have time for questions.

Today, the committee is studying and voting on my office's annual appropriation, which is $29.2 million. This represents the salaries of approximately 339 indeterminate positions. Combined with our statutory authority, which funds all other expenditures under the Canada Elections Act, our 2016-17 main estimates total $98.5 million.

During this fiscal year, Elections Canada will continue to wrap up the 42nd general election. Two of our major tasks are to audit the financial returns of political entities and issue reimbursements of election expenses, as well as to complete a series of post-election reports.

The agency is currently processing the financial returns of candidates, while political party returns for the general election are due on June 20. Despite the high number of candidates who registered for the election—more than 1,800 in total—we remain confident that we will be able to complete the audits in accordance with our service standards. This means audits will be completed before August 19 on all returns that are eligible for a reimbursement, that were filed using the electronic financial returns software within the original four-month deadline, and that contain no errors requiring an amendment. The remaining audits will be completed in the 12 months thereafter.

As members are aware, my first report on the conduct of the 42nd general election was tabled by the Speaker of the House and referred to this committee on February 5. This report is a factual and chronological description of key events during the election.

My second report, to be published this summer, will present a more in-depth retrospective of the election. Informed by a number of surveys, studies and post-mortems, it will provide a review of the election experiences of electors and political entities. It will also include the findings from the independent audit of poll worker performance and Elections Canada's response.

The conclusions and lessons learned in the retrospective report will act as a bridge to recommendations for legislative changes. I will be recommending specific changes to improve the administration of the Canada Elections Act in a report early this fall.

(1105)

[English]

While wrapping up the election, we are also developing a new strategic plan to guide the agency forward based on our post-election studies and stakeholder feedback. The plan's core focus is on modernizing the electoral process to make it simpler, more effective, and more convenient and flexible for voters, while also preserving the integrity of the process.

With a majority government in place, as well as a fixed election date of October 21, 2019, there is an opportunity now to bring the electoral process, currently anchored in the 19th century, in line with contemporary Canadian expectations. My office is committed to ensuring that our services better align with those expectations in the 43rd general election. A key focus of the agency's plan is to modernize voting services by introducing technology at advance and election day polls and for voting at returning offices and by mail.

We can carry out some aspects of modernization under the current legal framework, but other aspects may require legislative changes. For example, currently electors can only vote at their designated table within a polling station. To create a more fluid and simpler process, I will be recommending legislative amendments that reorganize the duties and functions of various poll workers, enabling electors to vote at any table in their polling place. I intend to engage the committee as we advance on this initiative.

In moving forward with our plans, we remain mindful that Parliament may undertake a review of the electoral system. We will ensure that any new processes we develop will be able to accommodate any legislative changes that result from such a review. In this light, another important element of our strategic plan is to support parliamentarians with technical advice during this process as required.

I look forward to providing committee members with more detailed information on Elections Canada's plans for electoral services modernization at our informal meeting on May 3.

I want to thank you, again, Mr. Chair, for inviting me to discuss the 2016-17 main estimates for my office. My colleagues and I are happy to answer any questions the committee may have.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Just to give you a pre-warning, we may have to reschedule your other presentation again, but we'll talk about that later.

I welcome to the committee Mr. Mark Strahl and Rémi Massé, and two Yukoners sitting at the back.

We'll go, for the first round of questioning, to David Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Is there any proposed spending in the office's main estimates that has been put on hold, or that hinges on potential electoral reform outcomes?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

There is not at this point in time. As I was trying to convey, we are proceeding with our efforts to make proposals for modernizing services at this point, while keeping an eye on potential reforms that may shape up in the future.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You were talking about changes on election day, little things such as being able to vote at any table. What are the logistical impacts, and are there any negative consequences you can see of that, or how would it work?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Basically it flows from the idea that tasks would be specialized at the poll rather than generalized. Right now our process makes it such that an elector can show up at the poll and face a line up of 20 people ahead of them, while all the other tables in the gymnasium are free. We want to change that. We need to break that model. We want to allow electors to pick whichever table is free to go to cast their ballot.

Again, the results would be provided by location—by poll site, rather than poll by poll.

(1110)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Does that increase the risk of people voting twice, or that kind of thing, whereby somebody can go to multiple tables and not be caught?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

No, it would be under supervision as usual. Again, we will be proposing to have electronic scans to monitor electors as they go through the process.

It's a process that's used at municipal elections pretty much across the country, and also in some provinces; notably, New Brunswick has used a similar model for a long time now.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

As we remember, in the last Parliament there was a major change in electoral law called The Fair Elections Act. Can you talk about the impact of it on fund-raising for the election over the last while?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

On fund-raising...?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Well, it changed the rules around fund-raising in relation to Elections Canada, about when an expense is reportable and so forth. Can you talk abut the impact of that act, the positives and the negatives that we saw in the election?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

It's a bit early to say. As I'm sure you know, spending limits were adjusted. Contribution amounts were also adjusted slightly to reflect inflation, plus an additional 5%. There were also changes that allow borrowing for candidates' local campaigns, as well as changes regarding an initial contribution of I believe $5,000 to bring to your campaign.

It's too early for us to have done any analysis. We are just getting the returns as we speak. Within a year I should be able to report on the systemic aspect of the new regime.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You said you had a number of suggestions coming. When will we be seeing those?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Well, we are to talk at an upcoming meeting on I believe May 3—that may change, if I understood the chair correctly—and we will get into more details then on the specific concepts of modernization. You will also see some of it through the recommendations for legislative changes that will be tabled early in the fall.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

Now, one of the changes we saw was the removal of the voter identification card as a valid piece of identification. What kind of impact did that have, if any? What did you see?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

We have not completed our analysis at this point in time. We're still in the process of looking into that. If you look at the labour force survey that was conducted by Statistics Canada, you will see that among the reasons for people not voting, it looks like voter ID was a barrier for 170,000 people who claimed that not being able to prove their ID or address was an issue for them, and therefore they did not vote.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's 170,000?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Yes, 172,000, according to that survey .

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's a pretty big number.

There is currently no federal identification that meets the federal election requirements, is that correct?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Correct. There is no national ID card of any sort that meets the requirements of the Elections Act.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll share my time with Ms. Vandenbeld.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP)):

You have three minutes.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

I'd like to follow up on the voter education. I know that in the Fair Elections Act there was a lot of discussion about the role of Elections Canada in doing voter education and promoting voting. I know that Elections Canada in past has been very involved in, for instance, voter education programs for youth votes, mock elections, and things like that.

In program expenditures, is there still an amount for this kind of voter education?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

There is still an amount for not voter education but citizen education. Our mandate now is restricted to non-voters, those who are under the voting age. We do work with schools across the country and various groups to reach out to those who are not yet at voting age.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Do you think that inability to do voter education of those who are eligible voters might have had an impact on, for instance, these 175,000 people who didn't have the proper ID, or others who may have tried to vote and not been able to or who maybe not voted?

(1115)

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

I think we need to distinguish that during an election we focus exclusively on the mechanics of voting—where, when, and how to vote or to be a candidate. In that regard, we try to reach out with special means for groups who face barriers, be they youth or aboriginals, for example. For various groups that we have identified, we have special programs to better reach them.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Canada's voter education model was always a model in the world as well. I know that Elections Canada has always been a member of International IDEA, which of course maintains a technological knowledge network called ACE, electoral practitioners around the world. Can you tell me whether or not we have continued to the same extent, or if our participation in these international networks has gone up or down?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

We're still a very active member of IDEA—we're on the steering committee there—as well as with ACE. We are still very involved with those two organizations, and work closely with them from time to time.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. David Christopherson):

Thank you. The time has expired.

There's no more time for further questions in this round.

Mr. Reid, you now have the floor, sir.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

I'd like to return to something you mentioned, Mr. Mayrand, in your response to one of Mr. Graham's questions. You said that a survey had been done that indicated that 172,000 people had some problems with regard to ID. I'm not aware of that. I'm assuming this is...or I'm actually not assuming anything on where it came from, but if it's not a public document now, and you're in possession of it, would you be able to present it to us?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

It is a public document. It was released in February.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Was it released by you?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

No, it was StatsCan.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Would we find it on their website?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

It is the Labour Force Survey. I will be happy to provide it to all members after the session, no problem.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Giving it to the clerk would do the trick.... Then she will get it to us.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Yes, that's no problem.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

I wanted to turn to your report on plans and priorities, page 7. Under the topic of risk analysis, you discuss two things that are of considerable interest to me, as they relate to the electoral reform issue, changes to the voting system. Of course, my party has consistently advocated holding a referendum on this subject. You indicate that you are not currently able to hold a referendum, and that you would require a minimum of six months to do so.

Is it the case that, additionally, legislative changes would be required? I mention this now because my impression, Mr. Mayrand, is that the government is trying to run out the clock so it can say, “Oh, we have this promise; we must change the electoral system, but we are out of time for a referendum.” I want to make sure that no impediments that they can throw out are available to them as excuses—suddenly to discover, “Oh, if only we had thought of this”.

In addition to the six months that you mention would be required for the administration of a referendum, are there any other impediments that you would face? For example, is there a need to change our referendum legislation, that sort of thing?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

The Referendum Act is outdated. It has not been changed since 1992, which was the last time we had a national referendum. In that regard, it is very much out of sync with the Elections Act, particularly around political financing. For example, unions and corporations could contribute to referendum committees. I think that may come as a shock. There is no limit on contributions by any entities. Again, that may come as a shock, but the legislation still stands.

Is it possible to conduct a referendum under the current legislation? It is possible. It would be at times awkward, but it is possible. It is feasible. My preference would be to see it amended, updated, but again, it would not be impossible to carry out one. The important thing for us is that we get enough of a heads-up so that we can prepare properly.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right. After that, it would take you six months. Is that your estimation?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

All right. If you don't mind my pursuing this, just to be absolutely clear.... You said six months. Does that mean six months minimum, or does that mean that if we have six months to the day we could handle it?

(1120)

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Six months is an absolute minimum. Corporate memory is loose now, after more than 25 years. Not many people have run a referendum in our organization, so there is a lot of work to do. We also need to establish a new regulation. I think you saw a version a few years back. It is a substantive effort to be made. We need a new tariff, and we also need to establish recruitment programs for workers.

Mr. Scott Reid:

In this case, the regulation will be designed by you, not by us. Is that correct?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

That is correct. We will be tabling the proposed regulation before the House. Normally, this committee will review it and be able to make suggestions for amendments.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right. I am assuming that you are capable of moving in the initial direction without our formal authorization. May I encourage you to try to do as much of that as you can? While this is a contingency that the government has not indicated it favours, they have also been very careful, if you look at the minister's comments, never to actually say it is absolutely, 100% ruled out. I would like to ensure that if they decide to do it—or if they want to pretend that they are willing to do it—they have no option but to actually follow through. I would strongly recommend that any updates required from your end be done so as not to let yourself become the reason why we are not having one, at least on paper.

We have two minutes left, and I wanted to ask you about potential changes to the electoral system. Another concern I've had is that the government will run out the clock to the point where the only changes to the electoral system that are still possible prior to the 2019 election are ones that involve no redistribution, and of course both MMP and STV would require a redistribution.

The question is, how long would it take to engage the Electoral Boundaries Readjustment Act? I assume an amendment would be required to allow it to happen out of the normal sequence, but how long would the actual process take? Then we can figure out, from our end, how much time is required to amend the legislation, before that time, in order to allow the 2019 deadline to be met.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

You're correct, it would need legislation for it to happen. Again, it's difficult because I'm not sure what's on the table, but the bare minimum for a standard redistribution is 10 months. That's from the set-up of the commission until they finalize their report for the distribution.

Mr. Scott Reid:

There's a period after that, is there not as well?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

There are another seven months after that for implementing. You need to redesign all the maps across each riding and reorganize the poll divisions to reflect the new riding boundaries.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Could I ask you to just submit to us some more detailed kinds of timelines, and what the minimums are there? I believe that's the sort of thing that needs to be done in writing. That would be very helpful to us or the committee that is to be set up—the special committee—to guide us in deliberations.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Now we'll go to Mr. Christopherson, and thank you for chairing.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's fine. I was looking forward to recognizing myself and running over here and taking the seat. That would have been a first. After 30 years, you're always looking for firsts.

Thank you so much. It's good to see you all again. I am absolutely thrilled to be here to be part of the review of this with you.

There are a couple of things I just want to clear up. You mentioned in your opening comments two of your major tasks, one of which is auditing the financial returns of political entities and issuing reimbursements of election expenses. Correct me if my memory is wrong, but it seems to me that we still have on the books the rule that federal parties submit to you the expenses for which they expect reimbursement and they don't have to provide a receipt. Is that still the regime?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Correct.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Let's be clear. Like everybody else, in my own return, I have to give you the receipts, and I have to give you anything you ask for, but the federal parties, where there is how much money in total—a rough calculation...?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

In terms of reimbursement?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, to the federal parties.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

It would be over $60 million.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Sixty million dollars goes back to our respective political parties—no receipts required.

Thank you to the previous government for not changing this.

You still can't compel witnesses, too. Remember, we had a problem around that, and you still can't do that. When you're trying to suss out whether things are legitimate or not, you still don't have the power to force someone to testify. Is that correct?

(1125)

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

The commissioner cannot compel witnesses.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I use these points deliberately as a segue into my next question.

Chair, I'm going to ask your indulgence to at least allow me to place the question, but I accept and respect the fact that no government member has to answer. I think I'm entitled to at least ask the question, through you. I hope you will allow it.

With that, and I'm not trying to put any colleagues on the spot, is there a government member who can help the rest of us understand what the government's thinking is around the reforms? The government has said that it's going to strike a special legislative committee to deal with this, and yet Monsieur Mayrand comes in after every election. This would now be my fifth time going through this process. And there's going to be a whole host of changes, and I guarantee you, it's a lot of work. Indeed, Chair, we will need to set up a lot of time for this if we're going to be the ones who do it. It's a very complex procedure. It's fun because we all tend to work together to try to find fairness, as opposed to winning an argument, but it's still a lot of work.

My question for the government members is, given that this work is going to come, and my experience tells me that's a very all-inclusive, encompassing process, how does that link up with the government's plan to do a complete revamp of the whole electoral system?

We have two initiatives happening. One clearly comes here, but how does this special committee link into this work, and is it going to link in? We don't want to do the same thing in two different places, I wouldn't think. That wouldn't get us anywhere. Where's it going to go? Is it going to reside with us? However, that doesn't make sense to me from a common-sense point of view. If the government is going to set up a special committee to look at everything, it seems to me that we, as the procedure and House affairs committee, might want to consider handing this off to them, if they're willing to accept it, if they're going to become the experts in this Parliament on this.

I have those those kinds of general questions, Chair. I put them out there, and I respect that the government members are under no obligation to answer, but if they can provide any guidance or enlightenment, that would be helpful.

The Chair:

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

I simply want to thank Mr. Christopherson for his comments, and I know that we're deviating from the main purpose of our witnesses being here today—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes and no.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

The point is well taken. We'll take it under advisement. I'll bring it up your concerns with the Minister of Democratic Institutions. I think they're legitimate.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Fair enough. That's fine. I accept that. I appreciate your responding to me.

I also wanted to tie in, with whatever time I have left, to where Mr. Reid was going. It may not be for the same purpose, but I think the process that we're looking for is the same.

Mr. Reid has been clear. They're pushing for the referendum. He was upfront about that. I'm upfront about the fact that we believe big time in proportional representation. We know the government has a favoured model, but they're going to have a bit of a problem because the whole country knows that it would skew the system in their favour, and being fair-minded folks, they wouldn't want to be stuck with that label.

I still think there's hope for proportional representation. I truly do. Is there enough time, though, for us to do a complete revamp?

We'll leave the referendum piece out for now because Mr. Reid has asked some questions on that.

By the way, Chair, a few Parliaments ago there were some of us here who spent the better part of a couple of years going through the Referendum Act and bringing in experts. I'm just saying there's a whole baseline of fairly accurate in-depth information from constitutional experts, and there are Mr. Mayrand's thoughts, and his people's thoughts.

The work is there, Chair, if we end up going down that road, but is there enough time right now for us to revamp the whole system, completely redesign it, and have it ready for the next election?

What we're looking for obviously, and I'm not trying to trap you—I wouldn't dream of trying—is the trigger point. Once we get past a certain point it's not going to be practical. We share the concerns of Mr. Reid.

What would be the time needed to do a complete revamp, such as you've heard some of us talking about, in your best estimation, sir?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Well, I'll put it to the committee that legislation enacting the reform should be there at least 24 months before the election. There are all sorts of hypotheses. I don't know what exactly the reform will be, but if it involves a redistribution exercise, which PR does by definition, this is a significant undertaking. The timelines have already been cut in previous legislation. I don't know that they can be reduced any more. In fact, the commission asked for an extension in the last redistribution exercise.

It's not something that can be compressed easily unless, again, you redesign the whole redistribution process, but that's another—

(1130)

Mr. David Christopherson:

That speaks to the front end, and at the back end, you're saying, “All that work needs to be done. Push the button. You need two years.”

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Yes, once you have the redistribution, you would need six to seven months to implement the new maps, the new districts, and then we would need to get ready for the election. We would need to prepare all the training. We would also need to build the systems that would support this new regime.

Mr. David Christopherson:

There may be a major public education component that would have to be built in too.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Of course. Absolutely. We can assume that there would be a need for major public education.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

To follow up on my previous question about voter education, when we look at the regular program expenditures, we're talking about $29 million in-between elections. That does not include public awareness campaigns to encourage people to vote if they're over the age of 18 and are eligible voters, even though Canada is part of International IDEA, which actually provides best practices to other countries on exactly how to do that very thing.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

That's correct. Elections Canada is, in fact, the only body in the world that I know of that cannot promote democracy within the country.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you very much for that clarification.

You say you're in the process now of auditing the financial returns of political parties and candidates. However, once that audit is complete, if you find there are potential breaches, the ability to investigate breaches of the Canada Elections Act was moved from the commissioner of Canada elections, which reports through you to Parliament—

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

No.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

—or to Parliament directly—

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

No.

I'll let you finish.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

No?

Okay, so it was moved from that to the office of the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions.

What impact do you think that is going to have on the ability for enforcement, if there are breaches of the Elections Act?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Again, just to be clear, the commissioner's office was moved from Elections Canada to the DPP office. It is reporting through the DPP and through the Attorney General. It's not an office of Parliament, so it doesn't report directly to Parliament. That's one thing.

The other thing is that in terms of the effectiveness, the commissioner is still independent and has the resources to carry out investigations. I think one of the things he has repeatedly said is that it would considerably make investigations more effective and more timely if he had the power to compel witnesses, with full respect and due respect for the Charter of Rights, of course, as it exists for the federal bodies that do have the power to compel.

In future recommendations to this Parliament, we will go back and look at some of the offences and some of the mechanisms to ensure compliance. One of the considerations is that there are many, many offences that are technical and do not warrant the full load of a criminal investigation. I think that filing a return late by a month is an offence; I'm not sure it warrants a full-load investigation of that matter.

We're going to come back and propose some alternatives to enforcement mechanisms in due course.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I look forward to those recommendations. Thank you.

I didn't mention that I'm splitting my time with Ginette Petitpas Taylor. [Translation]

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Good morning, Mr. Mayrand.

Since I am a new parliamentarian, my questions may be very straightforward. I will put them to you.

I was wondering what the biggest challenges were for your organization during the latest election. I am well aware that you will publish another report in a few months, but perhaps you could give me a general overview of the challenges you faced.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

I identified two major risks prior to the election.

The first one had to do with technology, as we made many technological changes during the last election. That risk was managed well, and there were no material consequences on the election. The other risk had to do with potential confusion among voters given the many changes made to the Elections Act and numerous public debates that I feel may have created confusion. I am talking about identification rules, among other things. Generally speaking, I think we managed to use our education and advertising programs to inform the electors, but this remains a challenge. We have a complex identification system where 44 different pieces of identification can be used, as well as combinations thereof. People are often surprised that a passport is not enough to be able to vote in Canada. So there is still some confusion, but things went fairly well, generally speaking. The electors understood the situation.

As I mentioned, according to the preliminary studies—and we have not yet completed our analyses—it is clear that some groups of voters are more affected. I am thinking of young people, among others. The Statistics Canada survey seems to indicate that mostly young people had difficulty meeting the requirements in terms of identification and proof of address. Aboriginals also had problems with that. Therefore, some groups are more affected than the rest of Canadians.

(1135)

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

That was actually my second question.

I was wondering whether the 170,000 individuals who said they were unable to vote belonged to an ethnic group or another particular group. The region where those people live is also a consideration. Have any surveys been done on that?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

No, the survey does not make it possible to identify geographical differences or even groups. The only group that is really identified more reliably is that of young people aged 18 to 24. The survey also indicated that a high proportion of aboriginals were affected, but the number of individuals surveyed creates a fairly significant margin or error. So this should be taken with a grain of salt. According to our empirical evidence, for example, voting is a challenge for aboriginals. They often simply have no address. Those who live on reserves just don't have an address. They often have very few documents that meet the legal identification requirements. So that is still a challenge, and that is why we worked with the AFN and band chiefs from across the country to try to facilitate the application of those rules.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

We'll go to Mr. Reid, for a five-minute round.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Mayrand, I was just trying to do some mathematics relating to the timeline for a new voting system, assuming that we're looking at a voting system that involves triggering the redistribution process, which of course means every system other than preferential ballots in single-member districts.

The election is to take place near the end of October 2019. Assuming the writ consumes a month, we go back to September 2019. You mentioned training. How long would training be? You said the time; was it one month?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Most of the training for poll workers happens during the campaign month.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is it during that month? You don't have to add that on, then.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Yes, but the returning officers will have a significant learning curve to go through, and their key staff also. That kind of training takes place normally in the year—six or seven months prior to the writ's being issued.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

We would be looking under STV at ridings that are about four or five times the size—that's typical of STV, four- or five-member ridings—that they are now. If it's MMP, they'd probably be twice the size they are now. That gives a rough idea.

Okay, so we're not sure, but it would be some amount of time. I said about a month. Maybe that's unreasonably short.

For implementation, you indicated it would take six months. I'm going backwards: September, August.... Now we're at February 2019. Seventeen months of design puts it back to, I think, about October—maybe it's November—of 2016. The legislation that we need to set up the new system, including a change to the redistribution act, I'm assuming would take six months. Thus, we're now back to the end of the spring of 2017.

You can see what I'm trying to do: I'm trying to figure out when we have to have some kind of proposal moving forward to make sure it can actually happen, or else we have only one possible outcome, which is a preferential ballot in a single-member district.

Have I missed anything? Does that cover all the different things that have to be accomplished in order to actually have an STV or an MMP in place for 2019?

(1140)

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

The main aspect for us is getting the legislation in place, which allows us to determine what sort of operating system needs to be built or rearranged, depending on the scope of the changes. After that, you need to develop the whole training and all the instructions and procedures—and I should say, for the returning officers and their staff and for poll workers, but also, I believe, for candidates and campaigns; there will be quite a few changes we need to look at there also.

As it goes on, this would be done in parallel, possibly, with a redistribution taking place. There are some elements, subject to what exactly the reform is, that could be started a little bit before the redistribution is completed.

Mr. Scott Reid:

For example, the instructions on how one votes under a list system could be designed. You don't need to know.... That would be an example.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Yes. In addition, there's also the whole technology aspect. If we move to a system like the one you just described, you need to bring tabulators to the polls; you will need to bring very different technology. In fact, there's very little technology, as we speak, at the poll.

Those machines have to be procured, of course, and they have to be tested, they have to be set up, they have to be verified to make sure they work on polling day and are accurate and reliable. And we need to have contingency plans, if a machine should fail. There are all sorts of minutiae that we need to look at.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Just to be clear as to what you're referring to, is that for STV, or is it for MMP? You mentioned the tabulation.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

I would say both. The systems are different, but both would require technology at the polls to compute the results. I'm assuming that Canadians and candidates will want the results as quickly as possible. There are countries in which you'll wait for a few weeks to get the results. I assume that this is not a standard for Canada.

Mr. Scott Reid:

In Australia, in their senate elections, for example, you pack yourself a lunch, if you're going in to be a ballot counter.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Exactly. Again, that's another interesting aspect that we would need to look at, subject to the type of reform that takes place.

Australia is a good example: ballots have to be brought back to counting centres. We don't have that in Canada. Ballots are counted at the polls where the vote took place. Again, there's a delay. Just as an example, getting back some ballot boxes from Nunavut took over three weeks this time around. It was not general in that riding, but, again, because of weather and all sorts of circumstances, they were delayed. That's the sort of thing that we, at Elections Canada, need to be concerned about and find the best way to deal with those kinds of issues. That explained a bit the time that's required to assess the best process possible and be ready to implement it.

The Chair:

We'll move on to Ms. Sahota, who is sharing with Mr. Chan.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

I just want to get into more detail about the technology that you're talking about. It's very interesting to me. This committee has been talking a lot about modernizing Parliament. We also need to modernize our electoral system, that's for sure. I heard from a lot of people on my campaign who had perhaps come from other countries in the past, and found our system to be very archaic, very old-fashioned. At times I said that perhaps it was due to concerns about voter fraud or whatnot, and they hadn't perfected a system that worked at this point.

What are the systems that you allude to in your report here, and how can these make our system more effective, more modern, and easier for the average voter? Maybe we could perhaps get more people out to the polls if it were simplified.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

We need to expand electronic services across the board—including for candidates, honestly. I don't see any reason in this day and age that a candidate cannot file their campaign return electronically. I think that should be a given, but it's not yet, unfortunately.

In terms of the polls—and we'll have further discussion on these things—we certainly would look to bring what we call “live lists” at the polls. You have the electronic lists available at the polls. That means that someone who is showing up at the poll shows a voter ID card. The card is scanned, their name is struck out of the list immediately, and automatically it's valid across the country, so that person cannot show up somewhere else later during the day. As a result of that, they get their ballot. We could consider entering them into a tabulator, so, again, the results would be instant on election night. Mind you, it doesn't take very long, as we speak, in our current system.

The other thing that we need to look at is automating procedures. If you have voted at an advance poll, you know that electors, when they show up, have to prove their ID, etc. Then their name has to be searched in a big paper document, and they have to enter the name and address and they have to sign. There's no reason in this day and age that it still needs to happen this way. We would be looking at automation. There are good reasons that controls are in place: to ensure that the vote is reliable. However, but I think there are big opportunities for automation and better service at the polls.

We need to reduced lineups. I think that was an issue at advance polls because more and more Canadians went to vote at advance polls. We need to find ways of alleviating the procedural burden that is in place at advance polls.

(1145)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What challenges have you faced when trying to implement this new technology? I'm surprised in this last election we didn't update our system.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Well, a simple thing like getting rid of the register of electors at advance polls needs a change to the act. This is the level of prescription that exists in the legislation. It's the act that requires the elector to sign the register at advance polls. Automation there cannot take place without some sorts of amendments.

We also need to be able to reorganize the work at the poll. Currently the model is anchored on a ballot box, and two officers controlling that ballot box at all times. The officer cannot move around, even though it's busier next door, and electors cannot move around. Even though all the other tables are free, they still have to wait for their turn. I think we can reorganize the work differently so that we specialize tasks, which would allow more flexibility for electors to move around, and also more flexibility for officials to go where the bulk of the work is happening during the day. Again, at advance polls, I think the most telling image we have is of people all lined up at a single table. We need to get rid of that image, hopefully for the 43rd election.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

When was the last time the act was amended?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

In 2010 with Bill C-23—

Mr. Hughes St-Pierre (Chief Financial and Planning Officer, Integrated Services, Policy and Public Affairs, Elections Canada):

In 2014.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Oh, sorry. Yes, it was 2014.

The act has been repeatedly amended, but without a single focus or prism of modernization in those reviews. It was often in reaction to particular issues that emerged and fixing that issue without taking a step back and saying, “Well, let's rethink the service model here”.

The Chair:

We'll now go to Mr. Strahl.

Mr. Mark Strahl (Chilliwack—Hope, CPC):

Continuing with that thought about technology in the polling stations, I would submit that in my riding certainly, many of the people who are available to work on elections perhaps haven't had experience with technology. They're perhaps retired, or part-time workers who aren't as fluent in the language of technology. Would we be looking at hiring the same...?

I guess my concern would be this. Would you not need permanent or contract employees for this? I just see that in the attempt to make it more efficient, there could be disastrous results if there were not someone there who could handle the problem.

(1150)

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

I wouldn't minimize the change management aspect in this and the impact on the workforce. We would need to have expert resources to support the technology on the premises. It will be costly the first few times we run this model, but will ease after a while.

There are ways of designing technology that's so user-friendly you don't need to be an expert. Filling in a form electronically can be easier than filling it in on paper, honestly.

But these are fair considerations that we will have in mind as we go forward.

Mr. Mark Strahl:

There was another concern I had during the election. You mentioned your work with the AFN. Obviously we all applaud the work to get more people out to the polls no matter where they're from. The AFN took a very aggressive political stance at their highest levels in a kind of “anyone but Conservative” perspective. That was made known by the National Chief, etc.

My question is this. When you are working with an organization, that is a political organization, to increase voter turnout, how do you protect the integrity of Elections Canada from any allegation or perception that it would advantage one political entity over another?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

There are a few things here. We did work with some 50 organizations during this election, including, yes, the AFN. With each of the organizations, all the contractual arrangements required that they be independent and impartial during the election. Yes, their members could have very different political views, like any organization, but the organization itself had no particular leaning.

The other thing is that with those organizations, not necessarily trying.... I don't want to take responsibility for turnout. But they work to make sure that electors, Canadians, whatever their conditions are, have the information they need if they wish to vote. There are certain groups that are less likely to be registered, so we make efforts to help those groups around registration. Some groups face challenges with identification, so we make sure they know what their options are if they show up at the poll.

The AFN was basically maintaining a call centre to chiefs across the country, informing them of the tools available to inform their people about how, where, and when to vote.

Mr. Mark Strahl:

I have one final question. In your remarks you mentioned that we could “bring the electoral process, currently anchored in the 19th century, in line with contemporary Canadian expectations.” I guess my question is, how do you make the determination as to what contemporary Canadian expectations are?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

In our next report, I think you will see what Canadians have been telling us about the electoral process.

We already can see that Canadians increasingly want to move when and where they are ready. We've seen over the last few decades a significant increase of voter turnout at advance polls. This was initially set up as an exception, and now it's becoming increasingly the norm. This time around, 25% of all Canadian voters showed up at advance polls. That's telling us something. I cannot keep the same system at advance polls, which is billed as an exception, when an increasing bulk of electors want to use that option. Similarly, we had a 117% increase in voting by mail—in this day and age, yes. This is a channel that Canadians want to use, so I have to make sure that the channel works effectively in that regard. Canadians are increasingly upset—I mentioned it a few times now already—when they show up at the gymnasium and have to wait in line while all the other tables are free. Again, it adds up very quickly. We estimate that serving an electorate at an advance poll takes roughly 10 to 15 minutes. If you have 10 people ahead of you, and you're the eleventh, imagine the time it takes. If you see three or four tables that are free, why can't you go to them? If I show up at any store—Walmart in this country—I'll go to the checkout that is available. Why can I not do that? That's my experience as a citizen, as a consumer; I can go where I can get the fastest service.

Those expectations will be articulated better by Canadians themselves through the various studies that we've carried out in the last several months. You will be able to see them and all the background documentation there sometime in June, I hope.

(1155)

Mr. Mark Strahl:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We're running short of time.

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Let me simply thank you, Mr. Mayrand, and your staff for your professionalism.

I really have no substantive questions with respect to the main estimates.

I want to get back to some of the issues that Mr. Reid was raising. I share a lot of his concerns, frankly, with respect to my party and our government's aggressive timetable for potential electoral reform, in particular, our commitment to ending the first-past-the-post system by 2019. It gets back to the beginning of your earlier comments about the strategic planning process for your organization, and whether you have modelled out all of the potential scenarios and can give this committee a sense of the potential estimated costs, depending ultimately on what Parliament decides with respect to an electoral reform model that will be advanced. You've given us a sense of some of the timelines but also the necessary resources, particularly in terms of sufficient fiscal appropriation, to deal with all of these potential scenarios. Are you already thinking about that within your organization, within your strategic planning process, to deal with that? I suspect that we're talking about some potentially significant sums of money.

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Yes, especially the investment in technology that's likely to be needed to support any system reform. We are in the very early stages of our strategic plan. It hasn't been cast out fully yet. We have a sense of where we want to go, but we want to engage this committee and other political parties on our direction in modernizing services. As we progress, we will be costing those initiatives.

As for the reform itself, at this point in time I don't have enough information to be able to cost anything.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Would it be potentially useful to have any or some of the technological reforms that you're discussing, for example, tested in a by-election context? It would be a more prescribed test case. Are there any recommendations that you could make to this committee in terms of considerations that we could test?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

This is something we hope to be able to discuss a bit with you on May 3. One thing we would like to do, and traditionally have always done, is test new systems before we distribute them across a general election. We would be testing, either in a laboratory or during a by-election, the systems, the procedures, the training—everything—to make sure that it's as smooth as possible on election day. If we have reservations as a result of a test, we would not proceed during a general election. We would not put the election at risk, that's for sure.

The short answer is yes, we will be planning tests as we progress. In some cases, I may even need to come to this committee for formal approval, because whenever the tests involve changes to the act, I would need the approval of this committee—and the Senate, in fact—before proceeding with what we call a “pilot”. We would, then, bring a business case and a good description of what the test is about and what it's trying to measure.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I think it would be very useful to committee members—and frankly to both Houses of Parliament an opportunity—to have a sense of particularly the issues you want to prescribe, so that we can give you the necessary authority in advance.

We certainly on the government side would be amenable to recommendations that you see, particularly as a result of any deficiencies in the most recent general election, could be addressed. We would be very amenable to recommendations coming from your office.

(1200)

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson, if you can—

Mr. David Christopherson:

I see the clock. I will keep this brief.

How obscene it is, though, that changes to our electoral system have to be approved by the place where they knock on one door once for life.

Speaking to the vote, the actual estimates—the reason you're here—does the $29.2 million you're seeking support for in vote 1 in the main estimates speak to your operational budget? Is that correct—it's not your election budget?

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe you are actually one of the few entities in government with access to unlimited money during the course of an election. If you need to spend it, you're accountable for it, but you have the authority to spend it. Do I have it right, sir?

Mr. Marc Mayrand:

You're correct, and it's both during an election and in preparation for an election, even before the writ is issued.

The $29.2 million is strictly for salaries of indeterminate staff at Elections Canada. All other expenses of Elections Canada are statutory or are authorized by legislation.

Mr. David Christopherson:

The last thing I'll say, Mr. Chair, is that I am really looking forward to finally getting a chance to unravel the damage done by the “Unfair Elections Act”, and we're going to have some great discussions around voter identification cards going forward—trust me.

The Chair:

We'll go to the vote now. CHIEF ELECTORAL OFFICER Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$29,212,735

(Vote 1 agreed to)

The Chair: Shall I report the vote on the main estimates, less the amount granted in interim supply, to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Thank you, Mr. Mayrand, for the great job you do during elections. It's unbiased and very professional. We certainly appreciate it, and I think Canadians appreciate it. We have confidence that it's done very professionally and that their vote counts that way.

Thank you very much.

We'll let you know when we may have rescheduled your next meeting to. We're discussing that later today, actually.

We'll break for a couple of minutes.

If the new witnesses could come to the table, that would be great.

(1200)

(1205)

The Chair:

We're ready to start.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, I'm just wondering whether this meeting is being televised or not? It doesn't say it on the agenda, so I wanted to clarify that.

The Chair:

No, it's not.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Let me just ask that at the end of this meeting we discuss the idea of televising these meetings any time we have the ability to do so. We're frequently in the room where broadcasting takes place, and it makes sense.

The Chair:

I'd like to welcome our witnesses for our study to make Parliament more efficient, more inclusive of everyone representing Canada, and more family-friendly and friendly to the employees and the MPs, so that it's best for everyone's family and people who have inclusivity challenges. Hopefully you'll be helping us with that.

Our witnesses today, pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), for our study of initiatives toward a family-friendly House are Thomas Shannon, president of Local 232 of the United Food and Commercial Workers Union of Canada, and Mélisa Ferreira and Tara Hogeterp, representatives of Local 232. Then, from the Public Service Alliance of Canada we have Roger Thompson, president of Local 70390 and, for moral support, Jim McDonald, labour relations officer from the Union of National Employees.

We'll start with opening statements and after that we'll have rounds of seven minutes of questioning, which includes both the questions and the answers. We'll get as much in as we can.

Let us start with Mr. Shannon. [Translation]

Mr. Thomas Shannon (President, Local 232, United Food and Commercial Workers Union Canada):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for this invitation. I am happy to be appearing before you today on behalf of the union that represents all the workers of the New Democratic Party here, on Parliament Hill, and in ridings.[English]

We have a collective agreement with the NDP caucus that provides fair pay and flexible working hours.

I have with me today two mothers who have worked on the Hill and in the constituency for parliamentarians, and so from their experience they should be able to inform the committee's study of initiatives towards a family-friendly House of Commons.[Translation]

I will now yield the floor to Tara Hogeterp. [English]

Ms. Tara Hogeterp (Representative, Local 232, United Food and Commercial Workers Union Canada):

Hi. My name is Tara Hogeterp. I've worked on the Hill since 2003, and in that time I've had two children. I was very grateful to have the ability to take a full year of maternity leave and be able to return to the Hill and continue my career.

Finding child care in Ottawa can be very challenging, and I appreciated having the ability to request additional leave without pay to coincide with the availability of a child care space. Both of my children attended day cares off the Hill and the Children on the Hill Day Care. The Hill day care does not accommodate children under 18 months, and therefore alternative child care is needed, if and when a spot becomes available, for your child.

Most day cares and after school programs in the Ottawa area have set pickup and drop-off times. Having working hours that allow me to drop off and pick up my child at the end of the day is crucial.

My colleague, Mélisa, will now share her experience.

(1210)

[Translation]

Ms. Mélisa Ferreira (Representative, Local 232, United Food and Commercial Workers Union Canada):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I have been working on the Hill since 2011. From 2011 to 2015, I worked in a constituency office and, in this new Parliament, I have been working in Ottawa. My husband also works at the House of Commons. In 2013, we had twins. I went on maternity leave for a year, and then I returned to work at an MP's constituency office.

A flexible schedule is a must in my case, since the daycare my children attend closes very early, at 4:30 p.m. On the other hand, committee activities often wrap up very late. For example, the member I work for sat on the Special Joint Committee on Physician-Assisted Dying. The committee's schedule was very condensed, and meetings were held in the evening.

Parents who are both working on the Hill face major challenges. As young children are often sick, we have to miss work. The fact that we are protected by a collective agreement greatly contributes to our peace of mind. We know that we are not at risk of losing our job because we have to miss work regularly.

Thank you very much. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

President Thompson.

Mr. Roger Thompson (President, Local 70390, Public Service Alliance of Canada):

Good afternoon. We thank you for having us here.

I'm the local president of the UNE-PSAC, representative of all UNE-PSAC members employed by the House of Commons and at parliamentary protective services, the PPS group, which includes approximately 450 employees in total.

We represent House of Commons employees under four separate bargaining units: the operations sector, which includes material handling, maintenance and trades, transportation, messenger services, printing and mailing services, and food services; postal services; reporting and text processing; and the scanners department.

I'm accompanied today by Jim McDonald, a UNE labour relations officer who is assigned to assist and represent all UNE members employed by the House of Commons, as well as the scanners who are employed by parliamentary protective services.

The Chair:

Are there any other opening statements?

Okay, we'll go into questioning, starting with Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

My question is for Ms. Ferreira and Ms. Hogeterp.

I'm a former political staffer myself. I've heard from a number of staff that when they have kids, one of the things that is most important is predictability. For instance, we've been talking here in this committee about a compressed work week and potentially not having members sit on Fridays.

I have heard some of the staff saying that it would allow them a day of the week where they know that the member is not going to be dragging them to meetings, or running in the door urgently because there's a media request or something. They could then plan doctor's appointments for their kids, or the things that they need to do, on those Fridays. This would give more flexibility for parents who are on the Hill.

Has that been your experience? What would you think about that model?

Ms. Tara Hogeterp:

I still have to pay for day care on a Friday, so I'm going to be at work on a Friday. It doesn't make that much difference. I tend to put those types of appointments during break weeks, and I have not found any difficulty with that kind of schedule.

The other option during the week is usually Wednesday mornings when there's a caucus meeting, because all the MPs in all parties are kind of off. So there's that opportunity as well. I wouldn't say having that Friday would make a huge difference to my situation, because quite often my MP isn't here on a Friday anyway, if she doesn't have duty, so it tends to be a quieter day already.

(1215)

[Translation]

Ms. Mélisa Ferreira:

As Tara was saying, we also have to consider our colleagues in the ridings who work on Fridays, in the evenings and on the weekends. The option of having Fridays off may slightly lighten the workload, but when MPs are in Ottawa, the pace is always fast and the hours are long. I cannot comment on this. However, I try to schedule my appointments during break weeks or after the MP leaves on Friday afternoons. [English]

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

When I look at the political staff on the Hill, I often see that many of them are young and many of them are single. There are not that many who have families.

In my own experience I've seen a number of political staff who, as soon as they started families, actually left the work on the Hill and went to work in other fields where they had more predictable hours.

Do you think there's a form of self-selection amongst people who choose to work in this field, where people who do have young families are choosing not to because of the hours? Are there ways we might be able to alleviate that, to make it easier, so that people with young families would be more inclined to work on the Hill? [Translation]

Ms. Mélisa Ferreira:

I think this varies from one individual to the next.

Some people realize that it is difficult to balance work and family. I am lucky to have family members in the region, and my parents pick up the slack. My husband, who also works at the House of Commons, has flexibility that I don't have with my MP. Our schedule is actually planned out weeks in advance in terms of who is picking up the children and at what time, who is booking appointments, and so on.

It really depends on the person. I think it is possible to raise a young family while working in Parliament. We can be parliamentary assistants, MPs or legislative assistants on the Hill, but that requires a great deal of organization. [English]

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

As you know, other parties' staff are not unionized. Do you think that has made a difference? Would it be more difficult? The bulk of the staff on the Hill is not be represented by a union.

Mr. Thomas Shannon:

Well, I think what is different about us is—you're right—we are the only ones who are unionized. What that means is we have a collective agreement that we signed with the NDP caucus. It outlines flexible working hours and how much time you can take off.

It is a clear document that allows young mothers and young fathers to be able to look at it and say, “Okay, these are the hours that I must do. This is how I can be accommodated.” They can sit down with the NDP caucus to make sure that young families...because we do have quite a few young families. We have young staff and I know both the other parties have young staff.

I think it makes a difference in that there is clarity, and you can plan for the future knowing that you're not going to lose your job over the fact that your child is sick. Things can be planned out. The big difference is the clear rules that we have outlined in negotiations with management.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

The experience that you have, both of you, may not be indicative for a lot of the people who are working on the Hill.

I'd actually like to put the same question to Mr. McDonald and Mr. Thompson about the staff who are not political staff, the staff you represent, and whether or not you think that eliminating Friday sittings, for instance, would have an impact on the staff?

Mr. Roger Thompson:

Yes, we do, actually, because we have individuals in our collective agreement who are called SCI, which means seasonal certified indeterminate employees. Now, these employees are persons when they start off, and must work at least 700 hours in a calendar year to achieve employee status and qualify as an SCI, and get all the benefits.

We feel that if the sitting hours are cut down, it could be possible that an SCI employee could not achieve their threshold of 700 hours in two consecutive years. Then they would no longer be an SCI, and they would lose their status and all their benefits.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

If we were looking at a compressed work week, where we would still sit the same number of hours but then have more time also to be in our constituencies, that would not necessarily have an impact, because the number of hours of Parliament sitting would actually remain the same. It would just be compressed from Monday to Thursday.

Mr. Jim McDonald (Labour Relations Officer, Union of National Employees, Public Service Alliance of Canada):

One of the things that's going to come up with a compressed work week is that your going to elongate the days, I presume. Then people are going to work longer days, which is going to impact both their family life and their work life. They'll be required to work an additional three or four hours every day in order to make up the day that's been compressed.

I now work a compressed week, but it can be very difficult for people with child care. Most child-care facilities operate during daylight hours only, and most of them want the children cleared out by five, or at the latest by six o'clock in the afternoon. If you're a younger family with younger kids who are in day care, that's where we would end up going.

The other issue, of course, is the additional cost to the employer through the collective agreement, because of overtime, shift premiums, and so on.

(1220)

The Chair:

Mr. Strahl.

Mr. Mark Strahl:

Thank you very much. It's a pleasure to sit in on this committee today for this discussion.

Perhaps I have a unique perspective. I was the child of a member of Parliament. I have worked both on Parliament Hill, and in a constituency office on staff prior to my election here, so I understand, I think, where you're coming from.

I would submit to you that—and I'll get your comments on this in a minute—for staff, a compressed work week is actually the worst of all possible options. As an Ottawa-based staffer, from Monday to Thursday you are expected to be supporting your member from earlier in the morning until later at night, thus robbing you of time with your family. Then on Friday you don't get to go home. You are here to work. You are in fact extending your hours. Most members of Parliament that I know will be going home to their ridings but will still expect support from their staff.

I would submit that this is bad for staff and also for the members of Parliament who have their families here, those who have made the difficult choice to relocate their families to Ottawa. Currently, with the arrangements that our House leaders have been making, the whips have votes after question period. Last night was the first time, I think, that we've had multiple votes in the evening.

Many members have been able, with that predictability, to get home to have dinner with their families or make those arrangements that you talked about.

Perhaps I could just get your comments on your expectations. Have you spoken to your employers? In the case of the NDP staff, does your collective agreement allow for...? Maybe you could walk me through how you could possibly meet all of the requirements without a significant increase in your own personal hours.

Ms. Tara Hogeterp:

I would agree that having a compressed work week would be detrimental to family time. My kids are dropped off at school, and I can drop them off as early as 8 a.m., but I have to pick them up by 5:30 at the absolute latest. I think I will get penalized at $20 per 10 minutes if I'm late to pick them up. I don't have the luxury not to pick them up. Having a compressed work week would give me less family time, and I would imagine—

Mr. Mark Strahl:

—and cost you more money.

Ms. Tara Hogeterp:

—and cost me more money.

I would say that for families with young children, especially school-aged children, the critical time for families is between pickup and bedtime, that 5 to 7 period.

Mr. Mark Strahl: Absolutely.

Ms. Tara Hogeterp: That is the time when you find out what they've done for the day; it's the time when you have dinner together and that connection, and get them to bed.

It can be the most trying time, but it's also the most important time of your day. I would hate anyone, staff or MP, to lose out on those hours.

Mr. Mark Strahl:

Thank you. I understand. Certainly it's been a few years now, but when I was on staff, the maternity leave top-up that members who took maternity and paternity leave or staff members received was basically 92% of their wage. A Canadian receiving EI without any benefit package receives, I believe, 55%.

Is that the case? Do you have a top-up even further with your union, or is that 92% what you receive?

Ms. Mélisa Ferreira:

It's with the House of Commons. It's 93%.

Mr. Mark Strahl:

Okay, it's 93%.

I would argue, contrary to what Ms. Vandenbeld said, that the House of Commons actually encourages young families with that sort of support. That's something that most Canadians don't have. I know that many of my colleagues as members and many staff colleagues as well have continued working, with that generous maternity support.

(1225)

The Chair:

You have two and a half minutes.

Mr. Mark Strahl:

I want to turn to Mr. Thompson, to clarify this concerning your SCI workers, just to be clear.

It's been my understanding, having worked here and now being elected here, that there are salaried members of the House of Commons staff who are here every day, regardless of whether the House sits or not. However, there are many services that are not offered when the House of Commons is not sitting, and therefore.... For instance, the parliamentary restaurant is closed when the House is not sitting. With a compressed work week, the people in that service would not get more money, because they would not be working more hours. They would in fact take a pay cut and perhaps lose their SCI status. Am I correct in that.

Mr. Roger Thompson:

Yes, that could possibly happen. As Jim said, if you're working later hours, it doesn't mean that the employees will be making more hours. When the House is sitting, this is when these employees work—and not just in food services; there are also employees in transportation. When the members are not here, the buses are not running, and these SCI employees are not at work. Therefore, if this happens too much within a calendar year, and especially two consecutive calendar years, they lose all this.

I would say that the sitting hours would have to remain the same.

Mr. Mark Strahl:

From what you're telling me—the same as for the members' staff—essentially this would result likely in less pay for some people, or certainly no more. There would be a loss of benefits, loss of pay, and additional child care costs as well for many of your members.

Mr. Roger Thompson:

Exactly.

Another thing you have to understand about the SCI employees is that most of them, especially in food services, have two jobs. When the House is not here, they have a second job that they rely on outside, so that they can make their money. Some of them have houses and rent to pay or mortgages to pay. When the House is here, they're working their seven hours a day. When the House is not in session, it's down to five hours, or possibly 5.5 hours; therefore, they have another job.

If somebody were to compress the workload and these employees had to work longer throughout the day, how would they pick up their kids? And if they have that second job, which they rely on, they would lose that job. Therefore, when the House is not in session, what other job do they get?

Mr. Mark Strahl:

Mr. Chair, I don't know when I'll be back, but I would submit that cancelling a Friday, as the witnesses have said, will be detrimental to staff. It will cost staff more money and in fact will not result in a better work-family balance for either members or staff; in fact, it would make it worse.

One has to wonder what is really behind this motivation to cancel Fridays. I would submit that it is a 20% reduction in accountability. It is not looking to make life better for a work-family balance, because all of us know that when we go home on a Friday it is not to spend time with our families: we are expected to be working, as our staff are expected to be working.

This proposal, this trial balloon that's being floated, would actually make life worse for families, and not better.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, go ahead.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

I am sorry. It's Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I appreciate your watching out for my interests. Maybe I will elect you as my union steward. That is a compliment. It's okay.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

David, when I met my wife, she was a union rep, so don't worry.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You have the three-piece suit. You could be a union boss.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

This is fantastic. Tom, I never thought I would see the day when you move from over there, assisting me to do what I am doing, and now you are right here as a witness. You just never know, eh?

I want to address my comments to you, as a modern-day union boss, although you sure don't look like the caricatures they paint of union bosses, I have to tell you. You have to get a little more....

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson: I am on TV here, so you get too comfortable in this role.

Seriously, I want to use my seven minutes my way. I want to ask a broader question. This is an opportunity to talk about unions, quality of life, and how it fits in. I have two things to raise.

In your words, Tom.... I say Tom because I work with him all the time, and it would be silly for us to be calling each other “Mr.”

Here we are, in 2016. A lot of people believe, first of all, that unions have no place at all in modern society. Yes, they were fine back in the Depression and after the war, but not now, in a modern circumstance, and certainly not in an office setting, let alone the kind of work that some of your members do.

Could you just take a moment of my time and talk about why the union is still relevant to your members? You are a young man. Why do you care? Why are you involved? How can a union contract, given the kind of work you...? How do you do that? Explain to people how you would take work that normally doesn't fit the usual description of unions, in the old industrial-fashion way we look at it, and comment on that.

I make no bones about it, Mr. Chair. I am hoping there are staff for all the other parties on the Hill who are listening and might say, “You know what? Talk about a quality-of-life improvement. I should be thinking about this union.” That is just part of my being full-disclosure in as sunny a way as I can.

It's over to you, Tom, if you don't mind.

(1230)

Mr. Thomas Shannon:

Thank you very much for that, David—Mr. Christopherson.

You mentioned that unions are no longer relevant, and we hear that from certain people. In the 1800s they said that. I wasn't there, but there was an article in the 1800s that asked whether unions had served their purpose; were they done? I don't think they ever end, because the idea is that management is in charge and is trying to get things done, and we need to make sure that we come together as unionized staff to make sure we are protected and that we, first of all, do the most for our members and make sure we take care of the work we're to do in the House of Commons, because we need to be healthy and we need to be well paid and taken care of.

Moving on to your question about whether we're the same as the old industrial unions, the thing is, it's the same idea. We negotiate a contract with the NDP caucus—you might be familiar with them. We sit down and we say, here is how much is in the budget. What can we do to make sure that we are paid well so that we have retention?

Generally, in the unionized environment here the New Democratic Party staff are paid more, because we are able to negotiate collectively, rather than one on one. Obviously we know that with unions there is a wide disparity.

That keeps people in their jobs, because as they maintain seniority, they get more experience, become better as staff. I know there are actually former staff in front of me right now, and they know what it is: when you first start, you're learning the ropes, you're figuring it out, and then after five years, you have it right; you're doing a great job. Pay should be in connection with the amount of time you spend working.

But it's not just pay; it's also flexible working hours. Now, in this environment—and this is just a little outside the family-friendly theme—we have an overtime policy. When we need to work late—it happens a lot that you will be asking your staff to work late—what we do is take any time that is more than the regular work week, and we're able to use it for vacation time, for time off with our families.

Saying that, though, it is tough for young mothers or young fathers to take the actual overtime off, for the reasons they already gave in response to questions from the Liberals and Conservatives. However, it at least allows flexibility such that if you need to leave early, there's a connection with how much time you spend.

The last point is that when we're talking about the Labour Code and parliamentary privilege, MPs can more or less do...I won't say what they want with their staff, but there's an opening that they can just.... Abuse is very easy to do.

Most of you would be good bosses, but if you're not, you can just fire the boss right away.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Thomas Shannon: I'm sorry; you can fire the employee right away.

(1235)

Mr. David Christopherson:

You're speaking to the wrong people here.

Mr. Thomas Shannon:

You can't fire the boss. We can't fire the members of Parliament; however, you can just fire the employee, no questions asked.

We actually have a procedure we go through to ask, “Was it fair? What can we do to improve the relationship?”, because the ultimate goal in our sense—in the sense for all the staff here—is to move your party forward, your country forward, and to try to get things done for the people you represent. That way, there is a protection: we go through a process, whether it's harassment or there's a grievance. We make sure that nobody on the staff is ill-treated, because there is a process in place.

I guess that's the long-winded outline of the difference between our employees and the employees right now of other political parties.

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'll leave it at that, other than to give you an opportunity.... We talked about the Fridays. There are a few things that have been floating around today.

I'll just afford you an opportunity to comment on any of the suggestions you have heard, either formally or informally, that you like or don't like. It's just an opportunity for you to speak your mind on the other pieces of what we're talking about here. [Translation]

Ms. Mélisa Ferreira:

I agree with Tara and the member. A compressed work week would result in employees with young families having to work longer hours over four days and sacrificing time spent with their family. I think it would be more difficult if Fridays were eliminated, if I may say so. In my humble opinion, that's not the right thing to do. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you. I'm getting my time back.

Mr. David Christopherson:

And I'll die defending your right to have it; how's that?

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There are at least five former staffers around this table today, so I think it's very important for us to get on the record the impact of the parliamentary lifestyle on staff. I was a staffer here for—

Mr. David Christopherson: I was too. I was a constituency assistant.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: So there are at least six of us, then, but Mark isn't normally here.

I had a daughter while I was working as a staffer here, and then I ran a nomination campaign with a newborn. It was a bit of a challenge.

I know that this is outside of your normal duties. I really appreciate you guys coming to speak to us. I know it's probably not the most fun experience.

I've been here a lot. The one time I haven't been here is during elections. What's it like—this is especially to Mr. Thompson—during an election? What kind of impacts do elections have on the staff, the morale, the work that goes on here—especially longer ones, such as the 78-day one we just had?

Mr. Roger Thompson:

Do you mean the impacts of the election work-wise?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No. We all leave, so how does it look around here? How does it impact your jobs, if you're union members? What goes on here?

Mr. Roger Thompson:

Basically, where you guys are sitting today, this is what my department does every day: we set this up for you guys.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Well, thank you.

Mr. Roger Thompson:

You're very welcome.

In our department, we're mostly full-time employees, so we are very busy during elections. But if you're looking at the SCIs in some of these other departments that we talked about, the seasonal certified employees, you're correct that the work drops. The cafeterias are closed; the FPF, the facility the food comes from or the production facility, is shut down, and only minimum staff, probably, is working there, and maybe minimum staff in the kitchens or one or two cafeterias.

So the workload for these individuals drops. In some departments, like the one I work for, transportation, the full-time employees are busy. We're busy with the moves and all the elections and that. But when it comes to these SCI individuals, it dramatically drops. As I said, five or five-and-a-half hours is what they're given.

In our collective agreement, when you become an SCI individual, there is a seniority clause. The seniority for these individuals is based on job title. If an individual has seniority, then that individual will be working. An individual with less seniority cannot work more hours than somebody who has more seniority; therefore, if the facilities are closed, you only have a minimum number of employees who are working, so it's a big drop-off. It drops dramatically for these individuals.

(1240)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If many a lot of the services are designed around us, the members, would it be helpful for staff if, for example, as you mentioned, the cafeterias were open year-round, instead of just when we're here? Would that make a big difference to you? I'm curious to hear.

Mr. Roger Thompson:

If you would like my personal opinion—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: That's what I'm asking for.

Mr. Roger Thompson: —I've never understood why they were closed, because everybody needs to eat. I never understood why we—I'm sorry, I don't mean to say this—only cater to the MPs for these things and why they shut down.

Look at Christmas time; there are employees at all of the satellite sites on the Hill, employees who work at 131 or 181 Queen Street. When the MPs are not around, these employees need to eat, and when the cafeterias are closed.... There may be one or two cafeterias that stay open, and therefore for the employees, there are not enough of them open.

To be honest, yes, they could, but I'm not in management, so I don't....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No, that's a fair comment. I appreciate it.

Here is another question, again on House of Commons administration, effectively. At least two of you have kids; I don't know whether the rest of you have. When you had young children on the Hill, did you try to use the House of Commons' own day care? What kind of process was it? Why did you or didn't you?

Ms. Tara Hogeterp:

I had both my kids at the Parliament Hill day care. I actually sat on the board of the day care, so I have a little bit of knowledge about the Hill day care.

With my first child, I did not realize that I needed to put her on a waiting list when I was pregnant, so she did not get to go to the Children on the Hill Day Care until a year later. I had to find alternative care until we were able to get a spot.

Once she had a spot, her sibling, my son, was automatically put on the list and given priority, so he was able to get a spot. However, at the Hill day care, they don't have the facilities to have children under 18 months. My maternity leave was only one year, so there was a six-month gap before I could potentially get a spot. For those six months, I had to take two months unpaid, and then I found a nanny for four months. My daughter still was going while my younger child was with a nanny full-time, so we ended up paying double.

I know that if you get a spot and your spot becomes available but your child isn't 18 months yet, you are required to pay to hold your spot, or else you lose it and it will go to someone else.

It's very much “in demand” day care, and it's a lovely place, and I loved having my children there. It was so wonderful to be able to drop them off at work, and my kids still talk about “remember when I saw you on...?”—and he's, what, six and she's eight. So they still remember. My kids could pronounce the word “parliament” way before most kids could pronounce the word “boat”.

Coming here and seeing them on the Hill, it's really quite an honour to have that chance, and the day care is wonderful, but they don't have the capacity to take on more children because of the limited space. Also, for the day care to run, they need outdoor space. They're really limited.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We have a nice, big front lawn over there.

Ms. Tara Hogeterp:

Yes, yes; however, there's a question of privacy for the children, though they literally get tugged around, and they are trained to say “no pictures” to the tourists. It's quite cute.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fair enough; I understand.

Going beyond what you're able to accomplish on the board—going beyond that mandate—how would you see improvements to the day care. What kinds of improvements would you like to see? And what direction should it be heading in, in your view?

Ms. Tara Hogeterp:

I'm not here representing the day care, so this would be just my opinion, but I would love to have that day care able to take on MPs' needs and staff's needs by having it accessible at 12 months rather than 18 months. That would be ideal, because that six-month gap can be quite challenging for a family.

I remember that wait list being a real challenge, so we need to make sure that MPs know, when they become MPs, that if they're thinking about having children or once they have children, they need to get their names on that waiting list right away.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair.

The Chair:

Thank you. That's your time.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That answers that question.

The Chair:

Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair. I appreciate the conversation we're having today with former staff. I am one of the five, I believe, is the number we finalized on, former staffers both on the Hill and in the riding. It's good to hear the opinions coming from other staffers.

I just want to confirm—my memory is short on this—whether the day care here on the Hill is run by a private company or Hill staff.

(1245)

Ms. Tara Hogeterp:

Neither; it's a non-profit. It has a board of directors who run the day care.

I think it's at the pleasure of the Speaker that it exists. It was a long, hard-fought process by staffers—not necessarily political staffers, but people who worked on the Hill—who lobbied to have this day care created in, I believe, the eighties. I am pretty sure it was the eighties.

There are some resources provided by the House, basically to allow for the space, but everything is run by the fees collected from the parents.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I've got that.

Well, I think what we're experiencing with the day care is something that most Canadians are dealing with. When I went to register my son, I did it before he was born, and there was a waiting list. We checked out...I can't remember how many, but only one that we could identify that actually took a child under 18 months, which is quite troublesome when you're trying to scramble to get everything organized.

Is it the ratio that's the issue in terms of getting a provider in to look after children less than 18 months old? Is the instructor-to-child ratio the issue?

Ms. Tara Hogeterp:

There is an issue with the ratio and also the physical space, because children under 18 months require additional nap time, and there are also other requirements of the Ontario ministry for those children: there are requirements for change tables and certain elements. There's not enough space at the day care to accommodate that second, or essentially a third group, which would be the under-18 months.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I'm assuming it's an “if you build it, they will come” sort of thing. I'm assuming that if it were started up, if we're able to move on this and this happens, there would be, from the conversations we've had in previous meetings, a lot of interest in changing that requirement and that kind of roadblock for many people.

Ms. Tara Hogeterp:

I assume there wouldn't be any difficulty filling the spaces.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

That's what I'm hearing.

Ms. Tara Hogeterp:

The day care tries to maintain bilingualism, so they have a French program and an English program. The difficulty, I remember, when I was there was sometimes making sure that we had enough French kids to fill the French spots and English kids to fill the English spots, but that's just a balance that needs to be met.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Perfect.

Just to pick up where Mr. Strahl left off concerning the compressed work week, for MPs it probably doesn't make much difference, but for staff, I'm assuming.... I'm just thinking as a former staffer, or as now an MP hiring staff, how I would sell that to my staff: “You're going to be here early in the morning, you're probably going to work 12 hours a day from Monday to Thursday, and then Friday you're playing catch-up, and then we start all over again on Monday.” Mr. Strahl has touched on this a bit. I'm just seeking more of your thoughts.

I don't know how it would work in an office environment, if you're dealing with managing your budget but also managing staff life. It would be quite difficult, I think, in a compressed work week.

The Chair:

You have one minute. [Translation]

Ms. Mélisa Ferreira:

No, it's not easy, and I think this measure would be more convenient for the members than the employees. The members are already here. They already work 12 hours a day, while the employees have a schedule that ranges between 7 hours and 18 hours, if I may say so. Basically, I think it's really a measure that would favour the MPs rather than the employees. It would result in more overtime and more time spent in Parliament from Monday to Thursday than is currently being spent, and that would affect families. As Tara was saying earlier, the crucial time period is from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., before the children go to bed, and that would be time we would not be spending with our family. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you.

I would like to get a clarification from Mr. Thompson and Mr. McDonald.

How many of the staff working on the Hill are seasonal certified indeterminate and how many are actually full-time regular employees?

Mr. Roger Thompson:

We have approximately 102 SCI employees.

(1250)

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

How many other staff are there, roughly, on the Hill in total?

Mr. Jim McDonald:

There is a total of 450 in the bargaining units that we represent, and 102 of those are seasonal certified.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Okay, so it's less than a quarter, or 20%. I just wanted to get a sense of how many people are impacted, because the experience of others might be quite different with respect to a compressed work week. Also, it sounds as if there are things we can do here on the Hill that will make it not so MP-centric—for instance, if we look at the staff who are here even during the constituency weeks who could possibly alleviate some of those problems.

I also want to go back to the political staff. Having worked on the Hill both in caucus research but also as a ministerial staffer, what I found was that the work day, during the days we are sitting, revolves very much around the member or the minister. For instance, ministerial staff will spend much of their morning preparing for question period. There is a lot of work that comes around that. We have staff here sitting behind us who, when we're here and we're in committee, have to be with us. They are following us around all day, but things such as correspondence and briefing notes and all those sorts of things pile up.

From my experience, had there been a weekday to be able to catch up, when you were not immediately having to respond to the member and could catch up on those things.... I often worked weekends, and I've talked to a number of the staff who are sitting right behind me, and I think a lot of staff come in on weekends to avoid.... You must have time to catch up.

So wouldn't it possibly make it easier, for the staff who are coming in on the weekends, if there were a day when the member was not here? Then they would catch up and wouldn't have to work on the weekend. [Translation]

Ms. Mélisa Ferreira:

In my opinion, the time for us to catch up is when the House is not sitting.

I start my workday very early in the morning and I pick up my children from daycare at 4:30 p.m. Once they go to bed, at 8 p.m., I go back to work on the computer to prepare notes for the next day from home. Telework may be something you could consider. Your committee could think about a way to improve the conditions surrounding this way of working.

Currently, the software that enables us to have access to our data through Outlook Web Access is not the most effective way to operate, if I may say so. [English]

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Okay.

I'm sharing my time with Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Very briefly, speaking to Mr. Schmale's point about national day care, he may recall that we were on the cusp of a national day care program when his party took power and cancelled it, in exchange for a modest taxable monthly cheque that would have covered around 50 minutes per month of Ms. Hogeterp's school. So yes, it's a national day care problem, but it's one we should have, could have, and would have quite a while ago solved, had it not been for the frankly bizarre policy direction of the previous government.

That said, I was wanting to ask all of my colleagues here, have you seen many of your colleagues simply give up and leave the Hill because of the lifestyle we have to live here?

Ms. Tara Hogeterp:

No.

Just in the office I work in, there was almost a running joke that the chair we sat in caused women to get pregnant, because I got pregnant, then my colleague got pregnant, someone covering my maternity leave got pregnant—it was literally an office of pregnancy after pregnancy after pregnancy. All of those people still work on the Hill, except one who is now working in Alberta for a minister.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's in the same type of job?

Ms. Tara Hogeterp:

It's the same type of job, and we've all stayed. I know that most of my colleagues with children are staying because, with the support of our collective agreement, we have been able to maintain working hours and support our MPs with little trouble.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

And to that point, Mr. Shannon, are there any NDP staffers who are not unionized? I guess there are management layers, and so forth. In all my time on the Hill, I've never worked a week as short as the thirty-seven and a half hours that the government calls full-time. I think that's slightly understated, for the time we work.

How does it work, within the current budget context,¯for unionized political office to get all the work done that needs to be done? I'm curious to have your insight on that.

Mr. Thomas Shannon:

It is thirty-seven and a half full-time hours; that's what it is. However, in political jobs, people who are MPs now and people who were staff before know that there is a lot of work to get done. What usually happens is that many people here work longer. When they choose to do that because of whatever is going on, that time is given back to them at a later date. The idea is that there's a one-to-one ratio.

If you're working longer, which does happen....

You can't do that every day; otherwise you're going to destroy your life. The idea is that we're trying to make a work-life balance. You work what you can and you work your hours. If you work longer, then you can take that in times when it's less busy, which is during weeks that the House doesn't sit or in the summer, in general. That's the idea: to hold the balance and get as much done as possible within the time that we have at our workplaces, and on this earth as well.

(1255)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. And to the point about—

The Chair:

No, I'm sorry.

I'll just give the witnesses, if you have any closing remarks you'd like to make that you didn't get a chance to make, a chance before we finish off here

Mr. Jim McDonald:

I want to say that maybe I am more representative of the older type of union representative in both appearance and mannerisms, and how I've worked. I've been in the labour relations business for 35 years, and my career is almost split in half, with 17 years on the management side of the relationship and the other 17 or 18 years on the side of the union. There is still a need for unions for many reasons, but the more modern reason is that many new things are coming up. Mental health issues now are a big thing for us and for our members, and the cost-reduction exercises by employers trying to reduce the number of employees and the cost of an operation, and all of the associated things. The loss of benefits for the SCIs is a huge thing for us. How do you work for two years and get a decent income and full benefits, and then miss your SCI status by 20, 30, or 50 hours, and have to lose all that for a two-year period until you can re-establish yourself as an SCI employee again? It's an extremely difficult business.

I'm not sure if you're aware that the House, in various dispute resolution processes, has said on record that anybody who works prior to becoming an SCI is not even an employee, by definition. They're a person that happens to work here, and their benefits are restricted to the minimum standards of the employment standards relationships. Quite frankly, you don't keep those people around. There's no way you want to build a reliable workforce that's going to stick around for a long time and put them on that roller coaster ride. The House of Commons, in my experience since I've been involved with PSAC, has always operated in its own little bubble, if you excuse the expression. It doesn't operate like a normal employer situation, or a normal employer environment, for people who need that stability. If you're an SCI right now, try going to get a mortgage when you can't guarantee that your hours for next year are going to be the same as this year, or that you won't lose your status all together. I believe there have been situations where hours of work have been manipulated to prevent people from reaching that plateau, so they don't have to pay the benefits. There are different motivations, but I still think there's a really strong need for a union. I'm a believer in the union and what it has done for society, but unfortunately some people now are still continuing on as it was. I think we'd be in a sad state of affairs if there weren't unions around to prevent employees from being exploited.

The Chair:

Thank you all for coming. We really appreciate it. You have given us a good view for our study. If you missed anything, feel free to write to the clerk and add it in writing.

I ask the committee's indulgence, but we're at 1 o'clock. Perhaps we could stay a few minutes to address a couple of things on our next meeting, which is related mostly to the question of privilege and exactly how we're going to spend that next meeting. We have to change when we will hear again from Elections Canada more than likely, which is presently scheduled for next Tuesday—or at least we'd have to change part of the meeting we've scheduled them for.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

On a related issue, I want to advise colleagues that we're now starting to get into some of the areas where our lack of definition about being in camera could play out. I want to update everyone that Mr. Chan and I are continuing discussions and are hoping to have back here.... We're down to one clause that we're trying to find language for. If we can come to a meeting of the minds on that, Chair, I would ask that you allow us to put that motion up front. If we do have agreement, assuming everybody else is onside with it, it shouldn't take that long. I only mention it now as a matter of the order of our business. If we can tuck that in near the beginning and get it in place, then as we get into dicier issues, we will understand the rules that we're going to follow, particularly when we're in camera. I will leave that with you, sir.

(1300)

The Chair:

Scott, did you happen to talk to Mr. Scheer?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, I did, albeit we're changing topics now. He said that he had some practical concerns. What he wants to do, I think—and I'm not misrepresenting him, or telling tales out of school—is to make some changes to the way the proposed standing order is written. I don't know if he intends to present it to us, or if he wants to consult with the current Speaker privately. I don't know that, but at least this gives you an update. Just to let you know, I don't think he would take it amiss if, for example, you were to approach him directly and ask him what's up.

The Chair:

Okay. We'll leave that for now.

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I know that we did switch topics, but I want to go back to Mr. Christopherson's point.

First of all, I thank him for the courtesy of allowing me the opportunity to have that conversation. Again, I will also defer, to some degree, to the Conservative members of this committee. Once we have that appropriate language, if we can come to a consensus and can get unanimity, we could dispose of it fairly quickly.

The Chair:

Before we go back to the question of privilege, I have another thing to mention: the Australian clerk and serjeant-at-arms together are available for around six o'clock in the evening. We'd have to see what days are good for them. In the first week back, do any members know what day might be good for them on that rough time frame at that time of day, I think, around five, six, or seven o'clock?

Mr. David Christopherson:

What's this on, Chair?

The Chair:

It's on the family-friendly initiative, with the Australian legislature.

Mr. David Christopherson: Okay. I got it.

The Chair: They're 15 hours ahead of us, so....

Mr. Reid, is that...?

Mr. Scott Reid:

No, sorry. Someone just told me that Prince passed away, so I got distracted by that.

The Chair:

We're just looking to see if there happens to be a day that committee members are available to talk to the Australian legislators somewhere around five, six, seven o'clock during the week back. They're available, but they're 15 hours ahead of us.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is the idea to have them come to the committee or to meet with them informally?

The Chair:

No, they'd be on the phone. It would be a video conference, because they're 15 hours ahead.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I used to live there and I remember that intimately, believe me. I did some conference calls while I was there, and they involved getting up at two in the morning.

The Chair:

This is a good time in the morning for them.

Mr. Scott Reid:

What time are you suggesting?

The Chair:

Six o'clock at night, or before or after that, which is 9 a.m for them the following day.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's six p.m. for us, and which day would it be?

The Chair:

Well, that's what we're trying to find out. If there happens to be a day....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Wednesday the 4th would be good for me. It's up to you guys.

The Chair:

Wednesday the 4th?

We don't know if he's available, but we'll....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Wednesdays are generally better for me than Mondays.

The Chair:

We need at least three of us. We don't need to have the whole committee.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Could I suggest Tuesday? We had plans for all of us to have dinner that evening at 7 o'clock, so we've already cleared our agendas for that. Why not have our meeting before then as an actual meeting and then have an informal meeting where we all retire upstairs to the restaurant?

The Chair:

What does that sound like to people? Tuesday the 3rd?

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I can do that.

The Chair: Tuesday the 3rd.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I was simply going to say that for me, because of my chemotherapy, Mondays are the only day that is kind of difficult, because I'm in Toronto getting infused.

The Chair:

Yes, I would imagine that every day would be difficult.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I won't be able to be there. I'll actually be a little late for the dinner.

An hon. member: You're at committee, right?

Mr. David Christopherson: Yes, I'm chairing an internal committee.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Since Mr. Christopherson has a problem not with the day but with the time, the staff here are capable of doing it later. We could have the dinner first and maybe bump it a little earlier, and then have the actual formal meeting afterwards.

That way, David, we could accommodate your schedule.

(1305)

Mr. David Christopherson:

Either way, I'd be quite comfortable if I wasn't one of the ones who took that.... I can follow up on the committee Hansard.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Well, we should have a New Democrat here.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Well, it's either me or nothing right now, I'm afraid. I'm willing to change that—

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson: —but I think I might need an election first. I kind of liked it back up there, to tell you the truth.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm not for that myself, you understand. I would have voted for you had I not been voting for me.

Anyway, that's what I suggest. Maybe we could meet and schedule it at, say, 8 p.m. as a possibility, because we're having dinner anyway.

An hon. member: Yes.

The Chair: Will we try that?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes. I can also work at getting someone to represent me.

An hon. member: Send Tyler, your legislative assistant.

Mr. David Christopherson: He would make me look bad.

The Chair:

How long do you want to go? I guess an hour is our normal time with a witness. We usually have an hour for two or three witnesses, so that would be all we need for the one.

We'll try for 8 o'clock on the Tuesday. If they're not available, we'll try for before our dinner, and you could get someone else, David

Mr. David Christopherson: Okay.

The Chair: If they're not available at all, we'll revisit it by either email or whatever.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Chair, will that be a formal meeting?

The Chair:

Yes, in theory.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm available from 8:30 p.m. I'm hesitant to say that I'd be there for 8 o'clock.

The Chair:

You can come late. You won't be first on the speakers list.

Now we'll go back to the point of privilege. I think we should at least start that discussion, at least for the first hour, in our next meeting. Are there any proposals?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Can I ask a question through you to the clerk?

I can't recall, but is it an absolute must-do when a matter of privilege is sent to us that it go to the top of our list, or is it just by tradition that normally we do that?

The Chair:

Sometimes it does. Once it took a couple of months. Often it comes early, but there's no—

Mr. David Christopherson:

I was only asking because my experience is that these things are usually treated as a matter of priority out of consideration for the individuals, and out of respect that it's been sent to us by the Speaker. I would be in favour of treating it as a priority and getting at least that first hour in, so we can get a sense of timing for what's fair and provides justice to everyone involved.

The Chair:

If we set aside the first hour for that, to plan that, then we could see what the elections people thought of having one hour instead of two.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I don't like that at all.

The Chair:

You don't like that?

Mr. David Christopherson:

We're agreed on two hours, Mr. Chair, in my opinion.

The Chair:

We'll fill it with other witnesses then.

For that first hour...sorry, Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

It is the opposition party's motion. Do you have a particular proposal you want to suggest in the first hour for what you would like to do?

Mr. Scott Reid:

No, we don't at present. I'll have to get back to you on that.

I don't necessarily think we're talking.... Questions of privilege are typically dealt with as being urgent, but they need not be time consuming, if you follow the distinction. What we need to figure out is whether we can deal with this in a manner that simply gets it dealt with in a single meeting or if we need more than that. That seems like a reasonable starting point.

I don't know if you were in the House when it came up. You saw that this is not a matter that's highly contentious. I'm inclined to think it can be dealt with quickly. That's the only observation I can make.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I'm amenable to that. I wanted to get a sense of whether there a particular process or outcome from the direction coming from the House, given that is was your opposition house leader's motion.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right. It would be reasonable to have him here, I suppose.

That's the obvious thought. He is also an ex-speaker, so he has lots of procedural matters and that. Could I get back to you guys?

(1310)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Sure. My thought on that is to get the law clerk to give us some guidance on what's happened in the past where a similar order has come from the House to this committee, so that at least we have a foundation of what to expect.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's a good point. It's obviously going to add to the amount of time we take.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I'm not looking to spend a lot of time on this. Maybe we could do this informally, but I think a bit of guidance would be helpful in what was the practical outcome of the process.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You know what, that's not a bad way to start this, maybe getting a primer for all of us, because we'll have more questions of privilege. Having the law clerk to guide us through what we do, how we deal with this, how it's been dealt with in the past, and some best practices....

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Even if it's just a submission of a quick paper, so we have some sense of what.... I have a few anecdotal ones, more from dealing with the Ontario legislative experience, of similar prima facie cases of breach of members' privileges pursuant to this, where something was leaked.

The Chair:

What I'm hearing is that for the first hour of our first Tuesday back, we would have the law clerk, and that would hopefully guide a short process as to what we do following that. For the second hour, we'll get some witnesses in. Maybe we'll tentatively leave another hour open on the Thursday, depending on where the law clerk leads us, and use the second hour on the Thursday for other witnesses.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We can get Elections Canada back the following week.

The Chair:

Yes, okay.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Mr. Chair, I think that's a good idea.

We're starting out, and we know we're on a four-year voyage. Starting out with the law clerk makes all the sense in the world. It would be nice if we could do a secondary piece of work rather than just listen to the law clerk. Even if we set aside to try to scope out how much time we need, we could agree to hear from the law clerk and attempt to put a path forward, so this thing doesn't get ahead of itself.

The Chair:

Let's have him for 45 minutes, or so, and then spend 15 minutes defining the rest of the study.

Mr. David Christopherson:

We can have the macro from the provincial law clerk, and then we can do the micro in the remaining 15.

The Chair:

I think we have a bit of agreement here that we're not going to spend a lot of time on this particular point.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Well, that's what we think at this point.

The Chair:

Yes.

The week we were going to have Elections Canada is the week before the May constituency week. We have an hour on main estimates on May 17, which we might be able to move to the first week back. In the second meeting that week, the last day before the constituency week, we are giving, at least for part of that meeting, drafting instructions on the interim report. We'll try to juggle all that, I guess.

One last thing before we....

Yes, Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Just as a suggestion to the rest of the committee members, maybe we could use the steering committee. I apologize, because now my timing is a little bit more sporadic, but that might be a way we can figure this out as opposed to using committee time. Maybe we could schedule a more regularized steering committee process, maybe at least once a month.

I'm sorry; if you could work it around my unfortunate—

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, no, that's fine. There's that, but also, as I was going to say, we can go only so far before we need a work plan in front of us where we can actually see the dates and move them all around.

I think a steering committee would be well in order, Mr. Chair, and it would solve a lot of your problems.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Maybe we could go really long on that Tuesday night, treat part of it as a steering committee, and then schedule it going forward so that we have some regularity.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Steering committee or appetizers.

Mr. Arnold Chan: Exactly.

The Chair:

We have the next little while scheduled.

Mr. Reid, you wanted to bring up a point about television before we leave.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes. Thank you for reminding me.

I was just going to say that seeing as we're frequently meeting in a room that's televised—

(1315)

The Chair:

That could be televised.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, that's right. It has the potential to be televised.

I think as a matter of practice, when we're having hearings on something that's not of a purely administrative nature, when we're dealing with witnesses on any topic—the family-friendly stuff, the chief electoral officer, or whomever—I think we just should have the practice of being televised. It doesn't involve any extra work for us.

I used to do this as a practice with the human rights subcommittee when I was chairing it. We'd frequently meet in this room. It was astonishing how often people would say, “I saw you in Parliament.” And I'd say, “You couldn't have.” What they meant was that they saw me chairing one of those meetings. I got a much broader viewership than I frankly would have anticipated, for what's that worth.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I didn't realize we weren't being televised. I have to tell you that I just assumed we were, because why we wouldn't be is beyond me. We're in the room. It's the chief electoral officer. It's one of the most important issues the public would want to watch us addressing.

Like the public accounts committee, it seems to me that if we're in a room like this and doing public hearings of any sort, we should use the camera system as a matter of course, and only by exception not do so. This really should have been televised. There's absolutely no reason why not, other than our own oversight to make it happen.

Mr. Chair, in future, maybe we could ask the clerk to help us remember to do that when we're doing actual hearings and there's a clear public interest. We're in a room that already has the infrastructure.

The Chair:

David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have no objection. If we're in here anyway, and we're talking about something interesting with witnesses, then by all means have the cameras on.

An hon. member: I thought we were being televised.

The Chair:

Okay. Subject to availability, we'll do that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes. Thank you.

The Chair:

We're done?

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Notre emploi du temps est très chargé aujourd'hui. Nous accueillons tout de suite des témoins pour le Budget principal des dépenses, puis nous accueillerons un autre groupe de témoins pour notre étude; ensuite, nous allons étudier le plan pour la question de privilège, à la fin.

Il s'agit de la 17e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, pour la première session de la 42e législature. Elle est tenue en public. Aujourd'hui, nos travaux portent sur le Budget principal des dépenses 2016-2017: crédit 1, sous la rubrique du Bureau du directeur général des élections; nous accueillerons ensuite des témoins pour notre étude sur les initiatives visant à favoriser une Chambre des communes propice à la vie de famille; et, enfin, le Comité procédera à certains travaux portant principalement sur la motion relative au privilège.

Je voudrais souhaiter la bienvenue à nos témoins. Aujourd'hui, nous accueillons un bon visiteur que nous voyons tout le temps: M. Marc Mayrand, directeur général des élections, ainsi que Hughes St-Pierre, dirigeant principal des finances et de la planification, Services intégrés, Politique et Affaires publiques; Stéphane Perrault, sous-directeur général des élections, Affaires réglementaires; Michel Roussel, sous-directeur général des élections, Scrutins; et Belaineh Deguefé, sous-directeur général des élections, Services intégrés, Politique et Affaires publiques.

Merci à tous de votre présence. Nous pouvons passer à vos déclarations préliminaires.

M. Marc Mayrand (directeur général des élections, Élections Canada):

Merci, monsieur le président. [Français]

Monsieur le président, je vous remercie de m'avoir invité à discuter du Budget principal des dépenses de mon bureau pour l'exercice financier 2016-2017.

Mes collègues et moi sommes heureux de vous rencontrer pour la première fois depuis la 42e élection. Je tiens à féliciter tous les membres du comité de leur récente élection à la Chambre des communes. Mon allocution sera brève afin de laisser suffisamment de temps pour les questions de la part des membres du comité.

Aujourd'hui, le comité examine le crédit annuel de 29,2 millions de dollars de mon bureau et il passera ensuite au vote. Ce montant représente les salaires d'environ 339 postes indéterminés. Si l'on y ajoute notre autorisation législative, qui couvre toutes les autres dépenses engagées en vertu de la Loi électorale du Canada, notre Budget principal des dépenses de 2016-2017 s'élève à 98,5 millions de dollars.

Au cours de la prochaine année, Élections Canada continuera de clore la 42e élection générale. Deux de nos principales tâches seront, d'une part, de vérifier les rapports financiers des entités politiques et rembourser les dépenses électorales appropriées et, d'autre part, de préparer une série de rapports postélectoraux.

L'organisme traite actuellement les rapports financiers des candidats, et les partis politiques doivent soumettre leur rapport pour l'élection générale au plus tard le 20 juin prochain. Malgré le nombre élevé de candidats qui se sont enregistrés pour l'élection, soit un peu plus de 1 800 au total, nous sommes confiants de terminer les vérifications selon l'échéancier prévu dans nos normes de service. Ainsi, pour les rapports des candidats ayant droit à un remboursement, qui ont été soumis dans le logiciel Rapport financier électronique dans le délai original de quatre mois, et qui ne contiennent pas d'erreurs nécessitant une modification du rapport, les vérifications seront terminées avant le 19 août. Dans tous les autres cas, elles seront terminées dans les 12 mois suivants.

Comme vous le savez, mon premier rapport sur la conduite de la 42e élection générale a été déposé par le Président de la Chambre et transmis à ce comité le 5 février dernier. Ce rapport est une description factuelle et chronologique des faits marquants de l'élection.

Mon deuxième rapport, qui sera publié cet été, présentera une analyse plus détaillée de l'élection. Appuyé par plusieurs sondages, études et bilans, le rapport abordera l'expérience des électeurs et des entités politiques pendant l'élection. Il inclura également les conclusions d'une vérification indépendante du rendement des fonctionnaires électoraux et les réactions d'Élections Canada à ces conclusions.

Les conclusions et les enseignements du rapport rétrospectif serviront à formuler des recommandations de modifications législatives. Je proposerai en effet des modifications précises afin d'améliorer l'application de la Loi électorale du Canada au début de l'automne prochain.

(1105)

[Traduction]

Pendant que nous concluons les élections, nous élaborons également un nouveau plan stratégique pour orienter l'organisme dans l'avenir à la lumière de nos études postélectorales et de la rétroaction des intervenants. Le plan est principalement axé sur la modernisation du processus électoral afin de le rendre plus simple, plus efficace et plus commode et flexible pour les électeurs, tout en préservant l'intégrité du processus.

Comme le gouvernement en place est majoritaire et que la date des élections a été fixée au 21 octobre 2019, il est maintenant possible d'adapter le processus électoral, qui est actuellement ancré dans le XIXe siècle, aux attentes des Canadiens contemporains. Mon bureau est déterminé à s'assurer que nos services correspondent davantage à ces attentes au moment des 43e élections générales. La modernisation des services de vote par l'adoption de technologies dans les bureaux de scrutin par anticipation et le jour du vote ainsi que pour le vote dans les bureaux de directeur de scrutin et par courrier est une cible clé du plan de l'organisme.

Nous pouvons réaliser certains aspects de la modernisation en vertu du cadre juridique actuel, mais d'autres aspects pourraient exiger des modifications législatives. Par exemple, actuellement, les électeurs ne peuvent voter qu'à leur table désignée d'un bureau de scrutin. Afin que l'on puisse créer un processus plus fluide et plus simple, je recommanderai des changements législatifs qui réorganisent les tâches et les fonctions des travailleurs électoraux pour permettre aux électeurs de voter à toute table de leur lieu de scrutin. J'ai l'intention de mobiliser le Comité à mesure que nous progressons dans le cadre de cette initiative.

En allant de l'avant avec nos plans, nous demeurons conscients que le Parlement pourrait entreprendre un examen du système électoral. Nous allons nous assurer que tout nouveau processus que nous élaborons pourra être adapté à toute modification législative qui découlerait d'un tel examen. Dans cette optique, un autre élément important dans notre plan stratégique consiste à appuyer les parlementaires en leur donnant des conseils techniques durant ce processus, au besoin.

J'ai hâte de fournir au Comité des renseignements plus détaillés sur les plans d'Élections Canada pour la modernisation des services électoraux, à l'occasion de notre séance informelle du 3 mai.

Je veux encore vous remercier, monsieur le président, de m'avoir invité à discuter du Budget principal des dépenses 2016-2017 au nom de mon bureau. Mes collègues et moi serons heureux de répondre à toute question que le Comité pourrait nous poser.

Merci

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je veux simplement vous avertir que nous devrons peut-être encore une fois fixer votre autre exposé à une date ultérieure, mais nous en reparlerons plus tard.

Je souhaite la bienvenue à M. Mark Strahl et à Rémi Massé, ainsi qu'aux deux Yukonnais assis à l'arrière, à la séance du Comité.

Pour la première série de questions, nous allons céder la parole à David Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Le Budget principal des dépenses du bureau contient-il des propositions de dépenses qui ont été mises en attente ou qui dépendent des résultats d'une réforme électorale potentielle?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Pas en ce moment. Comme j'essayais de l'expliquer, nous nous efforçons actuellement de faire des propositions pour la modernisation des services, tout en restant à l'affût de réformes potentielles qui pourraient façonner l'avenir.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez évoqué des changements le jour des élections, des petites choses comme le fait de pouvoir voter à toute table. Quelles sont les répercussions sur la logistique, et, selon vous, pourrait-il y avoir des conséquences négatives; comment est-ce que cela fonctionnerait?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Essentiellement, la proposition découle de l'idée qu'aux bureaux de scrutin les tâches devraient être spécialisées plutôt que généralisées. Actuellement, notre processus fait en sorte qu'un électeur peut se présenter au bureau de scrutin et se retrouver au bout d'une file de 20 personnes, alors que toutes les autres tables du gymnase sont libres. Nous voulons changer cela. Nous devons briser ce modèle. Nous voulons permettre aux électeurs de choisir la table qui est libre pour aller y déposer leur bulletin de vote.

Encore une fois, les résultats seraient présentés en fonction du lieu — du bureau de scrutin — plutôt que par section de vote.

(1110)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que cela augmente le risque que les gens votent deux fois, ou ce genre de chose, c'est-à-dire qu'une personne pourrait se présenter à plusieurs tables sans se faire prendre?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Non, ça serait sous surveillance, comme d'habitude. Encore une fois, nous allons proposer l'instauration de balayages électroniques afin de surveiller les électeurs à mesure qu'ils suivent le processus.

Il s'agit d'un processus qui est utilisé dans le cadre des élections municipales pas mal partout au pays, ainsi que dans certaines provinces; le Nouveau-Brunswick, notamment, utilise un modèle semblable depuis longtemps, maintenant.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comme nous nous en souvenons, au cours de la dernière législature, un changement majeur a été apporté à la loi électorale appelée la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections. Pouvez-vous nous parler des conséquences de cette loi sur la collecte de fonds aux fins des élections, dernièrement?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Sur la collecte de fonds?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Eh bien, elle a changé les règles concernant la collecte de fonds relativement à Élections Canada, au sujet du moment où une dépense est déclarable, et ainsi de suite. Pouvez-vous nous parler des conséquences de cette loi, les conséquences positives et négatives que nous avons observées dans le cadre des élections?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Il est un peu trop tôt pour le dire. Je suis certain que vous savez que les limites de dépenses ont été rajustées. Les sommes des contributions ont également été rajustées légèrement afin de refléter l'inflation, en plus d'une proportion de 5 % supplémentaire. Des modifications ont également été apportées, qui permettent les emprunts pour les campagnes locales des candidats, ainsi que des changements concernant une contribution initiale de — je crois — 5 000 $ à apporter à sa campagne.

Il est trop tôt pour que nous ayons pu effectuer quelque analyse que ce soit. Nous sommes tout juste en train de recevoir les déclarations. D'ici un an, je devrais être en mesure de produire un rapport sur l'aspect systémique du nouveau régime.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez dit que vous alliez présenter un certain nombre de suggestions. Quand allons-nous les recevoir?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Eh bien, nous allons en discuter à l'occasion d'une réunion à venir qui aura lieu, je crois, le 3 mai — cette date pourrait changer, si j'ai bien compris ce qu'a dit le président —, et, à ce moment-là, nous allons décrire de façon plus détaillée les concepts particuliers de la modernisation. Vous en verrez également certaines dans les recommandations de modifications législatives qui seront déposées au début de l'automne.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Maintenant, une des modifications que nous avons vues a été le retrait de la carte d'identification de l'électeur comme pièce d'identité valide. Quels genres de conséquences ce retrait a-t-il eues, le cas échéant? Qu'avez-vous observé?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Nous n'avons pas terminé notre analyse pour l'instant. Nous sommes encore en train d'étudier cette question. Si vous examinez l'Enquête sur la population active qui a été menée par Statistique Canada, vous verrez que, parmi les raisons pour lesquelles les gens ne votent pas, il semble que la carte d'identification de l'électeur était un obstacle pour 170 000 personnes qui ont déclaré que le fait de ne pas pouvoir prouver leur identité ou leur adresse a été un problème pour eux et que, par conséquent, elles n'ont pas voté.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est 170 000?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Oui, 172 000, selon cette enquête.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est un chiffre assez important.

Actuellement, aucune pièce d'identité fédérale ne répond aux exigences relatives aux élections fédérales, n'est-ce pas?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Exact. Il n'y a absolument aucune carte d'identité nationale qui réponde aux exigences de la Loi électorale.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais partager mon temps de parole avec Mme Vandenbeld.

Le vice-président (M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD)):

Vous avez trois minutes.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Je voudrais revenir sur la question de l'éducation des électeurs. Je sais que la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections a suscité beaucoup de discussions au sujet du rôle d'Élections Canada en ce qui a trait à l'éducation des électeurs et à la promotion du vote. Je sais que, dans le passé, Élections Canada a été très impliqué, par exemple, dans des programmes d'éducation des électeurs portant sur le vote des jeunes, des simulations d'élections et des choses de ce genre.

Dans les dépenses de programme, y a-t-il encore une somme allouée à ce genre d'éducation des électeurs?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Il y a encore une somme, non pas pour l'éducation des électeurs, mais pour l'éducation des citoyens. Notre mandat est maintenant limité aux personnes qui ne votent pas, celles qui n'ont pas encore l'âge de voter. Nous travaillons auprès d'écoles de partout au pays et de divers groupes afin de sensibiliser les personnes qui n'ont pas encore l'âge de voter.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Pensez-vous que l'incapacité d'assurer l'éducation des électeurs qui sont admissibles à voter pourrait avoir eu une incidence, par exemple, sur les 175 000 personnes qui ne possédaient pas de pièces d'identité appropriées ou sur d'autres personnes qui pourraient avoir tenté de voter sans avoir été capables ou qui pourraient ne pas avoir voté?

(1115)

M. Marc Mayrand:

Je pense que nous devons faire la distinction... Durant une période électorale, nous nous concentrons exclusivement sur la mécanique du vote: où, quand et comment voter ou être un candidat. À cet égard, nous tentons, par des moyens particuliers, de sensibiliser les groupes qui font face à des obstacles, qu'il s'agisse des jeunes ou des Autochtones, par exemple. Pour ce qui est des divers groupes que nous avons mentionnés, nous avons établi des programmes spéciaux pour mieux les sensibiliser.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Le modèle d'éducation des électeurs du Canada a toujours été un modèle dans le monde également. Je sais qu'Élections Canada a toujours été membre d'International IDEA, qui, bien sûr, maintient un réseau de savoir technologique appelé ACE constitué de praticiens électoraux de partout dans le monde. Pouvez-vous me dire si nous avons continué d'être aussi actifs, ou bien si notre participation à ces réseaux internationaux a augmenté ou diminué?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Nous sommes encore un membre très actif d'IDEA — nous siégeons à son comité directeur — et de l'ACE. Nous sommes encore très actifs dans ces deux organisations, et nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec elles, de temps en temps.

Le vice-président (M. David Christopherson):

Merci. Le temps est écoulé.

Il n'y a plus de temps pour d'autres questions dans le cadre de cette série d'interventions.

Monsieur Reid, vous avez la parole, monsieur.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

J'aimerais revenir sur quelque chose que vous avez mentionné, monsieur Mayrand, dans votre réponse à une des questions posées par M. Graham. Vous avez dit qu'une enquête avait été menée et qu'elle indiquait que 172 000 personnes avaient connu des problèmes relativement aux pièces d'identité. Je ne suis pas au courant de cela. Je présume qu'il s'agit... ou, en fait, je ne présume rien au sujet de l'origine de cette information, mais, s'il ne s'agit pas d'un document public et que vous l'avez en votre possession, pourriez-vous nous le présenter?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Il s'agit d'un document public. Il a été publié en février.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est vous qui l'avez publié?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Non, c'était Statistique Canada.

M. Scott Reid:

Pouvons-nous le trouver sur son site Web?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Il s'agit de l'Enquête sur la population active. Je serai heureux de la fournir à tous les députés après la séance, aucun problème.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous pouvez donner le document à la greffière; ça fera l'affaire... Ensuite, elle nous le remettra.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Oui, cela ne pose aucun problème.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Je voulais aborder votre rapport sur les plans et les priorités, la page 7. Sous le sujet de l'analyse des risques, vous mentionnez deux choses qui revêtent un intérêt considérable à mes yeux, car elles sont liées à la question de la réforme électorale, aux changements à apporter au système de vote. Bien entendu, mon parti a toujours été en faveur de la tenue d'un référendum sur ce sujet. Vous affirmez qu'actuellement vous ne pouvez pas tenir de référendum et que vous auriez besoin d'au moins six mois pour le faire.

N'est-il pas vrai que, en plus, des modifications législatives seraient requises? Je le mentionne maintenant parce que j'ai l'impression, monsieur Mayrand, que le gouvernement essaie de perdre du temps afin de pouvoir dire: « Oh, nous avons fait cette promesse; nous devons modifier le système électoral, mais il ne nous reste plus assez de temps pour tenir un référendum. » Je veux m'assurer qu'aucun obstacle qu'il pourrait soulever ne pourra lui servir d'excuse... pour se rendre compte soudainement: « Oh, si seulement nous avions pensé à cela. »

En plus des six mois que vous avez mentionnés, qui seraient requis pour l'administration d'un référendum, y a-t-il d'autres obstacles auxquels vous feriez face? Par exemple, est-il nécessaire de modifier notre loi référendaire, ce genre de choses?

M. Marc Mayrand:

La Loi référendaire est désuète. Elle n'a pas été modifiée depuis 1992, c'est-à-dire la dernière fois que nous avons tenu un référendum national. À cet égard, elle n'est pas du tout harmonisée avec la Loi électorale, plus particulièrement en ce qui concerne le financement politique. Par exemple, des syndicats et des grandes entreprises pourraient contribuer à des comités référendaires. Je pense que cela pourrait en étonner plus d'un. Il n'y a aucune limite aux contributions faites par toute entité. Encore une fois, cela pourrait en étonner plus d'un, mais la loi est toujours en vigueur.

Est-il possible de tenir un référendum sous le régime de la loi actuelle? C'est possible. Par moments, ce serait gênant, mais c'est possible. C'est faisable. Je préférerais que la loi soit modifiée, mise à jour, mais, encore une fois, il ne serait pas impossible d'en tenir un. Ce qui est important, à nos yeux, c'est que nous soyons prévenus suffisamment à l'avance afin que nous puissions nous préparer adéquatement.

M. Scott Reid:

Exact. Après cela, il vous faudrait six mois. Est-ce là votre estimation?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien. Si cela ne vous dérange pas trop que je m'attarde sur ce sujet, simplement pour être tout à fait clair... Vous avez dit six mois. Est-ce que cela veut dire six mois au minimum, ou bien est-ce que cela signifie que, si nous disposons de six mois au jour près, nous pourrions y arriver?

(1120)

M. Marc Mayrand:

Six mois est un minimum absolu. La mémoire institutionnelle se perd maintenant, après plus de 25 ans. Peu de gens ont tenu un référendum dans notre organisation, alors il y a beaucoup de travail à faire. Nous devons également établir un nouveau règlement. Je pense que vous en avez vu une version il y a quelques années. Il s'agit d'un effort important à déployer. Nous avons besoin d'un nouveau tarif, ainsi que d'établir des programmes de recrutement pour les travailleurs.

M. Scott Reid:

Dans ce cas, le règlement sera conçu par vous, pas par nous. Est-ce exact?

M. Marc Mayrand:

C'est exact. Nous allons déposer le règlement devant la Chambre. Normalement, le Comité l'examinera et pourra formuler des suggestions d'amendements.

M. Scott Reid:

Exact. Je présume que vous pouvez aller dans la direction initiale sans notre autorisation officielle. Puis-je vous encourager à en faire le plus possible? Même s'il s'agit d'une éventualité à laquelle le gouvernement ne s'est pas montré favorable, il a également fait très attention — si vous regardez les commentaires de la ministre — à ne jamais vraiment dire tout à fait qu'il l'écartait entièrement. Je voudrais m'assurer que, s'il décide de tenir un référendum — ou s'il veut prétendre être disposé à le faire —, il n'aura d'autre choix que de le faire vraiment. Je recommanderais fortement que toute mise à jour requise de votre part soit faite afin que vous ne deveniez pas la raison pour laquelle nous ne tenons pas de référendum, du moins, sur papier.

Il nous reste deux minutes, et je voulais vous poser des questions au sujet des modifications qui pourraient être apportées au système électoral. Une de mes autres préoccupations tient à la possibilité que le gouvernement étire le temps au point où les seules modifications qu'il serait encore possible d'apporter au système électoral avant les élections de 2019 seront celles qui ne supposent aucun redécoupage et, bien entendu, le système mixte proportionnel et le mode de scrutin à vote unique transférable exigeraient tous deux un redécoupage.

La question est la suivante: combien de temps faudrait-il pour mettre en oeuvre la Loi sur la révision des limites des circonscriptions électorales? Je présume qu'une modification serait requise pour qu'elle entre en vigueur en dehors de la séquence normale, mais combien de temps le processus prendrait-il vraiment? Ensuite, nous pourrons déterminer, de notre point de vue, combien de temps il faudra pour modifier la loi, avant ce moment-là, afin que la date limite de 2019 puisse être respectée.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Vous avez raison, des dispositions législatives seraient nécessaires pour qu'elles puissent entrer en vigueur. Encore une fois, c'est difficile, car je ne suis pas certain de ce qui a été déposé, mais le strict minimum pour une norme de redécoupage est 10 mois. Il s'agit de la période qui s'étend de l'établissement de la commission au parachèvement de son rapport aux fins du redécoupage.

M. Scott Reid:

N'y a-t-il pas également une autre période après cela?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Il y a une autre période de sept mois, après cela, pour la mise en œuvre. Il faut reconcevoir toutes les cartes de chaque circonscription et réorganiser la division des bureaux de scrutin de manière à refléter les nouvelles limites des circonscriptions.

M. Scott Reid:

Pourrais-je vous demander de simplement nous présenter des genres de calendriers plus détaillés et de préciser quels sont les délais minimums? Je crois qu'il s'agit du genre de chose qui doit être faite par écrit. Cela serait très utile pour nous ou pour le comité qui sera mis sur pied — le comité spécial — pour orienter nos délibérations.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Nous allons passer à M. Christopherson, et merci d'avoir assuré la présidence.

M. David Christopherson:

Pas de problème. J'avais hâte de me donner la parole avant de revenir ici en courant pour m'asseoir dans le fauteuil. Ça aurait été une première. Après 30 ans, on cherche toujours les premières.

Merci beaucoup. Je suis heureux de vous revoir tous. Je suis tout à fait ravi d'être ici pour prendre part à l'examen de cette question avec vous.

Il y a deux ou trois choses que je veux éclaircir. Dans votre déclaration préliminaire, vous avez mentionné deux de vos tâches majeures, dont l'une consiste à vérifier les retombées financières des entités politiques et à produire des remboursements de dépenses électorales. Corrigez-moi si ma mémoire me joue des tours, mais il me semble que la règle selon laquelle les partis fédéraux vous soumettent les dépenses qu'ils s'attendent à se faire rembourser sans avoir à fournir de reçus est toujours en vigueur. S'agit-il encore du régime?

M. Marc Mayrand:

C'est juste.

M. David Christopherson:

Soyons clairs. Comme tout le monde, dans ma propre déclaration de revenus, je dois vous remettre les reçus, et je dois vous fournir tout ce que vous demandez, mais les partis fédéraux, où il y a combien d'argent au total... un calcul approximatif?

M. Marc Mayrand:

En ce qui concerne les remboursements?

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, aux partis fédéraux.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Il s'agirait de plus de 60 millions de dollars.

M. David Christopherson:

Soixante millions de dollars retournent dans les poches de nos partis politiques respectifs, aucun reçu n'est requis.

Remercions le gouvernement précédent de ne pas avoir changé cela.

En outre, on ne peut pas encore assigner de témoins à comparaître. Souvenez-vous: nous avions eu un problème à ce sujet, et nous ne pouvons pas encore le faire. Lorsqu'on tente de déterminer si les choses sont légitimes ou non, on n'a toujours pas le pouvoir de forcer quelqu'un à témoigner. Est-ce exact?

(1125)

M. Marc Mayrand:

Le commissaire ne peut pas assigner de témoins à comparaître.

M. David Christopherson:

J'utilise ces éléments délibérément, comme transition vers ma prochaine question.

Monsieur le président, je vais vous demander de faire preuve d'indulgence afin d'au moins me permettre de mettre la question en contexte, mais j'admets et je respecte le fait qu'aucun membre du gouvernement n'est tenu d'y répondre. Je pense que j'ai au moins le droit de poser la question, par votre entremise. J'espère que vous me permettrez de le faire.

Sur ce, et je ne suis pas en train d'essayer de mettre des collègues dans l'embarras, y a-t-il un membre du gouvernement qui peut aider le reste d'entre nous à comprendre quelle est la réflexion du gouvernement en ce qui concerne les réformes? Le gouvernement a dit qu'il allait mettre sur pied un comité législatif spécial chargé de régler cette question; pourtant, M. Mayrand intervient après toutes les élections. Il s'agit maintenant de la cinquième fois que je suis ce processus. Et il va y avoir tout un tas de changements, et je peux vous le garantir, cela représente beaucoup de travail. En effet, monsieur le président, nous allons devoir prévoir beaucoup de temps pour ce projet, si ça doit être à nous de le faire. Il s'agit d'une procédure très complexe. C'est amusant, car nous avons tous tendance à travailler ensemble pour trouver l'équité, au lieu de remporter un débat, mais c'est tout de même beaucoup de travail.

La question que j'adresse aux membres du gouvernement est la suivante: étant donné qu'il faudra bientôt commencer ces travaux — et, selon mon expérience, il s'agit d'un processus très exhaustif, englobant —, en quoi ces travaux sont-ils liés au plan du gouvernement visant à procéder à une refonte complète du système électoral dans son ensemble?

Nous avons deux initiatives à mener. L'une se déroule clairement ici, mais en quoi ce comité spécial est-il lié à ces travaux, et est-ce que cela va être relié? J'aurais tendance à penser que nous ne voulons pas faire la même chose à deux endroits différents. Cela ne nous mènerait nulle part. Où va-t-il aller? Va-t-il siéger avec nous? Cependant, cela n'a pas de sens à mes yeux, du point de vue du gros bon sens. Si le gouvernement doit établir un comité spécial chargé de tout étudier, il me semble que nous, en tant que comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, voudrons peut-être envisager de lui renvoyer la question, s'il est disposé à l'accepter, si ses membres doivent devenir les experts en la matière de cette législature.

Voilà le genre de questions générales que je me pose, monsieur le président. Je les ai formulées, et je respecte le fait que les membres du gouvernement n'ont aucunement l'obligation d'y répondre, mais, s'ils peuvent nous orienter ou nous éclairer, ça serait utile.

Le président:

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

Je veux simplement remercier M. Christopherson de ses commentaires, et je sais que nous nous écartons du but principal de la présence de nos témoins aujourd'hui...

M. David Christopherson:

Oui et non.

M. Arnold Chan:

J'en prends bonne note. Nous allons le prendre en délibéré. Je soulèverai vos préoccupations auprès de la ministre des Institutions démocratiques. Je pense qu'elles sont légitimes.

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien. Pas de problème. Je l'accepte. Je vous remercie de m'avoir répondu.

Je veux également établir un lien, pour le temps qui me reste, avec là où M. Reid voulait en venir. Son but n'était peut-être pas le même, mais je pense que le processus que nous recherchons l'est.

M. Reid a été clair. Il insiste pour qu'un référendum soit tenu. Il a été très franc à ce sujet. Je suis franc au sujet du fait que nous croyons extrêmement en la représentation proportionnelle. Nous savons que le gouvernement a un modèle privilégié, mais il va avoir un petit problème parce que tout le pays sait que ce modèle fausserait le système en faveur du gouvernement, et, comme les membres du gouvernement sont des gens de bonne foi, ils ne voudraient pas être pris avec cette étiquette.

Je pense encore qu'il y a de l'espoir pour la représentation proportionnelle. Je le pense vraiment. Toutefois, avons-nous assez de temps pour procéder à une refonte complète?

Nous n'inclurons pas le volet du référendum pour l'instant, puisque M. Reid a posé des questions à ce sujet.

En passant, monsieur le président, il y a quelques législatures, certains d'entre nous ici présents ont consacré la majeure partie d'une période de deux ou trois ans à un examen de la Loi référendaire et à la consultation d'experts. Je dis simplement qu'il y a toute une base de référence de renseignements assez exacts provenant d'experts en matière de constitution, et qu'il y a l'avis de M. Mayrand et celui des gens qui travaillent avec lui.

Les travaux sont là, monsieur le président, si nous finissons par emprunter cette voie, mais nous reste-t-il assez de temps pour procéder à la refonte du système en entier, pour le reconcevoir complètement et qu'il soit prêt pour les prochaines élections?

Évidemment, ce que nous recherchons, et je n'essaie pas de vous piéger — même dans mes rêves, je n'essaierais pas —, c'est le point de départ. Une fois que nous aurons passé un certain stade, ça ne sera plus pratique. Nous partageons les préoccupations de M. Reid.

Quelle serait la période nécessaire pour procéder à une refonte complète, comme celle dont certains d'entre nous ont parlé, selon votre meilleure estimation, monsieur?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Eh bien, je dirai au Comité que la loi mettant en œuvre la réforme devrait être en vigueur au moins 24 mois avant les élections. Il y a toutes sortes d'hypothèses. Je ne sais pas exactement en quoi consistera la réforme, mais, si elle suppose un exercice de redécoupage, ce que la représentation proportionnelle fait, par définition, il s'agit d'une tâche importante. Les délais ont déjà été raccourcis dans des lois précédentes. Je ne sais pas si on peut les réduire davantage. De fait, la commission avait demandé une prolongation lors du dernier exercice de redécoupage.

Il ne s'agit pas de quelque chose qui peut être condensé facilement, sauf si, encore une fois, vous concevez de nouveau l'ensemble du processus de redistribution, mais c'est une autre...

(1130)

M. David Christopherson:

Cela illustre le début et la fin du processus; vous êtes en train de dire; « Tout ce travail doit être fait. Appuyez sur le bouton. Il vous faut deux ans .»

M. Marc Mayrand:

Oui, une fois que le redécoupage aurait eu lieu, il vous faudrait de six à sept mois pour mettre en oeuvre les nouvelles cartes, les nouveaux districts, et ensuite, il faudrait que nous nous préparions en vue des élections. Il faudrait que nous préparions toutes les informations. Il faudrait aussi que nous établissions les systèmes qui appuieraient ce nouveau régime.

M. David Christopherson:

Il pourrait aussi falloir intégrer un volet majeur de sensibilisation publique.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Bien sûr. Absolument. Nous pouvons présumer qu'on aurait besoin d'une campagne de sensibilisation publique majeure.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Vandenbeld.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Pour revenir sur ma question précédente au sujet de l'éducation des électeurs, si nous regardons les dépenses courantes des programmes, il est question de 29 millions de dollars entre les élections. Cette somme ne comprend pas les campagnes de sensibilisation du public visant à encourager les gens à voter s'ils ont plus de 18 ans et qu'ils sont des électeurs admissibles, même si le Canada fait partie d'International IDEA, qui fournit en fait des pratiques exemplaires à d'autres pays exactement sur la façon de mener ces campagnes.

M. Marc Mayrand:

C'est exact. Élections Canada est, de fait, le seul organisme au monde que je connaisse qui ne peut pas promouvoir la démocratie au sein du pays.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Merci beaucoup de cette clarification.

Vous avez dit que vous étiez maintenant en train de vérifier les retombées financières des partis politiques et des candidats. Toutefois, une fois que cet audit sera terminé, si vous découvrez des infractions potentielles, la capacité d'enquêter sur les infractions à la Loi électorale du Canada est passée du commissaire aux élections fédérales, qui rendait compte au Parlement par votre entremise...

M. Marc Mayrand:

Non.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

... ou directement au Parlement...

M. Marc Mayrand:

Non.

Je vais vous laisser finir.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Non?

D'accord, alors il a été transféré de ce bureau à celui du directeur des poursuites pénales.

Selon vous, quelles seront les conséquences de ce transfert sur la capacité d'application de la loi, si la Loi électorale est enfreinte?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Encore une fois, simplement pour que ça soit clair, le bureau du commissaire est passé d'Élections Canada au bureau du directeur des poursuites pénales. Il rend des comptes par l'intermédiaire du directeur des poursuites pénales et du procureur général. Il ne s'agit pas d'un mandataire du Parlement, alors il ne relève pas directement du Parlement. C'est une chose.

L'autre chose est que, du point de vue de l'efficacité, le commissaire est encore indépendant, et dispose des ressources nécessaires pour mener des enquêtes. Je pense que l'une des choses qu'il a répétées, c'est que, s'il avait le pouvoir d'assigner des témoins à comparaître, en respectant pleinement et dûment la Charte des droits, bien entendu, comme c'est le cas des organismes fédéraux qui ont le pouvoir d'assigner des témoins à comparaître, cela rendrait les enquêtes considérablement plus efficaces et plus rapides.

Dans les futures recommandations que nous adresserons au Parlement, nous allons revenir nous pencher sur certaines des infractions et sur certains des mécanismes permettant d'assurer la conformité. L'une des considérations est qu'il y a un très grand nombre d'infractions qui sont d'ordre technique et qui ne justifient pas la tenue d'une enquête criminelle à part entière. Je pense que le fait de présenter une déclaration de revenus avec un mois de retard constitue une infraction; je ne suis pas certain qu'une telle affaire justifie la tenue d'une enquête complète.

Nous allons revenir et proposer des solutions de rechange aux mécanismes d'application de la loi en temps et lieu.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

J'ai hâte de connaître ces recommandations. Merci.

Je n'ai pas mentionné que je partageais mon temps de parole avec Ginette Petitpas Taylor. [Français]

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Bonjour, monsieur Mayrand.

Puisque je suis une nouvelle parlementaire, j'ai des questions qui sont peut-être très simples. Je vais vous les poser.

Je me demandais quels ont été les plus gros défis pour votre organisation durant la dernière élection. Je sais très bien que vous allez publier un autre rapport dans quelques mois, mais vous pourriez peut-être me donner un aperçu général des défis auxquels vous avez fait face.

M. Marc Mayrand:

J'avais établi deux grands risques avant l'élection.

Le premier concernait la technologie, parce que nous avons fait beaucoup de changements technologiques lors de la dernière élection. Ce risque a été bien géré et il n'y a pas eu de conséquences matérielles sur l'élection. L'autre risque était lié à la possibilité de confusion chez les électeurs compte tenu des nombreux changements qui avaient été apportés à la Loi électorale et de beaucoup de débats publics qui avaient un peu, selon moi, semé la confusion. Je parle, entre autres, des règles d'identification. De façon générale, je pense que nous avons réussi grâce à nos programmes d'éducation et de publicité à bien informer les électeurs, mais cela reste un défi. Nous avons un système d'identification complexe où 44 pièces d'identité diverses peuvent être utilisées ainsi que des combinaisons de ces pièces. Les gens sont souvent étonnés qu'un passeport ne soit pas suffisant pour pouvoir voter au Canada. Alors, il y a toujours une espèce de confusion mais, de façon générale, cela a quand même bien fonctionné. Les électeurs ont compris la situation.

Comme je l'ai mentionné, selon les études préliminaires — et nous n'avons pas encore terminé nos analyses —, il est évident qu'il y a des groupes d'électeurs qui sont davantage touchés. Je pense notamment aux jeunes. Dans le sondage de Statistique Canada, il semble que ce soient davantage des jeunes qui ont eu des difficultés à satisfaire aux exigences de preuve d'identification et d'adresse. C'est également le cas pour les Autochtones. Certains groupes sont donc plus touchés que le reste de la population.

(1135)

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

C'était finalement ma deuxième question.

Au sujet des 170 000 personnes qui disaient qu'elles ne pouvaient pas voter, je me demandais si elles appartenaient à un groupe ethnique ou un groupe en particulier. Il y a aussi la région du pays ou se trouvent ces personnes. A-t-on fait des sondages à cet égard?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Non, le sondage ne permet pas de déterminer les différences géographiques ni même les groupes. Le seul groupe qui est vraiment identifié, et d'une manière plus fiable, est celui des jeunes de 18 à 24 ans. Le sondage fait également état d'un taux élevé de personnes touchées chez les Autochtones, mais le nombre d'individus sondés crée une marge d'erreur assez importante. Il faut donc prendre cela un peu avec un grain de sel. Nos observations empiriques, par exemple, laisse entendre que c'est un défi pour les Autochtones. Souvent, ils n'ont tout simplement pas d'adresse. Ceux qui habitent sur des réserves n'ont tout simplement pas d'adresse. Souvent, ils ont très peu de documents qui leur permettent de s'identifier selon les exigences de la loi, Cela reste donc un défi et c'est pourquoi nous avons travaillé avec l'AFN et les chefs de bande du pays pour essayer de faciliter l'application de ces règles.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Nous allons passer à M. Reid, pour une intervention de cinq minutes.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur Mayrand, j'essayais seulement de faire certains calculs mathématiques relativement au calendrier pour l'établissement d'un nouveau système de vote, en présumant qu'il s'agit d'un système de vote qui suppose le déclenchement du processus de redécoupage, ce qui, bien sûr, veut dire tout autre système que celui du scrutin préférentiel dans des circonscriptions uninominales.

Les élections doivent avoir lieu vers la fin du mois d'octobre 2019. En supposant que nous consacrions un mois au bref, cela nous ramène à septembre 2019. Vous avez mentionné la formation. Combien de temps durerait la formation? Vous avez donné la durée; était-ce un mois?

M. Marc Mayrand:

La plus grande partie de la formation est donnée aux travailleurs électoraux pendant le mois que dure la campagne.

M. Scott Reid:

Pendant ce mois-là? Il n'est pas nécessaire de les ajouter, alors.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Oui, mais les scrutateurs devront quand même gravir une courbe d'apprentissage assez raide, comme leurs principaux employés. Ce type de formation est en général donnée en cours d'année, de six à sept mois avant la délivrance du bref.

M. Scott Reid:

En effet.

Avec un mode de scrutin à vote unique transférable, les circonscriptions seraient de quatre à cinq fois plus étendues — c'est typique, selon ce mode de scrutin, des circonscriptions dans lesquelles quatre ou cinq personnes sont élues — qu'aujourd'hui. Avec le système mixte proportionnel, elles seraient probablement deux fois plus étendues qu'aujourd'hui. Cela vous donne une petite idée.

D'accord, nous n'en sommes pas certains, mais cela représente quand même beaucoup de temps. J'avais parlé d'un mois. C'est peut-être trop court pour être raisonnable.

Pour la mise en oeuvre, vous avez dit qu'il faudrait six mois. Je remonte: septembre, août... Nous parlons donc de février 2019. Si la conception dure 17 mois, je crois que nous arrivons à octobre — peut-être novembre —2016. Pour les dispositions législatives nécessaires à la mise en place du nouveau système, y compris la modification de la loi sur les limites des circonscriptions électorales, il faudrait, j'imagine, six mois. Nous nous retrouvons donc encore une fois au printemps 2017.

Vous voyez bien ce que j'essaie de faire: j'essaie de savoir à quel moment nous devrons avoir une proposition à présenter pour être certains que cela pourra se réaliser, à défaut de quoi il ne nous restera qu'une seule issue, c'est-à-dire le scrutin préférentiel et les circonscriptions à député unique.

Ai-je oublié quelque chose? Est-ce que cela englobe toutes les choses que nous devrons avoir accomplies pour qu'un mode de scrutin avec vote unique transférable ou un système mixte proportionnel soit en place en 2019?

(1140)

M. Marc Mayrand:

L'aspect le plus important, pour nous, c'est qu'une loi ait été adoptée de façon que nous puissions déterminer quelle sorte de système d'exploitation nous allons devoir construire ou réorganiser en fonction de l'ampleur des changements. Après cela, nous allons devoir élaborer toute une formation ainsi que toutes les instructions et procédures... et, je devrais le souligner, à l'intention des scrutateurs, de leurs employés et des agents électoraux, mais également, je crois, à l'intention des candidats et pour tout ce qui concerne la campagne électorale; il y aura certainement quelques changements auxquels nous devrons voir.

Et en même temps, il faudrait faire cela de concert avec, si c'est possible, le redécoupage électoral. Il y a certains éléments, sous réserve de ce que la réforme apportera exactement, que l'on pourrait mettre en oeuvre un peu avant que le redécoupage soit terminé.

M. Scott Reid:

Par exemple, il faudrait rédiger les instructions concernant la façon de voter dans le cadre d'un scrutin de liste. Il n'est pas nécessaire de savoir... Ce serait un exemple.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Oui. De plus, il y a tout l'aspect de la technologie. Si nous passons à un système comme celui que vous venez de décrire, il faudra installer des tabulatrices de vote dans les bureaux de vote; il faudra y installer un équipement technologique très différent. En fait, à l'heure actuelle, il y a très peu d'équipement technologique dans les bureaux de vote.

Il faut bien sûr se procurer ces machines, il faut les mettre à l'essai, il faut les installer, il faut les vérifier pour s'assurer qu'elles fonctionnent le jour du vote et qu'elles sont exactes et fiables. Nous devons également avoir des plans de rechange, pour le cas où une machine tomberait en panne. Nous devons nous occuper de toutes sortes de petits détails.

M. Scott Reid:

J'aimerais clarifier ce dont vous parlez, s'agit-il du mode de scrutin par vote unique transférable ou du système mixte proportionnel? Vous avez parlé de tabulatrice.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Je dirais que cela s'applique dans les deux cas. Il s'agit de modes différents, mais ils exigent tous deux qu'on installe de l'équipement technologique dans les bureaux de vote pour calculer les résultats. J'imagine que les Canadiens et les candidats voudront que les résultats soient connus le plus rapidement possible. Dans certains pays, vous devez attendre quelques semaines avant de connaître les résultats. Je crois que cela n'est pas la norme, au Canada.

M. Scott Reid:

En Australie, par exemple, au moment de l'élection des sénateurs, vous devez apporter votre repas, si vous êtes affecté au dépouillement des votes.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Exactement. Encore une fois, c'est un aspect intéressant, et nous allons devoir y voir, selon le type de réforme qui aura lieu.

L'Australie est un bon exemple: les urnes doivent être apportées dans les centres de dépouillement. Cela ne se passe pas comme ça au Canada. Le dépouillement des urnes se fait au bureau de vote, là où le vote s'est tenu. Encore une fois, il y a un retard. À titre d'exemple, pour rapporter certaines urnes du Nunavut, il a fallu trois semaines, cette fois-ci. Ce n'est pas ainsi que cela se passe de manière générale, dans cette circonscription, mais, encore une fois, en raison du mauvais temps de toutes sortes de circonstances, il y a eu un retard. C'est de ce genre que choses dont nous devons nous préoccuper, à Élections Canada, et nous devons trouver la meilleure façon de composer avec ce type de problème. Cela explique pourquoi il faut tout ce temps pour évaluer le meilleur processus possible et nous préparer à le mettre en place.

Le président:

Nous passons à Mme Sahota, qui partagera son temps avec M. Chan.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Je voulais tout simplement obtenir un peu plus de détails sur la technologie dont vous parlez. Cela m'intéresse beaucoup. Notre Comité a beaucoup discuté de la modernisation du Parlement. Nous allons également avoir besoin de moderniser notre système électoral, c'est évident. J'ai entendu bien des gens, pendant ma campagne, qui avaient peut-être vécu dans un autre pays dans le passé, qui jugeaient notre système très archaïque, très démodé. Il m'arrivait de leur répondre que cela était peut-être dû aux préoccupations sur la fraude électorale ou des choses comme ça et qu'il n'avait pas encore été possible de mettre au point un système qui fonctionnait bien à ce chapitre.

Quels sont les systèmes auxquels vous faites allusion dans votre rapport et comment pourraient-ils faire en sorte que notre système soit plus efficace, plus moderne et plus facile pour l'électeur moyen? Nous pourrions peut-être inciter plus de gens à voter si le système était plus simple.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Nous devons fournir des services électroniques tous azimuts, ce qui concerne également des candidats, pour être honnête. Je ne vois pas pour quelle raison, à notre époque, un candidat ne pourrait pas transmettre son rapport de campagne par voie électronique. Cela devrait à mon avis aller de soi, mais ce n'est pas encore le cas, malheureusement.

En ce qui concerne les bureaux de vote — et nous allons discuter davantage de ces questions —, nous allons certainement envisager d'installer ce que nous appelons des « listes en direct ». Il y aura des listes électroniques dans les bureaux de vote. Cela veut dire qu'une personne qui se présente à un bureau montre sa carte d'identité d'électeur. La carte est balayée, et son nom est immédiatement supprimé de la liste, automatiquement, à l'échelle du pays, de façon que cette personne ne puisse pas se présenter ailleurs, plus tard, la même journée. Après cela, la personne obtiendra son bulletin de vote. Nous pourrions même enregistrer le vote dans une tabulatrice de façon, encore une fois, que les résultats soient livrés instantanément, le soir des élections. Remarquez, cela ne prend pas beaucoup de temps, aujourd'hui, avec notre système actuel.

L'autre chose que nous devons examiner, ce sont les procédures d'automatisation. Si vous avez déjà voté par anticipation, vous savez que les électeurs, lorsqu'ils se présentent, doivent prouver leur identité, etc. Ensuite, il faut qu'on cherche leur nom dans un volumineux document de papier, ils doivent inscrire leur nom et leur adresse puis signer. Il n'y a aucune raison de nos jours pour que cela se déroule encore ainsi. Nous envisagerions l'automatisation. Si des contrôles ont été mis en place, c'est qu'il y a de bonnes raisons: il faut s'assurer que le vote est fiable. Je crois cependant que l'automatisation et de meilleurs services aux bureaux de vote sont vraiment une possibilité.

Nous devons réduire les files d'attente. Je crois que cela a posé problème dans les bureaux de vote par anticipation, car les Canadiens ont été plus nombreux que jamais à voter par anticipation. Nous devons trouver le moyen d'alléger la procédure utilisée pour le scrutin par anticipation.

(1145)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Quelles difficultés se sont posées lorsque vous avez tenté de mettre cette nouvelle technologie en place? Je suis surprise que notre système n'ait pas été mis à niveau pour la dernière élection.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Eh bien, quelque chose d'aussi simple que l'élimination du registre des électeurs aux bureaux de scrutin anticipé exige une modification de la loi. C'est le niveau de prescription que la loi impose. C'est la loi qui exige que l'électeur signe un registre, dans les bureaux de scrutin anticipé. On ne peut pas automatiser le système sans apporter quelques modifications.

Nous devons également être en mesure de réorganiser les tâches, aux bureaux de scrutin. À l'heure actuelle, le modèle prévoit une boîte de scrutin et deux préposés qui la surveillent en tout temps. Le préposé ne peut pas se déplacer, même si c'est plus achalandé à côté, et les électeurs ne peuvent pas non plus aller ailleurs. Ils doivent attendre leur tour, même s'il n'y a personne aux autres tables. Je crois que nous pourrions réorganiser le travail et définir des tâches spécialisées, ce qui donnerait aux électeurs la possibilité de se déplacer et aussi aux responsables d'aller là où il y a plus de travail, pendant la journée. Encore une fois, dans les bureaux de vote par anticipation, nous avons une image très évocatrice de gens qui font tous la file devant une même table. Nous devons nous débarrasser de cette image, nous l'espérons à temps pour les 43e élections.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

À quand remonte la dernière modification de la loi?

M. Marc Mayrand:

En 2010, avec le projet de loi C-23...

M. Hughes St-Pierre (dirigeant principal des finances et de la planification, Services intégrés, Politique et Affaires publiques, Élections Canada):

En 2014.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Oh, je m'excuse. Oui, c'était en 2014.

La loi a souvent été modifiée, mais ces examens ne visaient pas un objectif unique ou multiple lié à la modernisation. Les modifications étaient souvent une réaction à des problèmes particuliers qui s'étaient présentés et visaient à régler le problème; on n'a pas pris un peu de recul en se disant: « Eh bien, profitons-en pour revoir le modèle de service. »

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à M. Strahl.

M. Mark Strahl (Chilliwack—Hope, PCC):

Afin de poursuivre cette réflexion sur la technologie des bureaux de scrutin, je dois faire valoir que, dans ma circonscription, à tout le moins, bon nombre des personnes disponibles pour travailler le jour des élections n'ont peut-être pas déjà fait l'expérience de la technologie. Il s'agit peut-être de gens à leur retraite, de travailleurs à temps partiel qui ne maîtrisent pas le langage de la technologie. Est-ce que nous allons vouloir les embaucher de nouveau...?

Voici ce qui me préoccupe, je crois. N'aurions-nous pas besoin d'employés permanents ou d'employés contractuels, pour ce travail? Je constate tout simplement qu'en essayant de rendre le système plus efficient, nous pourrions aboutir à un résultat désastreux si personne, parmi les employés, ne pouvait s'occuper de ce problème.

(1150)

M. Marc Mayrand:

Je ne minimiserais pas l'aspect de gestion des changements, dans ce dossier, ou les répercussions sur la main-d'oeuvre. Il faudrait prévoir des experts qui pourraient, sur place, appuyer la technologie. Il en coûtera peut-être plus cher les premières fois où nous utiliserons ce modèle, mais tout deviendra plus facile après un certain temps.

Il existe des façons de concevoir la technologie qui la rend tellement conviviale qu'il n'est pas nécessaire d'être un expert. Remplir un formulaire électronique est parfois plus facile que de le remplir sur papier, pour être honnête.

Mais il s'agit là de considérations légitimes, et nous les garderons à l'esprit pendant nos travaux.

M. Mark Strahl:

Il y a un autre aspect qui m'a préoccupé, pendant l'élection. Vous avez parlé de votre travail avec l'Assemblée des Premières Nations. Il est évident que nous approuvons tout ce qui se fait pour amener plus de gens à aller voter, peu importe d'où ils viennent. L'APN a clairement fait connaître sa position politique à ses plus hauts échelons en clamant: « N'importe qui, sauf les conservateurs. » L'annonce a été faite par le chef national, etc.

Ma question est la suivante: lorsque vous travaillez avec une organisation, je veux dire par là une organisation politique, pour augmenter la participation aux élections, comment protégez-vous l'intégrité d'Élections Canada contre une allégation ou une perception selon laquelle vous avantageriez une entité politique plutôt qu'une autre?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Il y a plusieurs aspects, ici. Nous avons en effet travaillé avec une cinquantaine d'organisations, pendant les élections, y compris, oui, l'APN. Selon leur contrat, toutes ces organisations devaient rester indépendantes et neutres pendant les élections. Oui, leurs membres pouvaient avoir différentes opinions politiques, comme c'est le cas dans toute organisation, mais l'organisation elle-même ne devait afficher aucune tendance particulière.

L'autre chose, c'est que, avec ces organisations, sans nécessairement essayer... Je ne veux pas assumer la responsabilité de la participation. Mais elles travaillent pour s'assurer que les électeurs, les Canadiens, peu importe leur situation, ont l'information dont ils ont besoin s'ils désirent aller voter. Il y a certains groupes qui sont moins susceptibles d'être inscrits, et nous déployons des efforts pour les aider à s'inscrire. Certains groupes ont de la difficulté en ce qui concerne l'identification, et nous nous assurons alors qu'ils savent quelles sont leurs options lorsqu'ils se présenteront au bureau de scrutin.

En fait, l'APN a mis sur pied un centre d'appels pour les chefs de tout le pays, pour les informer des outils grâce auxquels ils pouvaient renseigner les leurs sur la façon de voter et sur le lieu et la date du scrutin.

M. Mark Strahl:

J'ai une dernière question. Dans votre déclaration préliminaire, vous avez dit que nous pourrions « adapter le processus électoral, qui est actuellement ancré dans le XIXe siècle, aux attentes des Canadiens contemporains ». Ma question sera donc la suivante: comment pouvez-vous déterminer les attentes des Canadiens d'aujourd'hui?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Vous allez voir, je crois, dans notre prochain rapport, ce que les Canadiens nous ont dit au sujet du processus électoral.

Nous constatons déjà que les Canadiens veulent de plus en plus voter quand et où ils le veulent. Nous observons depuis quelques décennies une augmentation importante du nombre d'électeurs qui se présentent aux bureaux de scrutin anticipé. Au départ, le scrutin anticipé devait être une exception, mais il devient de plus en plus la norme. Cette fois-ci, 25 % des électeurs canadiens ont voté par anticipation. Cela nous dit quelque chose. Je ne peux pas laisser inchangé le système des bureaux de scrutin anticipé, qui se présente comme une exception, lorsqu'une proportion croissante d'électeurs veulent se prévaloir de cette option. De la même façon, nous avons enregistré une augmentation de 117 % du nombre de bulletins envoyés par la poste, oui, à notre époque. C'est une option que les Canadiens veulent utiliser, et je dois donc m'assurer que cette option est efficace pour eux. Les Canadiens sont de plus en plus irrités — je l'ai dit déjà plusieurs fois — lorsqu'ils se présentent au gymnase et qu'ils doivent attendre en file, alors que toutes les autres tables sont libres. Encore une fois, c'est logique. Nous estimons qu'il faut de 10 à 15 minutes environ pour chaque électeur qui se présente à un bureau de scrutin anticipé. Disons qu'il y a 10 personnes devant vous, et que vous êtes la onzième, imaginez le temps que cela vous prendra. Vous voyez bien qu'il y a trois ou quatre autres tables où il n'y a personne, et vous ne pouvez pas y aller? Si je vais au magasin — au Walmart, puisque nous sommes au Canada —, je vais aller à la caisse qui est libre. Pourquoi est-ce que je ne peux pas faire cela? C'est cela, mon expérience de citoyen, de consommateur; je peux me présenter là où le service est le plus rapide.

Les Canadiens formuleront eux-mêmes mieux ces attentes dans le cadre des diverses études que nous avons menées au cours des derniers mois. Vous pourrez les voir, avec toute la documentation de fond, en juin, j'espère.

(1155)

M. Mark Strahl:

Merci.

Le président:

Nous allons bientôt manquer de temps.

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

J'aimerais tout simplement vous dire merci, monsieur Mayrand, ainsi qu'à votre personnel, pour votre professionnalisme.

En réalité, je n'ai pas de questions importantes concernant le budget principal.

J’aimerais revenir sur certains des enjeux que M. Reid a soulevés. Je partage bon nombre de ses préoccupations, franchement, en ce qui concerne mon parti et l’ambitieux calendrier proposé par notre gouvernement pour, peut-être, réformer le système électoral et, en particulier, l’engagement que nous avons pris en vue d'éliminer d’ici 2019 le système majoritaire uninominal. Cela nous ramène au début de vos précédents commentaires sur le processus de planification stratégique de votre organisation; j’aimerais savoir si vous avez élaboré le modèle de tous les scénarios possibles et si vous ne pourriez pas donner à notre Comité une idée des coûts estimatifs potentiels, qui seront déterminés, au bout du compte, par la décision que prendra le Parlement quant au modèle de réforme électorale qui sera proposé. Vous nous avez donné une idée du calendrier, mais également des ressources nécessaires, en particulier des crédits suffisants, pour réaliser tous les scénarios potentiels. Est-ce que cette réflexion est déjà amorcée, au sein de votre organisation, dans votre processus de planification stratégique? J’imagine que nous parlons ici de sommes assez importantes.

M. Marc Mayrand:

Oui, en particulier les investissements dans la technologie qui seront probablement nécessaires pour soutenir une réforme quelconque du système. Nous n'en sommes qu'aux toutes premières étapes de notre plan stratégique. Ce dernier n'est pas encore tout à fait mis en forme. Nous avons une idée de ce que nous voulons faire, mais nous voulons avoir l'appui de votre comité et des autres partis politiques quant à l'orientation que nous devrions prendre pour moderniser les services. Nous allons déterminer le coût de ces initiatives à mesure que nous avançons.

Quant à la réforme elle-même, je n'ai pas à l'heure actuelle suffisamment d'information pour en déterminer les coûts.

M. Arnold Chan:

Serait-il utile, peut-être, de faire l'essai d'une ou de quelques-unes des réformes technologiques dont vous parlez, par exemple dans le cadre d'une élection partielle? Ce serait un cas type plus réglementaire. Voudriez-vous présenter à notre comité d'autres recommandations sur les éléments que nous pourrions mettre à l'essai?

M. Marc Mayrand:

C’est un sujet que nous espérons pouvoir aborder avec vous le 3 mai. Il y a une chose que nous aimerions faire, et que nous avons l’habitude de faire, et c’est de mettre à l’essai les nouveaux systèmes avant de nous en servir dans le cadre d’une élection générale. Nous pourrions mettre à l’essai, soit en laboratoire, soit pendant une élection partielle, les systèmes, les procédures, la formation... tout cela... pour nous assurer que, le jour des élections, tout baignera dans l’huile. Si nous avons des réserves, après un essai, nous n’irions pas de l’avant pendant une élection générale. Nous ne voudrions pas que les élections comportent des risques, c’est certain.

Donc, la réponse courte est oui, nous prévoyons mener des tests au fur et à mesure. Dans certains cas, je devrai peut-être demander à votre Comité une approbation officielle, car, dans tous les cas où des essais supposent une modification de la loi, je dois obtenir l'approbation de votre comité — et, en fait, du Sénat — avant de lancer ce que nous appelons un « projet pilote ». Nous devons à ce moment-là présenter une demande motivée et une bonne description de l'essai en question et de ce qu'il vise à mesurer.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je crois qu'il serait très utile pour les membres du Comité — et, franchement, que ce serait une occasion pour les deux Chambres du Parlement — d'avoir une idée plus détaillée des enjeux que vous voulez étudier, de façon que nous puissions vous accorder à l'avance les pouvoirs nécessaires.

Il est certain que, du côté du gouvernement, nous serions disposés à accepter les recommandations qu'il faudrait à votre avis mettre en oeuvre, en particulier à la lumière des défaillances observées pendant la dernière élection générale. Nous serions tout à fait disposés à accepter des recommandations présentées par votre bureau.

(1200)

M. Marc Mayrand:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson, si vous pouvez...

M. David Christopherson:

Je vois l'heure. Je serai bref.

C'est indécent, pourtant, que les changements de notre système électoral doivent être approuvés par des gens qui sont nommés à vie.

Puisqu'on parle d'élections, du budget principal proprement dit — la raison pour laquelle vous êtes ici —, est-ce que la somme de 29,2 millions de dollars pour laquelle vous demandez une autorisation, au titre du crédit 1 du Budget principal des dépenses, est destinée à votre budget d'exploitation? Est-ce bien cela, ou s'agit-il de votre budget électoral?

Corrigez-moi si je me trompe, mais je crois que vous êtes en réalité l'une des rares entités gouvernementales qui a accès à des montants illimités pendant une élection. Si vous devez dépenser ces sommes, vous en êtes responsable, mais vous avez le pouvoir de les dépenser. Ai-je raison de penser ainsi, monsieur?

M. Marc Mayrand:

Vous avez raison, et nous pouvons le faire pendant une élection, mais aussi pendant la préparation d'une élection, avant même que le bref soit délivré.

Cette somme de 29,2 millions de dollars vise exclusivement le salaire des employés d'Élections Canada embauchés pour une période indéterminée. Toutes les autres dépenses d'Élections Canada sont des dépenses prévues ou autorisées par la loi.

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai une dernière chose à dire, monsieur le président, et c'est que j'ai réellement très hâte d'avoir enfin l'occasion de lever le voile sur les dommages causés par la « déforme électorale », et il va y avoir des discussions assez intéressantes au sujet des cartes d'identité des électeurs, bientôt... Vous pouvez me croire.

Le président:

Nous allons maintenant passer à la mise aux voix. DIRECTEUR GÉNÉRAL DES ÉLECTIONS Crédit 1 — Dépenses de programme.......... 29 212 735 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté.)

Le président: Dois-je faire rapport à la Chambre du vote sur le Budget principal des dépenses, moins la somme votée au titre de crédit provisoire?

Des voix: D'accord.

Le président: Merci, monsieur Mayrand, de l'excellent travail que vous faites pendant les élections. C'est un travail impartial et très professionnel. Nous l'apprécions, c'est certain, et je crois que les Canadiens l'apprécient aussi. Nous sommes convaincus que c'est un travail très professionnel et que, de cette façon, leur vote compte.

Merci beaucoup.

Nous vous communiquerons la date de notre prochaine réunion éventuelle. Nous allons d'ailleurs discuter de cette question plus tard aujourd'hui.

Nous allons prendre une pause de quelques minutes.

Si les témoins veulent s'installer à la table, ce serait excellent.

(1200)

(1205)

Le président:

Nous sommes prêts à reprendre nos travaux.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, je me demandais seulement si cette réunion était télévisée ou non? Ce n'est pas indiqué sur l'ordre du jour, et je voulais le clarifier.

Le président:

Non, elle ne l'est pas.

M. Scott Reid:

Permettez-moi de vous demander que, à la fin de la séance, nous discutions de la possibilité de téléviser les séances chaque fois que nous en avons la possibilité. Nous nous réunissons souvent dans une salle équipée pour la diffusion, et cela serait logique.

Le président:

J'aimerais souhaiter la bienvenue à nos témoins en vue de notre étude visant à rendre le Parlement plus efficient, plus inclusif et représentatif des Canadiens, plus propice à la vie de famille et plus accueillant pour les employés et les députés, dans l'intérêt des familles de tous et de tous les gens pour qui l'inclusivité peut poser problème. Nous espérons que vous allez nous aider à ce chapitre.

Nos témoins d'aujourd'hui, conformément au paragraphe 108(2) du Règlement, pour notre étude sur les initiatives visant à favoriser une Chambre des communes propice à la vie de famille, sont Thomas Shannon, président de la Section locale 232 des Travailleurs et travailleuses unis de l'alimentation et du commerce Canada, ainsi que Mélisa Ferreira et Tara Hogeterp, représentantes de la Section locale 232. Nous accueillerons ensuite Roger Thompson, président de la Section locale 70390 de l'Alliance de la fonction publique du Canada, et Jim McDonald, agent des relations de travail du Syndicat des employées et employés nationaux, qui le soutiendra moralement.

Nous allons commencer par les déclarations préliminaires, après quoi il y aura des séries de questions de sept minutes, qui seront consacrées aux questions et aux réponses. Nous allons veiller à ce qu'il y en ait le plus possible.

Commençons par M. Shannon. [Français]

M. Thomas Shannon (président, Section locale 232, Travailleurs et travailleuses unis de l'alimentation et du commerce Canada):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie de cette invitation. Je suis ravi de comparaître devant vous aujourd'hui au nom du syndicat qui représente tous les travailleurs du Nouveau Parti démocratique ici, sur la Colline du Parlement, et dans les circonscriptions.[Traduction]

Nous avons une convention collective avec le groupe parlementaire du NPD qui nous assure un juste salaire et des heures de travail flexibles.

Je suis accompagné aujourd'hui de deux mères, qui ont travaillé sur la Colline du Parlement et dans la circonscription des députés, et leur expérience leur permet donc d'éclairer l'étude menée aujourd'hui par le comité sur les initiatives visant à favoriser une Chambre des communes propice à la vie de famille. [Français]

Je vais maintenant céder la parole à Mme Tara Hogeterp. [Traduction]

Mme Tara Hogeterp (représentative, Section locale 232, Travailleurs et travailleuses unis de l'alimentation et du commerce Canada):

Bonjour. Je m'appelle Tara Hogeterp. Je travaille sur la Colline du Parlement depuis 2003, et j'ai depuis cette date eu deux enfants. Je suis très reconnaissante d'avoir eu la possibilité de prendre un congé de maternité d'une année complète et de pouvoir revenir travailler ici et poursuivre ma carrière.

Il peut être très difficile de trouver des services de garde, à Ottawa, et j'ai apprécié d'avoir eu la possibilité de demander un congé supplémentaire non rémunéré jusqu'à ce qu'une place en service de garde s'ouvre. Mes deux enfants ont été inscrits dans une garderie ailleurs que sur la Colline et à la garderie Les enfants de la Colline. Cette dernière n'accepte pas les enfants de moins de 18 mois, et c'est pourquoi il faut trouver un autre service de garde et, surtout, attendre qu'une place se libère.

La plupart des garderies et des services de garde en milieu scolaire, dans la région d'Ottawa, ont un horaire fixe quant à l'arrivée et au départ des enfants. Il est essentiel pour moi d'avoir un horaire de travail qui me permet de les laisser à l'heure dite et de les reprendre à la fin de la journée.

Ma collègue Mélisa va maintenant parler de son expérience.

(1210)

[Français]

Mme Mélisa Ferreira (représentante, Section locale 232, Travailleurs et travailleuses unis de l'alimentation et du commerce Canada):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je travaille sur la Colline depuis 2011. De 2011 à 2015, j'ai travaillé dans un bureau de circonscription et, depuis le début de la nouvelle législature, je travaille à Ottawa. Mon conjoint travaille lui aussi à la Chambre des communes. En 2013, nous avons eu des jumeaux. J'ai pu alors bénéficier d'un congé de maternité d'un an, à la suite de quoi je suis retournée travailler au bureau de circonscription d'une députée.

Le fait d'avoir un horaire de travail souple est nécessaire dans mon cas, étant donné que la garderie que fréquentent mes enfants ferme aussi très tôt, soit à 16 h 30. En revanche, les activités des comités finissent souvent très tard. Par exemple, la députée pour laquelle je travaille a siégé au Comité mixte spécial sur l'aide médicale à mourir. Il s'agissait dans ce cas d'heures très condensées, où le comité avait ses séances en soirée.

Les parents qui travaillent tous les deux sur la Colline font face à des défis majeurs. Comme les jeunes enfants sont souvent malades, il faut s'absenter du travail. Le fait d'être protégés par une convention collective nous apporte une grande quiétude. En effet, nous savons que nous ne risquons pas de perdre notre emploi à cause du fait que nous devons régulièrement nous absenter du travail.

Merci beaucoup. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Thompson.

M. Roger Thompson (président, Section locale 70390, Alliance de la Fonction publique du Canada):

Bon après-midi. Nous vous remercions de nous avoir invités ici.

Je suis président d'une section locale du Syndicat des employées et employés nationaux de l'Alliance de la Fonction publique du Canada, une section qui représente l'ensemble des membres du SEN-AFPC employés par la Chambre des communes et le Service de protection parlementaire, c'est-à-dire, au total, environ 450 personnes.

Nous représentons les employés de la Chambre des communes regroupés en quatre unités de négociation distinctes: le secteur des opérations, qui s'occupe de la manutention, de la maintenance et des corps de métier, du transport, des services de messagerie, des services d'impression et de distribution du courrier et des services alimentaires; le secteur des services postaux; le secteur des rapports et du traitement de texte; et le secteur des scanographes.

Je suis venu aujourd'hui avec Jim McDonald, agent des relations de travail du SEN, qui est chargé d'aider et de représenter tous les membres du SEN de même que les opérateurs de scanographe à l'emploi du Service de protection parlementaire.

Le président:

Est-ce tout pour les déclarations préliminaires?

D'accord, nous allons passer aux questions en commençant par Mme Vandenbeld.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Ma question s'adresse à Mme Ferreira et à Mme Hogeterp.

J'ai déjà moi aussi fait partie du personnel politique. J'ai entendu un certain nombre de mes collègues expliquer que, lorsqu'ils ont des enfants, l'une des choses les plus importantes était la prévisibilité. Par exemple, nous avons discuté ici, en tant que comité, de la semaine de travail comprimée et de la possibilité de ne pas siéger les vendredis.

J'ai entendu certains employés dire que cela leur permettrait, une journée par semaine, de savoir que le ou la député ne va pas les traîner à une réunion, les bousculer pour une demande des médias ou quelque chose d'autre. Ils pourraient alors prendre rendez-vous chez le médecin, pour leurs enfants, ou faire les autres choses qu'ils ont à faire, les vendredis. Cela donnerait plus de flexibilité aux parents qui travaillent sur la Colline du Parlement.

Pouvez-vous nous parler de votre expérience? Que pensez-vous de ce modèle?

Mme Tara Hogeterp:

Je dois quand même payer le service de garde, le vendredi, alors je vais venir au travail, le vendredi. Cela ne fait pas une si grande différence. J'ai l'habitude de prendre ces rendez-vous-là pendant les semaines de relâche, et cet horaire ne m'a jamais causé de problème.

L'autre possibilité, pendant la semaine, c'est habituellement les mercredis matins, lorsqu'il y a une réunion du caucus, étant donné que les députés de tous les partis sont pour ainsi dire absents. Il y a donc là aussi une possibilité. Je ne dirais pas que le fait d'avoir un congé le vendredi améliorerait beaucoup ma situation, étant donné que, assez souvent, ma députée n'est même pas présente de toute façon le vendredi, si elle n'est pas en devoir, et c'est donc en général une journée assez calme.

(1215)

[Français]

Mme Mélisa Ferreira:

Comme Tara le mentionnait, il faut aussi penser à nos collègues dans les circonscriptions qui travaillent les vendredis, les soirées et les fins de semaine. La possibilité d'avoir le vendredi de congé allégerait peut-être un peu le travail, mais quand les députés sont à Ottawa, le rythme est toujours rapide et les heures sont longues. Je ne suis pas en mesure de me prononcer sur cette question. Cependant, je m'organise pour prendre mes rendez-vous pendant les semaines de relâche ou quand la députée part le vendredi après-midi. [Traduction]

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je constate souvent, en ce qui concerne le personnel politique du Parlement, qu'il s'agit dans bien des cas de gens jeunes, souvent aussi célibataires. Ils ne sont pas si nombreux que cela à avoir une famille.

J'ai moi-même connu un certain nombre de membres du personnel politique qui, dès qu'ils avaient fondé une famille, quittaient leur travail sur la Colline du Parlement pour occuper un autre emploi dans un autre secteur, où les horaires étaient plus prévisibles.

Pensez-vous qu'il se fait une certaine forme d'autosélection parmi les gens qui veulent travailler dans ce domaine et que les gens qui ont une jeune famille choisissent de s'abstenir en raison de l'horaire de travail? Existe-t-il un moyen pour nous de remédier à cette situation, de rendre les choses plus faciles, de façon que les gens qui ont une jeune famille seraient davantage portés à travailler sur la Colline du Parlement? [Français]

Mme Mélisa Ferreira:

Je pense que c'est à chaque personne de le dire pour elle-même.

Il y en a qui se rende compte que la conciliation travail-famille est difficile. Pour ma part, je suis chanceuse puisque j'ai des membres de ma famille dans la région et mes parents prennent la relève. Mon conjoint, qui travaille aussi à la Chambre des communes, a une flexibilité que je n'ai pas avec la députée. En fait, notre programme est prévu des semaines et des semaines à l'avance, à savoir qui va chercher les enfants, à quelle heure, qui prend les rendez-vous et tout le reste.

Cela dépend vraiment de la personne. Je pense qu'il est possible de travailler et d'élever une jeune famille quand on travaille au Parlement. On peut être un adjoint parlementaire, une députée ou un adjoint législatif sur la Colline, mais cela nécessite beaucoup d'organisation. [Traduction]

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Comme vous le savez, le personnel des autres partis n'est pas syndiqué. Pensez-vous que cela a changé les choses? Est-ce que ce serait plus difficile? La majorité des employés de la Colline du Parlement ne sont pas représentés par un syndicat.

M. Thomas Shannon:

Eh bien, je crois que ce qui nous distingue, c'est que — vous avez raison — nous sommes les seuls à être syndiqués. Cela veut dire que nous avons signé une convention collective avec le groupe parlementaire du NPD. Cette convention prévoit un horaire de travail souple et détermine les heures de congé qu'il est possible de prendre.

C'est un document clair que les jeunes mères et les jeunes pères peuvent consulter et comprendre: « D'accord, voilà donc les heures auxquelles je dois travailler. Et voici les mesures d'accommodement qui me sont offertes. » Ils peuvent rencontrer des membres du groupe parlementaire du NPD pour s'assurer que les jeunes familles — il y a quand même un assez grand nombre de jeunes familles parmi nos employés. Nous avons de jeunes employés, et je sais qu'il y a de jeunes employés dans les deux autres partis.

Je crois que la différence a trait au fait que ce document est clair, qu'il permet aux employés de planifier l'avenir en sachant qu'ils ne perdront pas leur emploi parce que leur enfant est malade. Il y a des choses qui peuvent être planifiées. La grande différence, c'est que nous avons des règles claires qui ont été établies dans les négociations avec la direction.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Votre expérience, et je m'adresse à vous deux, ne reflète peut-être pas très bien l'expérience des gens qui travaillent sur la Colline du Parlement.

J'aimerais en fait que M. McDonald et M. Thompson répondent à cette question au sujet de leurs employés qui ne sont pas membres du personnel politique, les employés qu'ils représentent. J'aimerais que vous me disiez si, à votre avis, l'élimination des séances du vendredi, par exemple, aurait une incidence sur ces employés.

M. Roger Thompson:

Oui, nous le pensons, en effet, car nous comptons dans nos unités de négociation des employés saisonniers qualifiés embauchés pour une durée indéterminée. Ces employés, au départ, doivent travailler au moins 700 heures dans une année civile pour avoir le titre d'employé et devenir employé saisonnier qualifié et avoir droit à tous les avantages.

Nous pensons que, si les heures de séance sont réduites, il se pourrait qu'un employé saisonnier qualifié ne puisse atteindre ce seuil de 700 heures pendant deux années consécutives. Ces personnes ne pourraient donc plus devenir des travailleurs saisonniers qualifiés; elles perdraient leur statut et tous leurs avantages.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Même avec la semaine de travail comprimée, il y aurait le même nombre d'heures de séance. Par contre, nous aurions plus de temps pour nous occuper de nos circonscriptions. L'effet ne se ferait pas nécessairement sentir, puisque le nombre d'heures de séances du Parlement resterait le même. La semaine serait simplement condensée du lundi au jeudi.

M. Jim McDonald (agent des relations de travail, Syndicat des employées et employés nationaux, Alliance de la Fonction publique du Canada):

Je présume qu'une semaine de travail comprimée suppose de rallonger la journée de travail. Cela pourrait nuire à la vie personnelle et professionnelle des gens, parce qu'ils devront travailler trois ou quatre heures de plus chaque jour pour rattraper le travail de la journée supprimée.

Ma semaine de travail est comprimée, et laissez-moi vous dire que cela peut poser de grandes difficultés en ce qui concerne les enfants. La plupart des garderies sont ouvertes seulement le jour, et la plupart d'entre elles veulent que les parents viennent chercher leurs enfants avant 17 heures ou, au plus tard, 18 heures. Voilà le problème qui se pose aux jeunes familles avec des enfants en bas âge.

Évidemment, il y a aussi la question des dépenses supplémentaires engagées par l'employeur dans la convention collective pour le temps supplémentaire, les primes de poste, etc.

(1220)

Le président:

Monsieur Strahl.

M. Mark Strahl:

Merci beaucoup. C'est avec plaisir que je siège au Comité aujourd'hui pour discuter de cette question.

Mon point de vue est peut-être particulier: je suis fils de député, et j'ai travaillé sur la Colline du Parlement et dans un bureau de circonscription comme employé avant de devenir député, alors je crois comprendre où vous voulez en venir.

Selon moi — je répondrai à vos commentaires dans un instant —, la semaine de travail comprimée représente la pire option pour les employés. Ici, à Ottawa, on attend de nos employés qu'ils travaillent du lundi au jeudi, de tôt le matin à tard le soir, pour soutenir leur député, ce qui empiète sur leur vie familiale. Le vendredi, ils ne peuvent même pas retourner chez eux parce qu'ils doivent continuer à travailler. Ils prolongent leurs heures de travail. La plupart des députés que je connais retournent dans leur circonscription, mais s'attendent à ce que leurs employés continuent leur travail de soutien.

À mon avis, c'est une situation nuisible pour les personnes qui vivent ici avec leur famille ou qui ont fait le choix difficile de déménager avec leur famille à Ottawa, et cela vaut autant pour les députés que leurs employés. Présentement, les leaders à la Chambre ont pris des arrangements pour que les whips puissent prévoir des votes après la période de questions. Hier, nous avons tenu, pour la première fois — je crois —, plus d'un vote en soirée.

Un grand nombre de députés peuvent s'appuyer sur cette prévisibilité pour rentrer chez eux et souper avec leur famille ou prendre des arrangements comme ceux dont vous avez parlé.

Peut-être pourriez-vous vous exprimer sur vos attentes? Avez-vous parlé à vos employeurs? En ce qui concerne la convention collective des employés du NPD, permet-elle de...? Peut-être pouvez-vous m'expliquer comment il vous serait possible de satisfaire à toutes les exigences sans accroître considérablement votre horaire de travail personnel.

Mme Tara Hogeterp:

Je suis d'accord, une semaine de travail comprimée serait néfaste pour la vie familiale. Je peux déposer mes enfants à l'école au plus tôt à 8 heures, mais je dois aller les chercher à 17 h 30 au plus tard, et je dois payer 20 $ par tranche de 10 minutes — je crois — si j'arrive en retard. Je n'ai pas les moyens de ne pas aller les chercher. La semaine de travail comprimée supposerait pour moi moins de temps passé en famille, et j'imagine...

M. Mark Strahl:

... et une augmentation des dépenses.

Mme Tara Hogeterp:

... et une augmentation des dépenses.

À mon avis, la période entre 17 et 19 heures, entre le moment où on va chercher les enfants et celui où on les met au lit, est la plus importante pour les familles, surtout les familles avec des enfants en bas âge et, en particulier, des enfants en âge d'aller à l'école.

M. Mark Strahl: Je suis tout à fait d'accord.

Mme Tara Hogeterp: C'est à ce moment-là que vous parlez avec eux de leur journée, que vous soupez en famille et créez des liens avec eux, avant de les mettre au lit.

Même s'il s'agit parfois de la période la plus éprouvante de la journée, c'est également le moment le plus important. Je ne supporterais pas l'idée que quelqu'un perde cela, que ce soit un employé ou un député.

M. Mark Strahl:

Merci. Je vous comprends. Ça fait quelques années, mais quand j'étais membre du personnel, le supplément de rémunération pour les congés de maternité ou de paternité des députés et des employés leur permettait de toucher environ 92 % de leur salaire, tandis qu'un Canadien qui touche des prestations d'assurance-emploi sans avoir droit à d'autres avantages sociaux reçoit 55 %, je crois.

Est-ce votre situation? Touchez-vous un supplément de rémunération supérieur dans votre syndicat, ou est-ce que vous touchez aussi 92 %?

Mme Mélisa Ferreira:

Le supplément de rémunération est celui en vigueur à la Chambre des communes; l'employé touche 93 % de son salaire.

M. Mark Strahl:

D'accord, 93 %.

Je ne partage pas l'avis de Mme Vandenbeld. Selon moi, la Chambre des communes encourage effectivement les jeunes familles grâce à ce genre de soutien. Un grand nombre de Canadiens n'ont pas accès à ce genre de choses. Je sais qu'un grand nombre de mes collègues députés ainsi que beaucoup de mes collègues dans le personnel ont continué de travailler, avec ces généreuses prestations de maternité.

(1225)

Le président:

Il vous reste deux minutes et demie.

M. Mark Strahl:

Monsieur Thompson, j'aimerais avoir une précision, au sujet des employés saisonniers qualifiés nommés pour une durée indéterminée.

Si je comprends bien —ayant travaillé ici comme membre du personnel et maintenant comme député —, certains employés salariés de la Chambre des communes travaillent ici tous les jours, que la Chambre siège ou non. Toutefois, il y a aussi un grand nombre de services qui ne sont pas offerts les jours où il n'y a pas de séance de la Chambre... Par exemple, le restaurant du Parlement est fermé ces jours-là. Les employés du restaurant ne feraient pas plus d'argent dans une semaine de travail comprimée, puisqu'il n'y aurait pas plus d'heures de travail. De fait, leur salaire pourrait baisser, et ils seraient à risque de perdre leur statut d'employé saisonnier qualifié nommé pour une durée indéterminée. Est-ce exact?

M. Roger Thompson:

Oui, c'est une possibilité. Comme Jim l'a dit, ce n'est pas parce que vous travaillez plus tard que les employés vont nécessairement travailler plus. Les employés travaillent quand la Chambre siège, et ça ne concerne pas uniquement les services de restauration; il y a aussi le transport. Les autobus ne circulent pas en l'absence des députés, ce qui veut dire que les employés saisonniers qualifiés de ce service ne travaillent pas. En conséquence, s'ils perdent trop de journées de travail pendant une année civile, ou pire, pendant deux années civiles, ils risquent de tout perdre.

Je suis d'avis que l'horaire des séances devrait demeurer le même.

M. Mark Strahl:

D'après ce que vous me dites — et cela s'applique aussi aux employés des députés —, la semaine de travail comprimée entraînerait essentiellement une diminution de salaire pour certaines personnes. Dans tous les cas, leur salaire n'augmenterait pas. Les employés pourraient perdre des avantages, du salaire et devraient dépenser davantage en frais de garderie.

M. Roger Thompson:

C'est exact.

Ce que vous devez comprendre à propos de ces employés saisonniers qualifiés, c'est que la plupart d'entre eux ont deux emplois, et c'est particulièrement vrai pour ceux des services de restauration. Certains d'entre eux ont un loyer ou une hypothèque à payer, alors ils prennent un autre emploi pour faire de l'argent les jours où il n'y a pas de séance. Les jours où la Chambre siège, ils travaillent 7 heures. Les autres jours, ce n'est que 5 heures ou peut-être 5 h 30. En conséquence, ils doivent avoir un autre emploi.

Si on applique la semaine de travail comprimée, ces employés devront travailler plus longtemps. Comment pourront-ils alors aller chercher leurs enfants? Du même coup, ils perdraient leur second emploi. Que vont-ils faire les jours où la Chambre ne siège pas?

M. Mark Strahl:

Monsieur le président, je ne sais pas quand je pourrai revenir, mais je suis d'avis que le fait de supprimer les séances du vendredi, comme l'ont dit les témoins, serait néfaste pour le personnel. Les employés devront engager d'autres dépenses, et cela ne faciliterait pas la conciliation travail-famille, ni pour les employés ni pour les députés. En fait, cela pourrait empirer la situation.

On ferait bien de s'interroger sur les véritables visées de cette tentative d'annuler les séances du vendredi. Selon moi, c'est une journée de moins où le gouvernement a à rendre des comptes. On ne cherche pas à faciliter la conciliation travail-famille, parce qu'on sait tous que pour nous, le vendredi soir n'est pas réservé à la famille. On s'attend de nous et de nos employés que nous continuions à travailler.

Cette proposition — ce ballon d'essai — serait néfaste pour notre vie familiale et non l'inverse.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, vous pouvez y aller.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Excusez-moi, je voulais dire M. Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vous remercie d'avoir mes intérêts à coeur. Peut-être seriez-vous intéressé à devenir mon délégué syndical? Ne vous en faites pas, c'est un compliment.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous savez David, quand j'ai rencontré mon épouse, elle était représentante syndicale, alors il n'y a pas de quoi s'inquiéter.

M. David Christopherson:

Avec votre costume trois-pièces, vous pourriez être chef syndical.

Merci, monsieur le président.

C'est incroyable. Tom, jamais je n'aurais cru qu'un jour vous seriez ici à m'aider dans mon travail, et vous voilà ici en tant que témoin. On ne sait jamais ce que l'avenir nous réserve, n'est-ce pas?

J'aimerais vous poser une question, puisque vous êtes un chef syndical moderne, même si, je dois l'avouer, vous ne ressemblez pas aux caricatures. Vous devriez prendre un peu plus...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David Christopherson: Je sais que je passe à la télévision. Parfois, on peut être trop à l'aise dans son rôle.

Sérieusement, j'ai l'intention d'utiliser mes sept minutes comme je l'entends. Je veux poser une question très large. Nous avons l'occasion de discuter des syndicats, de la qualité de vie et de la façon dont les choses interagissent. J'aimerais soulever deux points.

Tom, dans vos propres mots... Je peux l'appeler Tom parce que nous travaillons ensemble tout le temps, et ce serait absurde que nous nous appelions l'un et l'autre « monsieur ».

Aujourd'hui, en 2016, un grand nombre de personnes croit — pour commencer — que les syndicats sont inutiles dans la société moderne. Ils avaient peut-être leur place à l'époque de la grande dépression et dans la période d'après-guerre, mais ce n'est pas le cas dans le monde moderne, et certainement pas dans un bureau, vu le genre de travail que certains de vos membres font.

Je vais vous donner un peu de mon temps pour que vous puissiez nous parler de l'importance des syndicats pour vos membres. Vous êtes un jeune homme. Pourquoi devriez-vous vous intéresser à cela? Pourquoi devriez-vous participer? Vu le travail que vous faites, comment une convention collective peut-elle... Comment cela fonctionne-t-il? Pouvez-vous nous expliquer comme vous adaptez les activités qui ne correspondent habituellement pas à celles des syndicats... en tout cas, pas aux syndicats de l'époque industrielle? J'aimerais que vous formuliez des commentaires à ce sujet.

Monsieur le président, je ne m'en cache pas; j'espère qu'il y a des employés de tous les autres partis sur la Colline du Parlement qui nous écoutent et qui se disent: « Vous savez quoi? Cela pourrait améliorer ma qualité de vie. Je devrais m'intéresser au syndicat. » Je veux ainsi vous faire profiter de ma nature transparente et de mon naturel enjoué.

Tom, si vous êtes prêt, vous pouvez y aller.

(1230)

M. Thomas Shannon:

Merci pour tout, David... monsieur Christopherson.

Vous avez dit que, selon certains, les syndicats n'ont plus leur place aujourd'hui. Nous entendons le même son de cloche ici et là depuis les années 1800. Je n'étais pas né à l'époque, mais un article publié pendant à cette époque remettait en question la pertinence des syndicats. Était-ce temps de passer à autre chose? Je ne crois pas que les syndicats seront jamais inutiles, parce qu'il y a les patrons d'un côté qui cherchent à faire fonctionner leur organisation, et de l'autre, il y a nous, qui devons nous unir pour former des syndicats afin de nous protéger et de nous assurer, avant tout, que nous faisons tout en notre pouvoir est fait pour le bien de nos membres, tout en accomplissant le travail que nous effectuons pour la Chambre des communes. Nous devons être en santé et être bien rémunérés et protégés.

Vous m'avez demandé si nous fonctionnons selon le modèle des vieux syndicats de l'époque industrielle. La vérité, c'est que nous partons du même principe. Nous avons négocié la convention collective avec le caucus du NPD... ça vous dit peut-être quelque chose. Nous nous assoyons avec les responsables et nous leur montrons ce qu'il y a dans nos budgets. Comment peut-on s'assurer d'être bien rémunéré afin de maintenir les employés en poste?

Habituellement, dans le contexte syndical actuel, le personnel du Nouveau Parti démocratique est mieux rémunéré, parce que nous négocions collectivement plutôt que seul à seul. Nous savons, bien évidemment, qu'il y a une grande disparité dans les situations selon qu'il y ait un syndicat ou non.

Nous parvenons ainsi à maintenir les employés en poste: ils accumulent de l'expérience et de l'ancienneté, et, par conséquent, deviennent de meilleurs employés. Je sais qu'il y a même d'anciens employés en face de moi présentement. Ils savent comment les choses fonctionnent. Au début, on fait ses premières armes, on apprend comment les choses fonctionnent et, après cinq ans, on sait faire un excellent travail. Le salaire devrait correspondre au temps que vous avez consacré à votre travail.

Cela ne se limite pas à la rémunération, il y a aussi l'horaire de travail flexible. Nous avons ici présentement — et je sais que je déroge un peu du thème de la vie de famille — une politique sur les heures supplémentaires. Quand nous avons besoin de travailler tard — et vous demanderez souvent à vos employés de travailler tard —, nous prenons toutes les heures supplémentaires, et les employés peuvent les utiliser pour prendre des vacances et pour passer du temps avec leur famille.

Cela étant dit, il est cependant difficile pour les jeunes mères et les jeunes pères de vraiment prendre des jours de congé, pour les raisons déjà données en réponse aux questions des libéraux et des conservateurs. Toutefois, cela leur offre au moins une certaine flexibilité: s'ils ont besoin de partir plus tôt, ils peuvent utiliser le temps qu'ils ont accumulé.

Le dernier point que j'aimerais aborder concerne le Code du travail et le privilège parlementaire. Les députés peuvent plus ou moins... disons, pas faire ce qu'ils veulent avec leurs employés, mais il y a une marge de manoeuvre qui... il est très facile d'abuser.

La majorité d'entre vous serait d'excellents patrons, mais dans le cas contraire, vous pourriez renvoyer un patron en claquant des doigts.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Thomas Shannon: Pardon, je veux dire: vous pourriez renvoyer un employé en claquant des doigts.

(1235)

M. David Christopherson:

Vous ne parlez pas aux bonnes personnes ici.

M. Thomas Shannon:

Vous ne pouvez congédier le patron. Nous ne pouvons congédier les députés; cependant, vous pouvez seulement congédier l'employé, sans poser de question.

Nous suivons en réalité une procédure, de façon à nous demander: « Était-ce juste? Que pouvons-nous faire pour améliorer la relation? », parce que le but ultime, à notre avis — de l'avis de tout le personnel ici —, c'est de faire avancer le parti, le pays, et d'essayer d'accomplir des choses pour les personnes que vous représentez. De cette façon, il y a une protection: nous suivons un processus, qu'il s'agisse de harcèlement ou d'un grief. Nous nous assurons qu'aucun membre du personnel n'est victime de mauvais traitements, parce qu'il y a un processus en place.

Je suppose c'est une trop longue description de la différence entre nos employés et les employés d'autres partis politiques en ce moment.

Le président:

Vous avez 30 secondes.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vais en rester là, à part vous donner l'occasion... nous avons parlé du vendredi. Il y a certaines choses qui ont circulé aujourd'hui.

Je vais simplement vous fournir l'occasion de formuler des commentaires sur l'une ou l'autre des suggestions que vous avez entendues, de façon officielle ou non, que vous aimez ou non. C'est simplement une occasion pour vous de vous exprimer sur les autres aspects de ce dont nous parlons ici. [Français]

Mme Mélisa Ferreira:

J'abonde dans le même sens que Tara et que le député. Le fait de comprimer les heures va faire en sorte que les employés avec de jeunes familles vont devoir travailler de plus longues heures pendant quatre jours et sacrifier du temps passé avec leur famille. Je crois que ce sera plus difficile si le travail du vendredi est supprimé, si je puis m'exprimer ainsi. À mon humble avis, ce n'est pas la bonne chose à faire. [Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. Je reprends mon temps.

M. David Christopherson:

Et je me battrai jusqu'à la mort pour que vous l'ayez; qu'en dites-vous?

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il y a au moins cinq anciens membres du personnel autour de la table aujourd'hui, donc je crois qu'il est très important pour nous d'inscrire dans le compte rendu les répercussions du mode de vie parlementaire sur le personnel. J'ai été employé ici pour...

M. David Christopherson: Je l'ai été aussi. J'ai été adjoint de circonscription.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Nous sommes donc au moins six, mais Mark n'est pas ici habituellement.

J'ai eu une fille pendant que je travaillais comme membre du personnel ici, puis j'ai mené une campagne d'investiture avec un nouveau-né. Cela a été passablement difficile.

Je sais que cela dépasse le cadre normal de vos fonctions. J'apprécie vraiment que vous veniez nous parler. Je sais que ce n'est probablement pas l'expérience la plus agréable qui soit.

J'ai passé beaucoup de temps ici. La seule fois où je n'ai pas été ici, c'est durant les élections. Comment est-ce que les choses se passent — ma question concerne particulièrement M. Thompson — durant une élection? Quel genre de répercussions les élections ont-elles sur le personnel, le moral, le travail qui est effectué ici — particulièrement les élections de longue haleine, comme celles de 78 jours qui viennent de se terminer?

M. Roger Thompson:

Parlez-vous des répercussions des élections sur le travail?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Non. Nous partons tous, donc à quoi est-ce que cela ressemble ici? Comment cela influe-t-il sur votre travail, si vous êtes des syndiqués? Que se passe-t-il ici?

M. Roger Thompson:

Essentiellement, l'endroit où vous êtes assis aujourd'hui, c'est ce à quoi mon service s'attelle chaque jour: nous faisons la mise en place pour vous.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Eh bien, merci.

M. Roger Thompson:

Tout le plaisir est pour nous.

Dans notre service, la plupart de nos employés travaillent à temps plein, ce qui fait que nous sommes très occupés durant les élections. Mais si vous prenez le cas des ESAI — les employés saisonniers accrédités — dans certains des autres services dont nous avons parlé, vous avez raison de dire que le travail diminue. Les cafétérias sont fermées; l'installation de production alimentaire, l'installation d'où provient la nourriture ou l'installation de production, cesse ses activités, et seulement une équipe restreinte, probablement, travaille là-bas, et il y a peut-être une équipe restreinte dans les cuisines ou dans une ou deux cafétérias.

Donc, la charge de travail pour ces personnes diminue. Dans certains services, comme celui pour lequel je travaille — le transport — les employés à temps plein sont occupés. Nous sommes occupés par les déménagements et toutes les élections et le reste. Mais lorsqu'il est question des employés saisonniers accrédités, le travail diminue de façon radicale. Comme je l'ai dit, ils se voient offrir 5 ou 5 h 30 de travail.

Dans notre convention collective, une clause d'ancienneté est prévue pour les personnes qui deviennent des employés saisonniers accrédités. L'ancienneté de ces personnes est fondée sur le titre du poste. Si une personne a de l'ancienneté, elle travaillera. Une personne ayant moins d'ancienneté ne peut travailler plus d'heures qu'une personne qui a plus d'ancienneté; par conséquent, si les installations sont fermées, il n'y a qu'un nombre minimal d'employés qui travaillent, et il s'agit donc d'une baisse importante. Le nombre d'heures de travail baisse de façon radicale pour ces personnes.

(1240)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si bon nombre des services sont conçus en fonction de nous, les députés, serait-il utile pour le personnel que, par exemple, comme vous l'avez mentionné, les cafétérias soient ouvertes toute l'année, plutôt que seulement lorsque nous sommes ici? Cela changerait-il beaucoup les choses pour vous? Je suis curieux de le savoir.

M. Roger Thompson:

Si vous voulez mon avis...

M. David de Burgh Graham: C'est ce que je vous demande.

M. Roger Thompson: ... je n'ai jamais compris pourquoi elles sont fermées, parce que tout le monde doit manger. Je n'ai jamais compris pourquoi nous — je suis désolé, je ne veux pas dire cela — ne nous occupons que des députés pour ces choses et pourquoi elles sont fermées.

À Noël, par exemple, il y a des employés dans l'ensemble des sites satellites sur la Colline, des employés qui travaillent au 131 ou au 181, rue Queen. Lorsque les députés sont absents, ces employés doivent manger, et lorsque les cafétérias sont fermées... il y a peut-être une ou deux cafétérias qui restent ouvertes, et, ainsi, il n'y en a pas assez pour les employés.

À vrai dire, oui, elles pourraient rester ouvertes, mais je ne fais pas partie de la direction, donc je ne...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Non, c'est un commentaire juste. Je l'apprécie.

Voici une autre question, qui concerne de nouveau l'administration de la Chambre des communes, en effet. Vous êtes au moins deux à avoir des enfants; je ne sais pas si le reste d'entre vous en ont. Lorsque vous aviez de jeunes enfants sur la Colline, avez-vous essayé d'utiliser la garderie de la Chambre des communes? De quel genre de processus s'agissait-il? Pourquoi l'avez-vous fait ou ne l'avez-vous pas fait?

Mme Tara Hogeterp:

Mes deux enfants sont allés à la garderie de la Colline parlementaire. En réalité, j'ai siégé au comité de la garderie, donc je m'y connais un peu au sujet de la garderie de la Colline.

Dans le cas de ma première enfant, je ne m'étais pas rendu compte que je devais l'inscrire sur une liste d'attente lorsque j'étais enceinte, donc elle n'a pas pu aller à la garderie de la Colline avant l'année suivante. J'ai dû trouver une autre garderie jusqu'à ce que nous soyons en mesure d'obtenir une place.

Une fois qu'elle a eu une place, son frère, mon fils, a été mis automatiquement sur la liste et s'est vu accorder la priorité, donc il a été en mesure d'obtenir une place. Cependant, à la garderie de la Colline, il n'y a pas d'installations prévues pour les enfants de moins de 18 mois. Mon congé de maternité n'était que de un an, et il y a donc eu un écart de six mois avant que je puisse avoir la possibilité d'obtenir une place. Pendant ces six mois, j'ai dû prendre deux mois à mes frais, puis j'ai trouvé une nourrice pour quatre mois. Ma fille allait toujours à la garderie tandis que mon cadet était avec une nourrice à temps plein, et nous avons donc fini par payer en double.

Je sais que si vous obtenez une place et que celle-ci se libère, mais que votre enfant n'a pas encore 18 mois, vous êtes tenu de payer pour la conserver, sinon vous la perdez, et elle ira à quelqu'un d'autre.

C'est une garderie très « en demande », et l'endroit est joli. J'ai adoré que mes enfants puissent être là-bas. C'était si fantastique de pouvoir les déposer au travail, et mes enfants disent encore « te souviens-tu lorsqu'on t'a vue...? » — et il a, quoi, six ans, et elle a huit ans. Ils s'en souviennent donc encore. Mes enfants pouvaient prononcer le mot « Parlement » bien avant que la plupart des enfants ne puissent prononcer le mot « bateau ».

Le fait de venir ici et de les voir sur la Colline... c'est vraiment un honneur d'avoir cette chance, et la garderie est fantastique, mais elle n'a pas la capacité d'accepter plus d'enfants parce que l'espace est limité. Aussi, pour que la garderie fonctionne, il doit y avoir un espace extérieur. C'est vraiment limité.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous avons par là-bas une belle et grande pelouse.

Mme Tara Hogeterp:

Oui, oui; cependant, c'est une question de respect de la vie privée pour les enfants, même s'ils se font littéralement traîner un peu partout et qu'ils sont formés pour dire « pas de photos » aux touristes. C'est assez adorable.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien; je comprends.

Au-delà de ce que vous êtes en mesure d'accomplir au comité — au-delà de ce mandat —, quelles améliorations pourraient être apportées à la garderie? Quel type d'améliorations aimeriez-vous voir? Et dans quelle direction devrait-elle aller selon vous?

Mme Tara Hogeterp:

Je ne suis pas ici pour représenter la garderie, donc ce n'est que mon opinion, mais j'aimerais que la garderie soit en mesure de répondre aux besoins des députés et à ceux des membres du personnel, en étant accessible aux enfants de 12 mois plutôt que de 18 mois. Ce serait idéal, parce que cet écart de six mois peut représenter un certain défi pour une famille.

Je me rappelle que la liste d'attente représentait un véritable défi, donc nous devons nous assurer que les députés savent, lorsqu'ils deviennent députés, que, s'ils songent à avoir des enfants, ou qu'une fois qu'ils ont des enfants, ils doivent inscrire immédiatement leurs noms sur la liste d'attente.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est juste.

Le président:

Merci. Votre temps est écoulé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela répond à la question.

Le président:

Monsieur Schmale.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président. J'apprécie la conversation que nous avons aujourd'hui avec les anciens membres du personnel. Je suis l'un des cinq, je crois que c'est le nombre sur lequel nous nous sommes entendus, anciens employés sur la Colline et dans la circonscription. C'est bien d'entendre l'opinion d'autres membres du personnel.

Je souhaite seulement confirmer — ma mémoire me fait défaut à ce sujet — si la garderie ici sur la Colline est administrée par une société privée ou par le personnel de la Colline.

(1245)

Mme Tara Hogeterp:

Ni l'un ni l'autre; c'est un organisme sans but lucratif. La garderie est gérée par un conseil d'administration.

Je pense, si elle existe, c'est grâce au Président. Le processus a été long et laborieux pour les employés — pas nécessairement pour les membres du personnel politique, mais pour les personnes qui travaillaient sur la Colline — qui ont exercé des pressions pour que la garderie soit créée dans les années 1980, il me semble. Je suis assez sûre que c'était dans les années 1980.

Il y a quelques ressources fournies par la Chambre, essentiellement pour ce qui concerne l'espace, mais tout est géré grâce aux droits perçus auprès des parents.

M. Jamie Schmale:

J'ai bien compris.

Eh bien, je pense que la situation qui touche la garderie est une chose à laquelle la plupart des Canadiens font face. Lorsque je suis allé inscrire mon fils, je l'ai fait avant sa naissance, et il y avait une liste d'attente. Nous avons vérifié... je ne peux me rappeler le nombre, mais nous avons pu repérer seulement une garderie qui acceptait les enfants de moins de 18 mois, ce qui est assez problématique lorsque vous faites des pieds et des mains pour tout organiser.

Est-ce le ratio qui pose problème pour ce qui est de trouver un fournisseur pour s'occuper des bébés âgés de moins de 18 mois? Est-ce le ratio éducateur par enfants qui pose problème?

Mme Tara Hogeterp:

Le ratio est un problème, et aussi l'espace physique, parce que les enfants de moins de 18 mois doivent faire une sieste supplémentaire, et le ministère de l'Ontario a aussi d'autres exigences pour ces enfants. Il y a des exigences en matière de tables à langer et de certains éléments. Il n'y a pas assez de place à la garderie pour accueillir un second ou un troisième groupe, qui serait le groupe des moins de 18 mois.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je présume que c'est une de ces choses où « si on le fait, les gens viendront ». Je présume que si on lançait cela, si nous sommes en mesure d'avancer dans ce dossier et que cela se produit, il y aurait, selon les conversations que nous avons eues lors des réunions précédentes, beaucoup d'intérêt à changer cette exigence et à éliminer ce genre d'obstacles pour de nombreuses personnes.

Mme Tara Hogeterp:

Je présume qu'il n'y aurait aucune difficulté à combler les places.

M. Jamie Schmale:

C'est ce que je comprends.

Mme Tara Hogeterp:

La garderie essaie de maintenir le bilinguisme, et elle a donc un programme français et un programme anglais. La difficulté, je me souviens lorsque j'y étais, c'était parfois de nous assurer que nous avions assez d'enfants francophones pour combler les places en français et d'enfants anglophones pour combler les places en anglais, mais ce n'est qu'une question d'équilibre à atteindre.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Parfait.

Simplement pour reprendre là où M. Strahl s'est arrêté concernant la semaine de travail comprimée, pour les députés, cela ne change probablement pas beaucoup les choses, mais pour le personnel, je présume... je réfléchis seulement en tant qu'ancien employé, ou maintenant en tant que député qui embauche des employés, comment est-ce que je vendrais l'idée à mes employés: « Vous serez ici tôt le matin, vous travaillerez probablement 12 heures par jour, du lundi au jeudi, puis, le vendredi, vous rattraperez votre retard, et nous recommencerons à zéro le lundi. » M. Strahl a abordé un peu cette question. Je cherche seulement à connaître davantage votre opinion.

Je ne sais pas comment cela fonctionnerait dans un environnement de travail, si on s'occupe de gérer le budget, mais aussi de gérer la vie du personnel. Ce serait assez difficile, je crois, dans une semaine de travail comprimée.

Le président:

Vous avez une minute. [Français]

Mme Mélisa Ferreira:

Non, ce n'est pas facile, et je pense que c'est une mesure qui accommode davantage les députés que les employés. En effet, les députés sont déjà ici. Ils font déjà ce travail de 12 heures par jour alors que les employés ont un cadre qui se situe plutôt entre 7 heures et 18 heures, si je peux m'exprimer ainsi. En somme, je pense que c'est vraiment une mesure qui favorise les députés plutôt que les employés. Cela va faire en sorte qu'il va y avoir davantage d'heures supplémentaires et plus de temps passé au Parlement du lundi au jeudi que c'est le cas en ce moment et cela aura des impacts sur les familles. Comme Tara le disait précédemment, le temps qui est crucial, c'est celui de 17 heures à 20 heures, avant le dodo des enfants, et c'est du temps que nous ne passerons pas avec notre famille. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Vandenbeld.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Merci.

J'aimerais obtenir une précision de M. Thompson et de M. McDonald.

Combien des membres du personnel qui travaillent sur la Colline sont des employés saisonniers accrédités et combien sont en réalité des employés réguliers à temps plein?

M. Roger Thompson:

Nous avons environ 102 employés saisonniers accrédités.

(1250)

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Combien d'autres membres du personnel y a-t-il, à peu près, au total sur la Colline?

M. Jim McDonald:

Il y en a au total 450 dans les unités de négociation que nous représentons, et 102 parmi ceux-ci sont des employés saisonniers accrédités.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

D'accord, donc c'est moins d'un quart, ou 20 %. Je voulais seulement avoir une idée du nombre de personnes touchées, étant donné que l'expérience des autres pourrait être assez différente en ce qui a trait à la semaine de travail condensée. De plus, il semble y avoir des choses que nous pouvons faire ici sur la Colline pour que ce ne soit pas si centré sur les députés — par exemple, si nous tenons compte du personnel qui est ici même durant les semaines où les députés retournent dans leur circonscription — et qui pourraient atténuer certains de ces problèmes.

Je voudrais aussi revenir sur le personnel politique. Pour avoir travaillé sur la Colline — au sein de l'équipe de recherche du caucus, mais aussi comme membre du personnel d'un ministre, je trouve que la journée de travail, les jours où nous siégeons, tourne beaucoup autour du député ou du ministre. Par exemple, le personnel du ministre passe une bonne part de sa matinée à préparer la période de questions. Il y a beaucoup de travail qui tourne autour de cela. Il y a du personnel ici derrière nous qui — lorsque nous sommes ici avec le Comité — doit nous accompagner. Il nous suit toute la journée, mais des tâches comme la correspondance et les notes d'information et toutes sortes de choses s'accumulent.

Selon mon expérience, s'il y avait eu un jour par semaine pour faire du rattrapage, sans avoir à répondre immédiatement au député... J'ai souvent travaillé la fin de semaine, et j'ai parlé à un certain nombre de membres du personnel qui sont juste derrière moi, et je crois que beaucoup de membres du personnel viennent ici la fin de semaine pour éviter... Il faut avoir du temps pour faire du rattrapage.

Alors, ne serait-il pas plus facile, pour les membres du personnel qui viennent la fin de semaine, d'avoir une journée où le député n'est pas là? Ils pourraient alors faire du rattrapage et n'auraient pas à travailler la fin de semaine. [Français]

Mme Mélisa Ferreira:

Selon moi, les périodes où la Chambre ne siège pas sont celles où nous pouvons faire du rattrapage.

Je commence ma journée de travail très tôt le matin et je vais chercher mes enfants à la garderie à 16 h 30. Or quand ceux-ci sont au lit, à 20 heures, je me mets de nouveau au travail à l'ordinateur pour préparer le discours du lendemain à partir de chez-moi. Le télétravail serait un aspect que vous pourriez considérer. Votre comité pourrait en effet réfléchir à la façon d'améliorer les conditions qui entourent cette façon de travailler.

À l'heure actuelle, les logiciels qui nous permettent d'avoir accès à nos données par l'entremise d'Outlook Web Acces ne constituent pas la façon la plus efficace de fonctionner, si je peux m'exprimer ainsi. [Traduction]

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

D'accord.

Je partage mon temps avec M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très brièvement, pour revenir sur le point de M. Schmale au sujet du programme de garderies national, il se rappellera peut-être que nous étions sur le point d'avoir un programme de garderies national lorsque son parti est arrivé au pouvoir et l'a annulé, le remplaçant par un modeste chèque mensuel imposable qui aurait payé environ 50 minutes par mois des frais imposés à Mme Hogeterp par l'école. Alors, oui, il y a un problème à l'égard des services de garderie à l'échelle nationale, mais c'est un problème que nous aurions dû et que nous aurions pu régler et que nous aurions réglé il y a longtemps si ce n'eût été de l'orientation politique franchement étrange qu'a prise le gouvernement précédent.

Cela dit, je voulais demander ceci à tous mes collègues ici présents: avez-vous beaucoup de collègues qui ont simplement abandonné et quitté la Colline en raison de la vie que nous devons mener ici?

Mme Tara Hogeterp:

Non.

Dans le bureau où je travaillais, on disait souvent à la blague que la chaise occasionnait des grossesses, parce que je suis tombée enceinte, ma collègue est tombée enceinte, ma remplaçante pendant mon congé de maternité est tombée enceinte... C'était carrément une grossesse après l'autre. Toutes ces personnes travaillent encore sur la Colline, sauf une qui travaille maintenant pour un ministre en Alberta.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans le même type d'emploi?

Mme Tara Hogeterp:

C'est le même type d'emploi, et nous sommes toutes restées. Je sais que la plupart de mes collègues ayant des enfants restent parce que, grâce à notre convention collective, nous avons pu garder les mêmes heures de travail et soutenir nos députés sans trop de problèmes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Et sur ce point, monsieur Shannon, y a-t-il des membres du personnel ministériel du NPD qui ne sont pas syndiqués? Je suppose qu'il y a plusieurs niveaux de direction. Depuis que je travaille à la Colline, je n'ai jamais fait de semaine aussi petite que les 37 heures et demie que le gouvernement qualifie de « temps plein ». Je crois que c'est une légère sous-estimation du temps que nous passons au travail.

Dans le contexte budgétaire actuel, comment les bureaux politiques syndiqués arrivent-ils à faire tout ce qu'il y a à faire? Je suis curieux d'entendre votre point de vue à ce sujet.

M. Thomas Shannon:

Le temps plein représente 37 heures et demie, c'est bien cela. Cependant, dans les postes politiques, les gens qui sont députés actuellement et ceux qui ont déjà occupé ce genre d'emploi savent qu'il y a beaucoup de travail à faire. Ce qui arrive habituellement, c'est que beaucoup de personnes font plus d'heures. Lorsqu'elles choisissent de le faire, en raison des circonstances, elles peuvent récupérer ce temps plus tard. L'idée est d'appliquer un ratio de un pour un.

Si vous faites plus d'heures, ce qui arrive...

Vous ne pouvez pas faire cela tous les jours, sinon vous gâchez votre vie. L'idée est d'essayer d'atteindre un équilibre entre sa vie personnelle et le travail. Vous faites le travail que vous pouvez et vous travaillez les heures que vous pouvez. Si vous faites plus d'heures, vous pouvez alors récupérer ce temps pendant les périodes moins occupées, soit pendant les semaines où la Chambre ne siège pas ou pendant l'été, en général. C'est ça l'idée: garder l'équilibre et en faire le plus possible pendant le temps que nous passons au travail, comme partout ailleurs.

(1255)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Et à propos du point...

Le président:

Non, je suis désolé.

Je vais seulement donner la possibilité aux témoins d'ajouter des commentaires qu'ils n'auraient pas eu la possibilité de faire avant de lever la séance.

M. Jim McDonald:

Je veux dire que je représente peut-être plutôt l'ancien type de représentant syndical pour ce qui est de l'apparence et de la manière d'être, ainsi que de la façon dont j'ai travaillé. J'évolue dans le domaine des relations de travail depuis 35 ans, et ma carrière est presque divisée en deux, avec 17 années du côté du patronat et les 17 ou 18 autres années du côté du syndicat. Les syndicats sont encore nécessaires pour nombre de raisons, mais la raison la plus moderne est l'émergence de nombreuses nouvelles réalités. Les problèmes de santé mentale sont maintenant une considération très importante pour nous et nos membres, et les exercices de réduction des coûts amorcés par les employeurs en vue de diminuer le nombre d'employés et les coûts de fonctionnement, et tout ce qui y est relié. La perte des avantages pour les employés saisonniers qualifiés est énorme à nos yeux. Comment est-il possible de travailler pendant deux ans et d'avoir un revenu décent et tous les avantages pour ensuite perdre son statut d'employé saisonnier qualifié en raison de 20, 30 ou 50 heures manquantes et tout perdre pendant deux ans jusqu'à ce que l'on puisse être considéré à nouveau comme un employé saisonnier qualifié? C'est un marché extrêmement difficile.

Je ne sais pas si vous êtes courant de ce fait, mais la Chambre, dans divers processus de règlement des différends, a déclaré officiellement que toute personne qui occupe un emploi avant de devenir un employé saisonnier qualifié n'est pas considérée comme un employé, selon la définition. Il s'agit simplement d'une personne qui travaille ici, et ses avantages sont limités aux normes minimales des relations employeur-employé. En toute franchise, ces gens-là ne restent pas. Il est impossible de bâtir un effectif fiable qui va rester longtemps si on leur fait subir des montages russes. La Chambre des communes — selon mon expérience, depuis que je suis à l'AFPC — a toujours été dans sa bulle, si vous me passez l'expression. Elle ne fonctionne pas comme un employeur normal, ou comme dans un milieu de travail normal, pour des gens qui ont besoin de stabilité. Si vous êtes actuellement un employé saisonnier qualifié, que vous essayez de contracter une hypothèque, mais que vous ne pouvez pas garantir que vos heures seront les mêmes l'an prochain que cette année, ou bien que vous ne perdrez pas carrément votre statut d'employé. Je crois qu'il y a des situations où les heures de travail ont été manipulées pour empêcher des gens de franchir ce seuil, pour ne pas avoir à leur payer d'avantages. Il y a diverses motivations, mais je crois qu'il y a un besoin criant de syndicat. Je crois aux syndicats et à ce qu'ils ont apporté à la société, mais malheureusement, certaines personnes fonctionnent encore comme avant. Je crois que la situation serait pitoyable s'il n'y avait pas eu des syndicats pour empêcher les employés d'être exploités.

Le président:

Merci à tous d'être venus. C'est très apprécié. Vous nous avez donné une bonne vue d'ensemble pour notre étude. Si vous avez d'autres points à ajouter, n'hésitez pas à les soumettre par écrit à la greffière.

Il est 13 heures, je demande l'indulgence du Comité. Peut-être devrions-nous rester quelques minutes pour aborder quelques aspects touchant notre prochaine réunion, à savoir surtout la question de privilège parlementaire et ce que nous allons faire exactement à l'occasion de la prochaine réunion. Il est plus que probable que nous devrons changer la date à laquelle nous accueillerons à nouveau les gens d'Élections Canada — nous sommes sensés leur parler mardi prochain — ou que nous devrons au moins modifier la partie de la réunion que nous avons planifiée pour eux.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Dans le même ordre d'idées, je tiens à signaler à mes collègues que nous commençons maintenant à parler de certains aspects qui nous permettront d'en arriver à une définition de ce qu'on entend par « à huis clos ». Je veux mettre tout le monde au courant du fait que M. Chan et moi-même continuons les discussions et que nous espérons vous revenir avec... Il nous reste seulement à nous entendre sur la formulation d'une clause. Si nous pouvons parvenir à nous entendre, monsieur le président, je vous demanderais de nous permettre de présenter ouvertement cette motion avant toute chose. Si nous arrivons à une entente, en supposant que tous les autres l'appuient, cela ne devrait pas prendre beaucoup de temps. Je souhaitais simplement le mentionner maintenant pour vous tenir au courant de la situation. Si nous pouvions l'insérer quelque part au début et l'adopter, alors au moment d'aborder des dossiers plus délicats, nous comprendrons les règles à suivre, surtout lorsque nous sommes à huis clos. Je vous laisse vous en occuper, monsieur.

(1300)

Le président:

Scott, auriez-vous parlé à M. Scheer?

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, je lui ai parlé... Je vois que nous changeons de sujet. Il a dit qu'il avait quelques préoccupations sur des aspects pratiques. Ce qu'il veut faire, je crois — et je ne suis pas en train déformer ses propos ni de vendre la mèche —, c'est de modifier le libellé de l'ordre permanent proposé. J'ignore s'il a l'intention de nous le présenter ou s'il souhaite consulter le Président actuel en privé. Je ne le sais pas, mais au moins vous êtes au courant. Pour votre information, je ne crois pas qu'il le prendrait mal si, par exemple, vous l'abordiez directement et lui demandiez ce qu'il en est.

Le président:

D'accord. Mettons cela de côté pour l'instant.

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je sais que nous avons changé de sujet, mais j'aimerais revenir sur le point de M. Christopherson.

D'abord j'aimerais le remercier de m'avoir permis de participer à cette conversation. Encore une fois, je vais m'en remettre, jusqu'à un certain point, aux députés conservateurs du Comité. Une fois la formulation appropriée établie, si nous pouvons en venir à un consensus et obtenir l'unanimité, nous pourrions procéder assez rapidement.

Le président:

Avant de revenir sur la question de privilège, j'ai autre chose à mentionner: le sergent d'armes et le greffier de l'Australie sont tous deux disponibles vers 18 heures. Il faudrait vérifier les jours qui leur conviennent. Pendant la première semaine où nous serons de retour, savez-vous quel jour vous conviendrait à ce moment-là de la journée, je crois, entre 17, 18 ou 19 heures?

M. David Christopherson:

C'est à quel sujet, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Au sujet des initiatives propices à la vie de famille, avec des représentants de l'assemblée législative de l'Australie.

M. David Christopherson: D'accord. Je comprends.

Le président: Nous avons un décalage horaire de 15 heures avec eux, alors...

Monsieur Reid, est-ce que...?

M. Scott Reid:

Non, excusez-moi. Quelqu'un vient juste de me dire que Prince est décédé, alors cela m'a déconcentré.

Le président:

Nous essayons seulement de trouver une journée où les membres du Comité sont disponibles pour parler aux législateurs de l'Australie vers 17, 18 ou 19 heures pendant la semaine de notre retour. Ils sont disponibles, mais nous avons un décalage horaire de 15 heures avec eux.

M. Scott Reid:

Est-ce que le but serait qu'ils se joignent au Comité ou de les rencontrer de façon informelle?

Le président:

Non, ils seraient au téléphone. Ce serait par vidéoconférence, parce qu'il est 15 heures plus tard chez eux.

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai déjà habité là-bas, et je m'en souviens très bien, croyez-moi. J'ai fait des appels conférence quand j'étais là-bas, et je devais me lever à 2 heures du matin.

Le président:

L'heure proposée est dans la matinée, c'est un bon moment pour eux.

M. Scott Reid:

Quelle heure suggérez-vous?

Le président:

Dix-huit heures, ou un peu avant ou après cette heure, ce qui correspondrait à 9 heures le lendemain chez eux.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est 18 heures pour nous, et ce serait quel jour?

Le président:

Eh bien, c'est ce que nous essayons de décider. S'il y a une journée...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le mercredi 4 serait bon pour moi. Qu'en dites-vous?

Le président:

Le mercredi 4?

Nous ne savons pas s'il est disponible, mais nous...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le mercredi me convient généralement davantage que le lundi.

Le président:

Nous devons être au moins trois personnes. Le Comité complet n'a pas besoin d'être là.

M. Scott Reid:

Est-ce que je peux suggérer le mardi? Nous avions comme projet d'aller souper à 19 heures ce soir-là, alors cette plage horaire est déjà bloquée pour cela. Pourquoi ne pas tenir cette réunion avant, comme une vraie réunion, puis poursuivre de façon informelle au restaurant?

Le président:

Qu'en pensez-vous? Le mardi 3?

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Ça me va.

Le président: Le mardi 3.

M. Arnold Chan:

J'allais seulement dire que pour moi, à cause de ma chimiothérapie, le lundi est la seule journée plus difficile pour moi, parce que je reçois le traitement à Toronto.

Le président:

Oui, j'imagine que n'importe quel jour serait difficile.

M. David Christopherson:

Je ne pourrai pas être là. D'ailleurs, je serai un peu en retard pour le souper.

Une voix: Vous serez avec un autre comité, n'est-ce pas?

M. David Christopherson: Oui, je préside un comité interne.

M. Scott Reid:

Puisque M. Christopherson a un problème avec l'heure, mais pas avec la journée, le personnel ici peut la prévoir pour plus tard. Nous pourrions d'abord souper, quitte à commencer un peu plus tôt, puis tenir la réunion officielle après.

De cette façon, David, nous nous adaptons à votre horaire.

(1305)

M. David Christopherson:

Peu importe, ça me conviendrait très bien si je ne faisais pas partie de ceux qui s'occupent de cela... Je peux effectuer un suivi au moyen du hansard du Comité.

M. Scott Reid:

Eh bien, un membre du Nouveau Parti démocratique devrait être présent.

M. David Christopherson:

Eh bien, j'ai bien peur qu'en ce moment c'est moi ou personne d'autre. Je suis prêt à changer cela...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David Christopherson: ... mais je crois qu'il faudrait d'abord tenir des élections. Je me suis pas mal amusé à ce moment-là pour tout dire.

M. Scott Reid:

Personnellement, je ne suis pas en faveur, vous comprenez. J'aurais voté pour vous si je n'avais pas voté pour moi-même.

De toute façon, voici ce que je propose. Nous pourrions nous réunir et fixer l'appel à, disons, 20 heures, provisoirement, car nous avons prévu de dîner ensemble de toute façon.

Une voix: Oui.

Le président: C'est ce que nous allons faire alors?

M. David Christopherson:

Oui. Je peux aussi tenter de trouver quelqu'un pour me représenter.

Une voix: Envoyez Tyler, votre adjoint législatif.

M. David Christopherson: Il me ferait mal paraître.

Le président:

Combien de temps voulez-vous prévoir? J'imagine qu'une heure est le temps que nous consacrons habituellement à un témoin. Nous prévoyons habituellement une heure pour entendre deux ou trois témoins, donc ce serait suffisant pour une personne.

Nous tenterons de fixer le rendez-vous à 20 heures, le mardi. S'ils ne sont pas disponibles, nous proposerons de tenir le rendez-vous avant notre repas, et vous pourriez trouver quelqu'un pour vous remplacer, David.

M. David Christopherson: D'accord.

Le président: S'ils ne sont pas disponibles du tout, nous reviendrons sur ce sujet par courriel ou d'une autre façon.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur le président, est-ce qu'il s'agira d'une réunion formelle?

Le président:

Oui, en théorie.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis disponible à partir de 20 h 30. J'hésite à confirmer que je serai présent à 20 heures.

Le président:

Vous pouvez arriver en retard. Vous ne serez pas le premier à poser des questions.

Revenons maintenant sur la question de privilège. Je crois que nous devrions au moins commencer la discussion à ce sujet, au moins pendant la première heure de notre prochaine séance. Y a-t-il des propositions?

M. David Christopherson:

Puis-je poser une question au greffier par votre entremise?

Je ne me souviens plus, mais est-ce qu'il est absolument obligatoire de placer en tête de liste une question de privilège qui nous est renvoyée, ou est-ce uniquement par habitude que nous procédons généralement de cette façon?

Le président:

C'est parfois le cas. Il est arrivé par le passé que cela prenne quelques mois. Bien souvent, la question est abordée tôt, mais il n'y a pas...

M. David Christopherson:

Je posais la question parce que, selon mon expérience, ces questions sont habituellement traitées de façon prioritaire par égard pour la personne visée, et par respect du fait que la question nous a été renvoyée par le Président. Je serais favorable à l'idée de traiter cette question de façon prioritaire et à y consacrer au moins la première heure, afin que nous puissions déterminer ce qui est équitable et juste pour toutes les personnes touchées.

Le président:

Si nous réservons la première heure pour cette question, afin d'établir un plan, nous pourrions ensuite vérifier auprès des responsables d'Élections Canada s'ils sont d'accord pour qu'une heure au lieu de deux leur soit allouée.

M. David Christopherson:

Je n'aime pas ça du tout.

Le président:

Vous n'aimez pas ça?

M. David Christopherson:

À mon avis, nous nous sommes entendus pour deux heures, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Nous entendrons d'autres témoins alors.

Pendant la première heure... Désolé, monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Il s'agit d'une motion de l'opposition officielle. Avez-vous une proposition particulière à faire en ce qui concerne l'utilisation de la première heure?

M. Scott Reid:

Non, nous n'avons pas de proposition à faire pour l'instant. Je devrai vous répondre plus tard.

Je ne crois pas vraiment qu'il s'agisse... Les questions de privilège sont habituellement traitées comme des urgences, mais elles n'ont pas besoin de prendre beaucoup de temps, si vous voyez la différence. Nous devons déterminer s'il est possible de régler cette question d'une façon qui permet de le faire en une seule séance ou s'il nous faut plus de temps. Cela me semble être un point de départ raisonnable.

Je ne sais pas si vous étiez présent à la Chambre au moment où la question a été soulevée. On comprend qu'il ne s'agit pas d'une question très litigieuse. Je suis plutôt d'avis qu'il est possible de la traiter rapidement. C'est la seule remarque que je puisse faire.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je suis ouvert à cela. Je voulais savoir s'il y avait des directives de la Chambre concernant le processus ou le résultat, vu que c'est le leader de l'opposition officielle à la Chambre qui a présenté la motion.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est exact. J'imagine qu'il serait raisonnable qu'il soit présent.

C'est ce qui vient à l'esprit. Il est aussi un ancien président, donc il a traité de nombreuses questions de procédure et des questions connexes. Puis-je vous revenir là-dessus?

(1310)

M. Arnold Chan:

Bien sûr. Je crois que nous devrions faire appel au légiste pour qu'il nous donne certaines orientations sur la façon dont des ordres semblables venant de la Chambre ont été traités par le passé par le Comité afin que nous ayons au moins une idée de ce à quoi nous attendre.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous soulevez un bon point. De toute évidence, il faudra consacrer plus de temps à cette question.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je ne cherche pas à passer beaucoup de temps sur cette question. Nous pourrions peut-être obtenir ces renseignements de façon informelle, mais je crois qu'un peu d'orientation serait utile concernant le résultat pratique du processus.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous savez, ce n'est pas une mauvaise façon de commencer à aborder cette question; c'est peut-être une bonne idée que nous obtenions des informations de base parce que d'autres questions de privilège nous seront renvoyées. Le légiste pourrait nous guider quant à nos travaux, à la façon de traiter ces questions, à la façon dont ces questions ont été réglées antérieurement et nous exposer certaines pratiques exemplaires...

M. Arnold Chan:

Même s'il ne nous présente qu'un court document, afin que nous comprenions... J'ai connu quelques cas semblables, surtout liés à mon expérience législative en Ontario, d'allégations d'atteinte au privilège parlementaire, concernant une fuite de renseignements.

Le président:

Si j'ai bien compris ce que vous dites, pendant la première heure de notre séance prévue le premier mardi après le retour, nous allons entendre l'exposé du légiste et cela, nous l'espérons, dictera un processus à suivre ensuite. Pendant la deuxième heure, nous entendrons des témoignages. Nous allons peut-être laisser une heure libre, provisoirement, pendant la séance du jeudi, selon ce qui découlera de l'exposé du légiste, et nous entendrons d'autres témoignages pendant la deuxième heure de la séance du jeudi.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous pourrons entendre d'autres témoignages des responsables d'Élections Canada la semaine suivante.

Le président:

Oui, d'accord.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, je crois que c'est une bonne idée.

Nous commençons notre mandat, et nous savons que nous en avons pour quatre ans. Le fait de commencer par consulter le légiste est tout à fait logique. Il serait bien aussi de faire des travaux au lieu de seulement écouter l'exposé du légiste. Même si nous réservons une période pour tenter de cerner de combien de temps nous aurons besoin, nous pourrions nous entendre pour écouter l'exposé du légiste et ensuite tenter d'établir un plan d'action afin que cette question n'échappe pas à notre contrôle.

Le président:

Allouons environ 45 minutes au légiste, et ensuite nous prendrons 15 minutes pour déterminer l'emploi du temps du reste de l'étude de cette question.

M. David Christopherson:

Le légiste de la province peut nous donner les grandes lignes, et nous pourrons ensuite nous occuper des détails pendant les 15 minutes restantes.

Le président:

Je crois que nous sommes en quelque sorte d'accord sur le fait que nous ne consacrerons pas beaucoup de temps à ce point en particulier.

M. David Christopherson:

Eh bien, c'est ce que nous pensons pour l'instant.

Le président:

Oui.

La semaine pendant laquelle il était prévu d'accueillir des responsables d'Élections Canada est celle qui précède la semaine passée dans les circonscriptions pendant le mois de mai. Le 17 mai, une heure est allouée au Budget principal des dépenses, que nous pourrions éventuellement déplacer à l'horaire de la première semaine au retour. Pour ce qui est de la deuxième séance prévue pendant cette semaine, soit la dernière journée avant la semaine passée dans les circonscriptions, nous donnerons, du moins pendant une partie de cette réunion, des instructions de rédaction concernant le rapport provisoire. J'imagine que nous allons essayer de trouver une façon de tout faire.

Une dernière chose avant que nous...

Oui, monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

J'aimerais suggérer aux autres membres du Comité que nous recourions peut-être au comité de direction. Je m'excuse, parce que je suis maintenant présent de façon plus irrégulière, mais peut-être que cela serait une solution qui nous permettrait de régler cette question sans utiliser du temps réservé au Comité. Peut-être pourrions-nous établir un horaire régulier de réunion en comité de direction, disons au moins une fois par mois.

Je suis désolé; s'il était possible de tenir compte de ma malheureuse...

M. David Christopherson:

Non, non, cela ne pose pas de problème. Il y a cela, mais aussi, je m'apprêtais à dire que nous ne pouvons poursuivre que pendant un certain temps avant d'avoir un plan de travail qui nous permettra de voir les dates et d'apporter des modifications au calendrier.

Je crois qu'il y aurait certainement lieu de tenir une réunion du comité de direction, monsieur le président, et cela permettrait de résoudre bon nombre de nos problèmes.

M. Arnold Chan:

Nous pourrions peut-être tenir une réunion très longue le mardi soir, en réserver une partie au comité de direction et ensuite déterminer l'horaire des réunions futures afin d'établir une certaine régularité.

M. David Christopherson:

Un comité de direction en guise de hors-d'oeuvre.

M. Arnold Chan: Exactement.

Le président:

L'horaire est établi pour une certaine période.

Monsieur Reid, vous souhaitiez soulever un point concernant la télédiffusion avant que nous ne partions.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui. Merci de me le rappeler.

J'allais simplement dire que, puisque nous nous réunissons fréquemment dans une salle d'où les séances sont télédiffusées...

(1315)

Le président:

Pourraient être télédiffusées.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, c'est exact. La télédiffusion est possible.

Je crois que, quand nous tenons des audiences qui ne portent pas sur un sujet de nature uniquement administrative, quand nous entendons des témoignages sur des sujets divers — sur les initiatives favorisant la vie de famille, le directeur général des élections ou quelqu'un d'autre —, les délibérations devraient être télédiffusées d'office. Cela n'ajoute rien à notre charge de travail.

J'appliquais cette pratique quand j'étais président du sous-comité des droits de la personne. Nous tenions régulièrement nos réunions dans cette salle-ci. Il était étonnant de constater le nombre de fois que des personnes me disaient: « Je vous ai vu au Parlement » et je répondais: « Ce n'est pas possible. » Ce qu'elles voulaient dire c'était qu'elles m'avaient vu en train de présider une de ces réunions. J'étais beaucoup plus écouté que je n'aurais pu le prévoir, pour ce que ça vaut.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Je n'avais pas réalisé que nos séances n'étaient pas télédiffusées. Je dois admettre que je tenais cela pour acquis, tout simplement, parce que je ne comprends pas pourquoi elles ne le seraient pas. Nous sommes réunis dans la salle. Nous accueillons le directeur général des élections. Il s'agit d'une des plus importantes questions que le public souhaiterait nous voir traiter.

Comme dans le cas du Comité permanent des comptes publics, je suis d'avis que, si nous sommes dans une salle comme celle-ci et que nous tenons des audiences publiques, nous devrions nous servir du système de caméra d'office, et ne pas le faire seulement de façon exceptionnelle. La présente séance aurait vraiment dû être télédiffusée. Il n'y a absolument aucune raison pour ne pas l'avoir fait, sinon d'avoir oublié.

Monsieur le président, à l'avenir, nous pourrions peut-être demander au greffier de nous aider à nous rappeler de le faire quand nous tenons des audiences qui sont vraisemblablement d'intérêt public. Nous sommes dans une salle qui est déjà munie de l'équipement nécessaire.

Le président:

David.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'ai pas d'objection. Si de toute façon nous sommes dans cette salle-ci et que nous discutons d'un sujet intéressant avec des témoins, eh bien, allumez les caméras.

Une voix: Je croyais que nos délibérations étaient télédiffusées.

Le président:

D'accord, nous ferons cela, selon les disponibilités.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui. Merci.

Le président:

Nous avons terminé?

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on April 21, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.