header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-01-26 PROC 3

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

I'd like to call to order this third meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. This meeting is being televised. Today we'll consider committee business and continue consideration of our routine motions.

Just before I make introductory remarks, I'll remind people that at the end of the last meeting, Mr. Christopherson had the floor. I will shortly yield to him after a couple of opening comments here.

As you know, one of the high priorities in committee work is to deal with government business. You did get a letter about some government business, which I'll mention at the end of the meeting. Hopefully it will be for future meetings.

I had a chat with Mr. Christopherson on the weekend. We felt that before we proceeded back to his having the floor on the motion we were discussing, and to facilitate the rest of Parliament doing its work, it would be good if we could first go to the very last motion on routine business. That is the delegation of authority to the whips to appoint all the other committees.

Is that okay, Mr. Christopherson?

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Chair, that accurately reflects our discussion. Yes, I do defer...for the motion to be placed, and would hope that I get the floor back after we've done that.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Sure, as agreed.

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

Given that from Mr. Christopherson, we're fine on the government side to proceed in that manner.

Could we then perhaps move that particular motion, if that's agreed by all committee members?

The Chair:

Are you moving the motion?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I am moving the motion. I'll read out the motion for the record, please. This deals with the delegation of authority to whips.

I so move: That the three Whips be delegated the authority to act as the Striking Committee pursuant to Standing Orders 104, 113 and 114, and that they be authorized to present to the Chair, in a report signed by all three Whips, or their representatives, their unanimous recommendations for presentation to the House, on behalf of the Committee.

The Chair:

Is there discussion?

These are routine motions. Hopefully a lot of them will go through quickly.

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: We will now give the floor to Mr. Christopherson.

We will turn to the motion we were dealing with regarding the subcommittee. I believe it was routine motion two in your packages.

David, we're speaking to the amendment you made.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Great. Thank you, Chair.

I'm glad that we're able to get a little bit of business done, because I did say that I wasn't deliberately trying.... My sole purpose wasn't just to delay things. I have, I think, a relevant point.

I hope that the government's had a bit of a change of heart, given that, again, this really doesn't need to be an issue. It's both nothing and big at the same time.

The situation is this. We're talking about our committee, which is the only body that can make a decision. We create a steering committee, sometimes called a subcommittee, but we call it a steering committee here. The whole purpose of the steering committee is to make the business of the committee move more efficiently and more quickly.

At the steering committee, we deal with things like the order of witnesses we'll agree upon, or the time frame we'll set aside for public hearings versus going in camera. In other words, what we really do is map out the work plan and the details. Do you know the old expression about the kind of letter you get when a committee writes it? It's the same sort of thing. There's so much detail that for all of us to do it just bogs us down and takes forever, so we leave those kinds of things with the steering committee.

Here's the thing, and this is why I said at the outset that only PROC, as a committee, can make decisions. The steering committee, or subcommittee, is not a decision-making body. Whether or not we agree with the voting or consensus issue that I'm raising, at the end of the day, even if there's a voting system—which I'm arguing we shouldn't have at that level—that committee can't make a decision to order coffee. They have no authority to make any decisions.

With any recommendation that's made when it's a consensus model—which is what I'm pushing for—if there's unanimity among the three representatives of the three parties at the steering committee, that recommendation goes to the committee. Normally, it comes and everybody's just fine with it, because their representative has looked at it. There are some cases where it's a little different, but for the most part, when a unanimous recommendation comes from the steering committee.... In fact, usually the entire report is accepted in terms of the recommendations made, because each of us knows that our representative was there, speaking on behalf of our vested interests as individual caucuses, while at the same time working for the betterment of the entire committee. That works best when there's consensus.

The other rule is that if you don't have unanimity, nothing goes to the committee. There are no recommendations. There's no politics. There's nothing to defeat. If there's no unanimity, it comes directly to the committee as if it had bypassed the steering committee. That's the impact that it has. It goes to the committee, it's discussed. If there isn't unanimity, then it comes right to this committee, acting as if it never went to the steering committee. The only thing that the steering committee does is try to come to an agreement on the details of the business that we do.

Again, if it were the Conservatives, with the greatest of respect, I wouldn't even try to make this argument, because on the committee that I chaired in the last Parliament, they eliminated the steering committee. There was no point in talking about the minutiae and details of a committee when the government of the day just stood there, folded its arms, and said, “It shall not be” and that was the end of that.

(1110)



We know how well that attitude went over after enough years, culminating in the election we just had and culminating in the election of the new government with a new mandate and a new vision. Part of what this new government promised—and this is the only reason why I'm making this an issue—is that one of our jobs as the opposition is to hold the government accountable. I understand that rules aren't very sexy and they're not very appealing, but I've been around long enough to know that with the rules we agree to today, when we get into crises down the road, go into our various corners, and have pitched political battles—that doesn't happen all the time on this committee but it happens from time to time on every committee—when that happens, we'll thrash it out.

But there's one thing we know for sure, Chair. No matter how controversial the issues are here, the government wins every vote 10 times out of 10. Every vote, they win. I've been in a majority government. It's a great feeling; you walk into a meeting in the House and you know you're going to win every vote, no matter what. This is a government that ran on a platform that said, “We're going to be different at committees”.

We really like the mother ship, the Westminster model, and the way they do committees. People who go there to watch them say that it's difficult to tell the opposition members from the government members. That means one of two things. Either you're in a democracy where there is very little democracy, everything is decided from on high and the opposition has no power or doesn't want power, but you do not have a dynamic democracy.... Most of us who've been here for a while have been to those countries, and we know first-hand what that looks like.

It's either that situation, where you can't tell who's government and who's opposition, or the situation where there's a stranglehold on everything. I won't name countries, but we could all put titles to that thought. They're actually functioning in a way that means they're there as parliamentarians and their partisan membership is secondary to trying to do the work of the committee. What they do, very successfully compared to us, is to try to remove some of the partisanship that's in the House. When they get to committee, they act as parliamentarians.

When everybody is focused the same way on an issue or a problem, if you're just observing and it's hard to tell who's the government and who's the opposition, that's a good thing. At most of our committees if you came walking in, within three minutes you'd know who's government and who's opposition, because our speeches can be and often are laced with partisanship. The government ran on a platform of saying, “We don't like that, it's not the kind of democracy we want, and we don't think that reflects the values of Canadians.” I'll say to the government that there were an awful lot of us in the NDP who shared that sentiment.

So the government got elected, okay? The dog chased the car and the dog caught the car. Now what? Well, so far, it's the same old same old.

We came here to our first meeting after the government ran on a platform of openness, transparency, new independence, and certainly removing parliamentary secretaries from the chokehold they had over the government majority. We walked in here on the first day and what did we see? We saw Mr. Lamoureux, whom I quite like; I've served with him for quite some time now, but this is not about him personally. Mr. Lamoureux, as the parliamentary secretary, was sitting right where Tom Lukiwski used to sit, who used to be the parliamentary secretary to the government House leader. It was the very system this government ran on, saying that they were going to change it. That was the first meeting. They completely threw everything they said in the election out the window and just went back to normal: “We'll do it just the way Conservatives did”.

So we called them on it. I called them on it. He moved down a couple of seats. We called him on it again and he moved down a couple of seats more, so we're making gains. He's getting closer to the door, but he's still here. At that first meeting, the blues will show that he spoke, by my estimate, probably 80% to 90% of the time, which used to be the problem. The parliamentary secretary would roll in here, tell the government members what the marching orders were from on high that day, and regardless of what debate we had, that was the way the vote went.

That exact thing is what the government said they were going to change. They said that they were going to give committees more independence, that they were going to let go of some of the power that the previous government corralled. Okay. That's good stuff and is part of the reason why the government was elected and got as many seats as it did.

(1115)



Now we're talking about the steering committee in that context. All I'm suggesting and asking and putting forward is that we...because remember, there's no set rule. Most committees go by consensus. I don't know any steering committee where they actually take votes, which is the point.

The government says, “Well, we won't do it very often and we're not looking to do that.” No, no, no. First of all, I started out negotiating collective agreements 40 years ago and I've been in politics ever since. That stuff is not going to wash. Once we get into our corners, and fighting on partisanship, those rules are what we have to live by. The government stands by every letter of them in order to maintain the control they want.

As a sign of good faith...and I really thought this was an easy one. I thought I was handing Mr. Lamoureux a ball that he would pick up and run with all over the bloody court, because he could say, “Oh, we're honouring our commitments. Mr. Christopherson's putting the pressure on us, but make no mistake, we want to do these things. We're willing to do that, blah blah blah.” I was worried that I had given him all that, and instead he digs in. In fact one of his members even tried to shut me down. Talk about shades of the previous government.

Back to the point, the steering committee...and here's the thing. If you don't live inside this stuff every day, it sounds like, “What the heck? You're just going on and on, trying to take up time.” I accept that this is some of the criticism. Fair enough. It's not true, but it's a fair criticism that can be made.

What happens if you have that voting dynamic? A number of things, Chair. You've been around a long time. You're back now, but you've been here before. You know how this place works.

If we're going by vote, well, now we're into the partisan parliamentary games that happen. They're all legal, but they're games, such as waiting until somebody leaves the room so that you can move a motion. That sort of thing happens even in the House, where House leaders and whips are keeping an eye on who's in the House, who isn't, and whether they can gain an advantage and grab control of the House. It's been done. If you're in a committee where voting matters, then it also depends on winning that vote, because now you have a positive motion going forward. Once you introduce voting into the dynamic of a meeting room....

Again, those of us who have been doing this kind of thing...and it doesn't have to be politics. It can be anybody engaged in community work who understands the difference between working towards something on a consensus basis versus a voting decision. Remember, all of this is in the context that this committee is the only body that can make decisions, and that the government wins these votes 10 times out of 10. All we're asking is that we remove that irritant—that's all it really is—from our steering committee and subcommittees and acknowledge that they are consensus. If there isn't unanimity on an issue, it won't go forward to the committee with a recommendation, and if there is, it does. It's nice and simple.

This is the thing I'm having trouble with, Chair. What I'm speaking to means that the government gives up nothing, really, especially when they argue that they're never going to use the voting. Since it can't be a decision-making body, we're not taking.... It would be hard to measure the amount of power that's being taken. “Power” is not the right word. It's influence, nuance, advantage, but it's not power because that body doesn't make decisions. Even when they're unanimous, they are only recommendations. The subcommittee cannot make decisions for this group.

I come back to the fact that this was an easy one. My problem looking forward, as somebody who has been around here for a bit, is that if they're not willing to loosen up on things that really don't even matter, where there isn't any real power to give—it's more of a nuisance, a nuance, an influence, call it what you will—and they won't even give that up, then really how sincere is the government in terms of doing things differently from the last Parliament?

So far, all I see is same old same old. Nothing has changed. The faces have changed, but I'm still sitting here facing a majority, with the parliamentary secretary possibly still calling the shots.

(1120)



Also, on the first real attempt to modify anything, a tiny little thing like this, the government is digging in their heels and saying, “Oh, no, we can't do that.” Well, you can't have it both ways. You can get elected on sunny ways but that alone isn't going to carry the day. We have to see some change. I'm not getting any indication of that.

I was kibitzing with Mr. Lamoureux in the House yesterday hoping that would provide him a chance to come over and say, “By the way, Dave, we're not going to make an issue out of that other thing.” No, that didn't happen so unless I'm hearing something different, and I'm getting no indication the government is going to change, it doesn't look like they're going to acquiesce on this. If they're not going to give on this, then a whole lot of Canadians need to understand that the government is serious about parliamentary change only when it suits them, which, of course, is the antithesis of the point. The point is to try to make this less partisan, but here we are.

I thought I was rather generous. I gave Mr. Lamoureux a Christmas gift when I identified to him what he was giving me as I saw it unfolding. I asked Mr. Lamoureux—I'm paraphrasing myself—why he was doing this. I said, I'm going to keep talking about this until the end of the meeting and that means it's going to carry over into the Christmas and New Year's break, that means when there's a slow news day somebody is going to pick up that little thread and say, “Oh, here's something interesting. I have to give my editor something today. Here's something that's legitimate and real. It's not that big but it's something.” Sure enough, that's what happened.

I'll repeat myself from last year. Why on earth would the government want to take a hit on one of their key signature pieces, which was democratic reform, especially, as the government said, in the area of committees? They said they wanted them to be more independent, less under the control of the PMO, less partisanship, more camaraderie, more working together, more acting as parliamentarians rather than partisans.

Sure enough, it wasn't big, but it was big enough. They took this hit and they're continuing to take this hit.

Every time they stand up and brag about their other democratic reforms don't think that this isn't going to come back. This is only one, because my sense is that this government is not prepared to be serious about change. It's going to be drip, drip, drip. The government can make their big headline announcements and then it's going to be drip, drip, drip. At the end of four years if this continues, there's going to be a whole lot of Canadians saying, “Wait a minute, what happened to all that change that they talked about? What about injecting new life and dynamism into our democracy and into our House of Commons?”

Remember that the government said, “particularly in the area of committees”. I don't understand it from a procedural point of view. I don't understand it from a reform point of view. I don't understand it from an efficiency point of view. I certainly don't understand it from a partisan point of view, especially when the government says it really doesn't want to use voting.

Why are you maintaining that the voting system even exists there? Why?

There's only one answer. I believe Mr. Chan referred to it. I stand to be corrected. I think he made a reference that “there may be times”. Okay, here we go: “there may be times”. That's why these things matter now because we get one kick at this in four years, just one. Some committee rules get changed, Mr. Chair, as you know, over the course of Parliament, but for the most part once committee rules are set that's what you live by. That's why I'm making an issue out of this now because it's the only chance we have.

Mr. Chair, I would be interested before I completely relinquish the floor to see if there's a response from the government. If they're willing to say they agree, then I don't need to go on and I don't need to summarize. If they aren't, then I will move on to summarize because I'm not going to die on this political hill.

(1125)



From a partisan point of view, we've already gotten more from this than anyone would have any right to expect, because of the government's pigheadedness.

Anyway, Chair, with the understanding that I still have the floor, I would offer colleagues on the government side a chance to respond to what I've said so far, and I'd still like a chance to have the floor back.

The Chair:

You can't automatically have the floor, but you're next on the list.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Well, I'll put myself on the list after I give it, which seems kind of silly. If nobody else takes the floor, there's nobody to get on it afterward. That's my point.

The Chair:

You're going to be the only one on the list anyway.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Just say yes.

The Chair:

While we're waiting, I'm just going to read into the record for Jamie—I welcome him to the committee—and for anyone who wasn't at the last meeting what we're debating. This is the second routine motion of the Subcommittee on Agenda and Procedure. A motion of amendment was moved on December 10, 2015.

It was moved by Mr. Chan: That the Subcommittee on Agenda and Procedure be established and be composed of the Chair, the two Vice-Chairs and two Government members.

Then there was an amendment, which we're debating now. It was moved by Mr. Christopherson that the motion be amended by replacing the words “two Government members” with the following: “one Government member”.

Is there someone other than Mr. Christopherson who wanted to speak? Will we just carry on?

Okay. You might as well carry on until someone approaches me.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, I think we're getting close to the end, Chair. I said that this wasn't an exercise in trying to deliberately hold things up, and it wasn't, but it is interesting that on the motion we're talking about, we're talking about how many government members.... Quite frankly, if it was about consensus, fill your boots, and bring as many as you want. The whole idea is just to come to some agreement on things. But this matters because now they're getting into the voting aspect.

I've been around and around on this, Chair. I've made my point, certainly more so than I thought I would end up doing. I have to say, Chair, that this is so much like dealing with the last government. This government wants to say they're different, and I know in their hearts they may be, but as PROC has unfolded, this is just like Toryland. This is just exactly the way the last government ran things.

I see members shaking their heads to say no, no. I understand how you feel, but the fact of the matter is that those of us who were here the last time know that this is a repeat of that way, and on this first issue.... Besides, it would be nice to see the member jump in. She has a lot of body language.

Is Mr. Lamoureux not letting you speak? I thought the whole idea was that everybody gets their say.

I see this body language, and you just have so much to give, but there's no.... I used to watch that. I feel for you. I understand what that's like. I've seen it with some of my colleagues in the last government. They were itching to speak. They wanted to bring democracy and oxygen to the discussion, but they were stifled, much like what we see here where the parliamentary secretary keeps himself very busy on his BlackBerry and with his notes, keeps his head down, and tries not to make eye contact, while the rest of the members are sitting there and wondering, “Why are we in this mess?”

I get a sense that they would like to say something, but they aren't. What does that look like? Well, it's exactly the way it was before.

Words alone don't change things, my friends. If you want to change things, you have to change them. This first opportunity, the very first and likely the easiest opportunity this government would ever have to indicate they really do want to do things differently and aren't interested in the PMO having its throat grip on every committee, this was their chance, and there they sit, quiet, just like the Conservatives used to be, waiting for the moment to use their majority vote to ram through what they want to do.

Now, how that is different and is sunny ways and openness escapes me. I will be very interested to see where and how this government is actually going to deliver on making committees more independent, more transparent, and less partisan. I'm anxious to see where that is going to be, because this is the easiest opportunity the government is going to get, and they have no interest.

I'm done.

(1130)

The Chair:

Are there any other speakers to the amendment? Are we ready for the vote?

I'll read the amendment so that we know what we're voting on. It is moved by Mr. Christopherson that the motion be amended by replacing the words “two Government members” with the following: “one Government member”.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'd like a recorded vote.

(Amendment negatived: nays 5; yeas 4)

The Chair:

The amendment was defeated, so we'll go to the motion itself.

Is there any debate on the motion itself?

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'd like a recorded vote, please.

(Motion agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

We'll go on to the third routine motion, which, because of name changes, has to be....

Yes, Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I seek your guidance. I wish to place a motion regarding in camera business, and would ask for your guidance, through the clerk, on where best to introduce that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Number nine deals with in camera.

The Chair:

Motion nine is related to in camera.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Mine aren't numbered. What's the heading?

The Chair:

It's “Access to In Camera Meetings”.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes. I wondered, but because it was only “access”, I didn't want to get caught on the narrowness.

You'll allow me to make a motion at that time regarding in camera meetings?

The Chair:

This is totally new. Can we just do that at the end of routine motions here?

(1135)

Mr. David Christopherson:

If you want. I just wanted to find an appropriate place for it.

The Chair:

Okay. We'll do the ones we normally do, and then we'll do yours at the end.

Mr. David Christopherson: Sure.

The Chair: Good.

Could someone move motion three?

David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In relation to the subcommittee on private members’ business, I so move: That, pursuant to Standing Order 91.1(1), the Subcommittee on Private Members' Business be composed of one (1) member from each recognized party and a Chair from the Government party; and that Ginette Petitpas Taylor be appointed Chair of the Subcommittee.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Are we having campaign speeches from the candidates for the chairmanship?

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

Madame Petitpas Taylor, did you want to give a campaign speech?

Ms. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Good morning.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

I guess not.

Are we ready for the vote?

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: The next motion is routine, related to quorum. Does someone want to move a motion?

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

I move: That the Chair be authorized to hold meetings to receive and publish evidence when a quorum is not present, provided that at least three (3) members are present, including one (1) member of the opposition and one (1) member of the Government.

The Chair:

Is there debate?

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes. I have no problem with it as far as it goes.

The only thing I would ask is that, if we could amend it, either through a friendly amendment or a proper amendment, rather than just one member of the opposition, it be one member of the recognized parties in opposition, or words to that effect. In other words, there are three recognized parties and a number of independents who belong to other parties. Under this, the way it is, both of the other recognized opposition parties could be absent, yet quorum would still be maintained.

I realize this points to the divides between caucuses and independents, and that's something we still have to wrestle with. Our system is still not fair to independents, but it is geared to caucuses. It is geared to recognized parties. It's the basis of our entire structure. I'm just asking if we could make sure that it's clear that when it reads, “including one (1) member of the opposition”, it is one from a recognized party.

The Chair:

Wait a minute. You want to make sure that when it refers to “opposition” here, it's either of the two recognized parties.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, that it's a recognized party.

The Chair:

It's not an independent.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Exactly, that's my point, Chair.

I understand and feel bad that it does what it does to independents, but the structure is built around caucuses. I have to protect the rights of my caucus.

The Chair:

All right, but—

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux (Winnipeg North, Lib.):

Mr. Chair, could you solicit a comment from the clerk? My understanding is that for all committees in the past, quorum was the government and official opposition being present. There has never been any consideration to a third party's presence.

I'm wondering if the clerk can provide any indication of whether or not I am right or I am wrong. My understanding is that the presence of a member of the official opposition and a member of the government party is required in order to have a quorum. What's being proposed would be something completely new.

The Clerk of the Committee (Ms. Joann Garbig):

This particular motion here provides for a reduced quorum for the purpose of gathering evidence, so the committee can decide what it wants that to be composed of. The quorum for a meeting such as this is 50% plus one, but very often as a courtesy the chair will wait until there's representation around the table before calling the meeting to order.

Does that answer the question?

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

Would the committee be able to function if we were to adopt Mr. Christopherson's rule, for example, if a third party representative was not at the table?

The Clerk:

As this motion reads right now, it is one member of the opposition, so it could be either of the opposition parties represented on the committee. If I understand the amendment correctly, Mr. Christopherson would like to provide for a member of—

(1140)

The Chair:

An officially recognized party....

The Clerk:

But it applies to members of the committee already.

Mr. David Christopherson:

If I may, I hear your point. Thank you very much, Madam Clerk.

It really would only apply if we added one of the independents to the committee, because they're not on the committee right now. It is not unusual for that to happen. Sometimes parties will bring someone in, and in that situation that one member could be there and that could qualify. It's not maybe as critical as I originally was thinking, but I still would like it. I think it would still be helpful if it's clear that it's a member of a recognized opposition party.

If I may say to Mr. Lamoureux, if we just added, “including one member of a recognized opposition party”, if you drop in those words, my problems go away and I don't think it changes anything. You can check with the clerk, but I don't think it would change a thing. It would just mean that you have to be a member of one of the three recognized parties to qualify when they're doing a count on a small group for quorum, just for the purpose of submissions.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

I would have loved that sort of an opportunity when I was sitting in your position.

I don't know if it's a concern—we can talk about it, I guess. The concern is that the NDP would then have to be physically present in order for us to receive tabled documents.

Mr. David Christopherson:

No.

If I may, Chair, I was suggesting either-or, but it couldn't be an independent. If the official opposition is here, the government is here, and we're not here, too bad for us. If you're there, we're here, and the official opposition isn't here, too bad for them.

What will not happen is the government and an independent, and then the official opposition and the third party are both left out of a meeting. That's the only point I'm making.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I just want to know from the clerk, if it's about members who are present, is that members of Parliament or members of committee? If it's members of committee, it's a redundant point. If it's members of Parliament, then it's more interesting.

The Chair:

The point Mr. Christopherson is making is that on some occasions a member of the committee has been a member who's not from the two officially recognized opposition parties. For instance, it could be Elizabeth May. It could be an independent, because occasionally the committee will make a motion and allow these people to be committee members. All Mr. Christopherson is proposing is that when we have a quorum that allows an opposition member, the opposition member has to be from one of the two official parties.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I think the point Mr. Graham is making, though, is that they're not permanent members of this committee, so how could an independent substitute, ceding the substitution of this committee...? That's my point, so that's why I think Mr. Graham is saying that it's a redundant point.

The Chair:

Mr. Chan, there are occasions when the committee accepts as permanent members people who are either independents or from another party that doesn't have official status, like the Bloc, or the Greens, and actually makes them members of the committee. That's the—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Even for a short period of time, for a certain subject they can be recognized members.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I see the point you're making. We're just trying to understand the point you're making.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's fair enough, Mr. Chan. There are no games here. Sometimes, too, the opposition parties, for machination reasons with the government, will let an independent be one of their representatives. Technically, they then have a seat there, and technically that would give them that right. It's a small matter. I'm not going to do what I did last time on the other one. It's not that big. If you don't think it's an improvement....

I'd like to hear from the official opposition, because really, they can be the decider for me, but I'm not going to die on this hill. I just think it's an improvement.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

As the mover of the motion, I think I would accept that as a friendly amendment.

The Chair:

Okay.

Are there further comments?

So the motion, with the friendly amendment, will read...?

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I'll read it again as amended. It says that the chair be authorized to hold meetings to receive and publish evidence when a quorum is not present, provided that at least three members are present, including one member of a recognized opposition party and one member of the government.

(1145)

Mr. David Christopherson:

Perfect.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid was speaking to the motion. It's a friendly amendment, so we're just speaking to the motion. We'll have one vote eventually, but go ahead.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Well, that creates a problem for me, because I support the original motion but not the amended motion. I'm not sure if procedurally there's anything I can do about that.

The Chair:

You could amend the motion.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Oh my goodness, okay. To go back to its original wording?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Well, Chair, no. The fair thing to do in light of that, then, is to leave the motion as a first motion, the other one as an amendment, and then Mr. Reid can vote against the amendment and vote as he wants on the main motion.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Agreed.

The Chair:

Okay. We'll have this change as an amendment, and we'll debate the amendment now.

You have the floor.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I actually don't support this, Dave. This is purely for the purpose of receiving testimony. I can envision a situation in which there would be a witness testimony of some sort that is of particular interest to members of either the Bloc Québécois or to a Green MP and is for whatever reason not of interest.... Maybe it relates in some respect to the votability of their private member's bill or something like that. I actually can't think of a really convincing example. I'm just not sure that we should diminish their status here and their ability to come here.

It affects us. It doesn't affect the Liberals. In fact, let's say for the sake of argument that Elizabeth May was to hear witness testimony. If we weren't coming, she would have to prevail upon two Liberals to come in order to make the whole thing work. I just think diminishing their status and their ability to fully participate at the same level as us is something that I'm not sure we should give up.... On that basis, I think my inclination would be to vote against this.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks, Chair.

I have no qualms with Mr. Reid's comments, other than I didn't see it as diminishing. I acknowledge that it is recognizing the status of recognized parties, but to say that it diminishes.... It's not preventing anyone from coming that otherwise could.

As I understand it, Chair, any member of Parliament can come and sit at a committee meeting, if they wish. They just can't speak unless they're given a spot from their party or somebody gives them the spot, and they're not allowed to vote. Any one of us can march into any committee meeting, sit down, start listening, and even ask questions if our caucus agrees. I don't see in any way that this diminishes their right. They would still have the right to come. In my view, the only difference is that if we were counting for a quorum, they wouldn't be part of that count. But it in no way diminishes their right to be there. Their status is no less than it ever was. Actually, this is a clarification more than anything.

I hear Mr. Reid's point. I have great respect for his thoughts on these kinds of matters. But I would disagree with the suggestion that passing the amendment takes away anything from any member of Parliament. It does not. In my view, it recognizes the importance of caucuses and recognized parties, and that if you're going to count quorum and you need at least one other opposition party there, it ought to be one of the two recognized parties.

The Chair:

Is there further debate, not on the motion but on the amendment?

We're ready to vote: we'd better read out an amendment....

Yes, Mr. Lamoureux.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

Scott, if you don't mind, I don't quite understand. Could you perhaps focus on your concern in regard to it?

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's simply this. Right now the way it works is that this is just quorum for the purpose of getting testimony. In order to be able to receive testimony, you have to have either two government members and one opposition member, or two opposition members and one government member. That opposition member could be any member of the opposition.

Under the amendment, that member could only be from the New Democrats or the Conservatives. That means you could not have the committee sit to hear testimony if both the Conservatives and the NDP didn't want that. But for the sake of argument, it might be the case that the Greens or the Bloc wanted to have testimony and the government thought they were willing to go along with it. Effectively it diminishes....

To some degree, leaving it as is, not putting in the amendment, diminishes the capacity of ourselves and the New Democrats to prevent testimony from being taken. On the theory that in Parliament we should always default towards openness and more debate, I'm simply defaulting towards that direction.

(1150)

The Chair:

Are there further comments on the amendment? We're ready to vote.

Mr. Christopherson, you're making the amendment. Do you want to read it out just so we're clear what we're voting on, for the record?

Mr. David Christopherson:

I move that where the current motion says, “including one (1) member of the opposition”, it would be amended to say, “including one (1) member of a recognized opposition party”. It would be the exchange of those words.

The Chair:

Okay.

All in favour of the amendment?

All opposed to the amendment?

Mr. David Christopherson:

You have your work cut out for you.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

I'm going to vote following convention. I'm not always going to vote following convention, but I don't think it's worth breaking a convention of the House and committees on this particular motion.

The convention, as some of you who have been around here for a while know, is that when the Speaker or a chair breaks a tie, it stays with the convention. It stays with the status quo. It's a vote to not change.

The status quo when we came into this meeting was that there was no rule related to the subcommittee and the quorum of the subcommittee, so my vote, to maintain that status quo, is to vote no on the amendment.

(Amendment negatived)

The Chair: Is that understood? Okay.

If there are no further amendments—someone could amend something on which they could get a majority—we'll go to the debate on the motion itself, as was originally presented by Ms. Vandenbeld.

Is there any further debate? Are you ready for the question?

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: Thank you, everyone, for this actually very constructive debate we're having. That was very interesting.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Mr. Chair, can I move to the next matter?

The Chair: Sure.

Mr. Arnold Chan: This deals with the time for opening remarks and questioning of witnesses.

It originally had read that witnesses be given 10 minutes to take their opening statement, and that during the questioning of witnesses the time allocated to each questioner be as follows: for the first round of questioning, seven minutes to a representative of each party in the following order....

I'm sorry, I should change that. Let me back up.

It should read that for the first round of questioning, six minutes to a representative of each party in the following order: Conservative, Liberal, NDP, and Liberal. For the second round, six minutes would be allocated for the following order: Liberal, Conservative, Liberal, Conservative. And then finally, on the last one....

Sorry, that's five minutes for a Conservative for number four; and then create a fifth slot for three minutes, allocated to the NDP.

That would total 50 minutes.

(1155)

The Chair:

Does anyone want that to be read again?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

My apologies. Do you want me to read that again?

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm not even looking for an amendment; an understanding would suffice that, from time to time, where we have more than one witness, we may want to massage some of the opening remark times, depending. If I may, that's the sort of work that normally the steering committee would look at and make those kinds of adjustments on.

With that understanding, my understanding is that there has been consultation with the parties. As much as it sucks being back in the third party, I accept the reality of where we are. I can live with this.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I'll read it out. Regarding time for opening remarks and questioning of witnesses, it says that witnesses will be given 10 minutes to make their opening statement; and that during the questioning of witnesses the time allocated to each questioner is as follows: for the first round of questioning, six minutes to a representative of each party in the following order: Conservative, Liberal, NDP, Liberal; for the second round, six minutes to be allocated in the following order: Liberal, Conservative, Liberal, then for the fourth slot, it would be a Conservative for five minutes, and then for the fifth slot, the NDP would be allocated three minutes.

The Chair:

Is there discussion on the motion?

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

I appreciate the attempts being made to be reasonably fair here, although I will point out that this is certainly a bit of a change from previous practice. I think there is one amendment that needs to be made here. I'll point out why first, and then I'll explain.... Actually, no, I'll explain the amendment I'm suggesting.

In round two, I believe that the order should go Conservative, Liberal, Conservative, Liberal. That would actually bring us closer to how it was in the last Parliament, where we had fairly similar distribution amongst government, opposition, and the third party.

I don't have to tell anyone who's been around this Parliament for a while that, when we look at an hour-long panel, if you have a couple of witnesses, which is often the case, very often you're only going to get through six or seven of these slots, let's say. Therefore, what would happen is that those last couple of slots you've indicated, the last two being Conservative and NDP, those often would not actually take place. If you do a bit of analysis of that, it does weight this very heavily towards the government by allowing them that first and third slot in the second round rather than what we had done previously. If you look at the previous practice of this committee, this is a fair-sized change. If you look at the first six slots in this one, under the existing rules from the last Parliament, it would go Conservative, Liberal, NDP, Conservative, NDP, Conservative, which in the old Parliament was government.

The difference is that you've weighted the opposition speaking slots more heavily towards the end of the order, which we don't often get to. If you take those last couple of slots off.... We would often not see those happening. With those two slots it would be 42 minutes of questioning. That's often what you would see. Therefore, as the official opposition, we would actually get almost 6% less speaking time than what our seat count would indicate we should receive.

I'm not opposed to the actual times that have been allocated here. I just believe that in round two the opposition should come first, so it should go Conservative, Liberal, Conservative, and then Liberal, and then, of course, the NDP would remain as it is currently there. That would certainly provide a much fairer and more equitable speaking slot based on the number of seats that each party has in Parliament, so that every party is being treated equally and fairly, and each member of Parliament is being treated equally and fairly.

If the government is serious about trying to do that, I would suggest they would be comfortable entertaining that amendment.

I move that amendment.

(1200)

The Chair:

Can I make sure people understand your amendment? Read it, please.

Mr. Blake Richards:

The amendment would be that, for round two, the first slot would go to the Conservative Party, the second slot would be Liberal, the third slot would be Conservative, the fourth slot would be Liberal, and then the fifth slot would be the NDP, with all the times remaining the same.

The Chair:

You're basically changing Liberals and Conservatives in the second round.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Exactly.

The Chair:

We'll have Mr. Christopherson and then Mr. Chan.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Just on the off chance that Mr. Chan is going to agree, I'll let him take the floor before me.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I have two very quick points.

First of all, in terms of the overall composition of time I would simply note for the record that the government is actually ceding approximately 8% of total time to the opposition relative to its proportionality within the House of Commons. However, I take the point that you raised with respect to the risk that sometimes we don't get to the bottom order of the questions.

The other point I want to make is that I understood that this was already under significant discussion among the House leaders with respect to this particular order. That was my understanding.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson—

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Sorry, let me rephrase that. I should have said that among the whips it had been informally agreed upon.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

That point is very relevant. Could we get that confirmed?

I have to say in my briefing I was advised that there was agreement. The advice I was given by our whip staff was that we would support this because there had been an all-party agreement. If that's not the case then that's significant. Can we just clarify? Though we're not legally bound, we may be honour-bound. Was there a buy-in by all three whips' offices? Can we confirm that, yes or no? The only thing to keep in mind, folks, is that these things don't matter much to us but these whips still have to meet. If they had an agreement and it falls apart here, it makes it very difficult for them to do their business. I'm not hearing from the official opposition any sense of where their whip was.

I'll say my thing and then I'm done. I don't have a horse in this race. By virtue of our results I get screwed and there's nothing I can do about it. We don't have enough seats to change it. I don't have a horse in this particular debate but here's the thing. If there was a deal, a deal is a deal is a deal. If a deal was struck, then unless it's agreed to unravel it that deal should hold.

If there wasn't and it's coming to us with just a recommendation as opposed to a deal, then I would argue on the side of the official opposition that there is an element of fairness, recognizing the government was gracious enough to do the 8%. Normally, we try not to have the same party take the floor. There's usually rotation and this does change that. In effect, the government would get a 12-minute run on the floor, theoretically, with almost the same person. If they put somebody in for 15 seconds in between, they can get the floor back. Basically, a government member would get a 12-minute run. I don't really think that's fair.

In fairness, if the Liberals have their lion's share of the time, which they deserve, then at least the order should be government, opposition, government, opposition. Therefore, I would support the official opposition, but only in the absence of an unanimous agreement by the whips. If there was such a thing, that should hold.

I'm done. Thanks.

(1205)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

On the substance of this debate I would just point out that in terms of individual members of this committee, right now there are three Conservative members on the committee and there are three spots for Conservatives to ask questions. There is one NDP member who will then get two spots to ask questions. There are five Liberal members of this committee and four spots for Liberals. Already with this proposal, one of us would not have a chance to ask questions. I think it's probably more than fair. I just wanted to point out that I think the order is quite fair as it is. In fact, probably one of us would have less time to speak.

Mr. Scott Reid:

In terms of fairness, I used to chair not a committee but a subcommittee on international human rights. We operated by consensus. We would have hearings and then we would ask questions.

Like in this proposal, we had opposition members at the back end, as the last people to ask questions. The only way we could ever accommodate them was by letting the committee run over time. We met just before question period. We met from one to two o'clock, two days a week, on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Questions run over. Someone asks a question and then the answer winds up running over. This happens all the time. It may be different here, but we would have someone talking about their experience of being tortured, for example. As chair, you can't cut them off, so they go on, and what started off being six minutes winds up being seven or eight minutes.

In order to accommodate the people at the back end in asking questions, we would allow our meeting to run through the S.O. 31s. When I would realize we were running over, I'd send the clerk out and ask the people around the table if anybody had an S.O. 31 so we could change the order. I don't think we will have that flexibility, because the room we're in now will frequently be booked by somebody else coming in afterwards, so we won't have the ability to extend our meetings.

The point I'm getting at is that I think the chances that the NDP will get any of its three minutes at the end are very low. The chances that the Conservatives will get their five minutes, while not quite as low, are pretty low. I think this is a fundamentally problematic issue to be dealt with. I would say that it would make more sense, quite frankly.... I like what Mr. Richards was suggesting, but the fairest thing actually would be if the Liberals had the last spot. I'm not saying that they should have three minutes. They should still get six minutes, but it should be in the last spot.

The Chair:

Before we continue debate, is there any comment from any of the parties on the potential agreement the whips had?

Ms. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

If I may comment on that, my understanding is that we had presented the information to the whips and asked for feedback, and we didn't receive any negative feedback from it. The parties seemed to agree on it.

Was there a formal deal per se? No, but we certainly didn't receive any negative feedback at all.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, I go to the meeting of the House leaders and whips. It happens every Tuesday in the afternoon, so in the event that we deviate here from what they're doing there, or with what they agreed on, there would be a chance to discuss it within a very short amount of time. I don't think we should feel ourselves absolutely bound by our.... I hate to use the term “honour” when we're talking about party discipline, quite frankly, but I could say by our vows of obedience and chastity or whatever it is we take vis-à-vis our party whips. With regard to this subject, I think we should look at making some improvements here.

The Chair:

Do you want “chastity” in the minutes?

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid:

We're in public. It's too late to take it back.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson, based on your earlier comment, do you have any comments on that as related to the whips?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes.

At the end of the day, I think that's the case. Quite frankly, we don't have to honour that. I just wanted to make sure that we knew the context, but we're masters of our own destiny, as we like to say at each committee.

The only thing I would mention is that, yes, if we're going to be fully fair—and I very much appreciate Mr. Reid's sense of fairness—if we're going to make it so that it's not a 12-minute Liberal run and recognize that the bottom two often get dropped, then the fairest way to fix that would indeed be to move the six-minute Liberal in round two from the number one slot and move it into the five slot. That way, we're still maintaining that the NDP at least has a fighting chance of getting a couple of seconds of our three minutes, and the fairness of going government-opposition, government-opposition is maintained. I like that idea for self-serving reasons as well as for an element of fairness.

(1210)

The Chair:

Is there further debate?

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you.

I wanted to respond, I guess, to Ms. Vandenbeld.

I know you had sort of indicated your feeling that it would shortchange one of your members. I would like to point out that if you look at the proposal I'm making in terms of an amendment compared to the original proposal, they're actually the same in terms of the number of slots that each party gets. It's only the order.

As to the reason the order is important, I think Mr. Reid actually did a fairly good job of explaining it. I also had the experience of chairing a couple of parliamentary committees in the past. Having sat on a number of others, I can say with quite a degree of certainty—I think it would be hard for anyone who's been in Parliament to disagree with this—that when we talk about a total order here, there are 50 minutes of questions and answers. As Mr. Reid explained quite well, we know it's very rare that six minutes will be exactly adhered to and that we will jump right from one to the other.

I know that every chair does things a little bit differently, but I know that when I was a chair, I tried to be very strict on the members in terms of keeping them to time. But with witnesses, when they're trying to answer a question and they've only been given maybe the last 15 seconds or something of the member's time, you do try to give the witness a little bit of a chance to actually answer the question. As well, there's always a little bit of a transition when the chair transitions from one questioner to the next.

The reality that exists here is that very rarely, probably almost never, would those last couple of slots actually be utilized. Therefore, what this does is weight the questions very heavily in favour of the government. Frankly, that's not a fairness.

If you were to flip the order so that the Liberal is not first in the second round, it actually would create a fair situation. If the government's intention here is to be fair, they would certainly accept this proposal. If not, it seems like it's another one of those smoke-and-mirrors situations, where they're trying to put something out that looks like fairness but we all know isn't.

The number of speaking minutes that each party would receive does not change here, only the order, so that in the event we don't get through the whole order, the opposition will not be shortchanged.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

If Mr. Richards could read the amendment again—

Sorry.

The Chair: Mr. Lamoureux.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Maybe I can address it in a broader way, if I can, Blake.

If we go back to the last series of PROC meetings, typically you would have the government start off debate. The government's the one that actually begins the questioning. Here in this proposal, it's the opposition that starts the questions. That is, I think, a progressive move, allowing for opposition to do it.

If you take a look at the last PROC series of meetings, the government always had five slots, so every member of the government side would be afforded the opportunity to speak. Under this new system, the government now is going to.... If every member were to speak, they would have to split their time. If you want to reflect in terms of the issue of just fairness and how it's changing, it actually works to the advantage of the official opposition.

David's right in the sense that he's guaranteed the one spot. It might be tough to get that second spot, but at the very least the NDP is guaranteed that their committee member will be afforded the opportunity to speak. More Conservative members will likely be speaking, because if you get two panellists speaking, the chance of getting that second series of questions will be off and on.

The deputy whip made reference to what has taken place. There was a sense of goodwill discussion, or an offering of what we were looking at here. The general feeling of the committee, from what I understand, was that there was some presentation made to the whips. The official opposition does benefit under this proposal compared to the previous way in which it was administered. The NDP will get, if in fact it's one presenter and it's a quick go-around, that second series of questions. In that sense there's a benefit.

The party that loses out under this new structure is in fact the governing party, because no longer are they the first to question and there's a very good chance they will lose one of their questioners. That's almost an absolute. I think maybe if you look at it from that perspective...unless you're suggesting that we go back to the way it was, where, for example, it would be the government that would start as opposed to the official opposition, but I don't think I'm hearing that.

In that sense, I think we should accept it. We have that House leadership meeting later on this afternoon, and we can raise the issue there, but maybe consider accepting it. The preference is to deal with it now.

(1215)

The Chair:

Ms. Taylor.

Ms. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

If I may just give a bit of information with respect to the new proposed structures, I have a few figures here. If we look at the past and present, or the recommendations that we're making, we see that the governing party would have had 56.3% of the time. With this recommendation that we're bringing forward, we would only have 48%. The Conservatives would have been at 30.3%. With this recommendation, they would have 34%. The NDP would have 13% of the time. With this proposal, they would have 17%.

That really looks at the numbers with respect to the divisions of time that we're proposing.

The Chair:

We'll have Mr. Richards, and then Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I believe what I just heard from Mr. Lamoureux, and correct me if I'm wrong, is that the government is saying that should we flip the order so that the government gets the first question in round one, they would be willing to accept the amendment that we're making. In other words, if I'm hearing it correctly, I would consider that a friendly amendment. The order in round one would be Liberal, Conservative, NDP, Liberal, and in round two, it would be Conservative, Liberal, Conservative, Liberal, NDP.

If I'm hearing that, we could accept it as a friendly amendment.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm willing to hear from Mr. Lamoureux on that point before I take the floor.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

Can you just repeat that one more time?

Mr. Blake Richards:

You indicated that should the government get the first round of questioning in round one, I think I heard that you were willing to entertain it. If that's the case, I would see a deal on the order being in round one, Liberal first, Conservative second, NDP third, and Liberal fourth; then in round two, it would be Conservative first, Liberal second, Conservative third, Liberal fourth, NDP fifth.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I want to ask for clarification from my colleague, Mr. Richards, on this point.

This is without actually changing the number of minutes assigned. You would have a longer six-minute Liberal round following a five-minute Conservative round in the second.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You're saying that number four would still be a six-minute slot.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, it would be a six-minute Liberal slot. We're not trying to challenge their time.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm comfortable with that.

The Chair:

So you'd be changing that five-minute slot to a six-minute slot.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'd be comfortable with that.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

We'd start off, then.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Correct.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

Okay.

Mr. Blake Richards:

We'd flip the order in both rounds, essentially.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

Sure. How would you feel if we went Liberal, Conservative, NDP, Liberal—

Mr. Blake Richards:

That's round one.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

That's round one, and then we go Conservative, Liberal, Liberal, Conservative, NDP. It's only because that gives us four. Otherwise, we're taking a risk. We have five members.

(1220)

Mr. Blake Richards:

Again, what you're then doing is taking time away from the opposition if that does happen. I think the other concern is having back-to-back questions from the government. I think it's important that we maintain the order there, so it would be Conservative, Liberal, Conservative, Liberal in the second round.

However, we would allow the Liberal to have a full six-minute slot at the end, rather than a five-minute slot.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

On the second round, we'd only have four of our five members. Every other party's going to have the opportunity to make sure that their member gets to speak, except for the Liberals. If we can get the second and third spots, there's a better chance that at least four of the five will be afforded the opportunity to speak.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That would be at the expense of one of the Conservative members. That's the issue here. You're already taking time away from the opposition parties, and we'd actually be allocated less time than our seat count would indicate in that scenario.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

However, you're getting the lead in the second round.

Mr. Blake Richards:

In the second round, yes. In the first round, I'm willing to allow the government to have that lead and to give more time on that fourth slot in the second round.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks, Chair.

Well, hope springs eternal, so I haven't completely given up on trying to get myself out of the fifth spot in the second slot, but it's another hill I'm not going to hold my breath on.

Let me just say to Mr. Lamoureux that I appreciate the fact that they're willing to discuss it, but it still leaves us with the same problem. The problem is that the government's getting a 12-minute run. That's the issue. I'm already in the spot where, if anybody gets jettisoned, we're gone. Those are the results of the election. I have to live with them.

In terms of the element of fairness in everything else—again, I wouldn't have a horse in this race—the problem is a government getting a 12-minute run at a committee. I don't mean the Liberal government, but any government. That's a huge advantage I've never seen before. I think the government has to recognize that as the problem. Quite frankly, to be fair, I thought the official opposition made a very fair suggestion.

I recognize, Mr. Lamoureux, that you're right. We have a lot of committees. Public accounts, of all the committees, is the premier oversight committee, and we had the government lead off. I don't think it's like that anywhere in the Commonwealth, so I recognize that it's to your credit that you were willing to put that the way it should be.

To be fair, I thought that for the official opposition to give up that spot to give the government some latitude to break up the 12-minute run was pretty fair-minded too. You know yourself that when this place is packed and everybody's paying attention, the first up gets the greatest attention. I thought it was something for the official opposition to give that up.

Your counter-proposal, Mr. Lamoureux, still leaves us with.... I might point out that negotiations are still happening with the parliamentary secretary, not anybody else. I would say in fairness that the 12-minute run thing is still there, and that's the real problem. That really is a problem. I'm not aware of any other committee where a government member has ever had a 12-minute run structurally built in. Man, I'd give my political right arm to have that at every meeting I started to go to.

Thanks.

The Chair:

We're still on the amendment. Let's carry on with further debate on the amendment.

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I thought for a minute there that it seemed as though we had some willingness to try to cooperate and make this work. In the absence of that, it seems the government is simply making an attempt to appear to be offering something to the opposition but is actually trying to benefit themselves.

It's unfortunate that they're seeking to basically have more time in the committee than their seat count would indicate. We thought we were trying to be reasonable and offer something that could work for everybody so that the committee would be fair and equitable. It appears that this is simply another example of the Trudeau government, a smoke-and-mirrors situation where what they're saying is one thing and what they're doing is another thing. It's really unfortunate if that's the route they're going to go down. I hope they'll reconsider and accept our reasonable offer.

The Chair:

Is there any further debate on the amendment?

(1225)

Mr. David Christopherson:

Am I hearing from the government side that they're going to stick with demanding 12 minutes? Is that...? Here we go again.

Here we go again on the easy stuff—the easy stuff—and I say that as somebody who benefited from this. I appreciate it, three minutes or 3%, whatever it was. Everything is relative, right?

But I have to tell you this. To demand a 12-minute run? Even Harper didn't demand that. Apologies to present company, but it's about the most anti-democratic, other than.... After I left the Harris experience in Queen's Park, it took until I ran into Harper to find anybody nearly as undemocratic, and they didn't try to do this. Twelve minutes is a big, big, deal.

The government just won't.... Here we go again. They're all looking down, talking to each other. Once again, this is the way.... The government wants to do things differently, but what I'm telling you is that you're exactly like the last government. They did exactly the same thing. They made their arguments that they thought were reasonable and shut up and wouldn't say anything more. They buried their heads in their books and played with their smartphones and their iPads and chatted with each other, but would not engage seriously because they'd made up their minds.

Again, this is the easy stuff. What evidence is there that this government is at all serious about democratic reform? Even their preferred voting method, which they're talking about now, everyone is acknowledging is skewed in their favour. We'll see how that plays out.

Here we are again at committee, the one area where the government said they were going to be more transparent, with more accountability and less partisanship, and at every turn where we've tried to get them to recognize that there's a little more fairness that can be brought to this very easily, it's “No, no, no, we've made up our minds, we've decided, that's it, we don't want to hear any more”. They go quiet, like Harper's people did. They'll sit there and say nothing, and we have two choices over here. We can filibuster, and you can't filibuster everything, or we just acquiesce.

Then this goes away as an issue, and for the next four years we live with the government getting a 12-minute run. Let me tell you, when the government is under attack because of the witnesses who are coming forward, having a 12-minute run to take the public away from where the last series of questions and answers had them to where they want to be is a gift directly from heaven. It doesn't get any better. Trust me, that's from somebody who has a measly three minutes at the end of the second round, which likely I'm going to be lucky to see.

But as much as I'd like this to be about us, it isn't. It's about fairness. Again, I say to the government that a 12-minute run, when we measure these things by the minute and when percentages are all calculated to the decimal point, is a big deal in terms of how we run our committees.

I see a lot of activity over there, but I don't know whether that's the next issue they're working on and this one is already old, or whether there's still hope that the government may decide that maybe they'd let a little fairness in.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: [Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. David Christopherson: Well, it's nice to hear you speak, though. It's nice to see you jump in. We appreciate that. It gives Mr. Lamoureux, the parliamentary secretary, a chance to get a rest from being the one who's leading all the discussions, which is another reform that they've already broken, by the way. I mean, you're racking them up pretty quick around here: boom, boom, boom.

But I have to tell you this. I'm defending the opposition, but really what I'm defending is fairness. This is not fair. It is so not fair that even the Harper government didn't attempt to ram through this kind of scenario.

(1230)



Now we know why they threw a few crumbs to the NDP and a couple of percentages to the official opposition. It was because they hoped that would be enough to buy them this incredibly lucrative political gift of having the floor for 12 minutes straight with a witness or a series of witnesses. It's not fair. This government said fairness would matter. When are they going to start showing it? When?

Because they're not showing it yet. It's all talk. It's talk, talk, talk, sunny ways, talk, talk, talk, sunny ways, change, democracy, transparency, non-partisanship, talk, talk, talk. When it's time to do something, it's nope, and arms crossed, no way, end of debate: “We'll just wait and use our majority to shut down the pesky opposition again”. That's where we are, and you know what? We just spent 10 years in that, and this government was elected with a mandate to be different. Where's the difference?

Thanks, Chair.

The Chair:

Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

We talk about fairness. I actually find it interesting that it's Mr. Christopherson, who has two chances to speak in every round, who is talking about those of us who.... One of us will not get a chance to speak because there are five members and there are four spots.

But I would like to propose an amendment.

Mr. Richards, you mentioned to me the fact that it's possible that we may not frequently get to number four in the second round—and that's something I'm not as familiar with—but I think what we could do to meet you halfway is that if we were to reduce the number of minutes in the second round for the first three questioners to five minutes, that would save us three minutes, and we would go five, five, five, and three minutes. That makes it more likely that we would get to that fourth spot in the second round.

I think that's only fair, because I do think it's important. We on this committee are all individuals—

Sorry?

Mr. Blake Richards:

What order would it be in?

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

The order would stay the same, but we would be reducing, so in fact we would be losing—

An hon. member: Instead of 12 minutes, it's only 11.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld: In fact, if you look at the percentages compared to the previous Parliament, both opposition parties have more time to speak. This would be reducing our time more, but it would make it more likely that we would get to that fourth spot.

Just to meet you halfway, I think that would be fair also to individual members of the committee who as well want to have a chance to ask questions as individuals.

The Chair:

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you.

I appreciate the offer there and the feeling there. If the government is quite certain that this would then make the fourth slot come up in most meetings, then why not make the switch so they don't have two slots in a row?

If they're quite certain that this proposal would then allow the fourth spot to exist, why not make the flip so there are not two Liberal spots in a row? That's still 11 minutes. It's a slight improvement, I suppose, but not much of a one. Make the flip, then, if you're so confident that the number four would then come up. Why not make it if you're so convinced that it will change the fourth spot and give that opportunity? I don't understand why you wouldn't make that flip.

The compromise has already been made. To give the government that length of time all in one stretch is certainly not fair, as has been pointed out many times, and if you're convinced that number four would then come up, why not make the flip? I don't see any reason why you wouldn't.

The Chair:

Mr. Lamoureux.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

Thank you, Chair.

I want to be sensitive to what Blake and David are saying.

I must admit, Blake, that I'm a little bit surprised that you're prepared to surrender that first line of questioning, so maybe what we'll do is take advantage of that. If you're prepared to say that the government should have the first round of questions, I think we'll take that back.

What about the idea of seven minutes? Remember, the way it worked was that it was seven minutes at the very beginning. Are you content with the six minutes? The governing party starts off with six or seven minutes. It used to be seven minutes. What are your thoughts? I'd like to maybe come up with a proposal, but I want to get your sense on the amount of time for questioning.

(1235)

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm not quite certain exactly what you're asking there, Kevin. Are you indicating that you would want to change the whole first round to seven minutes? Or are you indicating that you want just that first slot to be seven minutes? What are you indicating?

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

It seems to me that your preference is to go back to the old system, and I'm open to that, but the old system led off with seven minutes by the government, seven minutes by the official opposition, and seven minutes by the third party. You would do that whole first round with seven minutes, and then you would go to five minutes. Is that also your preference?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Well, no, that's not what I indicated, but give us a minute to consider that.

You're suggesting that the whole first round would then go to seven minutes, and the second round would become five minutes. Is that what you're indicating?

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

I'm just trying to get a sense of what your preference would be, if we come up with a proposal,. Strictly thinking of that first round, is it seven minutes, six minutes, five minutes, or do you want to stay with the six minutes in terms of what's being proposed?

I want to make sure you're confident that you want to surrender that first line of questioning. That's a big one for me.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Why don't you give us a moment to give some thought to this, okay?

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

Okay.

The Chair:

Would the committee members like to suspend for a couple of minutes so we can discuss this?

Okay. We'll suspend for a few minutes so the parties can discuss this amongst themselves.

(1235)

(1245)

The Chair:

I think we may have come to an agreement here. There's some good work going on, anyway.

What I'd like to do, to make this clear for the minutes, is to withdraw first the amendment and then the motion.

I'd ask the committee first of all if we could withdraw Mr. Richards' original amendment.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Yes, withdraw the original. I'll reread the motion that I think we all have consensus on—

The Chair: Okay, wait.

All in favour?

(Amendment withdrawn [See Minutes of Proceedings])

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

I think Blake was going to have—

The Chair:

Now I want to withdraw the original motion. Then we'll start with a new original motion.

Is anyone opposed to withdrawing the original motion?

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

I believe, Blake, you were going to withdraw your amendment and then reintroduce a new amendment.

I believe that's what was—

The Chair:

No. We're going to withdraw, though, everything we started with. We're going to just start with a new motion now.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

We thought it might be better, because it's the official opposition that is giving up that first spot, that the record would show the official opposition actually moving the amendment. That's the....

Mr. Blake Richards:

Obviously there has been some discussion. I think everyone has agreed that we're all trying to find a way to compromise here.

The Chair:

Just to clarify, we have withdrawn your first amendment.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Correct. I'm willing to withdraw, yes.

The Chair:

Now you're going to propose a different amendment.

Mr. Blake Richards: Sure.

The Chair: Okay.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Based on the discussions we've all had, I think all parties seem to have an agreement here that we can proceed with the following: in round one, all slots would be seven-minute slots, with the order being Liberal, Conservative, NDP, Liberal; in round two, the first four slots would all be five-minute slots, and the order would be Conservative, Liberal, Conservative, Liberal; the fifth slot would remain a three-minute slot, and it would be an NDP slot.

The Chair:

Does everyone understand? Is there any discussion on the amendment?

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Now we'll vote on the amended motion, which is basically the same thing.

(Motion as amended agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Thank you for your co-operation. I think there's been some excellent work so far. That's why I came to Parliament, to have rational debate in committee and to move things forward in a thoughtful way.

We'll go on to the next motion, which is document distribution.

Ruby.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

I'd like to move the next matter regarding document distribution. I move: That only the Clerk of the Committee be authorized to distribute documents to members of the Committee and only when such documents exist in both official languages and that witnesses be advised accordingly prior to appearing before the Committee.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: Next is working meals.

Does someone want to move that?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the interest of recognizing that it is lunchtime, I'll move number seven on working meals. I move: That the clerk of the Committee be authorized to make the necessary arrangements to provide working meals for the Committee and its Subcommittees.

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair:

Next is a motion related to travel, accommodation, living expenses, and witnesses. Would anyone like to make a motion on that?

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I so move: That, if requested, reasonable travel, accommodation and living expenses be reimbursed to witnesses not exceeding one (1) representative per organization; and that, in exceptional circumstances, payment for more representatives be made at the discretion of the Chair.

The Chair:

Is there any debate?

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: Next is access to in camera meetings.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Mr. Chair, I know that Mr. Christopherson had wanted to make an amendment. Could I suggest that we move to item 11 first, dispense with it immediately, and then we can come back to your point?

The Chair:

Okay, so we'll do the two on in camera meetings at the end.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

If that's acceptable to you and it's acceptable to—

(1250)

Mr. David Christopherson:

I think the chair had suggested that we do it at the end.

Is that what you're also reaffirming?

Mr. Arnold Chan: Yes.

Mr. David Christopherson: Yes, I'm fine with that.

The Chair:

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

On notices of motions, I propose: That 48 hours' notice be required for any substantive motion to be considered by the Committee, unless the substantive motion relates directly to business then under consideration; That the notice of motion be filed with the clerk of the Committee and distributed to members in both official languages; That 48 hours' notice be calculated in the same manner as for the House; and That the motions be submitted to the clerk no later than 6:00 p.m.

The Chair:

If it's okay, I'm going to ask the clerk to speak. Administratively, they have a little bit of an issue with the time. This may facilitate things. I'll let the clerk talk about her thoughts.

The Clerk:

Thank you, Chair.

I just want to flag for members that when we receive notices of motions, we do all we can to turn them around quickly and distribute them to the membership as soon as possible. With a 6:00 p.m. deadline, it will be very difficult to turn them around and distribute them to the members the same day, because at that time of day we do not have access to the services that we normally need to process a notice of motion.

It's up to the committee what it would like to adopt, but I just want to flag that particular difficulty with 6:00 p.m.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What time do you need?

The Clerk:

Earlier in the day would give us better access to the translation services, and also to the offices of the members if we should need to call for clarification.

The Chair:

“Earlier” being what?

The Clerk:

Four o'clock is good.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm curious, did we have this last time?

A voice: Yes.

Mr. Christopherson: Was it a problem last time, too? Is that why you're raising it, Madam Clerk?

The Clerk:

I'm not aware since I was not with the committee in the last session.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I move a friendly amendment to move it to 4:00 p.m.

The Chair:

There's a friendly amendment to move it to 4:00 p.m.

Is there any further discussion on the motion?

(Motion as amended agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: The clerk would like to put on the record that she thanks the members who accommodated to make the administration easier and more efficient.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll move number nine, unless you wanted to say something.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

On access to in camera meetings, I move: That, unless otherwise ordered, each Committee member be allowed to have one staff member present from their office and one staff member from their party at in camera meetings.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion on this?

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Is this as it was previously?

The Chair:

Yes, it reads exactly the way it was last time.

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: Transcripts of in camera meetings, does anyone want to move that?

Ms. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

On transcripts of in camera meetings, I move: That one copy of the transcript of each in camera meeting be kept in the Committee clerk's office for consultation by members of the Committee.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion? Are you ready for the vote?

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: Just before we go to Mr. Christopherson, I want to make two points.

First of all, once again, thank you for a very thoughtful and productive session. I think that's what the people of Canada are looking for in their Parliament—at least I heard that at the doors. Thank you very much, everyone, for thoughtful discussions of the points.

As I mentioned at the beginning, I want to say that for the next meeting, which is on Thursday already—and maybe we can discuss this after Mr. Christopherson's motion here—we have a letter from the House leader, which I think you should have all received. Our highest priority is government business, so it might be timely to accept the government leader's offer to appear before our committee.

However, we'll discuss that after Mr. Christopherson's motion.

David, the floor is yours.

(1255)

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Chair.

You know what? In fairness, Chair, I can't imagine that I would be anywhere near done in five minutes. If you want to move ahead to that one order of business, as it speaks to the next meeting—it basically involves inviting someone—I'd be willing to do that, again, as long as I can get my motion right after and you recognize we're not yet done all our rules until my motion is dealt with one way or another.

It's up to you. I'll go ahead if you want.

The Chair:

Yes. If we don't finish the debate on your motion, could we do that at the next meeting as well?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, that's my thinking.

The Chair:

Okay. Let's—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Was the government looking to invite the government House leader to the next meeting?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

We really should do that first, or you're not going to get to it when I get the floor.

The Chair:

Would the committee like to invite the government House leader to the next meeting, based on the letter that all of you received? Would anyone like to move a motion? From any party?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I so move.

An hon. member: I second the motion.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion? All in favour? Is anyone opposed?

(Motion agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Okay.

Mr. Christopherson, if we don't finish your motion today, we will at the next meeting.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Just to be clear, because we will only have a few minutes and it takes me that long to clear my throat, would we bring in the government House leader and do all of that and then return to me? Or were you looking at finishing my motion and then hearing from the witness? I have a fair bit to say and I don't want to disrupt an otherwise productive meeting because of rules.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

If we could have the House leader before [Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's why I'm offering and that's kind of what my sense is, because I have something to say on this, and where I come from it's important.

I don't want to hold up the business of the committee, so for what it's worth, Chair, I leave it with you that I'm quite prepared to even adjourn this, have our witness on Thursday, and then upon conclusion of our business with the witness, if you direct that I will then be given a chance to place my motion and it gets its full hearing, I'm fine with that, sir.

The Chair:

That's probably a good way to go. Will this be a notice of motion today?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, a notice of motion, with the assurance that it comes up right after we hear from the government House leader. If that's your ruling, I'm fine, Chair.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a very quick question for the chair. Just for clarification, do the 12 rules we've passed here apply for the next meeting or not until after the motion is dealt with?

The Chair:

They all apply immediately. They were passed.

The understanding in our friendly group here is that at the next meeting we will have the government House leader and then do Mr. Christopherson's motion. Does everyone understand that?

Do you want to submit...?

Mr. David Christopherson:

The clerk has circulated it already in both languages.

The Chair:

Okay. That's perfect.

Is there any further business in the two minutes we have left?

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Further to the motion we passed at the beginning of the meeting about the tabling of the committee reports, when would it be your intention to table that report to the House?

The Chair:

As soon as we can have it ready because we want the committees to get started.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Do we have an estimate of when that might be?

The Chair:

I'll ask the clerk to respond officially to that.

The Clerk:

We will prepare the report as quickly as possible as soon as we have all of the information we need.

The Chair:

I'm sorry. Are you talking about the report with all the names or just the fact that we're letting the whips go ahead...?

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's the report with the names.

The Chair:

Whenever the parties have submitted all their names, we can do it as quickly as possible, and we will.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. Do you have to first table the fact that we're allowing the whips to do so?

The Chair:

No.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Does the report have to be tabled?

The Chair:

No, not the permission. It's just the big report with all the names.

(1300)

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. Thanks.

The Chair:

I would like to ask for a clarification.

Does that motion have to be unanimous in the House to support the one where we're reporting back what the whips are proposing for all the committees?

The clerk indicates that the practice is that the chair presents that report and asks the House to adopt the report.

Is there any further business? We're right on time in this very productive meeting.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is it possible for the clerks and the analysts to have name tags as well for future meetings?

The Chair:

Could you have name tags for the clerk and the analysts, Madam Clerk?

Mr. David Christopherson:

They have to remain anonymous.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

That's a good point, Mr. Graham. I think we can arrange that.

Thanks, all of you.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Je déclare ouverte la troisième séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Cette réunion télévisée nous permettra de discuter des travaux du Comité et de poursuivre notre examen des motions de régie interne.

Je rappelle à tous que M. Christopherson avait la parole à la fin de notre dernière séance. J'aurais quelques remarques préliminaires à faire avant de lui permettre de poursuivre.

Comme vous le savez, l'examen des travaux du gouvernement est l'un des éléments importants du mandat de notre comité. Je reviendrai donc à la fin de la séance à la lettre que vous avez reçue à ce sujet. Nous espérons pouvoir en traiter lors de séances à venir.

Je me suis entretenu avec M. Christopherson au cours du week-end. Nous avons convenu qu'il pourrait reprendre la parole au sujet de la motion à l'étude, mais que nous pourrions d'abord, pour permettre au reste du Parlement de poursuivre son travail, traiter de la dernière de nos motions de régie interne. Cette motion porte sur la délégation d'autorité aux whips pour la sélection des membres de tous les autres comités.

Cela vous convient-il, monsieur Christopherson?

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

C'est effectivement ce que nous avions convenu, monsieur le président. Je suis donc d'accord pour que l'on examine maintenant cette autre motion, pour autant que j'aie à nouveau la parole après coup.

Merci.

Le président:

Certainement, comme convenu.

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

Les députés du parti ministériel sont d'accord pour procéder de cette manière.

Pourrions-nous maintenant présenter cette dernière motion, si personne n'a d'objection?

Le président:

Vous présentez la motion?

M. Arnold Chan:

J'en fais la proposition et je vais la lire aux fins du compte rendu. Cela concerne la délégation d'autorité aux whips.

Je propose: Que le mandat du Comité de sélection aux termes des articles 104, 113 et 114 du Règlement soit délégué aux trois whips et que ces derniers soient autorisés à remettre directement au président du Comité, dans un rapport signé par les trois whips, ou leurs représentants, leurs recommandations unanimes, afin qu'il en fasse rapport à la Chambre au nom du Comité.

Le président:

Quelqu'un veut en discuter?

Il s'agit de motions de régie interne que l'on peut généralement adopter assez rapidement.

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président: Nous allons maintenant donner la parole à M. Christopherson.

Nous revenons donc à la motion concernant le sous-comité. Je crois que c'était la deuxième dans la liste des motions de régie interne que l'on vous a remise.

David, nous discutons maintenant de l'amendement que vous avez proposé.

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien. Merci, monsieur le président.

Je suis heureux que nous ayons pu tout au moins régler cette question car, comme je l'indiquais, je ne m'efforce pas délibérément... Je n'interviens pas dans le seul but de retarder la procédure. À mon humble avis, le point que j'essaie de faire valoir est tout à fait pertinent.

Comme je l'ai déjà dit, c'est une question qui pourrait se régler plutôt facilement, et j'espère donc que le gouvernement a eu le temps de changer son fusil d'épaule. C'est une simple affaire de détails, mais elle a toute son importance.

Je vous rappelle la situation. Notre comité plénier est la seule instance décisionnelle. La motion vise à créer un sous-comité que nous appelons ici comité de direction. Celui-ci a pour seul mandat de permettre au comité plénier de s'acquitter plus efficacement et plus rapidement de ses tâches.

Le comité de direction s'efforce de régler des questions comme l'ordre de comparution des témoins et le temps consacré aux séances publiques par rapport aux séances à huis clos. Autrement dit, il s'agit en fait d'établir dans ses moindres détails le plan de travail du comité. Vous savez ce qu'on dit du genre de lettres que l'on peut recevoir lorsque c'est un comité qui la rédige? Il s'agit donc de choses semblables. Il y a tellement de détails à régler que si nous tentions d'en débattre tous ensemble, nos travaux s'en trouveraient paralysés. Nous laissons par conséquent le comité de direction s'en charger.

Voici ce qui cause problème, et c'est la raison pour laquelle je soulignais au départ que seul notre comité dans son ensemble peut prendre des décisions. Le comité de direction, ou le sous-comité, si vous préférez, n'est pas un organe décisionnel. Peu importe la conclusion à laquelle nous en arriverons, à savoir si l'on fonctionnera avec un système de votes ou suivant une formule de consensus — la solution que je privilégie pour le sous-comité — celui-ci ne pourra même pas décider de commander du café. Il n'a absolument aucun pouvoir décisionnel.

Suivant un modèle de consensus — celui que je préconise —, lorsque les représentants des trois partis au sein du comité de direction parviennent à s'entendre, leur recommandation est soumise au comité plénier. En règle générale, tous les partis acceptent d'emblée les recommandations de la sorte étant donné que leurs représentants respectifs se sont déjà penchés sur la question. Il arrive que les choses ne se déroulent pas de cette manière, mais la plupart du temps, lorsqu'une recommandation unanime vient du comité de direction... En fait, nous acceptons habituellement le rapport complet en même temps que les recommandations qu'il renferme parce que nous savons tous que l'un de nos représentants était présent pour défendre les intérêts de notre caucus, tout en cherchant à favoriser l'efficacité du comité dans son ensemble. C'est la formule du consensus qui est préférable pour parvenir à un tel résultat.

Par ailleurs, si une question ne fait pas l'unanimité au sein du comité de direction, le comité plénier ne reçoit aucune recommandation, aucune politique, aucune proposition qui pourrait être rejetée. En l'absence d'un consensus, le comité se penche directement sur la question, comme si l'on avait sauté l'étape du comité de direction. C'est ainsi que les choses fonctionnent. Les membres du comité de direction discutent d'une question; s'ils ne parviennent pas à s'entendre, le comité plénier en est directement saisi et doit en disposer comme si le comité de direction n'en avait jamais traité. Le comité de direction est là uniquement pour convenir des détails de nos travaux.

Malgré tout le respect que je dois aux conservateurs, je n'essaierais même pas de faire valoir cet argument s'ils étaient encore au pouvoir. N'ont-ils pas en effet tout simplement éliminé le comité de direction qui aurait relevé du comité dont j'assumais la présidence lors de la dernière législature? À quoi bon tenter de régler les menus détails du fonctionnement d'un comité alors même que le gouvernement au pouvoir croise les bras en affirmant que l'on va se passer d'un tel comité, et que rien ne sert d'en débattre?

(1110)



Nous ne savons que trop bien où une attitude semblable nous a menés après toutes ces années, pour aboutir à l'élection d'un nouveau gouvernement avec un nouveau mandat et une nouvelle vision. Ce nouveau gouvernement a notamment promis — et c'est justement pour cette raison que je soulève la question — de faire en sorte que nous puissions faire notre travail d'opposition en demandant des comptes au gouvernement. Je sais fort bien que les règles n'ont rien d'attrayant, mais je suis ici depuis assez longtemps pour savoir que les règles dont nous allons convenir aujourd'hui vont refaire surface lorsque nous vivrons des crises et nous livrerons des batailles rangées — ce n'est pas toujours le cas au sein de ce comité-ci, mais cela arrive de temps à autre dans tous les comités.

Mais une chose est sûre, monsieur le président. Quelle que soit la controverse pouvant être suscitée par une question donnée, le gouvernement remportera toujours le vote, 10 fois sur 10. Il sort toujours gagnant. J'ai déjà fait partie d'un gouvernement majoritaire. C'est une sensation incroyable; vous vous présentez à une séance à la Chambre en sachant fort bien que vous aurez toujours gain de cause, quoi qu'il advienne. Nous avons devant nous un gouvernement qui a fait campagne en promettant que les choses se feraient différemment au sein des comités.

On soutenait que l'on devrait vraiment s'inspirer du modèle de Westminster et du fonctionnement de ses comités. Ceux qui assistent à leurs séances disent avoir de la difficulté à distinguer les députés de l'opposition de ceux du gouvernement. De deux choses l'une, soit une démocratie n'en a que le nom, toutes les décisions étant prises en haut lieu et l'opposition ne disposant d'aucun pouvoir ou ne souhaitant pas en disposer... Ceux parmi nous qui sont ici depuis un certain temps déjà ont pour la plupart pu visiter ces pays où la démocratie manque de vigueur et se faire une excellente idée de l'allure que les choses peuvent prendre en pareil cas.

Il y a donc des pays où l'on n'arrive pas à distinguer le gouvernement de l'opposition et d'autres où le gouvernement a la mainmise sur absolument tout. Je ne vais pas nommer ces pays-là, mais nous sommes tous capables de les reconnaître. Dans certains cas, le mode de fonctionnement adopté fait en sorte que chacun accomplit son travail au sein du comité à titre de parlementaire d'abord, son appartenance à un parti venant au second plan. Ils sont parvenus beaucoup mieux que nous à libérer la Chambre d'une partie de son esprit partisan. En comité, ils agissent à titre de parlementaires d'abord.

Lorsque tous les membres d'un comité abordent une question ou un problème avec la même volonté d'en traiter efficacement, il est très difficile pour un observateur de distinguer le gouvernement de l'opposition, ce qui est une excellente chose. Dans le cas de la plupart de nos comités, il faut à peine trois minutes pour savoir qui fait partie du gouvernement et qui est dans l'opposition, car nos interventions sont souvent teintées de partisanerie. Le gouvernement s'est fait élire en affirmant qu'il n'appréciait pas cette façon de faire, que ce n'est pas le genre de démocratie qui l'intéresse, et qu'il ne croit pas que cela soit conforme aux valeurs des Canadiens. Je dirais aux gens du gouvernement que nous étions très nombreux au sein du NPD à être du même avis.

Un nouveau gouvernement a donc été élu. Les poursuivants ont rattrapé leur proie. Quoi de neuf alors? Pour l'instant, c'est toujours la même rengaine.

Nous sommes venus participer à notre première séance après l'élection d'un gouvernement qui avait promis de l'ouverture, de la transparence, une indépendance nouvelle, et, bien évidemment, la fin d'une époque où les secrétaires parlementaires décidaient de toutes les actions au sein du parti ministériel. Qu'avons-nous vu en arrivant ici pour cette première séance? Nous avons vu M. Lamoureux, et cela n'a rien de personnel, car c'est un collègue de longue date que j'apprécie beaucoup... Nous avons donc vu M. Lamoureux qui, dans son rôle de secrétaire parlementaire, était assis à la place qu'occupait auparavant Tom Lukiwski, qui agissait lui-même comme secrétaire parlementaire pour le leader du gouvernement à la Chambre. Le nouveau gouvernement semblait donc vouloir perpétuer ce même système qu'il avait promis de changer. C'était notre toute première séance, et on avait déjà complètement oublié les promesses électorales pour revenir simplement à la normale en se disant qu'on allait faire comme les conservateurs.

Nous devions faire quelque chose, et je suis intervenu. Il s'est alors décalé de quelques places. Nous sommes revenus à la charge et il s'est encore éloigné de deux ou trois sièges. Nous progressons; il se rapproche de la porte, mais il est encore des nôtres. En consultant les bleus de cette première séance, vous verrez qu'il a sans doute parlé pendant 80 à 90 % du temps, selon mon estimation. C'est exactement ce qui posait problème. Le secrétaire parlementaire informe ses collègues du parti ministériel de la teneur des ordres donnés en haut lieu ce jour-là et, peu importe les discussions que nous pouvons avoir en comité, c'est dans ce sens que les votes seront exprimés.

C'est justement cette façon de procéder que le gouvernement a prétendu vouloir changer. Ils ont dit souhaiter accorder une plus grande indépendance aux comités et renoncer à une partie des pouvoirs que le gouvernement précédent s'était appropriés. Tout cela est très bien, et c'est ce qui explique notamment l'élection de ce gouvernement et le grand nombre de sièges qu'il a obtenus.

(1115)



Nous parlons maintenant de la situation du comité de direction dans un tel contexte. En fait, je propose simplement que nous... Il faut se rappeler qu'il n'y a pas de règles établies; la plupart des comités fonctionnent par consensus. Il n'y a pas à ma connaissance de comité de direction où les questions sont mises aux voix, et c'est ce qui est problématique ici.

Le gouvernement nous dit qu'il n'utilisera pas cette possibilité très souvent, qu'il n'a pas l'intention de le faire. On ne peut absolument pas accepter une telle argumentation. Je dois vous dire que j'ai négocié mes premières conventions collectives il y a 40 ans déjà et que j'ai toujours fait de la politique depuis. Nous ne sommes pas dupes. Lorsque nos querelles partisanes battront leur plein, ce seront ces règles qui feront foi de tout. Le gouvernement verra à les faire respecter à la lettre pour pouvoir continuer à exercer le contrôle souhaité.

En gage de bonne foi... et je croyais vraiment que cette question allait être réglée très facilement. Je pensais ainsi rendre un précieux service à M. Lamoureux qui aurait pu déclarer: « Nous respectons nos engagements. M. Christopherson exerce une certaine pression, mais n'ayez crainte, nous voulions déjà le faire et blablabla. » Je me demandais si j'avais bien fait d'être aussi généreux avec lui, mais il est plutôt allé dans le sens contraire. Un de ses collègues a même essayé de me faire taire. On croirait revoir l'ancien gouvernement.

Revenons à nos moutons. Voici ce qui cloche avec le comité de direction. Ceux qui n'ont pas à composer avec ces questions au quotidien peuvent bien croire qu'il n'y a pas lieu d'en faire toute une histoire et que j'essaie simplement de faire perdre du temps au comité. Je conviens que c'est une critique que l'on peut formuler, même si cela n'a rien à voir avec la réalité.

Qu'advient-il si l'on instaure cette dynamique de vote? Différentes choses, monsieur le président. Vous êtes ici depuis longtemps déjà. Vous vous êtes absenté un certain temps, mais vous êtes de retour. Vous connaissez nos modes de fonctionnement.

En permettant de voter sur ces questions, on ouvre la voie à tous ces petits jeux de partisanerie parlementaire auxquels les députés peuvent parfois se livrer. Tout cela est légal, mais cela demeure des manoeuvres, comme le fait d'attendre que quelqu'un quitte la salle pour présenter une motion. On voit des agissements de la sorte même à la Chambre où les leaders parlementaires et les whips s'efforcent de garder le compte des présences et des absences pour voir s'ils peuvent en tirer un avantage en prenant contrôle de la Chambre. On l'a déjà vu. Au sein d'un comité où les motions sont mises aux voix, chacun s'efforce de remporter ce scrutin pour qu'une proposition qui lui est favorable puisse aller de l'avant. À partir du moment où la notion de vote s'insinue dans la dynamique d'une salle de réunion...

Encore là, ceux parmi nous qui ont l'habitude de ces choses... et il ne s'agit pas nécessairement de politique. N'importe quel travailleur d'un groupe communautaire est à même de saisir la différence entre les discussions visant à dégager un consensus et une décision soumise à un vote. Il ne faut pas oublier que ce comité est la seule instance décisionnelle en l'espèce et que le gouvernement sort vainqueur de ces votes 10 fois sur 10. Nous demandons simplement que l'on supprime cet irritant — et c'est vraiment juste un irritant — en reconnaissant que le comité de direction doit travailler suivant une formule de consensus. Si une question ne fait pas l'unanimité, il n'y a pas de recommandation au comité. Ce n'est pas plus compliqué que cela.

C'est ce que je trouve préoccupant, monsieur le président. À la lumière de ce que je viens de vous dire, vous pouvez comprendre que, dans les faits, le gouvernement ne renonce à rien du tout en soutenant qu'il ne va pas se servir du système de vote. Comme le sous-comité n'est pas un organe décisionnel, nous n'enlevons... Il serait difficile d'évaluer dans quelle mesure ses pouvoirs sont réduits. Et on ne devrait peut-être même pas parler de « pouvoirs », mais plutôt d'influence ou de léger avantage, car il n'y a pas de pouvoir décisionnel en cause. Même en cas d'unanimité, on n'aboutit qu'à des recommandations. Le comité de direction ne peut pas prendre de décision à la place du comité plénier.

Je vous souligne encore une fois que cette question aurait pu être réglée très facilement. Ma vaste expérience m'amène à m'interroger sur ce que l'avenir nous réserve. En effet, si le gouvernement n'est pas disposé à faire montre de souplesse à l'égard de questions qui n'ont pas vraiment une grande importance alors qu'aucun pouvoir véritable n'est en jeu, on peut se demander s'il était vraiment sincère en affirmant vouloir faire les choses différemment de celui qui l'a précédé.

Pour l'instant, je ne vois aucun changement. C'est du pareil au même. Seuls les visages ont changé, mais je me retrouve de nouveau assis en face d'un parti majoritaire, avec le secrétaire parlementaire qui pourrait encore être le seul maître à bord.

(1120)



En outre, à notre première tentative de modifier quelque chose d'aussi simple, le gouvernement se campe sur ses positions en affirmant que cela n'est pas possible. On ne peut pas jouer sur les deux tableaux. Vous pouvez bien vous faire élire en promettant des voies ensoleillées, mais la partie n'est pas gagnée pour autant. Il faut que nous puissions constater des changements. Je n'en ai aucune indication pour l'instant.

À la Chambre hier, j'ai parlé de choses et d'autres avec M. Lamoureux dans l'espoir qu'il profite de l'occasion pour me dire: « En passant, Dave, nous n'allons pas nous opposer à cette proposition. » Comme cela n'est pas arrivé et à moins que quelqu'un m'indique que les choses ont changé, et je ne perçois aucun signe en ce sens du gouvernement, il ne semble pas que j'aurai gain de cause. Si le gouvernement n'acquiesce pas à un souhait aussi simple, un grand nombre de Canadiens ne vont pas manquer de se demander si leur gouvernement n'a pas l'intention d'apporter des changements au Parlement uniquement lorsque cela fera son affaire, ce qui va, bien évidemment, à l'encontre de l'objectif visé. On voulait réduire la partisanerie politique, mais voilà comment les choses se passent.

Je me trouvais plutôt généreux. Je croyais avoir offert à M. Lamoureux un beau cadeau de Noël en lui indiquant comment sa réaction pouvait m'être bénéfique. Je lui ai demandé pourquoi il agissait de la sorte. Je lui ai dit que j'allais continuer à parler de la question jusqu'à la fin de la séance, ce qui nous amènerait jusqu'à la pause des Fêtes. Il y aurait bien alors une de ces journées où il ne se passe pas grand-chose pour inciter un journaliste en quête d'une nouvelle intéressante à soumettre le dossier à son rédacteur en chef. Il n'y a pas de quoi en faire tout un plat, mais c'est quelque chose de concret et c'est mieux que rien. Comme il fallait s'y attendre, c'était effectivement ce qui s'est produit.

Je vais vous répéter ce que j'ai dit à la fin de la dernière année. Pourquoi diable le gouvernement voudrait-il se retrouver dans une position délicate à l'égard de l'un de ses engagements les plus importants, à savoir la réforme démocratique, tout particulièrement au niveau des comités? Les libéraux ont dit souhaiter des comités plus indépendants, moins partisans et affranchis du contrôle du Cabinet du premier ministre, de telle sorte que leurs membres puissent travailler ensemble en toute collégialité en agissant davantage comme des parlementaires, plutôt qu'en tant que membres d'un parti.

Il va de soi que ce n'était pas un dossier de tout premier plan, mais c'était suffisamment important. Ils ont compromis leur engagement et ils poursuivent dans le même sens.

Soyez bien certain que l'on ne manquera pas de le leur rappeler à toutes les fois où ils voudront se péter les bretelles avec leurs autres réformes démocratiques. Ce n'est qu'un début, car je n'ai pas l'impression que ce gouvernement est vraiment disposé à apporter des changements. Tout cela va se faire au compte-gouttes. Le gouvernement peut bien y aller de grandes annonces qui vont faire les manchettes, mais les changements ne vont être que très subtils. Au bout de quatre années d'un tel régime, il y a bien des Canadiens qui vont se demander ce qu'il est advenu de tous ces changements que l'on promettait d'apporter. Qu'en est-il de ce dynamisme nouveau que l'on disait vouloir insuffler à notre démocratie et à notre Chambre des communes?

N'oubliez pas que le gouvernement s'était engagé à procéder à de tels changements « surtout au niveau des comités ». Je n'y comprends rien du point de vue de la procédure, ni de celui de la réforme, pas plus que de celui de l'efficience; je n'y comprends assurément rien dans une perspective partisane, d'autant plus que le gouvernement soutient ne pas souhaiter vraiment se servir de ces votes.

Pourquoi tenez-vous alors à l'existence même d'un système de vote? Pourquoi donc?

Il n'y a qu'une seule réponse possible. Je crois que M. Chan y a fait allusion. Sauf erreur de ma part, il a dit qu'il pourrait y avoir des occasions... Voilà bien ce qui m'inquiète. C'est pourquoi il importe de bien faire les choses dès maintenant, car c'est la seule possibilité qui s'offrira à nous au cours des quatre prochaines années. Comme vous le savez, monsieur le président, il arrive que des comités modifient leurs règles pendant une législature mais, dans la plupart des cas, ces règles restent inchangées. C'est pour cette raison que j'estime important d'en discuter maintenant, car nous n'aurons pas d'autres occasions de le faire.

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais savoir si quelqu'un du parti ministériel souhaiterait réagir avant que je mette fin pour de bon à mon intervention. S'ils me disent maintenant qu'ils sont d'accord, alors nul besoin pour moi de poursuivre et de résumer mon argumentation. S'ils ne sont pas d'accord, je devrai récapituler le tout, car je n'ai pas l'intention de débattre de cette question jusqu'à ce que mort s'ensuive.

(1125)



Si l'on veut parler de partisanerie, nous en avons eu plus que notre dose à cause de l'entêtement du gouvernement.

De toute façon, monsieur le président, en supposant que j'ai toujours le droit de parole, j'accorde à mes collègues d'en face le droit de réplique, et j'aimerais reprendre la parole par la suite.

Le président:

Vous n'avez pas de droit de parole automatique, mais vous êtes le prochain sur la liste.

M. David Christopherson:

Eh bien, je mettrai mon nom sur la liste après mon intervention, ce qui me semble plutôt illogique, car si personne ne prend la parole après, il n'y aura personne sur la liste. C'est ce que je vous dis.

Le président:

De toute façon, vous serez le seul sur la liste.

M. David Christopherson:

Il suffit de dire oui.

Le président:

Pendant que nous attendons, je vais lire l'ordre du jour pour le compte de Jamie, à qui je souhaite la bienvenue au Comité, et pour quiconque n'a pas pu assister à la dernière réunion. Nous en sommes à la deuxième motion de régie interne visant le Sous-comité du programme et de la procédure. Une motion d'amendement a été déposée le 10 décembre 2015.

M. Chan a proposé: Que le Sous-comité du programme et de la procédure soit créé et composé du président, des deux vice-présidents et de deux membres du parti ministériel.

Nous sommes maintenant saisis d'un amendement. M. Christopherson a proposé que la motion soit modifiée par substitution, aux mots de « deux membres du parti ministériel » des mots « d'un membre du parti ministériel ».

Y a-t-il quelqu'un autre que M. Christopherson qui souhaite intervenir? Allons-nous tout simplement continuer?

D'accord. Vous pouvez continuer jusqu'à ce que quelqu'un demande d'intervenir.

M. David Christopherson:

Je suis à la veille de terminer, monsieur le président. Je disais que mes propos ne visaient pas à ralentir les choses, et c'est vrai, mais il est intéressant, compte tenu de la motion dont nous sommes saisis, de constater combien de membres du parti ministériel... Bien franchement, s'il s'agissait d'un consensus, il faudrait avoir autant de membres que possible. Ce qui compte, c'est d'en arriver à un accord quelconque. Toutefois, la question reste valide, car il est question maintenant des votes.

J'ai fait le tour de la question, monsieur le président. Je vous ai exposé mon point de vue, beaucoup plus que je ne l'aurais pensé. Je dois vous dire, monsieur le président, que j'ai vraiment l'impression d'avoir affaire au gouvernement précédent. Le gouvernement actuel dit qu'il veut être différent, et c'est peut-être son intention, mais ce que j'ai observé ici au sein du Comité me fait penser aux conservateurs. L'ancien gouvernement agissait exactement de la même manière.

Je vois des membres qui font non de la tête. Je vous comprends, mais il reste que ceux d'entre nous qui étaient ici reconnaissent que c'est exactement la même façon de procéder, et sur cette première question... Je veux bien que ma collègue intervienne. Son langage corporel en dit long.

M. Lamoureux ne vous permet pas de parler? Je croyais qu'on voulait que tout le monde puisse s'exprimer.

Je vois votre langage corporel, et vous avez tant de choses à donner, mais il n'y a pas... J'ai déjà vu ça. Je compatis. Je comprends. J'ai pu le constater chez certains de mes collègues du dernier gouvernement. Ils mourraient d'envie de parler. Ils voulaient faire valoir la démocratie, alimenter la discussion, mais on les a bâillonnés, tout comme le fait le secrétaire parlementaire, qui s'affaire à son BlackBerry, qui prend des notes, qui reste la tête penchée et nous évite du regard, tandis que les autres membres sont assis et se demandent: « Pourquoi en sommes-nous arrivés là? »

J'ai l'impression que ces membres voudraient intervenir, mais ils ne le font pas. À quoi ressemble ce scénario? C'est exactement ce qu'on voyait avant.

Les mots à eux tout seuls ne changent pas les choses, chers amis. Si vous voulez changer le monde, il faut poser des gestes. Si le gouvernement veut indiquer qu'il a réellement envie de faire les choses différemment et ne veut pas que le BPM jugule chaque comité, c'est l'occasion de le faire, et pourtant les gens sont assis, tranquilles, comme le faisaient les conservateurs, en attendant le moment de recourir à leur droit de vote majoritaire afin de faire adopter ce qu'ils veulent.

Je n'arrive pas à comprendre comment cette façon de procéder est différente, positive et ouverte. Je serai bien intéressé de voir comment le gouvernement va joindre le geste à la parole et rendre les comités plus indépendants, plus transparents et moins partisans. J'ai hâte de voir comment il va procéder, car nous avons ici une occasion en or, et le gouvernement ne semble pas être intéressé.

J'ai terminé.

(1130)

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres personnes qui souhaitent intervenir concernant l'amendement? Sommes-nous prêts à passer au vote?

Je vais lire l'amendement afin que nous soyons clairs sur l'objet du vote. Il a été proposé par M. Christopherson que la motion soit modifiée par substitution, aux mots « de deux membres du parti ministériel », des mots « d'un membre du parti ministériel ».

M. David Christopherson:

J'aimerais que ce soit un vote par appel nominal.

(L'amendement est rejeté par 5 voix contre 4.)

Le président:

L'amendement ayant été rejeté, nous passons maintenant à la motion.

Y a-t-il des commentaires concernant la motion?

M. David Christopherson:

J'aimerais que ce soit un vote par appel nominal, s'il vous plaît.

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à la troisième motion de régie interne qui, à cause des changements de nom, doit être...

Oui, monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

J'aimerais vous demander un conseil. Je souhaite proposer une motion concernant les réunions à huis clos et j'aimerais, à la lumière de vos conseils et de ceux de la greffière, savoir quel serait le moment de le faire.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Le point numéro neuf porte sur les réunions à huis clos.

Le président:

La motion numéro neuf porte sur les réunions à huis clos.

M. David Christopherson:

Je n'ai pas de numéro. Quelle est la rubrique?

Le président:

C'est « Accès aux réunions à huis clos ».

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord. J'y avais pensé, mais puisqu'il était question uniquement d'« accès », je ne voulais pas commettre d'erreur.

Vous me permettez de déposer une motion lorsque nous serons rendus au point qui porte sur les réunions à huis clos?

Le président:

C'est un point tout à fait nouveau. Serait-il possible de le faire après que nous ayons traité toutes les motions de régie interne?

(1135)

M. David Christopherson:

Si vous voulez. Je souhaitais tout simplement trouver un moment opportun.

Le président:

D'accord. Nous allons traiter les motions de régie interne, et ensuite vous pourrez déposer votre motion.

M. David Christopherson: D'accord.

Le président: Parfait.

Puis-je demander à quelqu'un de déposer la motion numéro trois?

David.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En ce qui concerne le Sous-comité des affaires émanant des députés, je propose: Que, conformément à l'article 91.1(1) du Règlement, le Sous-comité des affaires émanant des députés soit composé d'un (1) membre de chaque parti reconnu à la Chambre et un président du parti ministériel; et que Ginette Petitpas Taylor en soit la présidente.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Les candidats prononceront-ils des discours dans le cadre de leur campagne?

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président:

Madame Petitpas Taylor, souhaitez-vous prononcer un discours?

Mme Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Bonjour.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président:

On dirait que non.

Sommes-nous prêts à passer au vote?

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président: La prochaine motion concerne la régie interne et plus précisément le quorum. Puis-je demander à quelqu'un de déposer la motion?

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Je propose: Que le président soit autorisé à tenir des réunions afin de recevoir et de publier des témoignages en l'absence de quorum, pourvu qu'au moins trois (3) membres soient présents, dont un (1) membre de l'opposition et un (1) membre du gouvernement.

Le président:

Y a-t-il des commentaires?

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui. La motion en soi ne me pose pas de problème particulier.

Je demanderais seulement que nous puissions la modifier au moyen d'un amendement favorable ou adopté en bonne et due forme, afin que ce soit un membre d'un parti de l'opposition reconnu plutôt que tout simplement un membre de l'opposition, ou quelque chose du genre. En d'autres termes, nous avons des membres des trois partis reconnus ainsi que certains membres indépendants qui représentent d'autres partis. Le libellé de la motion actuelle permettrait d'avoir le quorum même si les représentants des deux autres partis de l'opposition reconnus étaient absents.

Je sais que cela nous ramène à l'écart entre les caucus et les indépendants, une question qui reste entière. Notre système n'est pas juste à l'égard des indépendants, il privilégie les caucus. Il a été conçu pour favoriser les partis reconnus. C'est la base même de notre structure. Je vous demande tout simplement de rendre les choses claires en précisant, lorsqu'on dit : « y compris un (1) membre de l'opposition », qu'il s'agit alors d'un membre d'un parti reconnu.

Le président:

Minute. Vous voulez être sûr qu'ici, lorsqu'il est question de « l'opposition », on fasse référence en fait à l'un ou l'autre des deux partis reconnus.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, un parti reconnu.

Le président:

Pas un député indépendant.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est exact. C'est ce que je voulais dire, monsieur le président.

Je comprends tout à fait la situation des indépendants et j'en suis navré, mais la structure actuelle favorise les caucus. Je dois défendre les droits de mon caucus.

Le président:

D'accord, mais...

M. Kevin Lamoureux (Winnipeg-Nord, Lib.):

Monsieur le président, pourrions-nous consulter la greffière? D'après ce que je comprends, dans le passé, le quorum était constitué des membres du parti ministériel et de l'opposition officielle qui étaient présents, et cela vaut pour tous les comités. On n'a jamais tenu compte de la présence d'un troisième parti.

La greffière pourrait-elle nous indiquer si j'ai raison ou non? J'avais compris qu'il fallait la présence d'un membre de l'opposition officielle et d'un membre du parti ministériel afin d'avoir le quorum. Ce que mon collègue propose serait tout à fait nouveau.

La greffière du comité (Mme Joann Garbig):

La motion dont nous sommes saisis prévoit un quorum réduit pour recueillir des témoignages, et le Comité peut en décider la composition. Le quorum d'une réunion comme celle-ci serait de 50 % plus un, mais bien souvent, le président fait preuve de courtoisie et attend jusqu'à ce que tous les partis soient représentés avant de commencer la réunion.

Ma réponse vous suffit-elle?

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Le Comité serait-il capable de fonctionner s'il adoptait l'amendement de M. Christopherson? Si, par exemple, un représentant d'un troisième parti n'était pas présent?

La greffière:

Selon le libellé actuel, la motion indique que ce serait un membre de l'opposition, donc l'un ou l'autre des partis de l'opposition représentés ici au Comité. Si j'ai bien compris l'amendement, M. Christopherson voudrait qu'un membre d'un...

(1140)

Le président:

D'un parti officiellement reconnu...

La greffière:

Mais c'est déjà le cas pour les membres du Comité.

M. David Christopherson:

Permettez-moi d'intervenir. Je vous ai bien compris, madame la greffière. Merci beaucoup.

Le cas se présenterait uniquement si nous accueillions des indépendants au Comité, parce qu'en ce moment, ils n'en font pas partie. Or, ce n'est pas inhabituel. Parfois des partis font venir un député, et dans ce contexte un indépendant pourrait être présent et ainsi le cas de figure se présenterait. La question n'est peut-être pas aussi critique que je ne le pensais à l'origine, mais j'aimerais tout de même proposer mon amendement. Je crois que ce serait utile de préciser qu'il s'agit d'un membre d'un parti de l'opposition reconnu.

J'aimerais dire à M. Lamoureux que si nous ajoutions tout simplement: « y compris un membre d'un parti de l'opposition reconnu », je n'aurais plus aucun souci et je ne crois pas que notre façon de procéder en serait changée. Vous pouvez vérifier auprès de la greffière, mais à mon avis il n'y aura pas de changement. Cela veut dire tout simplement qu'il faut être membre d'un des trois partis reconnus pour constituer un petit groupe aux fins du quorum lorsqu'il s'agit de recueillir les témoignages.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

L'idée m'aurait paru bien bonne lorsque je me retrouvais dans votre situation.

Je ne sais pas s'il s'agit d'un problème, mais nous pouvons en parler. Il faudrait alors que le NPD soit représenté afin que nous puissions recueillir des mémoires.

M. David Christopherson:

Non.

Monsieur le président, je proposais qu'il s'agisse d'un représentant de l'un ou de l'autre des partis de l'opposition mais non d'un député indépendant. Si l'opposition officielle est présente, ainsi que le parti ministériel, et nous ne le sommes pas, tant pis pour nous. Si vous êtes représentés, et nous aussi, mais l'opposition officielle ne l'est pas, tant pis pour elle.

Le cas de figure qui ne se présentera pas, c'est que le parti ministériel soit représenté, accompagné d'un député indépendant, sans qu'il y ait de représentants de l'opposition officielle et du troisième parti. Voilà ce que j'avance.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ma question s'adresse à la greffière. S'agit-il de membres qui sont présents, des députés à la Chambre ou des membres du Comité? Si ce sont des membres du Comité, c'est redondant. Si l'on parle de députés tout simples, la question devient plus intéressante.

Le président:

Ce que M. Christopherson veut dire, c'est que le cas de figure s'est déjà présenté où un membre du Comité ne représentait pas l'un des deux partis de l'opposition officiellement reconnus. Il pourrait s'agir, par exemple, d'Elizabeth May. Ce pourrait être un député indépendant, car il arrive à l'occasion que le Comité adopte une motion pour permettre à ces députés de devenir membres des comités. Tout ce que propose M. Christopherson, c'est que nous ayons le quorum en ayant un membre d'un parti de l'opposition, c'est-à-dire l'un des deux partis de l'opposition reconnus.

M. Arnold Chan:

Ce que M. Graham veut dire, il me semble, c'est qu'il ne s'agit pas de membres permanents du Comité, mais comment un député indépendant peut-il devenir membre de notre Comité...? C'est ce que je veux savoir, et je crois que c'est pour cela que M. Graham a dit que c'est redondant.

Le président:

Monsieur Chan, il arrive parfois que le Comité accepte à titre de membres permanents des personnes qui sont ou bien députés indépendants ou bien membres d'un autre parti qui n'a pas de statut officiel, comme le Bloc ou les Verts, et ces gens deviennent membres du Comité. C'est le...

M. David Christopherson:

Ces gens peuvent être reconnus comme membres même pendant une courte période dans le cadre d'une certaine étude.

M. Arnold Chan:

D'accord. Nous cherchons tout simplement à comprendre votre argument.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est tout à votre honneur, monsieur Chan. Nous ne faisons pas de machination. Il arrive parfois également que les partis de l'opposition, dans leurs tractations avec le gouvernement, permettent à un indépendant de figurer comme un des leurs. Ainsi, de façon technique, ces gens ont une place ici et ils y ont tout à fait droit. C'est une question d'ordre mineur. Je ne vais pas m'étendre là-dessus comme je l'ai fait pour le point précédent. Ce n'est pas si important que ça. Si vous ne croyez pas que c'est une amélioration...

J'aimerais bien connaître l'avis de l'opposition officielle, car c'est elle qui en décidera. Je ne vais pas en faire une question de vie ou de mort. À mon avis, c'est juste une amélioration.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Moi-même, qui suis la motionnaire, j'accueillerais la proposition en tant qu'amendement favorable.

Le président:

D'accord.

D'autres commentaires?

Ainsi, la motion, modifiée par l'amendement favorable, se lira...?

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je la relirai telle qu'amendée. Elle indique que le président soit autorisé à tenir des réunions afin de recevoir et de publier des témoignages en l'absence du quorum, pourvu qu'au moins trois (3) membres soient présents, dont un (1) membre d'un parti de l'opposition reconnu et un (1) membre du gouvernement.

(1145)

M. David Christopherson:

C'est parfait.

Le président:

M. Reid souhaite intervenir. Comme il s'agit d'un amendement favorable, nous nous en tiendrons à la motion. La motion sera soumise aux voix, mais allez-y, je vous en prie.

M. Scott Reid:

Cette situation me pose problème, car j'étais en faveur de la motion originale mais non de la motion amendée. J'ignore, par contre, si la procédure me permet de m'y opposer.

Le président:

Vous pourriez amender la motion.

M. Scott Reid:

Ah bon. Je pourrais proposer le retour au libellé original?

Le président:

Oui.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, en fait, la réponse est non. Pour être juste, il faudrait laisser la motion telle quelle en tant que première motion, la deuxième en tant qu'amendement, et ensuite M. Reid peut voter contre l'amendement et s'exprimer comme il veut par rapport à la motion principale.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

D'accord.

Le président:

Bon. La modification sera proposée en tant qu'amendement, et nous allons maintenant débattre de l'amendement.

Vous avez la parole.

M. Scott Reid:

En fait, je n'appuie pas l'amendement, Dave. C'est uniquement dans le but de recevoir des témoignages. Je peux imaginer une situation dans laquelle un témoignage quelconque revêt un intérêt particulier pour des députés du Bloc québécois ou du Parti vert et, pour je ne sais trop quelle raison, ne revêt pas un intérêt... Peut-être que dans un certain sens, cela concerne la possibilité qu'un projet de loi émanant d'un député fasse l'objet d'un vote ou quelque chose du genre. Je ne peux penser à un exemple vraiment probant. Je ne suis pas certain que nous devrions affaiblir leur statut et leur capacité de venir ici.

Cela a des conséquences pour nous, mais pas pour les libéraux. En fait, de façon purement hypothétique, supposons qu'Elizabeth May doit entendre un témoignage. Si nous ne nous présentons pas à la réunion, elle devra persuader deux libéraux de venir à la réunion pour que le tout fonctionne. C'est seulement que je ne pense pas qu'affaiblir leur statut et leur capacité de participer pleinement comme nous... En ce sens, je serais porté à voter contre l'amendement.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je n'ai rien contre les observations de M. Reid, à part que je ne considère pas qu'on affaiblit quelque chose. J'admets qu'on reconnaît ainsi le statut des partis reconnus, mais de là à dire qu'on affaiblit... L'amendement n'empêche personne de se présenter à une réunion.

Sauf erreur, monsieur le président, n'importe quel député peut assister à une réunion s'il le désire. C'est seulement qu'il ne peut pas prendre la parole à moins que son parti ou une personne lui accordent une place, et il n'est pas autorisé à voter. N'importe qui parmi nous peut se présenter à une réunion de comité et même poser des questions si le caucus l'accepte. Je ne vois pas en quoi cela porte atteinte à leur droit. Ils auraient tout de même le droit de se présenter. À mon avis, la seule différence, c'est que nous ne tiendrions pas compte de leur présence pour vérifier le quorum. Or, cela ne remet aucunement en question leur droit d'être présent. Leur statut n'en est pas plus diminué qu'auparavant. Il s'agit surtout d'une précision.

Je comprends ce que soulève M. Reid. Je respecte beaucoup son opinion sur ce type de situation. Je ne partage toutefois pas son point de vue selon lequel l'adoption de l'amendement priverait des députés de quelque chose. À mon avis, on tient compte ici de l'importance des caucus et des partis reconnus et de l'idée selon laquelle s'il faut vérifier le quorum et qu'il faut qu'au moins un parti d'opposition soit représenté, il doit s'agir d'un des deux partis reconnus.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres interventions, non pas au sujet de la motion, mais bien de l'amendement?

Nous sommes prêts à voter: il serait préférable que nous lisions un amendement...

Oui, monsieur Lamoureux.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Scott, si je peux me permettre, je ne comprends pas très bien. Pourriez-vous expliquer ce qui vous préoccupe?

M. Scott Reid:

C'est simple. À l'heure actuelle, il s'agit seulement du quorum requis pour recevoir des témoignages. Pour pouvoir en recevoir, il faut que deux membres du gouvernement et un membre de l'opposition soient présents ou encore que deux membres de l'opposition et un membre du gouvernement soient présents. Le membre de l'opposition peut provenir de n'importe quel parti d'opposition.

L'amendement sous-entend qu'il ne peut s'agir que d'un néo-démocrate ou d'un conservateur. Cela veut dire que le Comité ne pourrait pas siéger pour recevoir des témoignages si à la fois le Parti conservateur et le NPD ne le souhaitent pas. Cependant, de façon purement hypothétique, il se pourrait que le Parti vert et le Bloc québécois veuillent recevoir des témoignages et que le gouvernement soit prêt à accepter. En réalité, cela affaiblit...

Dans une certaine mesure, laisser la motion telle quelle, c'est-à-dire ne pas adopter l'amendement proposé, restreint la capacité de notre parti et du NPD d'empêcher le Comité de recevoir des témoignages. En partant du principe que nous devrions toujours favoriser l'ouverture et les discussions, c'est la direction que je choisis par défaut.

(1150)

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres interventions au sujet de l'amendement proposé? Nous sommes prêts à voter.

Monsieur Christopherson, c'est vous qui présentez l'amendement. Voulez-vous le lire pour que nous comprenions bien l'objet du vote, pour le compte rendu?

M. David Christopherson:

Je propose que la motion actuelle soit modifiée par le remplacement des mots « dont un (1) membre de l'opposition » par « dont un (1) membre d'un parti d'opposition reconnu ».

Le président:

D'accord.

Tous ceux qui sont pour l'amendement proposé?

Tous ceux qui sont contre?

M. David Christopherson:

Vous avez du pain sur la planche.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président:

Je vais voter en respectant la convention. Je ne vais pas toujours voter, mais je ne crois pas qu'il vaut la peine de rompre avec une convention de la Chambre et des comités pour la motion dont nous sommes saisis.

Selon la convention, comme le savent ceux d'entre vous qui font partie de ce Comité depuis un certain temps, lorsque le Président de la Chambre ou un président de comité doivent trancher, ils maintiennent le statu quo. C'est un vote pour le statu quo.

À notre arrivée à la réunion d'aujourd'hui, le statu quo, c'était qu'il n'y avait pas de règle liée au Sous-comité et au quorum du Sous-comité, de sorte qu'en votant pour le maintien du statu quo, je vote contre l'amendement.

(L'amendement est rejeté.)

Le président: C'est compris? D'accord.

Si aucun autre amendement n'est proposé — quelqu'un pourrait proposer un amendement et obtenir une majorité de voix en sa faveur —, nous allons discuter de la motion que Mme Vandenbeld avait présentée initialement.

Est-ce que quelqu'un d'autre veut intervenir? Êtes-vous prêts à répondre à la question?

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président: Je vous remercie tous de votre discussion très constructive. C'était très intéressant.

M. Arnold Chan:

Monsieur le président, puis-je passer au prochain sujet?

Le président: Oui.

M. Arnold Chan: Il concerne le temps alloué pour les allocutions d'ouverture et l'interrogation des témoins.

Voici ce qui est écrit dans le document d'origine. Que dix (10) minutes soient accordées aux témoins pour leur allocution d'ouverture; et que pendant l'interrogation des témoins, le temps soit alloué à chaque intervenant comme suit: au premier tour, sept (7) minutes soient accordées à un représentant de chaque parti dans l'ordre suivant...

Excusez-moi, je devrais changer cela. Permettez-moi de revenir en arrière.

Le texte devrait se lire comme suit: qu'au premier tour, six minutes soient accordées à un représentant de chaque parti dans l'ordre suivant: Parti conservateur, Parti libéral, NPD et Parti libéral. Au deuxième tour, six minutes seraient accordées dans l'ordre suivant: Parti libéral, Parti conservateur, Parti libéral, Parti conservateur. En fin, au dernier tour...

Veuillez m'excuser, il s'agit de cinq minutes pour un conservateur, et de trois minutes pour un néo-démocrate.

Cela fait 50 minutes en tout.

(1155)

Le président:

Voulez-vous qu'on en refasse la lecture?

M. Arnold Chan:

Excusez-moi. Voulez-vous que je le lise à nouveau?

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Je ne cherche même pas à présenter un amendement. Il suffirait de convenir que de temps en temps, lorsque nous accueillons plusieurs témoins, nous voudrons peut-être modifier le temps accordé aux témoins pour leur allocution d'ouverture selon la situation. Si vous me le permettez, c'est le type d'élément que le comité de direction examinerait normalement et pour lequel il ferait ce type d'ajustement.

Cela étant dit, je crois comprendre que les partis ont été consultés. Bien que ce soit décevant de reprendre la place de troisième parti, j'accepte la position dans laquelle nous sommes. Je suis capable de m'y adapter.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres interventions?

M. Arnold Chan:

Je vais le lire. En ce qui concerne le temps alloué pour les allocutions d'ouverture et l'interrogation des témoins, que 10 minutes soient accordées aux témoins pour leur allocution d'ouverture; et que pendant l'interrogation des témoins, le temps soit alloué à chaque intervenant comme suit: au premier tour, que six minutes soient accordées à un représentant de chaque parti dans l'ordre suivant: Parti conservateur, Parti libéral, NPD et Parti libéral; au deuxième tour, que six minutes soient accordées dans l'ordre suivant: Parti libéral, Parti conservateur et Parti libéral. Ensuite, cinq minutes seraient accordées à un conservateur et trois minutes à un néo-démocrate.

Le président:

Y a-t-il des interventions sur la motion?

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Je sais que les efforts déployés sont valables, bien que je veux souligner que cela diffère un peu de la pratique précédente. Je crois qu'il faut apporter un amendement. Je vais tout d'abord expliquer pourquoi, et j'expliquerai par la suite... En fait, non. Je vais expliquer l'amendement que je propose.

À mon avis, au second tour, l'ordre devrait être le suivant: Parti conservateur, Parti libéral, Parti conservateur, Parti libéral. Cela ressemblerait davantage à l'ordre qui était suivi au cours de la législature précédente, durant laquelle la répartition des sièges entre le parti au pouvoir, le parti de l'opposition officielle et le troisième parti était assez similaire.

Je n'ai pas à dire aux gens ici qui sont des parlementaires depuis un certain temps que si deux ou trois témoins comparaissent en une heure, ce qui se produit souvent, il n'est vraiment pas rare que seulement six ou sept intervenants aient le temps de poser des questions. Par conséquent, souvent, les dernières interventions auxquelles vous faites référence — celle d'un député conservateur et celle d'un député du NPD — ne seront pas effectuées. Si on analyse un peu les choses, cette façon de procéder favorise grandement le parti au pouvoir puisqu'il a les première et troisième interventions du second tour, ce qui diffère de la procédure précédente. Si l'on tient compte de la pratique antérieure du Comité, il s'agit d'un changement assez important. Si l'on regarde les six premières interventions ici, selon les règles qui étaient suivies au cours de la dernière législature, l'ordre serait le suivant: Parti conservateur, Parti libéral, NPD, Parti conservateur, NPD, Parti conservateur, qui était au pouvoir auparavant.

La différence, c'est que vous donnez plus de temps de parole à l'opposition dans ses dernières interventions. Or, souvent, nous n'avons pas le temps de nous rendre à la fin de la liste d'intervenants. Si on enlève les dernières interventions... Souvent, elles n'ont pas lieu. Ces deux interventions ont lieu après 42 minutes. C'est souvent ce qui se passe. Par conséquent, en tant que membres de l'opposition officielle, notre temps d'intervention serait presque de 6 % inférieur à celui qui correspondrait normalement au nombre de sièges que nous avons.

Je ne m'oppose pas au temps qui nous est alloué. Je crois seulement qu'au deuxième tour, l'opposition devrait avoir la première intervention et que l'ordre devrait donc être le suivant: Parti conservateur, Parti libéral, Parti conservateur. Ensuite, il y aurait une intervention d'un représentant du Parti libéral, et une intervention d'un représentant du NPD, comme il est déjà indiqué. De cette manière, le temps alloué serait divisé de façon plus équitable compte tenu du nombre de sièges que chaque parti occupe, de sorte que les partis et les députés seraient traités de façon juste.

Si le gouvernement veut vraiment essayer de le faire, je dirais qu'il devrait juger l'amendement acceptable.

Je propose l'amendement.

(1200)

Le président:

Puis-je m'assurer que les gens comprennent bien l'amendement? Lisez-le, s'il vous plaît.

M. Blake Richards:

Il s'agit de modifier la motion de sorte qu'au second tour, l'ordre des interventions soit celui-ci: Parti conservateur, Parti libéral, Parti conservateur, Parti libéral et NPD. Le nombre de minutes accordées ne change pas.

Le président:

Pour l'essentiel, il s'agit d'inverser l'ordre d'intervention des libéraux et des conservateurs au second tour.

M. Blake Richards:

Exactement.

Le président:

Je cède la parole à M. Christopherson. Ce sera au tour de M. Chan, par la suite.

M. David Christopherson:

Dans l'hypothèse peut-être optimiste où M. Chan accepterait ce qui est proposé, je le laisse intervenir avant moi.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je veux soulever très rapidement deux points.

Tout d'abord, pour le compte rendu, je dirai simplement qu'en ce qui concerne le temps total alloué, le gouvernement cède, en fait, environ 8 % du temps total à l'opposition par rapport au nombre de sièges qu'il occupe à la Chambre des communes. Cependant, je comprends le point que vous avez soulevé, soit qu'il se peut que nous ne nous rendions pas toujours à la dernière intervention.

L'autre chose que je veux souligner, c'est que j'ai compris que des discussions ont eu lieu entre les leaders à la Chambre au sujet de cet ordre. C'est ce que j'avais cru comprendre.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson...

M. Arnold Chan:

Excusez-moi. Permettez-moi de reformuler ma phrase. J'aurais dû dire que cela correspond à ce qu'avaient convenu les whips.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

C'est un point très pertinent. Pourrions-nous obtenir une confirmation à ce sujet?

Je dois dire que selon l'information que j'ai reçue, on s'est entendu. Le personnel de notre whip m'a informé que nous appuierions cela parce que tous les partis se sont entendus là-dessus. Si ce n'est pas le cas, alors c'est important. Pourrions-nous avoir des précisions? Même si nous ne sommes pas contraints juridiquement, nous le sommes peut-être moralement. Les trois bureaux des whips y ont-ils adhéré? Pourrions-nous obtenir la confirmation? La seule chose qu'il ne faut pas oublier, tout le monde, c'est que même si ces choses nous préoccupent peu, les whips doivent tout de même se rencontrer. S'ils se sont entendus et que nous brisons cette entente, il leur sera très difficile de faire leurs travaux. L'opposition officielle ne dit pas quelle était la position de son whip.

Je vais dire ce que j'ai à dire, et ce sera tout. Je n'ai rien à gagner sur cette question. En raison des résultats que nous avons obtenus, je suis perdant et je ne peux rien y faire. Nous n'avons pas obtenu suffisamment de sièges pour changer la situation. Je n'ai rien à gagner dans cette discussion, mais une chose doit être dite. Si on s'est entendu, une entente est une entente. Si c'est le cas, à moins que l'on convienne de la défaire, l'entente doit être maintenue.

Si ce n'est pas le cas et qu'il ne s'agit que d'une recommandation et non d'une entente, alors je dirais que du côté de l'opposition officielle, il y a un élément d'équité, que le gouvernement a eu l'élégance de céder 8 %. Normalement, nous essayons de faire en sorte que ce ne soit pas toujours le même parti qui a la parole. Il y a habituellement une alternance, ce qui changerait ici. En effet, le gouvernement aurait un temps de parole de 12 minutes, en principe, et il s'agirait presque de la même personne. Si l'on donne la parole à quelqu'un pour 15 secondes au milieu, il est possible d'avoir la parole à nouveau. Au fond, un membre du gouvernement aurait 12 minutes. Je ne crois pas vraiment que c'est juste.

À vrai dire, si les libéraux ont la majeure partie du temps de parole, ce qu'ils méritent, au moins, l'ordre devrait être le suivant: gouvernement, opposition, gouvernement, opposition. Par conséquent, j'appuie l'opposition officielle, mais seulement si les whips ne se sont pas entendus. S'ils se sont entendus, c'est ce qui devrait être respecté.

J'ai terminé. Merci.

(1205)

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Vandenbeld.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Dans le même ordre d'idées, j'aimerais souligner qu'à l'heure actuelle, le Parti conservateur a trois députés au sein du Comité et trois occasions de poser des questions. Le député néo-démocrate bénéficiera à lui seul de deux périodes d'intervention et les cinq députés libéraux, quant à eux, n'auront que quatre créneaux d'intervention. Déjà avec cette proposition, l'un de nous n'aura pas la possibilité de poser des questions. Je pense que c'est peut-être même plus que juste. Selon moi, l'ordre d'intervention actuel est équitable. En fait, c'est probablement l'un d'entre nous qui disposera de moins de temps de parole.

M. Scott Reid:

Puisque l'on parle de justice, sachez que j'ai déjà présidé le Sous-comité des droits internationaux de la personne. Nous fonctionnions par consensus. Nous tenions des audiences, puis nous posions des questions.

Comme dans cette proposition, les membres de l'opposition étaient les derniers à poser leurs questions. La seule façon dont nous pouvions leur accorder du temps, c'était en siégeant plus longtemps que prévu. Nous nous réunissions tout juste avant la période de questions. Nous siégions de 13 heures à 14 heures, les mardis et les jeudis.

Un député pose une question à un témoin, puis la réponse finit par dépasser le temps qui lui était alloué. Ça arrive tout le temps. Cela se passera peut-être autrement ici, mais si un témoin nous raconte son expérience de torture, par exemple, le président ne peut pas l'interrompre, et une intervention qui était censée durer six minutes peut finalement durer sept ou huit minutes.

Pour permettre aux dernières personnes sur la liste de poser leurs questions, nous prolongions la réunion conformément à l'article 31 du Règlement. Quand je réalisais que nous allions dépasser le temps alloué, j'en informais le greffier, puis je demandais aux gens autour de la table d'invoquer l'article 31 afin que nous puissions modifier l'ordre. Je ne crois pas que nous aurons cette flexibilité ici de prolonger nos réunions, étant donné que cette salle est souvent réservée.

Ce que je veux dire, c'est qu'il est très peu probable que le NPD puisse profiter de ses trois minutes à la fin. Les chances que les conservateurs utilisent leurs cinq minutes ne sont peut-être pas aussi minces, mais elles sont tout de même très faibles. Je considère que c'est un problème fondamental qu'il faut régler. Je dirais qu'il serait plus logique, très franchement... J'aimais bien ce que proposait M. Richards, mais le plus juste, ce serait que les libéraux aient la dernière période d'intervention. Je ne dis pas qu'on ne devrait leur accorder que trois minutes. Ils disposeraient quand même de six minutes, mais ils interviendraient en dernier.

Le président:

Avant que nous ne poursuivions le débat, avez-vous quelque chose à dire au sujet de l'entente potentielle entre les whips?

Mme Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Si je puis me permettre, d'après ce que j'ai compris, nous avons présenté l'information aux whips et nous leur avons demandé ce qu'ils en pensaient, mais nous n'avons reçu aucun commentaire négatif de leur part. Les partis semblaient être d'accord sur ce point.

Je ne crois pas qu'il y ait une entente officielle comme telle, mais chose certaine, nous n'avons reçu aucun commentaire négatif de la part des whips.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, j'assiste à la réunion des leaders à la Chambre et des whips tous les mardis après-midi, alors advenant le cas où nous nous éloignerions de ce qu'ils font ou de ce qu'ils ont convenu, il y aurait toujours une possibilité d'en discuter rapidement. Je déteste utiliser le terme « honneur » lorsqu'il est question de discipline de parti, mais honnêtement, je dirais que nos voeux d'obéissance et de chasteté à l'égard de nos whips ne devraient pas forcément nous lier... Je pense que nous devrions envisager d'apporter quelques améliorations à ce chapitre.

Le président:

Souhaitez-vous garder « chasteté » dans le procès-verbal?

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid:

Nous sommes en séance publique. Je ne peux pas revenir en arrière.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson, à la lumière de ces commentaires, avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter concernant cette entente entre les whips?

M. David Christopherson:

Oui.

Au bout du compte, c'est exactement cela. Très franchement, je ne crois pas que nous devons honorer cette entente. Je voulais simplement m'assurer que nous connaissions tous le contexte, mais comme nous nous plaisons à le dire à chaque séance de comité, nous sommes maîtres de notre destinée.

La seule chose que je dirais, c'est que si nous voulons être totalement justes — et j'apprécie le sens de l'équité de M. Reid —, si nous ne voulons pas allouer 12 minutes d'intervention aux libéraux en sachant que les deux derniers intervenants sont souvent lésés, le plus juste serait qu'au deuxième tour, les libéraux utilisent leurs six minutes en cinquième place plutôt qu'en première. Ainsi, le NPD aurait au moins la possibilité d'utiliser quelques secondes de ses trois minutes, et on maintiendra l'équité de la séquence gouvernement, opposition, gouvernement, opposition. J'aime bien cet ordre, non seulement parce que c'est dans mon intérêt, mais aussi parce qu'il me paraît juste.

(1210)

Le président:

Souhaitez-vous en débattre davantage?

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci.

Je souhaitais répondre à Mme Vandenbeld.

Je sais que vous aviez en quelque sorte l'impression que cela désavantagerait l'un de vos membres. Je tiens à dire que si vous comparez l'amendement que j'ai proposé avec la proposition initiale, vous constaterez qu'il est question du même nombre d'interventions pour chaque parti. On ne fait que les intervertir.

Je pense que M. Reid a très bien expliqué la raison pour laquelle l'ordre est important. J'ai moi aussi eu l'occasion de présider des comités parlementaires par le passé. Et ayant siégé à plusieurs autres comités, je peux affirmer avec un certain degré de certitude — et je pense que tous les parlementaires en conviendront — que lorsqu'on parle de l'ordre total ici, il y a 50 minutes de questions et réponses. Comme M. Reid l'a bien expliqué, nous savons qu'il est très rare qu'on s'en tienne exactement à ces six minutes.

Je sais que l'approche de chaque président est différente, mais lorsque j'étais moi-même président, je m'efforçais de respecter rigoureusement les limites de temps. N'empêche que lorsque les témoins se font poser une question alors qu'il reste à peine 15 secondes, on veut au moins leur laisser la chance de s'exprimer. Il y a aussi le temps de transition entre les intervenants qui entre en ligne de compte.

La réalité est que ces dernières périodes d'intervention ne sont que très rarement, voire jamais, utilisées. Par conséquent, cela avantage grandement le parti ministériel et n'a rien d'équitable.

Par conséquent, si on modifiait l'ordre des interventions, de manière à ce que les libéraux n'interviennent pas les premiers lors du deuxième tour, la situation serait beaucoup plus équitable. Si le gouvernement se soucie réellement de l'équité, il acceptera sans aucun doute cette proposition. Autrement, tout cela ne serait rien d'autre que de la poudre aux yeux.

Il n'est pas question ici de modifier le nombre de minutes allouées à chaque parti; on veut seulement changer l'ordre des interventions, de sorte que si on manque de temps, on ne désavantage pas l'opposition.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

J'aimerais que M. Richards nous lise de nouveau l'amendement...

Je suis désolée.

Le président: Monsieur Lamoureux.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais essayer d'aborder cette question de façon plus générale, Blake.

Comme on l'a vu au cours des dernières réunions du Comité, c'est habituellement le parti ministériel qui ouvre le débat. C'est lui qui pose les premières questions. On propose ici que l'opposition ouvre le bal. Selon moi, il s'agit là d'une mesure très progressiste.

Jusqu'ici, le gouvernement a toujours eu cinq périodes d'intervention, ce qui veut dire que chaque député ministériel avait la possibilité d'intervenir. En vertu de ce nouveau régime, le gouvernement devrait désormais... Si tous les députés souhaitent prendre la parole, ils devront partager leur temps. Par conséquent, lorsque vous parlez d'équité, ce nouveau régime avantage plutôt l'opposition officielle.

David a raison lorsqu'il dit qu'on lui garantit une intervention. Il pourrait être difficile de lui garantir la deuxième, mais le NPD devrait à tout le moins se réjouir du fait qu'un de ses députés aura l'occasion de s'exprimer. Il est probable que davantage de députés conservateurs pourront prendre la parole, parce que si le comité interroge deux témoins, il se peut qu'on ne se rende pas à la deuxième série de questions.

Le whip adjoint a fait allusion à ce qui s'est passé. Il semble qu'on ait fait preuve de bonne volonté, et d'après ce que j'ai compris, la plupart des membres estiment qu'on a présenté des arguments aux whips. L'opposition officielle est clairement avantagée par cette proposition par rapport à ce qu'il y avait auparavant. S'il n'y a qu'un seul témoin et qu'il s'agit d'un tour de table rapide, le NPD pourra intervenir lors de la deuxième série de questions. C'est donc un avantage.

Le parti qui perd le plus au change dans cette nouvelle structure est en fait le parti ministériel, puisqu'il n'est plus le premier à poser les questions et qu'il y a de très bonnes chances qu'il perde l'une de ses interventions. C'est presque garanti. Je pense que si l'on regarde cela sous cet angle... à moins qu'on revienne à ce qu'il y avait avant, c'est-à-dire que le gouvernement ouvre le débat plutôt que l'opposition officielle, mais je ne crois pas que c'est ce que vous proposez.

De ce point de vue, je pense que nous devrions l'accepter. Nous tenons une réunion des leaders parlementaires cet après-midi, et nous pourrions en discuter à ce moment-là, mais l'idéal serait d'en discuter tout de suite.

(1215)

Le président:

Madame Taylor.

Mme Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

J'aimerais vous donner un peu d'information au sujet de la nouvelle structure qui est proposée. Je vais vous présenter quelques chiffres à des fins de comparaison. Tout d'abord, sachez que par le passé, le parti ministériel occupait 56,3 % du temps et qu'avec la nouvelle proposition, il disposerait de seulement 48 %. Les conservateurs accaparaient 30,3 % du temps et, en vertu de ce nouveau régime, ils auraient 34 %. Le NPD, quant à lui, occupait 13 % du temps, et il aurait désormais 17 %.

Ce sont donc les chiffres à l'appui des recommandations.

Le président:

Je vais maintenant céder la parole à M. Richards, suivi de M. Christopherson.

M. Blake Richards:

Si j'ai bien compris ce qu'a dit M. Lamoureux, et corrigez-moi si je me trompe, si on modifie l'ordre de façon à ce que le gouvernement puisse poser ses questions en premier au premier tour, il serait prêt à accepter notre amendement. Autrement dit, il s'agirait d'un amendement amical. L'ordre pour le premier tour serait donc le suivant: libéraux, conservateurs, néo-démocrates, libéraux, puis au deuxième tour, ce serait conservateurs, libéraux, conservateurs, libéraux, néo-démocrates.

Si j'ai bien entendu, nous pourrions l'accepter comme étant un amendement favorable.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Je suis prêt à laisser M. Lamoureux s'exprimer sur cette question avant de prendre la parole.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Pourriez-vous répéter?

M. Blake Richards:

Si j'ai bien compris, vous avez indiqué que si le gouvernement intervenait en premier au premier tour, vous seriez disposé à accepter la proposition. Si c'est le cas, nous pourrions nous entendre sur l'ordre suivant: au premier tour, libéraux, conservateurs, néo-démocrates et libéraux; puis au deuxième tour, conservateurs, libéraux, conservateurs, libéraux et néo-démocrates.

M. Scott Reid:

J'aimerais demander une précision à mon collègue, M. Richards.

On ne veut pas ici modifier le nombre de minutes allouées aux partis. Au deuxième tour, les libéraux disposeraient d'une période de six minutes après la période de cinq minutes des conservateurs.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous dites qu'à leur quatrième intervention, les libéraux auraient toujours un créneau de six minutes.

M. Scott Reid:

Absolument. Nous ne contestons pas le nombre de minutes allouées.

M. Blake Richards:

Cela me convient.

Le président:

Par conséquent, on remplacerait ce créneau de cinq minutes par un créneau de six minutes.

M. Blake Richards:

Je n'ai aucune objection.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

À ce moment-là, nous serions les premiers à poser nos questions.

M. Blake Richards:

C'est exact.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

D'accord.

M. Blake Richards:

Essentiellement, nous changerions l'ordre des interventions pour les deux tours.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Tout à fait. Que penseriez-vous de l'ordre suivant: libéraux, conservateurs, néo-démocrates, libéraux...

M. Blake Richards:

Au premier tour.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

C'est exact. Puis au deuxième tour: conservateurs, libéraux, libéraux, conservateurs, néo-démocrates. Cela ne nous donnerait que quatre interventions. Autrement, nous prenons un risque. Nous avons cinq membres.

(1220)

M. Blake Richards:

Encore une fois, vous vous trouvez à enlever du temps à l'opposition. Ce qui nous préoccupe également, ce sont les interventions consécutives du parti ministériel. Je crois qu'il est important de maintenir l'ordre qui se trouve ici pour le deuxième tour: conservateurs, libéraux, conservateurs et libéraux.

Cependant, nous accorderions six minutes aux libéraux à la fin, plutôt que cinq minutes.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Au deuxième tour, il n'y aurait que quatre de nos cinq membres qui pourraient intervenir. Tous les membres des autres partis pourraient s'exprimer, à l'exception des libéraux. Si nous pouvions intervenir en deuxième et en troisième place, il y aurait plus de chances qu'au moins quatre de nos cinq membres puissent prendre la parole.

M. Blake Richards:

Ce serait aux dépens d'un député conservateur. Il est là le problème. Vous enlevez déjà du temps aux partis de l'opposition, et on nous allouerait moins de temps que l'indique notre nombre de sièges dans ce scénario.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Toutefois, vous ouvrez le bal au deuxième tour.

M. Blake Richards:

Effectivement. Au premier tour, je suis prêt à laisser le parti ministériel commencer, puis à lui accorder plus de temps lors de sa quatrième intervention, au deuxième tour.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

L'espoir est éternel. Voilà pourquoi je n'ai pas complètement renoncé à l'idée d'essayer de ne plus être le cinquième intervenant au deuxième tour. Mais cet espoir ne se réalisera pas de sitôt.

Permettez-moi de simplement exprimer à M. Lamoureux ma reconnaissance. Ils veulent en discuter, mais le problème subsiste : le parti ministériel obtient 12 minutes consécutives de temps de parole. Voilà le problème. Je suis déjà dans la position où, si quelqu'un doit être sacrifié, ce sera nous. Ce sont les résultats des élections. Je dois m'y faire.

En ce qui concerne l'équité à tous les autres points de vue — encore une fois, je ne recherche aucun avantage personnel — le problème provient de ces 12 minutes consécutives de temps de parole accordées à un parti ministériel dans un comité. Je ne vise pas les libéraux, mais tout parti ministériel. Cet avantage énorme, c'est du jamais vu. Le gouvernement doit reconnaître que c'est le problème. Franchement, je pense que l'opposition officielle a avancé une proposition très honnête.

Je reconnais, monsieur Lamoureux, que vous avez raison. Nous avons beaucoup de comités. Celui des comptes publics, pour ne mentionner que celui-là, est le principal comité de surveillance, et c'est le gouvernement qui commençait. Je ne crois pas que ce soit comme ça ailleurs dans le Commonwealth. Je reconnais donc que c'est tout à votre honneur d'avoir voulu procéder comme il le fallait.

Pour être franc, j'ai pensé que l'opposition officielle, en renonçant à ce temps de parole pour permettre au gouvernement d'interrompre ce bloc de 12 minutes, a elle aussi fait preuve de bonne volonté. Vous savez qu'une salle pleine de gens qui écoutent accorde son attention au premier qui parle. Ce renoncement de l'opposition officielle doit être souligné.

Votre contre-proposition, monsieur Lamoureux, nous laisse encore... Je pourrais signaler que les négociations se poursuivent avec le secrétaire parlementaire et personne d'autre. Que, soyons justes, la séquence de 12 minutes tient toujours, et c'est un vrai, c'est le véritable problème. À ma connaissance, il n'existe aucun autre comité qui ait sciemment prévu d'accorder à un député ministériel 12 minutes ininterrompues de temps de parole. Je donnerais tout le capital politique que je possède pour en profiter à toutes mes réunions.

Merci.

Le président:

Nous discutons toujours de l'amendement. Poursuivons.

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Pendant un instant, il m'a semblé exister une volonté de coopération dans la recherche d'une solution. C'était une illusion. Il me semble que le gouvernement essaie d'avoir l'air d'offrir quelque chose à l'opposition alors qu'il essaie de tirer les marrons du feu.

Il est malheureux qu'il essaie d'avoir plus de temps de parole au Comité que ce à quoi le nombre de ses sièges lui donnerait droit. Nous pensions être raisonnables en offrant une solution satisfaisante pour tous, pour le fonctionnement équitable du Comité. On voit que c'est un autre exemple, de la part du gouvernement Trudeau, d'écran de fumée, de miroir aux alouettes, de parlage. C'est un choix vraiment malheureux. J'espère qu'il en reviendra et qu'il acceptera notre offre raisonnable.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres observations sur l'amendement?

(1225)

M. David Christopherson:

Est-ce que j'ai bien entendu? Le parti ministériel dit vouloir camper sur ses positions et continuer d'exiger 12 minutes? Est-ce que...? Ça y est, c'est reparti!

Nous voilà repartis sur ce qui ne présente aucune difficulté — aucune difficulté — et je le dis pour en avoir moi-même profité. Je vous en suis reconnaissant, des trois minutes ou 3 %, peu importe. Tout est relatif, n'est-ce pas?

Mais sachez qu'exiger 12 minutes de suite, même Harper ne l'a pas fait. Toutes mes excuses à vous tous, mais c'est à peu près ce qu'il y a de plus antidémocratique, après... Après le régime Harris à Queen's Park, il m'a fallu attendre Harper pour trouver un rejet presque aussi fort de la démocratie, et aucun des deux n'a même essayé cela. Douze minutes, c'est énorme.

Le gouvernement ne se contentera pas seulement de... C'est reparti. Les yeux baissés, les conciliabules. Encore une fois, c'est la méthode... Le gouvernement veut faire les choses différemment, mais je vous le dis, vous faites exactement comme votre prédécesseur, vous agissez exactement comme lui. Ses membres, après avoir brandi des arguments qu'ils croyaient rationnels, se retranchaient derrière, puis se taisaient. Ils plongeaient le nez dans leurs livres et jouaient avec leurs téléphones intelligents et leurs iPad, ils conversaient entre eux, mais ils ne tenaient pas de discussion sérieuse, parce que leur idée était faite.

Encore une fois, c'est la partie facile. Quelle preuve existe-t-il que ce gouvernement soit sérieux en ce qui concerne la réforme démocratique? Même sa méthode préférée de scrutin, dont il parle maintenant, tous le reconnaissent, est biaisée en sa faveur. Nous verrons bien ce qu'il en adviendra.

Nous sommes encore une fois réunis au Comité, l'endroit où le gouvernement a dit qu'il allait être le plus transparent, là où il rendrait le plus de comptes et où il ferait le moins de petite politique, et toutes les fois que nous avons essayé de l'amener à reconnaître les petits gains très faciles d'équité dont le processus peut profiter, il nous répond par un refus, que son idée est faite, qu'il a décidé que c'est la fin de la discussion, un point c'est tout. Il n'ouvre plus la bouche, comme les suiveurs de Harper. Il siégera sans mot dire, ce qui nous conduit à devoir choisir entre l'obstruction systématique, impossible sur toutes les questions, ou le simple acquiescement.

Ensuite, cela cesse d'être un problème, et pendant les quatre années qui suivent, nous avons le parti ministériel qui profite d'une séquence de 12 minutes. Permettez-moi de vous dire que lorsque le gouvernement est attaqué par les témoins qui se manifestent, 12 minutes pour distraire le public de la dernière série de questions et attirer son attention sur un sujet qu'on veut lui imposer, c'est un don direct du ciel. On ne peut demander mieux. Croyez-en l'opinion de quelqu'un qui dispose de trois petites minutes à la fin de la deuxième série de questions, qui ne me seront accordées que si je suis chanceux.

Je voudrais bien que tout cela nous concerne tous. Mais il s'agit d'équité. Encore une fois, je dis au parti ministériel qu'une séquence de 12 minutes, alors que chaque minute compte et que les pourcentages sont calculés à la décimale près, c'est beaucoup en ce qui concerne la méthode de marche de nos comités.

Je perçois beaucoup d'activité là-bas, mais j'ignore s'ils travaillent sur la prochaine question et que celle dont nous parlons maintenant est déjà refroidie, ou s'il subsiste un espoir que le gouvernement décide de faire preuve d'un peu d'équité.

M. David de Burgh Graham: [Inaudible]

M. David Christopherson: Eh bien, après tout, votre voix est agréable à entendre. Votre intervention nous fait chaud au coeur. Merci! Cela procure à M. Lamoureux, le secrétaire parlementaire, une pause dans la gestion des discussions, une autre promesse de réforme déjà brisée. Vous n'y allez pas de main morte: une de plus, deux, trois.

Sachez ceci: en défendant l'opposition, je défends en fait l'équité. Ce que vous faites n'est pas juste. C'est tellement injuste que même le gouvernement Harper n'a pas tenté d'imposer ce genre de scénario.

(1230)



Nous savons maintenant pourquoi ils jettent quelques miettes au NPD et quelques points de pourcentage à l'opposition officielle. Ils espéraient que cela suffirait pour se procurer cet avantage politique incroyablement payant que sont 12 minutes d'accès ininterrompu à un ou à des témoins. C'est tellement injuste alors que ce gouvernement a promis l'équité. Quand montrera-t-il sa sincérité? Quand?

Parce que cela reste à venir. Paroles, paroles, voies ensoleillées, paroles, paroles, voies ensoleillées, changement, démocratie, transparence, impartialité, paroles, paroles. Quand il est temps d'agir, pas question, on se croise les bras, fin de la discussion: « Attendons d'utiliser notre majorité pour bâillonner encore une fois l'opposition qui empoisonne notre existence ». Voilà où nous en sommes, et vous savez quoi? Nous venons de vivre 10 années de ce régime, et le nouveau gouvernement a été élu avec le mandat d'être différent. Où est-elle cette différence?

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Madame Vandenbeld.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Parlons d'équité. Pour moi, il est intéressant que M. Christopherson, qui a pu, deux fois, prendre la parole dans chaque cycle de questions, qui parle de ceux d'entre nous qui... L'un de nous n'aura pas la chance de prendre la parole, parce qu'il y a cinq membres et seulement quatre interventions prévues.

Mais je voudrais proposer un amendement.

Monsieur Richards, vous m'avez dit que nous risquions de ne pas nous rendre souvent au quatrième intervenant dans la deuxième série de questions — je ne sais rien de cela — mais je pense que nous pourrions faire un compromis, que si nous réduisions la longueur de l'intervention des trois premiers intervenants du deuxième tour à cinq minutes, nous gagnerions ainsi trois minutes et cela ferait trois fois cinq minutes et trois minutes. Il est donc plus probable que nous nous rendrions à cette quatrième intervention du deuxième tour.

Je pense que ce n'est que juste, parce que je pense que c'est important. Nous, les membres du comité, nous sommes tous des...

Pardon?

M. Blake Richards:

À quel rang cela se trouverait-il?

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

L'ordre resterait le même, mais nous réduirions les durées. En fait, nous perdrions...

Une voix: Au lieu de 12 minutes, ça n'en fait que 11.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld: En fait, si vous observez les pourcentages comparés à ceux de la dernière législature, le temps de parole des deux partis d'opposition est plus long. Cela réduirait davantage le nôtre, mais cela rendrait plus probable cette quatrième intervention.

Je pense que ce simple compromis serait équitable aussi pour chaque membre du comité qui veut toujours avoir la possibilité de poser ses questions à lui.

Le président:

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci.

Je vous suis reconnaissant de l'offre et, aussi, des sentiments qui l'animent. Si le gouvernement est si sûr qu'on se rendrait au quatrième intervenant dans la plupart des séances, alors pourquoi ne pas renoncer aux deux droits de parole de suite?

S'il est si certain que cette proposition permettrait la quatrième intervention, pourquoi ne pas renoncer à la possibilité d'intervention de deux libéraux l'un après l'autre? Cela fait encore 11 minutes. C'est une petite amélioration, mais c'est peu. Faites le changement si vous êtes si certains que le quatrième intervenant aura alors droit de parole. Pourquoi pas, si vous êtes si convaincus du résultat? Je ne comprends pas pourquoi vous vous en priveriez.

Le compromis a déjà été fait. Accorder ce temps au parti ministériel, sans interruption, n'est certainement pas équitable, comme beaucoup l'ont mentionné, et si vous êtes convaincus qu'on se rendrait à la quatrième intervention, pourquoi ne pas faire le changement? Je ne vois pas la raison de ne pas le faire.

Le président:

Monsieur Lamoureux.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je veux être bien disposé à l'égard de ce que disent Blake et David.

Je dois l'admettre, Blake, je suis un peu étonné que vous soyez prêts à renoncer à cette première intervention. Je pense que nous allons peut-être en profiter. Si vous êtes disposés à laisser au parti ministériel la première intervention, je pense que nous allons retirer cela.

Qu'en est-il des durées d'intervention de sept minutes? Rappelez-vous, au tout début, on prévoyait sept minutes. Êtes-vous satisfaits de six minutes? Le parti ministériel commence avec six ou sept minutes. Avant, c'était sept minutes. Qu'en pensez-vous? J'aimerais vous proposer quelque chose, mais je tiens à connaître ce que vous estimez devoir être la durée d'une intervention.

(1235)

M. Blake Richards:

Je ne suis pas tout à fait certain de ce que vous demandez là, Kevin. Êtes-vous en train de dire que vous voulez modifier la durée de la première série de questions pour qu'elles soient de sept minutes? Ou que le premier intervenant disposerait de sept minutes? Que dites-vous?

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Vous semblez préférer revenir au vieux système. Je ne dis pas non, mais il accordait d'abord sept minutes au parti ministériel, tout comme à l'opposition officielle et au troisième parti. Les interventions, dans la première série de questions, dureraient toutes sept minutes, puis elles passeraient à cinq minutes. C'est ce que vous préférez?

M. Blake Richards:

Et bien non, ce n'est pas ce que je dis, mais accordez-nous une minute pour étudier cela.

Vous proposez sept minutes pour toutes les interventions de la première série et cinq pour celles de la deuxième série. C'est bien ça?

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

J'essaie seulement de connaître vos préférences, si nous revenons avec une proposition. En ce qui concerne la première série de questions, les interventions sont-elles de sept, de six ou de cinq minutes ou voulez-vous conserver les six minutes proposées?

Je tiens à m'assurer que vous êtes sûrs de vouloir renoncer à cette première série de questions. La concession est énorme.

M. Blake Richards:

Pourquoi ne pas nous accorder un moment pour y penser, d'accord?

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

D'accord.

Le président:

Est-ce que les membres du comité voudraient qu'on suspende les travaux quelques minutes, pour en discuter?

D'accord. Nous suspendons les travaux quelques minutes, pour que les membres des partis en discutent entre eux.

(1235)

(1245)

Le président:

Je pense que nous avons peut-être trouvé un terrain d'entente. De toute manière, il se fait du bon travail.

Pour que le compte rendu soit clair, je voudrais d'abord retirer l'amendement, puis la motion.

Je demande d'abord au comité l'autorisation de retirer l'amendement initial de M. Richards.

M. Arnold Chan:

Oui. Retirez-le. Je relirai la motion sur laquelle, je pense, le consensus s'est formé...

Le président: D'accord. Attendez.

Tous ceux qui sont pour?

(L'amendement est retiré. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Je pense que Blake allait avoir...

Le président:

Maintenant, je veux retirer la motion initiale. Ensuite nous commencerons par une nouvelle motion initiale.

Quelqu'un s'oppose-t-il au retrait de la motion initiale?

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Blake, je croyais que vous alliez retirer votre amendement, puis en déposer un nouveau.

Je crois que c'était ce qui avait été...

Le président:

Non. Nous allons retirer tout ce par quoi nous avons commencé. Nous allons simplement commencer par une nouvelle motion, maintenant.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Nous pensions que ce serait mieux, parce que c'est l'Opposition officielle qui renonce à cette première intervention, que le compte rendu dirait que, en fait, l'Opposition officielle proposait l'amendement. C'est le...

M. Blake Richards:

Nous en avons évidemment discuté. Je crois que tout le monde était d'accord pour trouver un compromis.

Le président:

Je précise que nous avons retiré votre premier amendement.

M. Blake Richards:

C'est exact. Je suis prêt à le retirer, oui.

Le président:

Vous allez donc en proposer un autre.

M. Blake Richards: Bien sûr.

Le président: D'accord.

M. Blake Richards:

D'après les discussions que nous avons eues, je crois que tous les partis conviennent de procéder de la façon suivante: au premier tour, les interventions seraient de sept minutes chacune, dans l'ordre qui suit: libéral, conservateur, NPD, libéral; au deuxième tour, les quatre premières interventions seraient de cinq minutes chacune, dans l'ordre qui suit: conservateur, libéral, conservateur, libéral; la cinquième intervention serait toujours de trois minutes et elle appartiendrait au NPD.

Le président:

C'est clair pour tout le monde? Des commentaires au sujet de l'amendement?

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous allons maintenant mettre aux voix la motion amendée, qui est essentiellement la même.

(La motion amendée est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Merci pour votre coopération. Je crois que nous avons fait de l'excellent travail jusqu'à maintenant. C'est avec cet objectif que je suis arrivé au Parlement, soit d'avoir un débat rationnel en comité et de faire avancer les dossiers de façon réfléchie.

Passons à la prochaine motion, qui porte sur la distribution de documents.

Ruby.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

J'aimerais présenter la prochaine motion concernant la distribution de documents. Je propose: Que seulement la greffière du Comité soit autorisée à distribuer aux membres du Comité des documents et seulement lorsque ces documents existent dans les deux langues officielles et que les témoins en soient avisés au préalable.

Le président:

Des commentaires?

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président: La prochaine motion porte sur les repas de travail.

Quelqu'un veut en faire la proposition?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Puisque c'est l'heure du lunch, je propose la motion no 7, sur les repas de travail. Je propose: Que la greffière du Comité soit autorisée à prendre les dispositions nécessaires pour organiser des repas de travail pour le Comité et ses sous-comités.

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président:

La prochaine motion porte sur les frais de déplacement et de séjour des témoins. Quelqu'un veut la présenter?

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je propose: Que les témoins qui en font la demande soient remboursés de leurs frais de déplacement et de séjour dans la mesure où ces frais sont jugés raisonnables, à raison d'au plus un (1) représentant par organisme; et que, dans des circonstances exceptionnelles, le remboursement à un plus grand nombre de représentants soit laissé à la discrétion du président.

Le président:

Des commentaires?

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président: La prochaine porte sur l'accès aux réunions à huis clos.

M. Arnold Chan:

Monsieur le président, je sais que M. Christopherson voulait soumettre un amendement. Puis-je suggérer que nous passions à la motion 11 tout de suite, pour revenir à celle-ci plus tard?

Le président:

D'accord. Nous allons donc étudier les deux motions sur les réunions à huis clos à la fin.

M. Arnold Chan:

Si vous le voulez bien et si...

(1250)

M. David Christopherson:

Je crois que le président avait proposé que nous regardions tout cela à la fin.

Est-ce aussi ce que vous proposez?

M. Arnold Chan: Oui.

M. David Christopherson: D'accord, je n'y vois pas d'inconvénient.

Le président:

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

En ce qui concerne les avis de motion, je propose: Qu'un préavis de 48 heures soit donné avant que le Comité soit ainsi saisi d'une motion de fond qui ne porte pas directement sur l'affaire que le Comité étudie à ce moment; Que l'avis de motion soit déposé auprès de la greffière du Comité qui le distribue aux membres dans les deux langues officielles; Que l'avis de 48 heures soit calculé de la même façon qu'à la Chambre; Que les motions soient soumises à la greffière au plus tard à 18 heures.

Le président:

Si vous êtes d'accord, je vais céder la parole à la greffière. L'heure pose certains problèmes sur le plan administratif. Cela pourrait faciliter les choses. Je vais laisser la greffière vous faire part de ses commentaires.

La greffière:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je tiens à mentionner aux membres du Comité que lorsque nous recevons des avis de motion, nous nous efforçons de les traiter rapidement et de les remettre au Comité le plus tôt possible. Si l'échéance est fixée à 18 heures, il nous sera très difficile de les traiter et de les remettre aux députés le même jour, parce qu'à cette heure, nous n'avons pas accès à tous les services dont nous avons généralement besoin pour traiter un avis de motion.

La décision vous revient, mais je tenais à vous signaler que ce sera particulièrement difficile pour nous si l'heure de tombée est 18 heures.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quelle heure vous conviendrait?

La greffière:

Si c'était plus tôt dans la journée, il serait plus facile de recourir aux services de traduction, mais aussi de communiquer avec le bureau des députés si nous avons besoin de précisions.

Le président:

Que voulez-vous dire par « plus tôt »?

La greffière:

À 16 heures, ce serait bien.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Par curiosité, était-ce la même heure de tombée la dernière fois?

Une voix: Oui.

M. Christopherson: Est-ce que cela posait problème aussi à ce moment-là? Est-ce pour cette raison que vous le mentionnez, madame la greffière?

La greffière:

Je ne saurais vous dire, car je n'étais pas la greffière de votre comité à la dernière session.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je propose un amendement favorable pour que l'échéance soit devancée à 16 heures.

Le président:

Il y a un amendement favorable pour faire changer l'échéance à 16 heures.

D'autres commentaires au sujet de la motion?

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: La greffière tient à mentionner qu'elle remercie les membres du Comité qui ont accepté de faire le changement afin que l'administration des avis soit plus facile et efficace.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aimerais passer à la motion 9, à moins que vous ayez quelque chose à ajouter.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Concernant l'accès aux réunions à huis clos, je propose: Que, à moins qu'il en soit ordonné autrement, chaque membre du Comité soit autorisé à être accompagné d'un membre du personnel de son bureau et un membre du personnel de son parti aux réunions à huis clos.

Le président:

Des commentaires à ce sujet?

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Est-ce la même que précédemment?

Le président:

Oui, la formulation est exactement la même.

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président: Quelqu'un veut présenter la motion sur les transcriptions des réunions à huis clos?

Mme Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Au sujet des transcriptions des réunions à huis clos, je propose: Que la greffière du Comité conserve à son bureau une copie de la transcription de chaque réunion à huis clos pour consultation par les membres du Comité.

Le président:

Des commentaires? On passe au vote?

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président: Juste avant de céder la parole à M. Christopherson, je veux soulever deux points.

Premièrement, je veux vous remercier tous pour cette séance, qui fut tout à fait réfléchie et productive. Je pense que c'est ce à quoi les gens s'attendent du Parlement — c'est du moins ce que j'ai entendu dire. Merci beaucoup, tout le monde, pour ces discussions pondérées.

Comme je l'ai indiqué en début de séance, nous avons reçu une lettre du leader parlementaire pour la prochaine réunion, qui aura lieu jeudi — déjà. Vous devriez tous avoir eu la lettre. Nous pourrions en discuter après la motion de M. Christopherson, mais comme nous devons accorder la priorité aux affaires du gouvernement, il serait approprié d'accepter l'offre du leader parlementaire de venir témoigner devant notre comité.

Nous allons cependant en discuter après la motion de M. Christopherson.

David, la parole est à vous.

(1255)

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Savez-vous, monsieur le président, je crois honnêtement que j'aurai besoin de beaucoup plus que cinq minutes. Si vous voulez régler ce point, qui concerne la prochaine réunion — il s'agit essentiellement de lancer une invitation —, je n'y vois pas d'inconvénient. Je veux seulement m'assurer que je pourrai présenter ma motion tout de suite après et que vous ne déciderez pas de lever la séance avant que cela ne soit réglé.

La décision vous revient. Je peux commencer, si vous voulez.

Le président:

Oui. Si nous n'avons pas fini de débattre de votre motion, pourrions-nous y revenir à la prochaine réunion?

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, c'est à cela que je pensais.

Le président:

D'accord. Alors...

M. David Christopherson:

Pensiez-vous inviter le leader parlementaire du gouvernement à la prochaine réunion?

Le président:

Oui.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous devriez faire cela maintenant, car vous n'aurez plus le temps quand j'aurai pris la parole.

Le président:

Est-ce que le Comité aimerait inviter le leader parlementaire du gouvernement à la prochaine réunion, d'après la lettre que tout le monde a reçue? Quelqu'un pourrait proposer une motion à cet effet? Peu importe le parti.

M. Arnold Chan:

J'en fais la proposition.

Une voix: J'appuie la motion.

Le président:

Des commentaires? Tous ceux qui sont pour? Ceux qui sont contre?

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: D'accord.

Monsieur Christopherson, si nous ne terminons pas l'étude de votre motion aujourd'hui, nous le ferons à la prochaine réunion.

M. David Christopherson:

Juste pour que ce soit clair, parce que nous n'aurons que quelques minutes et que ce sera juste assez pour que je me racle la gorge, est-ce que nous allons recevoir le leader parlementaire du gouvernement et tout cela avant de revenir à ma motion? Ou pensiez-vous plutôt clore l'étude de ma motion et céder ensuite la parole au témoin? J'en ai assez long à dire et je ne veux pas perturber une réunion productive pour une question de règles.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Si nous pouvions recevoir le leader parlementaire avant [Note de la rédaction: inaudible]

M. David Christopherson:

C'est pourquoi je vous l'offre, parce que j'ai des choses à dire là-dessus, et d'où je viens, c'est un sujet important.

Je ne veux pas retarder les travaux du Comité, alors je vous propose bien humblement, monsieur le président, de clore la discussion maintenant. Nous pourrions entendre le témoin jeudi, puis lorsque nous aurons terminé cette portion de la réunion, si vous me permettez de dire tout ce que j'ai à dire à propos de ma motion, ce sera parfait pour moi, monsieur.

Le président:

C'est probablement une bonne solution. Déposez-vous un avis de motion aujourd'hui?

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, je dépose un avis de motion, si j'ai la certitude que nous en discuterons tout de suite après le témoignage du leader parlementaire du gouvernement. Si c'est votre décision, cela me convient, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aurais une question à poser très rapidement au président. Pour que les choses soient bien claires, est-ce que les 12 règles adoptées aujourd'hui s'appliquent à la prochaine réunion ou si elles ne s'appliqueront qu'après l'étude de la dernière motion?

Le président:

Elles s'appliquent toutes immédiatement. Elles ont toutes été adoptées.

Notre groupe a gentiment convenu de recevoir le leader parlementaire du gouvernement à la prochaine réunion, avant de passer à l'étude de la motion de M. Christopherson. Tout le monde a bien compris?

Voulez-vous soumettre...?

M. David Christopherson:

La greffière l'a déjà distribué dans les deux langues.

Le président:

D'accord, c'est parfait.

Il nous reste deux minutes. Avez-vous d'autres points à soulever?

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Concernant la motion adoptée en début de réunion sur le dépôt des rapports des comités, quand avez-vous l'intention de déposer ce rapport à la Chambre?

Le président:

Dès qu'il sera prêt, car nous voulons que les comités entreprennent leurs travaux.

M. Blake Richards:

Avons-nous une idée de quand ce sera?

Le président:

Je vais demander à la greffière de vous donner une réponse officielle.

La greffière:

Je vais préparer le rapport le plus rapidement possible dès que nous aurons reçu toute l'information nécessaire.

Le président:

Pardonnez-moi, parlez-vous du rapport avec la liste complète de noms, ou seulement sur la délégation d'autorité aux whips?

M. Blake Richards:

Je parle du rapport avec les noms.

Le président:

Lorsque les partis auront soumis tous les noms qu'ils proposent, nous pourrons régler cela le plus rapidement possible, et c'est ce que nous ferons.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Devez-vous d'abord déposer la motion voulant qu'on délègue l'autorité aux whips?

Le président:

Non.

M. Blake Richards:

Est-ce que le rapport doit être déposé?

Le président:

Non, pas celui sur la permission. Seulement le gros rapport contenant tous les noms.

(1300)

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord, merci.

Le président:

J'aimerais avoir certaines précisions.

Est-ce que cette motion doit être adoptée à l'unanimité à la Chambre pour appuyer celle concernant la délégation d'autorité aux whips pour tous les comités?

La greffière m'indique que la pratique veut que la présidence soumette le rapport à l'approbation de la Chambre.

D'autres commentaires? Nous sommes si productifs que nous respectons parfaitement notre horaire.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Serait-il possible d'avoir des porte-nom pour la greffière et les analystes aussi pour les prochaines réunions?

Le président:

Pourriez-vous prévoir des porte-nom pour la greffière et les analystes aussi, madame la greffière?

M. David Christopherson:

Ils doivent garder l'anonymat.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président:

Bon point, monsieur Graham. Je crois que cela peut s'arranger.

Merci à vous tous.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on January 26, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.