header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-01-28 PROC 4

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

We hate to keep the press waiting, so this is meeting number four of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. Pursuant to Standing Order 108(3)(a), we're having a briefing on the ministerial mandate.

Our witnesses today are the Honourable Dominic LeBlanc, PC, MP, Leader of the Government in the House of Commons, and Kevin Lamoureux, MP, Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons.

This is a session for roughly one hour. I'd like to thank the witnesses for coming so we can get on to substantive work, which I know the committee would love to do.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

I have a point of order.

The Chair:

We have a point of order.

Could you make it quick? I don't want to take time away....

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, of course.

I believe it requires the consent of the committee to have a new witness added on, and for Mr. Lamoureux, who is gradually rotating his way around the table—

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid: —and will have to actually cross the floor to make a complete circuit and then rejoin the Liberals at the end of the whole process, I think we have to approve him. I don't want to not approve him. I just think we should go through the formality of actually approving the new witness.

The Chair:

Is anyone—

An hon. member: Agreed.

The Chair: Is anyone opposed to having Mr. Lamoureux as a witness?

Okay. It has been agreed to by the committee. I'm not sure we had to do that, but we want to get going quickly.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Chair, do we have copies of opening remarks?

The Chair:

No.

Mr. David Christopherson:

What happened to openness and transparency?

The Chair:

We have opening remarks of up to 10 minutes.

Mr. LeBlanc, you're on.

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc (Leader of the Government in the House of Commons):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. Thank you, colleagues, and thank you, Kevin, for joining me.

Mr. Chairman, let me begin by saluting your re-election as the member for Yukon.

Your chairman and I are proud members of the class of 2000. We were among 24 Liberals elected in the class of 2000. In the last Parliament, sadly, we dropped to four, but with your return, Mr. Chairman, we're back up to five, so congratulations.

It's a privilege to be here. I guess I'm the first minister to appear before a committee in this new Parliament. I'm obviously happy to be here with my friend and our colleague, Kevin Lamoureux.[Translation]

I am here under the mandate given to me by the Prime Minister to cooperate in a concrete manner with the members of all parties and, of course, with our parliamentary committees.[English]

I'm hoping that together we can bring a new tone and a renewed sense of collaboration into our House, and that we can make efforts to extend that new tone down the hall to our colleagues who serve in the Senate.

My goal of making Parliament more relevant and more effective requires your co-operation and your expertise in reviewing the Standing Orders with a view to improving accountability, making this place more family friendly, and giving members of Parliament the ability to fully participate in all activities of the House.

I'm sure all of you have read with great excitement the mandate letter the Prime Minister gave me. It was made public, but I'll briefly summarize some of the main priorities in it. The mandate letter, in my case, includes a mix of changes to the Standing Orders, some legislative changes, and what I would call some policy changes or improvements.

Many of the commitments that require changes to our Standing Orders come, of course, under the purview of your committee. For example, making Parliament a more family-friendly place is one of the things the Prime Minister has asked me to work on. It would include things like, perhaps, eliminating Friday sitting days to allow colleagues to travel to far-flung parts of the country to work in their constituencies and to plan more and better time with their families.

Another is adjusting the times we vote in the House of Commons. We all come back to vote at 5:30 or 6 or 6:45 some days of the week. We're all sitting there at question period at three o'clock. Might there be a way, in routine deferrals of votes, to take them while everybody is in the House at three o'clock, for example?

For sitting hours, maybe we can have two sitting days on a Tuesday if we're going to drop a Friday sitting day.

Those are all issues that have been around this place for a lot longer than some of us have had the privilege of serving here. I have had informal conversations with colleagues on all sides of the aisle. There is a lot of common ground. It has to be done properly and thoughtfully, and we have to understand the consequences of these changes, but I very much hope that you can help all of us arrive at some improvements in that regard.

For question period reform, we could possibly have some form of a prime minister's question period. You know that was a commitment we made. Just to be clear, that was never made to substitute for the Prime Minister's ordinary weekly appearance in question period. It was to be in addition to that, or one of the days, for example, might have that different component. There was confusion as to whether we were suggesting that he come only one day a week. That is not the case, but is there one day a week when his appearance could perhaps be more effective or different? Maybe there could be a longer time for questions and answers. Those are some of the ideas.

There's ending the abuse of omnibus legislation. We have some ideas for how that might work. There's prorogation, though that falls into a constitutional prerogative of the crown and is, perhaps, more complicated.

There is the issue of parliamentary committees and making them more effective and of giving you, Mr. Chairman, and your colleagues the resources you need. There's the issue of not having parliamentary secretaries as voting members of committees. I understand you've had some conversations at this table about that issue. There's ensuring that committees are properly resourced.

(1105)

[Translation]

Some changes require legislative provisions, such as proposing amendments to the Parliament of Canada Act in order to make the Parliamentary Budget Officer an independent officer of Parliament, make the Board of International Economy public and reflect the new dynamic in the Senate.[English]

There's working with the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness on a proposal to create a statutory committee of parliamentarians to review government agencies with national security responsibilities. Again, to be clear, this was envisaged to include not only agencies under the purview of the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness but also other national security agencies that would exist in other departments, such as National Defence, and conceivably, Immigration or other departments. It was a horizontal mandate across the government.

A committee of parliamentarians would obviously include members of the opposition. That will require legislation, and we're working on proposals in that regard.[Translation]

I will also work with my colleague, Minister Brison, to implement a model that will guarantee consistency among budgets and public accounts, although I have not yet received any details regarding that proposal.

The objective is to improve the way the government reports on its spending to the House of Commons, as well as to help members carry out more detailed studies on the government's spending plans. That is one of the members' important roles, and we must facilitate their job more than we have in the past. I expect Minister Brison to obviously cooperate with this committee and with the Standing Committee on Public Accounts.[English]

Scott Brison and I are hoping to organize, quite quickly, perhaps next week, a meeting to which all parliamentarians could come and informally offer some ideas of how to better coordinate the estimates and budget cycles to give colleagues more accurate and more reliable information in a more timely way.

My last set of mandate commitments would include what we would talk about in terms of policy changes. They could include, for example, [Translation]

increasing the number of free votes, so that members can really represent the views of their constituents. That clearly affects our caucus more than other parties' caucuses, but I wanted to tell you about it.[English]

We want to ensure that all agents of Parliament and officers of Parliament are properly funded and accountable only to Parliament. We would be prepared, at the appropriate time, to increase resources available to Parliament for these officers if they have identified certain gaps in their capacity to hold the government to account or to serve members of Parliament.

We will work with the Board of Internal Economy to enhance changes that we all collectively made in the last Parliament to require members of Parliament to disclose quarterly their expenses in a common and detailed way.

Finally, Mr. Chair, I will work with my opposition House leader colleagues and the whips to take further actions, as you may deem appropriate or as others may suggest, to make sure that Parliament is a workplace free from harassment and sexual violence.

(1110)

[Translation]

In fact, all the proposals I just made are non-partisan. I want this committee to use its expertise to determine the best way to modernize the Standing Orders of the House of Commons, so as to give members more powers and enable them to better fulfill their parliamentary duties.[English]

I look forward, Mr. Chairman, to working with all of you. I hope this is the beginning of a conversation we can all have collectively. Obviously you'll decide on your own agenda and your own priorities, but I would encourage you, at the beginning of this Parliament, to look at changes to the Standing Orders or other changes you may have in mind so that we can quickly put into play some of these changes for which there may be common ground and not find ourselves doing things next fall that we could do this spring.[Translation]

That would be due to a lack of time or coordination.[English]

I would obviously be willing to be helpful in any way I can.

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. [Translation]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. LeBlanc.[English]

As we agreed at the last meeting, the first round would be a Liberal round of seven minutes.

I don't know who is speaking.

Ms. Vandenbeld, you have the floor.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

I'd like to split my time with Ms. Petitpas Taylor.

I want to thank you, Minister, for coming before the committee and for being so forthcoming on some of the things in your mandate letter. I must say I am very pleased to see in the mandate letter mention of a more family-friendly Parliament and to hear you elaborate a little bit about what that might look like with regard to things like the Friday sittings. Obviously, as an Ottawa area member of Parliament, I am not affected as much by that, but I've had a number of conversations with my colleagues who have young children and who are often flying first to another city and then to a rural area, which takes an additional three or four hours. As a local member, I can't even imagine how they are doing that with young children, or in some cases with responsibilities for aging parents or other things.

I would very much appreciate if you could elaborate a little bit on some of the things this committee could do in terms of not just a family-friendly Parliament but a more inclusive Parliament. I know that the all-party women's caucus in the previous Parliament was discussing this and had a draft report that included other things like the use of technology. When this Parliament started 100 years ago or more, we couldn't dialogue with one another unless we were in this place. Now we have multiple means by which we can have testimony from across the country. We can do things remotely and that might allow members to have more opportunity to be with their families and with their constituents but still participate in the dialogue and discussions here.

I've heard from other members with a young child and they have had difficulty with parking on the Hill. There are people with mobility challenges. How are we going to make this a place where we can do the work we have been elected to do here and also make sure that everybody is equally able to do so, especially in a Parliament where we have more women than we've ever had—26%—and we also have a younger group of members of Parliament, who probably have more caregiving responsibilities.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Ms. Petitpas Taylor.

Ms. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Thank you very much.

Minister, thank you for joining us this morning.

As a new member of Parliament being here for the first time, I was a bit surprised by the tone in the House. Many of the senior members are telling me that the tone is probably better than usual.

What we can do to improve decorum in the House and to make it more respectful and more productive?

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Thank you, Mr. Chairman, and through you to Anita and Ginette.

Thank you for those questions. I'll take the last one first, and then try to conclude with an answer to Anita's question.

Mr. Chairman, the tone.... I saw David laughing and with good reason.

For those of us who have been around or served in other legislatures, the sad news, Ginette, is that the tone is actually massively better than previous Parliaments. To be fair, it's not a partisan judgment; it includes when there were previous governments in office. I hope we can make this tone last. I've talked to my colleague House leaders. There is a broad desire because Canadians expect that of their parliamentarians, to work respectfully with one another, and to disagree, of course, and have vigorous debates.

I have friends on all sides of the aisle in the House of Commons, people I really like in every political party. We should focus on that, on the things we share in common, and not exasperate the points of difference. It starts with things like perhaps not heckling in question period. Certainly for my colleagues in the cabinet, it starts with answering the questions. That had become over time a practice that was rare: ministers getting up and answering the question, even saying, “You know, it's a difficult question, and I'm not sure there's a clear answer. Here's the best shot we have in answering it.” We're trying to do that. It won't be perfect. Old habits die hard, but I think we all need to make a greater effort.

The new members like you, Ginette, and colleagues in all parties are setting a better example perhaps than some of the old warhorses, like your chairman, who have these old habits that die hard.

Anita, with respect to your question, you're right; it starts with saying that it's not about taking Fridays off. There's nothing more irritating than when we have a break week and we hear, including from our own families and friends, “Oh, you have a week off.” Well, actually, no, we don't. I've loaded up a pile of events, activities, or meetings in a constituency one time zone away. Some people here are from three time zones away. We work in constituencies. People who elect us expect us to be present in our ridings. Many people travel a lot further than Ginette or I do from Atlantic Canada.

When my father was elected here 40 years ago, our whole family moved to Ottawa. I went to high school in Ottawa. We sort of reversed the route that I do now, where I go home on weekends to New Brunswick. We lived in Ottawa the whole school year and went to New Brunswick in the summer. That would be politically, and I think in a parliamentary concept, much less acceptable now than it was a generation or two ago.

To reflect that, I think we look at sitting hours. I think we acknowledge amongst ourselves that we're one of the few legislatures in the country that sits five days a week as a routine. People travel the furthest to get here than any other provincial assembly. I think we can use technology to make time more effective and save money when we're in constituencies.

With respect to the Friday, the challenge will be that if we take 20% of the sitting days in theory out.... It's not the hours. As a government, we have an obligation to have a routine where we can pass government legislation or at least bring it forward to be considered, so you'd probably have to take those hours and reallocate them to the other sitting days.

Again, colleagues should understand that if the conclusion is that those four and a half hours—because Friday is a short day—should be tacked on to other days, we're wide open to that. If colleagues don't want to lose Standing Order 31 statements and want to apportion them on other days, we're wide open to that. If people want to take those questions and reallocate them in some sensible fashion, we're open to that. It's a conversation we can have. Certainly some members in all parties—I won't out them—say that it would be a great idea, so we have to resist the temptation to say, “I can't believe they want to take a day off.” We all have to resist that race to the basement and have an open conversation about what would modernize this place.

That's one of the examples, but there are many others. The NDP whip talked to us about finding a child care space, as I understood it, not necessarily a child care supervised facility. That's a separate issue. There is one that's available. It may not be perfect, but it can be adjusted. It's about having a space where you could be with a small child for a brief period of time.

We should be open to all of this. Some would be for the Board of Internal Economy and some for your committee.

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

(1115)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. LeBlanc.

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thank you very much.

Welcome, Minister.

I have a few questions today. I listened with interest to some of the things you were discussing, at least in concept at this point. I certainly picked up on the idea of adjusting the voting times. It's something that I know many of us around this place have talked about for a long time, and it would make sense. Certainly, it sounds like there are some things there that we can agree on with you.

When you're talking about concepts like these, I think that a lot of times, of course, it's the details that matter. What we've seen so far from your government—I hate to say it, but it's the truth—is that talk is different from the actions. We've heard a lot of talk about openness and transparency, but what we're not seeing is the action and the follow-through on it.

Look at the first days of the government under former prime minister Harper, when the accountability act was put in place. That was creating accountability. What we saw from your government was removing accountability, the first nation to first nation accountability, for first nations people to be able to hold their leaders to account. These are the kinds of things we're seeing.

We can talk about the Senate. You promised change. Well, what you've created is a secret process that creates secret recommendations that the Prime Minister will either choose to accept or not, and they'll all be done in secret.

What we're hearing in the talk is different from what we're seeing in the action. I guess here's what I would want to know. You've talked about some of these concepts, and they sound interesting, but give us some details. Tell us some details of what you're proposing, of what you think some of these changes will look like.

Give us a sense of the process you're looking to go through in making these changes. Give us an idea of the timeline in terms of making those changes. How will all parliamentarians be involved? Give us an idea of some of the processes, some of the details here, because that's where the important points are.

(1120)

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Through you to the member, it won't surprise you that I don't share entirely your characterization of some of those initial moments of our government. We could have a conversation. I could address them all for you, and it would be entertaining, perhaps, for you and me and for others.

Let me focus on the last part of your question. You want details. I'm suggesting that we cancel the Friday sittings and reallocate those hours that would have been on a Friday to other sitting days. We could decide on what days make the most sense. If you and your colleagues want to take those questions and Standing Order 31s and, again, allocate them over a bunch of other sitting days, we would be open to that.

My suggestion would be that Tuesday may have to be characterized as two sitting days, because it may be a very long day in order to accommodate people travelling on the Monday. You could use those two days in a Tuesday. I'm told by the clerk that some other parliaments have done this and have characterized that as two sitting days, because as you know, for government legislation, often the Standing Orders talk about how many sitting days there are for particular dispositions. You'd have to look at the supply day consequences of getting rid of one of the sitting days. We would be open to those kinds of changes.

I would agree with you, Blake. Let's take, for example, as a matter of routine, deferring votes to three o'clock on the following day or at the end of question period. Private members' votes held on Wednesday evenings at the end of government orders, instead could be held at three o'clock on Wednesdays. We could change the committee schedule, obviously, to accommodate that.

We would be wide open to all of those. Those are just a few concrete suggestions, but the reason I wanted to come here, frankly, is that you asked how all parliamentarians would be engaged. That's by doing exactly what I'm doing this morning, coming here and asking for your advice. Those changes are properly and correctly the purview of your committee. I would welcome—and I know my cabinet colleagues would and Kevin would as well—the benefit of your advice, your report, and your suggested drafting of any of these changes.

As for other ideas, the list is by no means exhaustive. If you have other ideas, we would obviously welcome them enthusiastically.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. I appreciate a bit more detail there. We'll look forward to some more detail, hopefully in the days to come.

While we're on the topic of some of the promises that maybe are not being kept fully at this point, I think one of the things in your mandate is to ensure that parliamentary secretaries are no longer part of committees. Certainly, I suppose in some ways you could claim that it might be the case, this having and not having. We only have the one committee that's up and running at this point and Mr. Lamoureux is sitting down there with you today.

In the previous meetings we've had, he's certainly been here, directing the government members and being the main participant on the government side. One could certainly argue that despite his not being a voting member, he's still a very active member of the committee, even though he's not officially a member. Certainly, even when we were into some of the details of how we would have our routine motions work, he was very involved in that effort and the negotiation that took place around that.

When you have parliamentary secretaries here participating in everything that's going on—he's obviously here with you now—how will that work? Explain that to us. Is that how we'll see it in all committees? Is that what's going to happen? Is the parliamentary secretary still going to be very active in directing exactly what's going on in the government side? Is it the intention of the government to do that? Is that what we should expect to see?

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Obviously, it won't surprise you that I disagree with the way Blake said that the campaign commitment was that parliamentary secretaries would not be on committees or serve on committees. To be precise, as you picked up at the end of your comments, it was to not be voting members of committees.

As you know, I think it's Standing Order 114—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Sorry to interrupt.

I guess what I would have to ask, then, is: how is that a change? Not voting doesn't mean that they can't direct how everyone else votes. It doesn't mean that they don't direct what's going on at committee, so what change is that, really, other than in some kind of theoretical world? How is that a change?

(1125)

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

I sat on this committee when your colleague Tom Lukiwski was very much the director of this committee. I saw it, sitting on the side of the table you're on now.

Mr. Lamoureux is an experienced member of Parliament and is, as all of you are, entitled to go to whatever committee he decides to attend. It's a long-standing tradition in the Standing Orders—

Mr. Blake Richards:

So I think what you're saying is that there's no change at all. Is that what you're saying? There's no change at all.

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

No.

The Chair:

That's time.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Mr. Minister. My first two thoughts upon listening to your presentation were, first of all, that you are fair-minded. I think you're sincere in what you're putting forward. That's the impression I get. However, given the experience on this committee, certainly the devil remains in the details. We've already had a little bit of a struggle in terms of manifesting the words “transparency” and “openness”, and the actual decisions that we make here. I'm not going to revisit it. I'm sure you've been briefed on it. It's not worth going back to, but to me, it's indicative of words going in one direction and actions going in another. At some point, I hope to see the two sync up.

I'm going to remain guardedly optimistic going forward.

What I'll do with the time I have—having been here long enough, I know that once I let go of the floor, there is no guarantee I'm getting that sucker back—

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Blake was fairly successful at getting it back.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, and that's why the chair's going to make sure that doesn't happen again. I'll make sure that I'll get my stuff out there, and you can respond as you deem appropriate, Minister.

First off, on the parliamentary secretaries, again, it's almost like we come in now and it's Where's Waldo? I never know where he's going to pop up. He started over there, then he went to there, and now he's over there. I mean, it really does beg the question: why does the parliamentary secretary need to be on the committee if the whole purpose is to make committees more independent?

I say this from experience and partly as a confession. When I was parliamentary assistant to the finance minister back a long time ago at Queen's Park, I was on the finance committee. Make no mistake, I was there to ride shotgun. I was there to make sure that the government majority's will was exactly what prevailed. We weren't even pretending that it was any kind of independence. It was them and us.

That's the world we've had up until now. Your government has come in, Minister, and said you want to do things differently. We're hearing the words, but we're not seeing the action. If you really wanted to send a strong message.... Never mind technically whether the parliamentary secretary can vote or not. It's whether or not, as Blake has said, they're sitting here, orchestrating, as a general on the field, all the team and where they're going. They give a nod and that's where the vote goes. That's where the majority is, and they control this committee 10 times out of 10.

I say to you, in a sincere effort to respond to the effort that I think you've made to be sincere, that if you really want a notion or signal of change, remove the parliamentary secretary. There are still BlackBerrys, staff, and all kinds of means. If you really want to say that things will be different, that you want committees to work a little more independently and be less partisan, then please remove the one person who ties this committee work directly to the executive PMO and the control of the majority. I leave that with you.

Secondly, the PBO...excellent. I'd be interested in hearing what the time frame is to make them an officer of Parliament, given that the Liberals finally came around and agreed that it needs to be done. It's the same with the BOIE time frame. I know that we have House leaders there who can do this, but you're already up and meeting, and I haven't heard any time frame. I'd be interested to know what that might be.

For the estimates budget process with public accounts, you may know that I've sat on public accounts since I got here in 2004. I'm the longest-serving member. My advice would be to go root and branch, to go right back to the basics, so that the working understanding is good enough that if you're a new member, you understand exactly how that process works and then reflect that in the way we change things. Right now, the truth of the matter is that there are very few parliamentarians who truly understand in detail the estimates and the public accounts process that we go through. I think you've touched on an important thing, but please don't go halfway; go all the way. Let's just revamp this so that the public can follow it too.

Next, the family-friendly thing sounds great. The one thing we're a little bit cautious of is that the Liberals under former Premier McGuinty did this in Ontario in 2008. One thing they did was to change question period to the morning. Virtually everybody, and I'm advised that includes even the media gallery, acknowledged that it was done so that the government would have an opportunity to change the negative message coming out of question period and turn it into a positive message before the six o'clock rotation came around.

Regarding the Standing Orders, we spent a lot of time on this in the last couple of Parliaments. It took us I don't know how many meetings to come up with a report that we called the “low-lying fruit”. We all agreed, and it was the simple stuff. But that's the past. The heavy stuff is now in front of us. You want to make major changes, and I'm very interested to hear whether or not those changes will only take effect if it's a unanimous recommendation of this committee. Will you do it with just one opposition party, or is the government prepared to ram things through on its own?

With regard to in camera, I have a proposal in front of the committee right now. I'm sure you're at least aware of it. Perhaps you could give us your thoughts before I head into that debate and give some idea of whether you, as the government House leader, are prepared to entertain some rules around when we can go in camera and what we do there.

Finally, on prorogation, there was a ton of work done one or two Parliaments ago, back when we had minorities. We did a lot of work. Joe Preston was the chair. I would urge a revisiting of that as the starting point, because it addresses a lot of the constitutional things. We had all kinds of experts come in. It was a great civics lesson. We didn't come to a conclusion, but we learned a lot. I would just ask that you maybe consider that.

With that, Chair, I'll say thank you.

(1130)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. House leader, you have a minute and a half.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I left a minute and a half on the table?

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

You left a minute and a half, but you raised seven issues. You're an experienced parliamentarian, David, so you would know; I'll pick and choose the easy ones and then the chairman will cut me off.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, he will, but there's a second round, remember.

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

You got your comments on the record.

No, I appreciate the spirit in which you began your comments. I share that view. I am optimistic too that we can make incremental progress. It won't be perfect and there will be moments of disagreement, but where we can come to a broad consensus on Standing Orders, on legislation, and on just operationalizing some of these things that we all, at least in informal conversations, share, I think we should move expeditiously.

With respect to the public accounts process, you're absolutely right; it evolved—this is not a partisan judgment—over a number of governments and Parliaments into a process that was disconnected and unintelligible. I will suggest to my colleague Scott Brison that he have a conversation with you. Your experience on that committee will be useful. He is going to ask colleagues on the public accounts committee to help him fashion this. He and I will try quite quickly to arrive at a way to better align this process.

But you're right; we'll do it substantively and seriously, and not tinker with it. Otherwise, we won't achieve the objective.

Am I out of time, Mr. Chairman?

The Chair:

You are.

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Okay. Well, you'll have five on the table when we come back.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Mr. Minister, thank you.

Chair, I'll be splitting my time with Mr. Chan.

I just want to say quickly that I was a staffer in the 40th and 41st Parliaments, and I have seen a lot of dysfunction. As a former staffer, I think I have a different perspective, and I am looking forward to taking on these challenges head-on.

I kept my old boss's office, and I just changed desks, which I think was a lot of fun. I'm already seeing a real change, though, as a member.

Being an MP has severely hurt the time I have for my two-year-old daughter. I think that's the big issue for me. I come to Ottawa and I work 12 hours a day. Then I go back to the riding and work 12 or more hours a day there, too, except that I also have to drive a few hundred kilometres around my 20,000-kilometre riding. My wife and my daughter often come with me, which is wonderful. I'm very lucky. Most people don't have that option.

Since I'm expected to be everywhere all the time in 43 municipalities, do you have any suggestions on how to do better family friendliness on the riding side of things? We always talk about what happens here on the Hill, but not so much about what we do on the other side of this job. Thank you.

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Thank you, David.

To be honest, I hadn't reflected. I have a riding, perhaps not as large as yours geographically, but there are the same kinds of issues with francophone, anglophone, and aboriginal communities. When I became the member of Parliament in my riding, there were two traffic lights. I think there are now eight, so there's been a very marked economic improvement during my tenure. But it is like yours. I envy you. In your constituency, there are at least some larger urban areas, compared to rural New Brunswick.

It is a challenge. I know what I have done—and other colleagues have more experience at these kinds of issues—is to say that if I'm going to the northern part of my constituency and there are a series of local community groups or municipal leaders or others who have been calling the office to set up meetings, I try to bundle them. If I'm going to drive x number of hours, I borrow a municipal office in a small town and set it up as a satellite constituency office, and I invite people from that particular area to come to meet with me. We try to spend half a day or whatever time's allowed, and I can clear up a number of meetings and not go back over and over it again.

People at this table may have suggestions around how the Board of Internal Economy could, either through technology—and I know colleagues have more experience than I might with this—or through different allocation of resources.... For some people with huge, northern, and remote ridings, the points system, for understandable reasons, may not marry up with their particular transportation needs. I think the Board of Internal Economy should be wide open to listening carefully to ways that we could maybe not even change the budgets, but adjust the rules in a way that better serves colleagues with unique needs in their constituencies.

I don't know if that somewhat answers your question, David.

(1135)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It certainly helps. It's largely what we're doing. My riding is large enough that, effectively, travelling to my second office takes a point. If I go to my office every week and I come to the Hill every other week, the points are pretty much gone. If my staff have to travel to a city council meeting, often that means travelling well over 100 kilometres.

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Right.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We do try to group them, but that's not always realistic. We have to work to their schedules as well.

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Of course, and if you want to bring your family to Ottawa, you'll quickly reduce the number of points available for work.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm very lucky that we can drive, but most people aren't in that situation. Thank you.

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to the government House leader for being here.

First of all, I wanted to go back to some of the comments I listened to from my colleagues on the other side. I'm not sure I completely agree with the characterization.

Let me start with the issue of parliamentary secretaries and perhaps how we've been conducting ourselves here. As my friend Mr. Christopherson has noted in the past, a lot of us are relatively new parliamentarians. Obviously, we want to draw upon an experienced parliamentarian regardless of what his role happens to be before this particular committee. I think the role of parliamentary secretaries will be much more significant in other committees particularly in standing committees where not only is the parliamentary secretary bringing the expertise of a specific ministry to the table, because in many ways that individual will be the best informed individual, but also that person is here to ultimately facilitate our work before this particular committee. I simply want to say that I welcome the ongoing advice and mentorship that Mr. Lamoureux has been providing me in my new role as deputy government House leader.

With all due respect, I don't see any direction coming from my colleague. It's simply to better understand how the rules in fact actually operate. You saw how we operated in the last sitting of this particular committee. We came to a consensus on one particular issue and we split our votes across the aisle on another one. Let's see how we ultimately practise. I would simply implore my colleagues on the other side to give this a shot.

I want to address one particular issue with the government House leader rather than just making a long speech. That's with respect to the issue of decorum. I want to go back to some of the practices in the House. For example, there is one specific suggestion that came from Jason Kenney about perhaps removing clapping from the House, and I want to know whether the House leader thinks this would in fact make the House itself a more collegial place. What would be the appropriate way in which we would conduct ourselves that would be more reflective of the mother of parliaments, the United Kingdom Parliament, in terms of appropriate decorum.

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Arnold I share your view on the parliamentary secretary's circumstance. Obviously, I benefit enormously from the advice of Mr. Lamoureux, his counsel, and his friendship. He has, in our view, a very easy access to some of the senior officials in the Privy Council office, including my deputy minister and others, who support me as the House leader. It can be useful to committee members as you're looking at a whole series of issues for Kevin to be able to quickly and efficiently access some of the senior advice.

Arnold, with respect to the clapping, do you know what? You're right—it uses up time. The Speaker was a bit late, I guess, getting to question period. We finished question period and it was 3:30. If that incrementally starts happening, colleagues will miss other meetings, committees will get delayed, and witnesses will wait. If it was the consensus in this committee that this kind of manifestation.... I'm not sure whether people like it on TV. If you're in the House, the validity of an answer or a point shouldn't necessarily go with the volume of clapping. It does use up time. Colleagues get cut off in questions or answers because the Speaker includes the clapping time in those transactions. That may be a very useful suggestion to improve decorum.

(1140)

The Chair:

That's your time, Mr. House Leader.

Now we're moving into the second round, which is a five-minute round.

We'll start with Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I might do the opposite of what Mr. Christopherson did. I'll ask you individual questions and wait for your response on each one, and then we'll see where that takes us.

I want to say, however, that I very much agree with the compelling nature of your mandate letter. I read it to our children every night before bed. It puts them to sleep. I'm hoping the illustrated edition will be out soon.

I wanted to ask you a simple question to start. Regarding the changes that involve standing order changes, is it your intention that this committee do that work and then submit a report to the House or do you have another mechanism in mind?

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'm glad to hear that your children enjoy the mandate letter as much as I do. We're hoping to get a YouTube version of it in English and French.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I actually rapped it to them.

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

The Prime Minister's schedule is such that he and I are trying to get to a studio together to do it. It's comforting to know that they go to sleep knowing that Canada is a better place. I thank you for that.

Again, Scott, my preference would be that this committee could, if you can arrive at a consensus or a process, quickly recommend some changes and bring those in as a report. We would be wide open to another mechanism. If you would prefer to make suggestions in some form of a more informal report, then I would turn it into a government motion, number whatever, and we would have a debate on it. I would be open to that as well.

It's really a question of what we all think is the most effective use of parliamentary time and your committee time. If you have the time to do a report that would achieve common objectives, we would be wide open to that process. If you have a better suggestion, we would certainly be open to that as well. You have a lot of experience with this stuff, more than I do, Scott. Whatever process you and your colleagues here at this table would find useful, I think would be one that I would want to start with.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have just two suggestions, then.

One is that I think it would make sense for us to look at things on which we have a greater degree of consensus and put those forward. There's no need for there to be a single report. It would be helpful to take on the things that we can all agree on quickly, especially because right now we have a fairly limited number of things on our agenda. That will get worse as time goes on in this committee.

The second thought I had was that.... You know what? I've forgotten my second thought, to be honest. I started going back to your mandate letter and it just crowded that out—

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

I know, you get delirious reading it, Mr. Chairman. I understand that, but—

Voices: Oh, oh!

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc: Scott, you make a very valid point. If we can quickly arrive at that consensus—I think that's what I said in my opening comments less eloquently than you just did—on five items that we could quickly turn into standing order changes, I would urge you to consider doing that quickly and first. If other items require more study, or you need to hear from witnesses, or you can't get to a consensus or arrive at a conclusion, they could be put off for a subsequent time when the committee would judge that it wants to go back to them.

I think what I was trying to say is that if we're going to make some of these improvements, I would hope that we would make them sooner so we could all benefit from them for a longer period of time in this Parliament.

I don't want to be a cynic, and nobody here who knows me would think that I would be at all cynical about these things. There is, I think, as David said in his comments, and maybe Ginette and others, an amount of goodwill that I hope we can make last for the entire Parliament, teasing aside.

But as significant pieces of legislation land, there will be very complicated policy issues, and if we can in the short term arrive at some changes, let's take advantage of the goodwill that I think we all see. It's not perfect, and it may not be always at the same level, but let's take advantage of what goodwill there is now if we can arrive at some changes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I do remember my other point, which is simply this. It may make sense with some things to put them forward as temporary standing order changes and see how they work out. We can give it a year, or whatever the committee decides, but that is one way of greasing the skids for something that not everybody is 100% sure about.

(1145)

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

We would be open to that as well, to have them sunset, or to find a way, not to take up parliamentary time.... If they proved to be as effective as we hope they would, then they would stay. If not, there would be a mechanism by which you would revert to the other Standing Orders. Again, that seems to me to be a perfectly appropriate suggestion.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I think I'm out of time, so thank you very much.

The Chair:

You have 15 seconds.

Mr. Scott Reid:

All right. In that case—

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid: The designation of Tuesdays as two sitting days, I would assume, would have the effect of causing any current standing order that refers to the number of sitting days not to be changed in terms of how long the government has to report back, to respond to something, and that kind of thing. Is that right?

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

That is my understanding, but to be honest, I am not.... This was a conversation I had with our Acting Clerk in a hallway where he said to be careful because there are these downstream consequences, so I offered that as one suggestion that I'm told other parliaments have used, but your views and the views of the committee on that exact issue would be important.

It is not intended.... There's no trick in it, but I want to be up front. I cannot be in a situation where we would agree to something that would have a very significant reduction of our ability to move government legislation forward. That's no secret here, so finding the right balance, we would be wide open to that.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. House Leader.

We have a five-minute round for Liberals.

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Minister, thank you for being here today.

Coming back to the point about a family-friendly Parliament, I was talking with one of my NDP colleagues a couple of days ago. I had a very difficult time making the decision to run in this election because I have a young son myself, but she is trying to manage a child under one at this point. She was saying that the day care facility here doesn't take children until 18 months. I think that's a difficult issue for her.

As well, once I became aware of what the schedule here in Ottawa is, I saw that it's a very gruelling schedule. I don't usually get back to my place—I'm choosing to stay at a hotel right now—from the office until nine or 10, because I have constituency work to do when I get back to the office around seven or eight. That's why I've made the decision not to bring my son here. I figure I won't even see him when he's here.

But what do parents do who bring their children here? The day care ends at a certain time. I've seen it closed when I usually get back to my office, and for those who have children that are under 18 months, how can they serve?

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Thanks for those comments. You reflect—you personally, but I think all sides of the House now—a very positive trend toward having younger members of Parliament elected, including young parents. The NDP caucus in the last Parliament was, frankly, a huge step forward in making our Parliament more conscious of some of those challenges, and it continued, thankfully, in the last election as well.

Your specific question around child care hours and the rules around when children can be left in the appropriate child care facility are properly the purview of the Board of Internal Economy. I sit on the board. All parties have representatives on the board. We should and can look at that, because other colleagues have raised it. The NDP whip raised a version of that concern. I think there certainly would be a willingness to fix that. It's an administrative financial issue, I think. I'm no expert in how to operate high-quality child care facilities, but I think these issues can be resolved.

To be honest, though, it will have to be done in a way such that Canadian taxpayers are treated respectfully in terms of what is the portion that we would expect parents to pay, versus the employer. I think to be fair those issues have to reflect what's done in other jurisdictions.

Kevin, do you want to add something on the family-friendly piece? Do you have comments?

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons):

I think the only thing I would acknowledge is the fact that we need to recognize that the issues we raise on this side are shared on all sides of the House. As the House leader made reference to, we need to work with all MPs from all political parties. I think that today, more than in the past, there seems to be a lot of goodwill there, for a number of different reasons. The official opposition, the third party, and the government all seem to have an interest.

I think it's coming up. Each caucus has their respective commission flowing ideas, so that some of them will go through BOIE, while others might come back here in terms of what sorts of rules we can change in the Standing Orders. Some of this is outside PROC's jurisdiction, but collectively I would think that the parties working together would be able to get it done in dealing with child care and other issues, if that helps.

(1150)

The Chair:

Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman. I appreciate the time.

I too am the father of a young son, a four-year-old, so I welcome some of these suggested changes and look forward to working with my colleagues on this committee and hopefully making this a more family-friendly place. I welcome that discussion and look forward to it.

I want to quickly reference a few things that were mentioned.

Your party ran on openness and transparency. My first meeting was not too long ago, and again the parliamentary secretary was here and there, and then slowly moved away. Now, I understand that he's not a voting member, but the involvement was supposed to be removed. What I witnessed in that first meeting is that he was basically directing traffic. I know you said that about the experience, but it still goes to the issue that Mr. Christopherson mentioned about how you remove yourself from the majority government and how you become more independent. Again, as a new MP who was just elected, I heard what was going on throughout the election, and then I watched what happened in committee. They were two totally different things. If you want to expand on this, I'd be happy for you to do that.

Again, I'm concerned about the Senate process, with the list going in secret to the Prime Minister. In secret, the Prime Minister makes that recommendation, and you really never see the names. You really never see what is going on. I think that needs to be a little more transparent. I agree that change in the Senate needs to be done, but to me that secrecy doesn't change anything, really. It's still in secret and you don't actually see what's going on.

In terms of electoral reform, you may have said something different, but before Christmas you mentioned that you have ruled out any kind of referendum on this subject. I apologize if you've changed or if something happened after that.

I was at the minister's breakfast earlier this week. Everyone sat at a table and took suggestions. Everyone at the table had something different to say on electoral reform, every single person. There were eight people at the table, and we had eight different ideas, good or bad. At the end of the day when you choose somebody, you'll choose one method out of all these suggestions, and I think it's very tempting for any government in power to take the suggestion that benefits them and say that they've consulted Canadians and, “This is what they say”.

I urge you, Minister, to reconsider, if you haven't already, your stance on that referendum. I don't think it prejudges any process. I think you can still consult and you can still come up with the ideas, but at the end of the day, I think you look at that idea and say to the people, “This is what we've consulted on and how about this?” I think we really do need to have that referendum on this. You've seen it in other jurisdictions and I would urge you to look in that direction.

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Thank you very much, and congratulations on your election to Parliament. I hope that collectively we can find a way such that your four-year-old son will see his dad more often than perhaps other kids in different Parliaments saw their parents. That can be done in a way such that we can also serve our constituents and fulfill our responsibilities here.

On your comments about openness and transparency, I understand what you're saying. I came from a cabinet committee this morning on open and transparent government, so we have a cabinet committee focusing on these exact issues.

With respect to the Senate process, I hear what you're saying. In a different frame and a different constitutional context, there may have been a different way to do it. We are very much guided by the Supreme Court of Canada reference that Mr. Harper's government brought—we thought properly—to the Supreme Court to clear up what are in fact the rules. What is possible? What's not possible? It should bring clarity to the conversation around how to improve the Senate and to understand when you would or would not trigger a constitutional change.

Our commitment was to make incremental improvements while not reopening the Constitution. This more inclusive process, by which we hope the Prime Minister receives high-quality recommended names from a committee of people who are not strictly partisan advisers, we think is an incremental improvement.

On this business about releasing the names, we had a conversation about that, to be honest. Suppose the advisory committee gives the Prime Minister five names in the case of an appointment from New Brunswick. I'm not sure that the five people who may agree to be on that list to be considered as a potential appointment to the Senate would agree if they thought the list was to be made public, because to some extent it is a judgment on the four who weren't selected.

In a judicial appointments process, the Attorney General has a list of qualified persons determined by a judicial advisory committee. Every time we make a judicial appointment, we don't announce that there were 38 people on the list who weren't selected and we chose the 39th one. I'm just conscious from a human resources perspective about doing it in a way that respects privacy but also the professional and personal lives of the other people. That was the thinking behind it, but it may not be a perfect solution. In our view, it's a beginning and an incremental improvement.

(1155)

The Chair:

Madam Vandenbeld. [Translation]

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I see that we have with us an independent member, Mr. Thériault. If he wants, I will yield the floor to him.

The Chair:

Mr. Thériault, go ahead.

Mr. Luc Thériault (Montcalm, BQ):

How much time do I have, Mr. Chair?

The Chair:

You have five minutes.

Mr. Luc Thériault:

Okay. Thank you.

I listened carefully to what the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons said.

You are all familiar with the situation of Bloc québécois parliamentarians, who are all elected under the same banner. Among the government's reform intentions, I would have liked the government house leader to say this morning that he wanted to respect the mandate the Prime Minister gave him and make it so every parliamentarian can benefit from the same means to have their voice and the voice of their constituents heard in the House.

You know that we do not have those means. We are proposing a solution. We have sent a letter to the speaker and to all parliamentary leaders. I want to tell you what we are proposing.

We do not want to be recognized based on the arbitrary 12-member rule, but, at the very least, given the parliamentary work we have to carry out, we should receive at least ten-twelfths of the budget that was considered important to be given to 12 members elected under the same banner.

We would like the Internal Board of Economy to adopt a rule, so that all members elected under the same banner would receive the budget they need. At this time, the Bloc québécois members have to use part of their constituency budget to pay their staff working on the Hill.

Of course, I appreciate being given five minutes to speak this morning, but under the current rules, we are excluded from committees. We have also been excluded from special committees. In order for us to be able to plan our work, we should at least be able to participate in each committee meeting to have a right to speak. I want to specify that we asked for a right to speak without a right to vote.

Earlier, the minister talked about giving more powers to members, so that they could carry out their parliamentary duties. He intends to meet with parliamentary leaders to find a common ground. The intentions are there, but they are not materializing.

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Thank you

How much time do I have, Mr. Chair?

The Chair:

You have two minutes.

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Thank you.

Through you, Mr. Chair, I want to congratulate Mr. Thériault for being elected to the House. As my colleagues know, Mr. Thériault is an experienced parliamentarian who sat on Quebec National Assembly for a number of years. His presence in Parliament as an experienced parliamentarian will be even more valuable.

Mr. Thériault raised questions about the participation of the members of a party that has not reached 12 elected members. According to a number of Standing Orders of the House, those members are technically independent and cannot participate in committee meetings.

We are open to discussing the best way to enable them to participate in those meetings. I have had positive discussions with Mr. Thériault and his colleagues, as well as with the parliamentary leaders for NDP and the Conservative Party. I am very happy Anita gave Mr. Thériault an opportunity to speak. I hope this will be a tradition we could continue in committee meetings.

During speaking rotations in the House of Commons, I believe we offered our colleagues from Bloc québécois an opportunity to take the floor on a few occasions. That time could have been allocated to the Liberal Party. Through whips, we offered members of Bloc québécois to take the floor. I hope we could continue in that tradition.

To my knowledge, the Board of Internal Economy has not yet made a decision when it comes to resources. I have participated in all the meetings. Since the election, we have had only one one-hour meeting, when we had to approve the budget.

I think the problem will arise in the procedure of committee meetings. I was honest about that with Mr. Thériault when I explained the situation. Permanent committee members have very little time to ask questions and speak out. If, at some point, independent members who are non-voting members but participants were to take the floor, that would reduce the speaking time of the members of other parties that managed to have more members elected. The NDP had four times as many members elected as the Bloc, and the Conservative Party had ten times as many.

It is not easy to make a decision on this. We will continue the discussion, including with other House leaders, while respecting all members.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

(1200)

[English]

Thank you, colleagues. This brings to a conclusion something I know you've been looking forward to for many weeks, my appearance here.

I thank you, Mr. Chair.

I thank you, colleagues, for your suggestions.

I do hope, teasing aside, Larry, that you'll invite me back.

Colleagues, I hope that even informally we can work on things. It doesn't always have to be in such a formal setting. My office is just off the foyer, and I would obviously be happy to chat informally or in small groups or whatever you think is appropriate.

Thank you, Kevin, for joining me at the table. It's part of the evolution of Kevin's movement around the table.

You'd better watch out, Larry. He could end up in your seat at some point.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you.

The lunch is here, so we'll suspend for a couple of minutes.

(1200)

(1220)

The Chair:

We had better get started or we won't have any time left. I have just a couple of housekeeping points.

Last time, we talked about having the names up front. I had a discussion with the boss of the clerk, and it's been a tradition not to have their names up front, for a couple of reasons. One is to keep them out of the spotlight. Also, sometimes they change during meetings.

I suggested that, as we did, as a compromise we would pass around a sheet with those names on it that you could have in front of you for the whole meeting, the names of the clerk and the researcher who happen to be at the particular meeting. That would serve the same purpose and we wouldn't be flaunting their.... We don't want to get them on our bad side because we need them.

Of course, for the new people, the proceedings and verification officer up here will turn your microphones on normally, so you don't have to worry about that. Also, the contact information for the clerk and our Library of Parliament researcher is on the committee website and in the briefing book you were provided.

There are two things that hopefully we can accomplish. One is that we have a motion. The other is that we have to decide—either us or the subcommittee—what we're doing at our next meeting next Tuesday. We haven't given any thought to that.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

In light of the time, as it's pushing 12:30 and we need to have our business for the next meeting, I don't see my motion getting resolved today anyway, given the limited time.

Once again, if it's helpful to the committee, because this ended up being a notice of motion—the clerk can correct me if I'm wrong—I believe I have the option of either calling it or not. Therefore, I can pass on calling it and we could go to business. It might take a little longer than usual because we're not doing it as a steering committee. The worst-case scenario is that we do our business for the next meeting and we're out about 10 minutes early. Either that, or we can dig into it at the tail end and just start and then carry it over, but I kind of like to do things fresh.

Anyway, I leave that with you, Chair.

The Chair:

I appreciate that offer. I'll accept that offer, because I think it would be a very.... I hope our committee can accomplish something. If we can get something for the next meeting, we can keep going.

Thank you very much. That's very co-operative, and I think it's very helpful for progress in Parliament here. We will let you call your motion at another time, or at the end today if we have time and we'll start it. Otherwise, we should decide now what we want to do at our next meeting. I think we should decide now as a group, if we can, what we should cover in the next meeting.

We'll go to Mr. Christopherson and then Mr. Reid.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Chair.

Our plate is quickly going to fill, as I think members are beginning to see, and we'll be overwhelmed. Managing our time is one of the most stressful and difficult things for us to work out. The government House leader asked this committee if we could come to agreement on as many standing order changes as possible, to get those in the system and in place as quickly as possible, so that we could live under those new rules. It would make sense to me, although I would certainly be willing to listen to other thoughts, that this has the most time-sensitive nature to it in terms of changes. I for one am willing to support the aggressive agenda for changes, because I think those changes, if they live up to the words, will be good. That's why I'm prepared to move things out of the way and get at it.

Just as a cautionary note before I shut down, this is not nearly as easy as the minister led to believe. We spent—I see David over there smiling, because he remembers when we went through this—probably the better part of a calendar year just on what we were calling the “low-lying fruit”. In other words, it was the issues where we all agreed. It wasn't that complex. It wasn't controversial. If there was any controversy or disagreement, we set it aside and said, “Okay, that's not part of the low-lying fruit.” Everything got shovelled over there. It was all we could do to come up with a limited number of very minor changes.

I'm not overly optimistic that we can do it as quickly as the minister might like, but it seems to me that if they're serious—and I take them at their word that they're asking for our input as to how to approach this work—then beginning on the Standing Orders would be a good place, in light of the time sensitivity and the amount of time it takes even to just find the ones that we all agree on.

Before I relinquish the floor, Chair, I did raise this quickly in my little stream of consciousness with the minister, but I am serious. One of the things we used as a working tool when we were looking for what we called the low-lying fruit.... By the way, that report was issued, it did go through, and it was adopted by the House. They weren't big deals, but we did have the agreement that if anybody at the table, any of the caucuses, disagreed, it wasn't going forward.

I did ask the minister, although I didn't really expect he could answer it or would want to given the time available, but I put the question to you, Chair. I'd like to hear from the government. If we get into a crunch, and we're very likely to, on rule changes, how will the decision be made? At the end of the day, is it just majority rules and that's it—too bad, so sad? Alternatively, will we say, “No, if we can't reach unanimous agreement, we won't put forward changes to the rules”? Because all it will do is recreate a partisan fight in the House over rule changes that are meant to be non-partisan.

I would just leave that with you, Chair. Thank you.

(1225)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I was part of that process too. Looking back at it, I think one of the approaches we had last time, and that I wouldn't recommend doing again, was that we wanted to have a single report. We went through all of the rules. We essentially were trying to see how many rules we could get agreement on and whether we could work it out. On some things we achieved success, and on some things we clearly weren't going to achieve success and we put them aside. But on the many items where we might have achieved success, we talked and talked and talked.

Basically, I think what happened was that the deadline we had to make our report dictated the amount of time we put in. It was a version of Parkinson's law: the debate filled the available time.

It was a different model. We got as much low-hanging fruit as we could manage. We got the easy stuff. Standing on our tippytoes, we thought we might be able to reach the stuff, but we did a little hop and we couldn't get it. That's my apple metaphor here. It was all under the assumption that the picnic is over at a certain time, but until that happens, we can keep on going.

I think this time I would suggest a different approach. If we can take an item and resolve it, then we should just have a little report and send it off to the House. This committee, of course, is always generating little tiny reports, far more reports than any other committee, and far briefer reports. I think that would be appropriate. Then we seek the concurrence of the House. Presumably we would have an agreement that any report we're issuing here will be concurred in. Obviously that's subject to the parties agreeing, but it's not to turn that into an all-day concurrence debate. It's not an excuse for that. It's just to get concurred in. Then we can get that rule in place and move along.

The Chair:

Depending on what the Bloc does.

An hon. member: As long as we have agreement.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You're right. The Bloc and our Green member might say something different, but I think we should say that would be the agreement among the three parties who are actually sitting on the committee. That would help things along. In other words, I guess to channel Mackenzie King, I'm advocating for it being as piecemeal as necessary but not more piecemeal than necessary.

(1230)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Lamoureux.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

Having participated in that third party perspective, I think with the way it worked last time, it was very beneficial. I think that would be applicable this time around also, David.

I think what we saw from the government House leader's presentation is that he really and truly is approaching this with a very open mind. The feedback, from what I understand—and you can talk to your respective House leaders—is that there has been a considerable amount of dialogue on these issues already. To a certain degree, I think there might be an expectation, and the question is how we can best achieve and meet that expectation, which is universal on all sides of the House.

Before when we had low-lying fruit, it was really low. If we try to get into too many of the details.... If we have this general consensus that we want to change Fridays and have voting only on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays, and not have votes after three o'clock or whatever it might be, if we have the general principles, then maybe we can even approach the respective House leaders to see if they have some recommendations as to how they would like to proceed. I believe Dominic made reference to the fact that he's even open, if PROC wants to see it, to the government bringing in a separate motion. I think having informal and formal discussions would be healthy but they would not necessarily be about the low-lying fruit. Another way is to look at some of those tickets that can address those family issues that we hear about from all sides of the House and how we might be able to act on them.

I would expect that it would all be done through a consensus.

The Chair:

Okay.

I'm not hearing any objections to Mr. Reid's suggestion that we do an item at a time. If we were to do that, which item would you like to start the next meeting with? There were about five that the House leader suggested.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Can I suggest that we actually start by trying to compile the...? Actually, I agree with Mr. Christopherson. I really wish the House leader had brought his notes, because then we could be going through them and discussing them right now. I can remember little bits here and there. I also wish I had made better notes, to be honest, so it's partly my fault.

The Chair:

I have the mandate letter. I can give you a copy of that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I know the mandate letter well, as you know.

The Chair:

Yes, so do your kids.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I was going to say I could do a rap if you wish.

I think we should sit down. That's a good idea. We'll take the mandate letter and we should go through and say what each of us envisions on these things and try to come to an agreement. We could try talking about that now. I'm saying we should do that and come back with suggestions as to who has some expertise. He said that a legislature or maybe several legislatures had done four-day weeks, for example. I know that Ontario has. It would be reasonable to start by trying to get some officer of the Ontario legislature here. That's one example of the kinds of the witnesses I want to think about.

We could come back to the next meeting with lists of witnesses. They don't necessarily have to be for one topic. They could be just to try to get a sense of what we're biting off. I don't know if that's helpful.

The Chair:

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Might I suggest we even just go with the thematic aspects that come within the minister's mandate letter? The other way we could potentially look at it is to go through the Standing Orders by topic and then chunk it up that way. That's just another way to apportion the work. The real question is whether we do it as a committee as a whole or we just break off into having the subcommittee set that agenda.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Normally the subcommittee meets at the time allocated for this meeting, right?

The Chair:

Yes, but that does take up time.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I don't think there's a real obvious way here in this. We have to make it up as we go along. Is there merit in asking each of the caucuses to, number one, go back through not a thoroughly exclusive list but a list of the things that each caucus thinks is a priority they would like to talk about, and number two, give us some idea of where they might want to go just in general terms? Then, Chair, we can schedule a meeting of the steering committee. Even though we haven't finished all the rules yet, we can get through. Let the steering committee chew on it and come up with a proposal and a process that comes back here.

Obviously, what the minister said was important and reflects where the government would like to go. I'm sure that we and the Conservatives have options. We've all done this before.

Anyway, just as a starting point, I throw that out. Ask each caucus. Even if it's not on paper, verbally each of the representatives could be ready to come to the steering committee to provide a little more of a fleshed-out idea of where each of us would like to go. Then we can see where they intersect and try to identify the stuff we think would be the low-lying fruit, part two.

It's just a thought, Chair.

(1235)

The Chair:

Okay. Let me paraphrase that. If each party went back and their representative on the subcommittee came with, out of the mandate letter—there are about five things there—what their priorities are and the things they think we could work on, the subcommittee could present that as an agenda for our next meeting.

I'd like to add a little amendment for discussion. As a task-oriented person, Mr. Reid has suggested that there are people with expertise in a number of these areas. Maybe we could think of one of those obvious people to have here for one hour of our next meeting so that we get the discussion under way, in the meantime going in parallel with the same process.

The other thing is the timing of the subcommittee. Often it's done at the time the committee would normally meet.

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, no, outside of the committee time, Chair, please.

The Chair:

That will speed up our time, yes.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I want to start this by asking David a question.

Were you in the legislature when there were five-day weeks, or were there four-day weeks when you were there?

Mr. David Christopherson:

They were five days.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay, so that postdates you.

The obvious, then, if we're starting with that one, is that I would suggest getting the clerk of the Ontario legislature to comment, assuming the individual was there both before and after the change. They could comment in a non-partisan way on some of the practicalities of things that have arisen as a result; it would just be business. For that person, you'd want to check how long they've been the clerk. You'd want to make sure they were clerk when the transition took place, or deputy clerk. Assuming that's true, I would suggest starting with that person. I don't have a name, I'm afraid.

The Chair:

Are there any comments on that? For our next meeting, we'd invite the clerk or someone from the clerk's office in the Ontario legislature who has expertise on both four-day and five-day sittings.

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Is this a past clerk? It's probably not the current sitting clerk. I think the Ontario legislature returns after Family Day.

Mr. Scott Reid:

So that means they're back next week?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

No, the week after.

Mr. Scott Reid:

If we met with them next Tuesday—

Mr. Arnold Chan:

We could, if they're available.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes. We'll need to find out, but that's just a suggestion. There are other legislatures, I gather, that have this as well. Ontario is the one I know about because I live in Ontario, and I'm envious of my MPP, who gets a day....

The Chair:

Mr. Lamoureux.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

I'm wondering about this. If you try to relate to a provincial legislature that might have some commonality with Ottawa, you could look at a legislature like Victoria's, where a vast majority of the MLAs are rural. I don't know how—I have no idea—their voting process works and at what time. There was a suggestion that we maybe look at the possibility of having question period earlier as opposed to two o'clock, and there are the days of the week and so forth.

There might be some benefit in looking to the B.C. operation and the clerk's office, just to see if there's some value in having them also come down to make a presentation, if you're looking at a second one. Again, the vast majority of MLAs live well out of Victoria, so travel is a big issue in British Columbia, more so than in other provinces. That's a suggestion you might want to consider. If you're doing Ontario—

Mr. Scott Reid:

You're suggesting a panel of experts.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

I think maybe you can get someone from the clerk's office in Ontario and someone from the clerk's office in B.C. and hear what they have to say. On at least those three items, and possibly four, you can ask them for their opinion. For example, what have they been doing to be family friendly in the last few years? When is their question period? Was there a justification for it? Do they sit on the Fridays? As I say, I have no idea if they sit on Fridays. I don't know. I just think that they share a lot of things we would share in terms of distance-related issues.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Building on that, we could still have clerks from the House here who could comment on at least the viability of some of the options they're hearing, to give us a little more focused attention.

In other words, they could say, “That one idea sounds really good, but it would be difficult for us here because of this and this.” Or they could say, “It's up to the will of the parliamentarians; however, it is doable. It's not that big a deal.” Or they could tell it is a big deal. That's helpful too, because it gives us an idea of what the implications are of the changes we might recommend.

I think we're beginning to see a path, Chair.

(1240)

The Chair:

Yes. I think we would ask the clerks, whichever clerks we're asking, to tell us the consequences of some of these changes, because there would be consequences.

Were you suggesting that the panel would have three clerks on it—B.C., Ontario, and a local clerk here?

An hon. member: Yes.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I wonder if it would be useful to also have somebody who would bring the international context and look at what some other countries have done. I know that there are organizations in Ottawa, such as Parliamentary Centre, that do international work with parliaments. It might be worthwhile to bring in somebody who can bring that context as well.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Why don't we start by asking our analyst about this? We don't even know, in this group, which of our provinces have four-day as opposed to five-day sittings. That would be a start, just getting that list. I wouldn't recommend looking at the States, because everything about congressional life is just different. Possibly we could look at Australia and New Zealand. I don't know about New Zealand, but the Australian states are geographically large enough that they'd have similar problems, and it's our system.

The Chair:

Go ahead.

Mr. Andre Barnes (Committee Researcher):

Mr. Chair, I had looked into the matter for the all-party women's caucus a couple of years back. It's not necessarily fresh to me, but Ontario has made some changes. They now sit earlier. British Columbia has made some changes.

I think you might be correct about Quebec, but I don't necessarily recall. I know that Scotland has made some changes as well. I don't recall seeing that Australia has, frankly.

The Chair:

Could you do some research as opposed to discussing it now?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

I'll put it in a briefing note.

The Chair:

You can bring something for the next meeting, a little bit of the international stuff.

I think with three clerks to start with, that would probably be a big enough panel.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Just as a thought, Chair, I really liked Scott's idea earlier. The minister indicated that he was open to the idea of putting something in place, trying it out, and having a sunset clause or review clause. That makes a whole lot of sense.

In that context, I just want to suggest that, based on my experience—and I've been doing this for an awfully long time—I think we oughtn't be afraid to be bold, and, dare I say, even revolutionary.

I say that in this context. I was first elected in, believe it or not, 1985. I was elected to Hamilton City Council and regional council. We were called “aldermen”. There was absolutely no washroom for female council members. It was all geared to males. There was a washroom attached to the lounge, and it was private, but it was male only.

I've been around long enough now to see the first deaf person in the House of Commons. I've now seen those in wheelchairs twice—

The Chair:

Three times.

Mr. David Christopherson:

—yes, three times—and other changes too.

If you look ahead, let's say 50 years from now, they'll look back at where we are today and it will almost be like the story I'm telling you now, where we had to convert a closet into a washroom for that female councillor. We were still fighting about whether it was “aldermen” or not. I mean, that's how far back it goes. It shows you the kind of change that needs to happen.

Again, it's based on what's happened, especially in the last two Parliaments, the last one and this one. There are so many younger people.

Jamie, it wasn't always that a male politician would be as quick to jump in and say to Ruby, a female politician, “I have the same issue. I have a four-year-old son.” I mean, those roles were so defined. There was no blurriness in the lines, but you're in a time when you can say that you too have a four-year-old.

What I'm saying is that we have to make this place more real, and this is key to it. If we're going to attract more women.... Yes, good, we probably have more women here than ever, but we're still not there. We have a long way to go. I've worked with young women and have encouraged them to get involved. My wife is very active in electing more women across partisan lines.

A lot of the questions you raised, Ruby, and what you went through in terms of what to do about your child, all that reluctance—we have to remove all that so that the pressure of whether you go into public life is predicated solely on your personal circumstance, not your gender, or whether you're a mom or a dad. It should be built in.

We're starting to get there, and history is telling me that we will get there. I'm just saying let's not be afraid to be bold, to really, really shake it up. If something looks so obvious to us, and using Scott's technique of building in a fail-safe for ourselves a year or 18 months from now, let's go for it. We're going to get there anyway. Let's try to get there as quickly as we can to make this kind of change. We still have a long way to go, but with the kind of serious young politicians who are here now, I really feel like now's the time. Let's grab it.

Thanks.

(1245)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Christopherson. I agree. Hopefully, we won't get tied up on technicalities that would stop us from doing that.

For a way forward, let me propose what I think we've agreed to, which is that for our next meeting—and this might take the full two hours, actually—we should try to get the three clerks, from B.C., Ontario, and the House of Commons. Sometime between now and next Thursday, which we can discuss in a minute while the subcommittee meets, we'll bring back the priorities of our parties, out of those five or so items that the House leader mentioned, and then the subcommittee will decide how to direct the Thursday agenda or witnesses.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

In the interest of clarity, Chair, I suggest that you and/or the clerk send out an email advising what it is that the caucuses have agreed to do, because right now, it's just words. You get to these meetings and someone says, “Oh, I didn't realize I was supposed to do that”, and then we lose that time.

Maybe we could get a short memo advising exactly what it is we're being asked to bring back, or it could be clearly stated now in a sentence.

The Chair:

Let's say it now so it will go into the minutes, and we can take the minutes back.

It was your idea. Do you want to put it in English?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks. I would seek the assistance of the clerk to help me explain what I said—there's an impossible task.

Do we want caucuses to go back on everything, or are we focusing just on family friendly right now? Do you want to focus on family friendly and see how that works for us?

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Could we call it inclusive Parliament? That way, it can include—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I might suggest that we just limit ourselves to putting down no more than three items, and we'll agree to a deadline.

The Chair:

Do you mean items out of the mandate letter?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I mean sub-items within the mandate letter.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I have to tell you, I kind of like the idea of us doing them one at a time. What was the term that you just used?

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

It was inclusive Parliament.

Mr. David Christopherson:

“Inclusive Parliament”, I like that better.

If we just focus on that as a starting point, we can broaden this quickly if we want to. That way, we'll come to a meeting and we'll all be ready with our thoughts on that. That seems to be the one that we're most interested in, because it affects day-to-day life. We want to get it in place, try it out, and amend it down the road if we need to.

Maybe we'll do just that one item, Chair. It's complex enough.

The Chair:

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I certainly agree in principle with the approach being suggested here. My only concern is with logistics.

As our member on the subcommittee, I would really find it difficult to get the input I would need from my caucus that quickly. Obviously, we meet once a week as a caucus. That would probably be a good opportunity to get that so we would be able to do that next week and come with the input from my caucus, but I don't really feel that I'd be doing it proper justice.

Maybe we want to look at doing that right after the break or something.

The Chair:

Okay. We're going to have a break week, so why don't we schedule for next Tuesday and Thursday some obvious witnesses that we can come up with on the point the House leader made? Then, before the Tuesday after the break, we'll get some feedback from House leaders, whips, or larger caucuses, and that will determine our agenda for those weeks.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's probably a good idea, because it will also help inform us as to what is doable and what isn't, and we would be equipped to talk to our caucuses and then have a knowledge-based discussion. I like it.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I would just remind you that we still have to deal with your motion.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I appreciate that.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

My point is that it might eat up a significant part of Tuesday.

I want to get back to my earlier point. I was just saying that there are very specific ideas within each of the inclusive Parliament concepts. I'm saying let's limit it to no more than three concepts that each caucus would bring to the table.

One other idea I just want to throw on the table is whether we also want to invite any sort of deposition coming from members who are not part of a recognized party. I'm just putting that out there for everyone to consider.

(1250)

Mr. David Christopherson:

Do you mean in public, if they want to come down and make a submission?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

That's exactly my point. We all have the same privileges as members.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I know. I'm saying that maybe we should invite other members who want to come forward to make presentations and talk about their personal issues, so they're not just speaking to their own caucus but actually speaking to all of us about their issue. That would include the independents.

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I agree. I think it's important to have that perspective. I agree that we should have the clerks here, but the members are the ones who are living it, day to day, and they have the personal experience and knowledge behind it. I think somebody who's been here for years could speak to it properly, and then someone new could, so we would get a good cross-section of members.

The Chair:

What if we invited to the Thursday meeting next week any member of Parliament who wanted to appear before us on these types of topics?

Before we leave, though, I would want to refine down what that type of topic is.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

I think we have to be somewhat careful with that, in the sense that I could envision getting a number of Bloc members, for example, coming in and saying that what they want is party status and they want to change the standing order to reflect that party status. What they want, even without the party status, is to have Bloc representation. It might take us off the focus in terms of what it is that we're really trying to do.

If the idea is “family friendly” or other terminology, whatever is best for the committee, I think we need to have a better idea of what we want. We can always open it up for everyone to provide comment on this; then at least they have a sense of the package if they want to add further comment. My concern is that it becomes very convoluted really quickly. At some point, the Bloc and all people should be engaged in it. Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying they should be excluded from the process, but I think we need to have a better sense of the direction that we want go in.

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I think there are ways around solving that problem, such as maybe getting past parliamentarians. As Mr. Reid was asking Mr. Christopherson earlier, “Have you been both in the legislative assembly and an MP on the Hill?” Maybe it's about finding people with both experiences or perspectives. Somebody who is not currently serving might help alleviate that problem.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a very quick idea to throw out here without having thought it through that much. What about inviting some spouses to come and speak about the real experience of being married into this crazy job?

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's an interesting thought, actually. A number of the people who retired at the end of the last Parliament surprised me. I'm not going to mention names because it may be that in some cases health concerns were the real driving force. But they were people who would have been re-elected—they were in essentially secure seats—and they seemed to be enjoying their jobs.

There are people from not just the last Parliament but a number of the previous Parliaments who might be able to shed some light on this. With a bit of judicious searching, I'm sure we could find some people who could explain what the particular stresses were that they faced and caused them to leave. That's a possibility.

The Chair:

Just so we don't run out of town, I mean time—

An hon. member: Is that a Freudian slip, Chair?

The Chair: Right, out of town.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: I want to get exact details of the next meeting. First of all, we're going to ask those three clerks to comment on the items in the mandate letter, or do we have a specific sub-list, a shorter list?

Mr. David Christopherson:

I have to tell you, for what it's worth, Mr. Chair, that I think we should start with just the one subject and see how we do. It's complex enough. It has so many moving parts to it.

The Chair:

We'll define that once our—

Mr. David Christopherson:

There's the inclusive Parliament, the family-friendly piece, and I would suggest confining it just to that for now until we get our sea legs, our rhythm, and then we can start tackling.... If we put too much on there, it's going to be overwhelming and we're not going to get anywhere. That's my worry.

The Chair:

The clerk doesn't quite understand. Could you be a bit more detailed on the items under the mandate letter, items that fit under that topic?

Mr. David Christopherson:

My concern was that if we just say anything in the mandate items, which really is anything under the sun—

The Chair:

No, that's not what I'm saying. Just define that a bit more: the inclusive and the family friendly, the Friday sittings—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes.

The Chair:

—changing the votes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, it's anything at all that affects the life here, the rhythm. I don't know how you phrase it.

(1255)

The Chair:

Okay, so we're agreed on that for Tuesday's meeting.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, but what it's not about is public accounts and estimates. It's not about the Senate.

What it is about is anything that has to do with making this a more inclusive Parliament, family friendly, call it what you will. For anything that the caucuses believe is part of that rubric, bring it to the steering committee, bring it to the discussion.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are we limited to two meetings a week if this gets out of hand?

Mr. David Christopherson:

No. We can meet as much as we want.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's good.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

I wonder if it might help if we give a few examples. For example, Dominic talked about two sitting days on a Tuesday, the Fridays, and the time in which we have votes inside the House. Those are a few of the specifics, just as examples. Others might want to throw out another couple of examples, but those are the three that come to mind right away.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It's not a child care space, but a private family space, if that came up. Personally, I would leave a little more latitude for each of the caucuses to come up with whatever they think is part of this, and they can make the argument.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

They could cite a few examples of what they're talking about.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Sure.

Did we agree, Chair, that we would hold these hearings first and then hold a steering committee, and at that time we would bring all of it together and then bring a path back to the committee?

The Chair:

Sure.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I think where we were heading was to let ourselves be informed by the witnesses before we talk to our colleagues, so we can pass that on to them and bring back the information in the context of what we've already heard.

The Chair:

Okay, we have agreed on two things so far. We've agreed on what we're going to do at the next meeting, which is now, as you outlined it, before the steering committee. The second thing we agreed on was that our analyst is going to bring us back some international research.

Now, since we're not having a subcommittee meeting until after Tuesday's meeting, we have to decide what we are going to do in the Thursday meeting spot.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Do you mean next Thursday?

The Chair:

Yes. We have some suggestions about spouses or about parliamentarians from other parties.

Mr. David Christopherson:

There's always my motion.

The Chair:

There's your motion.

Mr. David Christopherson:

If you're looking for really good work to do, there it is.

The Chair:

It's up to the committee.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It would be best if we could finish it before the steering committee. It's not absolutely necessary, but it would be helpful to have it nailed down ahead of time.

The Chair:

We could split the meeting and have your motion for an hour and the steering committee for the second hour next Thursday.

Mr. David Christopherson:

We could do that.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

And we could stop even if it's not resolved.

The Chair:

Maybe we should do it the other way around. Have the steering committee first in case your debate takes two hours.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

It's subject to the availability of the clerks of the other Houses, so we may have to have some flexibility on that point.

The Chair:

Obviously.

Mr. Blake Richards:

My understanding was that we were thinking of doing the steering committee a little later than next week.

The Chair:

Do you mean so there would be feedback?

Mr. Blake Richards:

I might make an alternate suggestion. Our analyst has indicated that he might have some stuff he can go back and look at with regard to other legislatures, parliaments in other countries that are doing stuff. Through some of the discussion here there's been talk about former parliamentarians, etc.

If we're going to look at the motion with those things, maybe we could have kind of a committee business session on Tuesday to allow for some of those things. Maybe we could use some of that time as well to have our analyst give us some feedback on what we might be able to do. That gives you a bit more time to schedule a witness for Thursday. There might be a suggestion to have a couple of different panels, although I think maybe the clerks might take up a full two-hour session. That would give us a little bit more time, until after the break, to talk to our caucuses before we have that steering committee.

The Chair:

I had forgotten we were going to give you more time to go to caucuses, so on Thursday we could do a bit of your report.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

To get the research done and translated, I'd have to do it today, so it would be a very scant report. A preferable deadline for it would be next Thursday, if the committee can accept that.

The Chair:

That's what we're talking about. Sure.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

Okay, that's Thursday as opposed to next Tuesday.

The Chair:

Next Tuesday we're going to do the three clerks for two hours. Next Thursday we can do your report for an hour and then we'll have Mr. Christopherson's motion, which we can debate right through the break week if we can stay.

(1300)

Mr. David Christopherson:

We'll shuttle in.

The Chair:

Is that it? Does that sound good to everyone?

The directions to the caucuses are that whoever is on the steering committee from each caucus should come back with, if they can, some preferences or priorities or input on this family-friendly agenda from either your House leader, or your whip, or your entire caucus, or however you work internally.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Where are we bringing that, Chair?

The Chair:

It is to the subcommittee meeting, which would be after the break. That's a good point though. We have to decide when exactly that would be.

Mr. Blake Richards:

There are two things. I would suggest that in order to allow us a couple of potential opportunities with our caucuses, maybe we'd try to do that later in the week after the break week. That would be my thought on that.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Blake Richards:

The other thing I was going to ask, which I'm sure David would want to know as well, is who the government member is on the subcommittee, just so the two of us will know. I can't remember if we settled on one or two additional members from the government after all that.

The Chair:

There are two. I think they were talking about it this morning.

Mr. Blake Richards:

For the steering committee.

The Chair:

Have you picked out who will be on the steering committee?

An hon. member: Ruby and Arnold.

The Chair:

Okay, there you go—and the chair and the vice-chair and Mr. Christopherson, right?

Mr. Richards, when do you think we should have that subcommittee meeting?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Others might have a different opinion on it, but I personally would prefer to leave it until after our caucus meeting that week, which would normally occur on the Wednesday morning. It could be Wednesday afternoon or Thursday or whatever, but I personally would prefer to see that.

The Chair:

But it's the one after the break, not next week.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Exactly, after the break; that way there's an opportunity....

I don't know what the caucus meeting looks like for my party or for any of the others in terms of an agenda for next week. So just to allow two potential opportunities to raise it at our caucus meetings, I would prefer it to be after that.

The Chair:

If we do that, what are we going to do in the Tuesday meeting after the break?

Mr. Blake Richards:

We may have some suggestions coming out of Thursday, right?

The Chair:

Okay.

On Thursday, after your report, we will.... Let's say it's 45 minutes. We'll take 15 minutes to decide what we're doing the following Tuesday, and then we'll have an hour for Mr. Christopherson's motion.

How does that sound?

Mr. David Christopherson:

That sounds doable.

The Chair:

Are there any other comments?

I think that's a very good schedule. Seize the moment.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Nous sommes désolés de continuer à faire attendre la presse. Nous en sommes à la quatrième réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Conformément à l'alinéa 108(3)a) du Règlement, nous tenons une séance d'information sur le mandat ministériel.

Nous entendrons aujourd'hui le témoignage de l'honorable Dominic LeBlanc, CP, député, leader du gouvernement à la Chambre des communes, et de Kevin Lamoureux, député, secrétaire parlementaire du leader du gouvernement à la Chambre.

La présente séance durera environ une heure. Je remercie les témoins de leur présence qui nous permettra de faire du travail de fond, comme le souhaite le Comité.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

J'aimerais faire un rappel au Règlement.

Le président:

Il y a rappel au Règlement.

Pouvez-vous procéder rapidement? Je ne veux pas empiéter sur le temps...

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, bien sûr.

Je crois qu'il faut le consentement du Comité pour ajouter un témoin. Je crois qu'il faut approuver la présence de M. Lamoureux, qui est en train de faire graduellement le tour de la table...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid: … et qui devra en fait traverser de l'autre côté pour faire un tour complet et rejoindre les libéraux à la fin du processus. Je ne m'oppose pas à ce que le Comité approuve sa présence comme témoin, mais je pense qu'il faudrait simplement respecter la formalité qui consiste à approuver l'ajout d'un nouveau témoin.

Le président:

Est-ce que quelqu'un...

Une voix: D'accord.

Le président: Quelqu'un s'oppose-t-il à ce que M. Lamoureux soit témoin?

D'accord. Le Comité accepte l'ajout. Je ne suis pas certain que cette formalité ait été nécessaire. Quoi qu'il en soit, empressons-nous d'entrer dans le vif du sujet.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Monsieur le président, avons-nous des copies des observations préliminaires?

Le président:

Non.

M. David Christopherson:

Qu'en est-il de l'ouverture et de la transparence?

Le président:

Nous avons jusqu'à 10 minutes pour les observations préliminaires.

Monsieur LeBlanc, vous avez la parole.

L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc (Leader du gouvernement à la Chambre des communes):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je profite de l'occasion pour remercier mes collègues de même que M. Lamoureux de s'être joints à moi.

Monsieur le président, d'entrée de jeu, je vous félicite de votre réélection à titre de député de Yukon.

Le président et moi sommes de fiers membres de la promotion de 2000. Nous étions au nombre des 24 députés libéraux élus en 2000. Malheureusement, au cours de la dernière législature, nous n'étions plus que quatre, mais avec votre retour, monsieur le président, nous sommes de nouveau cinq. Félicitations.

C'est un privilège d'être ici. J'imagine que, depuis l'ouverture de la présente législature, je suis le premier ministre à comparaître devant un comité. Il va sans dire que je suis ravi d'être ici avec mon estimé collègue, Kevin Lamoureux.[Français]

Je suis ici en vertu du mandat qui m'a été donné par le premier ministre, c'est-à-dire de coopérer de manière concrète avec les députés de tous les partis et de coopérer, évidemment, avec nos comités parlementaires.[Traduction]

J'ose espérer que, ensemble, nous pourrons donner un nouveau ton aux débats à la Chambre des communes, y renouveler le sentiment de collaboration et nous employer à ce que nos collègues du Sénat adoptent également ce nouveau ton.

Pour atteindre mon objectif de rendre le Parlement plus pertinent et plus efficace, j'ai besoin de votre collaboration et de votre expertise pour revoir le Règlement, notamment en vue d'améliorer la reddition de comptes, de rendre la Chambre plus sensible aux besoins de la famille et de donner aux députés la possibilité de pleinement participer à toutes les activités de la Chambre.

Je suis persuadé que vous avez tous pris connaissance, avec grand enthousiasme, de la lettre de mandat que le premier ministre m'a adressée. Elle a été rendue publique, mais je vais tout de même en résumer les principaux éléments. Le mandat qui m'a été confié comprend entre autres des modifications au Règlement, certains changements législatifs et ce que j'appellerais des améliorations en matière de politiques.

Bon nombre des engagements qui exigent des changements au Règlement relèvent, évidemment, de la compétence de votre comité. Par exemple, le premier ministre m'a demandé de faire en sorte que le Parlement soit plus favorable à la conciliation travail-famille. Les changements pourraient comprendre l'élimination des séances du vendredi pour permettre aux députés de rentrer dans leur circonscription, certaines en régions éloignées, pour travailler et pour passer davantage de temps de qualité avec leur famille.

Un autre changement porterait sur les heures de vote à la Chambre des communes. Nous revenons tous à la Chambre pour voter à 17 h 30, 18 heures ou 18 h 45 certains jours de la semaine. Nous sommes tous présents à la période des questions à 15 heures. Serait-il possible de devancer les votes, de la même manière qu'on en reporte, pour qu'ils aient lieu lorsque tous les députés sont à la Chambre, à 15 heures par exemple?

Pour ce qui est des heures de séance, on pourrait peut-être combiner deux jours de séance le mardi si la Chambre ne siège plus le vendredi.

Toutes ces questions sont sur le tapis depuis plus longtemps que bon nombre d'entre nous avons le privilège de siéger dans cette enceinte. J'ai eu des conversations informelles avec des collègues de toutes les allégeances. Les opinions convergent sur de nombreux points. Les changements doivent être réfléchis et apportés comme il se doit et nous devons en comprendre les conséquences. Je souhaite vivement que vous nous aidiez à apporter certaines des améliorations envisagées.

Pour ce qui est de la réforme de la période des questions, une période pourrait être exclusivement réservée au premier ministre. Vous savez sans doute qu'il s'agit d'un des engagements que nous avons pris. Je tiens néanmoins à ce qu'il soit clair, qu'il n'a jamais été envisagé que cette période remplace la participation hebdomadaire du premier ministre à la période des questions. Elle doit s'y ajouter et, un jour pendant la semaine, on pourrait tenir cette période de questions réservée au premier ministre. Certains se sont demandé si nous suggérions que le premier ministre ne vienne à la Chambre qu'une seule fois par semaine. Ce n'est pas le cas, mais un jour par semaine, le premier ministre pourrait peut-être participer de façon plus substantielle ou différente. La période allouée aux questions et réponses pourrait vraisemblablement être prolongée. Voilà quelques-unes des possibilités que nous envisageons.

Nous comptons également faire cesser le recours abusif aux projets de loi omnibus. Nous avons déjà quelques propositions à faire à cet égard. Cependant, pour ce qui est de la prorogation, puisqu'il s'agit d'une prérogative constitutionnelle de la Couronne, la situation peut être plus compliquée.

En ce qui concerne les comités parlementaires, l'objectif consiste à les rendre plus efficaces et à vous donner, monsieur le président, les ressources dont vous et vos collègues avez besoin. Il est également question de faire en sorte que les secrétaires parlementaires n'aient pas le droit de voter aux comités. Si je ne m'abuse, monsieur le président, le Comité a déjà abordé la question. Nous tenons également à ce que les comités disposent de ressources adéquates.

(1105)

[Français]

Certains changements requièrent des dispositions législatives comme, par exemple, le fait de proposer des amendements à la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada afin de faire du directeur parlementaire du budget un agent indépendant du Parlement, rendre public le Bureau de régie interne et refléter la nouvelle dynamique au Sénat.[Traduction]

Nous devons également créer, en collaboration avec le ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile, un comité, établi par la loi et composé de députés, qui serait chargé d'examiner les ministères et les agences qui ont des responsabilités en matière de sécurité nationale. Je tiens à ce qu'il soit clair que ce comité devrait se pencher non seulement sur les agences relevant de la compétence du ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile, mais également sur d'autres ministères et agences liés à la sécurité nationale, comme la Défense nationale, et vraisemblablement, le ministère de l'Immigration. Il s'agit d'une initiative horizontale à l'échelle pangouvernementale.

Un comité de parlementaires inclurait de toute évidence des députés de l'opposition. Comme la création d'un tel comité doit être prévue dans une mesure législative, nous sommes actuellement en train de rédiger un projet à cet égard. [Français]

Je vais également travailler avec mon collègue, le ministre Brison, pour mettre en place un modèle qui garantira la cohérence entre les budgets et les comptes publics, bien que je n'aie pas encore eu de détails au sujet de cette proposition.

L'objectif est d'améliorer la façon dont le gouvernement fait rapport des dépenses à la Chambre des communes, afin de permettre aux députés de mieux étudier les plans de dépenses du gouvernement. C'est l'un des rôles importants des députés et nous devons leur faciliter la tâche beaucoup plus que ce qui a été le cas auparavant. Je m'attends à ce que le ministre Brison collabore évidemment avec ce comité et avec le Comité permanent des comptes publics à cet égard.[Traduction]

Mon collègue Scott Brison et moi espérons organiser, dans les meilleurs délais, peut-être la semaine prochaine, une rencontre informelle à laquelle nous inviterons l'ensemble des parlementaires à nous proposer des idées pour assurer une plus grande cohérence entre les budgets des dépenses et les Comptes publics, afin de donner à nos collègues de l'information plus exacte et plus fiable en temps opportun.

Les derniers engagements qui figurent dans mon mandat portent sur ce que nous pourrions qualifier de changements en matière de politiques. Ils comprennent entre autres... [Français] le fait d'augmenter le nombre de votes libres afin que les députés puissent véritablement faire valoir l'opinion de leurs électeurs. Évidemment, cela touche davantage notre caucus que celui d'autres partis, mais je voulais vous en faire part.[Traduction]

Nous tenons à nous assurer que tous les agents du Parlement aient le financement dont ils ont besoin et qu'ils rendent des comptes uniquement au Parlement. Nous serions disposés, au moment opportun, à augmenter les ressources mises à la disposition de ces mandataires du Parlement s'ils ont relevé certaines lacunes dans leur capacité d'exiger que le gouvernement rende des comptes ou de servir les députés.

Nous collaborerons avec le Bureau de régie interne pour améliorer les changements que nous avons apportés lors de la dernière législature, notamment exiger que, chaque trimestre, tous les députés dévoilent leurs dépenses d'une manière uniforme et détaillée.

Enfin, monsieur le président, je collabore avec les leaders et les whips des partis d'opposition à la Chambre pour prendre d'autres mesures, que vous pourriez juger appropriées ou que d'autres intervenants pourraient suggérer, pour faire en sorte que le Parlement soit un milieu de travail où le harcèlement et la violence à caractère sexuel n'aient pas leur place.

(1110)

[Français]

En fait, toutes les propositions que je viens de formuler sont de nature non partisane. Je tiens à ce que ce comité utilise son expertise pour déterminer la meilleure façon de moderniser les règlements de la Chambre afin d'offrir plus de pouvoirs aux députés pour qu'ils puissent mieux accomplir leurs tâches parlementaires.[Traduction]

Monsieur le président, je suis enthousiaste à la perspective de travailler avec vous. J'espère que ce n'est que le début d'une conversation à laquelle nous pouvons tous prendre part. De toute évidence, vous établirez le programme et les priorités du Comité, mais je vous inviterais, au début de cette nouvelle législature, à envisager certaines modifications que vous estimez souhaitables, notamment au Règlement, pour que nous puissions les mettre en oeuvre dans les meilleurs délais, surtout s'il s'agit d'éléments à l'égard desquels les opinions convergent. Nous ne voudrions pas avoir à faire à l'automne prochain ce que nous pouvons faire ce printemps. [Français]Ce serait le cas faute de temps ou de coordination.[Traduction]

Il va sans dire que je suis disposé à aider autant que je le peux.

Merci, monsieur le président. [Français]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur LeBlanc.[Traduction]

Comme nous en avons convenu lors de la dernière séance, le premier tour sera de sept minutes et sera réservé aux libéraux.

Je ne sais pas qui a la parole.

Madame Vandenbeld, vous avez la parole.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais partager mon temps de parole avec Mme Petitpas Taylor.

Monsieur le ministre, je vous remercie d'avoir comparu devant le Comité et d'avoir été très franc à l'égard de certains des éléments de votre mandat. Je suis ravie de constater que, dans votre lettre de mandat, le premier ministre vous a notamment confié la responsabilité de faire du Parlement un milieu plus favorable à la conciliation travail-famille. Pourriez-vous nous en dire davantage sur ce que vous envisagez, entre autres en ce qui concerne la séance du vendredi? De toute évidence, comme je représente une circonscription de la région d'Ottawa, je ne suis pas très affectée par cette situation, mais j'ai entendu parler de cette réalité par nombre de mes collègues qui ont de jeunes enfants et qui doivent d'abord prendre l'avion jusqu'à une grande ville, puis jusqu'à une région rurale, ce qui prolonge le trajet de trois ou quatre heures. À titre de députée de la région de la capitale nationale, je ne sais vraiment pas comment mes collègues qui ont de jeunes enfants, des parents vieillissants ou d'autres obligations, arrivent à composer avec une telle situation.

Je vous serais extrêmement reconnaissante de bien vouloir nous donner plus de détails sur ce que le Comité pourrait faire pour rendre le Parlement non seulement plus sensible aux besoins de la famille, mais également plus inclusif. Lors de la dernière législature, le caucus multipartite des femmes a abordé la question et a préparé un rapport provisoire qui recommandait notamment le recours à la technologie. Lorsque le Parlement canadien a été établi il y a une centaine d'années ou plus, il n'était pas possible de participer aux débats à moins d'être présent dans cette enceinte. De nos jours, de nombreux moyens de communication à distance permettent entre autres de recevoir des témoignages de partout au Canada. La communication à distance donnerait aux députés la possibilité de passer plus de temps avec leur famille et avec les gens de leur circonscription tout en leur permettant de participer au dialogue et aux débats dans cette enceinte.

J'ai entendu des députés qui ont de jeunes enfants mentionner qu'il est difficile de se garer sur la Colline du Parlement. Certains de nos collègues ont des problèmes de mobilité. Comment peut-on veiller à ce que le Parlement soit un milieu de travail qui permet aux députés de faire le travail pour lequel ils ont été élus et que tous soient également en mesure de s'acquitter de cette tâche, entre autres à une époque où cette institution compte plus de femmes que jamais — 26 % —, et que bien des députés sont jeunes et ont probablement davantage d'obligations familiales?

Merci.

Le président:

Mme Petitpas Taylor, vous avez la parole.

Mme Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur le ministre, je vous remercie de vous être joint à nous ce matin.

À titre de toute nouvelle députée, j'ai été un peu surprise par le ton utilisé à la Chambre. Or, nombre de mes collègues d'expérience m'ont dit que le ton actuel est probablement meilleur qu'à l'habitude.

Que pouvons-nous faire pour améliorer le décorum à la Chambre et pour rendre les échanges plus respectueux et plus productifs?

L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Merci, monsieur le président. Par votre intermédiaire, je remercie également Anita et Ginette.

Merci de vos questions. Je vais répondre en premier à la dernière, puis j’essayerai de conclure mon intervention en répondant à la question d’Anita.

Monsieur le président, le ton... Je vois David rire, et il a bien raison.

Pour ceux d’entre nous qui n’étaient pas là avant ou qui n’étaient pas députés dans d’autres législatures, la mauvaise nouvelle, Ginette, c’est que le ton est en fait extrêmement meilleur que dans les précédentes législatures. Pour être honnête, ce n’est pas un jugement partisan; cela inclut les autres précédents gouvernements. J’espère que nous réussirons à faire durer ce ton. J’ai discuté avec les autres leaders à la Chambre. C’est un souhait commun, parce que les Canadiens s’attendent à ce que leurs parlementaires collaborent respectueusement les uns avec les autres et qu’il y ait évidemment des divergences d’opinions et de vigoureux débats.

J’ai des amis de tous les côtés de la Chambre des communes et des gens que j’apprécie dans chaque parti politique. Nous devrions nous concentrer sur cet aspect et les points communs au lieu d’exacerber nos différences. Nous pouvons, par exemple, commencer par ne pas chahuter durant la période des questions. Pour ce qui est de mes collègues du Cabinet, il va de soi qu’il faut répondre aux questions. Au fil des ans, c’est devenu une pratique rare, à savoir que les ministres prennent la parole pour répondre aux questions ou même dire: « C’est une question difficile; je ne suis pas certain qu’il existe une réponse claire à la question, mais je vais faire de mon mieux pour y répondre. » Nous essayons de le faire. Ce ne sera pas parfait. Il est difficile de se défaire des vieilles habitudes, mais je crois que nous devons tous redoubler d’efforts en ce sens.

Les nouveaux députés comme vous, Ginette, et nos collègues de tous les partis donnent un meilleur exemple que certains vieux routiers, comme vous, monsieur le président, qui ont de la difficulté à se défaire de leurs vieilles habitudes.

Anita, en ce qui a trait à votre question, vous avez raison; il faut commencer par dire que la question n’est pas d’avoir congé le vendredi. Il n’y a rien de plus irritant que d’entendre des gens, y compris des membres de notre famille et des amis, dire que nous avons une semaine de congé lorsque nous avons une semaine de relâche. Eh bien, la vérité est en fait tout autre. J’ai une foule d’événements, d’activités ou de réunions prévus dans une circonscription située dans un autre fuseau horaire. Certains députés représentent des circonscriptions situées à trois fuseaux horaires d’ici. Nous travaillons dans les circonscriptions. Les électeurs que nous représentons s’attendent à ce que nous soyons présents dans nos circonscriptions. Bon nombre de députés doivent se déplacer beaucoup plus que Ginette ou moi qui devons nous rendre dans le Canada atlantique.

Lorsque mon père a été élu député il y a 40 ans, notre famille a déménagé à Ottawa. J’ai fait mes études secondaires ici. Nous avons en quelque sorte fait l’inverse de ce que je fais maintenant, à savoir que je retourne les fins de semaine chez moi au Nouveau-Brunswick. Nous habitions à Ottawa durant l’année scolaire, puis nous retournions au Nouveau-Brunswick durant l’été. Dans un contexte parlementaire, ce serait politiquement beaucoup moins acceptable maintenant que ce l’était il y a une ou deux générations.

En ce sens, je crois que nous pouvons regarder du côté des heures de séance. À mon avis, nous pouvons convenir que nous sommes l’un des seuls parlements au pays à siéger systématiquement cinq jours par semaine. Les députés fédéraux doivent se déplacer plus que leurs homologues provinciaux pour participer aux séances. Je crois que nous pouvons avoir recours à la technologie pour économiser temps et argent lorsque nous sommes dans nos circonscriptions.

Pour ce qui est de la question des séances du vendredi, le problème c’est que si nous réduisons, en théorie, de 20 % nos jours de séance... Le problème, ce ne sont pas les heures. En tant que gouvernement, nous devons avoir une routine pour faire adopter les projets de loi du gouvernement ou du moins les présenter aux fins d’étude. Il faudrait donc probablement répartir ces heures en prolongeant les autres jours de séance.

Chers collègues, je répète que vous devez comprendre que, si nous concluons que les quatre heures et demie de séance — les séances sont plus courtes le vendredi — doivent être réparties sur les autres jours, nous sommes tout à fait ouverts à cette idée. Si vous ne voulez pas éliminer les déclarations de députés et que vous voulez les répartir sur d’autres jours, nous sommes tout à fait ouverts à cette idée. Si les députés veulent redistribuer de manière sensée ces questions, nous y sommes ouverts. Nous pouvons en discuter. Il y a évidemment des députés de tous les partis — je n’en nommerai pas — qui affirment que ce serait une excellente idée. Nous devons donc résister à la tentation de dire: « Je n’arrive pas à croire qu’ils veulent avoir une journée de congé. » Nous devons tous résister à la tentation de nous abaisser à faire de tels commentaires; il faut avoir une conversation franche sur ce que nous pourrions faire pour moderniser la Chambre.

C’était un exemple parmi tant d’autres. La whip du NPD nous a parlé de trouver un local pour s’occuper des enfants, selon ce que j’en ai compris, mais pas nécessairement un service de garde supervisée. C’est une autre question. Il y en a déjà un. Ce n’est peut-être pas parfait, mais nous pouvons l’améliorer. La question est d’avoir un local où aller avec un jeune enfant durant un bref moment.

Nous sommes ouverts à toutes ses idées. Certaines questions relèveront du Bureau de régie interne; d’autres, de votre comité.

Merci, monsieur le président.

(1115)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur LeBlanc.

Monsieur Richards, vous avez la parole.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci beaucoup.

Bienvenue, monsieur le ministre.

J’ai quelques questions aujourd’hui. J’ai écouté avec intérêt certains éléments dont vous avez discuté, du moins, en principe pour l’instant. L’idée de modifier les heures des votes a certainement piqué mon intérêt. C’est un aspect dont bon nombre de députés parlent depuis longtemps, et ce serait logique. Il semble qu’il y a certainement des éléments sur lesquels nous pouvons nous entendre avec vous.

Lorsque vous parlez de concepts semblables, je considère évidemment que ce sont souvent les détails qui importent. Ce que nous avons vu pour l’instant de la part du gouvernement — je n’aime pas le dire, mais c’est la vérité —, c’est que les paroles et les gestes ne concordent pas. Nous avons beaucoup entendu parler d’ouverture et de transparence, mais nous ne voyons aucune mesure en ce sens.

Lors des premiers jours du gouvernement dirigé par l’ancien premier ministre Harper, la Loi sur la responsabilité a été présentée. Cela favorisait la reddition de comptes. Nous avons vu le présent gouvernement éliminer la reddition de comptes concernant les Premières Nations qui permettait aux membres des Premières Nations de demander des comptes à leurs dirigeants. Voilà des exemples de ce dont nous sommes témoins.

Nous pouvons parler du Sénat. Vous avez promis du changement. Eh bien, ce que vous avez créé, c’est un processus secret qui crée des recommandations secrètes que le premier ministre aura le choix d’accepter ou non, et le tout sera fait dans le secret.

Les paroles que nous entendons sont différentes des gestes que nous voyons. Voici ce que j’aimerais savoir. Vous avez parlé de certains concepts intéressants, mais j’aimerais avoir des détails. Donnez-nous des détails sur ce que vous proposez ou la forme que prendront ces changements.

Donnez-nous une idée du processus que vous suivrez pour apporter de tels changements. Donnez-nous une idée du calendrier en ce sens. Comment les parlementaires participeront-ils à ce processus? Donnez-nous une idée de certains de ces processus et des détails, parce que c’est ce qui est important.

(1120)

L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Par votre intermédiaire, j’aimerais dire au député qu’il ne sera pas surpris d’entendre que je ne partage pas entièrement sa description des débuts du présent gouvernement. Nous pourrions en discuter. Je pourrais traiter de chaque point, et ce serait probablement divertissant pour vous, moi et les autres.

J’aimerais me concentrer sur la dernière partie de votre question. Vous voulez des détails. Je propose d’éliminer les séances du vendredi et de répartir les heures du vendredi sur les autres jours de séance. Nous pourrions décider des jours les plus propices pour ce faire. Si vous et vos collègues êtes prêts à poser vos questions, à déplacer les déclarations de députés et à les répartir sur les autres jours de séance, nous sommes ouverts à cette idée.

Je propose que le mardi soit considéré comme deux jours de séance, parce que cette journée pourrait être très longue pour tenir compte des gens qui doivent se déplacer le lundi. Nous pourrions avoir deux jours de séance le mardi. Le greffier m’a dit que certains autres parlements l’ont déjà fait et qu’ils considéraient cela comme deux jours de séance, parce que le Règlement, comme vous le savez, prévoit souvent le nombre de jours de séance selon le cas pour des projets de loi du gouvernement. Il faudrait examiner les conséquences de l’élimination d’une journée de séance sur la journée de l’opposition. Nous sommes ouverts à de tels changements.

Je suis d’accord avec vous, Blake. Prenons comme exemple le report systématique des votes à 15 heures le lendemain ou à la fin de la période des questions. Les votes sur les initiatives parlementaires qui ont lieu le mercredi soir à la fin de la période réservée aux initiatives ministérielles pourraient avoir lieu à 15 heures le mercredi. Nous pourrions évidemment modifier en conséquence l’horaire du comité.

Nous sommes tout à fait ouverts à toutes ses idées. Voilà quelques suggestions concrètes, mais je tenais honnêtement à témoigner devant le comité, parce que vous avez demandé la manière dont tous les parlementaires participeraient au processus. Nous le ferons en faisant exactement ce que je fais ce matin, à savoir témoigner devant le comité et vous demander votre avis. Ces changements relèvent de votre comité. Moi, mes collègues du Cabinet et Kevin seront ravis de recevoir vos conseils, votre rapport et vos projets de libellé concernant ces changements.

Pour ce qui est des autres idées, la liste n’est aucunement exhaustive. Si vous avez d’autres idées, nous serons évidemment ravis de les entendre.

M. Blake Richards:

D’accord. Je suis content d’avoir un peu plus de détails à ce sujet. Nous espérons en avoir d’autres, avec un peu de chance, dans les jours à venir.

Pendant qu’il est question de certaines promesses qui ne sont peut-être pas entièrement respectées pour l’instant, je crois qu’une partie de votre mandat est de vous assurer que les secrétaires parlementaires ne font plus partie des comités. Je présume que vous pourriez dire à certains égards que vous le faites. Nous n’avons pour l’instant qu’un seul comité qui siège, et M. Lamoureux est assis aujourd’hui avec vous.

Lors des précédentes séances, il était bel et bien présent, dirigeait les députés ministériels et était le principal participant du côté du gouvernement. On pourrait faire valoir que, même s’il n’a pas le droit de vote, il est encore un membre très actif du comité, même s’il n’en est pas officiellement membre. À vrai dire, même lorsque nous discutions des détails du fonctionnement de nos motions de régie interne, il était très actif à cet égard et dans les négociations connexes.

Si les secrétaires parlementaires participent à tous les aspects du comité — il est évidemment ici avec vous —, comment cela fonctionnera-t-il? Expliquez-le-nous. Est-ce que ce sera ainsi dans tous les comités? Est-ce que c’est ce qui se produira? Les secrétaires parlementaires continueront-ils d’être très actifs et de diriger exactement ce qui se passe du côté du gouvernement? Est-ce l’intention du gouvernement d’agir ainsi? Est-ce ce à quoi nous devrions nous attendre?

L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Vous ne serez évidemment pas surpris d’apprendre que je ne suis pas d’accord avec ce qu’a dit Blake, à savoir que nous nous étions engagés pendant la campagne à ce que les secrétaires parlementaires ne siègent pas aux comités. À des fins de précision, comme vous l’avez mentionné à la fin de vos propos, l’engagement était qu’ils n’aient pas le droit de vote aux comités.

Comme vous n’êtes pas sans le savoir, je crois que c’est l’article 114 du Règlement...

M. Blake Richards:

Je m’excuse de vous interrompre.

Dans un tel cas, j’imagine que j’aimerais que vous m’expliquiez ce qui a changé. Même si les secrétaires parlementaires n’ont pas le droit de vote, cela ne signifie pas qu’ils ne peuvent pas influer sur la manière dont les autres votent. Cela ne signifie pas qu’ils n’auront pas leur mot à dire sur ce qui se passe au comité. Bref, qu’est-ce qui a réellement changé, mis à part dans un monde théorique? Pourquoi dites-vous que c’est un changement?

(1125)

L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Je siégeais au comité pendant que votre collègue Tom Lukiwski se comportait en tout point comme son chef d’orchestre. Je l’ai vu; il était assis de votre côté de la table.

M. Lamoureux est un député expérimenté et peut, au même titre que vous tous, assister aux séances de comité à son gré. C’est une tradition de longue date dans le Règlement...

M. Blake Richards:

Bref, j’en comprends que vous dites qu’il n’y a aucun changement. Est-ce bien ce que vous dites? Il n’y a aucun changement.

L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Non.

Le président:

Le temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Christopherson, vous avez la parole.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur le ministre. Mes deux premières réactions après avoir écouté votre déclaration étaient premièrement que vous étiez de bonne foi. Je crois que vous êtes sincère dans ce que vous proposez. C’est mon impression. Cependant, compte tenu de l’expérience au comité, ce sont certainement les détails qui gâchent tout. Nous avons déjà eu une certaine difficulté en ce qui concerne les mots « transparence » et « ouverture » et les décisions que nous prenons ici. Je ne veux pas rouvrir le dossier. Je suis persuadé que vous en avez été informé. Cela ne vaut pas la peine d’y revenir, mais cela témoigne, selon moi, de paroles qui vont dans un sens et de gestes qui vont dans l’autre. J’espère qu’à un certain moment les paroles et les gestes iront dans le même sens.

Je continuerai d’être prudent, mais optimiste pour la suite des choses.

J’aimerais utiliser mon temps de parole — je suis député depuis assez longtemps pour savoir que, lorsque je vous laisserai la parole, rien ne garantit que je l’aurai de nouveau...

L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Blake s'en est pourtant bien tiré.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, et c'est pourquoi le président fera en sorte que cela ne se reproduise pas. Je tiens à faire mes observations, et vous pourrez ensuite répondre comme bon vous semble, monsieur le ministre.

Premièrement, en ce qui concerne les secrétaires parlementaires, on dirais le jeu Où est Charlie? Je ne sais jamais où le secrétaire parlementaire se pointera. Il a commencé là, puis il s'est rendu là et maintenant, il se trouve là-bas. Décidément, la question qui se pose est la suivante: pourquoi le secrétaire parlementaire doit-il siéger au comité si le but est de rendre les comités plus indépendants?

Je dis cela par expérience et c'est, en partie, un aveu que je vous fais. Lorsque j'étais adjoint parlementaire du ministre des Finances il y a longtemps à Queen's Park, je siégeais au Comité des finances. Ne vous y trompez pas, j'étais là pour défendre la position du gouvernement. J'étais là pour m'assurer que la volonté de la majorité ministérielle allait l'emporter. Nous ne prétendions même pas qu'il existait une indépendance quelconque. C'était eux contre nous.

Voilà le contexte dans lequel nous avons oeuvré jusqu'à présent. Votre gouvernement, monsieur le ministre, est venu dire qu'il souhaite faire les choses autrement. Les paroles sont là, mais pas les gestes. Si vous voulez vraiment envoyer un message clair... Oublions la question technique de savoir si le secrétaire parlementaire peut voter ou non. Il s'agit plutôt de savoir, comme Blake l'a dit, si les secrétaires parlementaires siègent ici pour diriger l'ensemble de l'équipe, comme un général sur un champ de bataille, et pour dire quelle orientation adopter. Ils font un signe de tête, et c'est vers là que le vote s'oriente. Ils influent sur la majorité des voix, et ils contrôlent le comité 10 fois sur 10.

Si vous souhaitez réellement un changement, je vous recommande — et ce, en toute sincérité puisque vos efforts me paraissent sincères —, d'exclure le secrétaire parlementaire. Il y a quand même les BlackBerry, le personnel et toutes sortes de moyens. Si vous tenez à ce que les choses soient différentes, à ce que les comités fonctionnent de façon un peu plus autonome et à ce qu'ils soient moins partisans, alors de grâce, n'autorisez pas la présence de la personne qui relie directement le travail du comité au pouvoir exécutif du Cabinet du premier ministre et qui assume le contrôle de la majorité. Je m'en remets à vous.

Deuxièmement, le directeur parlementaire du budget... je trouve cela excellent. Toutefois, j'aimerais bien savoir dans quel délai on entend faire de lui un mandataire du Parlement, étant donné que les libéraux se sont finalement entendus sur la nécessité de prendre une telle mesure. Cela vaut aussi pour le Bureau de régie interne. Je sais que les leaders parlementaires sont là pour s'en occuper, mais vous tenez déjà des rencontres, et je n'ai rien entendu sur les délais. Je serais curieux d'en savoir plus.

Pour ce qui est du processus lié au budget des dépenses au sein du Comité des comptes publics, vous savez sans doute que j'y siège depuis mon arrivée à la Chambre, en 2004. J'en suis le doyen. Ce que je recommande, c'est d'examiner les questions de fond en comble et de revenir à l'essentiel, de sorte que tout nouveau député puisse comprendre exactement comment le processus fonctionne, pour ensuite changer les choses dans cet esprit. À l'heure actuelle, le fait est que très peu de parlementaires comprennent vraiment en détail le processus que nous suivons pour les prévisions budgétaires et les comptes publics. Je crois que vous avez fait ressortir un point important, mais je vous en prie, ne prenez pas de demi-mesures; allez jusqu'au bout des choses. Modernisons le processus pour que la population puisse également s'y retrouver.

Ensuite, l'idée d'un milieu favorable à la conciliation travail-vie familiale me paraît très bien. Notre seule réserve, c'est que les libéraux, sous l'ancien premier ministre McGuinty, avaient pris une telle mesure en 2008, en Ontario. Ils avaient entre autres avancé la période des questions pour qu'elle ait lieu le matin. Presque tout le monde — même, me dit-on, la tribune de la presse — a reconnu que cette mesure a été adoptée pour que le gouvernement ait l'occasion d'atténuer tout message négatif qui ressort de la période des questions et d'en faire un message positif avant la rotation de 18 heures.

En ce qui concerne le Règlement, nous y avons consacré beaucoup de temps au cours des dernières législatures. Il nous a fallu je ne sais combien de réunions pour produire un rapport sur des mesures que nous avons qualifiées de « fruits faciles à cueillir ». Nous nous sommes tous mis d'accord, et il s'agissait de choses simples. Mais c'est du passé. Nous devons maintenant nous attaquer à des questions difficiles. Vous voulez apporter des changements majeurs, et j'aimerais bien savoir si le tout ne se fera qu'à condition d'avoir la recommandation unanime de notre Comité. Procéderez-vous avec un seul parti d'opposition, ou le gouvernement entend-il imposer sa volonté et faire cavalier seul?

Relativement aux séances à huis clos, j'ai présenté une proposition à ce sujet devant le Comité. Je suis sûr que vous êtes au moins au courant. Avant que je me lance dans ce débat, vous pourriez peut-être nous dire ce que vous en pensez et si vous êtes disposé, en tant que leader du gouvernement à la Chambre, à adopter certaines règles qui précisent quand nous pouvons siéger à huis clos et ce que nous pouvons y faire.

Enfin, pour ce qui est de la prorogation, nous avons abattu de la besogne dans ce dossier au cours de la dernière ou de l'avant-dernière législature, lorsque nous étions minoritaires. Nous avons fait beaucoup de travail. C'était Joe Preston qui assumait la présidence. Je vous invite donc à commencer par revoir ce travail, parce qu'on y traite de nombreuses questions constitutionnelles. Nous avons entendu les témoignages de toutes sortes d'experts. C'était une grande leçon de civisme. Nous ne sommes pas parvenus à une conclusion, mais nous avons beaucoup appris. Je vous demande simplement de tenir compte de ce travail.

Voilà, monsieur le président. Je vous remercie.

(1130)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur le leader à la Chambre, vous avez une minute et demie.

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai laissé seulement une minute et demie?

L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Vous avez laissé une minute et demie, mais vous avez soulevé sept questions. Vous êtes un parlementaire d'expérience, David, alors vous connaissez la suite: je vais choisir les questions faciles, puis le président me coupera la parole.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, en effet, mais il y a un deuxième tour, n'oubliez pas.

L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Vous avez pu faire consigner vos observations au compte rendu.

Oui, je comprends ce que vous avez dit au début de votre intervention. Je partage votre point de vue. J'ai bon espoir que nous pourrons faire des progrès graduels. Ce ne sera pas parfait, et il y aura des moments de désaccord, mais je crois que nous devons agir rapidement chaque fois que nous pouvons en arriver à un consensus général sur le Règlement, la législation et la façon de concrétiser certaines de ces mesures, auxquelles nous souscrivons tous, du moins dans nos entretiens officieux.

En ce qui concerne le processus des comptes publics, vous avez tout à fait raison; au fil des gouvernements et des législatures — et ce n'est pas un jugement partisan —, ce processus a changé au point de devenir déconnecté et inintelligible. Je vais proposer à mon collègue Scott Brison de s'entretenir avec vous. Votre expérience au sein du Comité sera utile. Il demandera aux membres du Comité des comptes publics de l'aider à façonner le tout. Lui et moi essaierons sans tarder de trouver un moyen de mieux harmoniser le processus.

Mais vous avez raison; nous traiterons les questions avec attention et sérieux, et nous ne nous contenterons pas d'un simple rafistolage. Sinon, nous n'atteindrons pas l'objectif.

Ai-je épuisé tout mon temps, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Oui.

L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

D'accord. J'aborderai donc les cinq autres questions au prochain tour.

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Monsieur le ministre, merci.

Monsieur le président, je vais partager mon temps de parole avec M. Chan.

Je tiens à dire très rapidement que je faisais partie du personnel au cours des 40e et 41e législatures, et j'ai vu beaucoup de dysfonctionnements. En tant qu'ancien membre du personnel, je crois avoir une perspective différente, et j'ai hâte de relever ces défis.

J'ai gardé le bureau de mon ancien patron, et j'ai seulement changé de table, ce que j'ai trouvé bien amusant. En tout cas, à titre de député, j'observe déjà un véritable changement.

Être élu député a beaucoup réduit le temps que j'ai à consacrer à ma fille de deux ans. C'est là le grand problème pour moi. Je viens à Ottawa et je travaille 12 heures par jour. Ensuite, je retourne dans ma circonscription et je travaille 12 heures ou plus par jour là-bas aussi, sauf que je dois également faire un trajet de quelques centaines de kilomètres par voiture pour parcourir ma circonscription de 20 000 kilomètres. Mon épouse et ma fille m'accompagnent souvent, ce qui est merveilleux. Je suis très chanceux. La plupart des gens n'ont pas cette option.

Comme on s'attend à ce que je sois partout à la fois dans 43 municipalités, avez-vous des suggestions à faire sur la façon d'améliorer la conciliation travail-vie familiale dans le contexte des circonscriptions? Nous parlons toujours de ce qui se passe ici, sur la Colline, mais nous évoquons rarement l'autre partie de notre travail. Merci.

L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Merci, David.

Pour être honnête, je n'y ai pas réfléchi. Ma circonscription n'est peut-être pas aussi vaste que la vôtre, mais les enjeux sont les mêmes pour ce qui est des communautés francophones, anglophones et autochtones. Lorsque je suis devenu député de la circonscription, il y avait deux feux de circulation. Aujourd'hui, je crois qu'il y en a huit; la situation économique s'est donc nettement améliorée durant mon mandat. Mais c'est comme votre région. Je vous envie. Au moins, dans votre circonscription, il y a quelques grands centres urbains, contrairement à la zone rurale du Nouveau-Brunswick.

C'est un défi. Pour ma part, voici que j'ai décidé de faire, et d'autres collègues ont plus d'expérience que moi dans ce domaine: si je dois me rendre dans le nord de ma circonscription et qu'il y a une série de groupes communautaires locaux, de dirigeants municipaux ou d'autres personnes qui ont communiqué avec mon bureau pour organiser des réunions, j'essaie de les regrouper. Si je dois faire x heures de route, je loue un bureau municipal dans une petite ville et je m'en sers comme bureau satellite pour inviter les gens de la région à venir me rencontrer. Nous essayons d'y passer la moitié de la journée, ou peu importe le temps autorisé, et je peux ainsi tenir un certain nombre de réunions sans devoir me rendre sur place plusieurs fois.

Les gens ici présents auraient peut-être des suggestions à faire sur la façon dont le Bureau de régie interne pourrait s'y prendre, soit par des moyens technologiques — et je sais que certains collègues ont plus d'expérience que moi — ou grâce à une répartition différente des ressources... Aux yeux de certains députés qui représentent de très vastes circonscriptions septentrionales et éloignées, le système de points risque, pour des raisons faciles à comprendre, de ne pas répondre à leurs besoins de transport particuliers. Selon moi, le Bureau de régie interne devrait être bien ouvert aux suggestions sur les façons dont nous pourrions non pas nécessairement modifier les budgets, mais adapter les règles afin de mieux servir les intérêts de nos collègues ayant des besoins uniques dans leurs circonscriptions.

J'ignore si cela répond un peu à votre question, David.

(1135)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je trouve cela utile. C'est, en grande partie, ce que nous faisons. En raison de la vaste étendue de ma circonscription, le déplacement vers mon deuxième bureau compte pour un point. Si je me rends à mon bureau chaque semaine et que je viens sur la Colline toutes les deux semaines, j'épuise déjà presque tous les points. Si mon personnel doit se rendre à une réunion du conseil municipal, cela signifie souvent qu'il faut faire un trajet de plus de 100 kilomètres.

L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

En effet.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous essayons de regrouper les réunions, mais ce n'est pas toujours réaliste. Il faut aussi tenir compte des horaires des autres participants.

L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Bien sûr, et si vous voulez amener votre famille à Ottawa, vous réduirez rapidement le nombre de points disponibles pour le travail.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis très chanceux de pouvoir faire le trajet en voiture, mais ce n'est pas le cas pour la plupart des gens. Merci.

L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie le leader parlementaire de sa présence.

Tout d'abord, j'aimerais revenir sur certaines des observations formulées par mes collègues d'en face. Je ne suis pas tout à fait convaincu de ce qui a été dit.

Permettez-moi de commencer par la question des secrétaires parlementaires et peut-être la façon dont nous nous comportons ici. Comme mon collègue M. Christopherson l'a déjà fait remarquer, nous sommes nombreux à être des parlementaires relativement nouveaux. Bien entendu, nous voulons faire appel à un parlementaire chevronné, peu importe son rôle au sein du Comité. Je crois que les secrétaires parlementaires joueront un rôle beaucoup plus important auprès d'autres comités, particulièrement au sein des comités permanents où le secrétaire parlementaire met à profit son expertise de ministre parce qu'à bien des égards, il sera non seulement la personne la mieux informée, mais aussi celle qui, au bout du compte, est chargée de faciliter notre travail au comité. J'ajouterai simplement que j'accueille avec satisfaction les conseils et l'encadrement que M. Lamoureux me fournit sans cesse en ma nouvelle qualité de leader adjoint du gouvernement.

En tout respect, je ne vois pas comment mon collègue exerce une influence. Il nous aide tout simplement à mieux comprendre comment les règles fonctionnent réellement. Vous avez vu les résultats à la dernière séance du Comité. Nous sommes parvenus à un consensus sur une question particulière, mais nous avons divisé les votes sur un autre sujet. Reste à voir comment nous mettrons cela en pratique. J'implore simplement mes collègues d'en face de tenter l'expérience.

J'aimerais aborder une question précise avec le leader parlementaire, au lieu de m'en tenir à un long discours. Il s'agit de la question du décorum. Je voudrais revenir sur certains usages de la Chambre. Par exemple, Jason Kenney a proposé l'idée d'interdire peut-être les applaudissements à la Chambre, et je veux savoir si le leader parlementaire estime qu'une telle mesure favoriserait un esprit collégial à la Chambre. Quelle serait la façon appropriée de nous comporter pour mieux suivre le modèle des Parlements, celui du Royaume-Uni, en ce qui a trait au décorum?

L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Arnold, je partage votre opinion sur le rôle du secrétaire parlementaire. Il va sans dire que je profite énormément des conseils de M.  Lamoureux et de son amitié. À notre avis, il a un accès très direct à certains des hauts fonctionnaires du Bureau du Conseil privé, notamment à mon sous-ministre, qui m'appuient dans mes fonctions de leader du gouvernement à la Chambre. Cela peut s'avérer utile pour les membres du comité lorsqu'ils doivent examiner toute une série de questions; ainsi, Kevin peut accéder rapidement et efficacement aux conseils de certains hauts fonctionnaires.

Arnold, pour ce qui est des applaudissements, vous savez quoi? Vous avez raison: ils font perdre du temps. Le Président a un peu tardé, je suppose, à lancer la période des questions. Lorsque nous en sommes venus à bout, il était déjà 15 h 30. Si cela se reproduit souvent, les collègues rateront d'autres réunions, les comités seront retardés et les témoins devront attendre. Si la plupart des membres du Comité s'entendent pour dire que ce genre de manifestation... J'ignore si les téléspectateurs aiment cela. Quand on est à la Chambre, la validité d'une réponse ou d'un argument ne devrait pas nécessairement être mesurée par le volume des applaudissements. Cela fait perdre du temps. Les collègues se font interrompre durant les questions ou les réponses parce que le Président déduit la durée des applaudissements de leur temps de parole. C'est peut-être une suggestion très utile pour améliorer le décorum.

(1140)

Le président:

Votre temps est écoulé, monsieur le leader parlementaire.

Nous passons maintenant au deuxième tour, qui comprend des interventions de cinq minutes.

Nous allons commencer par M. Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je ferai peut-être le contraire de ce que M. Christopherson a fait. Je vais vous poser des questions individuelles et attendre vos réponses pour voir où cela nous mène.

J'aimerais cependant dire que je suis bien d'accord avec la nature contraignante de votre lettre de mandat. Je la lis à mes enfants tous les soirs avant le coucher — cela les endort. J'espère que la version illustrée sera bientôt publiée.

Je tenais à vous poser une question simple pour commencer. Pour ce qui concerne les changements qui supposent des modifications du Règlement, avez-vous l'intention que le Comité les fasse avant de présenter un rapport à la Chambre ou avez-vous un autre mécanisme en tête?

L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je suis ravi d'entendre que vos enfants aiment la lettre de mandat autant que moi. Nous espérons en faire une version YouTube en anglais et en français.

M. Scott Reid:

En fait, je la leur ai lu en style rappeur.

L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Compte tenu de l'horaire du premier ministre, nous essayons de trouver un studio pour le faire ensemble. C'est réconfortant de savoir que les enfants s'endorment en sachant que le Canada est un endroit meilleur. Je vous en remercie.

Encore une fois, Scott, je préférerais que, si le Comité arrive à dégager un consensus ou déterminer un processus, il recommande rapidement des changements et en fasse état dans un rapport. Nous serions tout à fait ouverts à l'idée d'un autre mécanisme. Si vous préférez faire d'autres suggestions dans un type de rapport plus informel, alors j'en ferais une motion du gouvernement, numéro je ne sais trop quoi, et nous en débattrions. J'y serais aussi favorable.

C'est vraiment la question de savoir ce qui, selon nous, serait la façon la plus judicieuse d'utiliser le temps du Parlement et de votre comité. Si vous avez le temps de rédiger un rapport qui permettrait d'atteindre des objectifs communs, nous y serions très favorables. Si vous avez une meilleure suggestion à formuler, nous sommes aussi prêts à vous écouter. Vous avez beaucoup d'expérience en la matière, Scott, plus que moi. Le processus que vous et vos collègues ici présents trouveriez utile serait probablement celui par lequel j'aimerais commencer.

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai deux suggestions à faire, dans ce cas.

La première est que je pense qu'il y aurait lieu pour nous de nous pencher sur les points sur lesquels nous nous entendons le plus et les présenter. Nul n'est besoin d'un rapport unique. Il serait utile d'aborder les sujets sur lesquels nous pouvons tous nous entendre rapidement, surtout que maintenant, nous avons un nombre relativement limité de points à l'ordre du jour. Le nombre s'accroîtra au fil du temps.

La deuxième suggestion est que... Savez-vous, j'ai oublié, honnêtement. J'ai commencé à repenser à votre lettre de mandat et cela m'est sorti...

L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Je sais que la lecture vous met en transe, monsieur le président. Je comprends cela, mais...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc: Scott, vous présentez un argument très valide. Si nous arrivons à dégager rapidement ce consensus — je pense que c'est ce que j'ai dit dans mes remarques liminaires avec moins d'éloquence que vous venez de le faire — sur cinq points dont nous pourrions rapidement faire des modifications à apporter au Règlement, je vous recommanderais vivement d'envisager de le faire rapidement et avant toute autre chose. Si d'autres points requièrent une étude plus approfondie, vous avez besoin d'entendre des témoignages, ou il vous est impossible de dégager un consensus ou de tirer une conclusion, ils pourraient être reportés à un moment où le Comité juge qu'il veut les revisiter.

Je crois que ce que j'essayais de dire est que nous aurions intérêt à apporter certaines de ces améliorations dans les plus brefs délais pour en profiter plus longtemps dans la présente législature.

Je ne veux pas être cynique, et nul ne croirait que je puisse être cynique sur ces points. Trève de plaisanterie, comme David l'a mentionné dans ses commentaires, et peut-être Ginette et d'autres personnes, je crois qu'il y a une bonne volonté qui, je l'espère, durera pendant toute la législature.

Mais au fur et à mesure que le Comité reçoit des projets de loi importants, il devra traiter des questions de politiques très complexes, et si nous pouvons, à court terme, en arriver à apporter certaines modifications, profitons de la bonne volonté dont, selon moi, nous sommes tous conscients. Elle n'est pas parfaite et elle pourrait varier, mais profitons de la bonne volonté dont nous bénéficions actuellement pour changer certaines choses.

M. Scott Reid:

Je me souviens de mon deuxième point: tout simplement qu'il y a lieu de présenter certains points comme des modifications temporaires du Règlement et de voir comment cela fonctionne. Nous pouvons attendre un an, ou la décision du Comité, mais c'est une façon de préparer le terrain pour quelque chose dont tout le monde n'est pas entièrement certain.

(1145)

L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Nous serions aussi favorables à ce qu'on laisse les points arriver à échéance, ou à trouver une façon de ne pas prendre de temps parlementaire... S'ils étaient aussi efficaces que nous le souhaitions, nous les garderions. Sinon, il y aurait un mécanisme qui permettrait de revenir à l'autre version du Règlement. Encore une fois, cela me semble être une suggestion parfaitement à propos.

M. Scott Reid:

Je crois que c'est tout le temps que j'avais, alors merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Il vous reste 15 secondes.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord, dans ce cas...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid: Je présume que la désignation des mardis comme deux jours de séance ferait en sorte qu'aucun article en vigueur du Règlement qui renvoie au nombre de jours de séance ne soit modifié en ce qui concerne le délai dont dispose le gouvernement pour faire rapport, répondre à un point et ce type de chose. C'est bien cela?

L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

C'est ce que j'ai cru comprendre, mais honnêtement, je ne suis pas... J'ai eu cette conversation avec notre greffier intérimaire dans un couloir où il a dit de faire attention, car il y a des répercussions en aval, alors j'ai fait cette suggestion que d'autres législatures ont utilisées, m'a-t-on dit, mais vos vues et celles du comité sur ce point précis seraient très importantes.

Ce n'est pas l'intention... Il n'y a pas arnaque, mais je veux être honnête. Je ne peux pas me trouver dans une situation où on approuverait quelque chose qui réduirait sensiblement notre capacité de faire avancer les mesures législatives gouvernementales. Ce n'est un secret pour personne, alors nous sommes tout disposés à trouver le bon équilibre.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le leader du gouvernement à la Chambre.

Nous avons une ronde de cinq minutes pour les libéraux.

Madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Monsieur le ministre, merci d'être venu aujourd'hui.

Pour en revenir au point concernant une meilleure conciliation travail-famille à la Chambre, je parlais avec une de mes collègues du NPD il y a quelques jours. J'ai beaucoup hésité à me présenter aux dernières élections parce que j'ai un jeune garçon, mais elle essaie de gérer la garde d'un enfant de moins d'un an. Elle dit que la garderie parlementaire n'accepte pas les bébés de moins de 18 mois. Je crois que c'est une question difficile pour elle.

De plus, lorsque j'ai su à quoi ressemblait l'horaire à Ottawa, j'ai vu qu'il était très exigeant. Je ne rentre habituellement pas chez moi — je choisis de rester à l'hôtel en ce moment — avant 21 ou 22 heures, car j'ai du travail à faire pour ma circonscription lorsque je retourne au bureau vers 19 ou 20 heures. Voilà pourquoi j'ai décidé de ne pas emmener mon fils ici. Je me suis dit que je ne le verrais même pas quand il serait à Ottawa.

Mais que font les parents qui viennent ici avec leurs enfants? La garderie ferme à une certaine heure. J'ai vu qu'elle était fermée quand je rentre au bureau, alors comment les parents d'enfants de moins de 18 mois peuvent-ils occuper un poste au Parlement?

L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Merci d'avoir formulé ces commentaires. Vous reflétez une tendance très positive — et je crois que l'on peut l'observer partout à la Chambre en ce moment —, celle de voir des jeunes députés, dont des jeunes parents. Au cours de la dernière législature, le caucus du NPD a fait une énorme avancée en sensibilisant les parlementaires à certains des défis que cela représente, et cette tendance s'est fort heureusement poursuivie au cours des dernières élections.

Votre question précise concernant les heures de garde et les règles relatives à l'âge auquel les enfants peuvent aller à la garderie relèvent du Bureau de régie interne. Je siège à son conseil, où tous les partis sont représentés. Nous pouvons étudier la question et nous devrions le faire, car d'autres collègues l'ont soulevée. Le whip du NDP a soulevé une préoccupation semblable. Je pense qu'on serait certainement disposé à régler le problème. Il s'agit, je crois, d'une question administrative d'ordre financier. Je ne suis pas spécialiste de la gestion des bonnes garderies, mais je crois que ces problèmes peuvent être réglés.

Par contre, pour être bien honnête, il faudra que cela soit équitable à l'égard des contribuables, c'est-à-dire en ce qui touche la partie que les parents devraient payer par rapport à celle de l'employeur. Je pense que pour être justes, ces questions doivent être traitées comme elles le sont dans d'autres administrations.

Kevin, avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter concernant la conciliation travail-famille?

M. Kevin Lamoureux (Secrétaire parlementaire du leader du gouvernement à la Chambre des communes):

Je pense que la seule chose que j'aimerais dire est que les questions que nous soulevons du côté des libéraux concernent tous les partis à la Chambre. Comme le leader du gouvernement à la Chambre l'a mentionné, nous devons travailler avec les députés de tous les partis. Je pense que, plus que jamais, les députés semblent faire preuve de bonne volonté, pour un certain nombre de raisons. L'opposition officielle, le troisième parti et le gouvernement semblent tous être intéressés.

Je crois que cela s'en vient. La commission de chaque caucus suggère des idées, alors certaines seront soumises au Bureau de régie interne, tandis que d'autres pourraient nous revenir pour que nous déterminions les articles à modifier dans le Règlement. Certaines de ces idées ne relèvent pas du PROC, mais collectivement, je pense que les partis qui travaillent ensemble seraient capables de régler les questions de garderie et autres, si cela peut être utile.

(1150)

Le président:

Monsieur Schmale.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président. Je vous sais gré de me donner la parole.

J'ai moi aussi un jeune fils de quatre ans, alors j'accueille favorablement certains des changements suggérés et me réjouis à la perspective de travailler avec mes collègues du Comité dans l'espoir de faire de la Chambre un endroit plus propice à la conciliation travail-famille. Je me réjouis à la perspective de participer à cette discussion.

J'aimerais revenir rapidement sur quelques points qui ont été soulevés.

Votre parti a mené sa campagne sur les questions de l'ouverture et de la transparence. J'ai participé à ma première réunion il n'y a pas si longtemps et, encore une fois, le secrétaire parlementaire était ici et là avant de tranquillement s'éloigner. Je crois comprendre qu'il n'est pas un membre votant, mais il devait participer de loin. D'après ce que j'ai vu à la première réunion, il faisait, en fait, la circulation. Je sais ce que vous avez dit concernant l'expérience, mais on en revient toujours à la question que M. Christopherson a soulevée sur la façon de prendre du recul face au gouvernement majoritaire et de devenir plus indépendant. Encore une fois, en tant que député nouvellement élu, j'ai entendu parler de ce qui s'est passé pendant l'élection et j'ai ensuite regardé ce qui se passait en comité. C'étaient deux choses entièrement différentes. Je vous saurais gré de fournir des précisions sur ce point.

Encore une fois, je me préoccupe du processus du Sénat et de sa liste présentée en secret au premier ministre. En secret, le premier ministre formule cette recommandation, et on ne voit vraiment jamais les noms. On ne voit jamais vraiment ce qui se passe. Je crois que ce processus doit être un peu plus transparent. Je suis d'accord pour dire qu'il faut changer les choses au Sénat, mais à mon sens, tous ces secrets ne changent rien, en fait. Tout se fait toujours en secret et personne ne sait ce qui se passe vraiment.

Pour ce qui est de la réforme électorale, vous avez peut-être dit quelque chose d'autre, mais avant Noël, vous avez mentionné que vous aviez écarté la possibilité de tenir tout type de référendum à ce sujet. Je suis désolé si vous avez changé d'idée ou si quelque chose s'est produit après cela.

J'ai pris part au déjeuner du ministre plus tôt cette semaine. Tout le monde s'est assis à la table et a fait des suggestions. Chaque personne avait quelque chose de différent à dire concernant la réforme électorale. Nous étions huit autour de la table et nous avions huit idées différentes, qu'elles soient bonnes ou mauvaises. Au bout du compte lorsque vous choisissez quelqu'un, vous opterez pour une méthode parmi toutes ces suggestions, et je pense qu'il est très tentant pour tout gouvernement au pouvoir de prendre la suggestion qui le favorise, de prétendre avoir consulté les Canadiens et d'ensuite affirmer « Voilà ce qu'ils disent ».

Monsieur le ministre, je vous exhorte à revoir votre position concernant ce référendum si vous ne l'avez pas déjà fait. Je ne crois pas qu'il préjuge le moindre processus. Je pense que vous pouvez toujours tenir des consultations et dégager des idées mais, au bout du compte, je pense que vous finissez par dire aux gens « Voilà ce qui est ressorti de nos consultations. Qu'en pensez-vous? » Je crois que nous avons vraiment besoin de tenir un référendum à ce sujet. Vous l'avez vu dans d'autres administrations, et je vous recommande vivement d'envisager cette option.

L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Merci beaucoup, et félicitations pour votre élection au Parlement. J'espère que nous pourrons trouver ensemble un moyen pour que votre fils de quatre ans puisse voir son père plus souvent que d'autres enfants de députés ont pu voir leur parent dans le cadre de législatures précédentes. Nous pouvons le faire tout en servant nos électeurs et en nous acquittant de nos responsabilités à la Chambre.

En ce qui concerne les observations du député sur l'ouverture et la transparence, je comprends ce que vous dites. J'ai siégé à une réunion d'un comité du Cabinet ce matin sur un gouvernement ouvert et transparent. Nous avons donc un comité qui se penche sur ces questions précises.

Pour ce qui est du processus au Sénat, je comprends ce que vous dites. Dans un esprit et un contexte constitutionnel différents, il y a peut-être eu une différente façon de faire. Nous nous appuyons beaucoup sur le renvoi que le gouvernement de M. Harper a porté, comme il se doit à notre avis, devant la Cour suprême du Canada pour clarifier les règles. Qu'est-il possible et impossible de faire? Cela devrait permettre d'éclairer le débat sur la façon d'améliorer le Sénat et de savoir quand il est possible d'amorcer un changement constitutionnel ou non.

Nous nous étions engagés à apporter graduellement des améliorations sans rouvrir la Constitution. Nous estimons que ce processus plus inclusif est une amélioration graduelle et espérons qu'il fera en sorte que le premier ministre reçoive le nom de personnes de grande qualité recommandées par un comité qui n'est pas uniquement composé de conseillers partisans.

Nous avons eu une discussion au sujet de la divulgation des noms, à vrai dire. Supposons que le comité consultatif soumette au premier ministre cinq noms pour la nomination d'une personne du Nouveau-Brunswick. Je doute que les cinq personnes qui ont accepté d'être sur la liste de candidats potentiels pour être nommés au Sénat accepteraient d'être sur la liste si elles savaient que leurs noms seront rendus publics. Dans une certaine mesure, les gens porteront un jugement sur les quatre personnes qui n'ont pas été choisies.

Dans le cadre d'un processus de nomination des juges, le procureur général a une liste de personnes qualifiées sélectionnées par un comité consultatif de la magistrature. Chaque fois qu'un juge est nommé, on n'annonce pas qu'il y avait 38 autres candidats sur la liste qui n'ont pas été sélectionnés et qu'on a choisi le trente-neuvième. Je suis conscient que, sur le plan des ressources humaines, nous devons effectuer les nominations de manière à respecter la vie privée des gens, mais aussi leur vie professionnelle et personnelle. C'était le raisonnement sous-jacent, mais ce n'est peut-être pas la solution parfaite. À notre avis, c'est un début et une amélioration graduelle.

(1155)

Le président:

Madame Vandenbeld. [Français]

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vois qu'il y a ici parmi nous un député indépendant, M. Thériault. S'il le veut, je vais lui céder la parole.

Le président:

Monsieur Thériault, vous avez la parole.

M. Luc Thériault (Montcalm, BQ):

De combien de temps est-ce que je dispose, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Luc Thériault:

D'accord. Merci

J'ai bien écouté ce qu'a dit le leader du gouvernement à la Chambre.

Vous connaissez tous la situation des parlementaires du Bloc québécois qui sont élus sous une même bannière. Parmi les intentions de réforme du gouvernement, j'aurais aimé que le leader parlementaire du gouvernement dise ce matin qu'il souhaite respecter le mandat que le premier ministre lui a donné, à savoir que chaque parlementaire puisse bénéficier des mêmes moyens pour faire entendre sa voix à la Chambre ainsi que celle de ses concitoyens.

Vous savez que nous ne disposons pas de ces moyens. Nous proposons une solution. Nous avons envoyé une lettre au Président et une lettre à tous les leaders parlementaires. Je voudrais vous informer de ce que nous proposons.

Nous ne souhaitons pas être reconnus selon la règle arbitraire des 12 députés mais que, à tout le moins, compte tenu des travaux parlementaires que nous devons accomplir, nous recevions au moins dix-douzièmes du budget qu'on considérait important de donner à 12 députés élus sous une même bannière.

Nous aimerions que le Bureau de régie interne adopte une règle afin que tous les députés élus sous une même bannière reçoivent le budget nécessaire. Présentement, les députés du Bloc québécois doivent prendre une partie de leur budget de circonscription pour payer leur personnel qui travaille sur la Colline.

Évidemment, j'apprécie que l'on me donne un droit de parole de cinq minutes ce matin, mais en vertu des règles actuelles, nous sommes exclus des comités. Nous avons aussi été exclus des travaux des comités spéciaux. Afin que nous puissions planifier notre travail, il faudrait au moins que nous participions à chaque réunion de comité pour avoir un droit de parole. Je précise que nous avons demandé un droit de parole sans droit de vote.

Le ministre a parlé tout à l'heure de donner plus de pouvoirs aux députés pour qu'ils puissent accomplir leurs travaux parlementaires. Il entend convoquer les leaders parlementaire pour trouver un terrain d'entente. Il y a des intentions, mais cela ne se concrétise pas.

L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Merci..

De combien de temps est-ce que je dispose, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Vous avez deux minutes.

L'hon. Dominic LeBlanc:

Je vous remercie.

Par votre entremise, monsieur le président, je tiens à féliciter M. Thériault d'avoir été élu à la Chambre. Comme le savent mes collègues, M. Thériault est un parlementaire d'expérience qui a siégé à l'Assemblée nationale du Québec pendant plusieurs années. Sa présence au Parlement comme parlementaire d'expérience sera d'autant plus valable.

M. Thériault a soulevé des questions en ce qui a trait à la participation des députés d'une formation politique n'ayant pas atteint le nombre de 12 députés élus et qui, selon plusieurs règles de la Chambre, sont techniquement des députés indépendants et ne peuvent pas participer aux réunions de comité.

Nous sommes ouverts à discuter de la meilleure façon de leur permettre de participer à ces réunions. J'ai eu des discussions positives avec M. Thériault et ses collègues, ainsi qu'avec mes homologues leaders parlementaires du NPD et du Parti conservateur. Je suis bien heureux qu'Anita ait donné à M. Thériault la chance de prendre la parole. J'espère que c'est une tradition que nous pourrons tous implanter dans le cadre des réunions de comité.

Lors des rotations pour prendre la parole à la Chambre des communes, je crois que nous avons offert à quelques reprises à nos collègues du Bloc québécois de prendre la parole. C'est du temps qui aurait peut-être pu être alloué au Parti libéral. Par l'entremise des whips, nous avons offert aux députés du Bloc de prendre la parole. J'espère que nous pourrons continuer cette tradition.

À ma connaissance, le Bureau de régie interne n'a pas encore pris de décision en ce qui a trait aux ressources. J'ai participé à toutes les réunions. Depuis l'élection, nous n'avons tenu qu'une réunion d'une heure seulement, au cours de laquelle il fallait approuver les crédits budgétaires.

D'après moi, le problème se posera dans le fonctionnement des réunions de comité. J'ai partagé cela honnêtement avec M. Thériault en lui expliquant ceci. Les députés qui sont des membres permanents des comités ont très peu de temps pour poser des questions et intervenir. Si, à un moment donné, des députés indépendants qui sont des membres non votants mais participants prennent la parole, cela réduira le temps de parole des députés d'autres formations politiques qui, elles, ont réussi à faire élire plus de députés. Le NPD a fait élire quatre fois plus de députés que le Bloc et le Parti conservateur 10 fois plus.

Ce n'est pas facile de trancher cela. Nous allons poursuivre la discussion, y compris avec mes collègues leaders parlementaires à la Chambre, et ce, dans le respect de tous les députés.

Merci, monsieur le président.

(1200)

[Traduction]

Merci, chers collègues. Voilà qui met fin à ce dont vous attendiez avec impatience depuis plusieurs semaines, à savoir ma comparution au comité.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, chers collègues, de vos suggestions.

J'espère, et je ne plaisante pas, que vous m'inviterez à nouveau, Larry.

Chers collègues, j'espère que, même officieusement, nous pourrons travailler sur des dossiers ensemble. Nous ne sommes pas toujours obligés de le faire dans un cadre aussi officiel. Mon bureau est dans une pièce attenante au foyer, et je me ferai un plaisir de tenir des discussions informelles, en petits groupes ou dans un autre cadre, comme vous le jugerez approprié.

Merci, Kevin, de m'avoir accompagné. C'est pour donner un coup de pouce à l'avancement de Kevin.

Vous feriez mieux d'être sur vos gardes, Larry. Il pourrait prendre votre place un jour.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci.

Le repas est arrivé. Nous allons suspendre la séance quelques minutes.

(1200)

(1220)

Le président:

Nous ferions mieux de commencer tout de suite ou nous manquerons de temps. J'ai quelques points d'ordre administratif à soulever.

À la dernière séance, nous avons parlé de fournir les noms d'entrée de jeu. J'ai discuté avec le patron de la greffière, et nous n'avons jamais divulgué les noms pour deux raisons. Premièrement, c'est pour éviter d'attirer l'attention sur ces personnes et, deuxièmement, les personnes changent parfois.

J'ai suggéré, en guise de compromis, de faire circuler une feuille avec ces noms que vous pourriez avoir sous les yeux durant toute la réunion, avec le nom du greffier et de l'analyste qui sont présents à la réunion ce jour-là. Cette méthode servirait les mêmes fins et nous n'afficherions pas leur... Nous ne voulons pas nous les mettre à dos car nous avons besoin d'eux.

Bien entendu, pour les nouveaux membres, l'agent des délibérations et de la vérification allumera vos microphones comme d'habitude. Vous n'avez donc pas à vous inquiéter de cela. De plus, les coordonnées de la greffière et de notre analyste de la Bibliothèque du Parlement sont affichées sur le site Web du Comité et dans le cahier d'information qu'on vous a fourni.

J'espère que nous pourrons accomplir deux choses. D'une part, nous sommes saisis d'une motion. Et d'autre part, nous devons déterminer — nous ou le sous-comité — ce que nous étudierons à notre prochaine réunion mardi. Nous n'y avons pas encore réfléchi.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Étant donné l'heure qu'il est, soit presque 12 h 30, et que nous devons déterminer ce que nous étudierons à la prochaine réunion, je ne pense pas que ma motion sera réglée aujourd'hui de toute manière.

Là encore, si c'est utile au Comité, puisque c'est devenu un préavis de motion — la greffière peut me corriger si j'ai tort —, je pense que j'ai le choix de présenter la motion ou non. Par conséquent, je peux ne pas la présenter et nous pouvons nous pencher sur les travaux du Comité. Cela risque de prendre un peu plus de temps que d'habitude car nous n'étudions pas les travaux en tant que comité de direction. Dans le pire des cas, nous déterminons ce que nous étudierons à la prochaine réunion et nous quitterons la réunion 10 minutes à l'avance. Nous pouvons procéder ainsi ou entamer l'étude de la motion à la fin et continuer à la prochaine réunion, mais je préfère que nous l'examinions en une seule fois.

Je vous laisse le soin de décider, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Je vous remercie de votre offre. Je l'accepte car je pense qu'il serait très... J'espère que notre Comité peut régler une chose. Si nous pouvons établir ce que nous étudierons à la prochaine réunion, nous pourrons ensuite passer à autre chose.

Merci beaucoup. Vous vous montrez très coopératif, et je pense que c'est très utile à l'avancement des travaux au Parlement. Nous vous laisserons présenter votre motion un autre jour ou à la fin de la journée si nous avons du temps pour commencer à l'examiner. Autrement, nous devrions décider maintenant de ce que nous voulons étudier à la prochaine réunion. Je pense que nous devrions décider maintenant en groupe, si nous le pouvons, de ce que nous devrions aborder à la prochaine réunion.

Nous entendrons M. Christopherson, puis M. Reid.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Nous allons rapidement avoir du pain sur la planche, comme les membres commencent à le voir, et nous serons débordés. Gérer notre temps est l'une des tâches les plus stressantes et difficiles à faire. Le leader du gouvernement à la Chambre a demandé au Comité si nous pourrions nous entendre sur le plus grand nombre possible de changements au Règlement pour les intégrer dans le système et les mettre en place le plus rapidement possible, afin que nous puissions appliquer ces nouvelles règles. Il me semble logique de procéder ainsi, même si je suis certainement disposé à entendre d'autres points de vue, car il faut agir rapidement pour apporter ces changements. Pour ma part, je suis disposé à appuyer ce programme ambitieux, car je pense que ces changements seront positifs, s'ils sont à la hauteur de ce dont nous avons discuté. C'est donc la raison pour laquelle je suis prêt à m'attaquer à ces dossiers sans tarder.

Avant de m'arrêter, j'aimerais faire une mise en garde: ce sera loin d'être aussi facile que le ministre l'a laissé entendre. Nous avons consacré — et je vois David sourire, car il se rappelle quand nous sommes passés par là — la majeure partie de l'année à examiner les « fruits faciles à cueillir ». Autrement dit, il s'agissait de dossiers sur lesquels nous étions tous d'accord. Ils n'étaient ni complexes ni controversés. Si un dossier faisait l'objet de controverse ou de désaccord, nous le mettions de côté et disions, « Ce n'est pas un sujet facile ». Nous écartions ces sujets. C'était tout ce que nous pouvions faire pour présenter un nombre limité de changements très mineurs.

Je suis loin d'être convaincu que nous pourrons le faire aussi rapidement que le ministre le voudrait, mais j'ai l'impression que s'ils sont sérieux — et je vais leur faire confiance lorsqu'ils disent qu'ils solliciteront notre avis sur la façon d'aborder ce travail —, alors il serait bien de commencer avec les changements à apporter au Règlement, parce qu'il est urgent que nous le fassions et qu'il faut beaucoup de temps pour trouver ceux sur lesquels nous sommes d'accord.

Avant de céder la parole, monsieur le président, j'ai dit rapidement ce qui me passait par la tête au ministre, mais je suis sérieux. L'une des choses que nous utilisions comme outil de travail lorsque nous tentions de trouver les sujets faciles... Soit dit en passant, je tiens à signaler que ce rapport a été publié, examiné et adopté par la Chambre. Ce n'étaient pas d'importants changements, mais nous avions convenu que si une personne à la table, de n'importe quel caucus, n'était pas d'accord, le changement ne serait pas apporté.

J'ai posé une question au ministre, même si je ne m'attendais pas vraiment à ce qu'il puisse ou veuille y répondre compte tenu du temps disponible, mais je vais vous adresser la question, monsieur le président. J'aimerais entendre l'opinion du gouvernement. Si nous sommes confrontés à un dilemme concernant des changements à apporter au Règlement, ce qui risque fort d'arriver, comment ferons-nous pour prendre une décision? Au bout du compte, c'est la majorité qui décide, un point c'est tout. Il faut s'en accommoder. Autrement, nous dirons, « Non, si nous ne nous entendons pas à l'unanimité, nous n'apporterons pas les changements au Règlement »? Nous ne ferons que créer à nouveau une bataille partisane à la Chambre au sujet de changements au Règlement qui sont censés être non partisans.

Je vais vous laisser le soin de décider, monsieur le président. Merci.

(1225)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai participé au processus également. À y repenser, l'une des approches que nous avions adoptées la dernière fois, et que je ne recommanderais pas d'adopter à nouveau, était de vouloir un seul rapport. Nous avons examiné toutes les règles. Nous tentions en fait de voir sur combien de règles nous pourrions nous entendre et si nous pourrions trouver une solution. Dans certains cas, nous avons réussi, et dans d'autres, il était clair que nous n'allions pas parvenir à une entente, alors nous avons mis ces règles de côté. Mais pour les règles où il y avait possibilité de parvenir à une entente, nous avons longuement discuté.

Essentiellement, je pense que ce qui est arrivé, c'est que le délai pour produire notre rapport a déterminé le temps que nous y avons consacré. C'était une version de la Loi de Parkinson: le débat a occupé le temps disponible.

C'était un modèle différent. Nous avons réglé le plus grand nombre possible de sujets faciles que nous pouvions régler. Nous avons réglé les dossiers faciles. Nous avons marché sur la pointe des pieds et pensions que nous serions en mesure de passer aux sujets plus difficiles, mais nous les avons sautés et n'avons pas pu les examiner. Cela se rapporte à ma métaphore avec la pomme. On supposait que le pique-nique prendrait fin un moment donné, mais d'ici à ce que cela arrive, on peut continuer.

Je pense que cette fois-ci, je suggérerais d'adopter une approche différente. Si nous pouvons régler une question, alors nous devrions préparer un petit rapport et l'envoyer à la Chambre. Bien entendu, le Comité produit toujours de petits rapports, beaucoup plus que n'importe quel autre comité, des rapports beaucoup plus courts. Je pense que ce serait une approche appropriée. Nous demandons ensuite à la Chambre de les approuver. Nous aurions vraisemblablement une entente selon laquelle tous les rapports que nous produisons seront adoptés. De toute évidence, c'est aux partis qui donnent leur approbation de décider, mais la discussion ne doit pas devenir un débat de toute une journée sur l'adoption. Ce n'est pas une excuse à utiliser. C'est seulement pour faire approuver les changements. Nous pouvons ensuite mettre en place la règle et passer à autre chose.

Le président:

Cela va dépendre de ce que le Bloc fera.

Une voix: Pour autant que nous soyons d'accord.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous avez raison. L'opinion du Bloc et de la députée du Parti vert risque d'être différente, mais je pense que nous devrions dégager un consensus parmi les trois partis qui siègent au Comité. Nous pourrons ainsi faire avancer les choses. Autrement, comme l'aurait fait Mackenzie King, je préconise que nous apportions des modifications à la pièce, au besoin, mais pas plus qu'il ne le faut.

(1230)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Lamoureux.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Ayant participé en tant que membre du troisième parti, je pense que l'approche adoptée la dernière fois a été fructueuse. Je crois que nous pourrions l'adopter cette fois-ci également, David.

Je pense que nous avons constaté, à la suite du discours du leader du gouvernement à la Chambre, qu'il veut vraiment aborder ce processus avec une grande ouverture d'esprit. Les gens, à ma connaissance — vous pouvez parler à vos leaders parlementaires respectifs —, ont indiqué qu'il y a déjà eu beaucoup de discussions sur ces questions. Dans une certaine mesure, je pense qu'il y a des attentes, et il faut déterminer comment nous pouvons y répondre, ce qui s'applique à tous les partis à la Chambre.

Avant, lorsque nous avions un « fruit facile à cueillir », il s'agissait d'un sujet très facile à régler. Si nous tentons de trop entrer dans les détails... Si tout le monde est d'accord pour tenir des votes seulement les mardis, mercredis et jeudis et ne pas procéder à des votes après 15 heures, par exemple, si nous avons les principes généraux, alors nous pouvons peut-être même pressentir les leaders parlementaires pour voir s'ils ont des recommandations quant à la façon de procéder. Je crois que Dominic a dit être même ouvert, si le Comité de la procédure le veut bien, à ce que le gouvernement présente une motion distincte. Je pense que la tenue de discussions officielles et non officielles serait bénéfique, mais elles ne porteraient pas forcément sur les fruits faciles à cueillir. Nous pourrions également examiner les solutions qui peuvent régler les problèmes qui touchent les familles dont nous entendons parler par tous les partis et voir comment nous pourrions intervenir.

Je m'attends à ce que toutes ces questions soient réglées par voie de consensus.

Le président:

D'accord.

Je n'entends aucune objection au sujet de la proposition de M. Reid, qui souhaite que nous examinions un point à la fois. Si nous procédons ainsi, par quel point voudriez-vous que nous commencions la prochaine séance? Le leader à la Chambre en a proposé environ cinq.

M. Scott Reid:

Puis-je proposer que nous commencions par compiler les...? En fait, je partage l'avis de M. Christopherson. J'aurais bien voulu que le leader à la Chambre ait amené ses notes, car nous pourrions alors passer les points en revue et en discuter tout de suite. Je me souviens de quelques bribes ici et là. Pour être honnête, je voudrais aussi avoir pris de meilleures notes; la faute m'incombe donc aussi en partie.

Le président:

J'ai la lettre de mandat. Je peux vous en remettre une copie.

M. Scott Reid:

Je la connais bien, comme vous le savez.

Le président:

Oui, et vos enfants aussi.

M. Scott Reid:

J'allais dire que je pourrais préparer un rapport si vous le souhaitez.

Je pense que nous devrions nous asseoir. C'est une bonne idée. Nous devrions examiner la lettre de mandat, et chacun d'entre nous devrait indiquer ce qu'il envisage pour ces points afin de tenter d'en arriver à un accord. Nous pourrions tenter d'en parler maintenant. Nous devrions procéder ainsi et revenir avec des suggestions de personnes qui possèdent de l'expertise. Il affirme qu'une ou peut-être plusieurs assemblées législatives ont adopté la semaine de quatre jours, par exemple. Je sais que celle de l'Ontario l'a fait. Il serait raisonnable de commencer en essayant de convoquer un fonctionnaire de l'assemblée législative de l'Ontario. Voilà un exemple du genre de témoins que je veux envisager de convoquer.

Nous pourrions présenter des listes de témoins lors de la prochaine séance. Il n'est pas nécessaire que ce soit à propos d'un sujet. Les témoins pourraient juste essayer de nous aider à appréhender les questions auxquelles nous nous attaquons. J'ignore si c'est utile.

Le président:

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Pourrais-je proposer de simplement examiner les aspects thématiques figurant dans la lettre de mandat du ministre? Peut-être pourrions-nous aussi examiner le Règlement par sujet et diviser ainsi le travail. C'est une autre manière de répartir le travail. La vraie question est la suivante: est-ce l'ensemble du Comité qui agira ou confiera-t-on au sous-comité la tâche d'établir le programme?

M. Scott Reid:

Normalement, le sous-comité se réunit pendant la période prévue pour la présente séance, n'est-ce pas?

Le président:

Oui, mais cela prend du temps.

Monsieur Christopherson

M. David Christopherson:

Je ne pense pas qu'il existe de manière vraiment évidente de procéder. Nous devrons trouver des solutions à mesure que nous progressons. Conviendrait-il de demander à chaque caucus de présenter non pas une liste absolument exclusive, mais une liste de points qu'il considère comme étant des priorités dont il voudrait discuter, et de nous donner quelques idées de l'orientation qu'il voudrait adopter de façon générale? Nous pourrions alors fixer une séance du comité directeur, monsieur le président. Même si nous n'avons pas encore terminé d'établir toutes les règles, nous pourrions aller de l'avant. Laissons le comité directeur examiner la question et proposer un processus.

À l'évidence, les propos que le ministre a tenus étaient importants et rendent compte de l'orientation que le gouvernement compte adopter. Je suis convaincu que nous et les conservateurs avons des options. Nous sommes tous déjà passés par là.

Quoi qu'il en soit, c'est ce que je propose pour commencer. Demandons l'avis de chacun des caucus. Même s'ils ne répondent pas sur papier, chaque représentant pourrait être prêt à témoigner de vive voix devant le comité directeur pour donner une meilleure idée de l'orientation que chacun voudrait prendre. Nous pourrions alors voir quels sont les points communs et tenter de déterminer quels seraient les éléments auxquels nous pourrions nous attaquer en premier.

Voilà ce que j'en pense, monsieur le président.

(1235)

Le président:

D'accord. Permettez-moi de paraphraser vos propos. Si chaque parti se penche sur la question et leur représentant au sein du sous-comité indique quels points de la lettre de mandat — il y a en environ cinq — il considère comme étant des priorités et quels dossiers nous devrions aborder, le sous-comité pourrait présenter ces éléments dans un programme lors de notre prochaine séance.

J'aimerais ajouter un petit changement aux fins de discussion. Avec les tâches à l'esprit, M. Reid a proposé de convoquer des témoins possédant de l'expertise dans un certain nombre de domaines. Peut-être pourrions-nous penser à une de ces personnes qu'il nous faudrait de toute évidence convoquer pour qu'elle témoigne pendant une heure au cours de la prochaine séance afin de lancer la discussion. Pendant ce temps, le même processus pourrait s'effectuer en parallèle.

Il faut aussi tenir compte du moment auquel le sous-comité se réunit. C'est souvent à l'heure où le Comité se réunirait normalement.

M. David Christopherson:

Non, non, pas pendant une séance du Comité, je vous en prie, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Cela accélérera les choses, oui.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Je veux commencer par poser une question à David.

Quand vous étiez au Parlement, est-ce que les semaines étaient de cinq ou de quatre jours?

M. David Christopherson:

Elles étaient de cinq jours.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. C'était donc après votre mandat.

À l'évidence, donc, si nous commençons par ce point, je proposerais de convoquer le greffier de l'Assemblée législative de l'Ontario pour traiter de la question, présumant qu'il était en poste avant et après le changement. Il pourrait traiter de manière impartiale des aspects pratiques des résultats de l'initiative. Ce serait dans l'ordre des choses. Il faudrait vérifier depuis combien de temps le greffier ou le greffier adjoint occupe ses fonctions afin de s'assurer qu'il était en poste au moment de la transition. Si c'est le cas, nous devrions convoquer cette personne en premier. Je ne connais pas son nom, je le crains.

Le président:

Est-ce que quelqu'un souhaite formuler un commentaire à ce sujet? Pour notre prochaine séance, nous inviterions le greffier ou un membre du bureau du greffier de l'Assemblée législative de l'Ontario possédant de l'expérience quant aux semaines de quatre et de cinq jours.

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

S'agit-il d'un ancien greffier? Ce n'est probablement pas celui qui est en poste actuellement. Je pense que l'Assemblée législative de l'Ontario revient après le Jour de la famille.

M. Scott Reid:

Elle sera donc de retour la semaine prochaine.

M. Arnold Chan:

Non, la semaine suivante.

M. Scott Reid:

Si nous le rencontrons mardi prochain...

M. Arnold Chan:

Nous le pourrions, s'il peut comparaître.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui. Nous devrons découvrir ce qu'il en est, mais ce n'est qu'une proposition. D'autres assemblées législatives procèdent ainsi, je suppose. Je sais que l'Ontario le fait parce que je réside dans cette province, et j'envie mon député provincial, qui a une journée...

Le président:

Monsieur Lamoureux.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Je m'interroge à ce sujet. Si vous cherchez à étudier une assemblée législative provinciale qui pourrait avoir des points communs avec celle d'Ottawa, vous pourriez vous tourner vers celle de Victoria, où la vaste majorité des députés viennent de régions rurales. Je n'ai aucune idée de la manière dont ils votent et du moment où ils le font. Il a été proposé d'envisager la possibilité de tenir la période de questions plus tôt au lieu de le faire à 14 heures. Il y a aussi les jours de la semaine et d'autres points.

Il pourrait être avantageux de nous intéresser au processus et au bureau du greffier de la Colombie-Britannique, juste pour voir si nous devrions également convoquer un représentant de cette province si vous souhaitez entendre un deuxième témoin. Je le répète, la vaste majorité des députés provinciaux vivent loin de Victoria; les déplacements constituent donc en Colombie-Britannique un problème encore plus important que dans d'autres provinces. C'est une proposition que vous pourriez envisager. Si vous convoquez un représentant de l'Ontario...

M. Scott Reid:

Vous proposez d'entendre un groupe d'experts.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Je pense que vous pouvez convoquer des représentants du bureau des greffiers de l'Ontario et de la Colombie-Britannique, et entendre ce qu'ils ont à dire. Vous pouvez leur demander leur avis sur trois ou peut-être quatre points. Par exemple, qu'ont-ils fait pour faciliter la conciliation travail-famille ces dernières années? Quand tiennent-ils leur période de questions? Pour quelles raisons? La Chambre siège-t-elle le vendredi? Comme je l'ai indiqué, je ne sais pas si c'est le cas. Je l'ignore. Je pense simplement qu'ils ont en commun de nombreux problèmes que nous éprouvons aussi sur le plan de la distance.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

En outre, nous pourrions convoquer des greffiers de la Chambre qui pourraient se prononcer au moins sur la viabilité de certaines des options proposées afin de nous aider à orienter un peu plus notre attention.

Autrement dit, ils pourraient dire: « Cette idée semble vraiment bonne, mais il nous serait difficile de l'appliquer ici pour telle ou telle raison. » Ils pourraient aussi dire: « C'est aux parlementaires de décider, mais c'est faisable. Ce n'est pas si difficile. » Ou ils pourraient dire que c'est très difficile. C'est également utile, car cela nous donne une idée des implications des changements que nous pourrions recommander.

Je pense que nous commençons à voir où aller, monsieur le président.

(1240)

Le président:

Oui. Je pense que nous pourrions demander aux greffiers, peu importe lesquels nous convoquons, de nous dire quelles seraient les conséquences de certains de ces changements, car conséquences il y aurait.

Proposez-vous d'entendre trois greffiers — un de la Colombie-Britannique, un de l'Ontario et un d'ici — afin de traiter de la question?

Une voix:Oui.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je me demande s'il serait utile de convoquer également un témoin qui traiterait du contexte international et de ce que d'autres pays ont fait. Je sais qu'il se trouve à Ottawa des organisations, comme le Centre parlementaire, qui font du travail international avec des parlements. Nous pourrions également inviter quelqu'un qui pourrait donner un point de vue international.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Pourquoi ne commençons-nous pas par faire appel à nos analystes à ce sujet? Notre groupe ne sait même pas quelles provinces ont des semaines de quatre ou de cinq jours. Le simple fait d'obtenir cette liste serait un début. Je ne recommanderais pas d'examiner ce qui se fait aux États-Unis, car le fonctionnement du Congrès est complètement différent. Nous pourrons peut-être voir ce qui se fait en Australie et en Nouvelle-Zélande. Je ne sais pas ce qu'il en est de la Nouvelle-Zélande, mais les États d'Australie sont suffisamment vastes pour éprouver des problèmes similaires aux nôtres, et ils utilisent notre système.

Le président:

Allez-y.

M. Andre Barnes (attaché de recherche auprès du comité):

Monsieur le président, je me suis penché sur la question du caucus multipartite des femmes il y a quelques années; ce n'est donc pas nécessairement quelque chose de nouveau pour moi. L'Ontario a cependant apporté quelques changements: l'assemblée siège maintenant plus tôt. La Colombie-Britannique a également effectué quelques modifications.

Je pense que vous pourriez avoir raison au sujet du Québec, mais je ne me souviens pas nécessairement des faits. Je sais que l'Écosse a réalisé quelques changements également. Sincèrement, je ne me souviens pas d'avoir vu que l'Australie en avait fait.

Le président:

Pourriez-vous effectuer quelques recherches au lieu d'en parler maintenant?

M. Andre Barnes:

Je rédigerai une note d'information sur le sujet.

Le président:

Vous pouvez apporter quelque chose pour la prochaine séance, avec quelques renseignements sur ce qui se fait à l'échelle internationale.

Je pense qu'en convoquant trois greffiers pour commencer, nous aurions probablement un groupe assez important.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, sachez que j'ai vraiment aimé l'idée que Scott a proposée plus tôt. Le ministre a indiqué qu'il était disposé à mettre des dispositions en place, à essayer quelque chose et à instaurer une échéance ou un processus d'examen. Voilà qui est fort sensé.

Dans ce contexte, fort de mon expérience — et je suis dans le domaine depuis très longtemps —, je dirais que nous ne devrions pas avoir peur d'oser et même de révolutionner les choses.

Je dis cela dans le présent contexte. Croyez-le ou non, j'ai été élu pour la première fois en 1985 au conseil régional et au conseil municipal de Hamilton. Nous portions le titre d'« échevins ». Il n'existait aucune toilette à l'intention des femmes membres du conseil. Tout était prévu en fonction des hommes. Il y avait bien une toilette privée jouxtant le salon, mais elle était réservée aux hommes.

Je travaille dans le domaine depuis maintenant assez longtemps pour avoir vu la première personne sourde à la Chambre des communes. J'ai maintenant vu à deux reprises des députés se déplaçant en fauteuil roulant...

Le président:

À trois reprises.

M. David Christopherson:

... À trois reprises, en effet, et j'ai été témoin d'autres changements également.

Dans l'avenir, dans 50 ans d'ici, disons, les gens considéreront notre époque pratiquement de la même manière dont nous voyons l'histoire que je vous ai relatée, quand nous avons dû convertir une garde-robe en toilette pour une conseillère. Nous nous disputions encore pour savoir s'il fallait parler d'« échevin » ou pas. Cela va aussi loin que cela. Voilà qui illustre le genre de changement qui doit s'effectuer.

Ici encore, nous agissons en raison de ce qui s'est passé, particulièrement au cours des deux dernières législatures, la présente et celle qui l'a précédée. Il y a tellement de jeunes.

Jamie, il n'y avait pas toujours un homme pour s'empresser de dire à Ruby, une politicienne: « J'éprouve le même problème. J'ai un fils de quatre ans. » J'entends par là que les rôles étaient très définis et les démarcations étaient claires. Mais vous vivez à une époque à laquelle vous pouvez déclarer que vous aussi, vous avez un fils de quatre ans.

Ce que je veux dire, c'est que nous devons rendre ces lieux plus réels, et cette intervention est essentielle pour y arriver. Si nous voulons attirer davantage de femmes... Oui, bon, il y a probablement plus de femmes ici que jamais, mais nous ne sommes pas encore arrivés au but. Nous avons encore beaucoup de chemin à faire. J'ai travaillé avec des jeunes femmes et je les ai encouragées à s'impliquer. Ma conjointe fait beaucoup pour faire élire plus de femmes dans tous les partis.

Nous devons éliminer tous les obstacles que vous avez évoqués, Ruby, et les problèmes que vous avez rencontrés en ce qui concerne votre enfant et les réticences, pour que les gens puissent prendre la décision de s'impliquer dans la vie publique uniquement en fonction de leur situation, et non en raison de leur sexe ou du fait qu'ils ont des enfants. Il faudrait que le système doit être conçu en conséquence.

Nous commençons à aller dans la bonne direction, et l'histoire m'indique que nous y arriverons. Je dis seulement qu'il ne faut pas avoir peur d'oser, de faire une véritable révolution. Si quelque chose nous semble très évident, alors allons de l'avant, en utilisant la technique de Scott qui consiste à établir une mesure de sécurité dans un an ou dans 18 mois d'ici. Nous y arriverons de toute manière. Essayons alors d'y arriver le plus rapidement possible pour effectuer ce changement. Nous avons encore beaucoup de chemin à parcourir, mais avec les jeunes politiciens sérieux qui sont ici maintenant, j'ai vraiment l'impression que c'est le temps d'agir. Alors profitons-en.

Merci.

(1245)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Christopherson. Je suis d'accord avec vous. Il est à espérer que nous ne nous empêtrerons pas dans des détails techniques qui nous empêcheraient d'y arriver.

Pour ce qui est de l'avenir, permettez-moi de proposer ce dont nous avons, je crois, convenu: pour la prochaine séance, nous devrions essayer de convoquer trois greffiers, soit un de la Colombie-Britannique, un de l'Ontario et celui de la Chambre des communes; leurs témoignages pourraient prendre les deux heures au complet, en fait. D'ici à la séance de jeudi prochain, dont nous pourrons traiter dans un instant pendant que le sous-comité se réunit, nous recueillerons les points que nos partis considèrent comme étant des priorités parmi les éléments que le leader à la Chambre a évoqués plus tôt, après quoi le sous-comité prendra une décision quand aux témoins ou à l'orientation de la séance de jeudi.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Pour que tout soit clair, monsieur le président, je propose que vous ou la greffière envoyiez un courriel nous informant de ce que les caucus ont convenu de faire, parce que pour l'instant, ce ne sont que des mots. On arrive aux séances et quelqu'un s'exclame: « Oh, je n'avais pas compris que je devais faire cela », ce qui nous fait perdre du temps.

Peut-être pourrions-nous recevoir un court mémo nous indiquant précisément ce que nous devons apporter. Vous pourriez aussi nous l'expliquer clairement maintenant, en une phrase.

Le président:

Disons-le maintenant pour que cela figure au compte rendu. Nous pourrions y revenir ensuite.

C'était votre idée. Voulez-vous l'expliquer en anglais?

M. David Christopherson:

Merci. Je demanderais à la greffière de m'aider à expliquer ce que j'ai dit: c'est une tâche impossible.

Souhaitons-nous que les caucus se prononcent sur tous les points ou nous intéressons-nous seulement à la conciliation travail-famille pour l'instant? Voulez-vous vous concentrer sur ce dernier point et voir ce que cela donne?

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Pourrions-nous qualifier cette initiative de Parlement inclusif? Ainsi, elle pourrait englober...

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord.

M. Arnold Chan:

Puis-je proposer de nous contenter de traiter de trois points tout au plus et de convenir d'un délai?

Le président:

Parliez-vous des points figurant dans la lettre de mandat?

M. Arnold Chan:

Je parle des sous-points qu'elle comprend.

M. David Christopherson:

Je dois vous dire que j'aime l'idée de les examiner un à un. Quel était le terme que vous venez d'utiliser?

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

C'était le Parlement inclusif.

M. David Christopherson:

« Parlement inclusif »: voilà qui me plaît davantage.

Si nous nous concentrons sur ce concept comme point de départ, nous pouvons l'élargir rapidement si nous le voulons. Ainsi, nous arriverons à la séance tous prêts, avec des idées sur la question. Il semble que ce soit le concept qui nous intéresse le plus, car il a une incidence sur la vie quotidienne. Nous voulons l'instaurer, le mettre à l'essai et le modifier au besoin au cours de route.

Nous nous occuperons peut-être seulement de ce point, monsieur le président. Il est suffisamment complexe.

Le président:

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

L'approche proposée ici me convient certainement en principe. La seule chose qui me préoccupe, c'est la logistique.

À l'instar de notre membre au sein du sous-comité, j'aurais vraiment de la difficulté à obtenir l'avis de mon caucus aussi rapidement. De toute évidence, le caucus se réunit une fois par semaine. Ce serait probablement le bon moment d'aborder la question. Cela nous permettra de régler ce point la semaine prochaine, et je pourrais présenter l'avis de mon caucus. Mais je n'ai pas vraiment l'impression que je lui rendrais justice.

Nous devrions peut-être envisager d'examiner la question après la pause.

Le président:

D'accord. Nous allons avoir une semaine de pause; pourquoi alors ne pas convoquer mardi et jeudi prochains des témoins évidents qui pourraient traiter du point soulevé plus tôt par le leader à la Chambre? Puis, nous obtiendrons les commentaires des leaders à la Chambre, des whips ou des caucus avant le mardi suivant la pause, ce qui nous permettra d'établir le programme des semaines suivantes.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est probablement une bonne idée, car cela nous permettra aussi de nous informer sur ce qui est faisable et sur ce qui ne l'est pas. Nous serions ainsi équipés pour parler à nos caucus et tenir des discussions éclairées. L'idée me plaît.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je vous rappellerais simplement que nous devons encore examiner votre motion.

M. David Christopherson:

J'en suis conscient.

M. Arnold Chan:

Ce que je veux dire, c'est que cela pourrait prendre une bonne partie de la séance de mardi.

Je veux revenir au point que j'ai soulevé plus tôt. Je disais simplement que chaque concept de Parlement inclusif englobe des idées très précises. Je propose donc de limiter à trois le nombre de concepts que les caucus pourraient présenter.

J'aimerais aussi savoir si nous voulons inviter des députés qui ne sont pas membres d'un parti reconnu à faire un exposé. Je le propose simplement pour que tous y réfléchissent.

(1250)

M. David Christopherson:

Proposez-vous qu'ils le fassent en public, s'ils veulent venir faire un exposé?

M. Arnold Chan:

C'est exactement ce que je propose. Les députés ont tous les mêmes privilèges.

M. David Christopherson:

Je sais. Nous devrions peut-être inviter d'autres députés, y compris des indépendants, qui veulent faire des exposés et traiter de leurs problèmes personnels pour qu'ils n'en parlent pas seulement à leur caucus, mais aussi à nous tous.

Le président:

Madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je partage son avis. Je crois qu'il importe d'avoir ce point de vue. Je conviens que nous devrions entendre les greffiers, mais ce sont les députés qui vivent la situation au quotidien, et ils possèdent de l'expérience et des connaissances personnelles à ce sujet. À mon avis, un député de longue date pourrait donner un bon compte rendu, puis un nouveau député pourrait présenter son point de vue, ce qui nous permettrait d'avoir un bon échantillon de députés.

Le président:

Et si nous invitions à la séance de jeudi prochain tous les députés qui souhaitent nous parler de ces sujets?

Avant de partir, cependant, je tiendrais à préciser le type de sujet à traiter.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Je pense que nous devons nous montrer prudents à cet égard. Par exemple, des députés du Bloc québécois pourraient réclamer le statut de parti et vouloir faire modifier le Règlement en conséquence. Ce qu'ils veulent, même sans le statut de parti, c'est une représentation du Bloc. Cela pourrait nous éloigner de ce que nous voulons vraiment accomplir.

À mon avis, si nous entendons traiter de la « conciliation travail-famille », peu importe le terme qui convient le mieux au Comité, nous devons avoir une meilleure idée de ce que nous voulons. Nous pouvons toujours élargir le concept pour permettre à tout un chacun de se prononcer sur le sujet. Au moins, ainsi, les gens ont une idée de ce dont il est question s'ils veulent formuler d'autres observations. Ce que je crains, c'est que l'affaire ne se complique très rapidement. Le Bloc et tout le monde devraient participer au processus à un moment donné. Ne vous méprenez pas: je ne dis pas qu'ils devraient être exclus du processus; je considère toutefois que nous devons avoir une meilleure idée de l'orientation que nous voulons adopter.

Le président:

Madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je pense qu'il existe des moyens de résoudre ce problème, en allant peut-être au-delà des parlementaires. Comme M. Reid l'a demandé précédemment à M. Christopherson: « Avez-vous été membre de l'assemblée législative et député sur la Colline? » Il nous faut peut-être trouver des gens qui possèdent de l'expérience ou un point de vue sur les deux plans. Une personne qui n'est pas actuellement en fonction pourrait nous aider à atténuer ce problème.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je viens d'avoir une idée, que je vous lance sans y avoir réfléchi beaucoup. Pourquoi n'inviterions-nous pas des conjoints à venir nous parler de l'expérience réelle du mariage avec quelqu'un qui fait ce travail de fou?

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est une idée intéressante, en fait. Il y a un certain nombre de départs qui m'ont surpris à la fin de la dernière législature. Je ne donnerai pas de noms, parce que la véritable raison peut en être des problèmes de santé dans certains cas, mais il y a des gens qui auraient été réélus, qui détenaient des sièges quasi garantis et qui semblaient aimer leur travail.

Outre les députés de la dernière législature qui sont partis, il y en a aussi de législatures précédentes qui pourraient peut-être nous éclairer. Je suis sûr que quelques recherches judicieuses nous permettraient de trouver des personnes pouvant nous expliquer le stress qu'elles vivaient et qui les a poussées à partir. C'est une possibilité.

Le président:

Si nous ne voulons pas partir... je veux dire manquer de temps...

Une voix: Est-ce un lapsus freudien, monsieur le président?

Le président: Oui, partir.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président: J'aimerais fixer les détails exacts de la prochaine séance. Pour commencer, nous allons demander à ces trois greffiers de nous parler un peu des éléments faisant partie de la lettre de mandat, ou avons-nous une sous-liste plus courte?

M. David Christopherson:

Je dois dire, monsieur le président, pour ce que cela vaut, que je pense que nous devrions commencer par aborder un sujet seulement, puis voir comment nous nous en tirons. C'est assez complexe. Il y a tellement de ramifications qui changent constamment.

Le président:

Nous en déciderons lorsque notre...

M. David Christopherson:

Il y a le concept du Parlement inclusif, celui de la conciliation travail-famille, et je pense que nous devrions nous en tenir à cela, le temps de trouver nos repères, d'atteindre notre vitesse de croisière, après quoi nous pourrons penser à nous attaquer à... À trop vouloir en faire, nous n'arriverons à rien. Nous serons dépassés. C'est ma crainte.

Le président:

La greffière ne comprend pas très bien. Pourriez-vous être un peu plus précis quant aux éléments de la lettre de mandat qui s'inscriraient dans ce thème?

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai peur que si nous ciblons tout le contenu de la lettre de mandat, qui comprend à peu près tout et son contraire...

Le président:

Non, ce n'est pas ce que je veux dire. Pouvez-vous définir ce que vous entendez par « Parlement inclusif » et « conciliation travail-famille », les séances du vendredi...

M. David Christopherson:

Oui.

Le président:

... des modifications à l'organisation des votes.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, tout ce qui nous complique la vie ici, brise le rythme. Je ne sais pas trop comment vous voulez le formuler.

(1255)

Le président:

Très bien, nous sommes d'accord pour étudier cela à la réunion de mardi.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, mais il n'est pas question des comptes publics et du budget, ici. Il n'est pas question du Sénat.

Il est question de tout ce qui peut rendre le Parlement plus inclusif, favoriser la conciliation travail-famille, utilisez les mots que vous voulez. Soumettez toutes les questions pertinentes, selon les caucus, soumettez-les au comité de direction, pour qu'on en discute.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Sommes-nous limités à deux séances par semaine si nous perdons le contrôle?

M. David Christopherson:

Non. Nous pouvons nous rencontrer aussi souvent que nous le voulons.

Le président:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est bon.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Il serait peut-être utile de donner quelques exemples. Dominic a parlé de l'idée de combiner deux jours de séance le mardi, des vendredis et du moment des votes à la Chambre. Ce ne sont que quelques exemples. Il y en a peut-être d'autres que vous voudriez nous donner, mais ce sont les trois qui me viennent immédiatement à l'esprit.

M. David Christopherson:

Ce n'est pas de garderie qu'il est question, mais d'un espace privé pour la famille. Personnellement, je laisserais un peu plus de latitude à chaque caucus pour déterminer ce que cela comprend, et ils pourront présenter leurs arguments.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Ils pourraient donner quelques exemples pour expliquer de quoi ils parlent.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui.

Sommes-nous d'accord, monsieur le président, pour tenir ces audiences d'abord, puis pour que le comité de direction se réunisse, afin de faire le bilan de tout ce qui s'est dit et de proposer une solution au comité?

Le président:

Bien sûr.

M. David Christopherson:

Je pense que nous avions l'intention de solliciter l'éclairage des témoins avant d'en parler avec nos collègues, question de pouvoir leur transmettre l'information et de la placer dans le contexte de ce que nous connaissons déjà.

Le président:

D'accord, nous nous sommes entendus sur deux choses jusqu'à maintenant. Nous avons convenu de ce que nous allons faire à la prochaine séance, qui aura lieu, comme vous l'avez précisé, avant la réunion du comité de direction. Nous avons également décidé que notre analyste allait nous brosser un portrait de ce qui se fait dans le monde à ce chapitre.

Cela dit, comme le sous-comité ne se rencontrera qu'après la séance de mardi, nous devons maintenant décider de ce que nous allons faire de la séance prévue pour jeudi.

M. David Christopherson:

Parlez-vous de jeudi prochain?

Le président:

Oui. Certains ont proposé que nous entendions des conjoints ou des parlementaires d'autres partis.

M. David Christopherson:

Il y a toujours ma motion.

Le président:

Il y a votre motion.

M. David Christopherson:

Si vous vous demandez ce que nous pouvons faire de bon, vous avez la réponse.

Le président:

C'est au comité d'en décider.

M. David Christopherson:

L'idéal serait de conclure la discussion avant la séance du comité de direction. Ce n'est pas absolument essentiel, mais ce serait très utile que nous nous entendions d'ici là.

Le président:

Nous pourrions diviser la séance de jeudi prochain en deux parties: une heure pour examiner votre motion, puis la deuxième heure pour la rencontre du comité de direction.

M. David Christopherson:

Nous pourrions faire cela.

Le président:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Et nous pourrions nous arrêter même si nous n'avons toujours pas de solution.

Le président:

Peut-être que nous devrions faire l'inverse. Le comité de direction pourrait se réunir d'abord, au cas où votre débat durerait deux heures.

M. Arnold Chan:

Tout dépend de la disponibilité des greffiers des autres chambres, donc nous devrons peut-être faire preuve de souplesse.

Le président:

Évidemment.

M. Blake Richards:

Je pensais que nous voulions que le comité de direction se réunisse un peu plus tard que la semaine prochaine.

Le président:

Pour qu'il ait le temps de recevoir nos commentaires?

M. Blake Richards:

Je pourrais peut-être faire une autre proposition. Notre analyste a indiqué qu'il pourrait étudier ce qui se passe dans d'autres législatures, dans d'autres pays. Nous avons évoqué ici la possibilité de parler avec d'anciens parlementaires, entre autres.

Si nous voulons examiner la motion à la lumière de tout cela, nous pourrions tenir une réunion de travail du comité, mardi, pour nous le permettre. Nous pourrions peut-être utiliser cette plage horaire pour entendre notre analyste nous parler des pistes de solution à notre disposition. Cela vous laisserait un peu plus de temps pour prévoir la comparution d'un témoin jeudi. Nous pourrions aussi recevoir quelques groupes de témoins, même si je pense que les greffiers pourraient prendre toute la séance de deux heures. Cela nous laisserait un peu plus de temps, jusqu'après la relâche, pour en discuter avec nos caucus avant que le comité de direction se réunisse.

Le président:

J'avais oublié que nous voulions vous laisser plus de temps pour en discuter avec vos caucus, donc nous pourrions prendre du temps jeudi pour examiner votre rapport.

M. Andre Barnes:

Pour que la recherche et la traduction soient prêtes à temps, je devrais tout faire aujourd'hui, donc ce serait un rapport très maigre. Il serait préférable de nous laisser jusqu'à jeudi prochain, si les membres du comité l'acceptent.

Le président:

C'est ce que nous sommes en train de dire. Bien sûr.

M. Andre Barnes:

D'accord, ce serait donc jeudi, plutôt que mardi prochain.

Le président:

Mardi prochain, nous allons nous entretenir avec les trois greffiers pendant deux heures. Le jeudi suivant, nous pourrons consacrer une heure à votre rapport, après quoi nous examinerons la motion de M. Christopherson, dont nous pourrons débattre pendant la relâche, si nous pouvons rester ici.

(1300)

M. David Christopherson:

Nous prendrons la navette.

Le président:

Est-ce que c'est tout? Est-ce que c'est bon pour tout le monde?

Les directives à transmettre aux caucus sont que quiconque représente chaque caucus au comité de direction devrait si possible nous faire part des préférences, des priorités ou des recommandations de son parti sur la conciliation travail-famille, par la voix de son leader parlementaire, de son whip, de tout le caucus ou de quiconque il aura désigné à l'interne.

M. David Christopherson:

À qui devons-nous les soumettre, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Ce sera pendant la réunion du sous-comité, qui aura lieu après la relâche. C'est cependant une bonne question. Nous devons décider du moment exact où elle se tiendra.

M. Blake Richards:

Il y a deux choses. Je proposerais que pour nous laisser une plus grande marge de manoeuvre, avec nos caucus, nous pourrions peut-être essayer de prévoir cette rencontre vers la fin de la semaine suivant la relâche. C'est ce que je pense.

Le président:

Très bien.

M. Blake Richards:

Je voulais aussi vous poser une question, qui intéresse aussi sûrement David: qui sera le député du parti ministériel au sous-comité, pour que nous le sachions tous les deux. Je ne me rappelle plus, après tout cela, si nous nous sommes entendus pour qu'il y ait un ou deux députés de plus du parti ministériel ou sous-comité.

Le président:

Deux. Je pense qu'ils devaient en discuter ce matin.

M. Blake Richards:

Pour le comité de direction.

Le président:

Avez-vous choisi qui siégera au comité de direction?

Une voix: Ruby et Arnold.

Le président:

D'accord, c'est entendu, en plus du président et du vice-président et de M. Christopherson, n'est-ce pas?

Monsieur Richards, quand devrions-nous tenir la réunion du sous-comité, d'après vous?

M. Blake Richards:

Nous ne partageons peut-être pas tous la même opinion, mais personnellement, je préférerais qu'elle se tienne après notre rencontre de caucus, cette semaine-là, et cette rencontre a habituellement lieu le mercredi matin. Ce pourrait donc être mercredi après-midi, jeudi, peu importe, mais c'est ce que je préférerais, personnellement.

Le président:

Vous parlez de la semaine après la relâche, pas de la semaine prochaine.

M. Blake Richards:

Exactement, de la semaine après la relâche. De cette manière, nous aurions l'occasion...

Je ne sais pas trop ce qui sera à l'ordre du jour de la réunion du caucus de mon parti ou des autres partis la semaine prochaine. Donc pour que nous ayons deux autres occasions de soulever la question lors des réunions de nos caucus, je préférerais que cette rencontre ait lieu après.

Le président:

Mais le cas échéant, que ferons-nous de notre séance du mardi suivant la relâche?

M. Blake Richards:

Des propositions pourraient être faites à la rencontre de jeudi, n'est-ce pas?

Le président:

Très bien.

Donc jeudi, après l'étude de votre rapport, nous allons... Disons que nous prenons 45 minutes. Nous aurons ensuite 15 minutes pour décider de ce que nous ferons le mardi suivant, après quoi nous consacrerons une heure à la motion de M. Christopherson.

Est-ce que cela vous convient?

M. David Christopherson:

Cela semble faisable.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

Je pense que c'est un très bon plan. Saisissez l'occasion.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on January 28, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.