header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2015-12-10 PROC 2

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning, everyone.

This is meeting number two of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. Today we will be considering committee business.

I'm going to state the obvious for some of you guys who have been here for a long time and you might be hearing things that you already understand, but there are some new members. We usually start all the committees with routine business. At the beginning of a session, committees normally agree to a number of routine motions to facilitate the organization of their work. These routine motions are generally the same in all committees, with some exceptions or variations. A committee can adopt whatever motions it wants; however, and if they wish, members are certainly free not to adopt them. We'll be doing them one by one.

We will now proceed with routine motions. We have a paper copy this time if you want it. It was also distributed to you in that briefing book at the first meeting in the attachment. We have paper copies if anyone wants them. We'll distribute them now.

Mr. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

We're still trying to figure out [Technical Difficulty—Editor] the source and where it's going to, so my apologies.

The Chair:

Okay. The messenger is going to do it.

The ones we're distributing are the ones that were used as a base last time around. Obviously there will need to be a few minor administrative amendments, but anything the committee wants to discuss as well....

We'll do each motion separately. If anyone is using their iPad, the motions are in section 5 of the committee briefing book, which is accessible from the “other documents” icon. Normally, in the future, you will get all the documents electronically, so if you want paper copies for the committee, you should print them out and bring them.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I must remember to call you that from now on, Larry.

I wanted to ask something. I'm not sure if you can answer this or if the clerks can answer this. Are all of these routine motions the same as they were as adopted—not as presented at the first meeting, but as adopted—in the last Parliament? Are there any changes from the way they were as adopted by this committee—they can be two different things—in the 41st Parliament?

The Chair:

I'll let the clerk answer that question.

The Clerk of the Committee (Ms. Joann Garbig):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Yes, the text was extracted from the minutes of the meeting in October 2013 when these motions were adopted by the committee.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. Is this a reasonable time in the meeting for me to raise specific questions with regard to individual items here? Should I wait for a different point in the meeting for the purposes of allowing the meeting to flow smoothly?

The Chair:

We're going to do each of them one by one, so when it comes to the one you want to talk about, then bring that point up.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That sounds fine to me. So this is literally what was adopted in October 2013.

The Clerk:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

All right.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Chair, I would like to pick up on the structural issue of the parliamentary secretaries, just to finish that off. I notice that there has been some change from the last meeting. We're not at the full promise yet, but we've managed to go in the right direction at least three places. My question remains, Chair. I'm seeing six members. I think the government gets six. One of them is Mr. Lamoureux, who is the parliamentary secretary.

Correct me if I'm wrong, please. I want to get this clarified, because it affects all the committees. If you don't mind, Chair, this is the first one, and it matters.

Through you, I will ask Mr. Lamoureux this.

The commitment from the government was that you were looking seriously, if you hadn't outright committed, at pulling parliamentary secretaries off the committees, since, at least you could argue, having them on committees impedes the independence of the members, given that the parliamentary secretary can use the whip structure to, if nothing else, put pressure on the members to follow the parliamentary secretary. Goodness gracious, if people don't—trust me—there's going to be trouble. You don't have to comment, but we all know how this works.

I think it's a great idea to give the committees more independence. We supported it. I think we're trying to be more like the mother ship in Britain, where they're really seen to be a lot more independent than our committees are. We have a long way to go, but one of those first good steps was the notion from the government that it would pull parliamentary secretaries from the committees.

Again, I raised that the other day. Mr. Lamoureux said he was going to give me an answer. So far, the only answer I see is that he's a voting member of the committee, and he's moved down three chairs. I can assure you the whip effect of a majority government is not affected by whether he sits there or there.

If I could, I'd like to get some clarification from Mr. Lamoureux that the government is going to pull parliamentary secretaries off the committees, because it would seem to me that this is going to set the pattern. Given that the government says it wants to do more work by committee where members can be more and more independent, I fail to see how his presence today supports that goal.

(1110)

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson, the House of Commons passed a motion regarding who is on this committee. Mr. Lamoureux is not a voting member of this committee. He's like any other member of Parliament. He's welcome to sit in. I'm the sixth government member on the committee.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay. I accept that. So he's not a voting member, but he's still here, and he still carries the clout of a majority government and the will of the Prime Minister.

The Chair:

Well, he's here, as are, I hope, all parliamentary secretaries, to provide information from the minister.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Are you going to defend him, now, Chair? Is that your role? Are you defending the government position?

The Chair:

I'm defending that the parliamentary secretary is here to provide information from the minister.

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, I'm sorry, Chair. Larry, I'm sorry. This is not going to work, man.

You're an independent chair. We'll battle out the partisan aspects, but I don't want to have to fight you too on a partisan issue. With great respect, sir—and I mean this—it sounds to me as though you're acting like a government member defending something the government is doing, when what you should be doing is refereeing us as we wrestle this issue to the ground.

The Chair:

Mr. Lamoureux.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux (Winnipeg North, Lib.):

Mr. Christopherson, I appreciate the concerns you have. I think that as much as possible, we need to be sensitive as to why we're actually here. I have a vested interest in this particular committee, and as do other members of the House of Commons, I have the right to be present.

I suspect that many of the things that take place in the procedure and House affairs committee will have some direct and indirect impact on the whole issue of what's taking place in the House. I'll use the Standing Orders as an example. I like to think my expertise might be of benefit to committee members.

I think you underestimate the important role as defined by the Prime Minister that committees have. He wants to see committees being more proactive and productive in engaging with all members. All members of this committee—all the Liberal members, and I'm sure you and the Conservative members—will contribute through healthy debate to whatever is on the agenda. If I can assist or contribute in any way, I look forward to doing that.

As one of the committee members, I can tell you that I have no intentions of voting. I am not a voting member of the committee, nor as a parliamentary secretary have I asked to be a voting member. I like to think I'm here to complement the members who are on the committee, and nothing more than that.

You'll find that the members on the committee representing the government are very independent in their thinking. If there are ways in which I can be here to support them, I'm more than happy to do that.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, I just wanted to say a couple of things.

One, I can see that our clerk is right. These really are the motions that came from 2013. We'll have to read them carefully, because they do say such things as “that Dave Mackenzie be appointed” chair of the subcommittee on private members' business, which was what we wanted at the time; it was a government member. Another spot in there refers to the number of seats and kind of assumes that the New Democrats are here, the Liberals are there, and the Conservatives are over on that side of the House.

My point is that, yes, these really are what we adopted. That confirms, of course, that Mr. Lamoureux is not on the committee.

I have a couple of suggestions regarding Mr. Lamoureux' role. It's not my place to say how he'll choose to conduct himself, but I have a suggestion just for clarity.

Kevin, you don't have to do this, but I would suggest that you sit at that end so that it's clear that these are the members of the committee, and anybody can see that you're not actually on the committee. You're just sitting at the table to listen and so on. That's the system we had when Elizabeth May came to this committee to deal with private members' business. She sat separately. It became clear that she was there not as a regular member of the committee.

That's one thing, and it's just a suggestion. You don't have to do that. It's just an idea. It reflects informal practices.

The second thing, though, is that if you're not a member of the committee, I think you actually have to get the unanimous consent of the committee to speak every time. I could be wrong, but I think that might be the case.

I see that the clerk has anticipated me and is pointing to the rules, so maybe we could get clarification on that.

(1115)

The Chair:

One second: can you add Mr. Graham to the list?

A voice: Yes.

The Chair: Standing Order 119 reads as follows: Any Member of the House who is not a member of a standing, special or legislative committee, may, unless the House or the committee concerned otherwise orders, take part in the public proceedings of the committee, but may not vote or move any motion, nor be part of any quorum.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

Just to be clear on that, if you don't mind, that then means that when we're having discussions like this, Mr. Lamoureux or presumably anybody else—or even, in theory, everybody else—can turn up here and seek a.... We'd need a big table for this to be done, but they could get a place at the table, put up their hand, and be recognized by the chair to participate in discussions like the one we're having right now. Is that correct?

The Chair:

Yes, unless the House or the committee orders otherwise. So if we say no, the committee can deny them.

As you know, your having been on committees for a long time, any member of Parliament can come to any committee, and can participate unless the committee decides no.

Mr. Scott Reid:

My understanding, when it comes to things like questioning witnesses, is that it only occurs in a case where a member is substituted in for somebody else in order to participate in the questioning and to then take their place in the normal rotation.

I don't think you're disagreeing with me. I see that you're nodding in confirmation with me. Okay.

But in a debate like this one, you would simply recognize anybody who is at the table who is a member of Parliament to participate in the discussion.

The Chair:

Unless the committee orders otherwise or decides otherwise.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Unless the committee orders otherwise. All right.

I don't want to seem uncollegial here, but that does present us with a problem that I can anticipate. The problem is that the committee consists of a majority of members from the government party; so Liberals can show up and participate, including slowing down any proceeding they don't like, by just coming along and participating in the debate.

In all fairness, history shows that you don't really need to draw on other members when you have Mr. Lamoureux at your disposal, because he has a remarkable capacity to offer voluminous thoughts on almost any subject on no notice whatsoever, and I mean that in the nicest way. Nonetheless, if anybody from any other party does the same thing, that will be shut down, and I think that is an issue.

I don't have any specific thing I'd propose right now, but I'll probably come back to this at our next meeting in January with a thought as to how we could modify this. I'll suggest a motion to be adopted by the committee which effectively would say that any intervention ought to involve the consent of the committee at any given time. The government, if it really wants to do something like this, can still override this, but I think there ought not to be more widespread participation.

This doesn't say that Mr. Lamoureux shouldn't be here, that he isn't welcome here. In my mind, he is very much welcome here. I just wanted to say that I think this is a problem, something that could be subject to misuse, and we want to prevent that from happening.

The Chair:

Okay. I don't want to belabour this too long. Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Well, I might want to.

Through you, Chair, I'd like to begin in terms of the comments from Mr. Lamoureux.

Most of what you said, Mr. Lamoureux, would stand if we were at two weeks ago and were having a blank slate discussion, but the problem is—and you can't erase the history—that you did arrive here at the last meeting and took the helm position, and you were the only member who spoke. Clearly, there was an intention that you were going to lead things.

Not only that, but normally, as a rule, this committee is staffed by, if you will, or has members on it who have experience, because of this sort of leading role that this committee plays in many of the activities of the House. That's why it has certain special rights. We always meet at the same time. We don't rotate. For the other committees, a lot of their stuff goes through that. There's all that kind of thing.

This is a very important committee, incredibly important in terms of the House, so for Mr. Lamoureux to be here.... Mr. Chan has some experience, I grant you that, but not much—I think a year or two after a by-election—and virtually everybody else is new. If you're going to throw newbies onto the committee, it makes sense that you'd bring in a seasoned veteran who would lead it.

Where would that seasoned veteran be? Oh, it's you, so any sense that this is just you dropping by because you're interested really doesn't hold any water. The fact of the matter is that you're here to ride shotgun on behalf of the PMO to make sure this committee does exactly what the Prime Minister wants, and guess what—that's the way it was the last time.

I raise this because the government is the one that has made such a big deal about wanting to be seen as the vehicle for change. I support that, and for some of the changes they want to make, I support those things. What I'm having trouble with is the words of the government versus the actions of the government. So far, when it comes to parliamentary secretaries on committees, there is nothing about their actions that link up with their words.

Mr. Lamoureux has every right to be here according to the rules, but I want to remind him that his Prime Minister stands up every day and talks about transparency, accountability, sunny ways, and how things are going to change, and so far, all we've seen from this government vis-à-vis PROC is the same old same old same old.

I would like to know as we're moving forward—maybe Mr. Lamoureux can point it out to me—when he's taking actions that support the government's words, because so far, they don't.

An hon. member: I'd like to—

(1120)

The Chair:

I'm sorry. We have Mr. Graham, Ms. Vandenbeld, and then Mr. Chan.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Mr. Christopherson, I would just like to know if you consider Tyler to have no experience.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Pardon me?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I've spent many years sitting behind you next to your assistant, and I'm wondering if that makes me have no experience whatsoever.

Mr. David Christopherson:

As a member of Parliament?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Well, I've been—

Mr. David Christopherson:

As a member of Parliament? Come on, David, you've been around long enough. Don't do this. You can do better than this as your starting gambit.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: I'd like to—

Mr. David Christopherson: If you're going to take a position, make sure you can defend it, David. If you're going to act like a veteran, then you had better make sure that you're going to be dealt with like a veteran.

Now come on. Nobody here has any real experience on this committee. Come on.

The Chair:

Order.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

David, I'd like—

The Chair:

Next in the order is Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

I do want to address that issue, because I think that's a slight against members of this committee. We may not have experience on this committee or in this Parliament, but I for one was the director of parliamentary affairs to the government House leader, and I've been an adviser to a number of parliaments on parliamentary reform with the Global Programme for Parliamentary Strengthening in the United Nations Development Programme. I think you will find that we are not as easily cowed as you think we will be, and I think you'll find that we will contribute fully to this committee.

An hon. member: [Inaudible—Editor]

The Chair:

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I want to address Mr. Christopherson's comments.

At the end of the day, this is part of the overall discussion. We still have to ultimately look at what the role of parliamentary secretaries will be. That is the actual function of this particular committee. Let's have that particular conversation, right? At the end of the day, we will determine—

Mr. David Christopherson:

We're going to define the work of the parliamentary secretaries?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

We're going to determine the rules that will ultimately govern that function—

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm interested.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

So let's have that conversation.

Mr. David Christopherson: I'm very interested.

Mr. Arnold Chan: We'll set the necessary agenda and have that conversation at the appropriate time.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Did you say that this committee is going to define the role of parliamentary secretaries? Because I second that.

The Chair:

Order, please. Please speak through the chair, when you're recognized.

I think people's opinions are well known on that. I'd like to get on with routine business and do the motions we have before us. If people would like to come back to this later, we could.

The first motion, which I'll read out and then ask someone to propose, is on the analysts' service. This is routine. It allows someone from the Library of Parliament to help us out: That the Committee retain, as needed and at the discretion of the Chair, the services of one or more analysts from the Library of Parliament to assist in its work.

That has been moved by Mr. Hoback.

Is there any debate or any objection to this motion?

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: I'd like to introduce Andre Barnes.

Welcome. It's great to have you back. We couldn't do this without you. We really appreciate all the staff. He has experience, as you know.

I'll read out the second motion as it is, but then I'll ask for an amendment, since, as you know, we're making a change here: That the Subcommittee on Agenda and Procedure be established and be composed of the Chair, the two Vice-Chairs, one Government member and the Parliamentary Secretary.

Mr. Chan.

(1125)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I'd like to propose an amendment to delete what it says after “the two vice-chairs” where it says “one government member and the parliamentary secretary” and to substitute the following wording: “two government members”.

The Chair:

The motion now reads: That the Subcommittee on Agenda and Procedure be established and be composed of the Chair, the two Vice-Chairs, and two government members.

Is there any discussion?

Mr. Hoback.

Mr. Randy Hoback (Prince Albert, CPC):

Could we have a clarification? When you say “two government members”, that means two government members who are actually members of this committee. Is that correct?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

That's correct.

The Chair:

We'll have Mr. Christopherson and then Mr. Reid.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I thank Mr. Chan. I support part of his motion, of course, the part that strikes the parliamentary secretary. That won't come as a shock. My difficulty is with putting two government members on.

Chair, I would seek your guidance on some of this. Most of the steering committees I've sat on have been one of two configurations. One is where the chair was actually the government representative and then there were two other members from the other two parties, which was very problematic. If you hearken back to some of the concerns I raised about your chairing a little earlier, there is the issue of the chair trying to represent a party at a steering committee, even though it's very informal, while at the same time being the one who referees the discussion, which is very difficult.

I moved a motion at public accounts committee, a number of parliaments ago, whereby we actually changed that and put on a formal government member and one from each of the recognized parties, and then the chair did its thing.

My understanding is that most steering committees don't bring non-unanimous decisions; at least that's been my experience. The steering committee tries to reach consensus. If there is consensus, which there is most of the time, in my experience, then things are brought forward to the full committee to vote on.

If the steering committee can't agree, then we don't have a power play on the steering committee such that the majority, meaning the government, gets to carry the day and bring the recommendation back. It can exercise its majority right at the committee, but the steering committee process is not a decision-making body per se. Everything we do has to come back to the main committee to be supported.

As we all know, the whole idea of steering committees or executives is to facilitate the business of the committee. There are a lot of details, just routine stuff. It puts together the schedule. Nobody's playing any games. It's just straight up front, boom, boom, boom, here's what we're trying to achieve and how can we best do this as a committee. As I said, 95% of the time there's agreement, because it's only about how we do our business, not about what the decisions are.

With that in mind, I would just ask the government to please consider the idea of a chair, a government representative, and then one representative from each of the recognized parties. In this case it would be the Conservatives and the NDP. Again, if there's no consensus, then it doesn't come back here by majority vote, because it's not a decision-making body. If it's a consultative body, and if all their decisions have to come back here, and the government has 100% guarantee that their will, because they have a majority, will always prevail, then it would seem to me we could facilitate things if we stayed with a chair and one from each of the recognized parties.

Thanks, Chair.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Since I moved the amendment—

The Chair:

No, it's Mr. Reid and then Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

My apologies, Chair.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I just want a bit of clarification. Is that effectively a proposal to amend Mr. Chan's amendment, and if so, are we debating it?

Mr. David Christopherson:

If I have any support for it, it is.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Could you word that as a subamendment, then? Then we could debate it.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I would move to amend the amendment, so I guess it's a subamendment to Mr. Chan's amendment, to strike everything after the words “government member”, and leave out the two government representatives and the parliamentary secretary.

Joann, I seek your assistance in trying to make some sense of that.

Mr. Randy Hoback:

The chair and two vice-chairs is what you're saying...?

Mr. David Christopherson:

The two vice-chairs.... No. You need a government member if you're going to do the one, two, three, so we would stop after “government member”. We would just stop it there.

Madam Clerk, I don't know if that constitutes a subamendment. I would seek your guidance.

The Chair:

If I got that correctly, the motion would read that the Subcommittee on Agenda and Procedure be established and be composed of the chair, the two vice-chairs, and one government member.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's correct, Chair.

The Chair:

Okay. There is an amendment on the table for discussion.

Mr. Reid is next in line.

Mr. Scott Reid:

My question at this point simply becomes this.... I can comment on this, but I first want to confirm it. Is this actually a subamendment, or is it a new amendment that can only be dealt with as an item of business when the first amendment is disposed of, given the fact that it is not really an amendment to it but a replacement for it?

I'm asking for your advice on that before I go any further.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Arnold, I don't know your thinking, but you can accept it as a friendly amendment and move things along if you're in agreement.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I don't know if that works here. I think that's Robert's Rules of Order, not parliamentary procedure.

An hon. member: [Inaudible—Editor]

The Chair:

The old procedures weren't really a motion, so the first motion we were dealing with was Mr. Chan's motion, and we have Mr. Christopherson's first amendment, so we're debating the amendment.

(1130)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Do we need a seconder?

The Chair:

No. We don't need seconders at committee.

On the amendment, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I actually had a different suggestion.

David, this is not me speaking against your motion. It's simply that I was going to propose an amendment, and it's easier to debate your amendment in a fully informed manner if you know what my amendment was going to be.

I was going to suggest that it would be the chair and the two vice-chairs, and then after that we would just say “two government members who are both permanent members of the committee”. My logic in suggesting this was, and I guess still is, that this would ensure that it's people who are actually involved in the working of the committee and have some knowledge, that it's not some outsider. In particular, it rules out the possibility that one of those two members could be a parliamentary secretary.

The problem with Mr. Chan's original motion.... Arnold, this is not me trying to say there's anything nefarious about it. It's simply a door that remains open. It could be two government members who could be two members of the committee or two members of another committee who have no actual knowledge here and are simply there to impose the will of the whip. Potentially, it could even be one or more parliamentary secretaries, at least in theory.

This was designed to shut that down. I have to say that although Mr. Christopherson's suggestion doesn't fully shut that down, it accomplishes roughly the same goal.

That's my contribution. It's not an argument for or against Mr. Christopherson's original proposal. It's simply how I was thinking of dealing with the same subject matter. I throw that out for others who are debating this issue.

An hon. member: [Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. Scott Reid: No, no. I just wanted to explain so that people will act in an informed manner when they're voting on Mr. Christopherson's subamendment; that's all.

The Chair:

Before we go on, Mr. Reid, when members are referred to with respect to subcommittees and things, it is always members of the committee.

Mr. Scott Reid: Is that correct?

The Chair: That's the convention, so your motion is redundant, just so you're aware of that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I actually was not aware of that. Is that correct? I'm sorry. I'm sure that on private members' business—I know this for a fact—we've had members on that subcommittee, which is a subcommittee of this committee, who were not members of this committee. Unless there was some other wording that precluded that, I think that convention has already been breached, as it were, and the actual wording in the motion could be helpful to plug that hole in the dike, so to speak.

An hon. member: Do you think you're going to be open to that amendment?

The Chair:

Okay. We have to deal with Mr. Christopherson's amendment. We'll think on that, okay? Who's next?

Mr. Chan is next and then we have Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Mr. Chair, I just want to ask Mr. Reid a quick question.

I'm actually fine if you propose that as an amendment, Mr. Reid. The only question on which I wanted to get clarification from you is this. Let's say we needed substitution; if it's the two government members who are part of this committee, that precludes us, so if we needed a substitution, could it only come from the permanent members of the committee?

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's correct. That's what I mean, yes.

(1135)

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm surprised they don't know, given the vast experience they claim to have.... But I don't want to be like that, so I won't say it.

Here's the thing, Chair: I think I get a sense of where this is going. You can see that my biggest concern is that the steering committee becomes just a mini-me of the committee, which really is pointless. I guess I'm seeking from you a clarification that my interpretation was the correct one, that you will use and that the clerk supports.

I had mentioned earlier in one of my soliloquies that the committee would not make recommendations that did not have consensus, where there wasn't unanimity, that it wouldn't be majority rule. Could I get a ruling from you on whether or not that is exactly correct? Or is there something different in terms of how that steering committee functions and how it reaches its decisions, and the relationship between those decisions and this committee?

For example, I had said that in my experience, only where there is unanimity do those recommendations come forward. Where there is not unanimity among, in this case, the three recognized parties, then it comes to the committee as an unresolved matter with no recommendation from the steering committee. Conversely, if the government were looking at the steering committee to actually win majority votes, and that would carry the strength of a positive recommendation...which is much harder to stop, especially if it's the government that's sending it and the government has all the votes here.

It's really important, in my opinion, Chair, to be clear from the get-go on whether or not the steering committee makes majority decisions that are then recommended to the committee. Or is it only decisions and recommendations that have unanimous support at the steering committee that come forward in that fashion?

The Chair:

I'll ask the clerk for clarification on that, and then we'll go to Mr. Hoback.

Mr. David Christopherson: Great. Thank you.

The Chair: The clerk suggests it's up to the call of the subcommittee; however they want to work and what they want to bring forward, it's up to them.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Then, Chair, I would seek, through you to Mr. Chan, some assurance that we're not looking at changing things.

I mean, here's the thing: You're now telling me the committee will decide for itself. If the government wins the argument and they get two members, that means they're guaranteed to win every vote, so why wouldn't they go to the subcommittee to argue they want the rules that way? They have the votes to force them. Then there's the whole system I was talking about, where the subcommittee, or steering committee, becomes nothing but a mini-me version of this committee with all its political dynamics.

I'm not trying to pick fights, by the way; I really do like working together, but we have to get the ground rules correct. I need some clarification from the government, in light of that ruling, on how they're going to interpret that at the subcommittee, because it matters whether we give agreement or not to two.

Let me put my cards on the table. If it's going to be consensus, fine, bring two. I don't think it's helpful. I don't think it changes anything. It just gives somebody another meeting. Maybe you need that, with all the caucus you have. That's fair enough. But it doesn't change the dynamic. If we're into a situation where it's majority vote as opposed to consensus, then, number one, we've moved away from some of the more independent tools available to this committee to work together, removed from the government, which supposedly is your goal.

If I could get that assurance, it would certainly make it a lot easier for me as we go forward. Otherwise, if you tell me that you're going to take two votes, change the rules in this Parliament, different from the last Parliament, to beef up the government strength in a subcommittee that's supposed to be as non-partisan as possible, I'm going to have some real difficulty with that, and I mean real difficulty, because it affects everything we do going forward, and it may likely set the template for the rest of our committees.

I say, with the greatest of respect, that if we want to get through the rest of our work, the government would be well advised to be very clear on what their intention is. I hope it's on the small-d democratic side and not the capital-C control side.

(1140)

The Chair:

Thank you. We have Mr. Hoback, and then Mr. Chan, Mr. Lamoureux, and Ms. Vandenbeld.

Mr. Randy Hoback:

Mr. Chair, in the spirit of moving this along, why don't we just deal with his subamendment and vote on it? I think Mr. Reid would have an amendment that he would like to make also. I don't think we're going to see any more discussion that's going to bring any more wisdom to the discussion.

The Chair:

Do you want to call the vote on the amendment?

Mr. David Christopherson:

As a point of order, you can't shut down debate in a committee. I want the floor, please, if nobody else does.

The Chair:

Okay, we're going to the other interventions at the moment. It's Mr. Chan, then Mr. Lamoureux, and then Ms. Vandenbeld.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Mr. Christopherson, it really comes down to our actual practices and how we conduct ourselves. We absolutely agree that the point of the steering committee is to operate under consensus, and if we can achieve that, that's exactly how we should proceed. We have every intention of working collaboratively with the other parties with respect to establishing that.

All we're proposing to do is to put into effect the replacement of the parliamentary secretary, within the standard past practices of the composition of this particular committee, and to replace that simply with a government member. That's all.

What you're proposing, really, is to change the composition of the committee and to change the actual membership balance.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I had a question, Mr. Chan, and my question was very clear—

The Chair:

Mr. Lamoureux, you're next in the order. Do you defer?

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

Yes.

The Chair:

Okay, then we have Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Mr. Chair, just to be realistic about the purpose of this amendment, you see that the only real effective change is replacing a parliamentary secretary with a government member. The reason for that is so that the parliamentary secretary is no longer a member of the subcommittee. Everything else remains exactly as it always was and there's no reason to think that the behaviour of the subcommittee or anything would be any different than it has been. The only effective change is replacing the parliamentary secretary.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

The government can go so far saying “the way it used to be”, but you came in here saying you were going to change things, make them better and more independent, and give us more independence.

I hear all of the arguments. I say to the government members, with the greatest of respect, that I asked the chair whether or not it would be majority rule or consensus. I've been around here a while; you listen to every word. Mr. Chan said that they were going to try to achieve consensus, but what I have not yet heard is whether or not only decisions that are unanimous will come forward to this committee. If that's the case, we don't have as big a problem. In fact, I don't think we have a problem. I don't like it, but I can live with it.

However, if the government is going to say the chair has now recognized the subcommittee has the right to decide whether it's going to be a majority decision or unanimous consensus building as a requirement, and that this has not been decided and will only be decided by the subcommittee.... I'm asking, in the spirit of the new sunny ways and openness of the government, whether it is saying that it is interested in keeping things the way they were and having less control from the PMO in terms of the work that we do. I just need to hear crystal clear that the subcommittee will not make recommendations to this committee that aren't unanimous.

If I get that assurance, we don't have a problem. If I don't have that assurance, you might want to settle in.

The Chair:

Are there any further interventions?

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'd like the floor.

The Chair:

Go ahead.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I had asked for some clarification. I now have the floor again. I'm asking, through you, if whoever's in lead over there would give me the assurance that, indeed, the decisions of the steering committee will be unanimous and that it's not going to be a partisan arena, as it hasn't been in the past. I'm seeking that clarification.

If the government's not willing to follow that aspect.... We've already been through some dancing with the parliamentary secretary. It only took a week and a half and suddenly the words aren't lining up with the actions. This is important. The work of the steering committee is crucial, especially in a committee like this, which often has a huge workload.

Mr. Chair, as you know, one thing that was very helpful the last time was the character and personality of the previous chair. I voted for you. I was hoping that the same sort of thing would happen. We need to be able to work together, because we do deal with a lot of issues that are not partisan. If the very core driving our agenda is not being decided in a consensual manner, but rather is being decided by a majority vote, it is legal but it is not sunny ways, and it is not openness, and it is certainly not an improvement.

I'm having trouble even understanding why they're having so much difficulty with it. The whole idea was that they wanted to give committees some independence and the first thing that we're wrestling with is to get them to let go of control so we can have some of that independence.

Either the PMO is going to run all of the committees the same way that it did for the last decade, with all due respect, or you're actually going to do things differently, which means that we do things differently.

(1145)

The Chair:

Are there any further interventions?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Mr. Chair, I still have the floor, and it looks like I'm going to have it for some time, because I want an answer. I'm entitled to an answer.

It's not an unreasonable thing for me to ask a government that says they're going to be open to tell us how the heck they're going to be running the steering committee or whether the committee is going to be allowed to run it, and so far, the silence from the government is deafening. It tells me that they still want control. They want to grab control of this committee by the throat and wrap it in some nice sunny ways and words and all that, but at the end of the day, here's the problem for the government.

I think I'd better settle in, because this is going to go on for a while. Here's the problem the government is going to have: slowly but surely, you're going to find out that every little deviance, especially when it comes to independence and some of the things you talked about in the House, is not going to go away. If the government wants to have the trappings or use it as a cloak but says “We're still in control and nothing has really changed”, this is exactly the way to do it.

I see an honourable member shaking her head. I have been over there too. I understand, but the fact of the matter is that we deserve some assurances, not just words about sunny ways, but real, concrete action.

People in Canada were tired of it. This government promised something new, and a lot of people I know and like and respect agreed with that idea and voted for them in order to have that change. The cameras aren't on in here, but those people wouldn't be very impressed with this. This is not impressive for a government that says they are not trying to control committees and that in fact, conversely, they want to make sure that committees are more independent.

All we're asking for, all I'm asking for, is the assurance that when we're at the steering committee, it will not be the PMO that's driving the agenda. The way we do that is to say that the steering committee is non-partisan. We represent partisan interests at the committee, but we're trying to reach a non-partisan agreement, an agenda.

Let's say we're doing hearings on a report and we're going to decide how many witnesses to have, how much time to allot, and the order of witnesses. Those things really aren't partisan, unless we're really fighting, and that's a different matter, but most of the time on this committee we aren't. Those are the sorts of things we'd be dealing with at committee. Our defences are down and we're working together.

However, it's a whole different ball game if, at the end of those discussions, the government gets to dictate the agenda by virtue of a majority-controlled recommendation from the steering committee. Guess what? When a majority-controlled recommendation comes from the steering committee, the government members are going to vote for it 10 times out of 10.

Now, some of you can go on the record and say that's not going to be the case. Be very careful. I caution you about doing that, because this is how things will be.

The only way they could be different is if we sat down in a steering committee and at the end of the day, if we hadn't come to an agreement, we would have failed. I would have failed my caucus; the Conservatives would have failed their caucus, and so would the government members have failed their caucus if we couldn't come to an agreement, given that our job is to put together a non-partisan agenda that the committee could then endorse. Then the politics of what we do would take over in between, but to leave it the way it is with the government unwilling even to clarify makes it pretty clear that this government has no intention of doing anything different from the last government.

I have asked for the government members to respond. I'm not getting any signal yet that they are, so I'm going to be a little while, because I want this clarified. It affects every one of our committees.

I still—

(1150)

The Chair:

Hold it. We have a point of order.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Mr. Chair, my point of order is on relevance. My understanding is that the subamendment that the honourable member is putting forward is on the number of members of the committee. He's suggesting only one government member as opposed to two government members. However, the discussion is about whether that subcommittee would operate on consensus or not, which is not relevant to the actual subamendment that was put forth.

The Chair:

What he is talking about is somewhat related to the amendment, so I will let it continue.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Chair. I appreciate that. They know me. We'll be here awhile.

Again, that would be another attempt to shut me down by Madam Vandenbeld when we're in camera, which I would tell her, and which David would know, was a technique of the government all the time. When it couldn't win an argument, it would shut down the person who was making the argument.

Again, despite all its intentions, it's not as easy as you would think to deliver what the government promised or quite frankly, somebody would have done it by now. The fact is that it's difficult, and when you're the government, it's tough to let go, but then you're the one who made the promise to do that. You're the government and you're not doing that. You want to hang on to the ability to control the committees through majority votes at the steering committee and majority votes here. You attempt to shut me down on my debate because you don't like the arguments.

I have to tell you that I know you feel this is all right and that I'm way out of line, but that's exactly where the previous government was. It may have had different motives. It may have enjoyed trying to shut us down more, but the fact remains that it was trying to shut us down, just as my friend Anita across the way tried to do with me.

I come back to my main point, Chair. People can make me stop talking really easily. Just give me an assurance that we're not going to have partisan majority control politics at the steering committee. That's not an unreasonable request for an answer, which I'm not getting. I'm not getting even a “no”, and I have to tell you that all of this is symptomatic of what the last government did.

For all of you who are new here and who are thinking that all of your words and good intentions alone change things, I don't question them, and I believe with all my heart that you're all here for the right reasons. You really do want to change things, but what I'm putting in front of you is that you're acting exactly like the previous majority government.

I still have the floor. Mr. Chan would like to speak, and I'd like to get back on the speakers list.

The Chair:

On the speakers list so far we have Mr. Richards, Mr. Chan and then Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. Christopherson, I have been a bit lenient, but some of your arguments have been repetitive, so when you come back, please say something new.

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Having been a member of this committee for the last couple of years of the previous Parliament, I can see both sides of the argument here. I was actually a member of the subcommittee, as was Mr. Christopherson. I believe Mr. Lamoureux would have been there as well at that time. I think it worked reasonably well in the past. Of course, things always come back to the committee for a final decision anyway.

However, I do understand the point Mr. Christopherson is making about one member. There is certainly some fairness in there, so I am a little bit torn on this one. I would be comfortable either way. I think the important point—and this is where I wanted to go, and I think Mr. Reid gave important context earlier—is that we ensure that they are, in fact, members of this committee. Mr. Christopherson's concern, despite the government's promises, is with the idea that the parliamentary secretary would sort of direct how the committee would function. Despite the government's promise to the contrary, I think both parties in the opposition are really seeking to avoid having the parliamentary secretary, on behalf of the Prime Minister's Office, directing and controlling what the committee does. That certainly is the concern Mr. Christopherson has been raising. I think Mr. Reid's suggestion that we ensure they are permanent members of the committee is the more important of the two.

I am hopeful that the government will seek to address some of the concerns being raised here and to find a way to compromise, because I do believe that's the important point here.

(1155)

The Chair:

Before Mr. Chan goes ahead, when Mr. Christopherson comes back, I wonder if the committee would consider, if we're not in agreement with this yet, putting it to the bottom of the routine motions here and seeing if there are some we can agree on. You don't have to answer that yet.

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Let me first address Mr. Christopherson's point. I think we're more preoccupied by form than by substance. You're proposing a change in the composition of the committee. We have every intention of working co-operatively, but there may be times when we ultimately can or cannot agree. All we're proposing to do is to simply remove the parliamentary secretary and replace that person with a government member. That was the practice we were basically adopting.

I want to turn to the points that both Mr. Reid and Mr. Richards raised with respect to the substitution question. My concern is that I think the intention here was to remove the parliamentary secretary as being one of the potential substitutes. I have some trouble with the idea that they must be only the permanent members of the committee. Sometimes one of us is sick or away for a protracted period of time and we need the opportunity to substitute somebody else in from the government caucus to represent us so that we have our six on this particular committee.

I don't want it to be so restrictive that we can't actually bring in someone else to replace us on this particular subcommittee.

The Chair:

We have Mr. Christopherson, Mr. Lamoureux, and Mr. Reid, in that order.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm prepared to defer to others. I've had a lot to say. As long as I can maintain another spot on the speakers list, I'll let the others speak now.

I heard your suggestion. I'm not really there, Chair. A lot of it, again, is goodwill. I want to bring goodwill, but I'm not getting any from the government. I don't see how I can just set that aside and pretend it's there and have goodwill for everything else. Either there's goodwill on this and the government is serious about changing its ways, or it isn't.

I'd like to get back on the list. Thank you.

The Chair:

We have Mr. Lamoureux, Mr. Reid and Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

Mr. Chair, like Mr. Christopherson, I have had the opportunity to sit on PROC for the last couple of years. I've also had the opportunity to sit on the subcommittee, and in my experience, there has been a very high sense of co-operation and consensus. I cannot recall there ever being a vote on the subcommittee. I have found the subcommittee to be very helpful. It does have its meetings; they are fairly straightforward. They then come back to the full committee for a vote.

I think what we need to look at is what we're actually debating right now. I say this in my capacity as a person with first-hand experience having sat on both committees and having seen how both of them actually operated.

I look to you, Mr. Christopherson, to provide comment, as I'm sure you will, in regard to this. Can you ever recall over the last two and a half years an incident where there was controversy at that subcommittee? I don't think we need to read something into something that's just not there.

If we look at the change that's being proposed, Mr. Christopherson, you continue to question the integrity of the Prime Minister's willingness to seek changes on standing committees. You're in the opposition. You can do all you want in regard to that. It does not diminish the attempt by the Prime Minister to make significant, positive changes to the committee. He is also making committees more open for dialogue.

This amendment, the change that's being proposed, does one thing: it takes the parliamentary secretary [Technical difficulty—Editor]. You've made reference to the importance of the procedure and House affairs committee. It is one of those senior committees to which other committees will often go. It is something we should be taking very seriously. I for one am taking it very seriously.

I listened to you, Mr. Christopherson, when you talked about, well, why was I sitting where I was? In order to try to show goodwill on my part, I thought, okay, fine, I'll change the location of where I sit, if that happens. I don't intend on being here at every meeting, per se. I'm not exactly sure of my role; I'm trying to better define my own role on it. All I know is that I do have an interest in it.

We have very capable individuals sitting on the government side, and we should not be questioning their integrity or their experience. It's much like many of your caucus colleagues who come before committees, many of them for the very first time. I don't believe you'll find Liberals questioning their integrity or their capabilities to perform.

I understand and I can appreciate that all members, including Liberal members, are anxious to see committees get to work to get the job done. Then, I believe, we'll get a better sense in regard to what role other members will be playing, including parliamentary secretaries. But I think we have to provide the opportunity for time to pass and to see what kind of work committees will be able to do. I'd like to think that a year from now you'll be looking at it and saying that these committees are in fact more productive and members are able to actually contribute by bringing forth amendments, and that you'll see amendments being accepted. At least that's what I would anticipate.

I'm very much aware in terms of what it is and many of the arguments that you've put forward, and I respect them. Having said that, if we go right back to the core rule, to what it is we're actually trying to do today, I don't think it's that much.

I had intentions of providing some comment today, because there were House leader discussions that involved all three House leaders. I was hoping to be able to share some of those thoughts. Maybe if we can pass this through, we will be able to get that opportunity. I'd like to think, because of the discussions that included your own House leaders, we'd be able to enter into at least some discussion on that, nut in order to do that, we have to go through these rules.

(1200)



Now, my experience of going through rules, and I've done it on more than just PROC, is that for motions of this nature, it's typically fairly quick. There's no surprise. In the documents before us that we're expected to pass, there aren't going to be any surprises from us.

No one should have been surprised that we're taking the parliamentary secretary off the subcommittee. That's all we are doing in this particular amendment. There is no other change to it. It is the government's intent that the representatives on that subcommittee be members of PROC. There is absolutely no change.

My suggestion—and that's all it is; it's just a suggestion—is that maybe if we could get through this motion we could then enter into a discussion, if it's the will of the committee and the chair to have some sort of discussion on agenda, because I know you were very concerned about the coming agenda. We were hoping to be able to do that, because today will likely be, or could be, our last day, unless the vice-chairs and the chair get together and reconvene the committee.

I'm hopeful that you'll appreciate that there is no hidden agenda here. What we want to do is to just see the motions pass, to take into consideration taking me off the subcommittee, and to make sure there's a different membership because of the switch in places inside the committee, with the Liberals, not the Conservatives, now being the government and so forth. That's it.

Then we can continue on and we can even have an open debate, possibly, if that's what the committee wants, after the rules have been passed, but that will be up to you. We're not going to...at least I don't think the chair or members of the committee are going to attempt in any way to shut you down.

(1205)

The Chair:

We have Mr. Reid, Mr. Christopherson, and then Mr. Angus.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, I want to respond first to something that Mr. Lamoureux said, and then to a prior comment Mr. Chan made. They're different subjects, but that's how it works.

With regard to Mr. Lamoureux's comment, he invited Mr. Christopherson to think back over the last three or four years, and he said, “I don't recall any controversy at the steering committee.” First of all, I want to add a little plug for my former government, which gets beat up on so much as being so awful in so many ways. I mean, oh my goodness. That was at the time when we had a majority on that subcommittee. We actually acted responsibly and consultatively. A Liberal member has actually just said so, alleluia, choruses of angels, and peace to all men, yay. It's Christmas. It's Hanukkah. It's all good. I just had to say that.

More substantively, my experience on this committee goes back 11 years. I was here with Ed Broadbent way back in the day. I feel a bit like one of those grizzled poilus who entered the French army in 1914 and somehow were always in a different place when the shells landed and were still there in 1918, having gone through multiple generations of others. It was not always sweetness and light with regard to the subcommittee. There were significant problems, not so much back in the very beginning when it was the Martin minority government, which was when I first came on, but during the two Harper minorities, there were problems with the subcommittee.

An hon. member: [Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. Scott Reid: What was that? Were there votes in the subcommittee? I wasn't actually on it, so I can't tell how it worked. My point is that—

The Chair:

I'm sorry, but on a point of order, we're not in camera right now and subcommittee meetings were in camera, so you can't really disclose what happened.

Mr. Scott Reid:

In all fairness, I actually can't tell whether there were votes, so you needn't worry. I was not there.

What I can tell you is that the agendas they came forward with were not always those that matched with.... They had not been arrived at in a manner that appeared to indicate that from those of us watching it—and our meetings were not in camera so they're on the record—and we had a lot of punch-ups. I think our clerk may have been there at the biggest punch-up.

You weren't doing it yourself. You were just watching.

They weren't literal punch-ups, but they were the next closest thing. We actually dissolved into complete disorder. There was a vote of no confidence in our chair. He was replaced by Joe Preston, who then immediately.... You may remember this.

Were you on the committee then, David?

Mr. David Christopherson:

I remember. I came in after, but I know the battle, yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

All right. It's sort of legendary.

He then refused to actually convene the committee or chair the meetings. All of this was over a number of different things. It was over an attempt to find the government in contempt of Parliament, which we thought was an illegitimate use of the committee's mandate and authority, and also an abuse of the facts, to be honest.

In the end, the Canadian people backed us up when we had an election on the subject back in 2011. The point I'm driving at is that there was not this consensus and there was considerable division.

Historically, just to establish that record, it has been an issue. That does not mean to suggest it would occur again. My sense, if we're talking about whether it would be consensus or not, is that there is a different dynamic in majorities than there is in minorities and you probably wouldn't get it. But I want to make sure that everybody understands the full record, that it is not something that has happened every single time.

Having said that, Arnold, with regard to your comments.... To be honest, I don't have as clear a memory of your comments as I had at one time. Mr. Lamoureux's comments were so long that some things have now faded away.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

My point was just on who could substitute on the subcommittee. I asked you a question to clarify whether it had to be one of the permanent members, and your answer was “yes”. I indicated then that I had a substantive concern with that, because I feel it restricts our ability in terms of substitutions and that it should be a government member.

In the past year, as you know, I suffered from cancer. If I was away for a protracted period of time, this would have just made it much more difficult for us to substitute me. We're all busy people. We're not suggesting that we don't want one of the permanent members. They're simply more familiar. But I don't want to preclude that capacity of our sometimes, on occasion, having to bring somebody else in as a substitute.

The key point for us is the removal of the parliamentary secretary, with which we would be fine. If you want to explicitly say that, I'm fine with that. I'm more concerned about our inability.... It's our intention that in most instances the substitute would be a permanent member of the committee because we are more familiar with what's going on. However, I don't want to fetter our ability to put someone else in, just in that circumstance where we don't have a permanent member of the committee who's available to come in and substitute and we must draw on somebody else. That's all.

(1210)

Mr. Scott Reid:

There are two things about that. Number one, what Arnold and I are discussing is, strictly speaking, not relevant to Mr. Christopherson's amendment. It's relevant to the amendment that I haven't made yet, so I'll respond to him and in the event that we get through Mr. Christopherson's amendment and move on to mine, I will simply refrain from repeating these comments.

With regard to the substantive point that Arnold's making.... I'm now copying my colleague, Tom Lukiwski, because he always refers to everybody by their first names. With regard to what Arnold's saying, I disagree when it comes to this subcommittee—not other subcommittees, just this one—for the following reason.

We have subcommittees in various things. I chaired a subcommittee that dealt with the Ethics Commissioner and her mandate to adjust our code of conduct and Conflict of Interest Code, which I suspect we will return to. When we get to that particular item or others like it, I will not be suggesting that it should be a permanent member of this committee. In the past, we had people who were not permanent members of the committee and that was fine. It was people who had a particular understanding of the issues related to conflict of interest.

On this one, however, I think that actually being involved in the committee and having an intimate personal knowledge of what's going on is really key to being on the steering committee. That's the reason that, on this particular subcommittee, just the steering committee, I think it's essential to have permanent members. I always thought that this was a problem in the past whenever we veered away from it, including when my government veered away from it and introduced people who didn't have an intimate knowledge of the problems.

I also want to point out with regard to this discussion that the private members' business subcommittee is dealt with. I said in earlier comments that I've seen members who are not members of the standing committee on the private members' subcommittee. It turns out, and the clerk pointed this out to me, that there is a separate standing order, Standing Order 91.1, that deals with membership on the private members' business subcommittee. It has a different set of criteria for membership that has nothing to do with our normal rules. Nothing we do here will relate to that. We can continue to have non-members of this committee on that subcommittee. That is fine, and I agree that it's fine because a knowledge of how that business works doesn't really relate to what we do here. Appeals from there come here, but we could argue that it's better to have someone who's not a member of this committee because you shouldn't be hearing an appeal to your own ruling.

I just wanted to get that clear. The steering committee is the one exception.

Arnold, I do take your point about people being ill, but there is a pretty large number of government members. It is actually more of an issue for us and especially an issue for the New Democrats. I am vaguely hopeful that Mr. Christopherson will hear my point on this because it relates to him, and I hope that he'll think about it. There are five government members, excluding the chair, on this committee, so you'll have people to draw upon if you need to. There is a tiny bit of an issue for us, as we have three Conservatives in opposition, but there's only one New Democrat. It's conceivable that, effectively, if we do what I've been recommending, where only permanent members go on—

Mr. David Christopherson:

I wouldn't have a substitute.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You wouldn't have and that could be an issue. Arnold put that thought in my mind. I'd be interested in your comment on it, but if you don't want to do it now, because we are dealing with your subamendment, not mine, that's fine.

I'll stop now. Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson and then Mr. Angus.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Chair, I'll pick up on Mr. Reid's last point just while it's fresh in my mind, and I have a number of other thoughts from previous speakers.

Mr. Reid, through the chair to you, your point is well taken. I think what would mitigate it in a huge way is exactly the issue I'm trying to get resolved. If the steering committee didn't have the political majority control power to control a motion that comes here, in the affirmative or in the negative, then it wouldn't matter as much because there would either be total agreement.... If you're not on there, you run the risk that you don't know what's going on, but for the most part, if somebody is on there from somewhere else, if it's by consensus, it's not as big a problem. There are two big issues, as I see them, with your point. If you get somebody on there who doesn't really know what is going on at the committee, it's a little difficult to be part of the steering committee that looks ahead, especially if you're in a bit of a jackpot and you're trying to get out of it. It's very difficult if you're not one of the ones who are there, but it's a lot easier for us on this side of the House, the other recognized parties, if there's a consensus model so that at the very least it's not being partisan-driven that way, and then when it comes here we still have the opportunity, but your point is well taken.

If I might, I would say just a couple of things, Chair. First of all, both Mr. Lamoureux and Mr. Chan have been sort of urging us to get on with things and to watch the clock, since this may be our last day. I want to remind colleagues that it was on Tuesday when we assembled all the things it takes to pull a committee together that the only thing we did was elect a chair and two vice-chairs. We had an hour and three-quarters or an hour and a half available, and I was ready to start working, but the government had no interest at all, so, I'm sorry, but the argument that the NDP caused major problems because they backed up the committee and the work couldn't get done isn't going to wash. The government has to remember that on Tuesday it shut us down after we did the least amount of work possible. I leave that with you.

Second, through you again, Chair, with respect to Mr. Lamoureux, I hear what you're saying and I don't necessarily disagree, Kevin. I think Scott was right that there actually were a few examples in which there were problems, but I agree with you to the extent that most of the time it's not an issue. When I link that with what the government has said it wants to do with committees, it reminds me of my old negotiating days back when I was in my twenties negotiating collective agreements and how whether an employer said “may” do something or “shall” do something could cause a strike. On the one hand, “may” means they might or they might not depending on how they feel that day. “Shall” means there is an obligation.

Unfortunately, Mr. Lamoureux, you didn't quite get your notes in order, because while you were arguing that we're always going to get along, Mr. Chan is on record as saying—I'm paraphrasing—that's likely to happen, but sometimes we'll disagree. There's the big “but”. Either the government wants the PMO to have the ability to control the committees or it does not. I again put forward that the government already has control.

I'm going to acknowledge that there's about a 99.9% certainty, if not 100%, that other than in some freakish scenario, I'm going to lose votes and the government's going to win. That is going to happen 10 times out of 10 whether it's in any committee or in the House, and, Chair, I'll be the first one to say that under our current system, as flawed as it is, that's the way it needs to be. I accept that. I'm not trying to rewrite the election results; as much as I might like to do that, I'm not trying to do that.

There's backup control for the government, and I do get that, but at the end of the day, you have that at committee. No matter how many times I place a motion or the former government members place motions, we're going to lose if the government decides it doesn't like those motions. That is just life for us. The government gets to win every time the government wants to win.

I've been there. It's glorious. It's great. It's wonderful walking into a room, whether it's the House or a committee, knowing that 10 times out of 10 you're going to win. It's a great feeling, but you have that, and you made a promise that you're going to do things differently, so arguments about what we did in the past carry only so much weight when the government came in on an agenda of change. Arguing status quo really is arguing against your own agenda.

(1215)



If you want to have two members on there, fine. That's not a hill I want to die on. However, if you're going to say that those two members are going to use their voting clout to force things through, that's not the intent of a steering committee. Even if the government doesn't get its way at the steering committee and there's no recommendation, the government lead—possibly Mr. Chan, if we're going by seniority and the fact that it won't be a parliamentary secretary, so it could be Mr. Chan or anyone else—is going to put forward a motion that reflects the argument that was made at the steering committee. They didn't win it at the steering committee because the rules of the steering committee provide for as much consensus as possible. The structure is meant to provide that. Then, when we don't have unanimity and we come here, Chair, I can all but guarantee that the government lead is going to move a motion that, just coincidentally, reflects everything that the government members wanted to do in the steering committee.

I don't have a problem with that. You're going to place that motion. The most we can do is debate the hell out of it and delay things, as I'm doing now, to make a point on something. We can do that, which we're entitled to do, assuming that you're not into railroading mode yet. You still have that backup at this committee.

Again, if you wanted to change things, this isn't even that big. I'm really quite surprised, Kevin, that you're letting us get this far down the rabbit hole, because this isn't going to reflect well on you either. This thing should have been boom, boom, boom, out of here. We could have been done on Tuesday.

All I'm trying to do is to help the government. Let's turn this and look at it differently. I'm trying to help by facilitating your agenda to make committees a little more independent. They're not going to be totally independent, because you have that majority vote. Fair enough. Again, nobody's arguing that. You have the right to make the decision. We can squawk and complain all we want, but you have that power. They used to have it; now they don't and you do. Okay. However, if you really want to change things and you want us to feel that committees are more independent, that we're actually reflecting what we think rather than what we're being told from on high....

That still applies to our parties. It's not as tight when you're not in government, but we all have leaders, whips, and House leaders, so those things still come into play at this committee. Other than the parliamentary secretary not being on the committee, there's not a lot of change to the power structure. It's a good start, but it doesn't really change the dynamic, and nobody's pretending it should. I'm not saying that you're evil for not doing that. That's the way it is. You get the final say.

However, if we really want to make things more independent—and this is not new; most of the steering committees I've sat on have operated by consensus. If we couldn't agree, the matter was bounced over to the committee with no recommendation. The government members would have done their homework, and Mr. Chan, for example, if he were the lead, or Ms. Taylor, if she were the lead, would put forward a motion that would exactly reflect what the government was saying in the steering committee. We would be fully expecting it, and then we'd have our array of measures and tools to respond, such as discussing and talking and holding things up and all that other stuff. That'll all come into play here, but at the end of the day, you win. Fair enough. But now a government that says it wants to do things differently wants to control the one place in committee work where there are no cameras and nobody sees the transcript, except for a very few people who have to get permission. It's like Maxwell Smart's cone of silence. Nobody knows what's going on.

They're fun meetings, quite frankly, because people are intelligent and they're funny in their work. If you've been around a long time, as I have, you actually get more of a thrill when you try to work together instead of fighting, because fighting is just the same old same old. Working together is a lot of fun; it really is, especially if you have serious challenges and you're working together. That's done a lot better in a collaborative relationship without the partisan aspect of power voting.

(1220)



Mr. Lamoureux, you just finished saying that you didn't expect it to be a problem. I don't disagree with you, but I have to listen to your colleague who sits besides you, who said that there's going to be occasions where...and that as soon as we get there...even if it's just one time.

I say again to Mr.—

(1225)

The Chair:

On a point of order, Mr. Christopherson, could you please not repeat yourself. You can't keep on repeating the same argument and keep the floor.

Mr. David Christopherson:

How am I repeating myself? I'm talking about the dynamics that are happening in a steering committee that show why my argument is the one that I think should prevail. Help me understand where I'm repeating myself, Chair.

The Chair:

You've said that a number of times.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm allowed to say it as many different ways as I want, as long as I'm saying it in a different way; I'm not using the same words.

I mean, really? Is that where we are? Anita is trying to shut me down. Now you're trying to shut me down. Here we are, with you telling us it's a whole new era, and all I'm doing is making arguments that we actually change things—like, really do it rather than talk. Come on.

I'm willing to relinquish, if you're tired of hearing from me, as long as you have other speakers and I can go on the list. I'll be glad to do that. But if that's not the case, Chair, I'll continue to talk about the things that I think are relevant to the matter in the motion that I put before us.

The Chair:

We do have other people on the list.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Very well. I'll be glad to defer.

Madam Clerk, would you put me to the bottom of the list again. Thank you.

I'll relinquish the floor.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

On a point of order, this is not to question.... Well, it is to question something you've just done, but it's not to question the integrity of what you've done. I just want to find this out for clarification and future reference, because I have a feeling that the issue of relevance may come up again; I'm just saying.

As chair, are you actually allowed to call people on relevance, or do you have to wait for one of the members of the committee, on a point of order, to raise the issue of relevance? This is just so that we know that it gets done in the right manner in future.

The Chair:

It's in the judgment of the chair.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

The Chair:

As I think committee members know, you can't be repetitive or out of relevance.

We have a long list now: Mr. Angus, Mr. Richards, Mr. Chan.

Mr. Angus.

Mr. Charlie Angus (Timmins—James Bay, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and welcome back. The last time I saw you was in a bookstore in Yukon, when I thought you were retired.

The Chair:

I was.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Charlie Angus:

I hope in your new capacity you won't be calling points of order on me in my attempt to help things along.

I also want to say welcome back to Mr. Chan. I'm very pleased to see that you went through your treatment and that you were elected. I would have preferred a New Democrat here, but I'm very happy to see that you're in good health, and so it's good to be here.

For the new members who might find this very tedious—I see a little rolling of the eyes—the issue before us today is the idea of “Trust us. We're great. This is the new era.” Mr. Lamoureux, on the question of whether my friend was questioning the word and the integrity of the Prime Minister, far be it from us over here to doubt the Prime Minister's word, but I wouldn't take it to the bank.

I say that because I've been here since 2004. I've served on good committees and I've served where it was a little toxic. I've served on committees in which we had a constitutional crisis and members actually interfered with the separation of the roles of the legislative branch and the courts, and we had to sometimes filibuster almost all night just to re-establish some of these basic rules.

How did that happen? Well, committees are made up of personalities. In politics there are sometimes big egos, and we're very partisan by nature. No matter how much we say we're going to be sunnier, this is the nature of it, and sometimes these committees can break down.

What is really reassuring from the Prime Minister is the message that he's taking the parliamentary secretaries off the committees. Mr. Lamoureux, it's great to see you in the House; it will be great to see you off this committee.

Those were promises. We've talked about this, and I've heard this for many years. Because of the power that the parliamentary secretary holds, I didn't actually believe a prime minister would do it. This is a really positive step, because the fundamental failing of the committee structure in the Canadian Parliament is that we are reduced sometimes to very juvenile status and to voting strictly along partisan lines. When the parliamentary secretary raises his or her hand, all hands go up on one side and all hands go down on the other side.

When I was over in the U.K. and sat in on a parliamentary committee hearing, I felt so silly as a result of the experience I've had in five Parliaments here. I couldn't figure out who was on the government side and who was on the opposition side. I was stunned that they were working together, and this was on an international affairs committee. I thought of how much our committee system has deteriorated, to the point where we have become a mirror of the House of Commons and we vote along whipped lines. That the Prime Minister has said that we're going to remove the parliamentary secretaries is a very powerful thing. With the Liberal majority, I don't think anybody is going to be voting for me to be chair of the aboriginal affairs committee that I'm on, but that we can choose a chair is a very powerful thing.

One of the things we need to look at, though, again goes back to the role of the subcommittee. In 2004 I was completely naive. I had no idea. I believed in the peaceable kingdom and I believed in trust. I've learned that unless you actually have it in the rule book, trust lasts sometimes as long as a meeting, sometimes not even that. However, I've had some really good chairs who saw their role as trying to build consensus so that we could actually work together and get something done.

Why this is really important for PROC is that PROC plays a very special role. It's where MPs of all parties have to look to deal with some very substantive issues, so its non-partisan nature—not that it is non-partisan, but to the extent it can be—is much more important than, say, on the ethics committee, which was sometimes like a WWF cage match in terms of its political toxicity. I get that. Some of our committees are more partisan than others. I wish you all very well and I'm very glad I'm not on it.

However, this is a committee that is entrusted. All parliamentarians put our faith in you, even though we know, as David said, that 10 times out of 10, if the Liberal members vote one way, that's how it's going to pass. However, within the subcommittee the idea of consensus has always been the one area where the chair could bring some sense of whether we could get a working plan, take that plan and come forward. If we don't have that consensus, it comes back here anyway in whatever motion gets brought and how people want to debate, and the majority vote wins.

(1230)



I think what's really important for my colleague is consensus. I've sat beside David in the House, and when he whispers he's as loud and as opinionated with his own party's members as he is with you, so for you new members, don't take anything personally over there.

David is very passionate about this. What I'm hearing, and I think it's a very coherent argument, is that it's not the number or the membership but the idea of consensus. If we're not going to get consensus at the subcommittee, it goes back. The majority will rule. Our motions will be defeated or accepted and Conservative motions will be defeated or accepted, but it's the power within the subcommittee that changes the dynamic of the working relationship.

I would love to trust you all. I'd love to trust the Prime Minister. These are very early and sunny days, but I've been in five different Parliaments and I've seen that sunny ways lead to stormy ways. We get bogged down in issues. In some of our committees, our personalities don't work. I've seen some chairs who are extraordinary, but in the case of other chairs—not you, Mr. Bagnell—I don't know how they got the job. No names will be mentioned.

This committee sets the example that the Prime Minister's word is really going to change the nature of committees. I think that when this change comes out of here, it will send a message to our other committees.

I have to say that in the last Parliament, I became a lot more partisan than I ever was in my previous political life. I want to ratchet that down. I'm tired of it. I want to get something done.

We're not going to build the peaceable kingdom here so you can go back and do what you're going to do, but I'm appealing to my colleagues here to recognize that if we can just incorporate the principle of consensus into the subcommittee, we can get this thing passed and we'll all be going home for Christmas.

It is a principle that has ramifications beyond just this committee. It will send a very clear message that the Prime Minister is serious about his word. I think all of our backs are going to loosen up and we'll start to find ways to find more consensus. We're going to start to see committees doing the job that Canadians expect them to do.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Angus. It's good to have you here.

Go ahead, Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Thank you.

First of all, Mr. Angus, thank you so much for your very kind comments. Please give my regards to your better half, Brit, whom I haven't seen in a while. Tell her I said hello.

Look, my only real point, and the point Mr. Christopherson raised that I want to get back to and address, is that we're all members of Parliament. First of all, again, all we're trying to do is remove the parliamentary secretary. My point is that we shouldn't fetter the independence of each particular parliamentarian in doing what they ultimately decide to do, even at the steering committee. Our intention is to arrive at consensus, but what you're saying is that it's actually trying to predetermine whatever's discussed at the steering committee. That's exactly what I'm saying: we shouldn't prejudge the outcome and say what might happen if we don't arrive at consensus, because all it takes is one member to filibuster at that point and force it back to committee.

I take the point that at the standing committee we can ultimately do whatever we need to do in order to get an agenda set. It is our intention to come to consensus, so watch how we practise. That's my point: watch how we practise over the next little while. Let's just get this passed. If it really becomes a problem, let's bring it back up at that time.

We're not doing anything other than presenting the intention of removing the parliamentary secretaries and beginning the work, so let's begin the work.

(1235)

The Chair:

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Mr. Chair, this is probably almost long forgotten at this point, but in his last intervention prior to this one, Mr. Chan made a point about the proposed amendment, if we ever get to it, that Mr. Reid was looking to make.

In regard to that argument, I want to point out that as it sits now and as we were suggesting it would sit in the future, the motion actually says that the subcommittee would be composed of the chair and the two vice-chairs. What that actually means is that no one can substitute for the chair, no one can substitute for me, and no one can substitute for David. The three of us would have to be there, so actually there is more flexibility for the one or two government members, whatever the case might end up being, to substitute, with the change forcing them to be a permanent member of the committee.

There are actually far more options for those government members to substitute somebody in, given that there are five of you. There may be three or four potential substitutes, so I actually don't see that being an issue at all. I think that can be accomplished and not cause any issues for government members in being able to substitute in. It would be the three of us, the chair and vice-chairs, who would actually....

There's never been a problem in the past with it that I can recall. Certainly in my experience on this committee and on other committees on which I've sat on a subcommittee, we never had an issue. We were always able to find a way. You can find a time to meet when those members can be available. I don't think that's an issue at all.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson is next, and then Mr. Lamoureux.

Mr. David Christopherson:

On the off chance that Mr. Lamoureux is going to respond to my concerns in a positive way, I'd be prepared to defer to him and speak after him, or I'll take the floor now.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

I will be very brief.

I have actually been enjoying the comments. There were many things that made a lot of sense. One of the things that I might suggest, David, when we talk about trying to set the agenda, is that maybe one of those agenda items could potentially be a study of our standing committees. That could turn into a positive thing for us all, not only for our committee but for other committees. It might be an option worth exploring when we talk about future agendas for the PROC members who are on that subcommittee list.

I don't think it has to be controversial. I think there are a number of good thoughts with regard to how subcommittees or committees can work for the Parliament of Canada, and we should approach them with an open mind.

I would just emphasize here that I can appreciate your concerns. I'm going to go back to my experience with the subcommittee, which was actually fairly encouraging. I'm not going to prejudge what's going to ultimately take place. I'm not even going to be on it, because I'm the parliamentary secretary, nor do I have a desire to be on it, but I would be interested in hearing the outcome, if it's possible. If you don't think we can pass the rules today, then fine. We can continue having this discussion now. It might be better if we passed the rules and then got right into the discussion we're having right now and sent a couple of recommendations to the subcommittee. One of those recommendations could be to look at how we can enhance committees so that all parliamentarians feel more genuinely empowered, as well as to come up with some sort of report. That could be a report for us.

I was involved in some House leader discussions today which I was hoping to share with members. That's one of the reasons I came today, but maybe the House leaders can disseminate that information to individual members on PROC at a later time if it's not possible today.

(1240)

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

I didn't really hear what I wanted, but of course the government won't just come out and say “absolutely not.” They're still hoping they can get through this.

Look. I hear what you're saying and I appreciate the tone and I appreciate the respectful discussion. I'm enjoying it too. I would enjoy it more if we could bring a little more democracy to the whole thing.

You and Mr. Chan have repeated a number of times, and I'm sure your other colleagues agree, that you have every intention of reaching consensus. I don't question that. I truly honestly do not. I believe that's what you intend. I even believe it may be that way most of the time.

However, as my friend Mr. Angus has pointed out and as those of us who have been around here for a while know, you'll find that idea will quickly fall by the wayside. Let's face it: the government does have an agenda and they have to deliver on it in order to get re-elected in four years. Fair enough. Therefore, there will be times when they're going to want this committee to do certain things and go in a certain direction. Fair enough. You have that control here at the committee. However, maintaining absolute control of the steering committee tells us that the government will utilize it whenever it suits their purpose. As we move on and have more arguments and get more entrenched—and Mr. Lamoureux and to a certain extent Mr. Chan know this—things take on a life of their own, and you can't always separate the politics of what's happening in the House of Commons with what's happening here. As a result, sometimes we can really get into it here at this level.

Again I come back to the government's statement that they want things to be different. If you want things to be different, then you have to do them differently, and maintaining this power structure that allows the government to lower the boom when it suits them is the antithesis of a body that meets with a goal of consensus.

I think a reasonable person looking in from outside the Ottawa bubble would understand that if the government gets absolute control at the committee and absolutely everything from the steering committee has to go to the full committee, the government maintains 100% control. We're not arguing with that power structure, but what we are saying to anyone on the outside looking in is that the steering committee is where we're trying to agree on the rules of how we proceed, what witnesses to have in what order, and all the things that can take forever if ten of us sit there. You know the old saying about ten people writing a letter. That is in contrast to a smaller group without the political attention, without the cameras, without the games. You can't even win a vote. It's just working together. If we put that in place, at least we would have a little more democracy and a little more independence. It's only a little, but it matters. It matters when the government says that sometimes they'll have to. Well, all it takes is that one time, and the whole idea of that model is gone. It's either a consensus body or it isn't.

I wouldn't normally have made as big a deal of this with the previous government at the beginning of various Parliaments. I might reaffirm it at the individual committees, but clearly we're making this a big deal. I am making this a big deal on behalf of my caucus, because we believe in the idea of more independence for committees. We believe that independently ourselves. We believe it, so we support the government's initiative to do it, but you're not going to get a pat on the back just for a nice speech with a nice smile. It has to be more than that, and this is little. There will be a lot of people who watch what happens here who will be paying an awful lot of attention. It will not be the general public, but there are people who pay an awful lot of attention to what goes on. They understand very clearly how important these internal matters are, and given that PROC is the first committee, it really is setting the template.

(1245)



I know my friend Mr. Angus will be going to his committees and arguing for the same thing. If he can use PROC as an example and say, “Look, they clearly made it understood that it is consensus only, so how could we do it any differently here”, it's going to carry a lot of weight. I would think that by then the government's message would be that they're at least going to loosen the PMO's control over the steering committee, where we get along anyway.

Most of the rules of the committees are like that. In public accounts it was always that way, until the government eliminated the steering committee. That could be your next step, but it also would be the antithesis of what you were saying, so I come back to my argument again and say to the government that this is not a big deal. I think, Mr. Lamoureux, you're making a big mistake, unless this is another example of same old same old and this committee really is under marching orders and they've all been told to do what Mr. Lamoureux tells them to do and we're going to see that applied at all the committees.

If that's not the case, I don't know why on earth, Mr. Lamoureux, you are allowing this issue to become a big political deal, because if we don't get it resolved, it's still going to be hanging over us in the new year. It's not as though we have an unreasonable position. All I've asked in order to support your motion that there be two government members is that we stay with a consensus model. If you want to say that's not where we were last time, I don't care how you word it, but that's where we go now.

I want to do this. I have been impressed so far. I don't mind telling the government members that I was impressed, Mr. Lamoureux, that you responded as quickly as you did to the concerns I raised. As you know, when we did that in the past, we'd be heard out impatiently and then ignored, and they would move on. That was not by Randy, but there were those who would do that to us, so I do appreciate that you responded. I appreciate that. I continue to have to push you, but you do continue to respond, and that's good. A lot of us were absolutely flabbergasted that we actually had a real, open vote for the chair. In the past we used to call it an open vote, but when the government benches only put forward one name, it was kind of hard to find where the democracy was versus the command and control model. It looked the same, and in reality it was.

We were no better. We knew who the official opposition lead was going to be for vice-chair and we knew the third party vice-chair, which was a given. In the past we all knew those things ahead of time. This time the government said it was going to do things differently, and it did, and it was a thrilling exercise in democracy. I know Mr. Chan didn't take it personally, because I think he already knows the respect those of us who have seen him in action have for him. It was more a matter of experience. I keep saying that and I know it rubs the wrong way and I get that, but nonetheless, I think you'll come to agree over time that having someone with a lot more experience is actually to our benefit.

That's the way we saw it. Either way it's a Liberal, and when I go home at night, it doesn't matter to me which one of you is in the chair. However, it does matter in terms of how the committee meeting proceeds, and I think experience is an advantage. It's the same with the Speaker. I voted for the current Speaker. Of course everybody would say that now, but I did. There were some good candidates, but it was based on that experience of having sat on all sides of the House. When I became a deputy speaker at Queen's Park, I had been on the government side as a cabinet minister, had been in the third party, and had been a House leader, so I felt equipped. Whether I was up to the task was for my colleagues to determine, but I felt equipped to take the chair knowing and understanding where everybody was coming from.

All of that is to say those are good improvements. They are little teeny-tiny changes but good ones, so you get an attaboy or a happy face or a gold star or whatever you want. That was great, but it's small. Now we're starting to move into the area of power, and in a democracy, power is determined by a majority, a clear majority of 50% plus one. That is a clear majority and that's how we make decisions.

(1250)



You still have that control here, but now you want to maintain it even though you say you won't use it. At least the Conservatives, to their credit, would say, “No, we're the government and nothing's coming out of that committee that we don't control. Next argument.” You were left making your arguments, but they didn't go anywhere. It would drive us crazy. Some might argue that's why the configuration of the House is now the way it is: because of that kind of attitude—present company excluded, of course.

Now we have a new government that says it wants to do things differently. You've done that tinkering around the edges. We've given you the full credit. No one's trying to deny you your right to be complimented for the fact that we have an elected chair and we actually had to have a vote because we had two names on the ballot. Do you remember the old Soviet Union? They used to say they had a great democracy, except that nobody else except their choices could run, and they'd call it an election and say they won. That's what we used to do around here. You've changed that. Congratulations, but that's the easy stuff. That's the low-lying fruit.

The tougher stuff—and this is why it's easy to make the pledge but not so easy to honour it—is that we're actually talking about power. What I'm suggesting here doesn't alter the power alignment. The government still wins every vote 10 times out of 10. The only thing we're talking about is whether the PMO still has a grip on the throat of the subcommittee of PROC or it doesn't. You don't have to give up...you're not losing anything other than a command-and-control power technique that should be the antithesis of what you have said you're going to bring for change. If all you do is change and tinker around the edges but at the end of the day the power play is still the same old same old, then the wrapping may be different, but it's still the same lump of coal as a gift.

Again, the government wants to continue to receive accolades and to be patted on the back for what they're doing because they've made a good start, but it's only a start, and it is not unreasonable.... I was so glad my friend Mr. Angus talked about Britain. I wish we all had a chance to either go there or have a presentation on it. I've never been there, but I've certainly watched a lot of their committee meetings through different committees. It's amazing. It's a whole different world.

I like to think that's where the current Prime Minister is looking, that it's to that kind of independence, where a committee is a committee and you don't lose your chance to be a parliamentary secretary or a cabinet minister by opposing something the government has brought forward, or questioning it, or by supporting an opposition amendment that just, in your gut, in your experience, makes sense. It sounds like that's what should be happening all the time. In the past, you didn't have to be here too long to realize that's not necessarily how things function when the rubber hits the road.

Again, the government is not going down the road of the previous government and saying “Too bad, so sad.” They're saying, “No, we're still maintaining that we want to be different, that we want to open up the committees.” Here's the first chance where it really matters. All we're saying is to let the subcommittee act in a non-partisan way. Where it comes to agreement, which is most of the time, and when it comes forward with positive recommendations, you in the government still can change your mind and kill them if you want to. You don't lose anything other than hyper-control.

Hyper-control is saying as soon as the thing starts that you have this issue by the throat and you're not going to let go until you get the outcome you want. That's where we were. This government says they're going to take us somewhere else, and yet the first time we talk about power at committees, you're right back where the government members were, and there's no real argument for it except, “We want control, super control, maximum control—all control.” We've been there. You ran against that.

This is an easy one. It really makes me wonder about some of the other changes you want to make. Are you really that serious? All we're saying is to let the members of the steering committee come together.... In many ways it's the grunt work of committees, because you're sitting down and hammering out which witness can't make it at such a time because the clerk says they were contacted and they can only do it at that time, so how about if you need a special meeting to do that or you need to change the times.... These are the kinds of variables there are when you're working together.

(1255)



You're not thinking of the agenda. You're really not. Unlike the other committees, it's not just policy where the government agrees, the opposition disagrees, and there are a few exceptions. We deal with an awful lot of things here that are not partisan. For instance, if any one of you or any one of our colleagues—my friend Mr. Angus knows more about this than I do in terms of the process—is accused of acting in an unparliamentary fashion or of denying privileges to other members, or if there is anything to do with a member, with ethics, and it goes to the Speaker, as soon as the Speaker thinks there's an issue, guess where he sends it. Here.

I don't know about the new members, but I'm pretty sure I know the former government members and my own colleagues well enough, and I have to tell you that if it's my reputation hanging by a thread, I'd like to know that at least the consideration of how I'm going to be dealt with is going to be decided in a non-partisan fashion. I'd like to know that when there is an agreement about how to proceed about my integrity, my reputation, my political life, my representative on that committee agrees that the process is fair. That's why this matters.

I don't need the attention. I don't need the headlines. Like all of you, I just got elected, and for better or worse, I'm here for four years. You'll find over time that I get far more enjoyment out of working together than fighting, although I do it. I'm kind of good at it. I'm from Hamilton and that's what we do, and when it's necessary I try to rise to the occasion, but after all these decades, it's not my favourite thing. My favourite thing is that when we have a huge problem, we all have an interest in finding a solution that's not partisan. Trust me, that's when you really feel excited, because then you are really making a difference.

As you know, on a lot of committees, especially those like public accounts, we try to come up with unanimous reports. If we get a unanimous report where it's positive for the government, it's deserved, and where it's negative, it's deserved, because everyone has supported it. If it's just a report that says the government says the Auditor General was wrong and the government is wonderful, while the opposition members say no, the Auditor General was right, they're all wrong, and it's horrible, what have we achieved? It's the process, but what have we really achieved?

When we have agreement, then we're getting somewhere. Again, Chair, the whole idea is to make this committee work. I know that members are getting tired of hearing this. They're thinking, “My God, how long can that guy go? Is this really that important?” But I'm going to tell you that what we do right now.... I thought it was interesting when Mr. Chan, I believe, said that if it doesn't work, we can bring it back in a few months. Well, It doesn't work like that. Whatever rights the opposition fails to get in the early days of setting the rules are rights they are never going to get, because what happens is that the politics of the day take over. We each get entrenched into our situations.

If you think it's hard to let go of power now when you've really just started to get control of it, wait till you see how difficult it is six or twelve months down the road when you've been exercising that power and are glad you got it because the pesky opposition is making your life difficult and you see how nice it is to be able to step in and make them go away. That's the reality.

So with the greatest of respect, Mr. Chan, the whole idea that we could bring this back for review sounds good, but in the real world, it doesn't work that way and doesn't hold.

Let me try this. In the interest of trying to find some agreement in these dying moments, Mr. Chan, rather than six months of going with the government having all the power, maybe we could set it up in such a way that it is consensus and we revisit it in six months. Do the consensus for six months and let the government experience what it's like when the oxygen of democracy comes into a steering committee. Then, if they still believe that we're stifling their electorally given right to govern, let's bring it back and hash it out in public and we'll talk about what our experience has been. I suspect that our experience will be exactly the experience that Mr. Lamoureux has talked about in the past, which I've affirmed, and which Mr. Reid has commented on, which is that usually we do get along.

If that's the case, Kevin, this is a slam dunk, man.

(1300)



I can't believe you're going to let this committee go in a couple of minutes without this being resolved. You're going to report back there, and your one responsibility was to make sure that this committee got its independence, and got set-up out of the way, so that you could actually leave the stage.

You have to go back and report, “I failed. Oh, and by the way, we're now going to have a big issue about whether or not the Liberals will demand to have control at steering committees.” Really? That's really what you want the narrative to be going into the Christmas break and into the new year? Because that's where we're heading.

I've offered you a reasonable response. I've just offered you another reasonable amendment. The only way I could be more reasonable in your eyes, it would seem, would be to completely cave and collapse. That's not going to happen, because this is important.

I don't know why you're letting it become a cause célèbre. There are people out there who care about these things. Ever heard of Kady O'Malley? She knows these things better than most of us in this place. They matter to her, and she has a great ability to convey to the outside world why it matters to them.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, on a point of order, I apologize, but I see by the clock that it's past our stopping time of 1 p.m. I just wanted to draw that to your attention.

The Chair:

Noted.

If we come back at the next meeting, you will have the floor and we'll continue with this topic.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Very good, Chair. I appreciate that.

The Chair:

Okay.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous.

C'est la deuxième séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Nous allons aujourd'hui nous pencher sur l'organisation des travaux du Comité.

Ce que je vais dire va sembler évident à ceux qui siègent ici depuis longtemps. Vous allez donc peut-être entendre des choses que vous comprenez déjà, mais nous accueillons aussi de nouveaux députés. Il est d'usage de commencer les travaux de tous les comités par des motions de régie interne. Au début de la session parlementaire, les comités adoptent habituellement un certain nombre de motions de régie interne pour faciliter l'organisation de leur travail. Ces motions sont généralement les mêmes dans tous les comités, à l'exception de quelques variantes. Chaque comité peut adopter les motions qu'il veut, et bien sûr, les députés sont toujours libres de ne pas les adopter. Nous allons donc les prendre une à une.

Examinons sans plus tarder nos motions de régie interne. Pour cette fois-ci nous les avons en format papier, si vous les voulez. Elles sont aussi dans le cahier d'information que vous avez reçu à la première séance. Nous en avons des copies si quelqu'un en veut. Nous allons les distribuer maintenant.

M. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

Nous n'avons toujours pas établi clairement [Note de la rédaction: difficultés techniques] la source et qui les reçoit, donc je m'en excuse.

Le président:

D'accord. Le messager va s'en charger.

Les motions que nous sommes en train de distribuer sont celles qui ont orienté les travaux à la dernière session. Bien sûr, il faudra y apporter quelques petites modifications administratives, mais tout ce dont le comité souhaite discuter...

Nous allons étudier chaque motion séparément. Pour ceux qui utilisent leur iPad, les motions se trouvent à la cinquième partie du cahier d'information, qui est accessible par l'icône « autres documents ». Normalement, à l'avenir, vous devriez recevoir tous les documents par voie électronique, donc si vous souhaitez en avoir des copies papier pendant la séance, vous devez les imprimer et les apporter.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je ne dois pas oublier de vous appeler ainsi à partir de maintenant, Larry.

Je voulais vous demander une chose. Je ne sais pas trop si vous ou les greffiers pouvez me répondre. Ces motions de régie interne sont-elles toutes identiques à celles qui ont été adoptées — je ne dis pas présentées à la première séance, mais bien adoptées — à la dernière législature? Diffèrent-elles des motions adoptées par le Comité à la 41e législature, puisque ce peut être deux choses bien différentes.

Le président:

Je vais demander à la greffière de répondre à cette question.

La greffière du comité (Mme Joann Garbig):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Oui, le texte présenté ici est extrait du procès-verbal de la séance d'octobre 2013 où ces motions ont été adoptées par le comité.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. Est-ce le bon moment pour poser quelques questions pointues sur des motions en particulier? Devrais-je attendre un autre moment de la séance pour que nos délibérations avancent le plus harmonieusement possible?

Le président:

Nous les examinerons une à une, donc quand nous arriverons à celle dont vous voulez parler, vous n'aurez qu'à le mentionner.

M. Scott Reid:

Cela me convient. Ces motions sont donc littéralement celles qui ont été adoptées en octobre 2013.

La greffière:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais aborder la question structurelle des secrétaires parlementaires, pour terminer. Je remarque qu'il y a eu des changements depuis la dernière séance. Notre comité n'est pas encore à maturité, mais nous avons réussi à avancer dans la bonne direction sur trois éléments, au moins. Ma question reste entière, monsieur le président. Je vois ici six députés. Je pense que le gouvernement a droit à six membres. L'un d'eux est M. Lamoureux, qui est également secrétaire parlementaire.

Corrigez-moi si je me trompe, s'il vous plaît. J'aimerais que ce soit clarifié, parce que cela va se répercuter sur tous les comités. Si vous me permettez de la poser, monsieur le président, c'est ma première question, et elle a beaucoup d'importance.

Par votre intermédiaire, j'aimerais poser la question suivante à M. Lamoureux.

Le gouvernement s'était engagé à envisager sérieusement, s'il ne s'était pas carrément engagé à le faire, de retirer les secrétaires parlementaires des comités, puisqu'on peut à tout le moins craindre que leur présence aux comités ne nuise à l'indépendance des membres, puisque le secrétaire parlementaire peut utiliser la structure des whips, voire même prendre d'autres moyens, pour exercer une pression sur les membres du comité afin qu'ils l'appuient. Bonté divine, il est clair que s'ils ne le font pas, ils vont se mettre dans le pétrin. Croyez-moi. Vous n'avez pas besoin de réagir à cela, mais nous savons tous comment le système fonctionne.

Je pense que c'est une excellente idée que de donner plus d'indépendance aux comités. Nous l'avons déjà dit. Je pense que nous essayons de reproduire un peu plus notre modèle de la Grande-Bretagne, où les comités semblent vraiment beaucoup plus indépendants que les nôtres. Nous avons encore bien des croûtes à manger, mais l'un des premiers pas dans la bonne direction consistait à retirer les secrétaires parlementaires des comités.

Je l'ai mentionné la dernière fois. M. Lamoureux m'avait dit qu'il allait me répondre. Jusqu'à maintenant, la seule réponse que je vois, c'est qu'il est un membre votant du comité mais qu'il s'est décalé de trois chaises. Je peux pourtant vous assurer que l'effet de whip du gouvernement majoritaire sera le même qu'il soit assis ici ou là.

Si vous me le permettez, j'aimerais que M. Lamoureux m'assure que le gouvernement va retirer les secrétaires parlementaires des comités, parce que j'ai bien l'impression que c'est ce qui va indiquer la voie. Le gouvernement prétend souhaiter que les comités travaillent davantage dans l'indépendance de leurs membres, je vois mal en quoi sa présence ici aujourd'hui atteste de cette volonté.

(1110)

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson, la Chambre des communes a adopté une motion sur la composition de ce comité. M. Lamoureux n'a pas le droit de vote à ce comité. Il y est présent au même titre que n'importe quel autre député. Il est le bienvenu s'il souhaite assister à nos séances. C'est moi qui suis le sixième député représentant le parti ministériel au comité.

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien. J'accepte cette réponse. Il n'est donc pas un membre votant du comité, mais il est tout de même ici, et il porte le poids d'un gouvernement majoritaire ainsi que la volonté du premier ministre.

Le président:

En fait, il est ici, comme tous les secrétaires parlementaires, je l'espère, pour nous donner de l'information au nom du ministre.

M. David Christopherson:

Allez-vous le défendre maintenant, monsieur le président? Est-ce bien votre rôle? Êtes-vous en train de défendre la position du gouvernement?

Le président:

Je précise que le secrétaire parlementaire est ici pour nous donner de l'information au nom du ministre.

M. David Christopherson:

Non, je m'excuse, monsieur le président. Larry, je m'excuse. Cela ne va pas fonctionner.

Vous êtes un président indépendant. Nous allons débattre ici de questions partisanes, mais je ne veux pas avoir à débattre avec vous aussi d'une question partisane. Malgré tout le respect que je vous dois, monsieur — et je le dis avec la plus grande sincérité — vous me semblez vous comporter comme un député du parti ministériel qui défend ce que fait son gouvernement, alors que vous devriez être ici à titre d'arbitre pendant que nous débattons de la question sur le terrain.

Le président:

Monsieur Lamoureux.

M. Kevin Lamoureux (Winnipeg-Nord, Lib.):

Monsieur Christopherson, je comprends votre préoccupation. Je pense que dans la mesure du possible, il faut faire très attention aux raisons pour lesquelles nous sommes là. Je m'intéresse vivement aux travaux de ce comité, et comme les autres députés de la Chambre des communes, j'ai le droit d'être présent lorsqu'il siège.

Je crois que beaucoup de discussions au Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre ont une incidence directe et indirecte sur tout ce qui se passe à la Chambre. Je vais prendre l'exemple du Règlement de la Chambre des communes. J'ose croire que mon expertise pourrait être utile aux membres du comité.

Je pense que vous sous-estimez le rôle important des comités, tel que l'a défini le premier ministre. Il souhaite que les comités soient plus proactifs et productifs afin de mobiliser tous les députés. Tous les membres de ce comité, c'est-à-dire tous les députés libéraux, mais vous aussi et les députés conservateurs, contribueront au débat sain qui doit avoir lieu sur les sujets à l'ordre du jour. Si je peux vous aider ou contribuer au débat de quelque manière que ce soit, je serai ravi de le faire.

À titre de membre du comité, je peux vous dire que je n'ai nullement l'intention de voter ici. Je ne suis pas un membre votant du comité, et à titre de secrétaire parlementaire, je n'ai pas demandé à avoir le droit de vote. J'ose croire que je suis ici en complément des membres du comité, rien de plus.

Vous constaterez que les membres du comité qui représentent le parti ministériel sont très indépendants de pensée. Si je peux les aider de quelque façon que ce soit, je serai très heureux de le faire.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais dire un certain nombre de choses.

D'abord, je vois que notre greffière a raison. Ce sont bel et bien les motions de 2013. Nous allons devoir les lire attentivement, mais il y est écrit des choses comme « Que Dave McKenzie en soit le président », en parlant du Sous-comité des affaires émanant des députés, et c'est ce que nous voulions à l'époque, c'était un député du parti ministériel. Il est aussi question, ailleurs, du nombre de sièges, et l'on en déduit que les néo-démocrates sont ici, avec les libéraux, alors que les conservateurs sont de l'autre côté.

Je veux dire qu'en effet, ce sont bel et bien les motions que nous avions adoptées. Cela confirme, bien sûr, que M. Lamoureux ne fait pas partie du comité.

J'ai quelques recommandations à faire sur le rôle de M. Lamoureux. Ce n'est pas à moi de décider comment il va choisir de se comporter, mais j'aurais une recommandation à lui faire, par souci de clarté.

Kevin, vous n'êtes pas obligé de le faire, mais je vous recommanderais de vous asseoir au bout de la table, pour qu'il soit clair que ces personnes sont membres du comité et que tout le monde puisse voir que vous ne siégez pas au comité. Vous seriez simplement assis à la table pour écouter ce qui se dit. C'est la formule que nous avons utilisée lorsque Mme Elizabeth May est venue à ce comité dans le cadre de l'étude sur les projets de loi émanant des députés. Elle était assise à part. Il était donc clair qu'elle ne siégeait pas à titre de membre à part entière du comité.

Voilà pour la première chose, et ce n'est qu'une proposition. Vous n'êtes pas obligé de le faire. Ce n'est qu'une idée, selon nos usages informels.

La deuxième chose, toutefois, c'est que si vous n'êtes pas membre du comité, je crois que vous devez obtenir le consentement unanime du comité chaque fois que vous voulez prendre la parole. Je me trompe peut-être, mais je pense que c'est la procédure.

Je vois que la greffière avait anticipé ma question et qu'elle pointe le Règlement, donc nous pourrions peut-être obtenir des éclaircissements à cet égard.

(1115)

Le président:

Une seconde. Pouvez-vous ajouter M. Graham à la liste?

Une voix: Oui.

Le président: L'article 119 du Règlement se lit comme suit: Tout député qui n'est pas membre d'un comité permanent, spécial ou législatif peut, sauf si la Chambre ou le comité en ordonne autrement, prendre part aux délibérations publiques du comité, mais il ne peut ni y voter ni y proposer une motion, ni faire partie du quorum.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Pour que ce soit bien clair, si vous le voulez bien, cela signifie que lorsque nous avons des discussions comme celle-ci, M. Lamoureux ou un autre député (puisqu'en théorie ce pourrait être n'importe qui) pourrait se présenter ici et demander... Il nous faudrait une bien grande table pour cela, mais n'importe qui pourrait prendre place à la table, lever la main et obtenir l'autorisation du président pour participer à des discussions comme celle que nous avons en ce moment. Est-ce exact?

Le président:

Oui, à moins que les règles de la Chambre ou du comité ne prescrivent autre chose. Donc si nous disons non, le comité peut refuser de leur accorder la parole.

Comme vous le savez, puisque vous siégez depuis longtemps à des comités, n'importe quel député peut se présenter aux séances d'un comité et y participer, à moins que le comité n'en décide autrement.

M. Scott Reid:

D'après ce que je comprends, pour des choses comme l'interrogation des témoins, un député ne peut prendre la parole que s'il remplace officiellement un membre du comité, auquel cas il prend sa place dans l'alternance établie.

Vous ne semblez pas me contredire. Je vois que vous hochez la tête en signe de confirmation. Très bien.

Mais dans un débat comme celui-ci, vous pourriez simplement donner la parole à n'importe quelle personne présente, pourvu qu'il s'agisse d'un député, afin qu'elle participe à la discussion.

Le président:

À moins que les règles du comité ne prescrivent autre chose.

M. Scott Reid:

À moins que les règles du comité ne prescrivent autre chose. Très bien.

Je ne veux pas avoir l'air de faire preuve de mauvaise foi, mais j'y vois un problème potentiel. Comme le comité se compose en majorité de députés du parti ministériel, les libéraux pourraient décider de s'y présenter et de participer aux discussions, notamment pour ralentir les délibérations qui ne leur plaisent pas. Ils n'auraient qu'à se présenter pour participer au débat.

Franchement, l'histoire nous montre que vous n'avez pas vraiment besoin d'aller chercher d'autres députés si M. Lamoureux est là, puisqu'il est remarquablement habile pour s'exprimer longuement sur presque n'importe quel sujet, sans préavis, et je le dis en toute gentillesse. Quoi qu'il en soit, si n'importe quel député d'un autre parti voulait faire la même chose, on l'en empêcherait, et je pense que c'est un problème.

Je n'ai rien de précis à proposer pour l'instant, mais j'y reviendrai probablement à la prochaine séance, en janvier. Je vais réfléchir à la façon dont nous pourrions modifier cela. Je vais proposer une motion, que le comité pourra adopter pour établir qu'il devra obtenir le consentement de ses membres pour qu'une personne puisse intervenir. Le gouvernement, s'il le souhaite vraiment, pourra toujours rejeter cette motion, mais je pense qu'il ne devrait pas y avoir de participation élargie aux délibérations des comités.

Cela ne veut pas dire que M. Lamoureux ne devrait pas être ici ou qu'il n'est pas le bienvenu. À mon avis, il est tout à fait le bienvenu ici. Je voulais simplement dire que je vois là un problème, une échappatoire qui pourrait être utilisée à mauvais escient, et c'est ce que nous voudrions prévenir.

Le président:

D'accord. N'insistons pas trop longtemps sur cette question. Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Eh bien moi je pourrais vouloir le faire.

Monsieur le président, je voudrais commencer par les observations de M. Lamoureux.

La plupart de ses observations seraient valides si nous étions retournés deux semaines en arrière et étions partis de zéro, mais le problème, et c'est impossible de refaire l'histoire, est que vous êtes bel et bien arrivé ici, à la dernière séance, et avez pris les choses en main. Vous êtes le seul qui ait parlé. L'intention de vous confier les rênes était évidente.

Ce n'est pas tout. D'ordinaire, notre comité est composé de membres expérimentés, en raison de son rôle de premier plan dans beaucoup de travaux de la Chambre. Voilà pourquoi on lui accorde des droits spéciaux. Nos séances débutent toujours à la même heure. Nous ne sommes pas assujettis à des rotations, comme les autres comités. Et ainsi de suite.

Notre comité est très important, incroyablement important pour la Chambre. Pour que M. Lamoureux soit ici... M. Chan possède de l'expérience, je le concède, mais pas tellement — une année ou deux après une élection partielle — et presque tous les autres membres sont nouveaux. Dans un comité peuplé de néophytes, il est logique de dépêcher un vieux routier pour le diriger.

Ce vieux routier, qui serait-il? Ah oui, c'est vous. Alors, quand vous dites que votre visite découle simplement d'un élan spontané d'intérêt, ça ne tient pas debout. En fait, vous êtes ici pour servir d'antenne et de courroie de transmission au Cabinet du Premier ministre. Vous savez quoi? C'était la même chose avant.

J'en parle, parce que le gouvernement a tellement fait de bruit pour être perçu comme le véhicule du changement. Je n'y vois rien de mal ni même à certaines modifications proposées. Mais je m'interroge sur l'écart entre les discours et les actions du gouvernement. En ce qui concerne la présence de secrétaires parlementaires aux comités, cet écart est jusqu'ici absolu.

D'après le Règlement, c'est tout à fait le droit de M. Lamoureux d'être ici, mais je tiens à lui rappeler que, tous les jours, son premier ministre parle de transparence, de reddition de comptes, de pensées positives et de changement. Jusqu'ici, la conduite du gouvernement à l'égard du comité est identique à celle des gouvernements antérieurs.

Je voudrais que, dorénavant, M. Lamoureux me signale les mesures qu'il prendra et qui sont conformes au discours du gouvernement, parce que, jusqu'ici, cela ne s'accorde pas.

Une voix: Je voudrais...

(1120)

Le président:

Je suis désolé. Nous devons d'abord entendre M. Graham, puis Mme Vandenbeld, puis M. Chan.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Monsieur Christopherson, pensez-vous que Tyler ne possède aucune expérience?

M. David Christopherson:

Pardon?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pendant de nombreuses années, mon siège était derrière le vôtre, à côté de celui de votre adjoint, et je me demande si, à cause de cela, je n'ai aucune expérience.

M. David Christopherson:

De député?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Eh bien, j'ai été...

M. David Christopherson:

De député? Allons, David, vous avez accumulé suffisamment d'expérience. Vous pouvez trouver une meilleure ruse.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Je voudrais...

M. David Christopherson: Quand on veut s'emparer d'une position, il faut s'assurer de pouvoir ensuite la défendre. Avant d'agir comme un vieux routier, il faut s'assurer qu'on sera traité comme un vieux routier.

Alors, convenez que personne, ici, au comité, ne possède vraiment d'expérience de ce comité. Franchement!

Le président:

Un peu de silence, s'il vous plaît.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

David, je voudrais...

Le président:

La parole est maintenant à Mme Vandenbeld.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Je tiens à en parler, parce que, d'après moi, c'est un affront aux membres du comité. Nous n'avons peut-être pas l'expérience de ce comité ou du Parlement, mais, pour ma part, j'ai été la directrice des affaires parlementaires du leader de la Chambre et conseillère auprès d'un certain nombre de parlements sur la réforme parlementaire, à la faveur du Programme mondial pour le renforcement parlementaire du Programme des Nations Unies pour le développement. Je pense que vous allez constater que nous ne nous laisserons pas aussi facilement intimider que vous le pensez et que notre apport aux travaux du comité sera absolument positif.

Une voix: [Note de la rédaction: inaudible]

Le président:

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je tiens à répondre aux observations de M. Christopherson.

En fin de compte, cela fait partie de l'ensemble des discussions que nous devons avoir. Nous devons encore examiner le rôle à confier aux secrétaires parlementaires. C'est en fait le rôle de notre comité. Discutons-en, si vous voulez bien. Au bout du compte, nous déterminerons...

M. David Christopherson:

Nous allons définir le travail des secrétaires parlementaires?

M. Arnold Chan:

Nous allons déterminer les règles qui, en fin de compte, régissent cette fonction...

M. David Christopherson:

Ça m'intéresse.

M. Arnold Chan:

Alors discutons-en.

M. David Christopherson: Ça m'intéresse beaucoup.

M. Arnold Chan: Nous allons établir le calendrier nécessaire et nous en discuterons en temps voulu.

M. David Christopherson:

Avez-vous dit que notre comité allait définir le rôle des secrétaires parlementaires? Parce que j'appuie cette idée.

Le président:

Un peu de silence, s'il vous plaît. Veuillez vous adresser à moi lorsque je vous donne la parole.

Je pense que les opinions de chacun sont bien connues sur cette question. Passons aux affaires courantes et expédions les motions déposées. Vous pourrez vous reprendre.

La première motion, que je vais lire et que je demande à quelqu'un de proposer, concerne le service des analystes de la Bibliothèque du Parlement pour aider le comité dans ses travaux. Que le Comité retienne, au besoin, et à la discrétion du président, les services d'un ou de plusieurs analystes de la Bibliothèque du Parlement pour l'aider dans ses travaux.

La motion est proposée par M. Hoback.

Quelqu'un a-t-il quelque chose à dire ou quelqu'un s'oppose-t-il à cette motion?

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président: je vous présente M. Andre Barnes.

Soyez le bienvenu. Je suis très heureux de vous revoir. Vous nous êtes indispensable. Nous sommes vraiment reconnaissants à tout le personnel pour son travail. Comme vous le savez, il possède l'expérience.

Je vais lire la deuxième motion telle quelle, puis je demanderai un amendement, puisque, comme vous le savez, c'est ce que nous faisons ici: Que le Sous-comité du programme et de la procédure soit créé et composé du président, des deux vice-présidents, d'un membre du parti ministériel et du secrétaire parlementaire.

Monsieur Chan.

(1125)

M. Arnold Chan:

Je propose de supprimer le texte qui suit « les deux vice-présidents », c'est-à-dire « un membre du parti ministériel et le secrétaire parlementaire » pour le remplacer par « deux membres du parti ministériel ».

Le président:

La motion se lit maintenant comme suit: Que le Sous-comité du programme et de la procédure soit créé et composé du président, des deux vice-présidents et de deux membres du parti ministériel.

Voulez-vous en discuter?

Monsieur Hoback.

M. Randy Hoback (Prince Albert, PCC):

Pouvez-vous préciser si, par « deux membres du parti ministériel », vous entendez deux députés effectivement membres du comité? C'est bien ça?

M. Arnold Chan:

C'est bien ça.

Le président:

La parole est à M. Christopherson. Nous entendrons ensuite M. Reid.

M. David Christopherson:

Je remercie M. Chan. J'appuie la partie de la motion qui, bien sûr, fait disparaître la mention du secrétaire parlementaire. Personne n'en sera vraiment surpris. J'éprouve cependant des difficultés à accepter deux membres du parti ministériel.

Monsieur le président, j'aurai besoin de vos lumières. La plupart des comités de direction dont j'ai fait partie avaient deux sortes de composition. Dans l'une, le président représentait le parti ministériel et les deux autres membres représentaient les deux autres partis, ce qui posait un problème énorme. Si vous vous rappelez certains des sujets de préoccupation que j'ai soulevés au sujet de votre présidence, un peu plus tôt, il y a le problème du président qui essaie de représenter un parti dans un comité de direction, même si cela se fait de façon très officieuse, tout en étant l'arbitre de la discussion, ce qui est très difficile.

Il y a un certain nombre de législatures, j'ai déposé une motion au comité des comptes publics pour changer cette formule, de manière à ajouter un représentant du parti ministériel pour le représenter officiellement et un membre de chacun des partis reconnus, alors que le président s'occuperait de son travail à lui.

À ce que je sache, la plupart des comités de direction ne prennent pas de décisions non unanimes. Du moins, c'est ce que j'ai constaté au fil des ans. Le comité de direction essaie de former le consensus. ce qui se produit la plupart du temps. Les dossiers sont ensuite mis aux voix dans l'ensemble du comité.

Si le comité de direction ne peut pas tomber d'accord, nous n'assistons pas alors, à ce niveau, à une épreuve de force donnant la victoire à la majorité, au gouvernement en fait, qui revient avec sa recommandation. Il peut profiter de sa majorité au comité, mais, quant à lui, le comité de direction n'est pas en soi un organisme de décision. Toutes nos actions doivent être avalisées par l'ensemble du comité.

Comme nous le savons tous, les comités de direction sont les auxiliaires de leur comité. Ils règlent beaucoup de détails, uniquement des affaires courantes. Ils établissent le calendrier des travaux. Personne n'essaie d'y jouer au plus fin. Il s'agit simplement de prendre des décisions rapides, expéditives, pour faciliter la tâche au comité. Comme je l'ai dit, on s'accorde 95 % du temps, parce qu'on ne touche qu'aux modalités et non à la nature des décisions à prendre.

Voilà pourquoi je demanderais seulement au gouvernement de bien vouloir envisager l'idée d'un président, d'un représentant du parti ministériel puis d'un représentant de chacun des partis reconnus, c'est-à-dire les conservateurs et le NPD. Encore une fois, s'il n'y a pas de consensus, la question ne revient pas ici après avoir fait l'objet d'un vote majoritaire, parce que ce n'est pas un organe de décision. Si c'est un organe de consultation et si toutes ses décisions reviennent au comité, le gouvernement est absolument sûr que sa volonté, parce qu'il possède la majorité, finira toujours par triompher, ce qui, d'après moi, devrait faciliter les choses si nous conservions un président et un membre de chacun des partis reconnus.

Merci, monsieur le président.

M. Arnold Chan:

Étant donné que c'est moi qui ai proposé l'amendement...

Le président:

Non. C'est M. Reid, puis M. Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Mes excuses, monsieur le président.

M. Scott Reid:

J'aimerais une petite explication. Est-ce en fait un amendement à l'amendement de M. Chan qui est proposé, et dans l'affirmative, est-ce que nous en discutons?

M. David Christopherson:

Si j'ai l'appui qu'il faut, oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Pourriez-vous formuler cela sous la forme d'un sous-amendement, dans ce cas? Nous pourrions alors en discuter.

M. David Christopherson:

Je propose de modifier l'amendement de M. Chan — alors il s'agit bien, j'imagine, d'un sous-amendement à l'amendement de M. Chan — de sorte que tout ce qui vient après « membre du parti ministériel » soit supprimé et que les deux membres du parti ministériel et le secrétaire parlementaire en soient retirés.

Joann, je vous demande de m'aider à mettre de l'ordre dans cela.

M. Randy Hoback:

Le président et deux vice-présidents? C'est ce que vous dites?

M. David Christopherson:

Les deux vice-présidents... Non. Il faut un député du parti ministériel pour avoir un, deux, trois. Donc, nous arrêterions après « membre du parti ministériel ». Nous arrêterions là.

Madame la greffière, je ne sais pas s'il s'agit bien d'un sous-amendement. J'aimerais votre avis.

Le président:

Si je comprends bien, la motion serait: « Que le Sous-comité du programme et de la procédure soit créé et composé du président, des deux vice-présidents et d'un membre du parti ministériel. »

M. David Christopherson:

C'est bien cela, monsieur le président.

Le président:

D'accord. Nous allons discuter de l'amendement qui est proposé.

M. Reid est l'intervenant suivant.

M. Scott Reid:

Ma question est simplement la suivante... Je pourrais faire des commentaires, mais je veux d'abord confirmer cela. Est-ce en fait un sous-amendement? Ou bien est-ce plutôt un nouvel amendement qui ne peut être traité que comme un point à l'ordre du jour, une fois que le premier amendement a été réglé, étant donné qu'il ne s'agit pas en fait d'un amendement, mais d'une motion de remplacement?

J'aimerais avoir votre avis à ce sujet avant d'aller plus loin.

M. David Christopherson:

Arnold, je ne sais pas à quoi vous pensez exactement, mais vous pouvez l'interpréter comme un amendement amical et contribuer à faire avancer les choses si vous êtes d'accord.

M. Scott Reid:

Je ne sais pas si cela fonctionne dans notre contexte. Je pense que ce sont les Robert's Rules of Order et que cela ne s'applique pas à la procédure parlementaire.

Une voix: [Note de la rédaction: inaudible]

Le président:

Les procédures antérieures ne constituaient pas vraiment une motion. La première motion dont nous discutions est donc celle de M. Chan, puis nous avons le premier amendement, présenté par M. Christopherson. Donc, nous discutons de l'amendement.

(1130)

M. Arnold Chan:

Avons-nous besoin de quelqu'un pour l'appuyer?

Le président:

Non. Nous n'avons pas besoin de quelqu'un pour appuyer les motions présentées en comité.

Au sujet de l'amendement, monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai, en fait, une suggestion différente.

David, ce n'est pas que je me prononce contre votre motion, mais j'allais proposer un amendement, et il est plus facile de discuter de votre amendement en ayant toute l'information nécessaire si vous êtes au courant de l'amendement que j'allais proposer.

J'allais suggérer que nous disions que ce serait le président et les deux vice-présidents, ainsi que « deux membres du parti ministériel qui sont des membres permanents du comité ». La logique derrière cela était, et est encore, je pense, que de cette manière, nous aurions l'assurance que ce sont des gens qui participent effectivement aux travaux du comité et qui sont au courant, plutôt que des gens qui viennent de l'extérieur du comité. Cela exclut en particulier la possibilité que l'un des deux membres du parti ministériel soit un secrétaire parlementaire.

Le problème avec la motion initiale de M. Chan... Arnold, je ne dis pas que votre amendement comporte quelque chose de répréhensible. C'est juste que cela laisse une porte ouverte. Il pourrait s'agir de deux membres du parti ministériel qui sont aussi membres du comité, ou deux membres du parti ministériel qui font partie d'un autre comité, qui n'ont aucune idée de nos travaux et qui ne sont là que pour imposer la volonté du whip. Il pourrait même s'agir d'au moins un secrétaire parlementaire, du moins en théorie.

Le but est d'éviter cela. Je dois dire que la suggestion de M. Christopherson n'empêche pas cela complètement, mais elle réalise en gros le même objectif.

C'est ce que je propose. Je ne me prononce pas pour ou contre la proposition initiale de M. Christopherson. C'est tout simplement la façon que j'envisageais pour résoudre la même question. Je lance l'idée pour ceux qui discutent de la question.

Une voix: [Note de la rédaction: inaudible]

M. Scott Reid: Non, non. Je voulais simplement expliquer les choses de sorte que les gens puissent être bien informés au moment où le sous-amendement de M. Christopherson sera mis aux voix, c'est tout.

Le président:

Avant que nous poursuivions, monsieur Reid, quand il est question du sous-comité et de ce genre de choses, nous parlons toujours de membres du comité.

M. Scott Reid: C'est vrai?

Le président: C'est ce qui est entendu, alors sachez que votre motion est redondante.

M. Scott Reid:

Je ne savais pas cela. C'est bien vrai? Je suis désolé. Je suis sûr que pour certaines initiatives parlementaires — c'est un fait —, le sous-comité comptait des membres qui n'étaient pas membres du comité. À moins de l'existence d'un texte qui empêche cela, je pense qu'il y a déjà eu atteinte à la convention et que le libellé de la motion pourrait servir à combler cette lacune.

Une voix: Pensez-vous être ouvert à cet amendement?

Le président:

D'accord. Nous devons nous occuper de l'amendement de M. Christopherson. Nous allons penser à cela, d'accord? Qui est la prochaine personne?

M. Chan est le suivant, puis M. Christopherson.

M. Arnold Chan:

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais simplement poser une brève question à M. Reid.

Je n'ai aucun problème avec l'amendement que vous proposeriez, monsieur Reid. La seule chose que j'aimerais que vous m'expliquiez est la suivante. Disons qu'il nous faudrait remplacer un membre: s'il est nécessaire que les deux membres du parti ministériel au sous-comité fassent partie du comité, cela empêche les autres membres de servir de substitut. Donc, si nous avons besoin d'un remplaçant, faut-il qu'il soit l'un des membres permanents du comité?

M. Scott Reid:

C'est juste. C'est ce que je veux dire, en effet.

(1135)

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Je suis étonné qu'ils ne sachent pas cela, compte tenu de la vaste expérience qu'ils disent avoir... Mais je ne veux pas être cette personne, alors je ne le dirai pas.

Voici, monsieur le président: je pense que je sais où tout ceci s'en va. Vous pouvez voir que ma grande préoccupation, c'est que le comité directeur devienne tout simplement un mini-moi du comité, ce qui serait en fait parfaitement inutile. J'aimerais que vous me disiez que mon interprétation est la bonne, que vous l'utiliserez et que la greffière l'appuie.

J'ai mentionné précédemment dans un de mes soliloques que le comité ne ferait pas de recommandations sans consensus, sans unanimité, et qu'il ne serait pas question de majorité qui mène. Puis-je vous demander de trancher et de nous dire si c'est exactement le cas? Est-ce que le comité directeur fonctionnera différemment et prendra des décisions différemment? Et quelle sera la relation entre les décisions et le comité?

Par exemple, j'ai dit que, d'après mon expérience, les recommandations ne sont adoptées que s'il y a unanimité. En l'absence d'unanimité entre les trois partis reconnus, la question est présentée au comité comme n'ayant pas été résolue et n'est accompagnée d'aucune recommandation du comité directeur. À l'inverse, si le gouvernement cherche à gagner en étant majoritaire au comité directeur, cela aurait un effet sur le poids d'une recommandation positive... laquelle serait bien plus difficile à freiner, surtout si c'est le gouvernement qui l'envoie et que le gouvernement est majoritaire au comité directeur.

D'après moi, monsieur le président, il est très important d'éclaircir cela dès le début, à savoir si le comité directeur prend des décisions à la majorité des voix pour ensuite faire des recommandations au comité. Ou bien ne serait-ce que les recommandations qui reçoivent le soutien unanime du comité directeur qui seraient transmises au comité?

Le président:

Je vais demander des éclaircissements à la greffière à ce sujet, puis nous allons passer à M. Hoback.

M. David Christopherson: Excellent. Merci.

Le président: La greffière dit que la décision quant à la façon de travailler et de présenter les recommandations relève du sous-comité.

M. David Christopherson:

Dans ce cas, monsieur le président, j'aimerais par votre entremise obtenir de M. Chan l'assurance que nous ne changerons pas les choses.

Voici ce que je pense. Vous me dites maintenant que le comité va prendre les décisions lui-même. Si le parti ministériel a le dernier mot et obtient deux membres, cela signifie qu'il est sûr de remporter tous les votes. Pourquoi dans ce cas ne pas aller discuter au sous-comité de la façon dont ils veulent que les choses se passent? Ils ont les voix nécessaires pour s'imposer. Puis il y a le système dont je parlais: le sous-comité ou le comité directeur ne devient rien de plus que la version mini-moi du comité, avec la même dynamique politique.

Je ne cherche pas à me disputer, en passant; j'aime vraiment travailler avec tout le monde, mais nous devons établir les règles de base convenablement. J'ai besoin d'éclaircissements de la part du parti ministériel, à la lumière de cette décision, concernant la façon dont il va interpréter cela au sous-comité, car c'est important dans la décision d'accepter deux membres du parti ministériel ou pas.

Je vais mettre cartes sur table. Si les décisions vont se prendre par consensus, pas de problème avec deux membres du parti ministériel. Je ne pense pas que ce soit utile et que ça va changer quelque chose. Cela ne fait qu'ajouter une réunion à l'emploi du temps d'une personne. Vous avez peut-être besoin de cela, compte tenu de la taille de votre caucus. Cela se comprend. Mais cela ne change pas la dynamique. Si nous en venons à prendre des décisions à la majorité des voix plutôt que par consensus, premièrement, nous renonçons à certains des mécanismes les plus indépendants que le comité utilise pour que nous puissions travailler ensemble, à l'écart du gouvernement, ce qui est censé être notre but.

Si j'ai cette certitude, cela me facilitera nettement les choses. Cependant, si vous me dites que vous allez vous donner deux voix et changer les règles du Parlement par rapport au Parlement précédent, afin de vous donner plus de force au sein d'un sous-comité qui est censé être le plus impartial possible, cela va vraiment poser un problème à mes yeux, parce que cela va avoir une incidence sur tout ce que nous allons faire à l'avenir et que cela pourrait servir de modèle aux autres comités.

Avec respect, je dis que si nous voulons accomplir notre travail, le gouvernement ferait bien d'exprimer clairement ses intentions. J'espère qu'il penchera du côté de la démocratie avec un petit « d » et non du côté du contrôle avec un grand « C ».

(1140)

Le président:

Merci. Nous allons écouter M. Hoback, puis M. Chan, M. Lamoureux et Mme Vandenbeld.

M. Randy Hoback:

Monsieur le président, pour faire avancer les choses, pourquoi ne pas nous occuper de cela et mettre son sous-amendement aux voix? Je pense que M. Reid voudrait aussi proposer un amendement. Je n'ai pas l'impression que poursuivre la discussion va nous apporter quelque chose de plus.

Le président:

Voulez-vous demander que l'amendement soit mis aux voix?

M. David Christopherson:

J'invoque le Règlement. Vous ne pouvez mettre fin au débat en comité. Je veux pouvoir prendre la parole, si personne d'autre ne veut le faire.

Le président:

D'accord. Nous allons passer aux autres interventions. Ce sera M. Chan, puis M. Lamoureux, puis Mme Vandenbeld.

M. Arnold Chan:

Monsieur Christopherson, en fin de compte, cela revient à la façon dont nous faisons les choses et dont nous nous conduisons. Nous sommes tout à fait d'accord pour dire que le comité directeur doit travailler par consensus et que si cela est possible, c'est exactement ainsi que nous devons procéder. Nous avons la ferme intention de travailler en collaboration avec les autres partis pour établir cela.

Tout ce que nous proposons, c'est de mettre en oeuvre le remplacement du secrétaire parlementaire dans le contexte des pratiques courantes concernant la composition de ce comité, et de remplacer le secrétaire parlementaire par un membre du parti ministériel. C'est tout.

Ce que vous proposez, en réalité, c'est de changer la composition du comité et de modifier la représentation des membres.

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai posé une question, monsieur Chan, et elle était très claire...

Le président:

Monsieur Lamoureux, vous êtes le prochain. Voulez-vous passer?

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Oui.

Le président:

Dans ce cas, nous avons Mme Vandenbeld.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Monsieur le président, soyons réaliste à propos de cet amendement, dont le seul effet réel est de remplacer un secrétaire parlementaire par un membre du parti ministériel. Le but de cela est de faire en sorte que le secrétaire parlementaire ne soit plus membre du sous-comité. Tout le reste demeure comme avant, et rien ne justifie de croire que le comportement du sous-comité ou quoi que ce soit d'autre changera. Le seul changement, en réalité, est le remplacement du secrétaire parlementaire.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Le gouvernement peut bien dire que les choses resteront « telles qu'elles étaient », mais vous êtes arrivés ici en disant vouloir changer les choses, les améliorer et donner plus d'indépendance, entre autres à nous.

J'entends tous les arguments. Je dis aux membres du parti ministériel, avec respect, que j'ai demandé au président si le comité directeur fonctionnerait à la majorité des voix ou par consensus. Je suis ici depuis un bon moment; on écoute chaque mot. M. Chan a dit qu'on allait essayer de fonctionner par consensus, mais ce que je n'ai pas encore entendu, c'est si les décisions qui seront soumises au comité auront été prises à l'unanimité ou pas. Si tel est le cas, nous n'avons pas un aussi gros problème. En fait, je ne pense pas que nous ayons un problème. Je n'aime pas cela, mais je peux l'accepter.

Cependant, si le parti ministériel dit que le président a maintenant reconnu que le sous-comité a le droit de déterminer s'il va prendre ses décisions à la majorité des voix ou à l'unanimité, et que cela n'a pas été décidé et le sera par le sous-comité... Je demande au parti ministériel, conformément aux nouvelles voies ensoleillées et à l'ouverture exprimée, de nous dire s'il compte maintenir les choses telles qu'elles étaient et ne pas soumettre notre travail au contrôle du Cabinet du Premier ministre. Je veux simplement entendre bien clairement que le sous-comité ne fera pas de recommandations au comité si elles ne sont pas adoptées à l'unanimité.

Si on m'assure de cela, je n'aurai aucun problème. Sinon, installez-vous bien.

Le président:

Est-ce que d'autres personnes souhaitent intervenir?

M. David Christopherson:

Je voudrais intervenir.

Le président:

Allez-y.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président. J'avais demandé des éclaircissements. Maintenant que j'ai de nouveau la parole, j'aimerais savoir, par votre entremise, si la personne responsable de l'autre côté pourrait me garantir que les décisions du comité de direction seront unanimes et que, comme par le passé, ses travaux ne seront pas entachés par la partisanerie. J'aimerais éclaircir ce point.

Si le gouvernement n'est pas disposé à respecter cette façon de faire... Nous avons déjà eu des échanges avec le secrétaire parlementaire. Il n'a fallu qu'une semaine et demie pour que tout à coup, les paroles et les agissements ne correspondent plus. C'est important. Le travail du comité de direction est crucial, particulièrement dans un comité comme le nôtre, lequel a souvent beaucoup de pain sur la planche.

Monsieur le président, vous savez qu'au cours de la dernière législature, le caractère et la personnalité du président précédent se sont révélés fort utiles. J'ai voté pour vous, espérant que la même chose se produirait. Il faut que nous puissions travailler ensemble, car nous nous penchons sur de nombreuses questions non partisanes. Mais si le fondement même de notre programme n'est pas le résultat d'un consensus, mais d'un vote majoritaire, c'est légal, mais pas idéal, car le processus n'est pas transparent et ce n'est certainement pas une amélioration.

J'ai de la difficulté à simplement comprendre pourquoi c'est si difficile. Le gouvernement voulait accorder aux comités une certaine indépendance, et dès le départ, nous devons le convaincre de relâcher son emprise pour que nous puissions jouir de cette indépendance.

Je ferais respectueusement remarquer que soit le Cabinet du premier ministre régentera les comités comme il l'a fait au cours de la dernière décennie, soit il agira différemment, c'est-à-dire que nous ferons les choses autrement.

(1145)

Le président:

Est-ce que quelqu'un d'autre souhaite intervenir?

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, j'ai toujours la parole, et il semble que je l'aurai pendant un certain temps, car je veux obtenir une réponse. J'ai droit à une réponse.

Il n'est pas déraisonnable de ma part de demander à un gouvernement qui affirme qu'il sera transparent de nous dire comment il entend diriger le comité de direction ou si nous serons autorisés à le diriger. Jusqu'à présent, le silence du gouvernement est éloquent. Il m'indique que le gouvernement veut encore garder le contrôle. Il veut contrôler notre comité en le tenant à la gorge, camouflant le tout sous de belles manières et de belles paroles; mais au final, le gouvernement aura un problème.

Je crois que je ferais mieux de m'installer, car la discussion va durer longtemps. Voici le problème auquel le gouvernement sera confronté: lentement, mais sûrement, vous vous apercevrez que chaque petite divergence, particulièrement quand il est question d'indépendance et de certaines choses dont vous avez traité à la Chambre, ne s'évanouira pas. Si le gouvernement veut se camoufler derrière les apparences tout en disant « Nous avons toujours le contrôle et rien n'a vraiment changé », c'est exactement la manière de s'y prendre.

Je vois qu'une députée secoue la tête. J'ai passé par là moi aussi. Je comprends, mais le fait est que nous méritons des garanties, pas seulement de belles paroles au sujet de belles procédures, mais des gestes concrets.

La population canadienne en avait assez des méthodes de l'ancien gouvernement. Le nouveau gouvernement a promis quelque chose de nouveau, et un grand nombre de gens que je connais, que j'aime et que je respecte ont aimé l'idée et ont voté pour les libéraux afin que les choses changent. La présente séance n'est pas télévisée, mais ces personnes ne seraient pas impressionnées par ce qu'il se passe ici. Ce n'est pas impressionnant de la part d'un gouvernement qui affirme qu'il ne veut pas contrôler les comités et qu'il veut, au contraire, veiller à ce qu'ils bénéficient d'une plus grande indépendance.

Tout ce que nous demandons, tout ce que je demande, c'est qu'on nous garantisse que ce n'est pas le Cabinet du premier ministre qui décidera du programme du comité de direction. Il faut pour cela déclarer que le comité de direction est non partisan. Nous y représentons des intérêts partisans, mais nous nous efforçons de nous entendre au sujet d'un programme non partisan.

Disons que nous tenons des séances sur un rapport et que nous devons décider du nombre de témoins à entendre, du temps à accorder aux audiences et de l'ordre de comparution. Ce ne sont pas là des questions partisanes, à moins que nous nous disputions vraiment, ce qui est une autre affaire; la plupart du temps, cependant, nous ne nous chicanons pas. C'est le genre de choses que le comité ferait. Nous baissons la garde et nous travaillons ensemble.

La situation est tout autre si, à la fin de ces discussions, le gouvernement détermine le programme en s'appuyant sur les recommandations prises par la majorité des membres du comité de direction. Vous savez quoi? Quand le comité de direction présente des recommandations adoptées par une majorité de voix, les membres du parti ministériel l'adopteront 10 fois sur 10.

Certains d'entre vous peuvent affirmer, aux fins du compte rendu, que ce ne sera pas le cas. Faites bien attention. Je vous mets en garde à ce sujet, car c'est ainsi que les choses vont se passer.

Elles ne peuvent se passer autrement que si le comité de direction se réunit et ne réussit pas à en arriver à un accord; il aurait alors échoué. J'aurais manqué à mes devoirs envers mon caucus, tout comme l'auraient fait les conservateurs et les libéraux envers leurs caucus si nous ne pouvions en arriver à un accord, puisque notre devoir consiste à établir un programme non partisan que le comité pourrait approuver. Les rouages politiques entreraient alors en jeu, mais si les choses restent comme elles le sont, avec le gouvernement qui ne veut même pas clarifier la situation, il est évident que le gouvernement actuel n'entend pas rompre avec les pratiques de celui qui l'a précédé.

J'ai demandé aux membres du parti ministériel de répondre. Rien ne m'indique qu'ils vont le faire. Mon intervention va donc se prolonger, car je veux éclaircir ce point, qui touche chacun de nous.

J'ai encore...

(1150)

Le président:

Un instant. Quelqu'un invoque le Règlement.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Monsieur le président, je m'interroge sur la pertinence de l'intervention. Je crois comprendre que le sous-amendement proposé par le député concerne le nombre de membres du comité. Il propose qu'il y ait un seul membre du parti ministériel au lieu de deux. La discussion porte toutefois sur le fait que le comité procéderait en fonction d'un consensus ou non, ce qui ne concerne pas le sous-amendement proposé.

Le président:

Le point qu'il soulève a un certain rapport avec l'amendement; je le laisserai donc poursuivre.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président. Je vous suis reconnaissant. Ils me connaissent. Nous en avons pour un moment.

L'intervention de Mme Vandenbeld est une autre tentative pour me faire taire pendant le huis clos. Je lui ferai remarquer que, comme David le sait, c'est une technique à laquelle le gouvernement recourait constamment. Quand il ne pouvait gagner un débat, il réduisait l'intervenant au silence.

Ici encore, il n'est pas aussi facile qu'on pourrait le croire pour le gouvernement de tenir ses promesses, malgré toutes ses bonnes intentions, sinon, bien franchement, quelqu'un l'aurait déjà fait. Le fait est que c'est une tâche ardue, et il est difficile pour le gouvernement de lâcher la bride, mais c'est vous qui avez promis de le faire. Vous êtes le gouvernement, et vous ne le faites pas. Vous voulez conserver la capacité de contrôler les comités par la majorité des voix au sein du comité de direction et de notre comité. Vous tentez de me faire taire parce que mes arguments vous déplaisent.

Je dois vous dire que je sais que vous pensez que c'est correct et que je fais fausse route, mais c'est exactement ce que le gouvernement précédent pensait. Ses motifs étaient peut-être différents et il s'est peut-être amusé à essayer de nous bâillonner plus souvent, mais il n'en demeure pas moins qu'il essayait de nous faire taire, comme mon amie Anita a tenté de le faire avec moi.

J'en reviens à mon point principal, monsieur le président. Il est très facile de me faire taire. Il suffit de me garantir qu'une majorité partisane ne contrôlera pas le comité de direction. Ce n'est pas trop demander que de vouloir obtenir une réponse à cet égard; or, je n'ai pas de réponse, pas même un « non », et je dois vous dire que tout cela ressemble à ce que le gouvernement précédent faisait.

Je ne remets pas en question la bonne volonté des nouveaux membres du comité qui croient que toutes leurs paroles et leurs bonnes intentions peuvent à elles seules changer les choses, et je crois de tout mon coeur que vous êtes tous ici pour les bonnes raisons. Vous voulez réellement changer les choses, mais je vous fais remarquer que vous agissez exactement comme le précédent gouvernement majoritaire.

J'ai encore la parole. M. Chan voudrait intervenir, et j'aimerais m'inscrire de nouveau sur la liste des intervenants.

Le président:

Cette liste comprend actuellement M. Richards, M. Chan et M. Christopherson.

Monsieur Christopherson, je me suis montré un peu permissif, mais certains de vos arguments étaient répétitifs. Quand vous aurez de nouveau la parole, dites quelque chose de nouveau.

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Ayant été membre du comité pendant quelques années au cours de la législature précédente, je peux voir la question des deux points de vue. J'ai fait partie du sous-comité, tout comme M. Christopherson. Je crois que M. Lamoureux en a également fait partie à l'époque. Je pense que le comité a raisonnablement bien fonctionné par le passé. Évidemment, la décision finale revient toujours au comité de toute façon.

Je comprends cependant l'argument de M. Christopherson au sujet d'un membre. C'est un argument d'une certaine justesse; je suis donc quelque peu déchiré à ce propos. Les deux possibilités me conviendraient. Je crois que ce qui importe — c'est là où je voulais en venir, et M. Reid a donné un contexte important plus tôt —, c'est que nous nous assurions qu'il s'agit de membres du comité. M. Christopherson craint que malgré les promesses du gouvernement, le secrétaire parlementaire ne détermine la manière dont le comité fonctionnerait. Même si le gouvernement a promis le contraire, je crois que les deux partis de l'opposition veulent vraiment éviter que le secrétaire parlementaire, au nom du Cabinet du premier ministre, dirige et contrôle ce que fait le comité. C'est certainement la crainte que soulève M. Christopherson. Je pense que le plus important des deux, c'est que nous nous assurions qu'il s'agit de membres permanents du comité, comme M. Reid l'a proposé.

J'espère que le gouvernement cherchera à atténuer certaines des préoccupations soulevées ici et à trouver un compromis, car je crois que c'est ce qui importe ici.

(1155)

Le président:

Avant que M. Chan n'intervienne, je propose que si le comité ne s'est pas encore entendu à ce sujet lorsque M. Christopherson aura de nouveau la parole, nous reléguions la question à la fin des motions pour affaires courantes et voyions si nous pouvons nous entendre sur certains sujets. Vous n'avez pas à répondre immédiatement à cette proposition.

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Permettez-moi d'aborder le point de M. Christopherson en premier. Je crois que nous nous préoccupons davantage de la forme que de la substance. Vous proposez de modifier la composition du comité. Nous avons la ferme intention de travailler en collaboration, mais il se peut que nous ne puissions nous entendre à certains moments. Tout ce que nous proposons, c'est de remplacer le secrétaire parlementaire par un membre du parti ministériel. C'est la pratique que nous adoptions essentiellement.

Je veux passer au point que MM. Reid et Richards ont soulevé au sujet de la question de la substitution. Ce qui me préoccupe, c'est que je crois qu'on a l'intention de retirer le secrétaire parlementaire de la liste des substituts potentiels. L'idée que seuls des membres permanents du comité puissent agir à titre de substituts me pose un certain problème. Parfois, l'un d'entre nous est malade ou absent pendant une longue période, et il faut que nous puissions remplacer l'absent par un autre membre du caucus du gouvernement afin que nous ayons six représentants au sein du comité.

Je ne veux pas que les modalités soient si restrictives qu'elles nous empêchent de faire appel à quelqu'un d'autre pour nous remplacer au sein du sous-comité.

Le président:

Dans l'ordre, il y a M. Christopherson, M. Lamoureux et M. Reid.

M. David Christopherson:

Je suis prêt à laisser la parole aux autres. Je me suis longuement exprimé. Si je peux ajouter mon nom à la liste d’intervenants, je vais laisser les autres s’exprimer.

Concernant votre proposition, monsieur le président, je ne suis pas encore là. Encore une fois, c’est une question de bonne volonté. Je veux faire preuve de bonne volonté, mais je n’ai pas l'impression que ce soit le cas de la part du gouvernement. Je ne vois pas comment je pourrais mettre ce point de côté et faire preuve de bonne volonté pour tout le reste. Soit le gouvernement est sérieux lorsqu’il dit qu’il veut changer sa façon de faire, soit il ne l’est pas. S'il l'est, qu'il fasse preuve de bonne volonté.

J’aimerais que mon nom soit de nouveau ajouté à la liste. Merci.

Le président:

M. Lamoureux, suivi de M. Reid et de M. Christopherson.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Monsieur le président, tout comme M. Christopherson, je siège au comité depuis plusieurs années. J’ai également eu l’occasion de siéger au sous-comité. Selon mon expérience, il y a beaucoup de collaboration et de consensus entre les membres. Je ne me souviens pas qu’il y ait eu un seul vote au sous-comité. J’ai trouvé le sous-comité très utile: il tient ses propres réunions et les discussions y sont plutôt franches. Les questions abordées sont renvoyées au comité aux fins d’un vote.

À mon avis, il faut bien analyser la question à l’étude. Je parle ici par expérience ayant siégé aux deux comités. J'ai vu comment ils fonctionnent.

Je suis convaincu, monsieur Christopherson, que vous aurez des commentaires à formuler sur le sujet. Vous souvenez-vous d’un incident, au cours des deux dernières années et demie, qui aurait soulevé la controverse au sous-comité? Il ne faudrait pas voir un problème là où il n’y en a pas.

Au sujet du changement proposé, monsieur Christopherson, vous continuez à remettre en question la volonté du premier ministre à apporter des changements aux comités directeurs. Vous êtes dans l’opposition et vous êtes libre de penser ce que voulez à cet égard. Cela ne diminue en rien la tentative du premier ministre à apporter des changements importants et positifs au comité et à faire en sorte que les comités soient plus ouverts afin de favoriser le dialogue.

Une des choses que permettrait la modification proposée, c’est que le secrétaire parlementaire [Note de la rédaction: difficultés techniques]. Vous avez fait référence à l’importance du Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Il s’agit d’un des plus anciens comités et d'autres comités le consultent. C’est une chose que nous devrions prendre très au sérieux. C’est mon cas.

Dans le cadre de votre intervention, monsieur Christopherson, vous vous êtes demandé ce que je faisais ici? Pour faire preuve de bonne volonté, je me suis dit: « Bon, d’accord, dans ce cas, je vais changer de place. » Je n’ai pas l’intention de participer à toutes les réunions du comité. Je ne suis pas encore certain de mon rôle au comité; je tente de mieux le définir. Tout ce que je sais, c’est que ce comité m’intéresse.

Les députés parlementaires qui siègent à ce comité sont très compétents; il ne faudrait pas remettre en question leur intégrité ou leur expérience. C’est la même chose pour bon nombre de vos collègues qui témoignent devant un comité pour la toute première fois. Aucun député libéral ne remettra en question leur intégrité ou leur capacité à remplir leur fonction.

Je comprends que tous les députés, y compris les députés libéraux, sont impatients de voir les comités reprendre le travail. Nous serons alors mieux en mesure de comprendre le rôle de chacun, y compris celui des secrétaires parlementaires. Mais je crois qu’il faut attendre et voir ce que les comités pourront accomplir. Je suis convaincu que, dans un an, vous direz que les comités sont plus productifs, que les membres peuvent participer et proposer des amendements et que des amendements sont adoptés. Enfin, c’est ce que je crois.

Je comprends très bien la situation et les arguments que vous avez avancés et je respecte vos arguments. Cela dit, si l’on retourne à la règle de base, à ce que nous tentons de faire, je ne crois pas qu’il soit nécessaire d’en faire grand cas.

Les trois leaders à la Chambre se sont entretenus et j’avais l’intention, aujourd’hui, de vous faire part de certaines réflexions qui sont ressorties de cette rencontre. Peut-être que si cette motion est adoptée, j’en aurai l’occasion. Étant donné la participation de votre leader à la Chambre à cette discussion, je suis convaincu que nous pourrions amorcer une discussion, mais d’abord, il faudrait en terminer avec la question des règlements.

(1200)



Selon mon expérience, et j’ai siégé à d’autres comités, pas seulement au PROC, les motions portant sur les règlements se règlent assez rapidement. Il n’y a aucune surprise. Dans le document que nous avons devant nous et que nous sommes censés adopter, vous ne trouverez aucune surprise.

Personne ne devrait être surpris de voir que nous proposons de retirer le secrétaire parlementaire du sous-comité. C’est tout ce que nous proposons. L’intention du gouvernement, c’est de faire en sorte que le sous-comité soit composé de membres du PROC. Cela ne change pas.

Ce que je propose — et ce n’est qu’une proposition —, c’est d’adopter la motion afin que l’on puisse discuter des travaux du comité, si c’est la volonté de la présidence et du comité, car je sais que c’est un sujet qui vous préoccupe beaucoup. Nous espérions en discuter aujourd’hui, car c’est probablement notre dernière réunion de l’année, à moins que le président et les vice-présidents décident de convoquer le comité.

J’espère que vous comprendrez que nous n’avons aucune intention cachée avec cette modification proposée. Tout ce que nous souhaitons, c’est que les motions soient adoptées, que le comité étudie la possibilité de me retirer du sous-comité, et que la composition du sous-comité soit différente en raison du changement de gouvernement, un gouvernement libéral plutôt que conservateur. C’est tout.

Nous pourrons avoir une discussion ouverte, si c’est la volonté du comité, une fois les règlements adoptés. Ce sera à votre discrétion. Nous n’allons pas… enfin, je ne crois pas que ni le président ni les membres du comité tenteront de vous empêcher de vous exprimer.

(1205)

Le président:

M. Reid, suivi de M. Christopherson et de M. Angus.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, j’aimerais réagir aux propos de M. Lamoureux et à ceux de M. Chan. Ils portent sur des sujets différents, mais bon.

M. Lamoureux a demandé à M. Christopherson de réfléchir aux trois ou quatre dernières années pour ensuite dire qu'il ne se souvenais d'aucune controverse au comité directeur. D’abord, j’aimerais faire un peu de propagande pour le gouvernement précédent, mon gouvernement, qui, semble-t-il, a été si mauvais pendant si longtemps. Non mais, ma parole. C’était à l’époque où nous avions une majorité au sous-comité. En fait, nous avons agi de manière responsable et en consultation. D’ailleurs, un député libéral l’a admis. Alléluia, choeur d’anges et paix sur terre. C’est Noël, la Hannoucah, après tout. Je voulais simplement le souligner.

Plus concrètement, j’ai 11 ans d’expérience au sein de ce comité. J’y ai siégé en même temps qu’Ed Broadbent. Je me sens un peu comme ces têtes grisonnantes qui ont joint l’armée française en 1914, qui étaient toujours loin des bombardements et qui étaient toujours présents en 1918, alors que plusieurs générations y sont passées. Ce n’était pas toujours rose au sous-comité. Il y a eu des problèmes considérables, pas nécessairement à l’époque du gouvernement minoritaire de M. Martin — c’est à cette époque que j’ai commencé à siéger au comité —, mais certainement au cours des deux gouvernements minoritaires de M. Harper.

Une voix: [Note de la rédaction: inaudible]

M. Scott Reid: Pardon? Quels étaient les résultats des votes au sous-comité? Je l’ignore, car je n’y siégeais pas. Ce que je veux dire…

Le président:

Pardonnez-moi, mais j'aimerais invoquer le Règlement. La présente séance ne se déroule pas à huis clos, alors que les réunions du sous-comité se déroulent à huis clos. Vous ne pouvez donc pas révéler ce qui s’y dit.

M. Scott Reid:

Sincèrement, je ne peux pas vous dire s’il y a eu des votes, car je n’y siégeais pas. Alors, ne vous inquiétez pas.

Ce que je peux vous dire, c’est que les travaux proposés ne concordaient pas toujours avec… Vu de l’extérieur, ça ne semblait pas très rose — nos réunions n’étaient pas à huis clos, je peux donc en parler. Il y a eu beaucoup de bagarres. Je crois que la greffière était là lors de la plus importante.

Vous n’y avez pas participé, mais vous étiez présente.

Bon, ce n’était pas des bagarres au sens propre, mais c’était tout comme. C’était le chaos. Il y a eu un vote de censure à l’égard du président. Il a été remplacé par Joe Preston, qui lui a immédiatement… Vous vous en souviendrez peut-être.

Siégiez-vous au comité à l’époque, monsieur Christopherson?

M. David Christopherson:

Je m’en souviens. Je suis arrivé après, mais je connais cet épisode.

M. Scott Reid:

D’accord. C’est quelque peu légendaire, comme épisode.

Le nouveau président avait refusé de convoquer le comité ou de présider les réunions. Il y avait plusieurs éléments à cette controverse. On a tenté de trouver le gouvernement coupable d’outrage au Parlement, ce qui, selon nous, était une utilisation illégitime du mandat et des pouvoirs du comité et, sincèrement, une citation abusive des faits.

Au bout du compte, les citoyens nous ont appuyés, en 2011, lors des élections. Ce que j’essaie de dire, c’est que les membres étaient considérablement divisés.

Aux fins du compte rendu, je dirais que cela à toujours été problématique. Cela ne veut pas dire que la même situation pourrait se reproduire. À mon avis, à savoir s’il y aurait ou non consensus, la dynamique est différente lorsqu’un gouvernement est majoritaire que lorsqu’il est minoritaire. Dans le deuxième cas, il n’y aurait probablement pas consensus. Mais je veux m’assurer que les gens comprennent bien que ce n’était pas la norme.

Cela dit, monsieur Chan, pour revenir à vos propos… sincèrement, j’ai oublié ce que vous avez dit. L’intervention de M. Lamoureux a été si longue, que j’ai oublié.

M. Arnold Chan:

Mon point portait sur qui pouvait remplacer au sous-comité. Je vous ai demandé, à titre de précision, s’il fallait que ce soit un membre permanent, et vous m’avez répondu que oui. J’ai alors souligné qu’il s’agissait d’une importante source de préoccupation pour moi, car, à mon avis, cela limite notre capacité à trouver un remplaçant. On devrait pouvoir faire appel à un député ministériel.

Comme vous le savez, au cours de la dernière année, j’ai lutté contre le cancer. Si cette modification proposée avait été en vigueur à l’époque, il aurait été beaucoup plus difficile de trouver quelqu’un pour me remplacer. Nous avons tous un horaire chargé. Ce n’est pas que nous ne voulons pas que les remplaçants soient des membres permanents. Après tout, les travaux du comité leur sont familiers. Mais, je ne veux pas que notre capacité à trouver quelqu’un d’autre à titre de remplaçant, à l’occasion, soit minée.

Le point important pour nous, c’est le retrait du secrétaire parlementaire. Nous sommes d’accord avec cette proposition. Je ne m’inquiète pas de notre incapacité à… Dans la plupart des cas, nous avons l’intention de faire appel à un membre permanent du comité à titre de remplaçant, car les dossiers leur sont familiers. Toutefois, je ne veux pas que notre capacité à faire appel à quelqu’un d’autre soit minée si aucun membre permanent du comité n’est disponible. C’est tout.

(1210)

M. Scott Reid:

Il y a deux aspects à cela. Premièrement, à proprement parler, ce dont Arnold et moi discutons n'a aucun rapport avec l'amendement de M. Christopherson. C'est lié à l'amendement que je n'ai pas encore présenté. Je vais donc lui répondre, et si nous examinons l'amendement de M. Christopherson et passons ensuite au mien, je m'abstiendrai simplement de répéter ces commentaires.

Concernant l'élément de fond soulevé par Arnold... Voilà que je me trouve à imiter mon collègue, Tom Lukiwski, parce qu'il appelle toujours les gens par leur prénom. Concernant les propos d'Arnold, je n'y souscris pas pour ce qui est de ce sous-comité — seulement celui-ci, pas les autres — pour la raison qui suit.

Nous avons des sous-comités pour divers sujets. J'ai présidé le sous-comité chargé des questions liées à la commissaire à l'éthique et à son mandat, qui est de modifier le code de conduite et le Code régissant les conflits d'intérêts des députés, questions auxquelles nous reviendrons, je suppose. Lorsque nous examinerons ce point précis, ou d'autres points semblables, je ne proposerai pas qu'on fasse appel à un membre permanent du comité. Dans le passé, des gens qui n'étaient pas des membres permanents du comité y ont siégé, et cela ne posait pas problème. Il s'agissait de gens qui avaient une compréhension particulière des questions de conflits d'intérêts.

Dans le cas présent, toutefois, je pense que participer aux travaux du comité et avoir une bonne connaissance de ce qui s'y passe sont des critères vraiment essentiels pour siéger au comité directeur. Voilà pourquoi je pense qu'il est essentiel que ce sous-comité précis — uniquement le comité directeur — soit composé de membres permanents. Dans le passé, j'ai toujours considéré que fonctionner autrement posait problème, même lorsque le gouvernement dont je faisais partie a agi ainsi et a invité à siéger des gens qui n'avaient pas une connaissance approfondie des enjeux.

Je tiens aussi à souligner, par rapport à ce débat, que la question du Sous-comité des affaires émanant des députés est réglée. Précédemment, j'ai indiqué que j'ai vu des cas où des députés ne faisant pas partie du comité permanent siégeaient au Sous-comité des affaires émanant des députés. Il se trouve, comme la greffière me l'a indiqué plus tôt, qu'il existe un règlement distinct, le paragraphe 91.1 du Règlement, qui traite de la composition du Sous-comité des affaires émanant des députés. L'ensemble de critères sur la composition du sous-comité n'a rien à voir avec les règles habituelles. Rien de ce que nous faisons ici ne sera lié à cela. Des députés qui ne sont pas membres de ce comité pourront donc continuer de siéger à ce sous-comité. Cela ne pose pas problème, et je suis de cet avis parce qu'avoir une idée de la façon dont cela fonctionne n'a rien à voir avec ce que nous faisons ici. Comme nous serons saisis, ici, des appels venant de ce sous-comité, on pourrait faire valoir qu'il est préférable qu'il soit composé de députés qui ne siègent pas à celui-ci, parce qu'on ne devrait pas étudier un appel sur nos propres décisions.

Je voulais simplement le préciser. Le comité directeur est l'exception à la règle.

Arnold, je comprends le point que vous soulevez concernant les gens qui sont malades, mais le nombre de députés du parti ministériel est assez élevé. En fait, cela pose davantage problème pour nous, et encore plus pour les néo-démocrates. J'espère que M. Christopherson entendra mon argument à ce sujet, parce que cela le concerne, et j'espère qu'il y réfléchira. Hormis le président, le comité compte cinq députés du parti ministériel; vous pourrez donc faire appel à l'un d'entre eux au besoin. Cela nous pose davantage problème, car l'opposition n'est représentée que par trois députés conservateurs et un député néo-démocrate. Il est concevable que dans les faits, si on suit ma recommandation selon laquelle seuls des membres permanents siégeraient...

M. David Christopherson:

Je n'aurais pas de remplaçant.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous n'en auriez pas; cela pourrait poser problème. C'est Arnold qui m'y a fait penser. J'aimerais avoir vos commentaires à ce sujet, mais si vous ne voulez pas le faire maintenant parce que nous sommes saisis de votre sous-amendement et non du mien, cela me convient.

Je vais en rester là. Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson, suivi de M. Angus.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, je vais répondre au dernier point de M. Reid, tandis que je l'ai à l'esprit. J'ai aussi des commentaires sur les observations d'autres intervenants.

Monsieur Reid, je vous dirais, par l'intermédiaire de la présidence, que j'ai pris bonne note de votre observation. Je pense que ce qui atténuerait considérablement le problème, c'est précisément la question que je tente de régler. S'il n'y avait pas, au comité directeur, une majorité politique disposant du pouvoir de décider du sort d'une motion qui y est présentée, en l'adoptant ou en la rejetant, alors cela n'aurait pas autant d'importance, parce qu'il y aurait soit unanimité... Si vous ne siégez pas à ce comité, vous risquez de ne pas savoir ce qui s'y passe, mais la plupart du temps, s'il y a consensus pour qu'un député faisant partie d'un autre comité y siège, le problème n'est pas aussi important. Selon mon point de vue, votre intervention soulève deux préoccupations importantes. Si vous demandez à quelqu'un de siéger au comité alors qu'il ne sait pas vraiment ce qui s'y passe, il est quelque peu difficile de faire partie du comité directeur qui étudie les travaux à venir, en particulier si la situation est difficile et qu'on tente de trouver une issue. C'est très difficile pour une personne qui n'en fait pas partie, mais c'est beaucoup plus facile pour nous, de ce côté de la Chambre, les députés des autres partis reconnus, si on fonctionne selon un modèle de consensus qui assure à tout le moins que ce n'est pas fondé sur la partisanerie. À ce moment-là, lorsque nous en sommes saisis ici, nous avons toujours l'occasion de nous prononcer. Cela dit, je prends bonne note de votre observation.

Si vous le permettez, monsieur le président, j'aurais simplement deux ou trois commentaires. Premièrement, MM. Lamoureux et Chan nous pressent en quelque sorte de poursuivre nos travaux et de surveiller l'heure, étant donné que cela pourrait très bien être notre dernière journée. Je rappelle à mes collègues que mardi dernier, lorsque nous avons fait tous les préparatifs nécessaires à la création d'un comité, la seule chose que nous avons faite a été d'élire un président et deux vice-présidents. Nous avions réservé une heure et 45 minutes, ou une heure et demie, et j'étais prêt à commencer à travailler, mais le parti ministériel n'était aucunement intéressé. Donc, je suis désolé, mais l'argument selon lequel le NPD a causé d'importants problèmes en retardant le comité et en l'empêchant de faire son travail ne tient pas la route. Les députés du parti ministériel doivent garder à l'esprit que mardi, ils ont mis fin aux travaux du comité alors que nous avions fait le strict minimum. Je vous laisse y réfléchir.

Deuxièmement, par votre intermédiaire encore une fois, monsieur le président, par rapport à M. Lamoureux, je comprends ce que vous dites, Kevin, et je ne suis pas nécessairement en désaccord avec vous sur ce point. Je pense que Scott avait raison: il y a en effet quelques exemples de situations qui ont posé problème, mais je conviens avec vous que ce n'est pas le cas la plupart du temps. Lorsque je fais un parallèle avec l'intention avouée du gouvernement sur le rôle des comités, cela me rappelle la vieille époque — j'étais dans la vingtaine —, celle où je participais à la négociation de conventions collectives et où une grève pouvait éclater selon que l'employeur utilisait « peut » ou « doit ». D'un côté, « peut » signifie que l'employé peut accomplir une tâche ou non, selon son humeur du jour; de l'autre, « doit » signifie qu'il y a une obligation.

Malheureusement, monsieur Lamoureux, vous n'avez pas bien noté les choses, parce qu'alors que vous faisiez valoir que nous arriverions toujours à nous entendre, M. Chan a déclaré — je paraphrase — que c'est probable, mais que nous pourrions parfois être en désaccord. Il y a là un gros « mais ». Soit le gouvernement veut que le BPM ait la capacité de contrôler des comités, soit il ne le veut pas. Je fais de nouveau valoir que le gouvernement exerce déjà ce contrôle.

Je vais reconnaître qu'il est certain à 99,9 %, sinon 100 %, que je serai du côté perdant lors de la tenue de votes, tandis que le gouvernement en sortira gagnant, à moins d'une situation on ne peut plus exceptionnelle. C'est ainsi que cela se passe 10 fois sur 10, dans n'importe quel comité ou à la Chambre. J'ajouterais, monsieur le président, que je serais le premier à dire que dans notre système actuel, malgré ses défauts, c'est ainsi que les choses doivent se passer. Je l'accepte. Je n'essaie certainement pas de refaire l'histoire et de modifier le résultat de l'élection, même si j'aimerais pouvoir le faire.

Le gouvernement se réserve le pouvoir de décider, et je le comprends, mais en fin de compte, c'est ce qui se passe en comité. Peu importe le nombre de fois où une motion sera présentée — par moi ou par un député de l'ancien gouvernement —, elle sera rejetée si le gouvernement décide qu'elle ne lui convient pas. C'est simplement notre lot quotidien. S'il veut l'emporter, le gouvernement l'emportera.

Je l'ai vécu. C'est extraordinaire, formidable. C'est fantastique d'entrer dans une pièce, que ce soit à la Chambre ou en comité, en sachant qu'on va l'emporter à tout coup. C'est une sensation extraordinaire, et vous avez ce privilège. Toutefois, vous avez promis de faire les choses différemment. Par conséquent, les arguments fondés sur nos actions passées sont bien faibles si on considère que le gouvernement a été élu en promettant un changement. Prôner le statu quo, c'est essentiellement aller à l'encontre de votre propre programme électoral.

(1215)



Si vous voulez qu'il y ait deux députés à ce comité, soit. Je ne m'y opposerai pas à tout prix. Toutefois, si vous dites que ces deux députés utiliseront leur poids politique lors d'un vote pour imposer des choses, cela ne correspond pas à la raison d'être d'un comité directeur. Même si le gouvernement n'a pas ce qu'il veut au comité directeur et qu'aucune recommandation n'est présentée, le porte-parole du gouvernement, possiblement M. Chan — si on tient compte de l'ancienneté et du fait que ce ne sera pas un secrétaire parlementaire, donc que ce sera M. Chan ou une autre personne —, présentera une motion qui reflétera les arguments avancés au comité directeur. Le gouvernement ne l'aura pas emporté au comité directeur parce que les règles qui s'y appliquent, en raison de la nature même de ce comité, visent l'obtention du consensus le plus large possible. Ensuite, monsieur le président, lorsqu'il n'y aura pas unanimité et que nous reviendrons ici, au comité, je peux vous garantir que le porte-parole du gouvernement présentera une motion qui, par pure coïncidence, correspondra exactement à tout ce que les députés ministériels voulaient faire au comité directeur.

Cela ne me pose pas problème. Vous présenterez la motion. Tout ce que nous pourrons faire sera d'en débattre vigoureusement et de retarder les choses, comme je le fais actuellement, pour faire valoir un point sur un aspect quelconque. Nous pouvons le faire, car nous avons ce droit, en présumant que vous n'êtes pas encore en mode grande vitesse. Vous avez toujours la marge de manœuvre que vous procure ce comité.

Encore une fois, si vous vouliez changer les choses, ce ne serait pas une si grosse affaire. Je suis vraiment très surpris, Kevin, que vous nous entraîniez aussi loin, parce que cela vous fera aussi mal paraître. Cela aurait dû être réglé en deux temps trois mouvements. Cela aurait pu être réglé mardi.

J'essaie simplement d'aider le gouvernement. Regardons la chose d'un autre angle. J'essaie de vous aider en faisant la promotion de votre programme qui vise à accorder une plus grande indépendance aux comités. Ils ne seront pas totalement indépendants, étant donné que vous êtes majoritaires. Soit. Encore une fois, personne ne le conteste. La décision vous appartient. Nous aurons beau pousser de hauts cris et nous plaindre, vous détenez tout de même ce pouvoir. Ces gens l'avaient auparavant; ils ne l'ont plus et c'est votre tour. Très bien. Cependant, si vous voulez vraiment changer les choses et que vous voulez que nous ayons le sentiment que les comités jouissent d'une plus grande indépendance et que les débats qu'on y tient reflètent vraiment notre point de vue plutôt que celui des hautes sphères...

Cela s'applique toujours au sein de nos partis. Ce n'est pas aussi contraignant pour les partis qui ne forment pas le gouvernement, mais tous les partis ont un chef, un whip et un leader parlementaire. Cela a donc une incidence sur le comité, évidemment. La structure du pouvoir demeure la même, essentiellement, outre le fait que le secrétaire parlementaire ne siège pas au comité. C'est un bon début, mais cela ne change pas vraiment la dynamique, et personne ne prétend que cela devrait être le cas. Je ne dis pas pour autant que vous êtes mauvais pour ne pas l'avoir fait. Les choses sont ainsi. Vous avez le dernier mot.

Toutefois, si nous voulons vraiment accroître l'indépendance... Cela n'a rien de nouveau; la plupart des comités directeurs auxquels j'ai siégé fonctionnaient par consensus. Si nous n'arrivions pas à nous entendre, la question était renvoyée au comité, sans recommandation. Les députés ministériels auraient fait leurs devoirs et le porte-parole choisi — M. Chan ou Mme Taylor, par exemple — présenterait une motion qui refléterait exactement les arguments avancés par le parti ministériel au comité directeur. Cela n'aurait rien de surprenant pour nous, et nous aurions une série de mesures et d'outils pour répondre: nous pourrions débattre, retarder les choses, etc. Ce sont autant de facteurs qui entrent en jeu au comité, mais en fin de compte, vous en sortez gagnants. Soit. Maintenant, toutefois, nous sommes dans une situation où un gouvernement qui dit vouloir faire les choses différemment tient à exercer un contrôle sur le seul élément lié aux travaux du comité où il n'y a pas de caméras et pour lequel personne ne peut consulter la transcription, sauf quelques rares personnes autorisées. C'est comme le cône du silence de Maxwell Smart. Personne ne sait ce qui se passe.

Pour être honnête, ce sont des réunions fort plaisantes, parce qu'on y trouve des gens intelligents qui s'amusent en travaillant. Pour une personne qui siège ici depuis longtemps, comme moi, il est bien plus stimulant d'essayer de collaborer plutôt que de s'engager dans des luttes qui reviennent toujours au même. Travailler ensemble est très plaisant, vraiment, en particulier lorsque les enjeux sont importants et que tous collaborent. Il est bien plus facile d'y arriver dans une relation axée sur la collaboration et exempte de l'aspect partisan qu'est la majorité des voix.

(1220)



Monsieur Lamoureux, vous venez tout juste de dire que vous ne vous attendiez pas à ce que ce soit un problème. Je ne suis pas en désaccord avec vous, mais je dois écouter ce qu'a dit votre collègue, qui est à côté de vous: à certaines occasions... et dès que nous... même s'il ne s'agit que d'une fois.

Encore une fois, je veux dire à M. ...

(1225)

Le président:

J'invoque le Règlement, monsieur Christopherson. Je vous demanderais de ne pas vous répéter s'il vous plaît. Vous ne pouvez pas reprendre sans cesse la même argumentation et continuer de parler.

M. David Christopherson:

En quoi est-ce que je me répète? Je parle de la dynamique d'un comité de direction qui montre pourquoi mon argumentation est celle qui devrait s'imposer à mon avis. Expliquez-moi en quoi je me répète, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Vous avez dit cela à un certain nombre de reprises.

M. David Christopherson:

Je suis autorisé à le dire de toutes les façons que je le souhaite, tant que je le dis d'une façon différente; je n'utilise pas les mêmes mots.

Vraiment? En sommes-nous là? Anita essaie de me faire taire et vous faites maintenant de même. Vous nous dites que nous sommes dans une nouvelle ère, et tout ce que je fais, c'est présenter des arguments pour que nous changions les choses — pour que nous agissions en ce sens plutôt que d'en parler. Voyons donc!

Si vous êtes fatigués de m'entendre, je suis prêt à laisser la parole à d'autres pourvu que vous ayez d'autres intervenants et que vous puissiez ajouter mon nom à la liste. J'en serai ravi. Toutefois, si ce n'est pas le cas, monsieur le président, je vais continuer à parler des choses qui, à mon sens, ont rapport avec la motion que j'ai présentée.

Le président:

Il y a d'autres personnes sur la liste.

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien. Je serai ravi de leur laisser la parole.

Madame la greffière, pourriez-vous ajouter encore une fois mon nom à la liste? Merci.

Je cède la parole à mes collègues.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

J'invoque le Règlement. Je ne veux pas remettre en cause... Eh bien, il s'agit de remettre en question ce que vous venez de faire, et non pas l'intégrité de ce que vous venez de faire. Je veux seulement obtenir des précisions qui nous seront utiles plus tard, car j'ai l'impression que la question de la pertinence risque de revenir. Je veux simplement le dire.

À titre de président, êtes-vous autorisé à invoquer la règle de pertinence ou devez-vous attendre que l'un des membres du comité invoque le Règlement et soulève la question de la pertinence? Je pose la question pour que nous sachions que ce sera fait de la bonne façon à l'avenir.

Le président:

C'est selon le jugement du président.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Le président:

Je crois que les membres du comité savent qu'ils ne peuvent pas se répéter ou dire des choses qui ne sont pas pertinentes.

Notre liste est longue: M. Angus, M. Richards et M. Chan.

Monsieur Angus.

M. Charlie Angus (Timmins—Baie James, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je vous souhaite un bon retour. La dernière fois que je vous ai vu, c'est dans une librairie au Yukon; je croyais à ce moment-là que vous aviez pris votre retraite.

Le président:

C'était le cas.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Charlie Angus:

J'espère que dans vos nouvelles fonctions, vous ne ferez pas de rappel au Règlement lorsque j'essaierai de faire avancer les choses.

Je veux également souhaiter un bon retour à M. Chan. Je suis très heureux que vous ayez reçu les traitements requis et que vous ayez été élu. J'aurais préféré qu'il s'agisse d'un néo-démocrate, mais je suis très heureux de voir que vous êtes en bonne santé. C'est bon d'être ici.

Je veux dire aux nouveaux députés qui trouvent peut-être cela vraiment pénible — j'en vois certains lever les yeux au ciel —, que nous parlons aujourd'hui de ce qui a été exprimé: « faites-nous confiance, nous sommes formidables, une nouvelle ère commence ». Monsieur Lamoureux, concernant votre observation selon laquelle mon ami met en doute la parole et l'intégrité du premier ministre, loin de nous l'idée de mettre en doute sa parole, mais je ne m'y fierais pas.

Si je dis cela, c'est que je suis député fédéral depuis 2004. J'ai siégé à de bons comités, mais aussi à des comités dont l'ambiance était toxique. J'ai fait partie de comités dans lesquels il y avait une crise constitutionnelle et des membres portaient atteinte à la séparation des rôles du pouvoir législatif et des tribunaux. Il nous fallait parfois faire de l'obstruction presque toute la nuit pour simplement rétablir certaines de ces règles de base.

Comment cela a-t-il pu se produire? Eh bien, les comités sont composés de personnages politiques. L'arène politique compte des gens qui sont parfois très orgueilleux, et nous sommes très partisans de nature. Nous avons beau dire que nous aurons de meilleures manières, telle est la réalité, et il arrive parfois que les comités échouent à cet égard.

Ce qui est rassurant de la part du premier ministre, c'est le message selon lequel il retire les secrétaires parlementaires des comités. Monsieur Lamoureux, c'est un plaisir de vous voir à la Chambre des communes; ce sera formidable de ne pas vous voir au comité.

Ce sont les promesses qui ont été faites. Nous en avons discuté, et j'en entends parler depuis de nombreuses années. Je ne croyais pas qu'un premier ministre le ferait, compte tenu des pouvoirs que détient le secrétaire parlementaire. Il s'agit d'une très bonne mesure, car le défaut fondamental de la structure des comités au sein du Parlement canadien, c'est que leurs membres sont parfois réduits à agir de façon très puérile et à voter strictement dans un esprit de parti. Lorsque le secrétaire parlementaire lève la main, tous les députés d'un côté font de même et tous les gens de l'autre côté ne le font pas.

Lorsque j'ai assisté à des audiences d'un comité parlementaire au Royaume-Uni, je me suis senti tellement ridicule en raison de l'expérience que je vis ici depuis cinq législatures. Là-bas, je n'arrivais pas à deviner quels députés faisaient partie du parti au pouvoir et lesquels étaient dans l'opposition. J'ai été étonné de constater qu'ils collaboraient, et il s'agissait d'un comité des affaires étrangères. Je me suis dit que notre système des comités s'est vraiment détérioré, au point où les comités sont devenus un miroir de la Chambre des communes et où nos votes sont soumis à la discipline de parti. Le premier ministre a envoyé un message très fort en annonçant le retrait des secrétaires parlementaires. Puisque les libéraux sont majoritaires, je ne pense pas que quiconque proposera que je sois élu au poste de président du comité des affaires autochtones auquel je siège, mais le fait que nous puissions choisir un président, c'est un aspect très fort.

L'une des choses sur laquelle nous devons nous pencher, encore une fois, c'est le rôle du sous-comité. En 2004, j'étais complètement naïf. Je n'avais aucune idée de la situation. Je croyais en un royaume paisible et en la confiance. J'ai appris qu'à moins que ce soit inscrit dans le Règlement, la confiance ne dure parfois que le temps d'une réunion, parfois même moins longtemps. Cependant, j'ai eu de très bons présidents qui considéraient que leur rôle consistait à essayer d'obtenir un consensus de sorte que nous pouvions collaborer et accomplir quelque chose.

C'est vraiment important pour votre comité, car il joue un rôle très spécial. C'est le comité vers lequel les députés de tous les partis doivent se tourner pour régler des questions très importantes. Ainsi, son caractère non partisan — non pas qu'il l'est, mais dans la mesure où il peut l'être — est plus important, si on le compare au comité de l'éthique, par exemple, dont les séances faisaient penser à un combat de la WWF tellement l'ambiance était toxique. Je comprends. La partialité est plus présente dans certains comités que dans d'autres. Je vous souhaite à tous la meilleure des chances, et je suis très heureux de ne pas faire partie du comité.

Toutefois, votre comité est chargé de faire certaines choses. Tous les parlementaires vous font confiance, même si nous savons que, comme David l'a dit, 10 fois sur 10, si les libéraux votent d'une façon, c'est la position qui sera adoptée. Toutefois, au sous-comité, l'idée de consensus a toujours été l'aspect pour lequel le président pouvait apporter un peu de raison: pouvons-nous avoir un plan de travail et le proposer? Si nous ne parvenons pas à un consensus, le comité est saisi de la question, peu importe la motion présentée et la volonté des députés d'en débattre, un vote a lieu et la majorité l'emporte.

(1230)



Je crois que ce qui compte vraiment pour mon collègue, c'est le consensus. J'ai déjà été assis à côté de David en Chambre, et lorsqu'il chuchote, il a des avis très arrêtés et s'exprime aussi fortement devant les députés de son parti que devant vous. Je ne veux donc pas que les nouveaux députés se sentent visés.

Il prend cela très à coeur. Si je comprends bien, et je crois que c'est un argument très cohérent, ce n'est pas le nombre qui compte, mais l'idée de consensus. Si le sous-comité n'arrive pas à un consensus, cela revient. La majorité l'emportera. Nos motions seront rejetées ou adoptées et il en sera de même pour les motions des députés conservateurs, mais c'est le pouvoir au sein du sous-comité qui change la dynamique de nos relations dans le cadre de nos travaux.

J'aimerais bien faire confiance à tout le monde ici. J'aimerais bien faire confiance au premier ministre. Nous n'en sommes qu'au début et ce sont de beaux jours, mais j'en suis à ma cinquième législature, et j'ai déjà vu de beaux jours se transformer en tempêtes. Nous nous perdons. Dans certains de nos comités, nos personnalités ne conviennent pas. Il y a eu des présidents extraordinaires, mais dans le cas de certains autres — et je ne parle pas de vous, monsieur Bagnell —, je me demande comment ils ont eu le poste. Je ne nommerai personne.

Votre comité doit montrer que la promesse du premier ministre changera vraiment l'ambiance aux comités. Je pense que si le changement provient d'ici, cela enverra un message aux autres comités.

Je dois dire qu'au cours de la dernière législature, je suis devenu plus partisan que jamais auparavant dans ma vie politique. Je veux que la situation change. J'en ai assez. Je veux accomplir quelque chose.

Nous ne bâtirons pas un royaume paisible ici. On pourra revenir et faire ce qu'on va faire, mais je demande à mes collègues de comprendre que si nous pouvons simplement intégrer le principe de consensus au sous-comité, nous pouvons adopter cela, et nous rentrerons tous à la maison pour Noël.

Ce principe a des répercussions dans d'autres comités que le vôtre également. Il enverra le signal très clair que le premier ministre remplit sa promesse. Je pense que nous pourrons respirer et commencer à trouver des façons d'arriver à un consensus. Les comités commenceront alors à effectuer le travail que les Canadiens attendent d'eux.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Angus. C'est bon de vous retrouver ici.

Allez-y, monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Merci.

Tout d'abord, monsieur Angus, je vous remercie beaucoup de vos bons mots. Veuillez saluer votre tendre moitié, Brit, que je n'ai pas vue depuis longtemps. Dites-lui bonjour de ma part.

Le seul point que je veux soulever, et je veux revenir sur le point qu'a soulevé M. Christopherson, c'est que nous sommes tous des députés. Tout d'abord, encore une fois, tout ce que nous essayons de faire, c'est retirer le secrétaire parlementaire. Ce que je veux dire, c'est que nous ne devrions pas entraver l'indépendance dont bénéficient les parlementaires qui, au bout du compte, peuvent faire ce qu'ils décident de faire, et ce, même au comité de direction. Notre objectif, c'est d'arriver à un consensus, mais ce que vous dites, c'est qu'il s'agit de déterminer d'avance ce qui fera l'objet de discussions au comité de direction. C'est exactement ce que je dis: nous ne devrions pas préjuger du résultat et dire ce qu'il pourrait arriver si nous ne parvenons pas à un consensus, car tout ce qu'il faut, c'est qu'un membre fasse de l'obstruction et force le retour au comité.

Je comprends qu'au comité permanent, nous pouvons, au bout du compte, faire ce que nous devons faire pour établir un programme. Nous comptons parvenir à un consensus. Alors, prêtez attention à notre façon de faire. C'est ce que je veux dire: observez la manière dont nous travaillons pendant un certain temps. Adoptons cela. Si des problèmes importants surviennent, nous n'aurons qu'à y revenir à ce moment-là.

Nous ne faisons rien de plus que présenter l'intention de retirer les secrétaires parlementaires et commencer les travaux; alors, commençons les travaux.

(1235)

Le président:

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Monsieur le président, vous l'avez probablement déjà oublié à ce stade-ci, mais lors de sa dernière intervention, M. Chan a fait une observation au sujet de l'amendement — qu'on aura peut-être l'occasion d'examiner un jour — que M. Reid voulait proposer.

Concernant cet argument, j'aimerais signaler que, dans sa forme actuelle, et comme nous proposions qu'elle soit à l'avenir, la motion vise à ce que le sous-comité soit composé du président et des deux vice-présidents. En fait, ce que cela signifie, c'est que personne ne peut remplacer le président, personne ne peut me remplacer et personne ne peut remplacer David. Tous les trois devrions être présents, alors que le ou les deux membres du parti ministériel, selon le cas, qui seraient obligatoirement des membres permanents du comité, bénéficieraient d'une plus grande latitude.

Beaucoup plus de choix s'offriraient aux députés ministériels, étant donné que vous êtes cinq. Il pourrait y avoir trois ou quatre substituts potentiels, alors je ne vois pas en quoi cela pose problème. Je pense que cela pourrait être réalisable et ne causerait aucun problème aux députés ministériels, qui pourraient agir à titre de substitut. Ce serait plutôt nous trois, le président et les deux vice-présidents, qui, en réalité...

À ma connaissance, cela n'a jamais occasionné de problèmes par le passé. Chose certaine, en ce qui nous concerne, cela n'a jamais été un problème au sein du comité et d'autres sous-comités auxquels j'ai siégé. Nous avons toujours réussi à trouver une solution. Il est toujours possible de se rencontrer à un moment qui convient à tout le monde. Je n'y vois vraiment pas d'inconvénient.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson, suivi de M. Lamoureux.

M. David Christopherson:

Dans le cas peu probable où M. Lamoureux répondrait à mes préoccupations de manière positive, je suis prêt à lui laisser prendre la parole avant moi, ou je peux prendre la parole tout de suite.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Je serai très bref.

J'apprécie vos observations. J'ai entendu d'excellents arguments. Puisqu'on parle d'établir l'ordre du jour des réunions, David, je proposerais que l'une des questions à l'ordre du jour soit l'étude de nos comités permanents. Cela pourrait être une bonne chose non seulement pour nous, mais aussi pour les autres comités. Selon moi, cette option mérite d'être examinée par les membres du sous-comité.

Cela ne doit pas nécessairement être controversé. J'estime qu'il y a plusieurs bonnes idées concernant la façon dont les sous-comités ou les comités peuvent mener leurs travaux pour le compte du Parlement du Canada, et nous devrions les examiner en gardant l'esprit ouvert.

Tout d'abord, sachez que je comprends vos préoccupations. Je vais revenir à mon expérience au sein du sous-comité, qui s'est révélée plutôt encourageante. Je ne vais pas préjuger de ce qui va se produire. Je ne vais même pas y siéger — et je n'y tiens pas non plus —, car je suis le secrétaire parlementaire, mais je serais tout de même curieux de connaître le dénouement, si c'est possible. Si nous ne pouvons pas adopter les règles aujourd'hui, ce n'est pas un problème. Nous pouvons poursuivre cette discussion. Je crois qu'il aurait été préférable d'adopter les règles, de tenir cette même discussion, puis de formuler quelques recommandations au sous-comité. Nous pourrions notamment recommander d'améliorer les comités de façon à ce que tous les parlementaires se sentent plus libres d'agir, et de rédiger un rapport connexe à notre intention.

J'ai discuté avec les leaders parlementaires aujourd'hui et je tenais à vous en parler. C'est d'ailleurs l'une des raisons pour lesquelles je suis venu aujourd'hui, bien que les leaders parlementaires pourraient vous transmettre cette information à une date ultérieure si ce n'est pas possible aujourd'hui.

(1240)

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je n'ai pas vraiment entendu ce que je voulais entendre, mais de toute évidence, le gouvernement ne va pas tout simplement répondre par un non catégorique. Il espère toujours pouvoir régler la situation.

Je comprends ce que vous dites et j'apprécie le ton employé, de même que nos échanges respectueux. Je m'en réjouirais toutefois davantage si nous pouvions infuser un peu plus de démocratie au sein des comités.

Monsieur Chan et vous-même avez répété à plusieurs reprises — et je suis sûr que vos autres collègues partagent cet avis — avoir pleinement l'intention d'en arriver à un consensus. Je n'en doute pas du tout. Sincèrement, je crois que c'est véritablement votre intention. Je crois même qu'il en est ainsi la majeure partie du temps.

Cependant, comme mon ami, M. Angus, l'a indiqué, et comme ceux qui sont ici depuis longtemps le savent, cette idée va rapidement tomber à l'eau. Il ne faut pas se leurrer: le gouvernement a un programme à respecter s'il veut se faire réélire dans quatre ans. Par conséquent, à certains moments, il voudra que le comité fasse certaines choses et prenne une certaine direction. Je suis d'accord. Vous détenez le pouvoir ici au comité. Toutefois, si le gouvernement exerce un contrôle absolu sur le comité de direction, cela veut dire qu'il pourra l'utiliser comme bon lui semble. À mesure que nous progressons et que nous avons des arguments solides et des positions bien campées — et M. Lamoureux et, dans une certaine mesure, M. Chan le savent —, les choses évoluent, et on ne peut pas toujours dissocier ce qui se passe à la Chambre des communes de ce qui se passe ici, et cela peut se répercuter sur nos travaux.

J'aimerais revenir encore une fois sur la déclaration du gouvernement selon laquelle il veut que les choses soient différentes. Pour ce faire, il doit agir différemment, et ce n'est pas en maintenant cette structure de pouvoir qui lui permet de resserrer la vis lorsque cela lui convient qu'il va y arriver. C'est tout le contraire d'un comité qui se réunit dans le but de parvenir à un consensus.

Je crois que toute personne raisonnable qui n'est pas dans la bulle d'Ottawa comprendrait que si le gouvernement exerce un contrôle absolu sur le comité, et que tout ce qui se passe au sein du comité de direction doit être soumis à l'attention du comité principal, le gouvernement a le plein contrôle. Nous ne contestons pas cette structure de pouvoir, mais pour ceux qui ne le savent pas, le comité de direction est l'endroit où nous essayons de nous entendre sur les règles de fonctionnement, l'ordre des témoins à convoquer et toutes ces choses qui pourraient prendre une éternité si nous étions 10 à y siéger. Vous connaissez le vieux dicton au sujet des 10 personnes qui écrivent une lettre. On parle ici d'un petit groupe à l'abri des caméras et des jeux politiques. On ne peut même pas gagner un vote. On ne fait que travailler ensemble. Si nous mettions cela en place, du moins, nous instaurerions une plus grande démocratie et nous accorderions une plus grande indépendance aux comités. Ce n'est pas grand-chose, mais c'est tout de même important, surtout lorsque le gouvernement dit qu'il devra, à l'occasion, exercer son contrôle. Il suffit d'une seule fois, et ce modèle de consensus est chose du passé. On est une entité consensuelle ou on ne l'est pas.

Je n'en aurais normalement pas fait toute une histoire au début des dernières législatures, avec le gouvernement précédent. Je pourrais le réaffirmer à tous les comités, mais une chose est sûre, cela revêt une grande importance. J'insiste là-dessus, au nom de mon caucus, parce que nous croyons en l'indépendance des comités. Nous appuyons l'initiative du gouvernement à cet effet, mais on n'obtient pas des félicitations seulement avec un beau discours et un beau sourire. Nous devons en faire davantage. Beaucoup de gens nous écoutent et accordent énormément d'attention à nos travaux. Je ne parle pas ici du grand public, mais des gens qui s'intéressent à ce qui se passe ici. Ils comprennent toute l'importance de ces questions de régie interne, et puisque notre comité est le premier comité, nous devons tracer la voie.

(1245)



Je sais que mon ami, M. Angus, fera valoir le même argument au sein des comités auxquels il siège. S'il peut utiliser notre comité à titre d'exemple en disant: « Regardez, ils ont indiqué clairement qu'ils fonctionneraient par consensus seulement, alors pourquoi procéderions-nous différemment? » Cela aurait beaucoup de poids. J'ose croire que d'ici là, le gouvernement nous assurera que le Cabinet du premier ministre va relâcher son contrôle sur le comité de direction, où nous réussissons à nous entendre de toute façon.

La plupart des règles des comités sont comme cela. Il en a toujours été ainsi au sein du comité des comptes publics, jusqu'à ce que le gouvernement élimine le comité de direction. Cela pourrait être votre prochain objectif, mais cela irait aussi totalement à l'encontre de ce que vous disiez, alors j'en reviens à dire au gouvernement que ce n'est pas la mer à boire. Je considère, monsieur Lamoureux, que vous commettez une grave erreur, à moins que nous ayons droit aux mêmes vieilles rengaines, c'est-à-dire que le comité reçoit des instructions et doit faire tout ce que M. Lamoureux lui dit de faire, et que tous les comités doivent s'y soumettre.

Si ce n'est pas le cas, pourquoi diable, monsieur Lamoureux, laisseriez-vous cette question prendre autant d'ampleur, en sachant très bien que si nous n'arrivons pas à la régler, nous y serons toujours confrontés au début de la nouvelle année. Ce n'est pas comme si nous avions une position déraisonnable. Tout ce que j'ai demandé, pour appuyer votre motion visant à ce qu'il y ait deux membres du parti ministériel, c'est que nous conservions un modèle de consensus. Vous avez beau dire que ce n'est pas là où nous en étions la dernière fois, j'estime que c'est l'orientation à prendre.

Je veux que nous procédions ainsi. J'ai été impressionné jusqu'à maintenant. Cela ne me dérange pas de dire aux députés ministériels que j'ai été surpris que M. Lamoureux réponde aussi rapidement à mes préoccupations. Comme vous le savez, par le passé, on a à peine écouté nos préoccupations, puis on n'en a pas tenu compte. Je ne parle pas ici de Randy, mais d'autres personnes, alors j'apprécie que vous ayez donné suite à mes préoccupations. Je dois continuer de vous pousser, mais vous continuez de me répondre, alors c'est bien. Beaucoup d'entre nous ont été sidérés de voir un véritable vote ouvert pour l'élection du président. Par le passé, nous appelions cela un vote ouvert, mais lorsque les députés ministériels ne proposaient qu'un seul nom, il était assez difficile de déterminer où se situait la démocratie par rapport au modèle de commandement et de contrôle. C'était du pareil au même.

Nous n'avons pas fait mieux. Nous savions quel député de l'opposition officielle allait occuper le poste de vice-président et qui allait être le vice-président du troisième parti; c'était une évidence. Par le passé, ce sont toutes des choses que nous savions à l'avance. Cette fois-ci, le gouvernement a indiqué qu'il procéderait différemment, et c'est ce qu'il a fait. Cela dit, ce fut un bon exercice de démocratie. Je sais que M. Chan ne s'est pas senti visé personnellement, parce qu'il doit savoir tout le respect que ceux qui l'ont vu en action éprouvent pour lui. C'était davantage une question d'expérience. Je continue de le dire et je suis conscient que cela peut être contrariant, mais au fil du temps, je suis certain que vous conviendrez qu'il est profitable d'avoir une personne d'expérience.

C'est ainsi que nous voyions cela. Qu'il soit d'allégeance libérale ou non, lorsque je rentre à la maison le soir, cela m'importe peu qui assume la présidence. Toutefois, pour ce qui est du fonctionnement du comité, je pense que l'expérience peut être un avantage. C'est la même chose pour le Président. J'ai voté pour le Président actuel. Bien entendu, c'est ce que tout le monde va dire, mais c'est la vérité. Il y avait de bons candidats, mais j'ai une grande expérience, ayant travaillé pour tous les partis. Lorsque je suis devenu vice-président à Queen's Park, j'ai été ministre, je suis ensuite devenu membre du troisième parti et j'ai été leader à la Chambre; je me sentais donc bien outillé. Maintenant, il appartenait à mes collègues de déterminer si j'étais à la hauteur de la tâche, mais je me sentais en mesure d'assumer la présidence en connaissant la position de tout le monde.

Cela dit, ce sont toutes de bonnes améliorations. Ce sont de petits changements, mais de bons changements; vous méritez un bonhomme sourire, une petite étoile ou ce que vous voulez. Ce n'est toutefois qu'un petit pas dans la bonne direction. Il est maintenant question du pouvoir et, dans une démocratie, le pouvoir est déterminé par une majorité, une majorité claire de 50 % plus un. Il y a une majorité claire et c'est ainsi que nous prenons les décisions.

(1250)



Vous avez encore ce contrôle et vous voulez le conserver même si vous affirmez que vous ne l'exercerez pas. Au moins, les conservateurs disaient clairement « C'est nous qui gouvernons et nous allons contrôler tout ce qui émane de ce comité. Passons aux arguments. » On nous laissait présenter nos arguments, mais cela ne donnait rien et nous rendait fous. Certains diront que c'est pour cette raison que la composition de la Chambre a changé, que c'est à cause de cette attitude — j'exclue bien sûr les personnes ici présentes.

Nous avons maintenant un nouveau gouvernement qui affirme vouloir faire les choses autrement. Vous avez légèrement changé les choses, et on vous en a attribué tout le mérite. Personne n'essaie de dire que vous n'avez pas le droit d'être félicité pour le fait que nous avons un président élu et que nous avons dû tenir un vote parce qu'il y avait deux noms sur le bulletin. Est-ce que vous vous souvenez de l'ancienne Union soviétique? Elle se vantait d'avoir une grande démocratie, sauf qu'elle imposait ses choix de candidats, qui étaient déclarés vainqueurs au terme de ce qu'on appelait des élections. C'est ainsi que les choses se passaient ici. Vous avez changé cela, et je vous en félicite, mais c'est ce qu'il y a de plus simple à faire.

Le changement le plus difficile — et c'est pourquoi il est facile de faire une promesse, mais difficile de la tenir — concerne la question du pouvoir. Ce que je veux proposer ne change rien au pouvoir. Le gouvernement remportera encore le vote 10 fois sur 10. La question est de savoir si le Cabinet du premier ministre a encore la mainmise sur le sous-comité. Vous n'avez pas à abandonner quoi que ce soit. Vous ne renoncez à rien, sauf à une technique de commandement et de contrôle, qui devrait être à l'opposé de ce que vous avez déclaré vouloir faire pour changer les choses. Si vous vous contentez de faire quelques petits changements ici et là, mais qu'au bout du compte le jeu de pouvoir est le même, alors on aura changé les choses qu'en apparence.

Je le répète, le gouvernement veut continuer de recevoir des félicitations pour ce qu'il fait parce que c'est un bon début, mais ce n'est seulement qu'un début, et il n'est pas déraisonnable... Je suis ravi que mon ami, M. Angus, ait parlé de la Grande-Bretagne. J'aimerais que nous ayons tous l'occasion de nous rendre là-bas ou d'assister à une séance d'information sur le sujet. Je n'y suis jamais allé, mais j'ai souvent regardé les délibérations des comités là-bas. C'est étonnant. C'est un tout autre monde.

J'aime croire que c'est ce que vise le premier ministre actuel, c'est-à-dire ce genre d'indépendance. Un comité doit être un comité et on ne devrait pas perdre la possibilité d'être nommé secrétaire parlementaire ou ministre parce qu'on s'oppose à une proposition du gouvernement, ou qu'on la remet en question, ou bien parce qu'on appuie un amendement présenté par l'opposition que nous jugeons valable d'après notre instinct et notre expérience. C'est ainsi que les choses devraient toujours être. Dans le passé, on comprenait très vite qu'il n'en était pas nécessairement ainsi dans la réalité.

Je le répète, le gouvernement actuel ne s'engage pas dans la même voie que l'ancien gouvernement; il ne dit pas « Tant pis pour vous. » Il nous dit « Nous voulons être différents, nous visons l'ouverture des comités. » Il a maintenant l'occasion pour la première fois de le démontrer. Tout ce que nous voulons, c'est que le sous-comité puisse agir d'une manière non partisane. Lorsqu'il parvient à un accord, ce qui se produit la plupart du temps, et lorsqu'il présente des recommandations positives, le gouvernement peut toujours changer d'avis et les rejeter s'il le souhaite. Il ne renonce à rien, sauf à un contrôle excessif.

Exercer un contrôle excessif signifie serrer la gorge et ne pas lâcher tant qu'on n'obtient pas le résultat qu'on souhaite. C'était la réalité auparavant. Le gouvernement actuel affirme qu'il changera cela, et pourtant, la première fois qu'il est question de pouvoir en comité, il se trouve là où l'ancien gouvernement se situait, et il n'a aucun argument valable à faire valoir, sauf qu'il souhaite exercer un contrôle maximal, tout le contrôle. Nous avons déjà vécu cela et vous l'avez dénoncé durant la campagne.

C'est facile à faire. Cela m'amène vraiment à me questionner à propos de certains des autres changements que vous voulez apporter. Êtes-vous vraiment sérieux? Tout ce que nous voulons, c'est qu'on laisse les membres du comité de direction se réunir... À bien des égards, c'est lui qui effectue le vrai travail, car il doit déterminer quel témoin n'est pas disponible à une telle heure parce que le greffier a communiqué avec lui et il a dit qu'il pouvait seulement se présenter à une certaine heure, alors qu'arrive-t-il s'il faut une réunion spéciale ou s'il faut changer l'horaire... C'est ce qui entre en jeu lorsqu'on travaille ensemble.

(1255)



On ne pense pas au programme. Pas du tout. Contrairement à d'autres comités, le nôtre ne traite pas seulement de politiques appuyées par le gouvernement et rejetées par l'opposition, à quelques exceptions près. Nous nous penchons sur bien des dossiers qui ne sont pas de nature partisane. Par exemple, si l'un d'entre vous ou l'un de nos collègues — mon ami, M. Angus, connaît mieux ce processus que moi — est accusé d'avoir agi de manière non parlementaire ou d'avoir privé d'autres députés de leurs privilèges ou si une situation qui concerne un député ou une question d'éthique est portée à l'attention du Président de la Chambre, qui estime qu'il faut se pencher là-dessus, devinez à qui l'affaire est renvoyée? Elle est renvoyée à notre comité.

Je ne connais pas les nouveaux députés, mais je suis certain de connaître assez bien les anciens membres du gouvernement et mes propres collègues. Je dois dire que si ma réputation ne tenait qu'à un fil, j'aimerais avoir l'assurance qu'on décidera d'une manière non partisane de la façon dont mon cas sera traité. J'aimerais avoir l'assurance que lorsqu'on aura déterminé comment procéder pour se pencher sur mon intégrité, ma réputation, ma vie politique, mon représentant au comité conviendra qu'il s'agit d'une procédure qui est juste. Voilà pourquoi c'est important.

Je n'ai pas besoin d'attention ni de faire les manchettes. Comme chacun d'entre vous, je viens d'être élu et, pour le meilleur et pour le pire, je suis ici pour quatre ans. Vous verrez au fil du temps que je retire beaucoup plus de satisfaction de mon travail en collaborant avec les autres plutôt qu'en les affrontant, même si c'est que je fais parfois, et je suis assez bon en fait. Je viens d'Hamilton et c'est ce que nous faisons. Lorsque c'est nécessaire, je tente de saisir l'occasion, mais après toutes ces décennies, je peux affirmer que ce n'est pas ce que je préfère. Ce que j'aime le plus, c'est essayer de trouver avec tout le monde une solution non partisane à un gros problème. Croyez-moi, c'est ce qui est vraiment excitant, car on peut alors vraiment améliorer les choses.

Comme vous le savez, bien des comités, particulièrement celui des comptes publics, essaient de présenter un rapport unanime. Lorsqu'on obtient un rapport unanime qui est positif pour le gouvernement, c'est mérité, et quand le rapport est négatif, c'est mérité également, car tout le monde appuie ce rapport. Si on affirme dans un rapport que le gouvernement est d'avis que le vérificateur général a tort, car selon lui il fait plutôt un excellent travail, et que l'opposition pense plutôt que le vérificateur général a raison et que le gouvernement a tort, qu'est-ce que cela nous donne? Il y a eu un processus, mais quel en est vraiment le résultat?

Lorsqu'on s'entend, alors c'est profitable. Je le répète, monsieur le président, l'objectif est de faire en sorte que le comité fonctionne. Je sais que les membres sont fatigués de m'entendre. Ils se disent « Mon Dieu, quand va-t-il finir? Est-ce que c'est si important? » Je vais vous dire que ce qu'on fait maintenant... J'ai trouvé intéressant que M. Chan, je crois, propose que si cela ne fonctionne pas, on revienne là-dessus dans quelques mois. Cependant, ce n'est pas possible. Les droits que l'opposition ne réussit pas à obtenir au moment d'établir les règles ne pourront pas être obtenus plus tard, car les considérations politiques du moment vont prendre toute la place. Notre situation restera la même.

Si vous croyez qu'il est difficile maintenant de céder une partie du pouvoir alors que vous venez tout juste de l'obtenir, imaginez-vous à quel point ce sera difficile de le faire dans 6 ou 12 mois, lorsque vous serez bien contents d'avoir ce pouvoir parce que les embêtants députés de l'opposition rendent votre vie difficile et qu'il est bien de pouvoir les faire taire. C'est la réalité.

Je vous respecte beaucoup, monsieur Chan, et je dois dire que votre idée de revenir là-dessus est bonne, mais dans la réalité, c'est impossible.

Je dirais donc que, pour parvenir à s'entendre avant la fin de ce débat, monsieur Chan, plutôt que de laisser le gouvernement disposer de tout le pouvoir pendant six mois, nous pourrions parvenir à un consensus, que nous examinerons dans six mois. Pendant ces six mois, laissons le gouvernement voir comment se passent les choses lorsque la démocratie peut s'exercer au sein d'un comité de direction. Ensuite, si le gouvernement croit encore qu'on brime son droit de gouverner, alors nous reviendrons sur la question et nous parlerons de notre expérience. Je présume que notre expérience sera exactement comme celle dont M. Lamoureux a parlé dans le passé et que M. Reid a commentée, c'est-à-dire qu'en général nous allons nous entendre, comme je l'ai affirmé aussi.

Si c'est le cas, Kevin, ce sera facile.

(1300)



Je ne peux pas croire que vous allez laisser cette réunion se terminer dans quelques minutes sans avoir réglé cette question. Vous allez faire un rapport là-dessus. Votre seule responsabilité était de veiller à ce que le comité soit indépendant pour que vous puissiez prendre vos distances.

Vous allez devoir dire « J'ai échoué. Et, soit dit en passant, nous allons être aux prises avec une grande question, celle de savoir si les libéraux exigeront d'avoir le contrôle aux comités de direction. » Vraiment? C'est vraiment ce que vous voulez dire juste avant la pause pour Noël et le Nouvel An? C'est ce qui risque fort de se produire.

Je vous ai offert une solution raisonnable, un autre amendement raisonnable. Pour être plus raisonnable à vos yeux, il semble que je devrais carrément céder. Il n'est pas question que je fasse cela, car c'est important.

Je ne sais pas pourquoi vous voulez que cela devienne une cause célèbre. Il y a des gens pour qui c'est important. Avez-vous déjà entendu parler de Kady O'Malley? Elle connaît ce genre de choses mieux que la plupart d'entre nous. C'est important pour elle et elle sait très bien exprimer pourquoi c'est important.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, j'invoque le Règlement. Je suis désolé, mais je constate qu'il est passé 13 heures et que nous avons donc dépassé le temps prévu pour la réunion. Je voulais seulement porter cela à votre attention.

Le président:

C'est noté.

À la prochaine réunion, vous aurez la parole et vous pourrez continuer sur ce sujet.

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien, monsieur le président. Je vous en suis reconnaissant.

Le président:

C'est bien.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on December 10, 2015

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.