header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-11-15 PROC 39

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1150)

[English]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC)):

Order. We're now in the public portion of the 39th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. We have with us today a number of witnesses on the votes on the supplementary estimates (B) for 2016-17.

We have with us, first of all, the Honourable Geoff Regan, the Speaker of the House of Commons; Mr. Mark Bosc, Acting Clerk of the House of Commons; Mike O'Beirne, acting director and officer in charge of operations, Parliamentary Protective Service; Daniel Paquette, chief financial officer of the House of Commons; and, Sloane Mask, deputy chief financial officer, Parliamentary Protective Service.

We'll shortly turn the floor over to the Speaker for his comments. I believe you all have a copy of of those comments in front of you. As per what was indicated to me informally by the members of the committee prior to our gavelling in the meeting, there seems to be a desire to have an informal nature to the meeting rather than follow the typical standard rounds of questioning. I'll entertain a speakers list to take questions in whatever order they come in from members. Obviously, I will police to some degree. If you seem to be getting long-winded, I may police and ask you to turn the floor to one of your colleagues, but I'm sure that won't happen to any of you.

I'll now turn the floor over to the Speaker for his opening remarks, and then we'll move to questions.

Hon. Geoff Regan (Speaker of the House of Commons):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

“Police”: that's an interesting word to use.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Hon. Geoff Regan: It's a pleasure to be back before the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs to present the House of Commons supplementary estimates (B) for the fiscal year 2016-17. I'm also pleased to have been invited to present the supplementary estimates (B) on behalf of the Parliamentary Protective Service, or PPS, as I will call it.

Mr. Chairman, you have mentioned the people who are with me here at the table. I thank you for that.[Translation]

With me are members of House administration's executive management team: Stéphan Aubé, chief financial officer; Philippe Dufresne, law clerk and parliamentary counsel; André Gagnon, acting deputy clerk; Benoit Giroux, director general of parliamentary precinct operations; Patrick McDonnell, deputy sergeant-at-arms and corporate security officer; as well as Pierre Parent, chief human resources officer. [English]

Let me begin by noting that all of the items included in the House of Commons supplementary estimates (B) have been presented to and approved by the Board of Internal Economy. Together, this represents an increase of $22,624,714 in funding levels for fiscal year 2016-17.

To facilitate our discussions today, we prepared a handout outlining the line items that were included in the supplementary estimates (B). You'll be glad to hear that I won't read it word for word.[Translation]

Having served as a member of this committee in the past, I recall a distinct preference for brevity, and so I will provide what I hope is a quick overview of each of the five line items under discussion, in the order that they are presented in the handout. This will leave more time for questions later.

The items include funding for: the carry-forward of the operating budget; security enhancements; renewal of the constituency communications network services, or CCN as we call it; committee activities; and, members' sessional allowances and additional salaries.[English]

We're seeking a carry-forward in the amount of approximately $13.7 million through the 2016-17 supplementary estimates (B).

This request corresponds to the board's carry-forward policy, a policy that's been in place since 1995. The policy allows members of Parliament, House officers, and the House administration to carry forward unspent funds from one fiscal year to the next, up to a maximum of 5% of operating budgets in their main estimates.

The ability to carry funds forward increases our budgetary flexibility, reduces the pressure to spend at the year-end, and provides and incentive for those who underspend their budgets. In short, it helps us better manage our finances.[Translation]

This carry-forward practice is also in place across all federal government departments. However, unlike those departments, the House of Commons must seek such carryforward funding through its supplementary estimates, and not from Treasury Board.

The funding will be allocated to budgets for members, House officers and the House administration. Notably, the House administration's allotment will be used to fund priority areas such as investments that support the administration's strategic plan, as well as those that ensure the timely replacement of much-needed IT infrastructure.

(1155)

[English]

With respect to security, we remain committed to our collective safety and that of the parliamentary precinct. To that end, we have sought temporary funding of $4.2 million for fiscal year 2016-17 as reflected in our next line item. This funding supports the House of Commons Corporate Security Office, or CSO, which works closely with its colleagues in the PPS.

The CSO has been facing increased demands for its services, including in the areas of accreditation, security clearance, event and visitor access services, constituency security, and threat and risk assessment. Indeed, the CSO's security advice, guidance, and training remain in high demand. As well, we're asking for more from the office. [Translation]

For example, in response to a number of security assessments, including the independent assessment requested in 2014 by the previous speaker, a number of initiatives to enhance our security are under way.

Additional funding is helping to build on these, including measures to improve the constituency office security program, install self-registration kiosks for visitors, and modernize the security camera system.[English]

A moment ago, I mentioned members' constituency offices within the context of security. We understand that access to state-of-the-art communications for members is a priority, whether they're in Ottawa or back in their constituency offices. That's why we've have sought a temporary increase of $2.1 million under supplementary estimates (B) for this fiscal year, which is item 3 in the handout.

The additional funding is helping to support the replacement of the current constituency communications network, or CCN, with what I think we aptly call the “enhanced constituency connectivity service”, or ECCS. This new Internet-based service will provide members with a seamless and always-connected experience, no matter the location of their constituency office.[Translation]

The enhanced constituency connectivity service, or ECCS, is designed to equal the excellent service that members already receive in their Hill offices, by providing them and their staff with secure access to the parliamentary precinct network as well as Internet connectivity and other WiFi services, from coast to coast to coast. [English]

Under item 4, committee activities—and not just this committee, obviously—you will note our request for a temporary increase of $1.5 million for fiscal year 2016-17. This increase is due to a renewed demand by many of the 24 standing committees to engage with Canadians who live outside of the national capital region, as well as the requirement to support the work of the Special Committee on Electoral Reform.

More specifically, temporary funding for committees under the global committee envelope was increased by $800,000 in 2016-17. Again, this reflects the budget requirements of the increased committee activities outside the national capital region, including enhanced consultations. An additional $678,000 was provided to fund the work of the then newly created Special Committee on Electoral Reform.[Translation]

It is my understanding that the experience so far demonstrates that there is public demand for such increased consultation. That said, let me emphasize that we continue to allocate funds for committee activities with the utmost rigour. For instance, measures have been taken to reduce the costs of committee travel, including by limiting the number of members travelling with each committee and ensuring that only essential staff accompany the committee for meetings outside of Ottawa.

(1200)

[English]

That brings me to the final line item in your handout, in the amount of $1.1 million for fiscal year 2016-17 and subsequent years. This amount represents an increase to salaries for members, House officers, the Speaker and other presiding officers: a 1.8% increase to members' annual sessional allowances and additional salaries over the previous year. The increase, which was approved by the Board of Internal Economy, took effect on April 1.[Translation]

As you know, members' sessional allowances and other additional salaries are statutory under the Parliament of Canada Act. Such increases are based on an index published by Employment and Social Development Canada and reflect the average percentage increase in base-rate wages for a calendar year in Canada resulting from major settlements negotiated in the private sector.

Now let me turn my attention to parliamentary protective service, the PPS. Since its creation, on June 23, 2015, PPS has been working diligently to ensure operational excellence through the execution of seamless service delivery in support of its physical security mandate throughout the parliamentary precinct and the grounds of Parliament Hill.

Efforts to enhance operational excellence through a series of resource optimization, coordination and professionalization initiatives remain ongoing.[English]

I'll now provide you with an overview of supplementary estimates (B) for 2016-17, which total $7.1 million, including a total voted budgetary requirement of $6.7 million and a statutory budget component of $367,000 for the employee benefits plan. Please note that this request represents unfunded requirements to support new and ongoing initiatives, and PPS was able to reallocate funding within an existing budgetary envelope to defray a portion of the total cost of the requirements.

PPS is requesting $1.7 million in funding from its 2015-16 operational budget carry-forward. This funding, in addition to the $3.1 million in additional funding that's being requested, will be used for a series of security enhancement projects. These projects are intended to address a significant number of the recommendations stemming from the reviews of the events of October 22, 2014, and to stabilize a protective posture in response to the requirements associated with the long-term vision and plan.

To further the integration and realize the benefits on interoperability, PPS is requesting $655,000 to support the consolidation of the PPS operational and operational support employees into two distinct facilities. This consolidation will enable PPS to secure sufficient office space for its current FTE base, ensure the necessary informatics are in place to support operations, streamline the quartermaster processes, facilitate the process of integrated briefings and resource deployment, and continue to work towards the creation of a unique PPS culture.[Translation]

Over the past several months, a series of reviews were conducted to make the best use of our professional resources while exercising resource stewardship in support of our overall operations. To that end, PPS is seeking $445,000 to support resource optimization initiatives. As a result of this investment, PPS will be realizing a $2.5-million return on the investment/savings, in the coming fiscal years.[English]

This funding will also be used to defray some of the costs incurred in coordinating the address to Parliament by the President of the United States of America, and I'm referring to the address that already occurred, just so nobody thinks that we have something planned. I don't know about that. We'll see.

(1205)

[Translation]

PPS remains committed to preserving the openness and accessibility of Parliament, while maintaining the responsive and appropriate public safety and security measures that are necessary today, given the evolution of our domestic and international threat environment.

As always, PPS is proud to serve and protect, and operational and employee excellence remain its highest priority.[English]

If its accomplishments over the past 18 months are any indication, PPS is well prepared to address the current global reality, as well as any future challenges to the physical safety and security of the parliamentary precinct and the grounds of Parliament Hill.

You will be pleased to hear that this now concludes my overview of the House of Commons supplementary estimates (B) for 2016-17 as well as those for PPS.

Along with the staff members present, I am happy to answer any questions you may have.

Thank you.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

We have about 10 minutes remaining in what was time scheduled for the meeting. At this point, I have three speakers who have indicated that they would like to be on the list: Mr. Graham, Ms. Vandenbeld, and Mr. Christopherson.

I'm trying to get a sense of what others would like to do. Maybe we'll ask our guest if it is possible to stay just a little longer if need be. Would that be troublesome?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I have something at 12:15, but I think I can manage to be a few minutes late for that and not be too late.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

A few more minutes? Okay. Let's see how it goes. It looks as if we may be able to accomplish this if you can stay for just a few more minutes. If you have to go, just let us know.

At this point, I have Mr. Graham. Again, because we do have I think four of you so far, try to keep the questions as brief as you can so the answers can be sufficient.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I can speak fast if you like, Mr. Chair.

The very first question I have is about understanding the million and a half dollars you want for committees. What services are provided by PPS to committees when they're travelling. They don't travel with an officer, so in general terms what are they doing?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I don't believe that's for PPS. The committee funding is a different thing.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: I see.

Hon. Geoff Regan: Am I correct, Marc?

Mr. Marc Bosc (Acting Clerk, House of Commons):

Yes, but when committees are travelling, if security risks are identified, we coordinate with local police forces and, if needed, hire locally for those purposes.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

The funding I was referring to—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: It's general.

Hon. Geoff Regan: —is general funding. The PPS is a different section.

I was referring to the increased activity of committees. We've seen it not only with more travelling, but also with more activities nightly on the Hill this year for some reason.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have one other quick question. How does the financial integration for PPS work between the House of Commons and Senate?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Dan, can you tell us?

Mr. Daniel G. Paquette (Chief Financial Officer, House of Commons):

Yes. At this point, they are two different entities. They get their own funding and their own votes for that. We work very closely together to make sure there is no overlap and that any gaps are addressed, but at this point there are two different entities and two different budgets that need to be managed separately.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

That means that for the area they look after, that's their cost, and for the area we look after, it's our cost.

Mr. Daniel G. Paquette:

That's right.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

We share proportionally any common costs. Is that right?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

When PPS was set up, obviously the House contributed more personnel and more money to the setting up of PPS than did the Senate, because we had a bigger security service. But now that doesn't really matter anymore. It's one service with separate institutions and separate votes in estimates.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Finally, is there any financial exchange between the RCMP and PPS?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I don't think so. Is there any transfer of funds from...?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

The RCMP put money into PPS as well. The complement of RCMP officers that was on the Hill became part of PPS.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

But that was to pay for the RCMP officers who are here.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. Thank you.

Because of time, I'll defer.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Thank you very much.

Thank you for a thorough presentation, Mr. Speaker.

My question is about the part you mentioned in terms of the creation of a unique PPS culture. Obviously, in terms of security, this place is not the same doing security in any other federal building. This is a place of the people. It is a place that belongs to Canadians and therefore needs to be open to Canadians, and that needs to be weighed in terms of the security of those who work in this place but also in terms of accessibility.

I don't see anything here in terms of training for things such as cultural sensitivity. In this committee, in one of our previous reports, we recommended a gender-based safety audit. I'm not seeing anything on that or other gender awareness, or aboriginal reconciliation, or the fact that this is a very different place. I understood in some informal conversations that some consideration was being given to having the protective services officers undergo this kind of cultural awareness training.

(1210)

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Mr. O'Beirne would be happy to address that.

Superintendent Mike O'Beirne (Acting Director and Officer in Charge of Operations, Parliamentary Protective Service):

Thank you very much.

Following the creation of the PPS in June 2015, our efforts were certainly geared towards integrating at every possible turn and every possible opportunity. That has certainly developed in the training area. We developed an integrated training unit, in the very first instance, made up of our highly trained personnel who came from the three partners. With that, we of course identified the need to standardize the training across the PPS and to develop a training regimen.

To that end, a recruit program training course was developed. As for what that is, it's the new PPS standard. We've identified the needs of the precinct, the grounds, the Senate, the House of Commons, and the Library of Parliament, and we've standardized training to that end. Included in that, certainly, is the tactical or more kinetic training that one would expect from a security entity.

However, to respond to your question, ma'am, certainly efforts are under way right now to develop the cultural training and diversity training within the RP, our recruit program. We are looking at launching our third course, RP3, in the new year, and we are very proud of that. Included in that as well as a follow-up is certainly training with respect to the privileges and immunities of parliamentarians and then of course tying that into your original point about balancing the needs of security with the requirement of having an open and accessible Parliament.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you. That's encouraging.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you.

Next we have Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

It's a shame that we didn't get a chance to finish all of our PPS briefings before we did this. I'm not suggesting any skulduggery; it's just unfortunate that we weren't able to get the horse in front of the cart.

However, be that as it may, there has been some reference to this, Speaker, in some of your comments, but could you again touch on the issue of the integration between the two sides, the Senate and the Commons? What parts of that integration still remain to be done? I know that you've touched on it, but in summary, there were still some outstanding issues, I believe, in terms of that transition into one. Were there two collective agreements? There were some aspects where it is still not uniformly seamless yet. I wonder if you could touch on those for me.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Do you want to cover that?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

Thank you.

You are correct. When the PPS was created and the Senate security, the House of Commons security, and the RCMP component came together, with that came two associations and one union, and those remain in place at this time. We're mindful of that as we move forward. However, we've put forth a motion to the PSLRB to look at merging into one. We see that as an operational benefit and as an operational requirement for moving various initiatives forward.

However, I will finish by saying, as I mentioned earlier, that we've concentrated our efforts on the integration of all partners at every turn. That includes our training unit, as I mentioned, and our integrated planning unit. If I can use an analogy, prior to the PPS, every entity was planning events with 33% of the information and 33% of the operation. We've eliminated all of that with an integrated planning unit that looks after everything that may happen on the Hill from a security perspective. Then, of course, there is an integrated intelligence unit, an intelligence-led entity. That assists us as well.

Certainly, that is awaiting disposition in front of the PSLRB, but we've put forth that motion.

(1215)

Mr. David Christopherson:

Good. Thank you.

Next is members' access. I've raised this on numerous occasions in numerous Parliaments. What I'm seeking is some assurance, on the record, ahead of time, that indeed there has been a higher recognition of the priority of ensuring that you plan for members getting to Centre Block, rather than finding situations where all of a sudden the green bus has to be stopped. I've seen members who have some short-term impairment having to walk across the front lawn because there was no preparation.

It's going to happen again. If it doesn't, I'll be the first one to sing alleluia at the end of this term, but I suspect it's going to come. What I'd like to hear up front, right now, before any events happen, is that this is being recognized as the priority that it should be, that we're not going to have incidents—other than something that happens that wasn't planned—and that there's going to be much better planning than there has been in the past for ensuring this, whether it's the President of the United States, the Pope, or whomever. Their security is an absolute priority, but there's also a constitutional priority to ensure that members can get to the House.

I would like to hear now, ahead of time, before we have any more visits, that this priority is being considered and recognized, and that those plans will be in place.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Just before you respond, Mr. Speaker, we're at 12:17 now. I have two other members on the list following this. Would you have the time to stay for those two, do you think, if we can keep them brief?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I think so.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Okay. We will do that. That's where I'll stop the list.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I have one more after this, and I'll keep it brief, Chair.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Okay. If you'll keep it very brief, that's fine.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I will.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Do you want to go ahead with your response, Mr. Speaker?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Thank you, Mr. Chairman, and through you to Mr. Christopherson, I want to assure you that I consider it a high priority that the privileges of members be respected at all times. Obviously, it's about their ability to do their work on behalf of their constituents. So many of the services we provide on Parliament Hill, that the House provides, are for that purpose, and that's why it's important that they be able to get around the Hill, to get to the House, and to get to Centre Block or back to their offices when need be. That has to be considered a priority at all times, so when there are visits, that needs to be part of the planning process.

Mr. David Christopherson: Exactly.

Hon. Geoff Regan: I'd love to be able to say to you and to promise you that this kind of thing will never happen again, the kind of thing you describe. That probably would be an unwise promise for me to make, but I would certainly hope we wouldn't see that kind of problem. At the same time, we will have, I'm sure, visitors from time to time and security issues involved. As you point out, the key thing is to plan for those and to try to do as much as we can to avoid problems for members.

I'm going to ask Mr. O'Beirne to reinforce my message.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That would be great. Thank you.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Is there anything you want to add?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

Certainly, Mr. Speaker. Thank you.

We incorporate measures and contingency plans into our operational plans at every opportunity. We do plan that. I can give you my assurances that they are incorporated into our planning cycle and our preparatory phases. When there is a large event, certainly, there are always the unforseen issues that may pop up, but I can assure you that we give them our full attention. If any issues do come up, they're rectified as quickly as possible.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's great. Thank you. That's what I was seeking, and I appreciate that. I realize, Speaker, that there are no guarantees. Things can happen, but you can appreciate—and I know you're very sensitive to these things—that it gets frustrating when you've been around here long enough to see that it keeps happening over and over.

Thanks very much to both of you. I'd love it if we didn't have to revisit this. That would be great.

The last question is a hypothetical. If a member has personal security concerns and they approach PPS, what can they reasonably expect from PPS in terms of a response, just in general? Is it only security here on the Hill and when you're in your constituency office....

(1220)

Hon. Geoff Regan:

The first thing is that the route for a member to take is actually not to approach the PPS. It is to approach the Corporate Security Office led by the Sergeant-at-Arms.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay, and if one does that...?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

If one does that, then I suppose it depends on whether the security measures or issues that the member is concerned about are on or off the Hill. If they're off the Hill and they relate to the work of the member, then I would expect the CSO to clearly communicate with or contact those police services that would be responsible in whatever area that was.

Let's say it's a constituency office. In that case, maybe it's a local police service in the town or city that the person is in that you want to consult to make sure that the services there are watching things and are aware of the concern that's raised. In each case, though, they have to decide what are the reasonable steps to take, in the same way that there are threat assessments done at various times in relation to public officials. If there is a significant threat, then appropriate measures are taken. That's what I would anticipate.

Am I off base in any way, Mike?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

No, Mr. Speaker. That's fine.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Is there anything else that I should have added but didn't?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

No. Certainly, I won't speak for the CSO, but once those linkages are made with the police of the jurisdiction, then, of course, the threat-risk assessment is effected and the measures are put into place.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I should have probably turned to Pat, from the Sergeant-at-Arms office. I could, if you'd like.

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, that's fine. It was a hypothetical. I wanted to get it on the record. Thank you.

Thanks, Chair. I'm good.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you. We have two more members to hear from.

We'll ask that you respect the Speaker's time and keep your questions as brief as possible.

Ms. Petitpas Taylor is next, and then Mr. Schmale.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Thank you so much, all of you, for being here today.

Very briefly, on your budget handout—I recognize that it's very brief—my question is, do we have a breakdown of overtime for our PPS people? The reason I ask is that we're always trying to promote wellness and workplace balance, and I'm wondering what that looks like when it comes to our PPS personnel.

Hon. Geoff Regan: Go ahead, Mike.

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Perhaps I can speak to that. Certainly, the issue of overtime has been at the forefront of our considerations. There are several reasons for that. Following the events of October 22, there were some changes in postures that were effected. This resulted in positions that had not been in place prior to that, so they resulted in an overtime position.

These have carried through following June 23, 2015. Following the creation of the PPS, the partners that came together were operational in nature, and that positioned the PPS to have to create its infrastructure. What I mean by that is its HR support and the financial support needed to permit the entity to continue its transition.

There have been some unbudgeted special events. One was the visit by the President of the United States. As well, certainly, one of the impacts is that we have to be very responsive to the LTVP projects that are presented. The challenge, of course, is to keep our hiring and retention mechanisms in pace with that. We're certainly mindful of 2018 and the LTVP projects that are going to be presented at that time, and we are looking at resourcing in a way to respond to that.

That said, your point about employee wellness is certainly at the forefront of our consideration as well. We're very mindful of that. To that end, we've incorporated some mechanisms in the PPS for employee wellness, for both physical and mental health. Some of them are mental health awareness initiatives. Others are physical health initiatives. We've created a position that oversees that development within the PPS.

(1225)

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Do we have a breakdown, though, of how much overtime we've incurred?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

For the breakdown, perhaps I'll turn to my colleague.

Ms. Sloane Mask (Deputy Chief Financial Officer, Parliamentary Protective Service):

This year, we've incurred about $2 million in overtime costs. This is very comparable with the results under the previous tenure of the Senate, House, and RCMP.

As Mike and Mr. Speaker have both mentioned, the 42nd session of Parliament has been quite a hectic session. We have had some additional overtime incurred in order to be able to support the events and ensure the safety and security of all our guests. Going forward, we're very mindful, as the Canada 150 celebrations are being launched, of the need to keep a close eye on overtime and employee wellness, and certainly that is a priority.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Thank you.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you.

Our final question today will come from Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

I have two quick ones.

First, a few months ago, we did a tour of the West Block construction, and part of that tour included the new chamber. What we noticed—and it has been brought up at this committee before—is that there is a series of windows that look right down onto this new chamber. Obviously, if someone wanted to do harm, they'd be in an elevated position, and they'd have clear access to all parliamentarians.

I'm looking for a comment, but if you don't have one, maybe you could put that on your radar as an ongoing concern that has been raised here before. We are—or at least I am—a little wary. This is something that we all noticed.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

You'd be interested to know that the windows will be opaque, which should help somewhat.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Okay.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Theoretically, somebody could break a window, obviously, but then you'd hear it and people would react.

Obviously, first of all, we don't want anybody who's a threat getting into the building. That's why we have the security systems we have and which we will have over there. I think what's better is to take what you're saying as a comment and a suggestion. Thank you.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

The second one, really quickly, is under security enhancements. You sought “temporary funding of $4.2 million” for the next fiscal year and you say, “The CSO has been facing increased demands for its services, including in the areas of accreditation, security clearance, events, and visitor access services...”. Is that because security is a little more enhanced? Is that where this is coming from? How does that compare to previous years? I'm assuming that everyone had to go through some sort of clearance to get into the building before now.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I'm going to ask the clerk to answer that.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Essentially, Mr. Schmale, this comes from the set-up of PPS a little over a year ago. At that time, it had to be done fairly quickly, so very quick decisions were made as to which unit would go and which unit would stay and so on. After that has all shaken out, we're now in a situation where we can properly assess the needs on both sides.

What we discovered on the Corporate Security Office side was that basically we'd given too much away. We need to bring up those levels of resources, especially for accreditation, but there are other areas as well where it's insufficient, plus, demand has gone way up. We're more vigilant in terms of looking at access. All of that combined resulted in a greater need for resources.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you very much.

Mr. Speaker, thank you for your flexibility with your time.

I will dismiss our witnesses now. Thanks to all of you for being here, and for your presentation and your responses.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Thank you.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

I'll ask members to remain seated while our witnesses dismiss themselves, because there are some questions we will have to put to dispose of the supplementary estimates we're studying today. While that's happening, I will call those questions with regard to the supplementary estimates. HOUSE OF COMMONS Vote 1b—Program expenditures..........$19,102,544

(Vote 1b agreed to) PARLIAMENTARY PROTECTIVE SERVICE Vote 1b—Program expenditures..........$6,691,090

(Vote 1b agreed to)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards): Shall the chair report the votes of the supplementary estimates (B) to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards): Thank you, committee members.

Unless there is any other business, I would call the meeting adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1150)

[Traduction]

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC)):

La séance est ouverte. Nous sommes maintenant dans la partie publique de la 39e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Aujourd'hui, nous accueillons plusieurs témoins pour discuter des crédits du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) de 2016-2017.

Tout d'abord, nous accueillons l'honorable Geoff Regan, Président de la Chambre des communes. Ensuite, M. Marc Bosc, greffier par intérim de la Chambre des communes; Mike O'Beirne, directeur par intérim et agent responsable des opérations, Service de protection parlementaire; Daniel Paquette, dirigeant principal des finances à la Chambre des communes; et Sloane Mask, adjointe au dirigeant principal des finances, Service de protection parlementaire.

Je donnerai bientôt la parole au Président pour qu'il livre son exposé. Je crois que vous avez tous reçu un exemplaire de cet exposé. Comme les membres du Comité me l'ont indiqué de manière non officielle avant le début de la réunion, ils souhaitent procéder de façon informelle plutôt que de suivre l'ordre habituel des questions. J'établirai donc la liste des intervenants selon l'ordre dans lequel les membres du Comité souhaitent poser leurs questions. Manifestement, je ferai régner l'ordre dans une certaine mesure. Si vous semblez prendre trop de temps, il se peut que je vous demande de céder la parole à l'un de vos collègues, mais je suis certain que cela n'arrivera à personne.

Je donne maintenant la parole au Président, qui livrera son exposé. Ensuite, nous passerons aux questions.

L'hon. Geoff Regan (président de la Chambre des communes):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Vous ferez donc « régner l'ordre » pendant cette réunion. C'est un choix de mots intéressant.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

L'honorable Geoff Regan: Je suis heureux de comparaître à nouveau devant le Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre pour présenter le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) de la Chambre des communes pour l'exercice 2016-2017. Je suis également heureux d'avoir été invité à présenter le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) au nom du Service de protection parlementaire, ou le SPP, comme je l'appellerai.

Monsieur le président, vous avez mentionné les personnes qui m'accompagnent. Je vous en remercie.[Français] Je suis accompagné de membres de l'équipe de la haute direction de l'Administration de la Chambre: Stéphan Aubé, qui est dirigeant principal de l'information; Philippe Dufresne, qui est légiste et conseiller parlementaire; André Gagnon, qui est sous-greffier par intérim; Benoit Giroux, qui est directeur général des opérations de la Cité parlementaire; Patrick McDonnell, qui est sergent d'armes adjoint et agent de la sécurité institutionnelle, ainsi que Pierre Parent, qui est dirigeant principal des ressources humaines.[Traduction]

Je commence cet exposé en soulignant que le Bureau de régie interne a pris connaissance de tous les postes compris dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) de la Chambre des communes et les a approuvés. Dans son ensemble, ce budget présente une augmentation budgétaire de 22 624 714 $ en financement pour l'exercice 2016-2017.

Pour faciliter les discussions, nous avons préparé un document qui présente les postes inscrits au Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B). Je suis sûr que vous serez soulagés d'apprendre que je ne lirai pas ce document textuellement.[Français]

J'ai déjà été membre de ce comité dans le passé et je me rappelle qu'il privilégie nettement la concision. Je m'efforcerai donc de survoler rapidement chacun des cinq postes dans l'ordre où ils sont présentés dans le document, ce qui laissera plus de temps aux questions et réponses.

Les postes comprennent des fonds pour le report de fonds du budget de fonctionnement; l'amélioration de la sécurité; le renouvellement des services du Réseau de communication avec les circonscriptions, ou RCC; les activités des comités ainsi que l'indemnité de session et la rémunération supplémentaire des députés.[Traduction]

Nous demandons un report d'environ 13,7 millions de dollars par la voie du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) de 2016-2017.

Cette demande est conforme à la politique du Bureau en matière de report de fonds, une politique en vigueur depuis 1995. Elle permet aux députés, aux agents supérieurs de la Chambre et à l'Administration de la Chambre de reporter à l'exercice suivant des fonds inutilisés, jusqu'à concurrence de 5 % du budget de fonctionnement qui leur est alloué dans le Budget principal des dépenses.

La possibilité de reporter des fonds offre une plus grande souplesse budgétaire, atténue les pressions de dépenser les sommes inutilisées en fin d'exercice et encourage ceux qui n'utilisent pas la totalité de leurs budgets. Bref, cela nous aide à mieux gérer nos finances.[Français]

Cette pratique est également en vigueur dans tous les ministères fédéraux. Cependant, à la différence des ministères, la Chambre des communes doit demander les fonds à reporter par la voie de son Budget supplémentaire des dépenses et non auprès du Conseil du Trésor.

Les fonds seront alloués au budget des députés, des agents supérieurs de la Chambre et de l'Administration de la Chambre. L'Administration de la Chambre utilisera principalement ces fonds pour investir dans les secteurs prioritaires qui appuient son plan stratégique et pour remplacer rapidement l'infrastructure des TI, qui est indispensable.

(1155)

[Traduction]

En ce qui a trait à la sécurité, nous demeurons résolus à assurer la sécurité de tous et celle de la Cité parlementaire. À cette fin, nous demandons un financement temporaire de 4,2 millions de dollars pour l'exercice 2016-2017, comme l'indique le poste suivant. Ces fonds servent à appuyer le Bureau de la sécurité institutionnelle — le BSI — de la Chambre des communes, qui collabore étroitement avec le SPP.

Les services du BSI sont de plus en plus sollicités, notamment en ce qui concerne l'accréditation, l'habilitation de sécurité, les événements et les services d'accès des visiteurs, la sécurité des bureaux de circonscription et l'évaluation des risques et de la menace. En effet, les conseils, l'orientation et la formation en matière de sécurité qu'offre le BSI continuent de faire l'objet d'une forte demande, et nous lui demandons d'en faire encore plus.[Français]

Par exemple, à la suite de plusieurs évaluations de sécurité, dont une évaluation indépendante demandée par mon prédécesseur en 2014, plusieurs initiatives destinées à améliorer notre sécurité sont en cours.

Le financement supplémentaire contribue à consolider ces efforts, notamment les mesures destinées à améliorer le programme de sécurité des bureaux de circonscription, la mise en place de bornes d'auto-inscription pour les visiteurs et la modernisation du réseau de caméras de sécurité.[Traduction]

Il y a quelques instants, j'ai mentionné la sécurité dans les bureaux de circonscription des députés. Nous comprenons que l'accès à un réseau de communication à la fine pointe de la technologie est une priorité pour les députés, qu'ils se trouvent à Ottawa ou dans leur bureau de circonscription. C'est pourquoi nous demandons une augmentation temporaire de 2,1 millions de dollars par la voie du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) pour le présent exercice. Il s'agit du troisième poste dans le document.

Le financement supplémentaire contribue au remplacement du Réseau de communication avec les circonscriptions — le RCC — actuel par ce qu'on appelle — à juste titre, selon moi — le Service amélioré de connectivité avec les circonscriptions — le SACC. Ce nouveau service Internet offrira aux députés une expérience en ligne continue et sans interruption, peu importe l'emplacement de leur bureau de circonscription.[Français]

Le Service amélioré de connectivité avec les circonscriptions, ou SACC, est conçu pour égaler l'excellence du service dont les députés jouissent déjà dans leur bureau de la Colline. Il vise aussi à offrir aux députés ainsi qu'à leur personnel un accès sécurisé au réseau de la Cité parlementaire ainsi qu'une connexion Internet et d'autres services WiFi, et ce, d'un océan à l'autre.[Traduction]

Pour le quatrième poste, soit les activités des comités — pas seulement celles de votre Comité, évidemment —, nous demandons une augmentation temporaire de 1,5 million de dollars pour l'exercice 2016-2017. Cette augmentation est attribuable à un regain d'intérêt de la part de plusieurs des 24 comités permanents à dialoguer avec les Canadiens qui habitent à l'extérieur de la région de la capitale nationale, ainsi qu'à la nécessité d'appuyer les travaux du Comité spécial sur la réforme électorale.

Plus précisément, en 2016-2017, l'enveloppe globale prévue pour les comités a reçu une augmentation temporaire de 800 000 $. Ce montant reflète les besoins budgétaires associés aux activités accrues des comités à l'extérieur de la région de la capitale nationale, notamment à l'augmentation du nombre de consultations. Une somme additionnelle de 678 000 $ a été accordée pour financer les travaux du Comité spécial sur la réforme électorale, qui venait d'être créé. [Français]

D'après ce que j'ai cru comprendre, l'expérience confirme qu'à ce jour, la population souhaite être consultée davantage. Cela dit, j'insiste sur le fait que nous demeurons extrêmement rigoureux lorsque nous accordons des fonds pour les activités des comités. Par exemple, nous avons pris des mesures pour réduire le coût de déplacement des comités en limitant le nombre de membres qui se déplacent avec chaque comité et en veillant à ce que seul le personnel essentiel accompagne les comités lors des réunions tenues à l'extérieur d'Ottawa.

(1200)

[Traduction]

Voilà qui m'amène au dernier poste dans le document qui vous a été remis, qui s'élève à 1,1 million de dollars pour l'exercice 2016-2017 et les exercices suivants. Cette somme correspond à l'augmentation de salaire des députés, des agents supérieurs de la Chambre, du Président de la Chambre et des autres présidents de séance, soit une augmentation de 1,8 % de l'indemnité de session annuelle et de la rémunération supplémentaire des députés par rapport à l'exercice précédent. Cette augmentation, qui a été approuvée par le Bureau de régie interne, est entrée en vigueur le 1er avril dernier. [Français]

Comme vous le savez, les indemnités de session et les autres rémunérations des députés sont des dépenses législatives conformément à la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada. Ces augmentations sont établies en fonction de l'indice des rajustements moyens en pourcentage des taux de salaire de base pour une année civile au Canada, provenant des principales ententes conclues pour les unités de négociation du secteur privé. Cet indice est publié par Emploi et Développement social Canada.

Je voudrais maintenant attirer votre attention sur le Service de protection parlementaire, le SPP. Depuis sa création le 23 juin 2015, le SPP s'efforce d'assurer l'excellence opérationnelle de la prestation continue de ses services, afin d'appuyer son mandat en matière de sécurité physique dans l'ensemble de la Cité parlementaire et des terrains de la Colline du Parlement.

Une série d'initiatives d'optimisation des ressources, de coordination et de professionnalisation sont en cours afin d'améliorer l'excellence opérationnelle.[Traduction]

Je vous présente maintenant un aperçu du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) pour 2016-2017, qui se chiffre à 7,1 millions de dollars, y compris un besoin budgétaire total voté de 6,7 millions de dollars et un poste législatif de 367 000 $ pour le régime d'avantages sociaux des employés. Veuillez noter que ces besoins non financés visent à appuyer des initiatives nouvelles et en cours, et que le SPP a été en mesure de réaffecter des fonds de son enveloppe budgétaire actuelle pour couvrir une partie du coût total de ces besoins.

Le SPP demande un financement de 1,7 million de dollars par la voie du report de fonds de son budget de fonctionnement de 2015-2016. Ce financement, en plus des 3,1 millions de dollars supplémentaires demandés, sera affecté à une série de projets d'amélioration de la sécurité. Ces projets visent à traiter bon nombre des recommandations découlant de l'examen des événements survenus le 22 octobre 2014 et à stabiliser la protection en place selon les exigences liées au plan et à la vision à long terme.

Afin d'accroître l'intégration et de tirer parti de l'interopérabilité, le SPP demande 655 000 $ pour appuyer la consolidation des employés des opérations et du soutien aux opérations du SPP en deux services distincts. Cette consolidation permettra au SPP d'obtenir suffisamment d'espace pour les bureaux de ses employés à temps plein actuels, de veiller à ce que l'équipement informatique requis pour les besoins opérationnels soit en place, de simplifier les processus du quartier-maître, de faciliter le processus d'exposés intégrés et de déploiement des ressources, tout en continuant d'essayer de créer une culture unique au SPP. [Français]

Au cours des derniers mois, une série d'examens ont été effectués afin d'établir la meilleure façon d'utiliser les ressources professionnelles, tout en les gérant sainement. Cela contribuera au fonctionnement global du SPP. Pour y arriver, le SPP demande un financement de 445 000 $ pour ses initiatives d'optimisation des ressources. Cet investissement permettra de réaliser des économies de 2,5 millions de dollars au cours des prochains exercices.[Traduction]

Ce financement servira également à couvrir certains coûts engagés pour la coordination de l'allocution au Parlement prononcée par le président des États-Unis. Je parle de l'allocution qui a déjà eu lieu. Je le précise pour m'assurer que personne ne pense qu'une nouvelle allocution est planifiée. Je n'en sais pas plus. Nous verrons.

(1205)

[Français]

Le SPP est engagé à préserver l'ouverture et l'accessibilité au Parlement, tout en maintenant les mesures réactives adéquates pour répondre aux besoins de sécurité publique actuels, compte tenu de l'évolution des menaces nationales et internationales.

Comme toujours, le SPP est fier de remplir son mandat de service et de protection. Sa plus haute priorité demeure l'excellence du personnel et du déroulement des opérations.[Traduction]

Si les accomplissements des 18 derniers mois reflètent la réalité, le SPP est prêt à gérer la réalité globale actuelle, ainsi que tout défi en matière de sécurité qui pourrait survenir au sein de la Cité parlementaire et sur les terrains du Parlement.

Vous serez heureux d'apprendre que ceci conclut mon survol du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) de la Chambre des communes et du SPP pour l'exercice 2016-2017.

Le personnel présent et moi-même serons ravis de répondre à vos questions.

Merci.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci, monsieur le Président.

Selon l'horaire, il reste environ 10 minutes avant la fin de la réunion. En ce moment, trois députés ont indiqué qu'ils aimeraient prendre la parole, à savoir M. Graham, Mme Vandenbeld et M. Christopherson.

J'aimerais savoir ce que les autres souhaitent faire. Je pourrais demander à notre invité s'il peut rester un peu plus longtemps, au besoin. Serait-ce possible?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

J'ai un engagement à 12 h 15, mais je crois que je peux m'arranger pour être quelques minutes en retard.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Quelques minutes supplémentaires? D'accord. Voyons ce que nous pouvons faire. Il semble que nous réussirons peut-être à accomplir cela si vous pouvez rester quelques minutes supplémentaires. Si vous devez partir, veuillez nous avertir.

En ce moment, je dois donner la parole à M. Graham. Encore une fois, étant donné qu'il y a environ quatre intervenants sur la liste, veuillez être aussi brefs que possible, afin de laisser suffisamment de temps pour entendre les réponses.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je peux parler rapidement si vous le souhaitez, monsieur le président.

Tout d'abord, j'aimerais comprendre la somme d'un million et demi de dollars que vous demandez pour les comités. Quels services le SPP fournit-il aux comités pendant leurs déplacements? Ils ne voyagent pas en compagnie d'un agent, donc que font-ils, en général?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je ne crois pas que ce soit pour le SPP. Le financement du comité est un élément distinct.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Je vois.

L'hon. Geoff Regan: Est-ce exact, Marc?

M. Marc Bosc (greffier par intérim, Chambre des communes):

Oui, mais lorsque les comités sont en déplacement, si des risques liés à la sécurité sont identifiés, nous coordonnons nos activités avec les services de police locaux et, s'il y a lieu, nous faisons appel à des services locaux pour répondre aux besoins.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Le financement auquel je faisais référence...

M. David de Burgh Graham: C'est général.

L'hon. Geoff Regan: ... est du financement général. Le SPP fait partie d'un différent service.

Je faisais référence aux activités accrues des comités. Nous avons non seulement constaté qu'ils voyageaient davantage, mais qu'ils siégeaient également plus tard le soir sur la Colline cette année pour une raison quelconque.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une autre brève question. Comment l'intégration financière du SPP fonctionne-t-elle entre la Chambre des communes et le Sénat?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Dan, pouvez-vous nous l'expliquer?

M. Daniel G. Paquette (dirigeant principal des finances, Chambre des communes):

Oui. En ce moment, ce sont deux entités différentes. Elles ont leur propre financement et leurs propres crédits budgétaires à cet égard. Nous collaborons très étroitement pour veiller à ce qu'il n'y ait aucun chevauchement et que les lacunes soient comblées, mais en ce moment, ce sont deux entités distinctes et deux différents budgets qui doivent être gérés de façon distincte.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Cela signifie qu'ils paient les coûts des activités dont ils s'occupent et nous assumons les coûts liés à nos activités.

M. Daniel G. Paquette:

C'est exact.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Nous partageons les coûts communs de façon proportionnelle. Est-ce exact?

M. Marc Bosc:

Lors de la création du SPP, la Chambre des communes a manifestement fourni plus de personnel et plus de financement que l'a fait le Sénat, car notre service de sécurité était plus grand. Toutefois, maintenant, cela ne fait plus aucune différence. Il s'agit d'un service avec des institutions distinctes et des crédits budgétaires distincts.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Enfin, y a-t-il des échanges financiers entre la GRC et le SPP?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je ne le crois pas. Y a-t-il des transferts de fonds de...

M. Marc Bosc:

La GRC verse également de l'argent dans le SPP. Le complément des agents de la GRC qui se trouvait sur la Colline est devenu une partie du SPP.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Mais cela servait à payer les agents de la GRC qui sont ici.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Merci.

Étant donné les contraintes de temps, je vais m'arrêter ici.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Madame Vandenbeld.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur le Président, je vous remercie de votre exposé détaillé.

Ma question concerne la partie que vous avez mentionnée sur la création d'une culture unique au sein du SPP. Manifestement, assurer la sécurité de ces lieux n'est pas la même chose qu'assurer la sécurité d'un autre édifice fédéral. C'est un lieu qui existe pour la population; il appartient aux Canadiens et c'est pourquoi il doit être ouvert aux Canadiens. On doit donc tenir compte de cet élément lorsqu'on assure la sécurité des gens qui travaillent dans ce lieu, mais également lorsqu'il s'agit de l'accessibilité.

Je ne vois rien ici qui vise la formation sur des sujets comme la sensibilisation aux différences culturelles. Dans l'un de nos rapports précédents, notre comité a recommandé une vérification de la sécurité fondée sur l'égalité entre les sexes. Je ne vois rien sur ce sujet ou sur un autre moyen de sensibilisation aux différences entre les sexes, ou sur la réconciliation autochtone, ou sur le fait qu'il s'agit d'un endroit très différent. D'après ce que je comprends, au cours de conversations informelles, on a envisagé d'offrir aux agents des services de protection ce type de formation axée sur la sensibilisation aux différences culturelles.

(1210)

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

M. O'Beirne serait heureux de répondre à cette question.

Surint. Mike O'Beirne (directeur par intérim et officier responsable des opérations, Service de protection parlementaire):

Merci beaucoup.

Après la création du SPP, en juin 2015, nos efforts ont certainement été axés sur l'intégration chaque fois que c'était possible et à chaque occasion. Ces efforts se sont certainement étendus au domaine de la formation. Nous avons mis au point une unité de formation intégrée, dans le tout premier cas, formée de nos employés hautement qualifiés provenant de trois partenaires. Ensuite, nous avons manifestement reconnu le besoin d'uniformiser la formation au sein du SPP et d'élaborer un régime de formation.

À cette fin, on a mis sur pied un programme de formation des recrues. En fait, il s'agit de la nouvelle norme du SPP. Nous avons cerné les besoins de la Cité parlementaire, des terrains du Parlement, du Sénat, de la Chambre des communes et de la Bibliothèque du Parlement, et nous avons uniformisé la formation à cette fin. Nous avons également inclus la formation tactique ou plus cinétique qui est habituellement offerte à une entité qui s'occupe des services de sécurité.

Toutefois, pour répondre à votre question, madame, des efforts sont certainement en cours pour offrir une formation axée sur les différences culturelles et sur la diversité au sein de notre programme de recrutement. Nous envisageons de lancer notre troisième cours, PR3, dès la nouvelle année, et nous en sommes très fiers. En plus d'un suivi, il y aura certainement une formation sur les privilèges et les immunités des parlementaires et ensuite, nous intégrerons cela à notre idée de départ, c'est-à-dire équilibrer les besoins en matière de sécurité avec les exigences liées à un Parlement ouvert et accessible.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Merci. C'est encourageant.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci.

Nous entendrons maintenant M. Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

C'est dommage que nous n'ayons pas eu la chance de compléter toutes nos séances d'information sur le SPP avant de participer à cette réunion. Je ne dis pas que c'est louche, je dis seulement qu'il est dommage que nous n'ayons pas pu éviter de mettre la charrue devant les boeufs.

Quoi qu'il en soit, monsieur le Président, vous avez déjà fait référence à cela dans certains de vos commentaires, mais pourriez-vous aborder à nouveau la question de l'intégration entre les deux unités, c'est-à-dire le Sénat et la Chambre des communes? Quelles parties de cette intégration ne sont pas encore terminées? Je sais que vous avez abordé la question, mais en résumé, il restait des questions en suspens, je crois, au sujet de la transition vers l'intégration. A-t-on signé deux conventions collectives? Quelques éléments n'ont pas encore été uniformisés. J'aimerais que vous nous en parliez davantage.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Voulez-vous répondre à la question?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Merci.

Vous avez raison. Lorsque le SPP a été créé et que les services de sécurité du Sénat, de la Chambre des communes et de la GRC ont été réunis, on s'est retrouvé avec deux associations et un syndicat, qui sont toujours en place. Nous en tenons compte pour la suite des choses. Toutefois, nous avons présenté une motion à la CRTFP pour qu'elle se penche sur la possibilité d'une fusion. Nous croyons que c'est un avantage sur le plan opérationnel et un besoin opérationnel pour différentes initiatives.

Cependant, je terminerai en disant que, comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, nous concentrons nos efforts sur l'intégration de tous les partenaires à chaque occasion. Cela inclut notre service de formation, comme je l'ai mentionné, et notre unité de planification intégrée. Si je peux faire une analogie, avant la création du SPP, chaque service planifiait des événements en ayant 33 % de l'information et en effectuant 33 % des activités. Nous avons éliminé tout cela avec la création d'une unité de planification intégrée qui s'occupe de tout ce qui peut se produire sur la Colline sur le plan de la sécurité. Ensuite, bien sûr, il y a une unité du renseignement intégrée, un groupe axé sur le renseignement. Cela nous aide également.

Il est certain que nous attendons la réponse de la CRTFP, mais nous avons présenté la motion.

(1215)

M. David Christopherson:

Bien. Merci.

Ma prochaine question porte sur l'accès des députés. J'ai soulevé ce point à maintes reprises dans bon nombre de législatures. J'essaie d'obtenir quelques garanties, à l'avance, qu'on reconnaît davantage la priorité d'assurer la planification de l'accès des députés à l'édifice du Centre pour éviter des situations où tout à coup, le service de navettes doit être interrompu. J'ai été témoin de situation où des députés ayant des problèmes de mobilités ont dû marcher parce qu'il n'y avait eu aucune préparation.

Une telle chose se reproduira. Si ce n'est pas le cas, je serai le premier à m'en extasier, mais j'imagine que cela viendra. Ce que j'aimerais entendre avant qu'un autre événement ait lieu, c'est qu'on reconnaît que c'est une priorité comme cela devrait être le cas, qu'aucun incident ne se produira — à moins que ce soit quelque chose d'imprévu — et qu'on planifie beaucoup mieux que dans le passé pour s'en assurer, qu'il s'agisse de la visite du président des États-Unis, du pape, etc. Il est absolument prioritaire d'assurer leur sécurité, mais assurer l'accès des députés à la Chambre est une priorité constitutionnelle également.

J'aimerais que vous me disiez, avant que d'autres visites aient lieu, qu'on tient compte de cette priorité et que des mesures seront prises.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Monsieur le Président, avant que vous répondiez à la question, je veux vous dire qu'il est maintenant 12 h 17. Deux autres membres du Comité ont des questions à vous poser. Avez-vous le temps de répondre à leurs questions si elles sont brèves?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je crois que oui.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

D'accord. C'est ce que nous ferons. Nous nous arrêterons par la suite.

M. David Christopherson:

J'aurai une dernière question, et je serai bref, monsieur le président.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

D'accord. Si vous êtes très bref, cela va.

M. David Christopherson:

Je serai très bref.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Voulez-vous répondre, monsieur le Président?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Merci, monsieur le président. Par votre intermédiaire, je veux assurer à M. Christopherson que le respect des privilèges des députés doit être une priorité en tout temps, à mon avis. Évidemment, il s'agit de leur capacité de faire leur travail au nom de leurs électeurs. Tant de services que nous fournissons sur la Colline du Parlement, en Chambre, ont cet objectif, et c'est pourquoi il est important que les députés puissent se déplacer sur la Colline, se rendre à la Chambre et à l'édifice du Centre et retourner dans leurs bureaux lorsque c'est nécessaire. Cela doit être considéré comme une priorité en tout temps, de sorte que lorsque des visites sont prévues, il faut que ce soit intégré dans le processus de planification.

M. David Christopherson: Exactement.

L'hon. Geoff Regan: J'aimerais beaucoup pouvoir vous promettre que le type de choses que vous décrivez ne se reproduira plus jamais. Ce serait probablement imprudent de ma part, mais j'espère que ce type de problème ne se reproduira plus. En même temps, nous aurons, j'en suis sûr, des visiteurs de temps en temps, ce qui amène des questions de sécurité. Comme vous le dites, le plus important, c'est de planifier en fonction de ces visites et de faire du mieux que nous pouvons pour que les députés n'aient pas de problèmes.

Je vais demander à M. O'Beirne d'intervenir là-dessus.

M. David Christopherson:

Ce serait très bien. Merci.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Certainement, monsieur le Président. Merci.

Nous intégrons des mesures et des plans d'urgence dans nos plans opérationnels à chaque occasion. Nous planifions cela. Je peux vous assurer qu'ils sont intégrés dans notre cycle de planification et dans nos phases préparatoires. Il peut toujours se produire des problèmes imprévus dans un événement d'envergure, mais je peux vous assurer que nous leur accordons toute notre attention. Si des problèmes surgissent, nous les réglons le plus rapidement possible.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est très bien. Merci. C'est ce que je voulais savoir, et je vous en remercie. Monsieur le Président, je suis conscient qu'on ne peut rien garantir. Des événements peuvent se produire, mais vous pouvez comprendre — et je sais que vous vous souciez beaucoup de cela — que la frustration s'installe lorsqu'on voit ce genre de choses se produire encore et encore.

Je vous remercie beaucoup tous les deux. Je serais vraiment ravi si nous n'avions pas à en reparler. Ce serait formidable.

La dernière question porte sur une situation hypothétique. Si un député a des préoccupations au sujet de sa sécurité, à quoi peut-il s'attendre de la part du SPP de manière générale? S'agit-il seulement de la sécurité ici sur la Colline et pour le bureau de circonscription...

(1220)

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Il faut tout d'abord dire qu'un député doit, en fait, s'adresser au Bureau de la sécurité institutionnelle dirigé par le sergent d'armes, et non au SPP.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord, et s'il le fait...?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

S'il le fait, alors j'imagine que tout dépend de l'endroit au sujet duquel le député a des préoccupations concernant des mesures ou des problèmes de sécurité: sur la Colline ou ailleurs. Si ce n'est pas sur la Colline et que c'est lié au travail du député, alors je crois que le BSI communiquerait avec les services de police responsables.

Supposons qu'il s'agit d'un bureau de circonscription. Dans ce cas, la personne voudra peut-être consulter le service de police local de la ville dans laquelle elle se trouve pour s'assurer que les services surveillent les choses et sont au courant des préoccupations soulevées. Dans chaque cas, toutefois, il faut déterminer quelles sont les mesures voulues, au même titre que sont effectuées les évaluations des menaces à divers moments concernant des fonctionnaires. S'il y a une menace importante, des mesures appropriées sont prises. C'est ce à quoi je m'attendrais.

Suis-je dans l'erreur, Mike?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Non, monsieur le Président. C'est bien.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Y a-t-il des choses que j'aurais dû ajouter?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Non. Je ne parlerai pas au nom du BSI, mais une fois que des liens ont été établis avec le service de police, alors, bien entendu, l'évaluation de la menace et des risques est effectuée et les mesures sont mises en place.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

J'aurais probablement dû faire appel à Pat, du Bureau du sergent d'armes. Je peux le faire si vous le voulez.

M. David Christopherson:

Non ça va. Ma question portait sur une situation hypothétique. Je voulais que cela figure au compte rendu. Merci.

Merci, monsieur le président. J'ai terminé.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci. Deux autres membres du Comité vont vous poser des questions.

Nous vous demandons de tenir compte du temps dont dispose le Président et de poser des questions brèves.

C'est maintenant au tour de Mme Petitpas Taylor, qui sera suivie de M. Schmale.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Je vous remercie tous beaucoup de votre présence.

Très brièvement, concernant votre document budgétaire — je sais qu'il est très court —, avons-nous un décompte des heures supplémentaires de nos employés du SPP? Si je pose la question, c'est que nous essayons toujours de favoriser un équilibre pour le bien-être au travail, et je me demande ce qu'il en est lorsqu'il s'agit de notre personnel du SPP.

L'hon. Geoff Regan: Allez-y, Mike.

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Merci, monsieur le Président.

Je peux répondre. La question des heures supplémentaires fait partie des aspects que nous prenons en considération. Il y a plusieurs raisons. Après les événements du 22 octobre, certains changements ont été effectués, ce qui a mené à la création de nouvelles fonctions qui n'existaient pas auparavant, de sorte qu'il a fallu prévoir des heures supplémentaires.

Cela a eu lieu après le 23 juin 2015. Après la création du SPP, les partenaires qui se sont regroupés étaient opérationnels, ce qui a fait en sorte que le SPP devait créer son infrastructure. Ce que je veux dire par là, c'est qu'il fallait que le soutien des RH et le soutien financier permettent au service de poursuivre sa transition.

Il y a eu des activités spéciales qui ne figuraient pas dans le budget, la visite du président des États-Unis, par exemple. De plus, entre autres répercussions, il nous faut tenir compte des projets de la VPLT qui sont présentés. Le défi, bien entendu, c'est d'adapter nos mécanismes d'embauche et de maintien en poste en fonction de cela. Nous tenons compte de 2018 et des projets de la VPLT qui seront présentés à ce moment-là, et nous examinons la question des ressources pour répondre aux besoins.

Cela dit, le point que vous soulevez sur le bien-être des employés est certainement l'une des choses que nous prenons en considération également. Nous en tenons bien compte. C'est pourquoi nous avons intégré des mécanismes dans le SPP pour le bien-être des employés, tant pour la santé physique que pour la santé mentale. Il y a entre autres des initiatives de sensibilisation à la santé mentale, ainsi que des initiatives sur la santé physique. Nous avons créé un poste pour que cela soit chapeauté au sein du SPP.

(1225)

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Y a-t-il un décompte des heures supplémentaires?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Pour cette question, je vais m'adresser à ma collègue.

Mme Sloane Mask:

Cette année, nos coûts en heures supplémentaires sont d'environ 2 millions de dollars. C'est très comparable aux résultats passés concernant le Sénat, la Chambre et la GRC.

Comme Mike et le Président l'ont dit, la 42e législature est très chargée. Nous avons dû payer des heures supplémentaires afin de pouvoir soutenir les activités et de garantir la sécurité de tous nos invités. Nous sommes très conscients — dans le cadre du lancement des célébrations du 150e anniversaire du Canada —, qu'il faut surveiller de près les heures supplémentaires et le bien-être des employés, et nul doute que c'est une priorité.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Merci.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci.

C'est M. Schmale qui posera les dernières questions.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'ai deux petites questions.

Tout d'abord, il y a quelques mois, nous avons visité la zone de construction de l'édifice de l'Ouest, ce qui incluait en partie la nouvelle Chambre. Ce que nous avons remarqué — et la question a déjà été soulevée devant le Comité —, c'est que des fenêtres permettent de voir la Chambre directement. Évidemment, si une personne voulait causer du tort, elle pourrait le faire, et elle pourrait voir tous les parlementaires.

J'aimerais obtenir des observations de votre part à ce sujet, mais si vous n'en avez pas, vous pourriez peut-être l'inclure parmi vos priorités comme préoccupation constante qui a déjà été soulevée ici. Nous sommes un peu sur nos gardes — ou du moins, c'est mon cas. C'est quelque chose que nous avons tous remarqué.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Vous serez heureux d'apprendre que les fenêtres seront opaques, ce qui devrait aider.

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'accord.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

En principe, quelqu'un pourrait casser une fenêtre, évidemment, mais les gens entendraient le bruit et réagiraient.

Évidemment, en premier lieu, nous ne voulons pas que quiconque pose une menace puisse entrer dans l'édifice. Voilà pourquoi nous avons mis et mettrons en place des systèmes de sécurité. Je prends bonne note de votre remarque. Merci.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Très rapidement, ma deuxième question porte sur l'amélioration de la sécurité. Vous demandez un « financement temporaire de 4,2 millions de dollars » pour le prochain exercice et vous dites que les « services du BSI sont de plus en plus sollicités, notamment en ce qui concerne l'habilitation de sécurité pour l'accréditation, les événements et les services d'accès des visiteurs [...] ». Est-ce parce qu'on améliore un peu la sécurité? Est-ce là la raison? Comment cela se compare-t-il avec les années précédentes? Je présume que tout le monde a dû passer par la sécurité pour pouvoir entrer dans l'édifice.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je vais demander au greffier de répondre à la question.

M. Marc Bosc:

Pour l'essentiel, monsieur Schmale, c'est lié à la mise en place du SPP il y a un peu plus d'un an. À l'époque, il fallait agir assez rapidement, de sorte qu'il a fallu décider très rapidement quelle unité on gardait, etc. Maintenant que c'est fait, nous sommes en mesure de bien évaluer les besoins des deux côtés.

Nous nous sommes rendu compte que du côté du Bureau de la sécurité institutionnelle, nous avions essentiellement cédé trop de choses. Nous devons augmenter les ressources, surtout pour ce qui est de l'accréditation, mais il y a d'autres volets pour lesquels les ressources sont insuffisantes. De plus, la demande a beaucoup augmenté. Nous sommes plus vigilants sur le plan de l'accès. Tout cela a fait augmenter les besoins en ressources.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur le Président, je vous remercie de nous avoir accordé du temps.

J'invite nos témoins à se retirer. Je vous remercie tous de votre présence, de votre exposé et de vos réponses.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Merci.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Je demanderais aux membres du Comité de rester pendant que nos témoins partent, car il y a quelques questions auxquelles nous devons répondre au sujet du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses que nous examinons aujourd'hui. Je vais poser les questions à cet égard. CHAMBRE DES COMMUNES Crédit 1b — Dépenses du programme..........19 102 544 $

(Le crédit 1b est adopté.) SERVICE DE PROTECTION PARLEMENTAIRE Crédit 1b — Dépenses du programme..........6 691 090 $

(Le crédit 1b est adopté.)

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards): Plaît-il que le président fasse rapport à la Chambre des crédits du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B)?

Des voix: D'accord.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards): Merci, chers collègues.

À moins qu'il n'y ait d'autres points, la séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on November 15, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.