header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-04-02 PROC 146

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. Welcome to the 146th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

This morning, the committee is looking into a situation involving PSPC's plans for the white elm tree that lies on the east side of Centre Block, as you can see in the photo on the screen before you. There are three other photos that I took, and we'll run through them, too, so you get a closer look. It's just next to the statue of Sir John A. Macdonald. This matter was brought to our attention by today's first witness, Mr. Paul Johanis, Chair of Greenspace Alliance of Canada's Capital.

Before we start, I'll read to the committee a letter from the Speakers, so you know what their interest is. The Speakers wrote to the ADM of Public Services and Procurement Canada: It has come to our attention that Greenspace Alliance of Canada's Capital has expressed concerns about the potential uprooting of a number of mature trees on the grounds of Parliament Hill to make way for the upcoming renovations to Centre Block. In particular, Greenspace is worried about a particular heritage elm tree, located next to the statue of Sir John A. Macdonald, just east of Centre Block. With the understanding that such decisions are not taken lightly, we are asking Public Services and Procurement Canada to take all necessary measures to ensure the protection of these mature and now vulnerable trees during the Centre Block restoration. It is our hope that with your support, a solution can be found to address the concerns that have been raised.

Welcome, Mr. Johanis. Maybe before you start, you could identify anyone in the audience who is related to the four organizations you said had an interest in this topic.

Mr. Paul Johanis (Chair, Greenspace Alliance of Canada's Capital):

Good morning.

Yes, there are members of Greenspace Alliance here, and members of Big Trees of Kitchissippi, which is a neighbourhood in the western part of Ottawa. We have Daniel Buckles and Debra Huron. Also here is Robert McAulay, president of the Beaverbrook Community Association in the Kanata area of Ottawa, who is very active in tree protection. Jennifer Humphries has just joined us. She is a member of the Community Associations for Environmental Sustainability, CAFES.

The Chair:

Thank you.

The clerk will cycle through a couple more photos.

Mr. Johanis, we look forward to some opening remarks, and then we'll have some questions from the committee members.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair, vice-chairs and members of the standing committee.

We're very honoured to be here. I have to say that we never expected to be here, but we're very happy to be here. Thank you for putting this on the agenda for the committee's consideration, and for inviting me to speak to you today.

I speak to you on behalf of four organizations that sent you the letter concerning the elm on March 18: Ecology Ottawa, a grassroots organization with a broad environmental mandate and a large following, mostly aimed at a younger demographic; the Ottawa Field-Naturalists' Club, founded in 1863 and the oldest natural history club in Canada, with 800-odd members; the Community Associations for Environmental Sustainability, CAFES, a collective of about 30 neighbourhood associations in Ottawa, including all or most of those in this riding, Ottawa Centre; and the Greenspace Alliance of Canada's Capital, of which I'm the current chair. We're a 100% volunteer, non-profit organization dedicated to protecting and preserving green space in the Ottawa-Gatineau area since 1997.

We're here to ask for two things. The first is to delay the removal of the centenary elm until after “leaf out”, so that its condition can be ascertained clearly and without controversy. The second is to reconsider the currently held assumptions about the size and location of phase two of the visitor welcome complex.

Why reconsider these assumptions? These assumptions are the proximate cause of the planned removal of the elm. We believe they should be revisited to confirm that the implicit trade-off that is being made between preserving the elm and building phase two of the visitor welcome complex in the same location still holds. To be clear, unless the government is open to considering or reconsidering these assumptions, the elm cannot be saved.

Why delay the removal of the elm? Well, to reconsider this trade-off, you as parliamentarians really need up-to-date, conclusive information about its condition.

Why this tree? Why are we going all-out to protect this one tree? First, it's not just any tree. It's an American elm. It's a species that was widespread in this part of Ontario until it was all but wiped out by Dutch elm disease in our area in the 1970s and 1980s. There were many on Parliament Hill, but this one is the sole survivor. It is unique. It's distinctive. It's historic.

For our colleagues in the Ottawa Field-Naturalists' Club, on this basis alone it would deserve protection and preservation wherever it might be located, but it's not located just anywhere. It stands next to Canada's most iconic building, Centre Block of Parliament. From this close proximity, it acquires an added significance and takes on an emblematic quality. Whatever happens to this elm makes a statement, which gets magnified and resonates far and wide.

To community organizations such as CAFES, the elm is emblematic of every mature tree being routinely taken down in their neighbourhoods to make way for infill and renovation. The loss of mature trees in Ottawa's core, and in urban centres across Canada, has reached crisis proportions. Community associations are desperate to stop the loss of tree canopy in their neighbourhoods. They are aghast to see the same dynamic being played out on Parliament Hill—they really can't understand it—wherein a builder with a plan always trumps green space.

To Ecology Ottawa, whatever happens to the elm is emblematic of the federal response to climate change. Mr. Reid, at the last meeting, referred to the 2006 long-term vision and plan for the parliamentary precinct. The rehabilitation of Centre Block represents the culmination of this vision. At the same meeting, deputy clerk Michel Patrice emphasized the need to reassess plans when things have changed.

Well, things have changed in a fundamental way since 2006. In 2019, climate change is real and action is urgently required to mitigate its impact. This is why the scope of the visitor centre now needs to be reconsidered. In this new context, different relative weights would likely be applied in the implicit trade-offs being made between preserving the elm and locating phase two of the visitor complex in that same space.

(1105)



At this time of climate crisis, every action matters. Every bit of warming matters. Every year matters, and every choice matters. This is the message the youth strike for climate brought to Parliament Hill and all over the world on March 15. I was with them on the Hill that day, and I spoke with maybe 100 of them, singly and in groups. When I pointed out the elm to them and informed them of the government's intention to cut it down, all reacted with shock, disbelief and disgust. They don't think you have your priorities right.

Up until last Tuesday, the elm did not stand alone. It was surrounded by many other mature trees. Most or all were removed by PSPC when they stripped the site of vegetation last week and turned it into a construction zone. This little enclave was part of the city's urban forest, which is one of the city's most important assets in its defence against climate change. It provided shade for visitors to the Hill, which is otherwise quite denuded, cooling and filtering the ambient air, absorbing and fixing carbon and releasing the oxygen we breathe, just the basic life-preserving work that trees do for us.

This clear-cut may seem catastrophic, but in fact it is also an opportunity. One of the arborist's reports commissioned by PSPC in September 2018 includes this recommendation: If this tree is to be preserved where it stands, multiple measures will need to be taken....If we are to see any improvement in the trees health the entire critical root zone measuring 9 meters from the trees trunk in all directions should be carefully excavated and cleared of all unnatural debris. This area...would have to be closed off to the public and all soil within the area would need to be remediated.

If the option of preserving the tree were selected rather than cutting it down, the clear-cut and vegetation stripping carried out by PSPC has in fact made a good start towards doing this remediation work. It's an opportunity.

In prior communications, both PSPC and the NCC have asked us to consider how their plan includes the regreening of the area after the renovations are complete. To replace the elm with like for like would take 100 years. It is, for all practical purposes, irreplaceable.

Regarding the planting of other trees in 10, 13 or however many years it will take to complete this renovation project, all we can say is that it's literally too little too late. We have the same 10 or 12 years to take effective action against climate change if we wish to keep its impact within adaptable limits. Again, however, the clear-cut may present an opportunity. The field is now clear to proceed with this replanting immediately with large caliper trees and the 4:1 replacement ratio recommended by the NCC to recreate a new, improved green enclave in this location.

Every one of us is being called upon to take action against climate change in whatever small way we can, reducing our greenhouse gas emissions or preserving or increasing green space as carbon sinks in our homes, in our lifestyles and in our own backyards. Preserving the centenary elm and restoring this green space is something parliamentarians can do right here on Parliament Hill in your own backyard.

PSPC has referred to the poor condition of the centenary elm as justification for its removal. We have found that the information supporting this judgment is contradictory and inconclusive. Our technical report on the subject was sent to you on March 18. I will read out only its conclusion here: Given the conflicting information concerning the condition of the tree, the dramatic unexplained changes observed in September 2018, the lack of testing or other inspection other than ground level visual observation and the fact that weather conditions in September 2018 might well indicate that heat and water stress were at the root of the tree’s observed condition, it would seem appropriate to delay the removal until such time as 1) it is ascertained whether the tree has survived into spring 2019, and 2) further testing is done to determine if the tree is affected by any disease.

(1110)



Destruction of this elm must not happen, and it can be stopped by you, Canada's parliamentarians.

While the National Capital Commission provides federal land use authorization and Public Services and Procurement Canada, as custodian of the land and buildings, executes the construction and renovation project, both are working to requirements approved by the Speakers of the House and Senate who, on your behalf, exercise the powers of Parliament to regulate its own affairs and to administer its precinct. Indeed, this standing committee has rightly taken upon itself the exercise of oversight that is so badly needed for this renovation project.

We've heard from PSPC and parliamentary staff, at the last meeting, that designs for the second phase of the visitor's centre are still very preliminary. All they know right now is how big a hole they want to excavate. It's very big—wiping out the centenary elm and forestalling the growth of any greenery in the northeast quadrant of the Hill for many years. Is this what you want? Is this what Canadians want?

Please do the right thing. Preserve the elm and restore its retinue of trees for the benefits they provide locally here on Parliament Hill. Also, take this opportunity to send the right message to all Canadians watching. Every action matters. Every choice matters. Please delay the removal of the centenary elm until leaf out and initiate a process whereby the currently held assumptions about the size and location of phase two of the visitor welcome complex are reconsidered.

Thank you.

(1115)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Before we go to questions I just want to add a little bit of information that may affect your questions, or Mr. Johanis you could comment on them in your answers to questions.

First of all, I want to know how long these trees can live. The researcher looked that up for me. Do you want to read the quote?

Mr. Andre Barnes (Committee Researcher):

The chair wanted to know the life expectancy. According to the University of Kentucky, many white or American elms can live to 100 to 200 years old, and some have been recorded as more than 300 years old.

The Chair:

We also have a dendrologist from Natural Resources Canada, who was asked to provide information to Public Works Canada.

He said: Thanks for your request and for the opportunity to view the large white elm (Ulmus americana) located to the east of Centre Block on Parliament Hill. The elm in question currently has less than 20% of the expected live crown of a healthy tree. The few leaves present in the crown are less than half the normal size expected for a white elm, are curling and show dead tissue among the leaf margins. In my opinion, the tree is unhealthy and may not survive into the spring of 2019. Without testing, it's not possible for me to say what is affecting the tree, but I would speculate either Dutch elm disease or phloem necrosis. Regardless, as the tree is no longer capable of generating a functional live crown, it can be expected to succumb in the very near future. Don't hesitate to contact me should you require additional information.

We'll go to questions. We'll start with Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

I'm not sure that I'll fill up all seven minutes for this, but we'll start.

In the picture we have in front of us—which won't be in Hansard, but nevertheless—there are two other trees. Is either of them an elm tree?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

No, the other trees aren't elms.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you know what they are?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

I believe they're Norway maples, but I'm not a tree identification specialist.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If those trees were to be removed, would that cause a problem?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

They've already been removed.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, then I guess no.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

The only tree that remains right now—that we can see, anyway, from beyond the fencing—is the elm.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So 100 years from now, what do you expect this tree to look like?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

That elm?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, that elm.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

Elms have the capacity to actually just keep growing. Many trees hit a plateau, but elms can grow beyond their current size for a very long time. As we heard, the life expectancy of an elm such as this can be up to 200 years. There are elms that are twice the size of that, just from having packed on carbon, basically, over many years.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Let's say we hold off until the spring, for the sake of argument, and the tree does not survive. Would there be any objection to removing it once it's dead?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

No. If it's dead, then clearly you can't just leave a standing dead elm there.

We're here to advocate for green space. The elm is the star of that area, but there is other green space in that whole area. It's planned that there will be green space in the future, with the planting of trees, which is in the plan right now. We're just saying to accelerate that, do it right away.

There's a plan to commemorate the elm. We've heard that the wood from the elm might be used for furniture or other things. Another option for commemoration would be in situ carving of the stump of the elm. There are very beautiful stump carvings that are preserved and used as memorials from various things. That would be another option.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If the tree is found to be unhealthy—we are hearing strong evidence that it is—would you object to having it cut down and used for furniture?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

No, we wouldn't object to that. We're just more concerned that measures be taken to keep it alive if it's savable.

(1120)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Go ahead. If you have more to say, go for it.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

I would like to refer to the comment, the memo that was read out by the chair. In fairness, this person responded on a 24-hour basis to a request from PSPC, provided a very quick response and was not able to produce a report with the full methodology and caveats that would normally be associated with a professional report.

Our contention is that the weather conditions of September 2018 weren't taken into account. Certainly, I don't think it is indicated in the report. We had two very long periods of heat with temperatures above 28°C to 30°C during September, which was very unusual, and very little rain all through to September 21, when the tornadoes swept through this place.

The tree was examined at a time when it was potentially under water stress and heat stress. That's not taken into account.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Have you seen the visitor welcome centre at the other end of Centre Block? You would have had to walk through it today.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Above it, you find a space that could be used as green space. I don't know how much space there is, but there's some space that could be grassified above that. Is it your hope regardless that the space between Centre Block and East Block become green space that we can then use? Could that be built above a visitor welcome centre?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

It certainly can. The only problem is that to get there in 10, 12 or 13 years, everything there, including the elm, has to be cut down. We are hoping that the government would be open to considering alternatives and that instead of building the next part of their visitor centre under that green space area, it could shift it somewhere. It could shift it in a way that wouldn't require that green space to be removed.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you have any suggestions on where that could be?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

We're very much at a disadvantage, because there's no public information on what the plans are. We just don't know. We're just shooting in the dark here.

We can infer from the fact that we're told all those trees are in the middle of an excavation area that the plan is to extend the visitor centre towards the north. Mind you, this is an underground visitor centre, so there would be no reason, I don't think, once it's been extended along the front of Centre Block, that rather than building it out towards the north, it could sort of be a mirror image instead and be built towards the south, to the west side of East Block. But I mean, this is just.... Who knows? Again, we don't have public information.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mentioned in your opening comments the need to inspect and further test the tree. What would that involve? Is that core samples? What work would that require? Would that in itself endanger the tree?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

No. I think there are non-invasive ways in which the tree could be further tested. Even in this memo that the chair read out.... Further testing could be done in a way that would determine whether there's any disease in this elm, and in a non-invasive way.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't have a lot of time left. We've heard there's a nine-metre or 30-foot radius of roots on a tree like this. How deep does that go? Do you know?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

It really depends on the subsoil conditions, I think, but one of the tests or one of the procedures that can be done, for example, is to actually map it out. There's equipment now that you can use that would map out the actual root extent of the tree.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is it possible to build under the tree while supporting it, or does that become extraordinarily complicated?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

I think that's an engineering question. It's possible to tunnel under the whole city of Ottawa to put in an LRT, so maybe you can tunnel under here to do a visitor centre, but....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We'll call it Elm Station.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: I think my time is up.

The Chair:

“Parliament Sinkhole”, maybe.

Just before we go to our next speaker, this is for Public Works and Services and Procurement Canada officials in the audience. Could you cover some of these points that have been made when you do your presentation in the next hour? Hopefully, you'll cover the specific design of the new visitor centre and where exactly it would be. Second, if there's any irrigation like water sprinkling in that area related to the September drought, that would be helpful for us to know, and also if there's any comment on the one-day analysis of the tree that I read out, the cursory analysis.

Now we'll go to Mr. Reid.

(1125)

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

We heard from that report that was read by our chair that the tree, according to the arborist, might be sufficiently unhealthy that it wouldn't survive the winter. Is it your view that we will be better able to figure out whether it survived the winter if we wait for the winter to end before cutting it down?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

That is one of our requests: Can we just wait until it leafs out and see whether it has, in fact, survived the winter, and if it has, in what condition?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right. The proposal to cut it down was based in part upon the assumption that the wood would be more usable for furniture if it was cut down prior to the sap starting to run. I am not an expert on the preparation of wood for furniture making and what having sap in the wood means, but I think I would be right—you can correct me if I'm wrong—that in the event that the tree is not healthy enough to survive the summer and it were cut down this autumn, if it was surviving but in a very poor state, the sap would be out of the wood again and we'd be back to a state where the wood was similar to the way it is now. Would that seem correct?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

I would think so, although, again, I don't have that expertise myself. However, I think that probably at this point the sap has already started to rise in that tree, and I would think that whatever opportunity there was to cut it down for that purpose is probably lost at this point.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right. That's a good point.

Obviously, the reason I raised those two questions was to say that if we are treating the health of the tree as being the driver here, as opposed to considerations about what kind of work has to go on in and under the space occupied by the tree, then there is no cause for hurrying. One can deal with this just as well in the autumn of 2019 as in the spring of 2019. The point was to put out to colleagues in this committee that we ought not to hurry for that reason.

There was talk about soil remediation and the importance of doing soil remediation in this area, which I just simply don't understand. What is the reason for doing soil remediation?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

The critical root zone of the elm right now is partly a parking lot. There's pavement and cars parked there. The rest of it, up until very recently, was very publicly accessible. There's a lot of foot traffic and a lot of vehicular traffic right around it, so that will cause compaction of the soil. The remediation is basically to loosen up the soil to allow for more oxygen penetration and to make it more available to the tree that way.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Oh, I see. So, soil remediation could be done in order to help enhance the health of the tree.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

Absolutely. That's what it's required for, yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

So, if we were to cut down the tree, there would be no need for soil remediation.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

No.

Mr. Scott Reid:

If we try to save the tree, then there might be need for soil remediation.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

Yes, because then what you want to do is give it every chance to survive and every chance to thrive, so you would want to take this opportunity in a way. Now that everything has been cleared out, you can actually do the soil remediation because half the work is done.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay, that makes sense. I get that.

I'm sitting here with the 2006 “Site Capacity and Long Term Development Plan” for Parliament Hill. On page 64, the visitor centre is south of Centre Block. The tree is east of Centre Block. I made a point of going there. I've visited that tree many, many times over the years, or passed by casually on my bicycle, walking or driving, but I actually went to look specifically. It's nowhere near the area that is shown as being covered by the visitor centre. These are very sketchy plans, of course, but nonetheless, as far as I know, no one has ever authorized putting this visitor centre under that spot or close enough that the key root structure of the tree.... Perhaps some peripheral roots might have gone that far, but the key roots that are essential for the tree's survival can't possibly be within the space the visitor centre is going to be built on. There must be some other reason why this space is needed. Do you know what that is?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

As I said, there is no public information about phase two of the visitor centre, so I'm in the dark.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay.

It did occur to me that, as a practical matter, it might be hard to remove the statue of Sir John A. Macdonald without cutting down the tree in order to get the crane over top. I'm not sure that's literally true, but the thought did occur to me. I'm not asking for a comment on that; I'm just wondering.

With regard to the size and survivability of the tree, are you familiar with the Washington elm in Concord, Massachusetts?

(1130)

Mr. Paul Johanis:

I've looked at a number of examples of historic elms like this and it's surprising how many you can actually find. Just around the table here there are examples that I could refer to. I have not seen the Washington tree itself, although I think it's in the book on the trees of D.C. I think one of our members has brought that book.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The reason I mention it is that tree died at around the age of 200, more or less; no one knows exactly when it was planted. It was already a large enough tree that it served as a good spot to commission the American army. Supposedly, during the revolution, the American army was commissioned by George Washington under that already large and majestic tree, which was probably a little under a century old at the time. For that historic reason, there was a desire to preserve it until such time as it died a natural death. For the last part of its life it was struggling—for a number of decades.

After ill health was shown, it managed to survive another 40 or 50 years, suggesting that that possibility exists for this tree, at least potentially. There may be some other reason. It may be that Dutch elm disease, which did not exist at that time, is a more formidable opponent. I throw that out more as a comment than as a question, to say that there are situations where trees that are not in perfect health can survive a fair number of years.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

I think that's a very good comment. Many of these historic trees are in fact braced, trussed and filled in ways that preserve them and keep them alive. They're extraordinary measures, if you will, but people care about and want to have these trees—are awed by these trees—enough that they will take these kinds of measures.

I'm just looking at Ms. Kusie over there. There's a tree in Calgary, I think—the “Stampede” elm—right in the middle of a parking lot.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

It's in Centennial Park, yes.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

It's been kind of kept alive that way. There's other examples like that. The "Comfort" maple near St. Catharines is a huge maple thought to be over 300 years old.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you for recognizing my city as well. I'm very impressed that you would know I'm from there. It means a lot.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

You're welcome.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you. That was very informative.

Over my mantelpiece in my house in Perth is an engraving from the 1870s of Parliament as it was then. I think perhaps it was somewhat idealized. The trees are more mature than they would have been at that time. The image that the original Hill was to have was of a park for the general enjoyment of the citizenry. There was an assumption that it would include more green space and less.... We do have a large lawn that is just grass that gets rolled out on a big roller every year, but that was not the plan.

I don't know if you would agree with me, but I feel that we—with our constant construction and reconstruction up here—have lost sight of something that was part of the original vision for this place, which was to be a sort of arboretum for the people. I think that may have been forgotten.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

I would agree with you. It's for the people locally, but it's also a strong symbol. It's a strong message.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Garrison.

Mr. Randall Garrison (Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke, NDP):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Could I get you to roll back to the first photo? I think it's quite significant. When you have a look at that photo, what trees do you see? You just see one tree. If our project here is to restore Centre Block, it's not just the building, but it's the site that gives meaning. That tree has stood there almost as long as Centre Block, so I guess I start from a perspective—it's not really a question—in saying we have lost sight of what we're trying to do here when we're focused on the visitor centre rather than the restoration of Centre Block to its former glory and the site that it sits on.

It's not really a question, but maybe you'd also have a comment. Would you agree with me that we're losing sight of something here?

(1135)

Mr. Paul Johanis:

I certainly agree with you. That northeast quadrant, up until last week, was a green space on Parliament Hill. You're up here all the time and you know that in the summertime it's a pretty impressive place if you're standing in the sun out there. It's nice to be able to get a little bit of shade and go and rest. I think preserving the elm and restoring that green space can be considered a priority.

As I said in my statement, we are dealing with a climate emergency. We need to do every small thing we can and we need to do it as soon as possible—not in 10, 12 or 13 years because we have 10, or 12 or 13 years to actually act. Why not regreen that corner right now?

Mr. Randall Garrison:

If I understand your presentation and some of the other commentary we've had, even if this tree is unhealthy that doesn't mean it's certainly a dead tree in the short term. It could live a very long time as a less than fully healthy tree, and we can take measures to improve its health, to remediate it.

Is that what you're telling us today?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

Yes. I think only a full assessment of its condition, a complete real general exam with appropriate testing, would answer that question. We just need to take the time, I think, to address that.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

Another thing that struck me in your testimony is that I don't believe this project will be done in 10 years. I don't believe it will be done in 12 years. I think it will be a bit longer than that.

When you look at having green space on the Hill, that's a long time that we could invest in planting trees, in remediating this tree, and planting other complementary things on that site.

If we get back to what's our intention here, which is to have that green space, then what you're saying to us is we're throwing away 10 years of progress we could make on regreening that hill?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

Yes, unless assumptions that are currently held about the size and location of the visitor centre are reconsidered, then, yes, that's the case.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

Again, as you said, it makes no sense to me that we would not be able to put the visitor centre under that flat grass at the front. I don't know the engineering reasons, but we should at least have a report that tells us whether we could or could not do that before we would begin to consider, in my view, taking apart the green space site there and for 10 years making it inhospitable. It doesn't make any sense to me.

But then I'm from Vancouver Island, and I'm pretty used to citizens chaining themselves to trees to try to preserve them, and I generally am on that side myself.

Are there other examples of this tree anywhere near to the Hill? My understanding is there are not.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

No. This is really the sole survivor. There were many elms on the Hill. I'm old enough to remember that there were elms all along the front right by the walls on the Wellington Street end. At every 50 feet maybe there was a large elm shading the front of the Parliament Buildings, shading Wellington Street.

There's a CBC archive video from 1979 showing the workers cutting down all those elms in the fight against Dutch elm disease. It's a pretty hard video to watch actually. Yes, it's not that long ago there were many significant large elms on the Hill, but this is the only survivor now.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

What you have presented today is I think two things from my point of view. One is there's no need to rush here. We have a 10- to 20-year construction project going on here so there's no need to rush. There are good reasons.... I think you pointed out that there was a visual evaluation of the tree from last September. I remember last September. All of us were a bit wilted and less than fully healthy at that point.

Is there any reason why you can see that we should accept that evaluation as a full evaluation of the tree?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

Our request is that we wait until leaf out to really see if the tree has survived the winter, how well it has survived the winter, and then do proper investigation of its health so there is complete, conclusive, non-controversial information about that topic.

(1140)

Mr. Randall Garrison:

Right. If it's possible to get a re-evaluation of the visitor centre, then the groups that you represent would be supportive of not waiting until we finish the renovation to replant that site, but to replant that site immediately.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

Absolutely.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

Great.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you.[Translation]

Ms. Lapointe, you have the floor.

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Mr. Johanis, for being with us today. I appreciate the information you have provided and the questions from my colleagues.

From what I understand, the tree is about 100 years old. Is that correct?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

Yes, that's right.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Our analyst said earlier that American elms can live 100 to 300 years, or more. You say you got this information from the United States, but are you also considering information that is relevant to Canada? Our climate is more northern.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

The information is from the University of Kentucky.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

We are still further north. Do you think that has an impact?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

I don't know precisely for these trees, but I could do some research and then forward you the information.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay.

Mr. Johanis, do you have anything to add?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

Yes. Allow me to make a comment.

In the city of Aylmer, just outside Ottawa, there is an American elm tree like the one on the Hill. This elm tree must be at least 200 years old. The tree on the Hill has a diameter of 84 centimetres, and the diameter of the elm in Aylmer must be double that. It's a giant elm tree. In Canada, and even in our region, in Aylmer, elm trees can live a very long time.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

It is certainly sad to learn that the elm tree has a disease. You mentioned the one in Aylmer, but are there several American elms in the area?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

In 1979, the National Capital Commission, or NCC, took action to combat Dutch elm disease. It decided to protect the 2,000 elm trees on its lands, and probably the one on the Hill. There was a fumigation program, then an inoculation program for these 2,000 elms.

We don't know how many of these elm trees have survived to date. Several have probably died since then. Perhaps the NCC has this information and should be asked for it. It's a question that we're asking ourselves. We're told that it's the only one to have survived, but is it one of 1,500 or one of 20?

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Where were these 2,000 elm trees?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

They were located throughout the National Capital Region.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Does that include the region on the other side of the Ottawa River?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

Yes, because the NCC still has land on this side of the National Capital Region.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Do you think it's the only elm to have survived?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

We don't think it's the only one to have survived, but are there 20 or 200 remaining? We don't know.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Speaking of the 2,000 elms, I suppose that others have grown since 1979, haven't they?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

Several elms have succumbed to this disease, but they have been replaced by hybrid elms, which means that they have been crossed with species that have a capacity to resist this inherited disease. The elm tree we are talking about today is a native elm, so it has not been crossed with other species.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

This cross is meant to make them…

Mr. Paul Johanis:

…able to withstand the disease.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

In my riding, there is a problem with ash trees.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

Here, too.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

All ash trees are being cut down in Laval and the Lower Laurentians. I hope scientists find ways to control tree diseases, including elm disease.

You said earlier that the elm tree on the Hill could be saved. Do you have any doubts? Three arborists went to check, and it seems that this tree is sick. Do you think it could be saved if it was given shock treatment?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

We'd really have to see. We have to wait to see how well it has survived the winter and what condition it's in.

I would like to clarify something about arborist reports. In May 2018, in the spring, the first report concluded that the elm tree was in good condition. The second report made following the observations on September 1 concluded that it was in average condition.

It was only in the last two reports in mid-September and late September that it was concluded that the tree was in poor condition. There has been an evolution. Something happened in September that caused the tree, which was considered to be in good condition, then in average condition, to deteriorate rapidly in September. What exactly happened? We think that the weather conditions played a role, but there is no answer. Time should be taken to do a complete examination of the tree to see whether or not it has been affected by a disease.

(1145)

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

I have more questions. You said earlier that you were present when the young people demonstrated on the Hill. It was reported in the news today that the climate in Canada is warming twice as fast as we thought and in the Arctic, it is three times as fast. Believe us, we are very much aware of this. I'm speaking for my children and grandchildren. There is no doubt that action is needed, and we must take it.

You said that you talked to the young people and told them that the tree would eventually be cut down, but did you tell them that the tree was sick?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

No. I simply told them that we were thinking of cutting down the tree to make way for a visitors' centre.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay, but couldn't the fact that the tree may not be in good condition have been discussed with them?

These young people were told that a tree will be cut down, but that four trees will be planted in its place. We're concerned about the CO2 that we breathe and want to remove from the atmosphere, but we're talking about having four trees rather than one.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

Yes, of course. When this measure is taken and the displaced trees have been replaced, there will be a beautiful green space. That's for sure.

As for the elm, there was sufficient doubt about its condition that it wasn't necessary to simply say that it was very sick. We don't know if this is the case.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

There are still three arborists who have been there.

Thank you very much. I appreciate your being here and everything you are doing to safeguard ecosystems. It's important.

That's it for me, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Lapointe.[English]

Before I go to Mr. Reid, I'd comment that your researcher appropriately has a green tie on.

Mr. Reid, you're on again.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes. Adam is a man for all seasons.

I believe I made an error in my earlier discussions. I think I said that the Washington elm was located in Concord, Massachusetts. It was actually in Cambridge, Massachusetts. People in both places will be furious with me.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll discuss it with my friends in both of them.

Mr. Scott Reid:

With regard to the term “American elm”, that's not a reference to the United States; that's a reference to the American continent, correct?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

Yes. The Ulmus americana is the genus for that tree, so it's the North American version of the elm.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

Obviously we are in the natural range of it. Are we at the northern edge of the range?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

North of us starts being boreal forest, and so it would not be found in that area. We're near the northern edge of its range.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The reason I ask this is that if you're trying to build a long-term prognosis for a tree and it turns out that it is, say, at the southern edge of its range and we expect that climate change is going to cause the Ottawa area to become warmer, then it would be harder for it to survive. However, if this is a tree that is close to the northern extent of its range, that doesn't necessarily mean it has a dismal future on the basis of climate change.

Does that sound like a reasonable thing—

(1150)

Mr. Paul Johanis:

I think that's a correct assumption, yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Do you know how far the roots typically extend horizontally for a tree?

Earlier I said I didn't think they would lapse into the area that would be part of the new visitor centre. However, it occurs to me that I might be wrong. Indeed, if there's remediation being done on the eastern wall of Centre Block, which is possible, then it might be that is incompatible with leaving the roots intact.

Do you have any idea of that information?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

In normal circumstances, the root ball of a tree more or less mirrors the crown of the tree. That's kind of the general rule of thumb, but it really depends on local growing conditions. If the soil is somehow in certain areas not as permeable as in other areas, the roots will find the best place for them to go, so you can have very idiosyncratic patterns of root growth.

Mr. Scott Reid:

There's a lovely photo up right now taken directly south of the tree. If we treat the crown as being the mirror of the root ball, it would indicate that the tree is a fair distance from East Block. The crown appears to go about halfway across the street.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

That's likely, yes.

Mind you, there is technology now that allows you to remote sense underground and map out the root pattern of a tree.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Cool.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

There are arborists who have this equipment. In fact we've had some contact us to offer to provide that kind of service.

The Chair:

Could you provide the committee those contacts later?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

I can.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's a really good idea.

I assume that being close to an area where activity like blasting is going on.... They were doing it when we were in Centre Block, and we had to listen to the blasting, and I can tell you it was stressful for us. I suspect that it's also stressful for trees.

Do you have any knowledge about whether that would affect the survivability of the tree?

If the visitor welcome centre goes in as planned—and other things will happen with Centre Block that are intrusive and loud—would that affect to any degree the ability of the tree to survive?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

As far as I know, if it's not in the immediate vicinity of the root ball of the tree—the vibrations might alter the actual structure of the earth around it and that might loosen up its roots. Unless it's very close to there, I don't know that it would have any negative effect on the elm's survival.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay.

I have one last question then.

Let's say we make it our goal to try to allow the tree to survive. If it turns out that it is healthy enough that we can expect that it would survive for years into the future if treated properly, what positive actions ought to be taken for its health?

For example, right now, temporary structures associated with the construction are being moved in and placed quite close to the tree in that area. As always happens in a construction zone, you put those temporary structures in spots that will not be excavated but rather in areas that are close to the excavations.

Does any of that—having a lot of traffic over and around its roots— negatively affect the tree?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

Yes. If it is going to be a construction zone with heavy equipment all around it, then that compacts the soil. That makes it very difficult. Often trees are lost to exactly just that, the “oops” moments that occur as a result of construction work too close to a mature tree. At a minimum, very solid hoarding would have to be built around the tree to protect it in terms of its immediate surroundings. Preferably, it would not be in a construction zone. Preferably, the construction zone would be moved.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The impression I get is that they are not going to have heavy equipment moving through that exact spot and that the immediate vicinity is going to be occupied by those trailers that get dropped in place, in which people go to examine drawings and warm up in the winter and so on.

(1155)

Mr. Paul Johanis:

We had thought, in fact, that it was going to be a staging area in that way. If that's the case, then it would just need to be protected. We were told, that, no, in fact that tree and all the other trees that were there are in the middle of the planned excavation area.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

We're going to find out in a few minutes from the folks who are actually administering this what that situation is.

I want to thank you again. This has been really helpful. I have learned a lot from your testimony.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

You're very welcome.

The Chair:

Thank you.[Translation]

Mr. Graham, you have the floor. [English]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a couple of quick follow-up questions.

Mr. Garrison commented that there's only one tree visible. I'd like to correct the record. There are actually tens of thousands of trees visible in the background.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

I said on the Hill.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

On the Hill, there are fewer.

I just want to make sure we don't lose sight of the forest for the trees there.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

There is one visible on the Hill.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

One is visible on the Hill.

For the elm tree, if it's only one, how do we pollinate it? Can it be pollinated? Is there another tree around here that could be used to do so? Can it self-pollinate like corn can?

Mr. Paul Johanis:

Elms are actually both sexes. They self-pollinate.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Then this tree, if it were left to survive, would have viable seeds survive.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

It could survive and it could propagate itself.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My point was not whether it could propagate itself but whether we could harvest those seeds for use to replant elms after this tree disappears.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

That's a very good point.

The seeds could likely be harvested. There is a group called the elm recovery project, at the arboretum at the University of Guelph.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I love the arboretum.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

Have you been?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I used to go to the University of Guelph.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

That group collects genetic material from these centenary elms. This particular elm wasn't registered with them, and we registered it with the arboretum.

We spoke with PSPC when we had the opportunity to meet with Ms. Garrett—who is here today—and we spoke about the elm recovery project. They undertook to contact the university. We were already in contact with them. I don't know whether we worked as matchmakers here or not, but in the end the contact was made.

Our understanding now is that the University of Guelph has collected twigs from the elm, and that these twigs will then be grafted into root stock and have saplings grown from them. In four or five years they'll be inoculated with the Dutch elm disease—not all of them, but a sample—to see how they react and if they have any resistance. Then the researchers will know whether this elm has genetic material that is resistant to the Dutch elm disease or not. In any event, there will be young trees propagated from this elm.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You made frequent reference in your comments to climate change, which is—as you know—something we all take quite seriously. What is the greenhouse gas impact of working around this tree—there would be a significant amount of extra movement and extra displacements, potentially—compared to the environmental impact of simply moving the tree? What are we saving in terms of that? It's symbolic, but in terms of real savings, I'm trying to see what they would be.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

Locally, it's just one tree. It has produced and continues to fix carbon and to exhale oxygen that we breathe in, but it is just one tree.

In the big picture, we're not making the argument that this going to have an impact in that sense. We are saying that this is not just any tree; this is a very symbolic tree. Whatever we do here is in a sense the image of our commitment to fighting climate change.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's all I have for now.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Does any Liberal who hasn't spoken have a one-minute question?

I'll go informal now, like we do for one-minute questions.

Mr. Garrison.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

Mr. Chair, my question is a procedural one at this point. I know we have other witnesses to hear on this.

From what we've heard today—and I certainly find it very persuasive—we're trying to get a moratorium on further damage to the tree at this point, and then an evaluation of its health. That's one question. How do we go about getting that in terms of this committee?

The second, of course, is a bit of a broader question in terms of the siting of the visitor centre and my own concern that we get busy on the green space and not wait 10 years for that.

I'm a visitor here today. How would the committee have impact on those two decisions?

(1200)

The Chair:

We'll defer that until the end of the meeting, but it's a good question. We just won't do it now, because we have other witnesses.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

I understand that we have other witnesses, but I—

The Chair:

Are you leaving?

Mr. Randall Garrison:

This is my third committee today. I hope not. Also, I have one more coming up. No, I'm not planning to leave, but it's a critical question. I don't think we should mislead people. If, in fact, this committee doesn't have any power to affect either of these decisions, then we need to direct our witnesses to where they need to go next, if it isn't this committee. That's my reason for asking while they're still here.

The Chair:

Well, I'm sure they'll stay to hear the next witnesses, so we're going to discuss that at the end.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Does anyone else have a question?

We're going to suspend for a very short break to change witnesses, and then we'll carry on.

Thank you very much. It was very helpful information.

Mr. Paul Johanis:

Thank you for having me this morning.

(1200)

(1205)

The Chair:

Welcome back to meeting number 146 of the committee as we continue our inquiry into the status of the elm tree on Parliament Hill.

We are pleased to be joined by officials from Public Services and Procurement Canada. Here with us today are Robert Wright, Assistant Deputy Minister, Parliamentary Precinct Branch; Jennifer Garrett, Director General, Centre Block program; and Lisa MacDonald, Senior Landscape Architect and Arborist.

I want to make a couple of comments before we start.

One is on the relationship with the National Capital Commission. From Parliamentary Privilege in Canada, page 169, “The grounds are maintained by the National Capital Commission by virtue of a request from the Minister of Public Works”. That's where the buck stops.

I'd also just like to put this discussion about one tree in the larger context. I think that over December and the beginning of this year we crossed the Rubicon in having parliamentarians have input into the development of their precinct. I want to thank Public Works and the Board of Internal Economy for coming to those agreements, which I think will make for good development.

Mr. Wright, before you came here I mentioned that I hoped you might include in your opening comments some real, technical description of the relation of where the visitor centre would be in relation to the nine-metre base coming out from the roots of the tree.

Second, the May report said the tree was in good condition, and subsequently it deteriorated; one of the reasons given was the drought in September. I'd just like to know if there's irrigation in that section of the Hill, water sprinklers, etc.

Lastly, do you have any comments on the fact it was fine in May? I read the dendrologist's report by Mr. Farr that your department provided to us; apparently there was just a one-day cursory evaluation of the tree.

Ms. MacDonald, first, could you tell me a little about your position and your scientific background?

Ms. Lisa MacDonald (Senior Landscape Architect and Arborist, Department of Public Works and Government Services):

I'm a landscape architect and certified arborist. I have been a certified arborist for seven years and have been practising landscape architecture for 10 years. I have been employed with CENTRUS since September. I've examined the tree a number of times starting in late September, including having some information from an aerial inspection that was conducted recently.

The Chair:

Pardon my ignorance, but what's an arborist and what's a dendrologist, and what's the difference?

Ms. Lisa MacDonald:

I believe a dendrologist is his position at NRCan, I'm not 100% sure, but he's also a registered professional forester. That's a different qualification. A certified arborist is somebody who practises in the field and has certification offered by an organization called the International Society of Arboriculture. You write an exam to enter, and then you have to maintain your certification with continuing education credits.

The Chair:

So that's related to the scientific growth of trees?

Ms. Lisa MacDonald:

It's related to understanding trees, how they grow, yes.

(1210)

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Wright, thank you for coming, and I look forward to your comments.

Mr. Robert Wright (Assistant Deputy Minister, Parliamentary Precinct, Department of Public Works and Government Services):

I do have some formal opening comments, but I'll try to address some of those questions up front so that sets the stage, if that would be okay.

The location of the visitor welcome centre is obviously a really critical matter to this study. You would all be aware of where phase one of the visitor welcome centre is located, in between Centre Block and West Block, which creates the new public entrance to West Block. The blasting that was referenced through some of the discussion in the first hour was related to the creation of that phase one of the visitor welcome centre. It's a large excavation.

Although the final elements that will be going into the visitor welcome centre are not final at this point, and we're working very closely with officials within the parliamentary administration to clarify that, it is becoming clearer over time. We'd be happy to come and make a presentation on where things are at. We do know, however, and have known for a long time, the broad contours of the visitor welcome centre. The visitor welcome centre in simple terms has phase one as the western section in between West Block and Centre Block. We would see the mirror image of that on the eastern side. The parliamentary complex, the triad, would work together as an integrated complex. As people were referencing during the discussion, it would extend out under the front lawn in front of Centre Block and be a fairly significant facility that would connect the triad and create a host of services that have been requested by Parliament.

First and foremost, of course, it creates significant enhanced security to the triad. That has for a long time now, in getting to an integrated visitor welcome centre, been seen as a priority. Two, it provides a universally accessible, barrier-free front door to Parliament for the first time, obviously extremely important; a number of services for Canadians who will be visiting the Parliament Buildings; interpretive services provided by the Library of Parliament; and of course core services. The intent would be to have some core services for Parliament as well. At this point, working with parliamentary officials, and again it's not final, it would be envisioned to have some committee rooms within the visitor welcome centre as well. We have heard loud and clear on Centre Block that it is very important to retain the look and feel of Centre Block. You would see many important services taking place within the visitor welcome centre. That would enable a restoration instead of a changing of Centre Block, which I think we've heard, critically.

That's the visitor welcome centre. We would be happy to come back or follow up with some images that could demonstrate that in a clear manner.

On the question about irrigation, there is no irrigation in that area. It happens from natural rainfall. Perhaps Ms. MacDonald can speak to this more clearly.

There is a suite of maples, for the most part, and the elm tree is in the area. Some of the maples are invasive. There are some linden trees that are invasive as well. Then there are a number of indigenous trees. My understanding is that maple trees are more susceptible to drought than elm, but you see some of those being quite healthy.

Now, the range of opinion on the health of the tree is critically important, because the conversation really began with asking, “What is the condition of the tree? Would it really be viable for removal and replanting?” Initially, we had a couple of different perspectives, going back to 1995, when a very eminent arborist indicated that it would have a lifespan of about 20 plus years, which we're at about now due to a couple of factors, of having suffered from Dutch elm disease and....

Just by way of interest, I grew up in “the city of stately elms”, Fredericton, New Brunswick. I've been an elm tree lover for a long time.

(1215)



We took this very seriously. We had some differing reports, so essentially we went out and got a second opinion and a third opinion, as you would if you were getting a medical diagnosis. In fact, I think at this point there are six assessments. It would seem fairly conclusive evidence—and I'll maybe have Ms. MacDonald speak to this more specifically—that the tree is in poor and declining health and is not a good candidate to be removed and replanted, which really informed our advice.

With that, I'll move to formal comments.[Translation]

Good afternoon. My name is Robert Wright, and I am the Assistant Deputy Minister for the Parliamentary Precinct at Public Services and Procurement Canada, or PSPC.[English]

Also here with me today is Jennifer Garrett, the Director General for the Centre Block rehabilitation program, as well as the professional arborist Lisa MacDonald who works under the design team for the project, CENTRUS.[Translation]

Mr. Chair, I would like to start my remarks today by thanking you and all the committee members for your keen interest in the restoration and modernization of the Parliamentary Precinct.[English]

Public Services and Procurement Canada is committed to working in partnership with Parliament in implementing our long-term vision and plan that is focused on restoring and modernizing the parliamentary precinct to ensure it meets the needs of a modern parliament and continues to serve as an inviting environment where Canadians can gather.

A core part of this joint plan is the restoration of the iconic Centre Block and the construction of an expanded visitor welcome centre, which will provide important services to parliamentarians and the Canadian public visiting Parliament Hill, providing both enhanced security and a barrier-free front door to Parliament.

Our joint plan to restore and modernize the precinct extends beyond the buildings to safeguarding and renewing the parliamentary grounds and all other spaces key to the operations of Canada's parliamentary democracy.

The landscape and the setting, including the great lawn that serves as Canada's market square as well as the rugged escarpment and the urban forest, are as much a part of what makes the precinct uniquely Canadian as the beautiful neo-gothic buildings themselves.

The restoration of Centre Block and, more to the point, the construction of the next phase of the visitor welcome centre, which will be located underground to minimize the visual impact to this important landscape, will require significant excavation work. Unfortunately, there are a number of trees, including the large elm tree, in the middle of the excavation zone.

To enable the work to proceed, it is impossible for the trees located in the excavation zone to remain in place. Although excavation work is not scheduled to begin for several months, it is highly dependent on the completion of preparatory work this spring and summer on the east side of Centre Block. These preparatory activities include archeological work, the relocation of underground services including an IT duct bank and the completion of a construction road. [Translation]

Demonstrating leadership in sustainability is a core objective of the long-term vision and plan and the Centre Block rehabilitation. Public Services and Procurement Canada is committed to working with Parliament to reduce its environmental footprint, as well as protecting and enhancing Parliament's urban forest.[English]

As a means to achieving this important commitment, Public Services and Procurement Canada has developed a comprehensive strategy to minimize the impacts of this required excavation work as much as possible. The focus of this plan is on relocating, wherever feasible, healthy trees that are indigenous to the area and replacing within the precinct all removed trees at a 4:1 ratio. Note that this plan exceeds the National Capital Commission best practice recommendation of replacing trees at a 2:1 ratio.

Of the 30 impacted trees, 14 will be relocated within the precinct. Of the 16 that will be removed, eight are invasive species. To offset the removal of the 16 trees, 64 new trees will be planted within the precinct.

(1220)



Additionally, the Centre Block and visitor welcome centre projects will include the implementation of a landscape plan that will see additional trees replanted in the east pleasure grounds.

To implement these plans, we worked hand in hand with parliamentary officials who have been engaged throughout the process. We also engaged with the federal heritage buildings review office, given Parliament Hill's important status, and with the National Capital Commission, which reviewed our plans and provided approval to proceed.[Translation]

In addition, Minister Qualtrough has communicated with the Greenspace Alliance of Canada's Capital about the plan to remove the tree. Departmental officials also met with representatives of that organization. In addition, PSPC responded to a joint letter from the speakers of the House of Commons and the Senate of Canada.[English]

I want to ensure the committee that removing trees in the parliamentary precinct is seen as a last-resort option. Unfortunately, the American elm tree is located in a high-intensity construction zone requiring significant excavation work and will not be able to remain in its existing location.

Given the tree cannot stay in its location, Public Services and Procurement Canada sought the advice of independent experts on the possibility of relocating the tree. Multiple arborists were consulted. They found that the elm is in deteriorating health, and given its health, the elm would not likely survive the trauma of relocation even if world-leading best practices in tree relocation are used. The costs to relocate the tree would be significant, estimated at approximately $400,000. These costs were developed by the construction management firm for the project, PCL/EllisDon, in joint venture. The combination of the elm's declining health, its low likelihood of survival and the significant costs that are involved led us to recommend the tree be removed.

Even if the construction on the visitor welcome centre does not proceed as discussed here earlier and the tree remains in place, significant construction activities in support of the Centre Block rehabilitation, such as the excavation of the foundation and work on the building's exterior masonry, will undoubtedly cause the tree stress and exacerbate its already poor condition. To preserve the legacy of the American elm, it is proposed that the dominion sculptor repurpose the wood in consultation with Parliament. As you may be aware, the thrones used in the newly restored Senate of Canada building used wood donated by the Queen from her estate.

As well, on the advice of the Greenspace Alliance of Canada's Capital, we are working with the University of Guelph to propagate the elm as well as provide genetic samples to support the university's elm recovery project. We recently took approximately 100 twig samples with the objective of being able to propagate up to approximately 50 elms within the parliamentary precinct.

This means that the tree samplings will be reproduced under scientific supervision, and we are committed to continue to work with Greenspace Alliance to commemorate the tree and to work with them and Parliament to find appropriate locations where the newly propagated elms might be planted.

Now that parliamentary operations have been moved out of Centre Block, we are preparing to begin the major rehabilitation program. We want to keep the project on track so that Centre Block can be reinstated as the seat of government as soon as possible. Work in the east pleasure grounds starting this spring is essential to maintain the program's momentum. [Translation]

In closing, I would like to reiterate that the ongoing engagement with Parliament is essential to ensure that the work being undertaken meets the needs of a 21st century parliamentary democracy without losing touch with our collective past.

Once again, I would like to thank you for your interest, and I would be happy to respond to questions from committee members. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

I'm looking at that picture. Is there any reason the new visitor centre can't start where the little grey hut is and come south towards the lawn?

Mr. Robert Wright:

Our understanding at this point is that it would reduce up to around 15% of the planned volume of the visitor welcome centre, which would have significant impact.

If we were to take the root system, as was discussed—and I'll pass it over to Ms. MacDonald—it certainly extends well beyond the trunk of the tree. There's a large zone that would be proscribed, which would require no activity around there.

You couldn't leave it there without changing the visitor welcome centre, but if the visitor welcome centre were to change, it would be very difficult to protect it.

Our understanding is that if there were no construction in this area and the Centre Block rehabilitation were not happening and there were no visitor welcome centre, then it is likely that this tree would have a one- to five-year lifespan, potentially up to 10 years. The likelihood that this tree would still be living when parliamentarians return to Centre Block is quite low, from our understanding and the analysis that has been done, which has been fairly significant. To date, I think there have been six assessments, which is fairly robust for the assessment of a tree.

(1225)

The Chair:

Okay.

We'll go to questions.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Based on what you just said, what would it cost to leave the tree in place?

Mr. Robert Wright:

We would have to take a significant analysis of that.

Before we get to costs, you would have a visitor welcome centre that would not be symmetrical. It would have an impact on how Parliament Hill and the landscape look. There would be no getting away from having a visitor welcome centre that would not have the symmetry that was envisioned from its beginning. We've already essentially created that symmetry with phase one.

Because phase one was essentially an anchor for the visitor welcome centre, we did do a broader conceptual design for the whole visitor welcome centre, which at the time was presented to parliamentarians, as well as going through the NCC and so on. It would be a significant re-envisioning of what the visitor welcome centre is, first and foremost.

Second—I couldn't today—we could undertake an analysis, but it would be a significant cost to try to save this tree. What I could say with confidence today is that it would have a low chance of success.

I think one thing that is important to note—because it has been noted that there is construction, and ATCO trailers and the like that are already there—is that the actual construction zone when we set it up will be much larger than what it is. There is no way that this tree will not be behind the hoarding. For the duration of the project, I can't see how it wouldn't be behind hoarding. It could not be a green space for the duration of the project. I think that's an important element.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When does this tree have to go, for your timelines as they currently stand?

Mr. Robert Wright:

We started with the initial plans, of which this was a part of a broader suite. It made sense with the plan to reuse the tree, to cut it before the sap started running. That was important. We had contracts in place to do the other tree, so it made sense to do it as one piece.

As I indicated, there's a suite of work that has to happen this spring and is essentially starting now. Three essential elements include archeological work; the removal of underground services, including an IT duct bank; and a construction road, which will enable Centre Block to go into rehabilitation. It will allow the decommissioning of Centre Block and enable the excavation work to proceed. Those are critical precursor projects.

All of that has to start this spring. At the very end—and it would cause challenges—as the visitor welcome centre is envisioned now, there's really no way to proceed in which the tree could remain, up to a maximum of the late summer.

(1230)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You talked about planting 64 trees. Would they be around Centre Block or within the precinct generally?

Mr. Robert Wright:

At this point they would be within the precinct generally. We've taken essentially a principle to not replant trees multiple times. The escarpment is the focus of replanting at this point, especially along the pathway at the bottom, because we know that there will be no impact over time.

There is a master landscape plan that will be implemented as we proceed with the projects. As you can see with West Block, there are elements of that landscape plan that are being put in place at the end stage of that project. One thing we could take to analyze is if there are ways to accelerate other elements of the landscape plan over time. We took quite seriously the comments about not waiting for 10 years to have more trees and green space on the Hill.

Of course, the long-term vision and plan guides all of the work that we do in partnership with Parliament. That is kind of a co-developed plan, and we are actually undergoing a revamp of that plan right now. It would be a good time to look at how the landscape plan interweaves within the long-term vision plan and whether there are elements that could be integrated more quickly than others.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't have a lot of time left, but I do have some more questions.

In my riding, we estimate we have about 3 or 4 billion trees, so I have a slightly different perspective from others to forestry because we practise silviculture, which is the practice of planting trees, cultivating them and harvesting them 40 years later. I have a slightly different perspective from my urban colleagues who might not do that.

You've already talked about cutting down the tree. The sap should start flowing any day now, I assume. Can we turn it over to the House of Commons to carpentry to make long-lasting furniture for the House, for the new chamber? Is that the intention?

Mr. Robert Wright:

Absolutely. We would want to work hand in hand with Parliament on what is appropriate.

We've already engaged with the dominion sculptor to commemorate the tree, and that could come from some carvings that would be put in Centre Block. It could be in other parliamentary buildings. It could be furniture; it could be some significant elements. It could be in public space or in chamber space. That's really to work for co-development with Parliament on that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We talked to the previous witness about the fact that the University of Guelph has taken stubs of this tree. Would you be able to plant the same tree back on the Hill by doing that?

Mr. Robert Wright:

Yes. There are two things. One is that they have the genetic material from the tree to be part of their ongoing scientific research. Second, yes, the plan is to plant the same stock throughout the parliamentary precinct. We would be more than happy to work with Greenspace Alliance and Parliament to find the appropriate spots to place those.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you to all three of you for being here, and particularly Mr. Wright. I know of your genuine love of this place. We had the chance, just by coincidence, to find ourselves both on the floor of the House the day before Parliament moved to West Block. I could see you looking on the one hand with a critical eye and on the other hand with a loving eye on the work that had been done thus far. While we are all critical in our own ways of this or that aspect of the move, I think what has been achieved in West Block is, in many respects, absolutely remarkable, quite an extraordinary accomplishment.

I also want to say one other thing. Someone decided to hold off on cutting down the tree until this meeting occurred. I don't know if that was you or somebody else, but if it's you, thank you. If it's somebody else, perhaps you could pass on our thanks for respecting the fact that we did want to meet with you earlier. Events beyond the control of anyone in this committee put that off.

Having said that, I want to ask a few things. I didn't know there was such a thing as the master landscape plan. I wonder if you'd be in a position to send that to our clerk just so that we can get an idea of what that is. We'd all be very grateful for that.

(1235)

Mr. Robert Wright:

Absolutely.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Should I assume that's a living document that changes with time?

Mr. Robert Wright:

Absolutely, and as I said, we're going through essentially a reboot of the long-term vision and plan, so that is one element that will be updated as well. The master landscape plan dates to 2012, I think, to inform many of the projects such as West Block and others. It is one of those elements being updated as part of the long-term vision and plan update.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have here a copy of the 2006 update to the site capacity and long-term development plan. Is that the most recent update of this plan, or is there a more recent one?

Mr. Robert Wright:

That is the most up-to-date plan at this point.

The Chair:

Can I interrupt just for a second? Just for the lights, it's a quorum call, so you don't have to worry about it.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay, thank you, Mr. Chair.

Please, Mr. Wright.

Mr. Robert Wright:

That is the existing framework, and that is the plan that is being updated. There's a trio of documents that create that long-term vision and plan and the implementation framework that goes along with it. We've completed phase one of the update, and now we're in phase two. We'd be happy to come and make a presentation on that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

On page 64 of that document is an overhead view of where everything is located, including the visitor centre. I know this is no help to you, as I'm sure you're intimately familiar with this. To state the obvious, it is south, rather than east, of Centre Block, and the tree is not on the footprint of the visitor centre as shown here. I gather something has happened since that time that has been approved through the appropriate channels to extend that footprint.

Mr. Robert Wright:

As you can see, that's almost a line drawing at that time from a conceptual perspective. What has evolved is the design development around phase one of the visitor welcome centre, which has recently opened, which also, in a positive way, forced thinking about the broader visitor welcome centre. That initial line drawing has continued to develop, both with professional architects and with the administrations of Parliament, about what would be envisioned in that space.

Again, we'd be happy to come and discuss where we are right now in working with parliamentary officials on what is envisioned, both in Centre Block and in the second phase of the visitor welcome centre.

I would say that the final decisions certainly have not been made with regard to the exact elements that will be in there. However, we are envisioning a visitor welcome centre phase two that would be approximately five to six times the size of phase one, which is a little over 5,000 square metres, so it's a sizable—

Mr. Scott Reid:

The 5,000 is the current one or the one you're going to build?

Mr. Robert Wright:

The 5,000 is the current one, it's phase one.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Would we be talking about building something that's 25,000?

Mr. Robert Wright:

That would be up to 30,000. That is grosso modo where we are looking.

Again, that's not final at this point, but this is driven by requirements that we're working to put in place.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Not all of us might agree with doing that, so I'll have to ask the question: Who would be approving this? We might want to insert ourselves in this process so as to redirect the outcome. Who exactly signs off on this?

(1240)

Mr. Robert Wright:

Again, this committee has been having conversations, I know, with the administration of the House. There's a lot of good work that's going on to help ensure that parliamentarians are more engaged in the work, which I think is essential. To walk this through in maybe a simplified manner, and hopefully it's not overly simplified: We don't do anything without the requirements coming from Parliament.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Of course.

Mr. Robert Wright:

Parliament sets the requirements and we then work hand in hand with parliamentary officials to develop the plans and designs. We then work hand in hand again with parliamentary officials to ensure that those requirements are being developed—

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'll stop you to ask you, when you say parliamentary officials, who do you mean? Do you mean the Board of Internal Economy? The Speaker? Some other body?

Mr. Robert Wright:

As Public Services and Procurement Canada, we don't directly interface with parliamentarians. It's the administration of the House that leads that engagement with parliamentarians, of course with the Senate. We come as requested to parliamentary committees.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm just trying to figure it out. Someone signs off so you can say this has been authorized. I'm trying to figure out who. We literally don't know who that someone is.

Mr. Robert Wright:

On requirements and on major plans, absolutely. To date, and I know things are perhaps shifting a little now, those presentations and endorsements would have been through the Board of Internal Economy, of course, which the Speaker chairs.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Garrison.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

I want to thank you all for being here. I assure you that, like Mr. Reid, I do trust that you understand and appreciate the significance of the Hill and are dedicated to that work. There's no doubt about that on my part, although I may be asking you some tough questions about that.

In terms of the landscape plan for this site, I guess I'm one of those for whom—I've only been here eight years, and I hope to come back for a few more—the treed spot next to Centre Block has been very important. I often meet people there in the only shaded spot. Does the landscape plan for the future include a treed spot on that exact spot?

Mr. Robert Wright:

Certainly, and part of the National Capital Commission's review was to really make sure that there was going to be enough soil over the visitor welcome centre to support the replanting of large trees in that area. So yes, part of that plan is to, if you will, reforest that area over time.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

So the visitor centre, as it's currently planned, does extend under that site.

Mr. Robert Wright:

Yes, if you get an idea from phase one, it's an underground facility and we have the ability to landscape over top of the facility.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

You talked about the symmetry, but you're talking about it being five times larger on one side. That doesn't seem symmetrical to me. It would seem logical to me that you could make reductions, and you talked about 15% if you moved back. You wouldn't lose symmetry as a result of that. You might lose it for other reasons. But the size is so different. The scope is so different.

Mr. Robert Wright:

Most of the size comes from in front of Centre Block not from.... It would be symmetrical in size, the eastern portion to the western portion. Most of the size is really about the visitor welcome centre. If you've been—and I'm sure most of you have—to the Capitol building in Washington, you'll know the underground visitor centre is fairly similar. The largest component of phase two, the visitor welcome centre, will actually be under the great lawn, invisible to the eye.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

I'm still having trouble with the symmetry argument, because it would seem quite possible architecturally to recreate symmetry without having to go underneath this site.

Mr. Robert Wright:

As you might note on the western side, there's a plaza and an entry point that acts as a node for Centre Block and West Block. So in the vision, we would be creating that same symmetrical node on the eastern side with the connection point between Centre Block and East Block.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

That would be in front of this site, since you've told me that this site would be a treed site.

(1245)

Mr. Robert Wright:

The trees will be over the top of the site, yes.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

Like Mr. Reid, I share some concerns about the size, but I've not been sitting on those committees and it's not for us to stick an oar in at this point.

Obviously, we're going to be operating with the new phase one of the visitor centre for at least a decade. So the capacity thing for security and for visitors must already be solved or we wouldn't be able to operate for 10 years just with that portion of it operating. We're operating with committee rooms. All those things are operating for the next decade.

I have questions about whether the necessity of that visitor centre being of that size has been a proven point. I guess it all comes back to what our priorities are here. My priority is that it be a treed site and that the work start on that essentially.

When you talked about the studies for the tree, you said an interesting thing we hadn't heard before. I'd like to know how many of those studies were premised on the tree having to move, because that's what you actually said to us, that the tree was studied for moving not for preservation.

Do we have any studies that asked what it would take to preserve that tree on site? It doesn't sound as if we do.

Mr. Robert Wright:

There are a number of points and questions there. I'll maybe start with the last one and then pass off to Ms. MacDonald.

You're quite right. A lot of the analysis was about whether this tree was a viable candidate for relocation and replanting, but we did look at what would be required if the tree were to stay in situ; if the visitor welcome centre were going to be quite significantly altered in its scope, what would have to be done? It seemed to be, one, fairly significant, and, two, with a low likelihood of success.

Maybe I'll pass it on to Ms. MacDonald to give some expert testimony.

Ms. Lisa MacDonald:

I evaluated the tree primarily for assessment as a candidate for transplant, for sure, but one of the earlier reports specifically looked at retaining it in place. The determination of that arborist was that the remediation to the root zone would not likely ensure long-term survival of the tree.

I have similar concerns for its long-term survival. I think it probably will leaf out this spring, but, to me, the questions are, how much longer does it have and why do we think that?

The drought conditions that were experienced last summer are a really valid point in terms of that being the sole determination of the tree's health, but that wasn't entirely what I based my assessment on. When I looked at the tree in September, it had very poor foliage, but it was compared to the other tree and also compared to the different components within the tree that were of concern to me. The north half of it had really bad foliage and the south half had slightly better foliage. Based on my evaluation at the time, I concluded that the north half is possibly diseased.

It is also impacted by a really large cavity injury. A cavity isn't necessarily a bad thing in a tree. Very large trees can survive cavities with no problem. However, the location of this one was of concern to me. The fact that it was on the part of the stem that was showing diminished foliage was more conclusive to me in terms of the tree's general health, as opposed to just the tree having not very many leaves. It is sort of a question of being relative to itself.

In the long term, I think there will be more and more dieback on that tree. The decision has to be made about what value it is offering in terms of that, and I suppose at what point it is past the point of being worth saving.

It's difficult to determine exactly when a tree is dead. If a tree has one living branch on it and the rest of the tree is not alive, then technically it's still living.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

Excuse me. With respect, we're a long way from that with this tree.

Ms. Lisa MacDonald:

It's certainly a long way from having just one living branch on the whole tree. However, I found that a good half of the tree was in pretty rough condition, and that was confirmed by an aerial investigation we did in March when we were looking for the twigs to send to the University of Guelph.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

Would your professional evaluation be of a higher quality if you had a bit more time to wait to see about the leaf out? Would that give you a better perspective, as a professional, on the health of the tree if you could wait for...? I call this spring, but I'm from Victoria.

Should it wait for spring to see the leaf out? Would you be able to give a better evaluation of the long-term prospects of the tree at that point?

(1250)

Ms. Lisa MacDonald:

More data is always better just objectively, but I feel fairly confident of the assessment I have given so far, considering I had multiple opportunities...including when the tree was in leaf already. The aerial inspection, and looking closely at the twigs, is a really valuable tool as well for arborists.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

Mr. Chair, I'm back to my same question of how we can be effective decision-makers.

The two questions, again, are, in the short term can we get a good evaluation of the tree, and second, are we making a right choice here with the visitor welcome centre on this spot?

Those are two questions that I'd still like to know how parliamentarians can address.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Garrison.

Now we'll go on to Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

I'm not sure if we're embarking on a venture into palliative care, because for this particular tree, I don't have a lot of faith in its ability to live beyond what we already see.

You just said something about an aerial view of the tree. Can you explain how that works? Does that give you substantial knowledge, a good dataset, as to how long this tree will survive?

Ms. Lisa MacDonald:

It gives you more information about the health of the canopy of the tree. In this particular case, it gave us more information about the health of the cavity within the tree.

Viewing the tree only from the ground is considered a limitation in terms of an assessment. Last week we were able to get a piece of equipment that brought a staff member up into the canopy to collect the twigs. Looking at the length of those twigs, and the health of the buds across the different parts of the tree does give you a good idea of the health of the tree in terms of how much growth it was able to sustain last year. That's not isolated just to the most recent period; that's the entire year's growth.

It's very important to get a close-up look at the cavity as well. It gives you an idea of whether the tree is successfully containing the decay agent for whatever caused that hollowing.

Mr. Scott Simms:

So that's how you monitor the cavity, from above?

Ms. Lisa MacDonald:

Yes. You go into a lift, and you get close up to it. You can probe it.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I had this vision of a drone. I apologize.

Ms. Lisa MacDonald:

No, there was no drone; it was a person in a lift.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes. I was looking for something far more grandiose.

I understand there are limitations to being on the ground. I should know: I'm five foot four. When you look at the tree, what is the most valuable dataset you can collect? Whether it's aerial or it's actually measuring from the outside of the tree, what is it?

Ms. Lisa MacDonald:

Again, more information is always good.

Mr. Scott Simms:

What is the most specific one you look at? If you were to walk up and say you have one measurement to make on this tree, what's it going to be, to decide whether it's in good health or not?

Ms. Lisa MacDonald:

I would never evaluate a tree based on one measure alone. I'm sorry. It's really a combination of factors. I'm sorry to not provide a more comprehensive—

Mr. Scott Simms:

It's quite all right. I have to look at policy all day. I always get it mixed up. I know how you feel.

Ms. Lisa MacDonald:

I look at the structure of the tree, whether there are any significant defects like the cavity, in combination with the health of the leaves, in combination with the environmental factors around it, and in combination with how other trees that are nearby and sharing similar environmental conditions are doing.

You look at all these together. You really shouldn't look at any one of them in isolation. Any one out of context could be misleading.

Mr. Scott Simms:

You said earlier that what you have seen thus far leads you to believe the conclusion about the lifespan of the tree. Mr. Garrison spoke of waiting to see what we have this coming spring, although you are satisfied with what you have seen so far. But that's not in isolation, is it? How far back are you going?

Ms. Lisa MacDonald:

We reviewed reports from as early as 1995, but my personal observations started in September of last year.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Those are your personal observations in addition to what has been measured since 1995?

Ms. Lisa MacDonald:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Simms:

So since 1995, what would that be?

Ms. Lisa MacDonald:

We had a report from 1995 and then a further five reports done by external arborists and registered professional foresters in 2017 and 2018.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay. Thank you.

Mr. Wright, this is obviously a more general question beyond just the one tree.

Let's look at the forest separate from the tree. When it comes to green space, how is the green space situation around Centre Block going to look 10 years from now as opposed to what it looked like last year when we closed down or this year when we close down?

(1255)

Mr. Robert Wright:

The plan is to have significantly more green space on the Hill, not less. We're moving towards more green rather than away from it. That really is the plan.

One thing that's critically important is that we're really trying to move to a campus approach to the way the precinct works. One element of that is how—

Mr. Scott Simms:

Can I get you to back up for a second? What is a campus approach?

Mr. Robert Wright:

The implementation of the long-term vision and plan has been quite an integrated and fairly holistic plan, but it has not addressed things like parking to the same degree as it has addressed buildings or material handling. All of that back-of-house infrastructure that integrates and supports how a campus or integrated space works is critical.

You will note that there is still a fair amount of surface parking on Parliament Hill. The vision over time is to get away from surface parking, to still provide parking for the operations of Parliament, but some kind of parking structure, probably somewhat underground, is envisioned that would allow a significant amount of the paved space to go green and to be replanted with trees, etc.

Mr. Scott Simms:

There are a couple of things there. More green space also provides less parking area on the surface. I don't want to say there's less parking.

Are you looking at some underground parking? Has that been decided yet?

Mr. Robert Wright:

That is part of the long-term vision and plan. There is no approved project at this point to implement that. However, that has always been part of the long-term vision and plan, to move away progressively from surface parking to an underground type of facility that is not designed and not approved at this point.

Mr. Scott Simms:

If you have the right amount of soil above it, as you mentioned earlier, then that underground parking space can be as big as we wish, or that doesn't go out beyond campus.

Mr. Robert Wright:

Right. We're well aware of the parking requirements and other requirements of ensuring that Parliament is able to operate.

Again, we work hand in hand with the officials to ensure that the operations of Parliament are supported and that we're able to restore appropriately and modernize the precinct so that it supports a 21st century parliamentary democracy.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Right, and the soil above the parking would be thick enough to support a tree of that size.

Mr. Robert Wright:

Again, it's not designed at this point. The point is that we're trying to move towards more green space on the Hill, not away from it.

We do, unfortunately, run into these in-between moments when we're doing a major project that has an impact. I understand that the duration of this type of project is a significant period of time, but it is really part of restoring and modernizing the Hill so that it supports the precinct now and 100 years from now.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you. I have one more quick question.

The idea of the underground parking can't be cheap. Has it been incorporated in the budgeting?

Mr. Robert Wright:

No, it's not a project that is approved at this point with a specific budget.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Ms. MacDonald, you referred to the previous reports. Apparently the one in May said the tree was in good condition. Has that cavity, all of a sudden, come since May?

Ms. Lisa MacDonald:

No, that report actually mentions the cavity and does note the decay in the cavity as well. However, that was done in early May, so the tree hadn't leafed out. It's noted in the limitations of that assessment that there were no leaves on the tree at that point. Whether the cavity was directly influencing the tree's ability to sustain a healthy canopy in that part of the tree at that point wouldn't have been measurable.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Wright, when I asked the question right at the beginning about the possibility of you starting at the grey building and coming forward, you said it would have to reduce the visitor centre by 15%, but why would that be? The front lawn of Parliament is pretty darned big. It seems as though there would be unlimited room there to have that.

Mr. Robert Wright:

We could always extend what is envisioned in the front of Parliament. You're right about that. It is the symmetry that would be affected. From all the evidence we have, it would be changing a major component of the plan—which is your prerogative. All the evidence we would have is that it would not lead to the tree living for a long period of time.

(1300)

The Chair:

Mr. Garrison.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

Chair, I'd like to move that the committee request a moratorium on the removal of the centenary elm and construction activity that compromises its health until the end of June to allow for a further evaluation of the health of the tree and of alternative plans that would allow for its long-term survival.

The Chair:

Okay. We'll discuss that shortly.

Are there any other questions for the witnesses?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, I was going to have questions, but why don't we just see if there's any interest in debating that, and if not, I would call for a vote?

The Chair:

Okay, read the motion.

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

The motion is: That the Committee request a moratorium on the removal of the centenary elm and construction activity that would compromise its health until the end of June to allow for a further evaluation of the health of the tree and of alternative plans that would allow for its long term survival.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

We can ask questions to clarify that, right?

Since we still have the witnesses here, what would essentially be the effect of approving a motion such as this? If we were to wait until June, how far back does that set your plans? Could you just give us a better idea of what the repercussions would be?

Mr. Robert Wright:

It would have a schedule and cost impact. There's no question about that.

For all of these precursor projects—the archeological work, the removal of underground services and the construction road—the devil would be in the details of how much we'd be able to do given that type of motion. That work was planned to essentially start now, so you would have essentially, I guess, a three-month impact with the escalation costs associated with that, which are significant.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Could you estimate what the costs would be?

Mr. Robert Wright:

May I pass that over to Ms. Garrett?

The Chair:

Go ahead, but I have to intervene as soon as you're finished.

Ms. Jennifer Garrett (Director General, Centre Block Program, Department of Public Works and Government Services):

Contracts worth approximately $11.5 million have been issued to subcontractors via our construction manager to do the planned work for the east pleasure grounds area, so we will have to work with our construction manager to renegotiate those contracts, and if they obviously can imagine with multiple activities occurring.... It's a very integrated and coordinated level of effort and you have multiple contractors in place, so we would have to task our construction manager, to go back and renegotiate those contracts to make sure that we could phase the worker hold-off of the work—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Could you possibly end up being in default or breach of those contracts?

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

Not likely in default or breach, but there are definitely increasing costs associated with that work.

The Chair:

I'm sorry, but it's past one o'clock and I need the permission of the committee to continue.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You won't have it, because she has a committee meeting. We all have one.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

We have to go.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Let's see if there's majority support to adjourn.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Adjourn.

The Chair:

Adjourn?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Adjourn the debate or the...?

Mr. John Nater:

If you want to adjourn the meeting, we should have a vote on that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We put off the inevitable for this tree if we do that.

The Chair:

Is there agreement to not adjourn?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm ready to vote on the motion if you want to do that.

The Chair:

Okay. Is everyone ready to vote on Mr. Garrison's motion?

(1305)

Mr. John Nater:

I would like a recorded vote.

The Clerk:

Mr. Garrison's motion states: That the Committee request a moratorium on the removal of the centenary elm and construction activity that would compromise its health until the end of June to allow for a further evaluation of the health of the tree and of alternative plans that would allow for its long term survival.

(Motion negatived: nays 5; yeas 4)

Mr. Scott Reid:

Before you move to adjournment, Mr. Chair, I wonder if I could just...?

The Chair: Yes?

Mr. Scott Reid: I had additional questions. I recognize that we're at the end of our time and we are on the verge of someone moving adjournment, but I have a number of further questions—I suspect that other members do as well—not in relation to the tree, but in relation to the entire visitor welcome centre and what's been approved, what hasn't been approved and the kinds of contracts that have been given out and so on. I wonder if we would be willing to invite the witnesses—in particular, Mr. Wright—to come back.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Mr. Chair, it's one o'clock.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Sorry, I'm not trying to move something. I'm just trying to serve notice of that.

The Chair:

We're going to have to adjourn.

To follow-up on that, as you know, and Mr. Garrison would know this, we've worked out a procedure with the Board of Internal Economy to work on these larger issues and plans. We'll follow that procedure and sort out something related to that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

For sure, those things are all on the table.

Thank you.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Bienvenue à la 146e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Ce matin, le Comité examine une situation concernant les plans de SPAC à l'égard de l'orme d'Amérique qui se trouve du côté est de l'édifice du Centre, comme vous pouvez le voir sur la photo à l'écran. Il y a trois autres photos que j'ai prises, et nous les ferons également défiler afin que vous puissiez les voir plus en détail. L'arbre est situé tout juste à côté de la statue de Sir John A. Macdonald. Cette question a été portée à notre attention par le premier témoin d'aujourd'hui, M. Paul Johanis, président de l'Alliance pour les espaces verts de la capitale du Canada.

Avant de commencer, je lirai au Comité une lettre des Présidents, afin que vous sachiez quel est leur intérêt. Les Présidents ont écrit ce qui suit au SMA de Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada: Nous avons appris que l'Alliance pour les espaces verts de la capitale du Canada a exprimé des préoccupations quant au déracinement possible d'un certain nombre d'arbres matures se trouvant sur les terrains de la Colline du Parlement en vue de faire place aux rénovations à venir de l'édifice du Centre. En particulier, l'Alliance s'inquiète à propos d'un orme patrimonial précis, situé à côté de la statue de Sir John A. Macdonald, tout juste à l'est de l'édifice du Centre. Étant donné que de telles décisions ne sont pas prises à la légère, nous demandons à Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada de prendre toutes les mesures nécessaires pour assurer la protection de ces arbres matures et à présent vulnérables pendant la restauration de l'édifice du Centre. Nous espérons que, avec votre soutien, une solution pourra être trouvée afin de répondre aux préoccupations qui ont été soulevées.

Monsieur Johanis, bienvenue. Peut-être que, avant de commencer, vous pourriez désigner toutes les personnes dans l'auditoire qui ont un lien avec les quatre organisations qui, selon vous, ont un intérêt quant à la question.

M. Paul Johanis (président, Alliance pour les espaces verts de la capitale du Canada):

Bonjour.

Oui, il y a dans la salle des membres de l'Alliance pour les espaces verts de la capitale du Canada ainsi que des membres de Big Trees of Kitchissippi, qui est un quartier de l'Ouest d'Ottawa. Nous avons Daniel Buckles et Debra Huron. Voici également Robert McAulay, président de la Beaverbrook Community Association de la région de Kanata, à Ottawa, qui travaille activement à la protection des arbres. Jennifer Humphries vient tout juste de se joindre à nous. Elle est membre des Community Associations for Environmental Sustainability, les CAFES.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Le greffier va faire défiler quelques autres photos.

Monsieur Johanis, nous attendons avec impatience votre déclaration préliminaire, après quoi les membres du Comité vous poseront des questions.

M. Paul Johanis:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs les vice-présidents et les membres du Comité permanent.

Nous sommes très honorés d'être ici. Je dois dire que nous ne nous attendions pas à être ici, mais nous sommes très heureux de l'être. Merci d'avoir inscrit cette question à l'ordre du jour du Comité et de m'avoir invité à m'adresser à vous aujourd'hui.

Je m'adresse à vous au nom des quatre organisations qui vous ont transmis la lettre au sujet de l'orme, le 18 mars dernier: Écologie Ottawa, une organisation populaire disposant d'un large mandat environnemental et d'un nombre important de partisans, surtout des jeunes; le Club des naturalistes d'Ottawa, fondé en 1863, qui représente le plus ancien club d'histoire naturelle au Canada et qui compte quelque 800 membres; les Community Associations for Environmental Sustainability, les CAFES, un collectif d'environ 30 associations de quartier d'Ottawa, y compris toutes, ou presque toutes celles qui se trouvent ici à Ottawa-Centre; ainsi que l'Alliance pour les espaces verts de la capitale du Canada, dont je suis l'actuel président. Nous sommes un organisme entièrement bénévole et sans but lucratif voué à la protection et à la préservation des espaces verts à Ottawa-Gatineau depuis 1997.

Nous sommes ici pour demander deux choses. La première consiste à retarder l'enlèvement de l'orme centenaire jusqu'à la pousse des feuilles afin que son état puisse être précisément déterminé, sans controverse. La deuxième est de revoir les hypothèses actuelles relativement à la taille et à l'emplacement de la phase deux du complexe d'accueil des visiteurs.

Pourquoi réévaluer ces hypothèses? Elles sont à la source du projet visant à abattre l'orme. Nous croyons que ces hypothèses devraient être réévaluées afin de vérifier que la concession implicite qui est faite entre la préservation de l'orme et la construction de la phase deux du complexe d'accueil des visiteurs à cet endroit est toujours valable. De façon claire, à moins que le gouvernement ne soit disposé à examiner ou à réexaminer ces hypothèses, l'orme ne pourra pas être sauvé.

Pourquoi retarder l'enlèvement de l'orme? Eh bien, pour évaluer cette concession, vous, en tant que parlementaires, avez besoin de données à jour et probantes sur son état.

Pourquoi cet arbre? Pourquoi remuons-nous ciel et terre pour protéger cet arbre? Premièrement, il ne s'agit pas d'un arbre quelconque. Il s'agit d'un orme d'Amérique, une espèce qui était répandue dans cette région de l'Ontario avant que la maladie hollandaise de l'orme la fasse presque disparaître de notre région dans les années 1970 et 1980. Il y en avait un bon nombre sur la Colline du Parlement, mais cet arbre est le seul survivant. Il est unique, emblématique, historique.

Pour nos collègues du club des naturalistes d'Ottawa, cette raison suffirait à assurer la protection et la préservation de l'orme, peu importe où il se trouve, mais il n'est pas situé n'importe où. Il se dresse à côté de l'édifice le plus emblématique du Canada, l'édifice du Centre. Cette proximité ajoute à son sens et lui donne valeur de symbole. Ce que l'on fera de cet orme constituera une déclaration, laquelle sera amplifiée et répercutée au loin.

Pour les organismes communautaires comme les CAFES, l'orme est emblématique de chaque arbre mature couramment abattu dans leurs quartiers afin de faire de l'espace pour des ouvrages intercalaires et des travaux de rénovation. La perte d'arbres matures au centre d'Ottawa et dans les centres urbains de tout le pays a atteint une proportion alarmante. Les associations communautaires tentent désespérément de mettre un terme à l'élimination du couvert forestier dans leurs quartiers. Elles sont atterrées de constater que la même chose se produit sur la Colline du Parlement — elles ne peuvent vraiment pas le comprendre —, à savoir qu'un constructeur et son projet l'emportent toujours sur l'espace vert.

Pour Écologie Ottawa, ce qu'il adviendra de cet arbre sera emblématique de la réponse du gouvernement fédéral aux changements climatiques. Lors de la dernière réunion, M. Reid a fait mention du plan et de la vision à long terme de 2006 pour la Cité parlementaire. La réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre représente le point culminant de cette vision. Lors de la même réunion, le sous-greffier Michel Patrice a insisté sur la nécessité de réévaluer les plans lorsque les choses changent.

Or, les choses ont changé fondamentalement depuis 2006. En 2019, les changements climatiques sont réels, et des mesures doivent être prises de toute urgence pour en atténuer les répercussions. C'est pourquoi la portée du projet du centre des visiteurs doit maintenant être revue. Dans ce nouveau contexte, des importances relatives différentes seraient probablement appliquées au compromis implicite entre la préservation de l'orme et l'emplacement de la phase deux du complexe des visiteurs à cet endroit.

(1105)



En cette ère de crise climatique, chaque mesure compte. Chaque petit degré de réchauffement compte, chaque année compte et chaque choix compte. C'est le message que la grève des jeunes pour le climat a porté sur la Colline du Parlement et partout dans le monde, le 15 mars. J'étais parmi eux sur la Colline ce jour-là et je me suis entretenu avec une centaine d'entre eux, individuellement et en groupe. Quand je leur ai parlé de l'orme et de l'intention du gouvernement de l'abattre, tous se sont montrés choqués, incrédules et dégoûtés. Ils ne croient pas que vos priorités soient les bonnes.

Jusqu'à mardi dernier, cet orme n'était pas seul. Il était entouré de nombreux autres arbres matures. La plupart de ces arbres ont été abattus par les employés de SPAC la semaine dernière, lorsqu'ils ont rasé toute la végétation sur le site pour y établir une zone de construction. Cette petite enclave faisait partie de la forêt urbaine de la ville, qui constitue un des meilleurs atouts de la ville pour lutter contre les changements climatiques. Elle offrait de l'ombre aux visiteurs de la Colline, laquelle aurait autrement été passablement dénudée, rafraîchissait et filtrait l'air ambiant, captait et fixait le carbone et libérait l'oxygène que nous respirons. Bref, elle faisait ce que les arbres font pour nous: elle préservait la vie.

Cette coupe à blanc peut sembler catastrophique, mais elle représente dans les faits une occasion. L'un des rapports commandés à l'arboriculteur par SPAC en septembre 2018 recommandait ce qui suit: Si on décide de préserver l'arbre où il se trouve, il faudra prendre de nombreuses mesures [...] Si on veut améliorer la santé de l'arbre, toute la zone racinaire critique, qui mesure neuf mètres depuis le tronc de l'arbre, devrait être creusée avec minutie et nettoyée de tous débris non naturels. Cette zone [...] devra être fermée au public, et le sol devra être décontaminé.

Si on avait choisi de préserver l'arbre, plutôt que de l'abattre, la coupe à blanc et l'enlèvement de la végétation qu'a fait SPAC n'auraient pas permis le commencement de ces travaux de décontamination. Il s'agit d'une occasion.

Dans des communications précédentes, SPAC et la CCN nous ont demandé de tenir compte du fait que leur projet comprend la plantation de végétaux une fois les travaux de rénovation terminés. Le remplacement de l'orme par un arbre identique prendrait 100 ans. Tout compte fait, il est donc irremplaçable.

Pour ce qui est de la plantation d'autres arbres dans 10 ans, 13 ans, ou peu importe quand se terminera ce projet de rénovation, tout ce que nous pouvons dire, c'est que l'expression « trop peu, trop tard » s'applique littéralement. Nous disposons de ces 10 à 12 années pour prendre des mesures concrètes afin de lutter contre les changements climatiques si nous souhaitons que leurs effets ne soient pas catastrophiques. Toutefois, encore une fois, cette coupe à blanc peut être une occasion. Nous avons donc le champ libre pour procéder à la plantation immédiatement, notamment de grands arbres de calibre, et respecter le rapport de remplacement de quatre pour un recommandé par la CCN afin de créer une nouvelle enclave améliorée à cet endroit.

Chacun d'entre nous est invité à prendre des mesures pour lutter contre les changements climatiques, peu importe l'ampleur de la contribution: réduire nos émissions de gaz à effet de serre et préserver ou développer les espaces verts, qui agissent comme des puits de carbone, dans nos maisons, dans nos modes de vie et dans nos arrière-cours. La préservation de cet orme centenaire et le rétablissement de cet espace vert sont une chose que peuvent faire les parlementaires, ici même, sur la Colline du Parlement, dans leur propre arrière-cour.

SPAC a mentionné le mauvais état de l'orme centenaire pour en justifier l'abattage. Nous avons découvert que les renseignements étayant ce jugement sont contradictoires et peu probants. Notre rapport technique sur la question vous a été transmis le 18 mars. Je me contenterai d'en lire ici la conclusion: Compte tenu des renseignements contradictoires sur l'état de l'arbre, des changements spectaculaires et inexpliqués observés en septembre 2018, de l'absence de tests ou d'inspections autres que les données d'observation visuelle à partir du sol, ainsi que du fait que les conditions de chaleur et de sécheresse observées en septembre 2018 peuvent expliquer l'état de santé de l'arbre constaté à cette date, il semblerait pertinent de retarder l'élimination de l'arbre jusqu'à ce que 1) on ait déterminé si l'arbre a survécu au printemps 2019, et, si tel est le cas, 2) d'autres tests soient effectués afin de déterminer si l'arbre souffre d'une maladie.

(1110)



Cet orme ne doit pas être abattu, et ce projet peut être stoppé, par vous, parlementaires canadiens.

Si la Commission de la capitale nationale autorise l'utilisation des terres fédérales et que Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada, en tant que responsable des terres et des édifices, est chargé du projet de rénovation et de construction, il reste que les deux organismes travaillent selon des exigences approuvées par le Président de la Chambre et le Président du Sénat qui, en votre nom, exercent le pouvoir du Parlement de réglementer ses propres affaires internes et d'administrer la Cité parlementaire. D'ailleurs, votre comité permanent a, à juste titre, pris l'initiative d'exercer la supervision dont ce projet de rénovation a tant besoin.

Lors de la dernière réunion, les employés de SPAC et le personnel parlementaire nous ont dit que les plans de la deuxième phase du complexe des visiteurs en sont à leur toute première étape. Tout ce qu'ils savent pour l'instant, c'est la taille du trou qu'ils veulent creuser. C'est énorme — faire disparaître l'orme centenaire et empêcher la croissance de toute végétation dans le quadrant nord-est de la Colline pendant des années. Est-ce ce que vous souhaitez? Est-ce ce que souhaitent les Canadiens?

Nous vous prions instamment de prendre la bonne décision: préserver l'orme et replanter des arbres autour afin de préserver les avantages qu'ils offrent sur la Colline du Parlement. Mais profitez aussi de l'occasion pour envoyer le bon message à tous les Canadiens qui observent: chaque action compte, chaque choix compte. Nous vous prions de reporter l'abattage de l'orme centenaire jusqu'à la pousse des feuilles et d'entreprendre un processus de réexamen des hypothèses concernant la taille et l'emplacement de la phase deux du complexe d'accueil des visiteurs.

Je vous remercie.

(1115)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Avant de passer aux questions, j'aimerais ajouter un peu d'information qui pourrait changer vos questions. Monsieur Johanis, vous pourriez faire des commentaires à cet égard lorsque vous répondrez aux questions.

Tout d'abord, j'aimerais savoir combien de temps peuvent vivre ces arbres. L'attaché de recherche s'est penché là-dessus pour moi. Voulez-vous lire la réponse?

M. Andre Barnes (attaché de recherche auprès du comité):

Le président voulait savoir quelle était l'espérance de vie de ces arbres. Selon l'Université du Kentucky, nombre d'ormes blancs ou ormes d'Amérique peuvent vivre de 100 à 200 ans, et on en a même observé qui avaient plus de 300 ans.

Le président:

Nous avons également demandé à un dendrologue de Ressources naturelles Canada de fournir de l'information à Travaux publics Canada.

Voici ce qu'il a dit: Merci de votre demande et de l'occasion qui m'a été offerte de voir le grand orme blanc (Ulmus americana) situé à l'est de l'édifice du Centre sur la Colline du Parlement. L'orme en question possède à l'heure actuelle une couronne inférieure à 20 % de celle qui serait attendue d'un arbre sain. Les quelques feuilles que compte la couronne ont une taille inférieure à la moitié de la taille normale pour un orme blanc, frisent et affichent des tissus morts sur les bords. À mon avis, l'arbre est en mauvais état et pourrait ne pas survivre jusqu'au printemps 2019. Sans effectuer de tests, je ne peux pas dire ce qui affecte l'arbre, mais je serais porté à croire que c'est la maladie hollandaise de l'orme ou la nécrose du liber. Quoi qu'il en soit, comme l'arbre n'est plus capable de produire une couronne vivante fonctionnelle, il devrait mourir bientôt. N'hésitez pas à communiquer avec moi pour avoir de plus amples renseignements.

Nous allons passer aux questions. Nous commençons par M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Je ne sais pas si je vais utiliser les sept minutes qui me sont allouées, mais je vais commencer.

Sur la photographie que nous avons devant nous — qui ne sera pas dans le hansard, mais peu importe —, il y a deux autres arbres. Est-ce qu'un de ces arbres est un orme?

M. Paul Johanis:

Non, les autres arbres ne sont pas des ormes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Savez-vous ce qu'ils sont?

M. Paul Johanis:

Je crois qu'il s'agit d'érables planes, mais je ne suis pas spécialiste de l'identification des arbres.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si on retirait ces arbres, cela causerait-il un problème?

M. Paul Johanis:

Ils ont déjà été retirés.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord, alors j'imagine que non.

M. Paul Johanis:

Le seul arbre qu'il reste à l'heure actuelle — que nous pouvons voir, de toute façon, derrière la clôture —, c'est l'orme.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Alors dans 100 ans, selon vous, de quoi aura l'air cet arbre?

M. Paul Johanis:

Cet orme?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

M. Paul Johanis:

Les ormes ont la capacité de continuer à croître. Nombre d'arbres atteignent un plateau, mais les ormes peuvent continuer à pousser pendant très longtemps. Comme nous l'avons entendu, l'espérance de vie d'un orme comme celui-ci peut aller jusqu'à 200 ans. Il existe des ormes deux fois plus grands que celui-ci, parce qu'ils ont emmagasiné du carbone, essentiellement, pendant de nombreuses années.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Disons que nous attendons jusqu'au printemps, aux fins de la discussion, et que l'arbre ne survit pas. Y aurait-il des objections à ce qu'on l'enlève après sa mort?

M. Paul Johanis:

Non. S'il est mort, alors il est clair qu'on ne peut pas le laisser là.

Nous sommes ici pour défendre les espaces verts. L'orme est l'emblème de cet espace, mais il y a d'autres espaces verts dans l'ensemble de cette zone. On a planifié de créer un espace vert à cet endroit dans l'avenir, en y plantant des arbres; c'est ce qui est prévu à l'heure actuelle. Nous disons seulement qu'il faut accélérer le processus et commencer immédiatement.

On a prévu commémorer cet orme. Nous avons entendu dire qu'on pourrait utiliser son bois pour fabriquer du mobilier ou d'autres choses. Une autre option de commémoration serait de réaliser sur place une sculpture avec sa souche. Il existe de magnifiques sculptures de souche qui sont préservées et qui servent de monuments commémoratifs pour diverses choses. Ce serait une autre option.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si on constate que l'arbre est en mauvais état — nous avons eu de solides indications que c'est le cas —, auriez-vous une objection à ce qu'on l'abatte et l'utilise pour fabriquer du mobilier?

M. Paul Johanis:

Non, nous n'aurions aucune objection à cela. Nous voulons surtout que des mesures soient prises pour le garder en vie s'il peut être sauvé.

(1120)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Allez-y, si vous avez autre chose à dire, poursuivez.

M. Paul Johanis:

J'aimerais revenir au commentaire, à la note qu'a lue le président. Par souci d'équité, la personne a répondu en 24 heures à une demande de SPAC, fourni une réponse très rapide et n'a pas été en mesure de produire un rapport avec la méthode complète et les réserves qui seraient normalement formulées dans un rapport professionnel.

Nous soutenons que les conditions météorologiques de septembre 2018 n'ont pas été prises en compte. Je ne crois certainement pas que cela figure dans le rapport. En septembre, nous avons eu deux très longues périodes de chaleur avec des températures dépassant les 28 à 30 oC, ce qui est très inhabituel, et il a très peu plu avant le 21 septembre, date à laquelle les tornades ont frappé l'endroit.

On a examiné l'arbre à un moment où il subissait peut-être un stress hydrique et un stress thermique. On n'en a pas tenu compte.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avez-vous vu le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs à l'autre bout de l'édifice du Centre? Vous avez dû passer par là aujourd'hui.

M. Paul Johanis:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Au-dessus du centre, il y a un endroit qu'on pourrait utiliser comme espace vert. Je ne connais pas sa superficie, mais il y a un espace au-dessus qui pourrait être gazonné. Souhaitez-vous quand même que l'espace entre l'édifice du Centre et l'édifice de l'Est devienne un espace vert que nous pourrions ensuite utiliser? Pourrait-on construire cela au-dessus du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs?

M. Paul Johanis:

Oui, absolument. Le seul problème, c'est que, pour y arriver en 10, en 12 ou en 13 ans, tout ce qui s'y trouve, y compris l'orme, doit être abattu. Nous espérons que le gouvernement est ouvert à examiner des solutions de rechange et que, au lieu de construire la prochaine partie du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs sous cet espace vert, il pourrait la bâtir ailleurs. Il pourrait en modifier l'emplacement de façon à ne pas retirer l'espace vert.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avez-vous des propositions d'emplacements?

M. Paul Johanis:

Nous sommes très désavantagés parce qu'il n'y a aucune information publique sur ce qui est prévu. Nous ne le savons pas. Vous nous demandez de nous prononcer sur un projet qui nous est inconnu.

Nous pouvons présumer, puisqu'on nous a dit que ces arbres se trouvent au centre d'une zone d'excavation, qu'on prévoit prolonger le centre des visiteurs du côté Nord. Remarquez bien qu’il s’agit d’un centre d’accueil sous-terrain, alors, une fois qu’il est prolongé à l’avant de l’édifice du Centre, rien n’empêche, à mon avis, que, au lieu de le construire vers le nord, on construise plutôt un genre de reflet vers le sud, se rendant du côté ouest de l’édifice de l’Est. Mais ce que je veux dire, c'est que c'est juste... Qui sait? Encore une fois, nous ne disposons pas d'information publique.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez dit dans votre déclaration liminaire qu'il faut inspecter l'arbre et procéder à d'autres tests. Que cela supposerait-il? S'agit-il d'échantillons de carottes? Quel genre de travail faudrait-il accomplir? Est-ce que cela mettrait l'arbre en danger?

M. Paul Johanis:

Non. Je crois qu'il existe des façons non invasives de procéder à d'autres tests sur l'arbre. Même dans la note qu'a lue le président... On pourrait effectuer, de manière non invasive, d'autres tests visant à déterminer si l'orme est atteint d'une maladie.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il ne me reste pas beaucoup de temps. Nous avons entendu dire qu'un arbre comme celui-ci possède des racines d'un rayon de 9 mètres ou de 30 pieds. Jusqu'à quelle profondeur les racines plongent-elles? Le savez-vous?

M. Paul Johanis:

Cela dépend vraiment des conditions du sous-sol, à mon avis, mais un des tests ou une des procédures que l'on pourrait utiliser, par exemple, c'est de cartographier l'arbre. Il existe maintenant de l'équipement dont on peut se servir pour cartographier l'étendue réelle des racines de l'arbre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-il possible de construire quelque chose sous l'arbre tout en le soutenant, ou est-ce que cela devient extrêmement compliqué?

M. Paul Johanis:

Je pense que c'est une question technique. Il est possible de creuser un tunnel sous l'ensemble de la ville d'Ottawa pour installer un train léger, alors on pourrait peut-être percer un tunnel ici afin de construire un centre des visiteurs, mais...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous allons l'appeler la Station de l'orme.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. David de Burgh Graham: Je pense que mon temps est écoulé.

Le président:

Peut-être la « Station du gouffre du Parlement ».

Premièrement, juste avant de passer à notre prochain témoin, je vais poser une question aux représentants du ministère des Travaux publics et des Services gouvernementaux dans la salle. Pourriez-vous couvrir certains des points qui ont été abordés lorsque vous présenterez votre exposé dans la prochaine heure? Nous espérons que vous allez parler de la conception précise du nouveau Centre d'accueil des visiteurs et de l'endroit exact où il sera situé. Deuxièmement, s'il y a eu de l'irrigation comme de l'arrosage dans cette zone lors de la sécheresse de septembre, il nous serait utile de le savoir, et également s'il y a des commentaires sur l'analyse de l'arbre que j'ai lue, laquelle a été réalisée sur un seul jour, l'analyse superficielle.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Reid.

(1125)

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

À la lumière du rapport qu'a lu notre président, l'arbre, d'après l'arboriculteur, pourrait être en si mauvais état qu'il ne survivrait pas à l'hiver. Pensez-vous que nous pourrons mieux savoir si l'arbre survivra si nous attendons la fin de l'hiver avant de l'abattre?

M. Paul Johanis:

C'est une de nos demandes: pouvons-nous attendre qu'il verdisse afin que nous puissions voir s'il a en fait survécu à l'hiver et, le cas échéant, dans quelle condition?

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. La proposition de l'abattre était fondée en partie sur l'hypothèse que le bois serait en meilleure condition pour fabriquer du mobilier si l'arbre était abattu avant que la sève coule au printemps. Je ne suis pas expert de la préparation de bois pour la fabrication de mobilier et de ce que cela signifie si le bois est gorgé de sève, mais je ne pense pas me tromper — vous me corrigerez si j'ai tort — en disant que si jamais l'arbre n'est pas en assez bon état pour survivre à l'été et qu'il est abattu à l'automne, s'il survit, mais dans un très mauvais état, la sève aura encore une fois redescendu et le bois sera de nouveau dans l'état qu'il est à l'heure actuelle. Devrions-nous procéder ainsi?

M. Paul Johanis:

J'imagine que oui, mais, encore une fois, je ne possède pas cette expertise. Toutefois, je crois que, en ce moment, la sève a probablement déjà commencé à monter dans l'arbre et je dirais qu'il est possiblement trop tard maintenant pour l'abattre.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. C'est un bon point.

Évidemment, la raison pour laquelle j'ai posé ces deux questions, c'était pour dire que, si la santé de l'arbre est notre principale justification ici, plutôt que le type de travail qui doit être réalisé à l'endroit où se trouve l'arbre, il est donc inutile de nous presser. Nous pouvons aussi bien nous occuper de cela à l'automne 2019 qu'au printemps 2019. Je voulais seulement souligner à mes collègues du Comité que nous ne devrions pas nous précipiter pour cette raison.

Il a été question de la décontamination du sol et de son importance dans ce secteur, ce que je ne comprends pas du tout. Pourquoi faut-il entamer des procédures de décontamination?

M. Paul Johanis:

Actuellement, la zone racinaire critique de l'orme est en partie un stationnement. C'est asphalté, et des automobiles s'y stationnent. Le reste de la zone était, jusqu'à très récemment, très accessible au public. Il y a beaucoup de circulation piétonne et routière autour de l'arbre, alors cela compacte le sol. Les procédures de décontamination visent essentiellement à ameublir le sol afin qu'il puisse absorber davantage d'oxygène pour l'arbre.

M. Scott Reid:

Oh, je vois. Alors, on pourrait effectuer des procédures de décontamination du sol en vue d'améliorer la santé de l'arbre.

M. Paul Johanis:

Absolument. C'est à ça que ça sert, oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Si nous abattions l'arbre, nous n'aurions pas besoin de ces procédures, n'est-ce pas?

M. Paul Johanis:

Non.

M. Scott Reid:

Si nous essayons de sauver l'arbre, alors il faudra décontaminer le sol.

M. Paul Johanis:

Oui. Ce qu'il faut faire, c'est donner à l'arbre l'occasion de survivre et de s'épanouir, alors il faut profiter de cette possibilité. Maintenant que tout a été enlevé, on peut entamer les procédures de décontamination du sol parce que la moitié du travail a déjà été faite.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord, c'est logique. Je comprends cela.

J'ai devant moi la version 2006 du plan sur la capacité de l'emplacement et le développement à long terme pour la Colline du Parlement. À la page 64, le centre des visiteurs se trouve au sud de l'édifice du Centre. L'arbre est à l'est de l'immeuble. Je me suis rendu à cet endroit. J'ai visité cet arbre à de très nombreuses reprises au fil des ans, ou je suis passé près de lui en vélo, à pied ou en voiture, mais j'y suis allé précisément pour l'examiner. Il est très loin de la zone qu'occuperait le centre des visiteurs. Ce sont des plans sommaires, bien sûr, mais néanmoins, à ce que je sache, personne n'a autorisé la construction de ce centre à cet endroit ou assez près de celui-ci pour que la zone racinaire critique de l'arbre... Peut-être que certaines racines en périphérie se rendent aussi loin, mais il est impossible que les racines critiques qui sont essentielles à la survie de l'arbre se rendent jusqu'à l'endroit où sera construit le centre des visiteurs. Il doit y avoir d'autres raisons pour lesquelles on a besoin de cet espace. Les connaissez-vous?

M. Paul Johanis:

Comme je l'ai dit, il n'y a pas d'information publique sur la phase deux du centre des visiteurs, alors je l'ignore.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

Je me suis dit que, sur le plan pratique, il serait peut-être difficile de retirer la statue de Sir John A. Macdonald au moyen d'une grue sans abattre l'arbre. Je ne sais pas si c'est le cas, mais l'idée m'est venue à l'esprit. Je ne vous demande pas de prendre position à cet égard; je me posais seulement la question.

Concernant la taille de l'arbre et sa capacité à survivre, connaissez-vous l'orme de Washington à Concord, au Massachusetts?

(1130)

M. Paul Johanis:

J'ai examiné un certain nombre d'exemples d'ormes historiques comme celui-ci, et il est étonnant de voir combien on peut en trouver en réalité. Juste autour de la table ici, il y a des exemples dont je pourrais parler. Je n'ai pas vu l'arbre de Washington, mais je crois qu'il se trouve dans le livre sur les arbres du D.C. Je crois qu'un de nos membres a apporté ce livre.

M. Scott Reid:

La raison pour laquelle j'en parle, c'est que l'arbre est mort à l'âge d'environ 200 ans; personne ne sait exactement l'année où il a été planté. Il était déjà assez grand pour qu'on y dirige l'armée américaine. Il semblerait que, pendant la révolution, George Washington a pris le commandement de l'armée américaine sous cet arbre, qui était déjà grand et majestueux et qui avait probablement un peu moins de 100 ans à l'époque. Pour cette raison historique, on a voulu le préserver jusqu'à ce qu'il meurt de mort naturelle. Dans la dernière partie de sa vie, il a éprouvé des difficultés pendant plusieurs décennies.

Après avoir montré des signes de maladie, il a réussi à survivre encore 40 ou 50 ans, ce qui nous donne à penser que l'arbre qui nous occupe peut peut-être vivre encore un demi-siècle. Il peut y avoir une autre raison. Peut-être que la maladie hollandaise de l'orme, qui n'existait pas à ce moment-là, est une maladie beaucoup plus grave. C'est davantage un commentaire qu'une question pour dire qu'il y a des situations où des arbres en mauvais état arrivent à survivre encore bien des années.

M. Paul Johanis:

Je crois que c'est un excellent commentaire. Nombre de ces arbres historiques bénéficient en fait de toutes sortes de mesures de préservation visant à les protéger et à les garder en vie. Ce sont des mesures extraordinaires, si vous voulez, mais les gens se soucient de ces arbres et veulent les garder — ils sont impressionnés par ces arbres —, alors ils prendront ces types de mesures.

Je me tourne vers Mme Kusie. Je crois qu'il y a un arbre à Calgary — l'orme « Stampede » — qui se trouve en plein milieu d'un stationnement.

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Oui, il est dans le parc Centennial.

M. Paul Johanis:

C'est de cette façon qu'on l'a en quelque sorte gardé en vie. Il y a d'autres exemples de ce genre. L'érable « Comfort », près de St. Catharines, est un énorme érable qui serait âgé de plus de 300 ans.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je vous remercie de parler également de ma ville. Je suis très impressionnée que vous sachiez d'où je viens. Cela me touche beaucoup.

M. Paul Johanis:

Je vous en prie.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci. C'était très instructif.

J'ai une gravure du Parlement datant des années 1870 au-dessus du foyer de ma maison à Perth. Je crois que l'image est quelque peu idéalisée parce que les arbres sont plus matures qu'ils auraient dû l'être à l'époque. Dans la conception initiale de la Colline, on prévoyait un parc pour l'agrément général des citoyens. On supposait qu'il comporterait plus d'espaces verts et moins de... Il y a un grand terrain couvert de gazon sur lequel on passe un gros rouleau chaque année, mais ce n'était pas ce qui était prévu.

Je ne sais pas si vous serez d'accord avec moi, mais je crois que, avec les constantes constructions et reconstructions sur la Colline, nous avons perdu de vue une partie de la vision initiale pour cet endroit, qui était une sorte d'arboretum pour les gens. Je pense qu'on a peut-être oublié cela.

M. Paul Johanis:

Je suis d'accord avec vous. C'est pour les gens de l'endroit, mais c'est également un symbole et un message puissants.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Garrison.

M. Randall Garrison (Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke, NPD):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Pouvons-nous revenir à la première photographie? Je crois qu'elle est très intéressante. Lorsque vous regardez cette photographie, quels arbres voyez-vous? Il n'y en a qu'un seul. Si notre projet ici est de restaurer l'édifice du Centre, ce n'est pas seulement cet immeuble qui donne un sens à l'endroit, mais également le site. Cet arbre est presque aussi vieux que l'édifice du Centre, alors je suis d'avis — ce n'est pas vraiment une question — que nous avons perdu de vue ce que nous tentions de faire ici en nous concentrant sur le centre des visiteurs au lieu de rétablir la gloire passée de l'édifice du Centre et du site sur lequel il se trouve.

Ce n'est pas vraiment une question, mais vous avez peut-être un commentaire à faire à cet égard. Ne conviendriez-vous pas avec moi que nous avons perdu de vue quelque chose dans le cas présent?

(1135)

M. Paul Johanis:

Je suis absolument d'accord avec vous. Le secteur nord-est était, jusqu'à la semaine dernière, un espace vert sur la Colline du Parlement. Vous êtes ici tout le temps et vous savez que, pendant l'été, c'est un endroit où il fait extrêmement chaud si vous vous tenez en plein soleil. Il est agréable d'avoir un peu d'ombre pour se reposer. À mon avis, la préservation de l'orme et la restauration de cet espace vert sont une priorité.

Comme je l'ai dit dans ma déclaration liminaire, nous faisons face à une urgence climatique. Nous devons faire tout en notre pouvoir dès que possible, et non pas dans 10, 12 ou 13 ans parce que c'est le temps dont nous disposons pour agir. Pourquoi ne pas reverdir cet endroit immédiatement?

M. Randall Garrison:

Si je comprends bien votre exposé et certains des autres commentaires que nous avons entendus, même si cet arbre est en mauvais état, cela ne veut pas dire qu'il va certainement mourir à court terme. Il pourrait vivre de nombreuses années même s'il n'est pas parfaitement sain, et nous pouvons prendre des mesures pour améliorer sa santé et assainir le sol.

Est-ce que c'est ce que vous nous dites aujourd'hui?

M. Paul Johanis:

Oui. Je pense que seule une évaluation complète de son état, un véritable examen général complet assorti des tests appropriés, répondrait à cette question. Selon moi, nous devons seulement prendre le temps de nous en occuper.

M. Randall Garrison:

Une autre chose qui m'a frappé dans votre témoignage, c'est que je ne crois pas qu'on peut réaliser ce projet en 10 ou 12 ans. Je pense que ce sera un peu plus long.

Si nous envisageons d'avoir un espace vert sur la Colline, nous pourrions consacrer beaucoup de temps à planter des arbres, à engager des procédures d'assainissement pour cet arbre et à planter d'autres espèces complémentaires sur ce site.

Si nous revenons à l'intention initiale, qui était d'avoir un espace vert, alors ce que vous nous dites, c'est que nous gaspillons 10 ans de travail que nous pourrions consacrer à reverdir la Colline?

M. Paul Johanis:

Si on ne revoit pas la taille et l'emplacement actuellement prévus pour le centre des visiteurs, alors, oui, c'est le cas.

M. Randall Garrison:

Encore une fois, comme vous l'avez dit, cela n'a pas de sens, à mes yeux, que nous ne puissions pas construire le centre des visiteurs sous la partie gazonnée devant l'édifice. Je ne connais pas les raisons techniques, mais, à mon avis, nous devrions au moins avoir un rapport qui nous dit si nous pouvons ou non faire cela avant que nous envisagions d'enlever l'espace vert qui s'y trouve et de rendre l'endroit inutilisable pendant 10 ans. Cela ne tient pas debout pour moi.

Je viens de l'île de Vancouver et je suis habitué de voir des gens s'enchaîner aux arbres et, en général, je suis du même avis.

Y a-t-il d'autres ormes près de la Colline? Je crois comprendre qu'il n'y en a pas d'autres.

M. Paul Johanis:

Non. C'est vraiment le dernier survivant. Auparavant, nombre d'ormes se trouvaient sur la Colline. Je suis assez vieux pour me rappeler qu'il y avait des ormes tout le long de la façade sur la rue Wellington. Peut-être à tous les 50 pieds, un grand orme jetait de l'ombre devant les édifices du Parlement et sur la rue Wellington.

Une vidéo d'archive de la CBC datant de 1979 montre des travailleurs qui abattent tous ces ormes pour combattre la maladie hollandaise de l'orme. C'est une vidéo assez difficile à regarder en réalité. Oui, il n'y a pas si longtemps, beaucoup de grands ormes se dressaient sur la Colline, mais celui-ci est le seul survivant aujourd'hui.

M. Randall Garrison:

De mon point de vue, vous nous avez dit deux choses aujourd'hui. D'abord, rien ne presse. Nous avons en cours un projet de construction qui durera de 10 à 20 ans, alors il est inutile de nous précipiter. Il existe de bonnes raisons... Vous avez dit qu'on avait effectué une évaluation visuelle de l'arbre en septembre dernier. Je me rappelle de ce mois de septembre. Nous étions tous un peu épuisés et n'étions pas très en forme à ce moment-là.

Selon vous, y a-t-il une raison pour laquelle nous devrions considérer cette évaluation comme une évaluation complète de l'arbre?

M. Paul Johanis:

Ce que nous demandons, c'est d'attendre jusqu'à l'éclosion des bourgeons pour réellement voir si l'arbre a survécu à l'hiver, s'il est en bon état, puis de mener une enquête en bonne et due forme quant à son état de santé afin que l'on puisse obtenir des renseignements complets, concluants et non controversés sur le sujet.

(1140)

M. Randall Garrison:

D'accord. S'il est possible d'obtenir une réévaluation du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, alors les groupes que vous représentez seront d'accord pour que nous replantions des arbres sur le site immédiatement plutôt que d'attendre que nous ayons terminé les rénovations.

M. Paul Johanis:

Tout à fait.

M. Randall Garrison:

Excellent.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci. [Français]

Madame Lapointe, vous avez la parole.

Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie, monsieur Johanis, d'être avec nous aujourd'hui. J'apprécie l'information que vous nous fournissez ainsi que les questions de mes collègues.

D'après ce que je comprends, l'arbre a environ 100 ans. Est-ce exact?

M. Paul Johanis:

C'est exact.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Notre analyste a dit tantôt que les ormes américains pouvaient vivre de 100 à 300 ans, voire davantage. Vous dites avoir obtenu cette information aux États-Unis, mais tenez-vous aussi compte de l'information qui concerne le Canada? Notre climat est plus nordique.

M. Andre Barnes:

C'est de l'information qui provient de l'Université du Kentucky.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Nous sommes quand même plus au nord. Pensez-vous que cela a une incidence?

M. Andre Barnes:

Je ne le sais pas précisément pour ce qui est de ces arbres, mais je pourrais faire un peu de recherche, puis vous transmettre l'information.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord.

Monsieur Johanis, avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter?

M. Paul Johanis:

Oui. Permettez-moi de faire un commentaire.

Dans la ville d'Aylmer, tout près d'Ottawa, il y a un orme américain comme celui se trouvant sur la Colline. Cet orme doit avoir au moins 200 ans. L'arbre sur la Colline a un diamètre de 84 centimètres et le diamètre de l'orme situé à Aylmer doit être le double. C'est un orme géant. Au Canada et même dans notre région, à Aylmer, les ormes peuvent vivre très vieux.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Il est certain que c'est triste d'apprendre que l'orme est atteint d'une maladie. Vous avez parlé de celui situé à Aylmer, mais y a-t-il plusieurs ormes américains dans la région?

M. Paul Johanis:

En 1979, la Commission de la capitale nationale, ou CCN, a pris des mesures pour combattre la maladie hollandaise de l'orme. Elle a décidé de protéger les 2 000 ormes qui se trouvaient sur ses terres, et sans doute celui situé sur la Colline. Il y a eu un programme de fumigation, puis un programme d'inoculation concernant ces 2 000 ormes.

Nous ne savons pas combien de ces ormes ont survécu jusqu'à aujourd'hui. Plusieurs ont sans doute succombé depuis cette date. La CCN a peut-être cette information et il faudrait la lui demander. C'est une question que nous nous posons. On dit que c'est le seul à avoir survécu, mais est-ce 1 sur 1 500 ou 1 sur 20?

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Où étaient situés ces 2 000 ormes?

M. Paul Johanis:

Ils étaient situés dans toute la région de la capitale nationale.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Cela inclut-il la région située de l'autre côté de la rivière des Outaouais?

M. Paul Johanis:

Oui, parce que la CCN a quand même des terrains de ce côté de la région de la capitale nationale.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Pensez-vous qu'un seul orme a survécu?

M. Paul Johanis:

On ne croit pas que ce soit le seul à avoir survécu, mais en reste-t-il 20, 200? On ne le sait pas.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Au sujet des 2 000 ormes, je suppose que d'autres ont poussé depuis 1979, n'est-ce pas?

M. Paul Johanis:

Plusieurs ormes ont succombé à cette maladie, mais ils ont été remplacés par des ormes hybrides, c'est-à-dire qu'ils ont été croisés avec des espèces ayant une capacité de résistance à cette maladie innée. L'orme dont il est question aujourd'hui est un orme natif, donc il n'a pas été croisé avec d'autres espèces.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Ce croisement vise à les rendre plus...

M. Paul Johanis:

... aptes à résister à la maladie.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Dans ma circonscription, il y a un problème en ce qui concerne les frênes.

M. Paul Johanis:

Ici aussi.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

On est en train d'abattre tous les frênes à Laval et dans les Basses-Laurentides. J'espère que les scientifiques trouveront des moyens pour enrayer les maladies des arbres, y compris celle de l'orme.

Vous avez dit tantôt que l'orme situé sur la Colline pourrait être sauvé. Avez-vous des doutes? Trois arboriculteurs sont allés vérifier et il semble que cet arbre soit malade. Croyez-vous qu'il pourrait être sauvé si on lui donnait un traitement-choc?

M. Paul Johanis:

Il faudrait vraiment y voir. Il faut attendre pour voir jusqu'à quel point il a survécu à l'hiver et dans quel état il est.

J'aimerais préciser quelque chose au sujet des rapports d'arboriculteurs. En mai 2018, donc au printemps, le premier rapport concluait que l'orme était en bon état. Le deuxième rapport fait à la suite des observations du 1er septembre concluait qu'il était dans un état moyen.

Ce n'est que dans les deux derniers rapports de la mi-septembre et de la fin septembre qu'on a conclu qu'il était en piètre état. Il y a eu une évolution. Quelque chose s'est passé au mois de septembre qui a fait en sorte que l'arbre, que l'on considérait comme étant en bon état, puis dans un état moyen, s'est détérioré rapidement au mois de septembre. Qu'est-ce qui s'est passé exactement? Nous pensons que les conditions climatiques ont joué un rôle, mais il n'y a pas de réponse. Il faudrait prendre le temps de faire un examen complet de l'arbre pour voir s'il est affecté par une maladie ou non.

(1145)

Mme Linda Lapointe:

J'ai d'autres questions. Vous avez dit tantôt que vous étiez présent quand les jeunes ont manifesté susr la Colline. Aujourd'hui, dans les nouvelles, on dit qu'au Canada, le climat se réchauffe deux fois plus vite qu'on ne le croyait et que, dans l'Arctique, c'est trois fois plus vite. Croyez-nous, nous sommes très sensibles à cela. Je parle pour mes enfants et mes petits-enfants. Il n'y a pas de doute qu'il faut agir, et nous le faisons.

Vous dites avoir parlé aux jeunes et leur avoir dit qu'on allait éventuellement couper l'arbre, mais leur avez-vous dit que cet arbre était malade?

M. Paul Johanis:

Non. Je leur ai dit simplement qu'on pensait couper cet arbre pour faire place à un centre de visiteurs.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord, mais le fait que l'arbre n'est peut-être pas en bon état n'aurait-il pas pu faire l'objet d'une discussion avec eux?

On dit à ces jeunes qu'on va couper un arbre, mais qu'on va en planter quatre. On se préoccupe du CO2 que l'on respire et qu'on veut retirer de l'atmosphère, mais on parle ici d'avoir quatre arbres plutôt qu'un seul.

M. Paul Johanis:

Oui, bien sûr. Lorsque cette mesure sera prise et que les arbres déplacés auront été remplacés, il y aura là un bel espace vert. C'est certain.

Pour ce qui est de l'orme, il y avait un doute suffisant quant à son état pour qu'il ne soit pas nécessaire de dire simplement qu'il était très malade. On ne sait pas si c'est le cas.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Il y a quand même trois arboriculteurs qui sont allés sur place.

Merci beaucoup. J'apprécie le fait que vous soyez présent et tout ce que vous faites pour la sauvegarde des écosystèmes. C'est important.

C'est tout pour moi, monsieur le président.

M. Paul Johanis:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, madame Lapointe.[Traduction]

Avant de céder la parole à M. Reid, j'aimerais dire que votre chercheur porte une cravate verte, ce qui est tout à fait approprié.

Monsieur Reid, c'est à vous de nouveau.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui. Adam s'adapte à toutes les saisons.

Je pense avoir commis une erreur plus tôt. Je pense avoir dit que l'orme de Washington était situé à Concord, au Massachusetts. Il se trouve en fait à Cambridge, au Massachusetts. Les gens des deux endroits seront furieux contre moi.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'en parlerai à mes amis qui vivent dans les deux villes.

M. Scott Reid:

En ce qui concerne l'expression « orme d'Amérique », ce n'est pas une référence aux États-Unis; il s'agit plutôt d'une référence au continent américain, n'est-ce pas?

M. Paul Johanis:

Oui. L'ulmus americana est le genre de l'arbre, c'est donc une version nord-américaine de l'orme.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

Manifestement, nous nous trouvons dans l'aire naturelle de l'arbre. Nous trouvons-nous à l'extrémité nord de l'aire?

M. Paul Johanis:

Au nord de nous commence la forêt boréale, et on ne le trouverait pas dans cette région. Nous nous trouvons près de l'extrémité nord de son aire naturelle.

M. Scott Reid:

Je pose la question, car si on essaie d'établir un pronostic à long terme pour un arbre, qu'il se trouve à l'extrémité sud de son aire naturelle et que nous nous attendons à ce que la région d'Ottawa se réchauffe avec le changement climatique, il serait donc plus difficile pour l'arbre de survivre. Toutefois, si l'arbre est près de la limite nord de son aire, cela ne veut pas nécessairement dire qu'il connaîtra un destin funeste en raison du changement climatique.

Est-ce que cela vous semble raisonnable...

(1150)

M. Paul Johanis:

Je pense qu'il s'agit d'une hypothèse juste, oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Savez-vous sur quelle distance s'étendent habituellement les racines d'un arbre à l'horizontale?

Plus tôt, j'ai dit qu'elles ne s'étendraient pas, selon moi, jusqu'à la zone où se trouverait le nouveau Centre d'accueil des visiteurs. Toutefois, j'avais peut-être tort. En effet, si on procède à des travaux de restauration sur le mur est de l'édifice du Centre, ce qui est probable, il ne sera peut-être pas possible de garder les racines intactes.

Quelqu'un connaît-il la réponse?

M. Paul Johanis:

En temps normal, la pelote racinaire d'un arbre équivaut plus ou moins à la couronne de l'arbre. C'est la règle générale, mais cela dépend vraiment des conditions de croissance locales. Si certaines zones du sol sont plus perméables que d'autres, les racines pousseront là où le sol est le plus propice, donc les racines peuvent prendre une forme très singulière.

M. Scott Reid:

En ce moment, on peut voir une ravissante photographie prise directement au sud de l'arbre. Si on considère que la couronne reflète la pelote racinaire, cela voudrait dire que l'arbre est assez éloigné de l'édifice de l'Est. La couronne semble couvrir environ la moitié de la rue.

M. Paul Johanis:

C'est probable, oui.

Cela dit, il existe maintenant une technologie qui permet de détecter à distance les racines dans le sol et de tracer la structure racinaire d'un arbre.

M. Scott Reid:

Chouette.

M. Paul Johanis:

Certains arboriculteurs sont dotés de cet équipement. En fait, nous avons demandé à certains d'entre eux de communiquer avec nous pour nous offrir ce genre de service.

Le président:

Pourriez-vous fournir les coordonnées de ces personnes au Comité plus tard?

M. Paul Johanis:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est une très bonne idée.

Je présume que si l'arbre est près d'une zone où il y a des activités de dynamitage... Il y a eu des travaux de ce genre lorsque nous étions dans l'édifice du Centre. Nous avons entendu le dynamitage, et je peux vous dire que c'était stressant pour nous. J'imagine que ce l'est également pour les arbres.

Savez-vous dans quelle mesure cela toucherait la capacité de survie de l'arbre?

Si la construction du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs se déroule comme prévu — et il y aura d'autres travaux dérangeants et bruyants dans l'édifice du Centre —, cela nuirait-il de quelque façon que ce soit à la capacité de survie de l'arbre?

M. Paul Johanis:

D'après ce que je sais, si les travaux ne sont pas à proximité immédiate de la pelote racinaire de l'arbre... les vibrations pourraient altérer la structure terrestre l'entourant, et cela pourrait desserrer les racines. À moins que les travaux ne soient très près de l'arbre, je ne sais pas si cela pourrait avoir un effet négatif sur la survie de l'orme.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

Je vais donc poser une dernière question.

Supposons que nous nous fixons comme objectif d'assurer la survie de l'arbre. Imaginons qu'il soit suffisamment en santé pour survivre quelques années encore s'il est traité adéquatement. Quelles mesures positives doivent être prises pour assurer sa santé?

Par exemple, à l'heure actuelle, les structures temporaires mises en place pour la construction sont déplacées et installées très près de l'arbre. Comme c'est toujours le cas sur un chantier de construction, ces structures temporaires sont placées dans des endroits où on ne prévoit pas creuser, à proximité des travaux d'excavation.

Tout cela — la circulation accrue au-dessus et à proximité des racines — a-t-il une influence négative sur l'arbre?

M. Paul Johanis:

Oui. Si on lance un chantier de construction tout autour et qu'il y a de l'équipement lourd, le sol sera compacté. Cela rend les choses très compliquées. Bien souvent, des arbres meurent précisément à cause d'erreurs commises parce que des travaux de construction ont eu lieu trop près d'un arbre mature. À tout le moins, il faudrait construire une solide clôture autour de l'arbre pour protéger son environnement immédiat. Idéalement, l'arbre ne se trouverait pas sur un chantier de construction, et les travaux seraient déplacés.

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai l'impression qu'il n'y aura pas de machinerie lourde qui se déplacera à cet endroit précis et que les environs immédiats de l'arbre seront occupés par ces remorques dans lesquelles les gens examinent des plans et se réchauffent en hiver, entre autres.

(1155)

M. Paul Johanis:

En fait, nous pensions qu'une zone de rassemblement serait aménagée à cet endroit. Si c'est le cas, il faudrait simplement protéger l'arbre. Toutefois, on nous a dit qu'en réalité, cet arbre et tous les autres se trouveraient au milieu de la zone d'excavation prévue.

M. Scott Reid:

Absolument.

Nous en saurons plus au sujet de la situation lorsque les responsables de l'administration prendront la parole.

Encore une fois, je vous remercie. Cela a été très utile. J'ai appris beaucoup de votre témoignage.

M. Paul Johanis:

Je vous en prie.

Le président:

Merci. [Français]

Monsieur Graham, vous avez la parole. [Traduction]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai deux ou trois petites questions de suivi à poser.

M. Garrison a dit qu'il n'y avait qu'un seul arbre visible. J'aimerais faire une mise au point. Il y a en fait des dizaines de milliers d'arbres visibles en arrière-plan.

M. Randall Garrison:

Je parlais de la Colline.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Sur la Colline, il y en a moins.

Je veux simplement m'assurer que l'arbre ne cache pas la forêt.

M. Randall Garrison:

Un seul est visible sur la Colline.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Un seul est visible sur la Colline.

En ce qui concerne l'orme, s'il n'y en a qu'un, comment pouvons-nous le polliniser? Peut-il être pollinisé? Y a-t-il d'autres arbres aux alentours qui pourraient servir à cette fin? L'arbre peut-il s'autopolliniser comme le maïs?

M. Paul Johanis:

Les ormes sont en fait hermaphrodites. Ils s'autopollinisent.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Donc, si on laisse vivre cet arbre, il produirait des semences viables.

M. Paul Johanis:

Il pourrait survivre et se multiplier lui-même.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La question est non pas de savoir s'il pourrait se multiplier lui-même, mais plutôt de savoir si nous pourrions récolter ses semences et replanter des ormes après la disparition de l'arbre.

M. Paul Johanis:

C'est un très bon point.

Les semences pourraient vraisemblablement être récoltées. Il existe un groupe qui travaille sur un projet de rétablissement de l'orme, à l'arboretum de l'Université de Guelph.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aime l'arboretum.

M. Paul Johanis:

Y êtes-vous déjà allé?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai fréquenté l'Université de Guelph.

M. Paul Johanis:

Ce groupe recueille du matériel génétique provenant de ces ormes centenaires. Cet orme en particulier n'était pas enregistré auprès du groupe, et nous l'avons enregistré à l'arboretum.

Nous avons parlé avec des gens de SPAC lorsque nous avons eu l'occasion de rencontrer Mme Garrett — qui est ici aujourd'hui — et nous avons discuté du projet de rétablissement de l'orme. Ils ont entrepris de communiquer avec l'université. Nous étions déjà en communication avec elle. Je ne sais pas si nous avons servi d'intermédiaires ou non, mais au bout du compte, un contact a été établi.

Nous croyons comprendre que des chercheurs de l'Université de Guelph ont recueilli des brindilles provenant de l'orme, lesquelles seront ensuite greffées à une bouture racinée à partir de laquelle pousseront des gaules. Dans quatre ou cinq ans, on leur injectera la maladie hollandaise de l'orme — pas à toutes les gaules, mais à un échantillon — pour voir comment elles réagissent et si elles possèdent une certaine résistance. Puis, les chercheurs sauront si cet orme possède du matériel génétique résistant à la maladie hollandaise de l'orme ou non. Quoi qu'il en soit, cet orme donnera naissance à de jeunes arbres.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans vos commentaires, vous avez souvent fait référence au changement climatique, que nous prenons tous très au sérieux, comme vous le savez. Quel est l'impact, du point de vue des gaz à effet de serre, du fait de travailler autour de l'arbre — il y aura possiblement beaucoup de mouvements et de déplacements — par rapport au simple fait de déplacer l'arbre? Quelles sont les économies à cet égard? C'est symbolique, mais j'essaie de comprendre quelles pourraient être les économies réelles.

M. Paul Johanis:

À l'échelle locale, il ne s'agit que d'un arbre. Toute sa vie, il a absorbé du carbone et dégagé l'oxygène que nous respirons, mais il ne s'agit que d'un seul arbre.

De façon générale, nous ne prétendons pas que cela aura une incidence à cet égard. Ce que nous disons, c'est qu'il ne s'agit pas simplement d'un arbre; c'est un arbre très symbolique. Quoi que nous fassions ici, cela reflète en quelque sorte notre engagement à lutter contre le changement climatique.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est tout pour le moment.

Merci.

Le président:

Y a-t-il des libéraux qui n'ont pas parlé et qui ont une question d'une minute à poser?

La discussion se poursuivra maintenant de manière informelle, comme nous le faisons pour les questions d'une minute.

Monsieur Garrison.

M. Randall Garrison:

Monsieur le président, à ce moment-ci, j'aimerais poser une question de procédure. Je sais qu'il y a d'autres témoins à entendre à ce sujet.

D'après ce que j'ai entendu aujourd'hui — et il va sans dire que j'ai trouvé cela très convaincant —, nous allons essayer d'adopter un moratoire pour qu'aucun dommage supplémentaire ne soit causé à l'arbre à partir de maintenant, puis demander une évaluation de son état de santé. Voilà ma première question. Comment allons-nous y parvenir dans le cadre des travaux du Comité?

Ma deuxième question, bien évidemment, est un peu plus générale et concerne l'emplacement du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs et la nécessité, à mes yeux, de prendre une décision quant à l'espace vert et de ne pas attendre 10 ans pour le faire.

Je suis un visiteur ici aujourd'hui. Comment le Comité peut-il influer sur ces deux décisions?

(1200)

Le président:

Nous allons reporter la question à la fin de la séance, mais c'est une bonne question. Nous n'allons pas y répondre maintenant, car nous avons d'autres témoins.

M. Randall Garrison:

Je comprends que nous avons d'autres témoins, mais je...

Le président:

Partez-vous?

M. Randall Garrison:

C'est ma troisième réunion de comité aujourd'hui. J'espère que non. Aussi, j'en ai un autre à venir. Non, je ne prévois pas partir, mais il s'agit d'une question essentielle. Je ne pense pas que nous devrions induire les gens en erreur. Si, en fait, le Comité n'a pas le pouvoir d'influer sur l'une de ces décisions, alors nous devons indiquer à nos témoins à qui ils doivent s'adresser pour la suite des choses, si ce n'est pas au Comité. C'est pourquoi je pose la question pendant qu'ils sont toujours ici.

Le président:

Eh bien, je suis certain qu'ils resteront pour écouter les prochains témoins; nous allons donc en discuter à la fin.

M. Randall Garrison:

Merci.

Le président:

Quelqu'un a-t-il une question?

Nous allons marquer une courte pause le temps de changer de témoins, puis nous reprendrons.

Merci beaucoup. Ces renseignements étaient très utiles.

M. Paul Johanis:

Merci de m'avoir reçu ce matin.

(1200)

(1205)

Le président:

Je vous souhaite à nouveau la bienvenue à cette 146e séance du Comité alors que nous poursuivons notre étude relative à l'état de l'orme sur la Colline du Parlement.

Nous avons le plaisir d'accueillir des fonctionnaires de Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada. Nous sommes en compagnie de Robert Wright, sous-ministre adjoint, Cité parlementaire; de Jennifer Garrett, directrice générale, Programme de l'édifice du Centre; et de Lisa MacDonald, architecte paysagiste principale et arboricultrice.

J'aimerais formuler deux ou trois commentaires avant de commencer.

L'un d'eux porte sur la relation avec la Commission de la capitale nationale. Voici un extrait de l'ouvrage Le privilège parlementaire au Canada, à la page 174: « La Commission de la capitale nationale entretient les terrains à la demande du ministre des Travaux publics. » Voilà à qui incombe la responsabilité.

J'aimerais également donner un peu plus de contexte à propos de cette discussion au sujet d'un arbre. Je crois qu'en décembre et au début de cette année, nous avons franchi le Rubicon en permettant aux parlementaires d'avoir leur mot à dire dans l'élaboration de la Cité parlementaire. J'aimerais remercier Travaux publics et le Bureau de régie interne d'avoir conclu ces ententes, lesquelles constituent, selon moi, une bonne chose.

Monsieur Wright, avant que vous veniez ici, j'ai dit que j'espérais que vous incluiez dans votre déclaration liminaire certaines descriptions techniques et concrètes quant à l'emplacement du centre d'accueil des visiteurs par rapport à la base de neuf mètres entourant les racines de l'arbre.

Ensuite, le rapport de mai dit que l'arbre était en bon état, et qu'il s'est détérioré par la suite; l'une des raisons évoquées était la sécheresse de septembre. J'aimerais simplement savoir s'il y a de l'irrigation dans cette section de la Colline, des systèmes d'arrosage, etc.

Enfin, qu'avez-vous à dire à propos du fait qu'il était en bon état en mai? J'ai lu le rapport du dendrologue, M. Farr, que votre ministère nous a fourni; apparemment, ce n'était qu'une évaluation superficielle de l'arbre, réalisée sur une seule journée.

Madame MacDonald, pour commencer, pourriez-vous me décrire un peu votre poste et votre expérience dans le domaine scientifique?

Mme Lisa MacDonald (architecte paysagiste principale et arboricultrice, ministère des Travaux publics et des Services gouvernementaux):

Je suis architecte paysagiste et arboricultrice certifiée. Je suis une arboricultrice certifiée depuis 7 ans et je pratique l'architecture de paysage depuis 10 ans. Je travaille pour CENTRUS depuis septembre. J'ai examiné l'arbre un certain nombre de fois depuis la fin de septembre, et je possède aussi certains renseignements concernant l'inspection aérienne qui a été réalisée récemment.

Le président:

Pardonnez-moi mon ignorance, mais qu'est-ce qu'un arboriculteur et qu'est-ce qu'un dendrologue, et quelle est la différence entre les deux?

Mme Lisa MacDonald:

Je pense que dendrologue est le titre de son poste à RNCan. Je ne suis pas tout à fait sûre, mais je pense qu'il est aussi un forestier professionnel inscrit. La qualification est différente. Un arboriculteur certifié est une personne qui pratique dans le domaine et qui possède une certification décernée par un organisme appelé la Société internationale d'arboriculture. Vous devez passer un examen pour être admis, puis vous devez conserver votre certification au moyen de crédits d'éducation permanente.

Le président:

Le métier est donc lié à la croissance scientifique des arbres?

Mme Lisa MacDonald:

Elle concerne la compréhension des arbres, de leur façon de croître, oui.

(1210)

Le président:

D'accord.

Monsieur Wright, merci d'être venu. J'ai hâte d'entendre vos commentaires.

M. Robert Wright (sous-ministre adjoint, Cité parlementaire, ministère des Travaux publics et des Services gouvernementaux):

J'ai une déclaration liminaire officielle à faire, mais je vais essayer d'aborder certaines de ces questions dès le départ afin de préparer le terrain, si cela vous convient.

L'emplacement du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs est manifestement une question cruciale dans le cadre de l'étude. Vous savez tous que la première phase des travaux liés au nouveau Centre d'accueil des visiteurs vise la construction d'une section située entre l'édifice du Centre et l'édifice de l'Ouest, ce qui fait en sorte que l'entrée publique mènera à l'édifice de l'Ouest. Le dynamitage auquel on a fait référence pendant la première heure de discussion concernait la création de cette première phase du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs. Ce sont d'importants travaux d'excavation.

Même si les éléments finaux du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs ne sont pas définitifs pour le moment, et nous travaillons très étroitement avec les représentants de l'administration parlementaire pour clarifier cela — cela devient plus évident avec le temps. Nous serions ravis de présenter un exposé de la situation. Toutefois, nous connaissons depuis longtemps les grandes lignes du projet du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs. Pour simplifier les choses, la phase un du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs concerne la section ouest entre l'édifice de l'Ouest et l'édifice du Centre. On verrait la même chose du côté est. L'enceinte parlementaire, la triade, serait réunie dans un complexe intégré. Comme l'ont dit les intervenants durant la discussion, il s'étendrait sous la pelouse devant l'édifice du Centre et prendrait la forme d'une installation assez importante qui relierait la triade et qui créerait une foule de services demandés par le Parlement.

D'abord et avant tout, cela permettrait d'améliorer grandement la sécurité de la triade. Il s'agit depuis longtemps d'une priorité relativement à la mise sur pied d'un Centre d'accueil des visiteurs intégré. Ensuite, le centre procure un accès universel, une porte principale à accès facile au Parlement pour la première fois, ce qui est bien sûr extrêmement important; un certain nombre de services aux Canadiens qui visiteront les édifices du Parlement; des services d'interprétation offerts par la Bibliothèque du Parlement; et bien sûr, les services essentiels. L'objectif est de mettre en place des services essentiels pour le Parlement également. À cette étape-ci, on collabore avec les représentants parlementaires et — encore une fois ce n'est pas définitif — on prévoit aménager certaines salles de comité dans le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs également. Il a clairement été dit qu'il était très important de préserver l'apparence et l'atmosphère dans l'édifice du Centre. De nombreux services importants seront offerts dans le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs. Cela nous permettrait de procéder à des travaux de restauration plutôt que de changer l'édifice du Centre, ce qui est crucial d'après ce que nous avons entendu.

Voilà pour le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs. Nous serions ravis de revenir pour vous présenter certaines images qui montreraient cela de manière plus claire ou de vous les faire suivre.

Quant à la question au sujet de l'irrigation, il n'y en a pas dans cette zone. L'irrigation se fait par la pluie naturelle. Peut-être que Mme MacDonald pourrait vous expliquer cela plus clairement.

Il y a une série d'érables, en grande partie, et l'orme est dans cette zone. Certains des érables sont envahissants. Certains tilleuls le sont également. Puis, il y a un certain nombre d'arbres indigènes. Je crois comprendre que les érables sont plus vulnérables à la sécheresse que l'orme, mais on en voit certains qui sont en assez bonne santé.

Les divergences d'opinions au sujet de la santé de l'arbre sont d'une importance cruciale, car la conversation a réellement commencé par des questions comme « Quelle est la condition de l'arbre? Survivrait-il réellement si on l'enlevait et qu'on le replantait? » Au début, nous avons entendu quelques points de vue différents, dont un remonte à 1995, lorsqu'un arboriculteur très réputé a dit que l'arbre aurait une espérance de vie d'environ 20 ans ou plus; l'arbre serait donc maintenant en fin de vie en raison de certains facteurs, du fait qu'il a souffert de la maladie hollandaise de l'orme et...

J'ajouterais que j'ai grandi dans « la ville aux ormes majestueux », soit Fredericton au Nouveau-Brunswick. J'aime les ormes depuis longtemps.

(1215)



Nous avons pris cela très au sérieux. Nous avons obtenu différents rapports, donc essentiellement, nous avons sollicité des gens afin d'obtenir une deuxième et une troisième opinion, comme vous le feriez si vous obteniez un diagnostic médical. En fait, je crois qu'à l'heure actuelle, il y a eu six évaluations. Il semble y avoir des données assez concluantes — et je vais peut-être demander à Mme MacDonald d'en parler de manière plus précise — selon lesquelles l'état de santé de l'arbre est mauvais et se détériore et que ce n'est pas un bon candidat pour l'enlèvement et le replantage. Ces données nous ont vraiment guidés au moment de formuler nos conseils.

Sur ce, je vais passer aux commentaires officiels. [Français]

Bonjour. Je m'appelle Robert Wright et je suis le sous-ministre adjoint responsable de la Cité parlementaire à Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada, ou SPAC.[Traduction]

Je suis également en compagnie de Jennifer Garrett, directrice générale du Programme de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre, et de Lisa MacDonald, architecte paysagiste qui travaille au sein de l'équipe de conception du projet, CENTRUS. [Français]

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais commencer par vous remercier, ainsi que tous les membres du Comité, de votre intérêt pour la restauration et la modernisation de la Cité parlementaire.[Traduction]

Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada s'est engagé à travailler en partenariat avec le Parlement pour mettre en oeuvre notre vision et notre plan à long terme qui sont axés sur la restauration et la modernisation de la Cité parlementaire pour nous assurer qu'elle répond aux besoins d'un Parlement moderne et qu'elle continue de servir d'environnement accueillant où les Canadiens peuvent se réunir.

Un élément central de ce plan conjoint est la restauration de l'emblématique édifice du Centre et la construction d'un Centre d'accueil des visiteurs élargi, lequel offrira d'importants services aux parlementaires et au public canadien qui visite la Colline du Parlement. Il offrira à la fois une sécurité accrue et une porte principale à accès facile au Parlement.

Notre plan conjoint visant à restaurer et à moderniser la cité s'étend au-delà des édifices et vise à sauvegarder et à renouveler les terrains du Parlement et tous les autres espaces essentiels aux activités de la démocratie parlementaire du Canada.

Le paysage et le cadre, y compris la pelouse d'honneur qui sert comme place du marché au Canada de même que l'escarpement rocheux et la forêt urbaine contribuent tous autant à rendre la cité typiquement canadienne que les magnifiques édifices néogothiques eux-mêmes.

La restauration de l'édifice du Centre et, plus précisément, la construction de la prochaine phase du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, lequel sera souterrain afin de minimiser l'impact visuel sur cet important paysage, nécessiteront d'importants travaux d'excavation. Malheureusement, un certain nombre d'arbres, notamment le grand orme, se trouvent au milieu de la zone d'excavation.

Pour que les travaux puissent avancer, il est impossible de laisser les arbres où ils se trouvent dans la zone d'excavation. Même si les travaux d'excavation ne commencent pas avant plusieurs mois, ils dépendent grandement de l'achèvement des travaux préparatoires ce printemps et cet été sur le côté est de l'édifice du Centre. Ces activités préparatoires incluent du travail archéologique, le déplacement de services souterrains, notamment un massif de conduits de TI, et l'achèvement d'une route de construction.[Français]

Faire preuve de leadership en matière de développement durable est l'un des objectifs centraux de la vision et du plan à long terme ainsi que du projet de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre. Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada s'est engagé à travailler avec le Parlement pour réduire son empreinte environnementale et pour protéger et améliorer la forêt urbaine du Parlement.[Traduction]

Comme moyen de respecter cet important engagement, Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada a mis sur pied une stratégie exhaustive afin de réduire au minimum les répercussions de ces travaux d'excavation nécessaires. Le plan est axé sur le déplacement, lorsque cela est possible, des arbres indigènes dans la zone et le remplacement dans la cité de chaque arbre éliminé par quatre arbres. Veuillez noter que ce plan dépasse la pratique exemplaire recommandée par la Commission de la capitale nationale, qui consiste à remplacer chaque arbre par deux arbres.

Sur 30 arbres touchés, 14 seront déplacés dans la cité. Des 16 arbres qui seront enlevés, 8 appartiennent à des espèces envahissantes. Pour compenser les 16 arbres enlevés, 64 nouveaux arbres seront plantés dans la cité.

(1220)



De plus, les projets de l'édifice du Centre et du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs comprendront la mise en oeuvre d'un plan paysager dans le cadre duquel on replantera des arbres supplémentaires sur les terrains d'attractions est.

Afin de mettre en oeuvre ces plans, nous avons travaillé main dans la main avec des fonctionnaires du Parlement qui ont participé tout au long du processus. Nous avons également discuté avec le Bureau d'examen des édifices fédéraux du patrimoine, compte tenu du statut important de la Colline du Parlement, et la Commission de la capitale nationale, qui a examiné nos plans et approuvé leur mise en oeuvre. [Français]

De plus, la ministre Qualtrough a communiqué avec l'Alliance pour les espaces verts de la capitale du Canada au sujet du plan visant à retirer l'arbre. Des représentants du ministère ont également rencontré des représentants de cette organisation. De plus, SPAC a répondu à une lettre conjointe des présidents de la Chambre des communes et du Sénat du Canada.[Traduction]

Je veux assurer aux membres du Comité que le retrait d'arbres dans la Cité parlementaire est considéré comme une option de dernier recours. Malheureusement, l'orme d'Amérique est situé dans une zone d'activités de construction intensives qui requiert d'importants travaux d'excavation, et il ne pourra pas rester à l'endroit où il se trouve actuellement.

Comme l'arbre ne peut pas rester là où il est, Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada a demandé conseil à des experts indépendants concernant la possibilité de le replanter ailleurs. Plusieurs arboriculteurs ont été consultés. Ils ont conclu que la santé de l'orme se détériore et que, compte tenu de son état de santé, il ne survivrait probablement pas au traumatisme de la replantation, et ce, même si on avait recours à des pratiques exemplaires de calibre mondial en la matière. Le coût lié à la replantation de l'arbre serait important; on estime qu'il s'établirait à environ 400 000 $. Ces coûts ont été établis par la société de gestion des travaux du projet, PCL/EllisDon, une coentreprise. La santé en déclin de l'orme, sa faible probabilité de survie et les coûts importants nous ont amenés à recommander le retrait de l'arbre.

Même si les travaux relatifs au Centre d'accueil des visiteurs ne sont pas réalisés comme il a été mentionné plus tôt et que l'arbre reste en place, d'importantes activités de construction visant la remise en état de l'édifice du Centre, comme l'excavation des fondations et des travaux de maçonnerie à l'extérieur du bâtiment, causeront sans doute du stress à l'arbre et empireront son état de santé déjà mauvais. Afin de préserver l'héritage de l'orme d'Amérique, on propose que le sculpteur du Dominion transforme le bois en sculpture, en consultation avec le Parlement. Comme vous le savez peut-être, les trônes utilisés dans l'édifice nouvellement restauré du Sénat du Canada sont faits de bois donné par la Reine qui provient de son domaine.

En outre, sur recommandation de l'Alliance pour les espaces verts de la capitale du Canada, nous travaillons avec l'Université de Guelph afin de propager l'orme, et des échantillons génétiques seront fournis pour appuyer le projet de rétablissement de l'orme de l'université. Nous avons récemment prélevé environ une centaine d'échantillons de brindilles dans le but de pouvoir planter jusqu'à environ 50 nouveaux ormes à l'intérieur de la Cité parlementaire.

Cela signifie que la reproduction à partir des échantillons d'arbre se fera sous supervision scientifique, et nous sommes déterminés à poursuivre le travail avec l'Alliance pour les espaces verts afin de rendre honneur à l'arbre et de collaborer avec le Parlement dans le but de trouver des endroits appropriés où les nouveaux ormes pourraient être plantés.

Maintenant que les activités parlementaires ont été déménagées à l'extérieur de l'édifice du Centre, nous nous préparons à entreprendre le grand programme de remise en état. Nous voulons que le projet continue de se dérouler selon l'échéancier prévu afin que l'édifice du Centre puisse redevenir le siège du gouvernement dès que possible. Les travaux qui commenceront ce printemps sur les terrains d'attractions sont essentiels au maintien de l'élan du programme. [Français]

En terminant, je voudrais rappeler que la collaboration continue avec le Parlement est essentielle pour assurer que les travaux répondent aux besoins d'une démocratie parlementaire du XXIe siècle sans perdre le lien avec notre passé collectif.

Encore une fois, je tiens à vous remercier de votre intérêt. Je serai content de répondre à vos questions. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je regarde cette photographie. Y a-t-il une raison pour laquelle le nouveau Centre des visiteurs ne pourrait pas commencer là où se trouve la petite cabane grise et s'étendre vers le sud, en direction de la pelouse?

M. Robert Wright:

Pour l'instant, nous croyons savoir que cette option réduirait le volume prévu du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs dans une proportion d'environ 15 %, ce qui aurait une incidence importante.

Si nous prenons le système radiculaire, comme on l'a mentionné — et je céderai la parole à Mme MacDonald —, il est certain qu'il s'étend bien au-delà du tronc de l'arbre. Une grande zone serait proscrite, et il faudrait que toute activité soit interdite dans ces environs.

On ne pourrait pas le laisser là sans changer le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, mais, s'il devait changer, il serait très difficile de protéger l'arbre.

Nous croyons comprendre que, si aucune construction n'était effectuée dans ce secteur, que la remise en état de l'édifice du Centre n'avait pas lieu et qu'il n'y avait aucun Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, il est probable que la durée de vie de cet arbre serait de 1 à 5 ans, pour un maximum de 10 ans. La probabilité qu'il soit encore vivant quand les parlementaires reviendront à l'édifice du Centre est très faible, d'après ce que nous croyons savoir et l'analyse assez importante qui a été effectuée. À ce jour, je pense que six évaluations ont été effectuées, ce qui est assez rigoureux pour l'évaluation d'un arbre.

(1225)

Le président:

D'accord.

Nous allons passer aux questions.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

D'après ce que vous venez tout juste de dire, quel serait le coût lié au fait de laisser l'arbre en place?

M. Robert Wright:

Il faudrait que nous procédions à une analyse importante de cette question.

Avant d'en arriver aux coûts, je préciserais que votre Centre d'accueil des visiteurs ne serait pas symétrique. Cela aurait une incidence sur l'aspect de la Colline du Parlement et du paysage. Il serait impossible que l'on construise un centre qui ne présenterait pas la symétrie qui avait été envisagée au départ. Nous avons déjà essentiellement créé cette symétrie dans le cadre de la phase un.

Comme cette phase était essentiellement le point d'ancrage du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, nous avons déjà réalisé une vaste étude de conception pour l'ensemble du centre, laquelle, à l'époque, a été présentée aux parlementaires, a été soumise à l'approbation de la CCN et ainsi de suite. Il s'agirait d'une révision importante de la nature du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, d'abord et avant tout.

Ensuite — je ne pourrais pas le faire aujourd'hui —, nous pourrions effectuer une analyse, mais le coût lié au fait de tenter de sauver cet arbre serait important. Ce que je pourrais affirmer avec assurance, aujourd'hui, c'est que les probabilités de réussite seraient faibles.

Je pense qu'un élément qu'il importe de souligner — parce qu'il a été mentionné que des travaux de construction sont en cours et que les remorques d'ATCO et d'autres véhicules du genre sont déjà sur place —, c'est que, une fois que nous aurons installé la zone de construction, elle sera bien plus grande qu'actuellement. Il est impossible que cet arbre ne soit pas derrière la palissade de chantier. Pour la durée du projet, je n'arrive pas à voir comment il pourrait ne pas se trouver derrière la palissade de chantier. Ce ne pourrait pas être un espace vert pour la durée du projet. Je pense qu'il s'agit d'un élément important.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quand cet arbre doit-il être enlevé, aux fins de vos échéanciers actuels?

M. Robert Wright:

Nous avons commencé par les plans initiaux, et cette tâche faisait partie d'un ensemble plus large. Comme on souhaitait réutiliser l'arbre, il était logique qu'on le coupe avant que la sève commence à couler. C'était important. Nous avions conclu des contrats pour l'enlèvement de l'autre arbre, alors il était logique de tout faire en même temps.

Comme je l'ai indiqué, une série de travaux doivent être réalisés ce printemps, et ils commencent essentiellement maintenant. Il y a trois éléments essentiels, soit les travaux archéologiques; le retrait de services souterrains, y compris un massif de conduits de TI; et la création d'une route de construction, qui permettra la remise en état de l'édifice du Centre. Elle permettra la désaffectation de cet édifice et la mise en oeuvre des travaux d'excavation. Il s'agit là des projets précurseurs essentiels.

Tous ces travaux doivent commencer ce printemps. À la toute fin — et cela causerait des problèmes —, selon la façon dont le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs est actuellement envisagé, il est vraiment impossible que l'on puisse procéder aux travaux d'une manière qui permettrait à l'arbre de rester en place après la fin de l'été.

(1230)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez parlé de planter 64 arbres. Seraient-ils autour de l'édifice du Centre ou bien à l'intérieur de la cité en général?

M. Robert Wright:

Pour l'instant, il serait à l'intérieur de la cité en général. Nous avons essentiellement adopté pour principe de ne pas replanter les arbres plusieurs fois. L'escarpement est au coeur du projet de replantation, en ce moment, surtout le long du sentier, en bas, car nous savons qu'il n'y aura aucune conséquence au fil du temps.

Un plan paysager d'ensemble sera mis en oeuvre à mesure que nous réaliserons les projets. Comme vous pouvez le voir dans le cas de l'édifice de l'Ouest, des éléments de ce plan paysager seront mis en place à l'étape finale du projet. Un aspect que nous pourrions soumettre à une analyse, c'est la question de savoir s'il y a des moyens d'accélérer la réalisation d'autres éléments du plan paysager au fil du temps. Nous avons pris très au sérieux les commentaires au sujet de l'importance de ne pas attendre 10 ans pour planter d'autres arbres et aménager davantage d'espaces verts sur la Colline.

Bien entendu, la vision et le plan à long terme orientent tous les travaux que nous effectuons en partenariat avec le Parlement. Il s'agit en quelque sorte d'un plan conjoint, et nous sommes en train de le revoir. Ce serait un bon moment pour étudier les façons dont le plan paysager se rattache au plan et à la vision à long terme et pour se demander s'il existe des éléments qui pourraient être intégrés plus rapidement que d'autres.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il ne me reste pas beaucoup de temps, mais j'ai d'autres questions à poser.

Nous estimons que ma circonscription compte environ trois ou quatre milliards d'arbres, alors j'ai un point de vue légèrement différent de celui d'autres personnes sur la foresterie, car nous pratiquons la sylviculture, c'est-à-dire la pratique consistant à planter des arbres, à les cultiver et à les récolter 40 ans plus tard. Mon point de vue est légèrement différent de celui de mes collègues des régions urbaines qui ne font peut-être pas cela.

Vous avez déjà parlé d'abattre l'arbre. La sève pourrait maintenant commencer à couler à tout moment, je présume. Pouvons-nous remettre l'arbre à la charpenterie de la Chambre des communes afin que l'on fabrique un mobilier durable pour la nouvelle chambre? Est-ce l'intention?

M. Robert Wright:

Absolument. Nous voudrions travailler main dans la main avec le Parlement sur ce qui est approprié.

Nous nous sommes déjà adressés au sculpteur du Dominion dans le but d'honorer l'arbre, et cela pourrait prendre la forme de gravures qui seraient installées dans l'édifice du Centre. Ce pourrait être dans d'autres immeubles parlementaires. Il pourrait s'agir de meubles; ce pourrait être des éléments importants. Ils pourraient se trouver dans un espace public ou en chambre. Il s'agit en réalité de travailler avec le Parlement à cet égard.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous avons parlé au témoin précédent au sujet du fait que l'Université de Guelph a prélevé des échantillons de cet arbre. Seriez-vous en mesure de replanter le même arbre sur la Colline en faisant cela?

M. Robert Wright:

Oui. Il y a deux choses. L'une est que les gens de l'université possèdent le matériel génétique de l'arbre et qu'il fait partie de leur recherche scientifique en cours. L'autre, c'est que, oui, le plan consiste à planter des arbres de même origine partout dans la Cité parlementaire. Nous serions plus qu'heureux de travailler avec l'Alliance pour les espaces verts et le Parlement afin de trouver les endroits appropriés où les placer.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Je vous remercie tous les trois de votre présence, et plus particulièrement M. Wright. Je connais votre amour sincère pour cet endroit. Nous avons eu la chance — et ce n'est que par coïncidence — de nous trouver tous les deux sur le parquet de la Chambre la veille du déménagement du Parlement dans l'édifice de l'Ouest. J'ai vu que vous regardiez, d'une part, d'un oeil critique et, d'autre part, d'un regard affectueux les travaux qui avaient été réalisés jusque-là. Même si nous sommes tous critiques, de notre propre manière, envers tel ou tel aspect du déménagement, je pense que ce qui a été réalisé dans l'édifice de l'Ouest est, à bien des égards, tout à fait remarquable, une réalisation vraiment extraordinaire.

Je veux également dire autre chose. Quelqu'un a décidé de retarder l'abattage de l'arbre jusqu'à la tenue de la présente séance. Je ne sais pas si c'était vous ou quelqu'un d'autre, mais, si c'est vous, je vous en remercie. Si c'est quelqu'un d'autre, vous pourriez peut-être transmettre nos remerciements à cette personne pour avoir tenu compte du fait que nous voulions vous rencontrer plus tôt. Des événements indépendants de la volonté de tous les membres du Comité ont retardé la tenue de la séance.

Cela dit, je veux poser quelques questions. Je n'étais pas au courant de l'existence d'un plan paysager d'ensemble. Je me demande si vous seriez en mesure de l'envoyer à notre greffier, simplement pour que nous puissions nous faire une idée de ce dont il s'agit. Nous vous en serions tous reconnaissants.

(1235)

M. Robert Wright:

Absolument.

M. Scott Reid:

Devrais-je présumer qu'il s'agit d'un document évolutif qui change au fil du temps?

M. Robert Wright:

Tout à fait, et, comme je l'ai dit, nous procédons essentiellement à une réinitialisation de la vision et du plan à long terme, alors il s'agit d'un élément qui sera mis à jour également. Le plan paysager d'ensemble date de 2012 — je pense — et vise à étayer un grand nombre des projets comme celui de l'édifice de l'Ouest et d'autres. Il s'agit de l'un des éléments révisés dans le cadre de la mise à jour de la vision et du plan à long terme.

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai ici une copie de la mise à jour de 2006 apportée au plan relatif à la capacité du site et à l'aménagement à long terme. S'agit-il de la dernière mise à jour de ce plan, ou bien y en a-t-il une plus récente?

M. Robert Wright:

Il s'agit de la version la plus à jour du plan, pour l'instant.

Le président:

Puis-je vous interrompre seulement pour une seconde? Simplement en ce qui concerne les lumières, il s'agit d'une demande de vérification du quorum, alors vous n'avez pas à vous en inquiéter.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord; je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Allez-y, monsieur Wright.

M. Robert Wright:

Il s'agit du cadre actuel, et c'est le plan qu'on est en train de mettre à jour. Un trio de documents crée cette vision et ce plan à long terme ainsi que le cadre de mise en oeuvre qui s'y rattache. Nous avons terminé la première étape de la mise à jour, et nous en sommes maintenant à la deuxième étape. Nous serions heureux de venir présenter un exposé à ce sujet.

M. Scott Reid:

À la page 64 de ce document figure une vue en plongée de l'endroit, y compris le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs. Je sais que cette image ne vous est d'aucune utilité, car je suis certain que vous connaissez intimement cet endroit. À l'évidence, l'aménagement est au sud, plutôt qu'à l'est, de l'édifice du Centre, et l'arbre n'empiète pas sur l'empreinte du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs qui est montrée sur cette page. Je présume que quelque chose est arrivé depuis ce moment-là, qui a été approuvé par les voies appropriées, pour que cette empreinte soit étendue.

M. Robert Wright:

Comme vous pouvez le voir, c'est presque un dessin au trait, à ce moment-là, d'un point de vue conceptuel. Ce qui a évolué, c'est la conception de la phase un du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, qui a récemment ouvert ses portes, ce qui a également — d'une façon positive — forcé la réflexion au sujet du centre dans son ensemble. Ce dessin au trait initial a continué à évoluer, avec l'apport d'architectes professionnels et d'administrateurs du Parlement, et on y a ajouté ce qui était envisagé pour cet espace.

Encore une fois, nous serions heureux de venir discuter de l'état de notre travail actuel avec les fonctionnaires parlementaires sur ce qui est envisagé pour l'édifice du Centre et la deuxième phase du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs.

J'affirmerais que les décisions finales n'ont certainement pas encore été prises en ce qui a trait aux éléments exacts qui se trouveront à cet endroit. Toutefois, nous envisageons une phase deux du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs qui ferait environ cinq à six fois la taille de la phase un, qui fait un peu plus de 5 000 mètres carrés, alors c'est considérable...

M. Scott Reid:

Les 5 000 mètres carrés, c'est le centre actuel ou bien celui que vous allez construire?

M. Robert Wright:

Le centre actuel, la phase un.

M. Scott Reid:

Serait-il question de construire quelque chose qui s'étend sur 25 000 mètres carrés?

M. Robert Wright:

La superficie irait jusqu'à 30 000 mètres carrés. C'est à peu près la taille que nous envisageons.

Encore une fois, ce n'est pas final, pour l'instant, mais c'est fondé sur des exigences que nous travaillons à mettre en place.

M. Scott Reid:

Nous pourrions ne pas tous être d'accord pour faire cela, alors je vais poser la question: qui approuve ce projet? Nous voudrons peut-être nous insérer dans ce processus de manière à pouvoir réorienter le résultat. Qui exactement approuve ce projet?

(1240)

M. Robert Wright:

Encore une fois, le Comité tient des conversations — je le sais — avec l'administration de la Chambre. On fait du bon travail dans le but de mieux s'assurer que les parlementaires participent davantage aux travaux, ce qui, selon moi, est essentiel. Pour expliquer ce processus d'une manière peut-être simplifiée, mais pas trop, je l'espère, je dirais que nous ne faisons rien sans respecter les exigences provenant du Parlement.

M. Scott Reid:

Bien sûr.

M. Robert Wright:

Le Parlement établit les exigences, et nous travaillons ensuite main dans la main avec les fonctionnaires à l'élaboration des plans et à la conception. Ensuite, nous collaborons encore une fois avec eux pour nous assurer que ces exigences sont élaborées...

M. Scott Reid:

Je vais vous arrêter pour vous poser une question. Quand vous dites fonctionnaires du Parlement, de qui voulez-vous parler? Voulez-vous dire le Bureau de régie interne? Le Président? Un autre organisme?

M. Robert Wright:

En tant que représentants de Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada, nous n'interagissons pas directement avec les parlementaires. C'est l'administration de la Chambre qui dirige cette intervention auprès des parlementaires et, bien entendu, auprès du Sénat. Nous comparaissons sur demande devant les comités parlementaires.

M. Scott Reid:

J'essaie seulement de comprendre. Quelqu'un approuve le projet afin que vous puissiez affirmer qu'il a été autorisé. Je tente de découvrir qui. Nous ne savons littéralement pas qui est cette personne.

M. Robert Wright:

Concernant les exigences et les plans majeurs, absolument. À ce jour, et je sais que les choses sont peut-être maintenant un peu en train de changer, ces présentations sont soumises au Bureau de régie interne, bien entendu, que le Président préside, et sont approuvées par cet organe.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Garrison.

M. Randall Garrison:

Je veux vous remercier tous de votre présence. Je vous assure que, comme M. Reid, je suis convaincu que vous comprenez l'importance de la Colline et que vous vous consacrez à ces travaux. Cela ne fait aucun doute dans mon esprit, quoique je pourrais vous poser certaines questions difficiles à ce sujet.

En ce qui concerne le plan paysager pour ce chantier, je suppose que je fais partie des personnes pour qui — je ne suis député que depuis huit ans, et j'espère être réélu pour encore quelques années de plus — l'endroit boisé situé à côté de l'édifice du Centre est très important. J'y rencontre souvent des gens au seul endroit ombragé. Le plan paysager pour l'avenir comprend-il un boisé exactement au même endroit?

M. Robert Wright:

Certainement, et, en réalité, l'examen de la Commission de la capitale nationale visait en partie à s'assurer qu'une quantité suffisante de terre recouvrerait le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs afin que l'on puisse replanter de gros arbres dans cette zone. Alors, oui, ce plan consiste en partie — si on veut — à reboiser cette zone au fil du temps.

M. Randall Garrison:

Ainsi, selon la planification actuelle, le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs s'étendra sous cet endroit.

M. Robert Wright:

Oui. Si vous vous faites une idée à partir de la phase un, il s'agit d'une installation souterraine, et nous avons la capacité d'effectuer du paysagement au-dessus.

M. Randall Garrison:

Vous avez parlé de la symétrie, mais vous affirmez qu'il sera cinq fois plus grand d'un côté. Cela ne me semble pas symétrique. À mes yeux, il semblerait logique que vous puissiez effectuer des réductions, et vous avez parlé de 15 % si vous reculiez. Vous ne perdriez pas de symétrie en conséquence de ce recul. Vous pourriez la perdre pour d'autres raisons. Toutefois, la taille et la portée sont très différentes.

M. Robert Wright:

La majeure partie de la superficie provient de l'avant de l'édifice du Centre, pas de... La partie est et la partie ouest seraient symétriques du point de vue de la taille. La majeure partie de la superficie concerne en réalité le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs. Si vous êtes allé — et je suis certain que oui — au Capitole, à Washington, vous savez que le centre des visiteurs souterrain est assez semblable. La plus grande composante de la phase deux — le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs — sera en fait située sous la grande pelouse, invisible à l'oeil nu.

M. Randall Garrison:

J'ai encore de la difficulté avec l'argument de la symétrie, car il semblerait tout à fait possible, d'un point de vue architectural, de recréer la symétrie sans avoir à aller sous cet endroit.

M. Robert Wright:

Comme vous le remarquez peut-être, du côté ouest, il y a une esplanade et un point d'entrée qui relie l'édifice du Centre et celui de l'Ouest. Alors, l'objectif serait de créer ce même lien symétrique du côté est grâce au point de liaison entre l'édifice du Centre et celui de l'Est.

M. Randall Garrison:

Ce serait devant cet endroit, puisque vous m'avez dit qu'il serait boisé.

(1245)

M. Robert Wright:

Les arbres seront au-dessus, oui.

M. Randall Garrison:

Comme M. Reid, je partage certaines préoccupations au sujet de la taille, mais je n'ai pas siégé à ces comités, et nous n'avons pas à mettre notre grain de sel à ce stade.

Manifestement, nous allons fonctionner avec la nouvelle phase un du centre des visiteurs pendant au moins une décennie. Alors, le volet de la capacité en ce qui concerne la sécurité et les visiteurs doit déjà être réglé, sans quoi nous ne pourrions pas fonctionner pendant 10 ans, alors que seule cette partie du centre est exploitable. Nous fonctionnons avec les salles de comité. Tous ces éléments fonctionneront pour la prochaine décennie.

Je me demande si la nécessité que le centre des visiteurs soit de cette taille a été prouvée. Je suppose que tout cela se résume à quelles sont nos priorités. La mienne, c'est qu'il y ait un endroit boisé et que les travaux à cet égard commencent, essentiellement.

Quand vous avez parlé des études relatives à l'arbre, vous avez dit quelque chose d'intéressant que nous n'avions pas entendu auparavant. Je voudrais savoir combien de ces études étaient fondées sur la prémisse selon laquelle l'arbre doit être déplacé, parce que c'est ce que vous nous avez dit, que le déplacement de l'arbre avait été étudié, pas sa préservation.

Disposons-nous d'études dans le cadre desquelles on s'est demandé ce qu'il faudrait pour préserver cet arbre et le laisser sur place? On ne dirait pas.

M. Robert Wright:

Vous avez formulé un certain nombre d'arguments et de questions. Je commencerai peut-être par la dernière, puis je céderai la parole à Mme MacDonald.

Vous avez tout à fait raison. Une grande partie de l'analyse portait sur la question de savoir si cet arbre était un candidat viable au déplacement et à la replantation, mais nous nous sommes penchés sur ce qu'il faudrait pour que l'arbre puisse rester sur place; si le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs devait faire l'objet de changements très importants du point de vue de sa portée, qu'est-ce qui devrait être fait? Ces travaux semblent, premièrement, être assez importants et, deuxièmement, présenter une faible probabilité de réussite.

Je céderai peut-être la parole à Mme MacDonald afin qu'elle vous présente un témoignage d'expert.

Mme Lisa MacDonald:

J'ai évalué l'arbre principalement en vue de sa transplantation, c'est certain, mais l'un des premiers rapports étudiait précisément la possibilité de le maintenir en place. L'arboriculteur en question a conclu que la restauration de la zone racinaire n'assurerait probablement pas la survie à long terme de l'arbre.

J'ai des préoccupations semblables à l'égard de sa survie à long terme. Je pense qu'il fera probablement des feuilles ce printemps, mais, à mes yeux, les questions sont les suivantes: combien de temps lui reste-t-il, et pourquoi pensons-nous cela?

Les conditions de sécheresse que nous avons connues l'été dernier pourraient à elles seules constituer une explication vraiment valable en ce qui concerne la santé de l'arbre, mais je n'ai pas fondé mon évaluation entièrement là-dessus. Quand j'ai regardé l'arbre, au mois de septembre, son feuillage n'était pas très beau, mais il a été comparé à celui des autres arbres, et j'ai aussi comparé diverses composantes de l'arbre qui étaient préoccupantes à mes yeux. Sa moitié nord présentait un feuillage vraiment flétri, et celui de la moitié sud était légèrement mieux. À la lumière de l'évaluation que j'ai effectuée à ce moment-là, j'ai conclu que la moitié nord est peut-être malade.

L'arbre a également subi une blessure marquée par une très grosse cavité médullaire. Ces cavités ne sont pas nécessairement mauvaises pour les arbres. Les très grands arbres peuvent survivre à des cavités médullaires sans problème. Toutefois, l'emplacement de celle-ci était préoccupant à mes yeux. Le fait qu'elle se trouvait sur la partie du tronc qui arborait un feuillage clairsemé était plus concluant, à mon avis, en ce qui concerne la santé générale de l'arbre, que le simple fait qu'il n'y avait pas beaucoup de feuilles. C'est en quelque sorte une question d'évaluer l'arbre par rapport à lui-même.

À long terme, je pense que cet arbre dépérira de plus en plus. La décision doit être prise au sujet de la valeur qu'il offre de ce point de vue, et je suppose qu'il faut déterminer à quel moment il aura dépassé le stade où il vaut la peine de le sauver.

Il est difficile de déterminer exactement à quel moment un arbre est mort. S'il a une branche vivante et que le reste de l'arbre ne l'est pas, techniquement, il est encore en vie.

M. Randall Garrison:

Pardonnez-moi. Sans vouloir vous offenser, nous sommes très loin de cette situation dans le cas de cet arbre.

Mme Lisa MacDonald:

Il est vrai que cet arbre est loin de n'avoir qu'une seule branche vivante. Toutefois, j'ai constaté qu'au moins la moitié de l'arbre était en assez mauvaise condition, et cela a été confirmé par un examen aérien que nous avons mené en mars, alors que nous cherchions à prélever des brindilles pour les envoyer à l'Université de Guelph.

M. Randall Garrison:

Votre évaluation professionnelle serait-elle de meilleure qualité si on attendait que vous puissiez évaluer la pousse des feuilles? N'auriez-vous pas une meilleure idée, comme professionnelle de la santé de l'arbre si vous pouviez attendre le...? Je dis le printemps, mais je suis de Victoria.

Devrait-on retarder cette évaluation jusqu'au printemps pour examiner la pousse des feuilles? Seriez-vous en mesure de mieux évaluer l'avenir de l'arbre à long terme à ce moment?

(1250)

Mme Lisa MacDonald:

D'un point de vue objectif, il est toujours mieux d'avoir plus de données, mais je suis plutôt confiante quant à l'évaluation que j'ai réalisée jusqu'à maintenant, vu que j'ai eu maintes occasions... y compris quand l'arbre était déjà en feuilles. L'examen aérien, ainsi que l'examen attentif des brindilles, constitue aussi un outil très utile pour les arboriculteurs.

M. Randall Garrison:

Monsieur le président, je reviens à ma question de savoir de quelle façon nous pouvons être des décideurs efficaces.

Encore une fois, les deux questions à se poser sont celles de savoir si, à court terme, nous pouvons obtenir une bonne évaluation de l'arbre et, ensuite, de savoir si nous faisons le bon choix de décider d'installer le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs à cet endroit.

J'aimerais encore savoir comment les parlementaires pourront arriver à répondre à ces deux interrogations.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Garrisson.

Nous allons maintenant passer la parole à M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Je ne suis pas certain si nous nous lançons dans des soins palliatifs, parce que, en ce qui concerne cet arbre en particulier, je ne fonde pas beaucoup d'espoir dans ses capacités de vivre beaucoup plus longtemps que l'horizon que nous pouvons entrevoir.

Vous venez de mentionner quelque chose à propos de la vue aérienne de l'arbre. Pouvez-vous nous expliquer comment cela fonctionne? Cette démarche vous fournit-elle des renseignements importants, un ensemble de données probantes, quant à la longévité de cet arbre?

Mme Lisa MacDonald:

Cela nous renseigne davantage à propos de l'état de la cime de l'arbre. Dans le cas qui nous occupe, cela nous a fourni plus d'information concernant l'état de la cavité qui s'est formée dans l'arbre.

On considère que mener l'examen d'un arbre seulement à partir du sol limite l'évaluation. La semaine dernière, nous avons été en mesure d'utiliser de l'équipement qui a permis à un membre du personnel de se rendre jusqu'à la cime pour prélever des brindilles. La longueur de celles-ci et l'état des bourgeons dans différentes parties de l'arbre nous donnent une bonne idée de la santé de l'arbre en ce qui concerne la croissance qu'il a pu soutenir l'an passé. Cela porte non pas seulement sur la période la plus récente, mais bien sur l'entièreté de la croissance au cours de l'année.

Il est aussi très important d'examiner de près la cavité. Cela nous renseigne sur la capacité de l'arbre à combattre avec succès l'agent de détérioration ou ce qui a causé ce creux.

M. Scott Simms:

C'est donc le moyen que vous utilisez pour surveiller l'état de la cavité, en vous plaçant au-dessus?

Mme Lisa MacDonald:

Oui. On prend place dans une nacelle et on s'approche le plus possible. On peut ainsi l'examiner.

M. Scott Simms:

J'avais l'image d'un drone. Je suis désolé.

Mme Lisa MacDonald:

Non, il n'y avait pas de drone; c'était plutôt une personne dans une nacelle.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord. Je m'attendais à quelque chose de beaucoup plus grandiose.

Je conviens qu'il y a des limites aux observations que l'on peut faire à partir du sol. Je suis bien placé pour le savoir: je mesure cinq pieds quatre. Quand vous examinez un arbre, quelles sont les données les plus utiles que vous pouvez recueillir? Quelles sont ces données, qu'il s'agisse d'un examen aérien ou de la prise d'un relevé effectué à l'extérieur de l'arbre?

Mme Lisa MacDonald:

Encore une fois, c'est toujours une bonne chose d'avoir davantage de renseignements.

M. Scott Simms:

Quel est le principal facteur que vous examinez? Si vous n'aviez qu'un facteur à mesurer sur cet arbre pour conclure qu'il est en santé ou qu'il ne l'est pas, quel serait-il?

Mme Lisa MacDonald:

Je ne fonderais jamais une évaluation d'un arbre sur un seul facteur. Je suis désolée. Il s'agit vraiment d'une combinaison de facteurs. Veuillez m'excuser de ne pas fournir plus de détails...

M. Scott Simms:

Il n'y a pas de problème. Je dois examiner des politiques à longueur de journée. Je m'embrouille toujours. Je sais ce que vous ressentez.

Mme Lisa MacDonald:

J'examine la structure de l'arbre, pour vérifier s'il y a des défauts importants, comme la cavité, ainsi que l'état des feuilles, les facteurs environnementaux autour de l'arbre et l'état des arbres à proximité qui subissent des conditions environnementales semblables.

Nous examinons l'ensemble de ces facteurs. On ne devrait vraiment pas en examiner un en particulier, de façon isolée. N'importe lequel de ces facteurs examinés hors contexte pourrait nous induire en erreur.

M. Scott Simms:

Vous avez dit plus tôt que ce que vous avez constaté jusqu'à maintenant vous mène à croire la conclusion à propos de l'espérance de vie de l'arbre. M. Garrisson a évoqué la possibilité d'attendre et de voir l'état de l'arbre ce printemps, même si les renseignements que vous avez recueillis jusqu'à maintenant vous suffisent. Ces renseignements ne sont pas examinés de façon isolée, n'est-ce pas? Jusqu'à quand avez-vous remonté?

Mme Lisa MacDonald:

Nous avons examiné des rapports qui remontent jusqu'à 1995. Toutefois, j'ai commencé à recueillir mes observations personnelles en septembre dernier.

M. Scott Simms:

Il s'agit de vos observations personnelles en plus des facteurs qui ont été mesurés depuis 1995?

Mme Lisa MacDonald:

Oui.

M. Scott Simms:

Donc, en quoi consistent les renseignements recueillis depuis 1995?

Mme Lisa MacDonald:

Nous disposions d'un rapport de 1995 et de cinq autres rapports produits par des arboriculteurs indépendants et des forestiers professionnels inscrits en 2017 et en 2018.

M. Scott Simms:

Très bien. Merci.

Monsieur Wright, ma question est bien évidemment plus générale et ne se limite pas à un seul arbre.

Penchons-nous sur la forêt plutôt que sur l'arbre. Quand il s'agit d'espaces verts, quel sera le portrait à cet égard autour de l'édifice du Centre dans 10 ans, par rapport à ce qu'il était au moment où nous avons fermé l'édifice l'an passé, ou plutôt cette année?

(1255)

M. Robert Wright:

Le plan vise une augmentation importante des espaces verts sur la Colline, et non leur réduction. Nous cherchons à ajouter de la verdure plutôt qu'à en enlever. C'est vraiment l'objectif.

Une des choses qui sont d'une importance capitale, c'est que nous tentons véritablement de mettre en oeuvre une approche campus au fonctionnement de l'enceinte parlementaire. Un des éléments de cette approche tient à la façon...

M. Scott Simms:

Pouvez-vous vous arrêter un instant? Qu'est-ce qu'une approche campus?

M. Robert Wright:

La mise en oeuvre de la vision et du plan à long terme a découlé d'un modèle plutôt intégré et holistique, mais elle ne tenait pas compte d'aspects comme le stationnement de façon aussi exhaustive que les édifices et la manutention de matériel. Toute cette infrastructure en arrière-plan qui permet d'harmoniser et de soutenir le fonctionnement d'un campus ou d'un espace intégré est essentielle.

Vous remarquerez qu'il y a toujours une bonne surface consacrée au stationnement sur la Colline du Parlement. La vision à long terme consiste à réduire les surfaces de stationnement, tout en continuant de fournir des espaces de stationnement pour le fonctionnement du Parlement. Toutefois, on prévoit plutôt un autre type de structure de stationnement, peut-être en partie souterraine, qui permettrait de remplacer une grande partie des surfaces pavées par des espaces verts où seraient plantés des arbres, entre autres.

M. Scott Simms:

Il y a quelques points dans ce que vous dites. Le fait d'ajouter des espaces verts réduit les espaces de stationnement en surface. Je ne veux pas dire qu'il y a moins d'espaces de stationnement.

Avez-vous examiné les possibilités du côté du stationnement souterrain? Des décisions ont-elles été prises à cet égard?

M. Robert Wright:

Cela fait partie de la vision et du plan à long terme. Aucun projet n'est approuvé à cet égard actuellement. Toutefois, cela a toujours fait partie de la vision et du plan à long terme, c'est-à-dire de réduire de façon progressive les espaces de stationnement en surface et de les remplacer par des installations souterraines qui actuellement ne sont pas conçues ni approuvées.

M. Scott Simms:

S'il y a la bonne quantité de terre au-dessus, comme vous l'avez mentionné plus tôt, alors cet espace de stationnement souterrain peut être aussi grand que nous le souhaitons, dans les limites du campus.

M. Robert Wright:

C'est exact. Nous sommes parfaitement au courant des exigences en matière de stationnement et des autres exigences pour assurer le fonctionnement du Parlement.

Encore une fois, nous collaborons étroitement avec les responsables pour nous assurer que le soutien nécessaire est fourni pour les activités du Parlement et que nous sommes en mesure de restaurer de façon adéquate et de moderniser l'enceinte parlementaire pour qu'elle puisse accueillir une démocratie parlementaire du XXIe siècle.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord, et l'épaisseur du sol au-dessus du stationnement serait suffisante pour soutenir un arbre de cette taille.

M. Robert Wright:

Encore une fois, la conception de ces installations n'a pas été réalisée actuellement. Le fait est que nous cherchons à accroître les espaces verts sur la Colline du Parlement, et non l'inverse.

Malheureusement, il nous arrive de nous trouver dans une situation de transition de ce genre quand nous réalisons un projet d'envergure qui a des incidences. Je conviens que ce type de projet s'échelonne sur une longue période, mais il fait véritablement partie de la restauration et de la modernisation de la Colline du Parlement afin que les activités dans l'enceinte parlementaire soient soutenues maintenant et pour les 100 prochaines années.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci. J'ai une dernière brève question à poser.

La proposition d'aménager un stationnement souterrain doit nécessairement entraîner des coûts importants. Cela a-t-il été prévu dans le budget?

M. Robert Wright:

Non, ce n'est pas un projet qui a été approuvé en ce moment selon un budget précis.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci.

Le président:

Madame MacDonald, vous avez mentionné les rapports antérieurs. Il semble que dans le rapport du mois de mai, il était mentionné que l'arbre était en bon état. Cette cavité est-elle soudainement apparue depuis le mois de mai?

Mme Lisa MacDonald:

Non, cette cavité est mentionnée dans ce rapport, et on y souligne aussi la détérioration survenue dans la cavité. Toutefois, cet examen a été mené au début du mois de mai, donc l'arbre n'était pas en feuilles. Il est noté dans les commentaires sur les limites de cette évaluation qu'il n'y avait aucune feuille dans l'arbre à ce moment. Il n'aurait pas été possible de mesurer à ce moment si la cavité avait un effet direct sur la capacité de l'arbre de conserver une couronne en santé dans cette partie de l'arbre.

Le président:

Très bien.

Monsieur Wright, quand j'ai posé la question au début de la séance à propos de la possibilité que vous commenciez les travaux à l'édifice gris et procédiez en avançant à partir de ce point, vous avez dit que cela réduirait de 15 % la taille du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs. Pour quelle raison cela serait-il le cas? Le parterre devant le Parlement est vraiment très grand. Il semble que l'espace y serait illimité pour la réalisation du projet à cet endroit.

M. Robert Wright:

Nous pourrions évidemment allonger la construction qui est prévue devant le Parlement. Vous avez raison. C'est la symétrie qui s'en trouverait modifiée. Tous les renseignements dont nous disposons montrent que cela modifierait un élément important du plan, ce qui demeure votre prérogative. Toutes les données dont nous disposons montrent que cela ne permettrait pas à l'arbre de vivre longtemps.

(1300)

Le président:

Monsieur Garrisson.

M. Randall Garrison:

Monsieur le président, je souhaite proposer que le Comité demande un moratoire sur l'enlèvement de l'orme centenaire et sur les activités de construction qui compromettraient sa santé jusqu'à la fin du mois de juin, afin de permettre une nouvelle évaluation de la santé de l'arbre et des plans alternatifs qui puissent permettre sa survie à long terme.

Le président:

D'accord. Nous allons discuter de cette proposition sous peu.

Quelqu'un souhaite-t-il poser d'autres questions aux témoins?

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, j'étais sur le point de poser des questions, mais voyons d'abord si des personnes souhaitent débattre de cette proposition et, si ce n'est pas le cas, je demanderai de passer au vote.

Le président:

Très bien, lisez la motion.

Le greffier du comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

La motion est la suivante: Que le Comité demande un moratoire sur l'enlèvement de l'orme centenaire et sur les activités de construction qui compromettraient sa santé jusqu'à la fin du mois de juin, afin de permettre une nouvelle évaluation de la santé de l'arbre et des plans alternatifs qui puissent permettre sa survie à long terme.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Nous pouvons poser des questions pour obtenir des précisions sur cette motion, n'est-ce pas?

Vu que tous les témoins sont encore présents, quelle serait l'incidence d'approuver une telle motion? Si nous devions attendre jusqu'en juin, à quel point cela retarderait-il vos plans? Pourriez-vous préciser quelles seraient les incidences?

M. Robert Wright:

Il y aurait des incidences sur l'échéancier et les coûts. Il n'en fait aucun doute.

Pour ce qui est de tous les projets devant être réalisés au préalable — les travaux archéologiques, l'enlèvement des tunnels de service et la voie de construction —, il faudrait examiner les détails liés aux travaux que nous pourrions réaliser en dépit de l'adoption d'une telle motion. Ces travaux devaient commencer maintenant, donc il y aurait, en somme, j'imagine, des incidences pendant une période de trois mois, et une augmentation des coûts connexes qui serait importante.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pourriez-vous nous donner une estimation de ces coûts?

M. Robert Wright:

Puis-je renvoyer la question à Mme Garrett?

Le président:

Allez-y, mais je devrai intervenir dès que vous aurez terminé.

Mme Jennifer Garrett (directrice générale, Programme de l'édifice du Centre, ministère des Travaux publics et des Services gouvernementaux):

Des contrats d'une valeur d'environ 11,5 millions de dollars ont été conclus avec des sous-traitants par l'entremise de notre gestionnaire de la construction afin qu'ils réalisent les travaux prévus dans la zone est des terrains d'attractions, donc nous devrons discuter avec notre gestionnaire de la construction pour renégocier ces contrats, et, bien entendu, comme on peut s'imaginer dans un cas où de multiples activités se déroulent... Il s'agit d'une initiative très intégrée et coordonnée, et de multiples entrepreneurs y participent, donc il nous faudrait demander à notre gestionnaire de la construction de rencontrer de nouveau ces entrepreneurs et de renégocier ces contrats afin de faire en sorte que nous puissions décaler le travail tout en conservant les travailleurs...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Serait-il possible que vous soyez dans une situation de violation de ces contrats?

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Il n'est pas vraisemblable que nous soyons en situation de violation de contrat, mais les coûts de ces travaux augmenteront assurément.

Le président:

Je suis désolé, mais il est plus de 13 heures et je dois obtenir la permission des membres du Comité pour poursuivre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous ne l'obtiendrez pas, parce qu'elle a une réunion de comité. Nous en avons tous une.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Nous devons partir.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Voyons si une majorité de membres souhaitent suspendre.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Suspendre.

Le président:

Suspendre?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Suspendre le débat ou le...?

M. John Nater:

Si vous souhaitez suspendre la séance, nous devons tenir un vote à ce sujet.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous remettons à plus tard ce qui est inévitable pour cet arbre si nous faisons cela.

Le président:

Les membres sont-ils d'accord pour ne pas suspendre la séance?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis prêt à voter sur la motion, si c'est ce que vous voulez faire.

Le président:

Très bien. Les membres sont-ils tous prêts à voter sur la motion de M. Garrisson?

(1305)

M. John Nater:

Je souhaite demander un vote par appel nominal.

Le greffier:

La motion de M. Garrisson est la suivante: Que le Comité demande un moratoire sur l'enlèvement de l'orme centenaire et sur les activités de construction qui compromettraient sa santé jusqu'à la fin du mois de juin, afin de permettre une nouvelle évaluation de la santé de l'arbre et des plans alternatifs qui puissent permettre sa survie à long terme.

(La motion est rejetée par 5 voix contre 4.)

M. Scott Reid:

Avant que vous ne leviez la séance, monsieur le président, je me demandais si vous pouviez...

Le président: Oui?

M. Scott Reid: Je souhaitais poser des questions supplémentaires. Je reconnais que nous avons épuisé le temps alloué et que quelqu'un s'apprête à proposer la levée de la séance, mais j'ai un certain nombre d'autres questions — je soupçonne que c'est le cas pour d'autres membres aussi — qui sont non pas liées à l'arbre, mais au Centre d'accueil des visiteurs et aux travaux qui ont été approuvés, à ceux qui n'ont pas été approuvés et au type de contrats qui ont été octroyés, et ainsi de suite. Je me demande si vous seriez disposé à inviter les témoins — en particulier M. Wright — à revenir.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Monsieur le président, il est 13 heures.

M. Scott Reid:

Je suis désolé, je n'essaie pas de présenter une motion. J'essaie seulement d'aviser le Comité de ma demande.

Le président:

Nous allons devoir lever la séance.

Pour poursuivre sur ce point, comme vous le savez, et M. Garrisson doit le savoir aussi, nous avons établi une procédure avec le Bureau de régie interne afin de mener des travaux portant sur des questions et des plans de portée plus générale. Nous allons suivre cette procédure et trouver une façon de traiter ces questions.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. Merci.

Le président:

Assurément, ces sujets sont tous sur la table.

Merci.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on April 02, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.