header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-12-08 PROC 45

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning.

Welcome, Mr. Lukiwski. You have been on this committee for nine and a half years, so I think you bring lots of experience to the table.

Mr. Tom Lukiwski (Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan, CPC):

Yes. Those are good memories.

The Chair:

Welcome to the 45th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

Today we're beginning our study of the Standing Orders and procedure of the House and its committees. Members will recall that the matter was referred to the committee on October 6, 2016, pursuant to Standing Order 51 following the debate in the House.

A briefing note summarizing the content of the debate in the House was prepared by the analyst and has been distributed twice now to members, once a long time ago, and then just yesterday or today so you would have it again.

Today's meeting is in public. Here is a brief summary of what happened the last time. This comes up after every Parliament. It's a standing order that we have to do this. First of all, the parties distributed the report to all their caucuses and received input from their caucuses. I'm assuming, hopefully, we'll get permission from the committee to allow their caucuses to have input.

Once they got into working on the report and stuff, it was in camera. I think Mr. Richards, Mr. Reid, and Mr. Christopherson were probably here during that procedure last time. Mr. Lukiwski went through one too.

I don't know if those people who were in such a debate before want to add anything to what I've said. Our researcher was integrally involved in the debate last time also. At Tuesday's meeting, he could add anything we've missed.

Tom, go ahead.

Mr. Tom Lukiwski:

Thanks, Larry.

Welcome to everyone here.

Larry was right. For nine and a half years I was a member of this committee. One of the things we did in the last Parliament was to do quite an extensive review of the Standing Orders. To give you a sense of history, as Larry has quite correctly noted, each Parliament is required within, I think, 80 or 90 days of the new Parliament being convened to do a review and report back to Parliament on any potential standing order changes.

Many times that wasn't the case. Many times, if it gave any kind of a review at all, Parliament gave a review that was cursory in nature, but sometimes it didn't even do a review.

In the last Parliament, I had suggested to then prime minister Harper that we do a fairly extensive review, because I felt there were many standing orders that could be revised. Many of them were very outdated and arcane, and I felt they could be dispensed with. Other changes would be perhaps more substantive, for example, if we wanted to take a look at changing the timing of question period, or if we wanted to look at substantive changes in other areas of how committees operated.

However, the one thing I insisted upon after I formed an all-party committee to do this review—and that all-party committee was only the three recognized parties: ourselves, the Liberals, and the NDP—was that if any member of a party brought forward to our little subcommittee a proposed change to a standing order, it had to receive unanimous consent or else it was not even considered. I pointed out that the Standing Orders affect all parliamentarians, and it would be patently unfair, in my opinion, even though we were in a majority situation, to try to change the Standing Orders with the tyranny of the majority. That approach worked out very well.

There were a number of suggestions made by all three parties that were not unanimously agreed upon. Once we found that out, they were off the table with absolutely no discussion. There was no debate. We didn't try to convince others to change their opinion. It simply was taken off the table.

At the end, we did change a number of standing orders. We deleted many of them, primarily because they were outdated, but it was because we had unanimous consent for all of them. Still to this day I feel quite strongly about that. If any Parliament wants to change standing orders, whether they be minor changes or substantive changes, it should, at least morally, get the unanimous consent of Parliament to do so. We don't need it, but I suggest it would be the proper thing to do, once again, only because these are the rules that guide us all. They affect us all. I don't believe in one party using its majority to try to change rules that affect all parliamentarians because it might just be convenient for them or it might benefit them somewhat politically.

That was how we approached things. It was a fascinating exercise to go through and to actually learn more about the Standing Orders. I thought I knew a little bit about procedure before I went into this exercise, but I found I knew nothing. I'm quite a bit more knowledgeable now than I was before.

I understand this committee is looking at the standing order changes now, and that's great, but I would offer up from my experience my thoughts that if you're going to make any changes, I would strongly suggest you try to get unanimous consent before you do so.

Thanks, Chair.

(1110)

The Chair:

Blake, do you remember anything from the process in the last Parliament?

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

I think Tom has outlined it pretty well. I don't know that there's much to add to that, to be honest with you.

The Chair:

Okay, that's fine.

I'm open to suggestions.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

It's interesting to hear the history of it, so thank you for that, Tom.

An idea that I wanted to throw out there is to go through the nine pages of the report from Andre and say which ones we want to defend at committee when it comes to a debate, which ones we find interesting for each of us to do as parties or as individuals, and then take one forward, see if we can get it passed, and see if there's a consensus to go forward on it. I'm not saying we should decide everything. We just say, “These are the ones I want to be the defender of.” The thought is that everybody would go through it and say what they like. That's where it would start, and then I can defend my clause.

An hon. member: Did you come up with lights on the camera? Is that you?

The Chair:

It was Mr. Baylis.

An hon. member: That has been suggested several times.

An hon. member: Yes, I like that idea.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What happened when that came up? Obviously it didn't change, so there was no consensus.

Was there a specific reason for the objection?

Mr. Tom Lukiwski:

That's a good question, David. I can't remember if there was a specific reason.

One of the things that happened with this all-party committee is that it basically just died on the vine. There were so many other issues that were coming forward that PROC had to consider and that Parliament as a whole had to consider. After we made the initial changes, we just kind of stopped.

I certainly was in favour of the camera. I don't know what the rationale of this suggestion was.

I suggested, particularly for new members but it would be helpful for all members, that if you had a camera with a light on, just as if you were in a television studio, you would know where to look. Sometimes it's just embarrassing if you're looking one way.... The camera should follow the speaker, but sometimes it doesn't.

The other ancillary benefit that I thought of, not that members should need any prompting, is that for those members who may not be paying attention in question period or in legislative debate, if they see a red light kind of glaring at them, it might wake them up a little bit. They might pay more attention and not be embarrassed if they see themselves asleep on camera.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think it would also help the camera crew to have that interaction with the people speaking.

Mr. Tom Lukiwski:

We talked about it. I think we actually arrived at the point where we checked with the technocrats to see whether that was within the art of the possible, and it was. It just hasn't been fulfilled. I still think it's a good idea.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There are nine cameras in there. It would be nice to have it.

The Chair:

How many people were on your special committee?

Mr. Tom Lukiwski:

I think there were just three of us: me, Joe Comartin, and who was the Liberal? Kevin Lamoureux. How could I forget Kevin? Not that he wants to speak at all, but....

Adam and I, together with a few others within our caucus and our staff, had a working group, and we went through all of the standing orders. We put out a laundry list of items we thought would be appropriate to change or amend. Every party did the same.

As I mentioned earlier in my dissertation, we brought forward those changes, and we took a look at all of the suggestions. If any party at any time for any reason said, “No, I don't like that change; I'm not in support of it,” then it was gone. We didn't even discuss it. Those that were left, we discussed and determined whether or not it would be appropriate to make the changes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I would be willing to go a step further and have debates on those items. If there's one person objecting, let's at least find out why and see if we can get past it. If they still say no, that's fine, but let's have the discussion.

The Chair:

Are there any further comments on David's proposal that we go through the list and see if there's....

Is your idea to go through the list to see if there's a champion for each item, and if not, then it drops off?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, it's like the “adopt a highway” program, but instead it's the “adopt a standing order” program.

(1115)

The Chair:

Are there any comments on that procedure? It would mean that we would start with a list, with the report, go through it and ask, for the first one if anyone is interested in it, and if not, it would drop off the order paper and we would go on to the—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We could come back to it later if someone else said that they wanted to do that one in retrospect. For example, David isn't here—

The Chair:

Before we go any further, I would like to get approval from the committee that we share this with our caucus members and get their feedback.

Mr. Tom Lukiwski:

Mr. Chair, that was going to be my question. I'm sorry. I'm probably asking questions that have already been asked. Has each party, every member had a chance to take this back to the caucus? I know I did a full presentation to our caucus at one time on all of the proposed changes to try to get their reaction. Because of their reaction, some of the suggestions that we had made, we struck. Our caucus simply wasn't in favour of it. I don't know if—

The Chair:

No, we haven't yet.

Mr. Tom Lukiwski:

It might be wise to do that, because otherwise, I can assure you, you may be thinking that you have a great idea, and once your caucus members find out—

The Chair:

[Inaudible—Editor] permission from the committee.

Mr. Davies.

Mr. Don Davies (Vancouver Kingsway, NDP):

Mr. Chair, I'm not 100% sure that I'm clear on David's suggestion about identifying this and being a champion. I'm not quite sure what that means.

You're asking—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You become the sponsor of the item. We could have a list from the analysts, and as a way of getting rid of stuff that nobody has an interest in, we would just say, “This is the one that I will take to the committee and defend.” It's a way of getting rid of stuff from the list faster.

Mr. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

This is just an amalgam of everybody's—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes. Every idea that came up, every question, and every speech is here. There are a lot of ideas. Some are more interesting than others.

Mr. Don Davies:

The proposal is that as long as there's one person who's saying, “This is something that I could foresee supporting”, it stays on the list.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's right.

Mr. Don Davies:

If nobody does that—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Then it's dropped.

Mr. Don Davies:

Then you drop it off the list. It's a way of culling.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's exactly right.

Mr. Don Davies:

I understand.

The Chair:

Just to be clear on everything, this report has in it everything that came up in the debate from everyone's speeches, so there are a zillion things in here.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Yes, as well as the questions.

The Chair:

Yes, the questions too.

It looks like we have consent on that, but before we do that, do we have consent to discuss this with our caucuses? I don't see any reason why we wouldn't, but....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It isn't a confidential document as it is right now, or is it?

An hon. member: We're in public—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: The document itself—

The Chair:

I'd just feel more comfortable if we all agreed.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I thought the document would be public given that it was a public debate.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's what I was going to ask. If it isn't public, can we make it public?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Yes, I know.

An hon. member: [Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In this case, it's simply a list of what happened in the debate in the House of Commons anyway.

The Chair:

Let me get back to the list.

Ginette.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

My only question is, if we have unanimous consent that there are some items here that we all agree on, why do we need to find a champion for them? If there are some items that we all agree on, can't we just say, okay, it's agreed?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If we all champion it, that makes it really easy, doesn't it?

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

The committee is the champion.

The Chair:

Mr. Davies.

Mr. Don Davies:

Mr. Chair, I'm just here covering for Mr. Christopherson, so forgive my newness to this.

My concern is if we haven't gone back to our caucuses yet to get their feelings on this, it almost appears to me to be putting the cart before the horse. It's hard for me to say to drop something completely or that we'll champion it when I haven't had a chance to get feedback from my caucus. I'm just wondering if anybody else has that—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have no problem with somebody coming back later and saying, “I'm going to champion this.”

The Chair:

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I'll do a mind-meld with David. There's nothing that commits you to a particular position. You can still come back and say.... The question is, if we think it's a stupid idea, let's just punt it, right?

To deal with the question that Ginette raised, again, I think the key for us is that we're just trying to cull this. The only thing I would say is that even if we all champion a particular idea, there is sometimes interoperability between the standing orders that we do have to think through. Even if there's a particular idea that we all agree is a great idea, we have to make sure that we've thought through its broader implications for its impact on all the other standing orders. We could say it's good, but I think we'd still have to look at it as a total package in the end, right?

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Absolutely, yes.

The Chair:

Mr. Davies, and then Mr. Graham.

Mr. Don Davies:

I'd say there are a couple of different ways that this could work. One way is to go through it and identify those issues that we all agree should be punted. That culls down the list.

(1120)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Effectively, you look through it and ask if anybody will sponsor it. If it's no, off it goes.

Mr. Don Davies:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's the same idea.

Mr. Don Davies:

As I heard Ms. Petitpas Taylor say it, the other way is we could identify those things that we all know are worthy of further consideration, of serious consideration.

The difference between those two is that with the second, the latter, you'd end up having a far shorter list. You might end up with the actual 10 or 20 standing order proposals that are serious and that you really want to consider. The other way is that we just identify the ones that we agree should be gone.

A lot of these, I think, will require further consideration. I'm in your hands.

The Chair:

I think you made a good suggestion. We have to check with our caucuses, too, before we decide anything.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think we have an opportunity to make larger long-term changes, so having a discussion on each item would be helpful for the long term, I think.

The Chair:

Do you want to start on the list, then?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mean to see how it goes and see what happens?

The Chair:

We'll try a couple and see how it goes and whether we all agree or all disagree.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Some of the changes in here don't necessarily affect the standing orders, so how do we deal with that? The very first item on the list says to make use of a standing order. You don't make a standing order to make use of a standing order. The standing order is already there. I'm not sure how to approach....

The Chair:

I think anything positive for Parliament, PROC can deal with.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We can make a recommendation on that.

The Chair:

We can make recommendations.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I'll champion that one.

The Chair:

Okay.

On number one, is there any party who rules that one out?

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Are we championing or are we ruling out?

The Chair:

We're going to get it championed the first time through.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The first time through just get a champion.

The Chair:

Table 1 has to do with bills.

Topic 1 is the committee study of bills before second reading: recommend that the government make more frequent use of Standing Order 73.

Anita? Okay.

Topic 2 is on omnibus legislation: examine restricting the introduction of omnibus legislation, or declaring omnibus legislation inadmissible, with the exception of budget bills, provided that matters contained in the budget bill do not fall outside of budgetary matters.

Do we have a champion?

Mr. Davies.

Table 2 concerns committees.

Topic 1 is committee bills: give committees the power to draft and introduce bills.

Anita?

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I will.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

You want to champion everything.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

These are from my speech, actually.

The Chair:

It's going to be a long report.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I was the one who put these in on committees.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

On the second pass you might get rid of more stuff.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

We have more than one.

The Chair:

You might get what?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You might get rid of some more stuff in a second pass, but let's at least see. The worst case is that it isn't going to work.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

These came from my speech.

The Chair:

Maybe we should limit the number that Anita can champion.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

What do you mean?

The Chair:

We're on table 2.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

What do you mean by a second pass? I'm confused.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We'll have a shortened list, hopefully, after this. We might get options sponsored by somebody, I don't know. Then we can get back to the study, because I don't think we're going to get this finished today—I think that's reasonable to assume—since we have to go back to caucus. It's not going to really get going until next year. We'll have a shortened list to work from, and if we want to punt more stuff, then so be it.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Okay.

The Chair:

Okay, back to table 2.

Topic 2 is election of committee chairs by the House: devise a procedure to allow all members of the House to elect committee chairs.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

We wouldn't be masters of our committee anymore.

The Chair:

Anita.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

This is what they do in the U.K.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

The House over the committee, eh?

The Chair:

Next is committee documents.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I was going to go double majority.

The Chair:

Topic 3 is committee documents: allow non-committee members to receive documents from clerks of committees.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We can already do that by the committee.

The Chair:

Okay, I'll pass that one. We have to get rid of something.

Topic 4 is Governor in Council appointments: allow committees to study Governor in Council appointments prior to the appointment occurring.

Mr. Davies.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Oh, good.

The Chair:

We have someone else.

Topic 5 is legislative committees: provide that legislation must be studied by a legislative committee. Standing committees would focus on policy matters and departmental estimates.

This was a fairly major recommendation. You have almost two sets of committees, one that does just the legislation on the topic, and then another that does all these other things. That's a major restructuring of Parliament. Is there a champion for this?

Okay, we'll pass that for right now.

Topic 6 is number of standing committees: reduce the number of standing committees.

Mr. Lukiwski.

Topic 7 is parliamentary secretaries: prohibit parliamentary secretaries from being committee members.

Mr. Davies.

Topic 8 is seating in committee: change the seating arrangement to have members around the table alternate between government and opposition members.

That's so we don't have this sort of adversarial—

(1125)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm not going to defend that. I was just going to say that how we sit isn't defined in the Standing Orders. We sit the way we feel like it. I could go sit between Jamie and Don right now if I wanted to.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

We can still recommend this.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Well, you could.

The Chair:

Did you say no to something, Anita? Oh, it was Ruby Sahota.

Topic 9 is track committee recommendations: create a mechanism for committees to track the recommendations they make in reports.

Mr. Davies.

Topic 10 is witnesses: create a prohibition against members moving motions or raising points of order during committee proceedings when witnesses are testifying.

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

We're all passing, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

It will be discussed later.

Topic 22 is written request to convene a meeting: reduce the number of members who must sign the request to convene a meeting from four members to two, but the two members must be from different parties.

Okay, we'll pass that one.

Now we're on table 3 where the subject is debates.

Topic 1 is on curtailing debate: study the rules and usage of closure and time allocation.

Mr. Davies.

Topic 2 is the duration of speaking times for “controversial” and “non-controversial” bills: provide for longer debate periods on controversial bills, and shorter debate periods for non-controversial bills.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

If nobody gets up, it's not controversial and it ends, so we don't need to change the Standing Orders.

An hon. member: That's right, exactly.

The Chair:

Ruby.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Let's not let anything pass without....

Mr. Don Davies:

Pass.

The Chair:

Yes, pass, Ruby, yes.

Topic 3 is duration of speaking times (general): study both the length of speaking times—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll comment on that one.

The Chair:

—and the time provided for questions and comments. Suggestions for changes included making all speaking times five minutes, making all speaking times 15 minutes, with 10 minutes for speech and five minutes for questions and comments; and blending a member's speaking times with the time provided for questions and comments. Further, prohibit whips from splitting speaking times.

There are a whole bunch of different things in there. Does anyone want to discuss any of that?

Topic 4 is list for recognizing speakers: limit or cease the practice of using a list provided to the Speaker by the parties to determine who speaks next, provided the Speaker recognizes members in an equitable rotation.

Right now, when you have a debate on a topic, your whips line up who's speaking. Do you want to discuss this?

Mr. Lukiwski.

Mr. Tom Lukiwski:

This is just a question, not a point or order or a point of clarification. Will these be the only suggested changes, or is there still opportunity for members to suggest other changes to the Standing Orders?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I'd be open to ideas.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Let me answer that. This committee is master of its own destiny. We're charged with the Standing Orders, and if anyone wants to raise anything at any time, and we have consensus, then I don't see why we can't bring that forward. This is just the mandated opportunity under the Standing Orders.

Mr. Tom Lukiwski:

No, that's great. I didn't know how you were operating, but—

The Chair:

We have a mandate to review the Standing Orders, so you can add stuff if your caucuses want to add things to this.

Mr. Tom Lukiwski:

I would certainly add one, but I don't think I would even get support from my caucus—

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Arnold Chan:

So we have to apply your own rules.

Mr. Tom Lukiwski:

No, no, I mean the rules would be....

I'd love to see a system enacted, as other parliaments have done throughout the world, where notes are not allowed. If you want to get up and make a speech, you don't have any notes.

The Chair:

Okay, except we're not doing the new suggestions right now.

Oh, it's in here.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

(1130)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

But you do recognize that invariably means that both Garnet and Kevin will basically dominate.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

An hon. member: Garnet uses notes now?

Mr. Arnold Chan: Garnet does use notes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My only objective right now is to do a bit of trash collection, so one thing at a time.

Mr. Tom Lukiwski:

No, that's fine.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We can add new trash later.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

I think it's in there.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, you can sponsor it now.

Let's get back to the meeting.

The Chair:

Topic 5 is questions following speeches: limit who can be recognized by the Speaker to ask questions following a speech to members from parties other than the member giving the speech.

Actually, the Speaker has already implemented that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

But if nobody else's party gets up, he'll still come back from the same party. That would get rid of that. I won't defend that.

Mr. Don Davies:

I think it's a bad suggestion.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, me too.

The Chair:

Okay, it's something we're not doing.

Topic 6 is to eliminate sharing or splitting of speaking times.

No one's championing that, good.

I'm neutral, sorry.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

That's fine.

The Chair:

Topic 7 is take-note debates held at the call of the opposition: allow the official opposition to call two take-note debates in each session and allow the third party to call one take-note debate in each session.

Is no one championing it?

Mr. Davies.

Mr. Don Davies:

I'll champion that.

The Chair:

Topic 8 is take-note debates, decision to hold a debate: allow take-note debates to be held if a certain number of government and opposition members assent to the decision.

Mr. Davies approves, champions.

Now we're on table 4 on deletions (Standing Orders, Practices).

Topic 1 is debate on concurrence motion for a report from the joint committee for the scrutiny of regulations: delete Standing Order 128, which schedules a debate in the House, at 1:00 p.m. on Wednesday following a notice of motion, to consider a report from the joint committee for the scrutiny of regulations.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's from my speech. I'm happy to defend it.

The Chair:

Topic 2 is first reading of a bill: cease the practice whereby the Speaker asks the House, “When shall this bill be read a second time?”

Is anyone championing that?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I will. It was in my speech.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Topic 3 is the prayer: end the practice of reading the prayer to begin each sitting of the House. Alternately, it was suggested the word “amen” in the prayer could be changed to “thank you”.

The Chair:

Mr. Davies.

Topic 4 is private bills: delete chapter 15 in the Standing Orders, dealing with private bills (Standing Orders 129 to 147).

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That was in my speech. I'll take it.

The Chair:

You're defending that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't see a reason....

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

That's not private members' bills.

The Chair:

No, it's not private members' bills.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No, it's not private members' bills. This is the C-1000s, which we haven't used for years. We still have it on the Senate side, so everybody goes to the Senate to do it anyway. We used it to build railways and canals. We don't do that much anymore.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

It also allows you to—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We also used it to get divorces. That's how it used to work.

The Chair:

Topic 5 is strangers detained by the Sergeant-at-Arms: delete Standing Order 158, which permits the Sergeant-at-Arms to detain strangers who misconduct themselves in the House or gallery, and who may not be discharged without a Special Order from the House.

In the old days, they would put them in the jail in the basement. If it was just before the summer recess, they were stuck there all summer because the House had to let them go.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Did that happen?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

This came from my speech, but I didn't say to delete it. I said I wanted to understand how it worked. If we want to explore it, I'm happy to do it.

The Chair:

Okay, we'll help David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I will bring it up, and we can shoot it down later.

The Chair:

We'll discuss it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We can put something—

The Chair:

Table 5 is on financial procedures. There's only one item here: ensure consistency between the estimates and the public accounts.

Mr. Davies.

On table 6 with respect to members, there are three topics.

Topic 1 is bribery (process).

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

There's a process to...?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

So much for honourable members.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That came from my speech too, because there's a standing order that said that bribery is a crime, but there's no process to deal with it. I thought, why do we have this if there's no process? I want to understand that.

The Chair:

The explanation says to develop a process for the House to deal with a charge of bribery levelled against a member.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The standing order is also possible.

The Chair:

Are you championing that?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll leave it alone.

The Chair:

We're letting that one go. There's no champion.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, I'll let it go.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It's a criminal matter.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I know, but that's the point. Why is it in the Standing Orders if it's a criminal matter?

The Chair:

Order. We've passed that. It's gone. It's dropped.

Topic 2 is rising to be recognized: allow party leadership to speak from any seat in the Chamber belonging to their party.

(1135)

Mr. Tom Lukiwski:

How do you define “leadership”?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's from my speech. I said anybody from the House leadership teams.

Mr. Tom Lukiwski:

So would that be House leaders, whips, party leaders?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

House leaders, whips, deputy House leaders, deputy whips, because they're often moving around in the chamber, all parties. It's to allow them to speak from any spot. It's too complicated to have everybody do that, but if they're at the other end of the room and they need to speak, they need to be able to get up to speak. That would apply for every party.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Are you talking to the House teams?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The House teams, the House leaders, and deputy leaders.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

The designated officers of the House.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The House officers, yes.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

If you want to champion it, then champion it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, I'll champion it.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

What would be so important that they have to rise to speak?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If something happens and one of the House leaders is at the other end of the room, and they have to rise on a point of order, right now they can't. They have to run back to their seat to do it. Why not allow that small group of people, who are the people managing the House, to get up from wherever they are?

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

That's a selling point for the parliamentary running team, then.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm not a member of that, that's for sure.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Great, so let's get you joined and you won't have to worry about that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's Standing Order 17. I'll defend it.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Fine.

The Chair:

Okay.

Topic 3 is sexual harassment-free workplace: review the measures in place to ensure they are sufficient to provide for a workplace free of sexual harassment for members and staff.

Ginette.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Yes, I'll do that.

The Chair:

We're on table 7 now, dealing with private member's business. There are nine suggestions here.

Topic 1 is amendments during second reading.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Wasn't it meant to be “second hour”?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That belongs to my speech; I had a long speech.

The idea was that between the first and second hour of debate, a sponsor of a motion could move changes to his bill based on the first hour of debate. Because of some controversial bills we've had around the time of this debate, it's just an idea to discuss.

I'll take that one, unless somebody else wants it.

The Chair:

First let me read the whole thing for the record so that it's in the minutes.

The one we just did was to permit the sponsor of a bill to move amendments to his or her bill during second reading debate.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

During second hour....

The Chair:

Do you want to change that to “hour”?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Between the two hours of debate, between the first and second hour of second reading debate.

The Chair:

Topic 2 under private members' business is designation as non-votable: strengthen or add to the criteria by which items of private members' business are judged votable or non-votable.

Was that in your speech, too, David?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No, not that one. The next one is, though.

The Chair:

Is there no champion for that? Okay.

Topic 3 is dissolution: permit private members' items on the Order Paper to survive and retain their place following a dissolution.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Provided members are on the list....

The Chair:

Yes, and the item here was.... Well, you could be like me. Until now, after 11 years, it's the first time I actually have a private member's slot. So this means at dissolution, if it's almost your turn, you stay there, and everyone would eventually get a chance.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I have a question. Does that go through successive parliaments, or within a particular sitting of parliament?

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

Dissolution means the end of a parliament, so it would be from one parliament to the other.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I think you're thinking of the prorogation issue, which is different.

Mr. Don Davies:

It's not dissolution; it's prorogation.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

It's prorogation.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There's something similar to this, as I said in my speech, but it's not exactly this. It might be what it's from. The idea that I was proposing in my speech was this: Let's say a bill passes the House and goes to the Senate, and then there's dissolution. Why couldn't the Senate finish dealing with that? The Senate is not changing. That was my point. It wasn't to come back to the House; it was that the Senate finish it.

Mr. Don Davies:

Private members' items.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, exactly. On a private member's bill that goes to the Senate, and hasn't finished being dealt with in the Senate when the House dissolves, why shouldn't they be allowed to finish that, instead of having it go all the way back to the beginning?

An hon. member: Do you want to champion that one?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: I will, on the understanding that's what I meant, not exactly what it says here.

The Chair:

And it is after dissolution, because right now it has stayed for the five years—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's after dissolution. That's correct.

The Chair:

—or the four years, or however long the parliament lasts.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If you want to shoot it down later, that's fine.

The Chair:

Okay.

Topic 4 is guiding principle or goal of private members' business: allow each member to have one item of private members' business debated each parliament.

Mr. Davies.

Mr. Don Davies:

I'll champion that.

The Chair:

Topic 5 is on hours per week for private members' business: increase the number of hours per week dedicated to private members’ business. It was suggested that a parallel chamber could be used to increase the time available for private members business.

Anita.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Yes.

The Chair:

Topic 6 is on the deadline for motions for the production of papers: establish a deadline of 180 days for papers to be tabled in the House.

Is there not a deadline now?

(1140)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Isn't it 120?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is it 120?

The Chair:

Is there no champion for this?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I won't take that one.

The Chair:

Okay, we'll pass on that.

Topic 7 is on random draw—

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

[Inaudible—Editor]

The Chair:

Oh, Anita is doing topic 6. We're going back to six. Anita is championing it.

A slight problem with this process is that we all gave our speeches and we're going to choose the things that we spoke on, but the people in our caucuses who spoke we're eliminating their items.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We're still going to take it back to caucus.

The Chair:

Okay.

Topic 7 in table 7 is on a random draw held for returning members: devise a mechanism to give returning members priority over newly elected members on the list for consideration of private members’ business. It was suggested two random draws could be held: one for returning members and one for new members.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's also mine. It's not exactly what I said.

The Chair:

It's returning members who haven't had a bill. Is that right?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Returning members would retain their current spot on the list if they return, assuming they get re-elected, followed by people who have been added to the list, such as people who left cabinet between elections, followed by new members on a new random draw. Once you have your spot, you have it until you get your bill, however long it takes. Right now, we have members who have been here for five terms who have never had a PMB, and other members come in and the first week out they'll have one. I don't think that's right. I think everybody should get an equal shot at this.

That's why I'll defend that one. Number seven is mine.

The Chair:

Okay, topic 8 is on a random draw held for members who have a bill or motion ready.

Mr. Don Davies:

Chair, on a point of order, what happened with number six? Was it deleted?

The Chair:

Anita.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Just to keep it alive.

The Chair:

You can assume that by default, if there is nothing.

Topic 8 is regarding a random draw held for members who have a bill or motion ready: when the list for consideration of private members' business is first established, give priority on the order of precedence to members who have introduced a bill or have a motion on notice.

There is no champion for that.

Topic 9, trading on the list: allow for trading between members on the list for consideration of private members' business.

Are you championing this, Arnold?

Okay.

We're on table 8 now regarding question period and statements by members. There are 14 items that came up in debate here.

Topic 1 is on applause: prohibit applause by members during question period.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Everyone's going to hate me, but I'm taking this one.

The Chair:

Anita.

Topic 2 is regarding answers: give the Speaker the power to judge the quality and substance of an answer, e.g., an answer must relate to the question.

Mr. Davies.

Topic 3 is on Deputy Speaker: position a second chair occupant at the opposite end of the chamber during question period.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Like the NHL, with two referees.

The Chair:

Mr. Davies, are you championing that? Okay.

Topic 4 is on government members: only permit questions from government members that pertain to their constituents.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If anything pertains to his constituents.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Yes.

The Chair:

No one's championing that? Okay.

Topic 5 is on reading text.

Mr. Lukiwski.

Topic 5 is on reading text: prohibit members from reading answers or questions.

Mr. Tom Lukiwski:

I've never done it in twelve and a half years, and I firmly believe that this would be a great change in Parliament, a very positive change, so I would gladly champion that.

The Chair:

Well, it used to be like that, from what—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We used to have note cards, and not whole sheets, and podiums for Hansard.

The Chair:

Topic 6 is on the length of questions and answers: extend the length of time provided for both questions and answers, and also extend the time period for question period.

Mr. Davies.

Topic 7 is on the list for recognizing speakers: limit or cease the practice of using a list provided to the Speaker by parties to determine who speaks next, provided the Speaker recognizes members in an equitable rotation.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I'll take it.

The Chair:

Anita.

Topic 8 is on non-partisan statements by members: restrict the use of statements by members to non-partisan statements and statements of interest and concern to constituents.

Is there no champion?

Topic 9 is on notice of questions.

Mr. Don Davies:

May I ask a question on that?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Don Davies:

That's relating to Standing Order 31, I think. Isn't there already some loose rule about the usage of them?

The Chair:

If there is, it's not working.

Mr. Don Davies:

Yes, that's true.

(1145)

Mr. Blake Richards:

I think what you're referring to is the rule that you can't use it to attack another member of the House. I think that was done in the last Parliament, right?

Mr. Don Davies:

Yes, there was some sort of rule around it, I think.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I'm going to read Standing Order 31, which simply says, A Member may be recognized, under the provisions of Standing Order 30(5), to make a statement of not more than one minute. The Speaker may order a Member to resume his or her seat if, in the opinion of the Speaker, improper use is made of this Standing Order.

An hon. member: Without ever defining what proper use is.

Mr. Arnold Chan: Without ever defining what that means.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's why they have a Speaker.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

It's really at the discretion of the Speaker.

Mr. Don Davies:

I don't agree with this proposal, because I don't think you could define “non-partisan statements”.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's too suggestive.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

You're at number 9 after this.

You're talking about number 8, the definition of it, if we wanted to do that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Everything that happens in Parliament is theoretically of interest and concern to constituents, so I don't...it's such a subjective thing that it's pointless.

Ms. Dara Lithwick (Committee Researcher):

We were at number 8, and now you're about to start number 9.

Mr. Don Davies:

The Speaker in the last Parliament did remind people occasionally when people were using their S. O. 31 statements to attack.... I can't remember.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, he was dressing people down for that. He got up and made a ruling that he wouldn't allow it anymore, and if it happened, then the member would be shut off.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Well, if you're attacking a specific member, yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, I think it was maybe even a bit more broad than just a specific member. It's attacking a member or using a...“partisan” isn't quite the word I'm looking for, but if you were using them as attack statements, even on the other parties or whatever.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

It sounds like this is worth further discussion, so just to keep the discussion going, I'll sponsor it.

The Chair:

Get your name on the list.

Number nine.

Mr. Don Davies:

So that's championed?

The Chair:

Yes.

Topic 9 is on notice of questions: add a requirement for notice of a question to be submitted before it can be asked.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Not a requirement.

The Chair:

Is there no champion?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's good practice if you want an answer, but it's not a requirement.

The Chair:

Topic 10 is a Prime Minister questions day: designate a question period for questions to the Prime Minister.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm not arguing for it, but he does only come one day a week now.

The Chair:

Topic 11 is on repetition: restrict number of times the same question can be posed and prohibit repetition of answers.

Mr. Chan, are you championing that?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

No.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Then he'd have to start coming more than one day a week.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Question period is only 15 minutes.

The Chair:

We're on number 11 now.

Mr. Blake Richards:

What I'm saying is, if no one championed it, then he'll actually have to start coming more than one day a week.

The Chair:

Are you asking about number 10, Blake?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Well, I was just asking if anyone had championed it.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm not championing it because I think he does that now and he should be coming more often.

The Chair:

Can we just champion number 11?

Topic 12 is on the respondent: allow the questioner to designate which minister or parliamentary secretary will respond to the question.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I want to address that very quickly. You can't do that because then you'd be referring to who is present or not present in the House, which is against the rules and I think it should stay that way.

The Chair:

Mr. Davies.

Mr. Don Davies:

I'll champion that. I don't think it means that.

The Chair:

Okay, that was championed.

Topic 13, timing of statements by members: move statements by members to the time for adjournment proceedings (late show). Hold adjournment proceedings immediately after question period, rename it, and have ministers respond to questions instead of parliamentary secretaries.

Is there no champion?

Topic 14, urgency of questions: examine utility of Standing Order 37(1), which provides that non-urgent questions can be directed by the Speaker to be placed on the Order Paper.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That came from my speech, but I won't defend it at this point. My question in the speech was, it's there and why aren't we using it? It's just too political, so forget it.

The Chair:

It's not defended.

Now we're on table 9 regarding recorded divisions. There are three recommendations here.

Topic 1, electronic voting or status quo: study electronic voting systems with a view of implementing a process for electronic voting, e.g., members vote using secure iPads. Other members expressed their preference for the status quo.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll put down electronic voting. It'll be fun.

The Chair:

If you hadn't, I would have.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can the chair take it on? I guess so.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Given where he's from, of course.

The Chair:

Topic 2, proxy voting: devise a system to allow members to vote by proxy, e.g. allow members caring for an infant to vote from the lobby.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Family friendly.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'll champion that.

The Chair:

Okay.

Topic 3, timing of recorded divisions: suggestions regarding the timing of recorded divisions included: prohibit recorded divisions after noon on Friday; prohibit votes on Monday, Thursday and Friday; hold recorded divisions on specific days of the week, e.g. Tuesdays and Wednesdays, like in Sweden; and hold recorded divisions immediately following question period.

Is there a champion?

(1150)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes, sure.

The Chair:

Some of those things we're trying to do already, but we need to get it in the Standing Orders. I think we agreed to that at a previous meeting.

Table 10 is on routine proceedings. There are seven items of potential discussion.

Topic 1, answers to written questions: give the Speaker the power to judge the quality and substance of answers to Order Paper questions, e.g. answer must relate to the question.

Mr. Davies.

Topic 2, reorder rubrics under routine proceedings: move the place of motions in the current order of rubrics to place it at the end of routine proceedings. Move the place of questions on the Order Paper to precede tabling of documents.

Is there no champion?

I think the purpose of that item might have been to get some of that business done without being interrupted by a dilatory motion, like we did today. We were debating for three hours on something and then those other things didn't get done. However, there is no champion.

Topic 3, tabling of documents by opposition members: permit the tabling of any document by members of the opposition.

Mr. Davies.

Topic 4, tabling of uncertified petitions: allow members to table uncertified petitions in the House.

What is that?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Twenty-five signatures are required. Give me a break.

The Chair:

You will champion it? Okay.

Topic 5, written questions (allowing questions to stand): remove the requirement that the government ask that all questions be allowed to stand each day.

Is there a champion?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's one of these absurd things where Kevin asks that they be allowed to stand and they have to agree. What happens if they don't agree? I don't even know.

Mr. Tom Lukiwski:

The Speaker wouldn't allow it, though.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It happened very early on. Somebody said no on that one, and it caused chaos at the table as they tried to figure out what to do.

Mr. Tom Lukiwski:

If the Speaker knew what he was doing, he wouldn't allow it.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

It's sort of an auto-pilot thing.

The Chair:

So would you champion that, David?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, I don't see requiring it to still be there.

The Chair:

We'll turn to topic 6, in table 10.

Mr. Don Davies:

What happened to 5?

The Chair:

David championed it.

Topic 6, written questions (questions transferred to notice of motion): delete Standing Order 39(6), which allows the Speaker upon request of government to allow lengthy Order Paper questions to stand on the Order Paper as a notice of motion.

Is there no champion at this time? We can come back to that.

Topic 7, written questions (question made order for return): delete Standing Order 39(7), which allows the House to allow the reply to a complex question to take the form of a return.

Is there no champion?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

[Inaudible—Editor] response.

The Chair:

We're on table 11, sitting schedule. There are seven potential topics for discussion here.

Topic 1, eliminate Friday sittings or continue to sit five days per week: eliminate Friday sittings of the House. Extend the rest of the sitting week in order to accomplish the Parliamentary business conducted on Friday, e.g. sit extra days during the year, sit on certain weekends, add an extra hour per day. Other members gave their views as to why a five-day sitting week should be maintained.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I'll do this one.

The Chair:

Anita will champion it.

Topic 2, parliamentary calendar (adjustment): begin sitting weeks earlier in the fall and adjourn earlier in the late spring. Increase the number of sitting weeks in January, decrease the sitting weeks in June.

Oh, this is mine.

Arnold.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I've got your back.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Topic 3, parliamentary calendar (sitting blocks): schedule sitting in blocks where the House sits for two weeks, then adjourns for two weeks. Avoid long blocks of consecutive sitting weeks.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll take on the second half of that.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

We can amend it, maybe.

The Chair:

Why don't we amend that and just have a discussion on the second half?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, that is just to avoid five-week and six-week chunks when things get really fun around here.

The Chair:

Is that okay with everyone?

Mr. Don Davies:

Do you want to take it, David [Inaudible—Editor] consideration of sitting for two?

(1155)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, it's just the second half, avoiding long blocks of consecutive sitting weeks. I make no promise that I can do it, but let's try to avoid it.

Mr. Don Davies:

I wouldn't mind looking at the two and two.

The Chair:

It's all still in there. We're not amending that at all.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That sounds good.

The Chair:

David is the champion.

Topic 4, parliamentary calendar (tabling): require the Speaker to table the sitting calendar in June prior to the summer adjournment.

Right now it comes in the fall.

Ginette will champion that.

I think the committee was quite favourable to it. We discussed this once, and we were quite favourable to that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We asked for it in our report.

The Chair:

Yes, it was so people could plan things.

Topic 5, private members' business (Fridays): increase the amount of time set aside for private members' business on Fridays.

Mr. Davies will champion that.

Topic 6, prorogation: study the rules and usage of prorogation.

Mr. Davies...we have about three people to champion that.

Topic 7, sitting week schedule (a proposal): the following was proposed during the take-note debate as a schedule for the sitting week: set aside Monday and Wednesday for committee work; on Tuesday and Thursday, the House sits from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.; hold all recorded divisions following question period on Tuesdays; set aside Thursdays for consideration of private members' business and opposition days; question period would be held each day, Monday to Friday.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is that even the days the House isn't sitting?

I'm not going to take this one.

The Chair:

Are there no champions for this?

Okay.

We're into table 12, which is on the election of the speaker. There are three items.

Topic 1, acclamation: amend Standing Order 4 to include a provision for instances when only one candidate seeks election as Speaker.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll take that one. The reason is that when Peter Milliken was re-elected as Speaker, he was acclaimed. I remember watching on TV and seeing Bill Blaikie getting up as the dean of the House to say that there was no process to deal with it so he hoped there would be unanimous consent. But what if somebody had said no? Let's fix that.

The Chair:

Topic 2, election of Deputy Speaker and Assistant Deputy Speakers: provide a formal process or guidelines for electing the Deputy Speaker and Assistant Deputy Speakers; ensure each party has a chair occupant.

An hon. member: Right now, we operate by convention.

Mr. Don Davies:

[Inaudible—Editor]

An hon. member: It's not that now; it's just convention.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's only by convention right now.

The Chair:

Mr. Davies is the champion.

Topic 3, wording issues: clarify or reword Standing Order 7(1.1) regarding putting the question forthwith on a motion to elect the Deputy Speaker, 7(2) regarding the language knowledge of the Deputy Speaker, and 7(3) regarding the term of office of the Deputy Speaker and the provision for a vacancy in that office.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll take that one. That's from my speech also. I read Standing Order 7 and found it utterly convoluted. I wouldn't mind making it a little bit more English.

The Chair:

Okay.

We're going on to table 13, the Speaker's role, powers and duties. This has 10 items.

Topic 1, dress code: Include in the Standing Orders a dress code for members.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's already in House of Commons Procedure and Practice.

The Chair:

That's a dress code for men.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The dress code for members is that you wear contemporary business attire. That is the dress code.

The Chair:

Okay. So there's no champion for that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

For men, it's a jacket and tie, but for women included, it's contemporary business attire.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Or historical costume consistent with your ethnocultural background.

Mr. Don Davies: That's there right now.

An hon. member: Yes.

Mr. Don Davies:

Do we delete that one?

The Chair:

No one championed that one, right?

Mr. Don Davies:

No.

The Chair:

Okay.

Topic 2, infants on the floor: permit infants accompanied by members to be on the floor of the chamber while the House is sitting.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'll champion it because if I don't get the proxy one in the lobby, then—

The Chair:

Topic 3, interruptions, heckling: prohibit any member from speaking while another member has the floor, except during question period.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Give it to Don. He can do it.

Mr. Don Davies:

I'm with you on this.

The Chair:

Don. Okay.

Topic 4, list for recognizing speakers: limit or cease the practice of using a list provided to the Speaker by the parties to determine who speaks next, provided the Speaker recognizes members in an equitable rotation. Penalize disruptive members by not recognizing them.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I'll take that one.

The Chair:

Okay, Anita.

Topic 5, official languages: disallow members from referring to another member's ability to speak an official language.

David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That one's mine. I didn't say the “ability to speak”. I was referring to the language somebody spoke in the past. I don't think it's appropriate. Both languages are of equal weight in the House, and you shouldn't be deriding someone for which language they spoke, which has happened.

(1200)

The Chair:

Okay. You're championing that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's mine, yes.

The Chair:

Topic 6, order and decorum: expand the Speaker's powers to maintain order and decorum. Encourage the Speaker to employ current disciplinary measures with greater frequency, e.g. disallow reading of text, repetition and relevance; cease to recognize disruptive members.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I'll do that one.

The Chair:

Anita will champion that one.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Chair, are those measures like contemporary corporal punishment?

The Chair:

Topic 7, questions of privilege: give the Speaker the power to decide questions of privilege rather than having the member who raised the question of privilege move a motion to give the matter further study.

Is there any champion for that? No.

Topic 8, reports on members' behaviour: mandate the Speaker to produce a written report grading each member's behaviour, to be made public on a quarterly basis.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Who got that one? I missed that one.

The Chair:

Is there no champion for that?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

House of Commons report cards.... That's interesting.

The Chair:

Anita, I can't believe you didn't champion that.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I won't go that far.

The Chair:

Topic 9, time allocation and closure: give the Speaker, along with the Board of Internal Economy, the power or discretion to determine use of time allocation.

That was yours, Anita.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Yes, that one is from my speech.

The Chair:

Topic 10, video replay: provide video replay to the Speaker in order to review alleged instances of misbehaviour.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Sportscaster, too?

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

We have two referees and now video replays.

The Chair:

Was that Frank's?

Mr. Don Davies:

That's Frank's.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Can we decline the first downs? I'm sorry—soccer rules.

The Chair:

We're now on table 14, on technical amendments.

This must have been quite a productive day in the House.

Topic 1, amend Standing Order 28(1): in the Standing Order dealing with the days when the House does not sit, replace “Dominion Day” with “Canada Day.”

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll take it.

The Chair:

David's the champion.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's part of bringing it up to at least the end of the 20th century.

The Chair:

Topic 2, correct Standing Order 68(3): in the section of the Standing Orders that deal with introduction and readings of public bills, in English, the standing order reads that bills may not be tabled in “imperfect” form, while in French it reads that bills may not be tabled in “incomplete” form.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll take it.

The Chair:

David's the champion.

Topic 3, correct Standing Order 71: in the section of the Standing Orders that deal with introduction and readings of public bills, in English, the standing order reads that every bill shall receive “three several readings.” In French it reads that every bill shall receive “three readings.” It was suggested “several” could be replaced with “separate.”

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

This one was dropped altogether. That's also from my speech. I'll take it.

The Chair:

Okay, David's the champion.

Table 15 is on technology, and there are two items here.

Topic 1, desk call buttons: install desk call buttons to call pages over and catch the eye of the Speaker.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's from my speech.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

David is—

The Chair:

There could be 100 buttons going off at once.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We could discuss it at more length if and when we get to that, but I have things to say about it.

The Chair:

Okay.

Topic 2, remote voting and tabling of documents: allow members who are temporarily incapacitated, pregnant or giving palliative care to vote and table documents remotely.

Does anyone want to discuss it?

We have one more page, and then maybe we'll have a short break for five minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Then should I take it back to caucus? I don't know what we can do once we get past the end of this.

The Chair:

We're on the last page, table 16, miscellaneous topics, administrative, internal, legal, procedural. There are 20 topics here.

Topic 1, Board of Internal Economy: hold all meetings of the board in public.

Mr. Davies.

Topic 2, broadcasting committees: broadcast as many committee meetings as possible.

Mr. Davies.

Topic 3, broadcasting hecklers: record and broadcast members who engage in heckling.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think that will have the opposite effect that they intended it to.

An hon. member: Yes.

The Chair:

Okay, there are no champions.

Topic 4, child care facility: increase playground equipment.

This is mine.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is that for us or for the kids?

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Arnold Chan:

We have enough tools.

The Chair:

It's for the kids.

Is no one championing it?

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

We can.

The Chair:

Okay, thanks, Ginette.

I think there should be a playground outside, because people bring their kids here in the summer.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I still want a zip line out there.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, topic 5 is my hill to die on.

The Chair:

The zip line should be to the Chateau Laurier or 1 Wellington.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Maybe move on to number 5. Number 5 is David's. Next.

(1205)

The Chair:

Okay, topic 5, clocks in the chamber: install synchronized digital clocks in the chamber that can be controlled by the Table. Install a clock that counts down on speaking times.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

This is my pet project. Yes, I'll take it.

The Chair:

You get a lot of words in your speech, don't you?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I managed to do a 20-minute speech in 10 minutes. This is the results.

The Chair:

David is the champion.

Topic 6, committee budgets: provide each standing committee with its own operating budget, and ensure the allocations are equitable across all committees.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Don't we have that?

The Chair:

The liaison committee already does that, right?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think that's out of our mandate, personally.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Yes.

The Chair:

Okay, there's no champion.

Topic 7, gallery and visitors: permit visitors to remain in the gallery following the end of question period.

Are they kicked out?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Let me address it. This is from my speech.

What happened is the day before I gave that speech, I had visitors in the group gallery, which is the one above the Speaker. At 3 o'clock the security went through and told them all to get out, and I thought that wasn't right. In the other galleries people are left there, but in the group gallery, where the big groups go, like the school groups, they're only there from two until three. They're not used the rest of the time.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

They're escorted out.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

They're escorted out. If you watch that gallery—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Usually they're going at the end of question period.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

—at the end of question period, just watch from about five to three, if there's a big group there, and you'll see security quietly going through and kicking everybody out—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I agree.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

—and I think that should not happen. I haven't received a good answer on that.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It's only at the end of question period that they're usually—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes. So I want that addressed.

The Chair:

Okay, we have lots of champions for that, and we'll discuss it. We'll get Ruby in there. She doesn't have her name in yet.

Topic 8, independent senators on interparliamentary associations: review procedures to allow independent senators to participate in interparliamentary associations.

Is that up to us?

An hon. member: No.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I don't think that would be up to us, but....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

They're masters of their own....

Mr. Arnold Chan:

They're masters of their own destiny. I think it's outside of our mandate.

Mr. Don Davies:

It is.

The Chair:

Okay, so we have no champions because we don't have any authority.

Topic 9, in table 16, indigenous peoples: study functioning of indigenous societies/governments.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

That was a standing order.

The Chair:

That was mine.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's a really big standing order.

The Chair:

It wasn't like a standing order change; it was a suggestion, but that's okay.

Not to bring it on anymore, but the United States constitution is largely based on the Six Nations Confederacy. They got a lot of items from there. In our area, we have traditional first nations modes of governance that we have approved in modern treaties, and I was just suggesting that it's something we could look at in governing of Parliament, but we don't have to discuss it.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

We can, if you want to.

The Chair:

It's something else. It was just a notice for people to think about.

Topic 10 is joint meal room: create a place where members from all parties can eat meals together.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

It's called a cafeteria.

The Chair:

No, but while you are in the House....

An hon. member: Is there a dining room there?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm actually not the sponsor, but I'll just explain where it comes from.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

This is [Inaudible—Editor].

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, the idea is that.... It used to be the case that, instead of having our lunches in our own lobbies, there was a lunch room for the two sides to get together, and it created a more collaborative atmosphere. Now it has changed, not that long ago—

The Chair:

Where would we meet?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have no idea, probably 237-C or something. You would go there to eat, instead of in your own lobbies.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Yes, that's the restaurant in the cafeteria, I think.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Well, there is a new one—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Anyway, I'm not sponsoring it. I'm just telling you that's what—

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Okay, that's where it came from.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

[Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. Don Davies:

Isn't that supposed to be the function of the parliamentary restaurant, though?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There, you pay. The food in the lobby is just the food that's available.

Mr. Don Davies:

Oh, I see.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Instead of having food in your own lobby, the lobby food is joint, that's all. That's the way it used to be.

The Chair:

So you're saying, in the West Block, the restaurant that's right beside the....

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

It's not a bad idea.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's not a bad idea [Inaudible—Editor]

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

When we toured the West Block, wasn't the restaurant...?

The Chair:

Okay, there is no champion for that.

The next one is members’ expenses: provide greater disclosure of members’ expenses.

I'm not sure that is us, either.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

No, that's not.... I think we do pretty well already.

The Chair:

Okay, there is no champion.

The next one is members’ offices: increase the member’s office budget, e.g. sufficient funds for members to hire four staff.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If you can't hire four staff, you're paying an awful lot.

The Chair:

That's not us either, is it? It's the Board of Internal Economy.

The next one is ministers (split role): put in place a system whereby ministers would not sit in the House; instead, their parliamentary duties are carried out by a “replacement” member.

This was in my speech. That's what they do in Sweden. When you're a minister, you are not allowed to sit in the House. They give you another member of Parliament for your constituency. You are so busy as a minister that you can't really do the two jobs well, so they give you another member and you don't sit in the House. You come one day a week, I think.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Who is “they”?

The Chair:

The minister—

(1210)

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, but who is “they”? Does the minister pick whoever they want?

The Chair:

I'm not sure how they select the person who represents their constituency.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That would remove democracy from the equation a bit, wouldn't it?

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Couldn't you just ask a neighbouring MP to...?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you want to defend this one?

Mr. Blake Richards:

[Inaudible—Editor] really a problem now.

Mr. Don Davies:

In Sweden, there is a PR system, though, so it's easier to swap the list, but here you wouldn't go to cabinet until after the government is elected—

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Correct.

The Chair:

I would be willing to discuss it, if someone champions it. I'm not sure I want to, as the chair.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I can champion it insofar as it gets sealed. It would be better to defend it, but I won't defend that one myself.

The Chair:

Okay, I'll defend it and get out of the chair at that time. I'll get Blake to chair.

Number 14 is on motion seeking to circumvent the provisions of existing standing orders: disallow or restrict motions that seek to circumvent a rule or practice unless they meet a threshold higher than 50% plus one, e.g. require unanimous consent.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

[Inaudible—Editor]

The Chair:

I think this arose from.... We have some things that require unanimous consent that can really shut down Parliament. If at the beginning here the Bloc wasn't giving unanimous...just appointing committee chairs and people on committees and stuff.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I know what it's getting at, and I am not going to defend it.

The Chair:

Okay, there is no champion for this.

The next one is officers of Parliament: examine the funding and operation of the offices of officers of Parliament, including the parliamentary budget officer.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's not in our mandate, as far as I can see.

The Chair:

This would be the Board of Internal Economy.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes.

The Chair:

The next one is one-stop shop: reopen the one-stop shop on the parliamentary precinct.

What is that?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That came from me. I call that a different kind of standing order.

Until three years ago, we had a one-stop shop where the post offices are now, where you could also get all of your supplies, instead of having to use eway.ca. If you wanted pens, paper, or binders, you went down there. I was a long-time staffer, and it was so much more convenient. When we lost that, it really made the day-to-day operations of offices more difficult, so I was hoping to bring it back. It is outside the mandate of this study, but I would like to see it back

The Chair:

Can we change the wording of this to “the one-stop shop for office supplies”? That's what you were referring to, right?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, but it was everything, whatever we needed.

The Chair:

Office-type supplies?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, but again, at most that would be a recommendation to BOIE.

The Chair:

Right, but we can recommend it to BOIE.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Ask experienced staff.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Do constituency staff still have the flexibility to get supplies at Staples, or somewhere like that?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, I've done it.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Okay.

The Chair:

Are you championing that?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, I'll champion that.

The Chair:

Okay. That was topic 16, David.

Topic 17, physical layout of seating in the chamber: consider alternatives to the current adversarial seating arrangement.

In places like Sweden, and the House of Representatives in the United States, the seating is in a semi-circle, so you're all facing the Speaker. You're all attacking the same problem for your country together, as opposed to ours, which is confrontational across the floor.

That's what this topic is about.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

[Inaudible—Editor] because sometimes a party sits on the government side, whereas when it's in the minority, it's the other way around.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

[Inaudible—Editor] when the new Centre Block is done?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The new Centre Block is already....

The Chair:

[Technical difficulty—Editor]

Mr. Davies. Okay, good.

Remind me, Anita, to make a comment on the new Centre Block when we finish the end of this list.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Okay.

The Chair:

Topic 18, recognized parties in the House: allow parties with fewer than 12 members to be recognized; increase their resources and allocate them committee seats.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I wonder where that came from.

Mr. Don Davies:

Eleven guesses.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Who's doing 19?

The Chair:

No one did that one yet.

Topic 19 is seats in the chamber: change the design of the seats in the chamber, e.g. the seats in the chamber have the tendency of ripping suit pockets.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Having ripped six pockets since the last election, I will defend this.

Mr. Tom Lukiwski:

Are you talking about your suit pockets or your pants pocket?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The pants.

It has not happened since I gave the speech, so I clearly learned my lesson.

Mr. Don Davies:

It may be a causation correlation.

The Chair:

Okay, David's championing that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I will champion that.

Mr. Don Davies:

I'll back you up.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you, Don.

Everybody except Scott Reid has had it happen once.

The Chair:

Topic 20 is Senate during dissolution.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's what I was talking about earlier.

The Chair:

Allow Senate to continue to study the bills before it during a dissolution.

Are you saying after the election, when there's an election?

(1215)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What I said was strictly to PMBs. If the House passes a PMB and sends it to the Senate, I don't think the Senate should kill it just because the House stops sitting, because the Senate doesn't change in the election. I'm saying we should allow the Senate to finish its work on that PMB, if it has received it and is dealing with it.

The Chair:

Are you championing this?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll champion that one.

Mr. Don Davies:

What it says, David, is “bills”. It doesn't restrict it to private bills, so would that be the same with government bills?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm referring only to private members' bills.

Mr. Don Davies:

Okay, it should say that, then.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, it should say that.

The Chair:

Okay. We're going to amend number 20. We'll amend it to say “private members' bills”.

Before we go any further, and this is a little off topic, Anita brought up the Centre Block, and it reminded me of whether people think that as MPs they have enough say in giving suggestions on redesign.

For instance, our committee did a tour of the West Block, but it was already designed and half built. I don't know if any of us here...I've been here 11 years.

Tom, you've been here a long time, as has Blake. Do you feel we've had a sufficient chance to have input into this new design of buildings? Someone just goes ahead and does it. I'm not saying they're bad, but MPs have—

Mr. Tom Lukiwski:

I don't think we've had any input, but I don't know if it's....

The Chair:

Appropriate?

Mr. Tom Lukiwski:

I don't know if it would be helpful, frankly. You know, too many chefs spoil the broth. They contract professional designers who take a look at other parliaments and take into account a whole bunch of factors before they come up with a final design.

I've taken a look at West Block. I saw West Block in its very early days, and I've seen it two or three times since. I think it's going to be magnificent. I really do. I love the design, particularly the House of Commons. We'll never want to go back to Centre Block again.

In terms of having us included in the design, I think very few of us in this Parliament are architectural designers to begin with, so I don't know what benefit.... I don't know what we would add to it. Maybe some general comments as to the size of offices or the facilities required by members would be helpful, but for the actual design elements, I just don't see where this would be—

The Chair:

I wasn't thinking of the technical design so much as the things that we run into, like David ripping his pants.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think it would be useful if any major changes went through a committee, whether it's a special committee or PROC, to at least be looked at: here's what we want to do, so is this acceptable to MPs? If it's not, we need to study it, and if it is, fine, let's carry on. We don't need to have 338 MPs providing their opinions. Have a committee that says, “This makes sense and this doesn't make sense.”

Otherwise, little issues.... Designers don't sit in those chairs. They don't know about the pockets, right? That's not their issue. It's like software from companies that engineers design and not the users. At the end of the day—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

We would never know, until after having used the place, and having sat in the chairs, and going through the doors. It's hard to look at a plan and say, “I can spot the problems here, here, here,” unless you are an architect or a designer. A normal person would have to live in the place for a little while and then discover the flaws.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I take your point, but there needs to be some kind of.... Things like the pocket issue; I'll use it just as my example, because it's an easy one. The shape of the chairs has three ridges. It's very decorative, very pretty, and because we have it, we can't change it, because that's the tradition.

You could sand off the inner point and nobody would have a pocket torn again. It would be a very minor change. How do we get to that kind of thing?

The Chair:

As a bigger example, what if in the new Centre Block, they decide we're not going to have any committee rooms because they want to do something else? A lot of us think this is a good place to have committee meetings, in Centre Block.

I think the Board of Internal Economy has a kick at this can. I think they decide these things. I don't remember ever being consulted as a backbencher MP on these things, not to have any veto or anything, but at least to put in comments. It is our workplace.

Mr. Davies.

Mr. Don Davies:

I think there should be a process. It's one of those things where you buy the whole cow, and you probably get...even in this process you can see three, four, or five substantive proposals that may have influenced the design. For instance, the....

The Chair:

The chamber.

Mr. Don Davies:

Yes, the form of the chamber, whether it's circular or not, or whether it's two chambers, or whether there's a common room.

I know one thing that has affected us in the NDP is not being able to have a caucus meeting in Centre Block. After the two main rooms are taken, there's really no other room. We meet over in the Promenade building.

As long as there would be a way that you could separate the substantive, meaningful suggestions from the 5,000 suggestions you're going to get about the colour of the paint in the bathrooms....

Maybe you just have to take it all in and allow the designers and the deciders to sift through them. I don't think it's a bad idea to have that suggestion.

(1220)

The Chair:

Can we just add that as—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

A specific suggestion in our report on this is that we have the power to make recommendations to the Board of Internal Economy. We can make the recommendations to the Board of Internal Economy that when the plans are being drafted to return to Centre Block 10 years down the road, the plans should be made a lot sooner so that we at least have the opportunity to see it before it is approved. That was a request for a comments period.

The Chair:

Why don't we add that as number 21 on the very last page?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Sure. Who has number 22?

The Chair:

There's 20 there now.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's my point.

The Chair:

This would be number 21, and we'll discuss that. Don, you be the champion because you suggested that.

Maybe you can come up with the wording that reflects what you just said, when we get to discuss it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm trying to make the point that I don't think we should limit ourselves to what we found here.

The Chair:

Right.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If we go back to the caucuses and come up with new ideas, then by all means let's have a discussion about them. I think our idea is to fix the rules. Let's fix them properly.

The Chair:

Some of the ideas that got kicked out, the person—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Might want it back.

The Chair:

—might want it back. If they weren't here.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That said, I don't see any reason to continue on this until we've had a chance to go to our caucuses.

The Chair:

Right.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't know if you guys agree with that.

The Chair:

David is suggesting we don't have much more work to do today, until we've gone back to our caucuses. We're not going to really be able to get to our caucuses by next meeting, which is when we're supposed to discuss this, on Tuesday.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We can wait until next week on this. I don't see a reason to proceed with that. If we can go straight to the minister at noon next Tuesday, I think we'll be fine with that.

The Chair:

Blake.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm not sure I heard everything you said. I would argue that since we don't really have.... We should be seeking the minister, and seeing if there's a possibility of two hours with the minister. As we pointed out the other day, there isn't really enough time to deal with and address the concerns and questions we have. I'm afraid we wouldn't move forward without it.

The Chair:

I think Arnold answered that last meeting.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I said the minister's in cabinet right?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Of course she is. So be it. I guess we won't get our answers then. We likely wouldn't anyway, so it's irrelevant.

The Chair:

The proposal is this. We're almost finished right now. Because we have to go back to caucuses, and caucuses don't meet before next Tuesday, the one hour to continue this on Tuesday we wouldn't do.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Unless you have a great objection, I don't....

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Could I make a suggestion? This will probably require the break. Maybe the analyst could look through it, and if there are some that have obvious content about another parliament doing it a certain way or it having been studied before in this committee, perhaps she could find some of that, so that we would have a bit more background when we come back to some of these points.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

A lot of it comes from [Inaudible—Editor].

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Yes, the [Inaudible—Editor].

The Chair:

Are you talking about Tuesday?

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

No. I don't think you could do that for Tuesday.

Mrs. Dara Lithwick:

No, we could do it after.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

It could probably be done over the break.

The Chair:

The other thing we could do Tuesday is another hour on our security report.

Mr. Davies.

Mr. Don Davies:

I'm sorry, but I may have misunderstood you, Mr. Chair. When the minister comes, I don't know if you used the words “in camera”, but we're talking about this being a public meeting.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Don Davies:

Would it be televised?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It would be surprising to have a minister without it being televised.

Mr. Don Davies:

Yes.

The Chair:

Were there any specific witnesses people had thought about for the security study that we're—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If we're discussing that, I'd want to do it in camera.

The Chair:

No, but are there any witnesses you can think of, if we do an hour on Tuesday?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you mean for the PPS study?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's all been done in camera. I think we should discuss that in camera.

The Chair:

Oh, because we're not in camera.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Right. We're public right now.

The Chair:

Could we break for a quick minute and then go in camera?

People, while we're in camera, think about whether in the first hour of Tuesday we should continue our security study, and which witnesses we would invite.

We'll take a two-minute break before we go in camera.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour.

Monsieur Lukiwski, je vous souhaite la bienvenue. Vous êtes membre de ce Comité depuis neuf ans et demi et apportez ainsi une grande expérience à cette table.

M. Tom Lukiwski (Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan, PCC):

Oui, j'en garde un bon souvenir.

Le président:

La séance est ouverte. Le Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre tient sa 45e réunion.

Nous allons débuter l'étude du Règlement et de la procédure de la Chambre et de ses comités. Les députés se rappelleront que la question a été renvoyée au Comité le 6 octobre 2016, conformément à l'article 51 du Règlement, à la fin des délibérations de la Chambre.

L'analyste a préparé un résumé de la teneur des délibérations de la Chambre, lequel a été distribué deux fois aux membres du Comité, soit, la première fois, il y a longtemps, et, la seconde fois, tout juste hier ou aujourd'hui pour nous assurer que vous l'ayez en main.

La réunion d'aujourd'hui est publique. Voici un court résumé de ce qui s'est produit la dernière fois. Chaque législature est suivie de cette démarche. C'est le règlement qui l'exige. D'abord, les partis distribuent le rapport à leur groupe parlementaire et recueillent les idées des membres. Je suppose qu'avec un peu de chance, nous obtiendrons la permission du Comité d'en saisir les groupes parlementaires.

Quand ils ont commencé à travailler sur le rapport, ce fut à huis clos. Je crois que M. Richards, M. Reid et M. Christopherson étaient là la dernière fois. M. Lukiwski en a étudié un, lui aussi.

Je ne sais pas si les députés qui ont déjà participé à ce genre de délibérations veulent ajouter quelque chose. Notre recherchiste a participé lui aussi aux délibérations la dernière fois. À la réunion de mardi, il pourra compléter, si nous oublions quelque chose.

Tom, c'est à vous.

M. Tom Lukiwski:

Je vous remercie, Larry.

Je souhaite la bienvenue à toute l'assistance.

Larry a raison. Pendant neuf ans et demi, j'ai fait partie de ce Comité. Une chose qu'on a faite lors de la dernière législature a été de procéder à un examen pas mal approfondi du Règlement. Pour vous donner une idée de l'histoire, comme Larry a bien fait de le souligner, tout Parlement doit, je crois, 80 ou 90 jours après que les nouvelles Chambres ont été convoquées, effectuer l'examen et faire rapport au Parlement de toute modification possible au Règlement.

Bien souvent, on ne l'a pas fait. Bien souvent, s'il a procédé à quelque examen que ce soit, le Parlement l'a fait de manière superficielle, et quelquefois, il ne l'a pas fait du tout.

Lors de la dernière législature, j'ai suggéré au premier ministre de l'époque, M. Harper, que l'on effectue un examen plutôt approfondi parce que je croyais qu'il y avait beaucoup de dispositions du Règlement qui pourraient être révisées. Beaucoup étaient dépassées et obscures et j'estimais qu'on pouvait s'en passer. D'autres modifications seraient peut-être plus importantes, par exemple, modifier le moment choisi pour la période des questions ou encore le mode de fonctionnement des comités.

Par contre, une chose sur laquelle j'ai insisté après avoir formé un comité composé de représentants de tous les partis — et ce comité n'était composé que des représentants de notre parti, du Parti libéral et du NPD — fut que toute modification au Règlement proposée à notre petit sous-comité, peu importe le parti, devait être acceptée à l'unanimité, à défaut de quoi elle n'était même pas étudiée. J'ai fait remarquer que le Règlement concernait tous les parlementaires et qu'il serait tout à fait injuste, à mon avis, même si nous disposions de la majorité, de tenter de modifier le Règlement en invoquant la suprématie de cette majorité. Cette façon de fonctionner a très bien marché.

Il y a eu plusieurs suggestions apportées par les trois partis qui n'ont pas obtenu l'unanimité. Une fois que cet état de fait était constaté, elles étaient retirées sans autre discussion. Il n'y avait pas de débat. On n'essayait pas de convaincre les autres de changer d'idée. Elles étaient tout simplement abandonnées.

Au bout du compte, nous avons modifié plusieurs dispositions du Règlement. Nous en avons supprimé un grand nombre, essentiellement parce qu'elles étaient dépassées, mais, pour toutes, ce fut par consentement unanime. À ce jour, je suis convaincu du bien-fondé de ce mode de fonctionnement. Si un Parlement veut changer le Règlement, que la modification souhaitée soit mineure ou majeure, il devrait, du moins moralement, obtenir le consentement unanime du Parlement pour ce faire. Ce n'est pas nécessaire, mais je prétends que c'est la bonne chose à faire, encore une fois, si ce n'est pour la simple raison que ces règles nous gouvernent tous. Elles valent pour nous tous. Je ne crois pas en un parti qui se servirait de sa majorité pour changer les règles qui concernent tous les parlementaires pour la simple raison que ça l'arrange ou que ce serait dans son intérêt sur le plan politique.

Voilà comment on a abordé la question. Le fait d'étudier et de vraiment apprendre le Règlement a été une activité fascinante. Je pensais connaître un peu la procédure avant de faire l'exercice, mais je me suis aperçu que je ne connaissais rien. J'en sais pas mal plus maintenant.

Je comprends que le Comité examine les modifications au Règlement maintenant, et c'est fantastique, mais je vous dirais que, d'après mon expérience, si vous voulez apporter des modifications, il est fortement conseillé de tenter d'obtenir le consentement unanime pour ce faire.

J'ai terminé, monsieur le président.

(1110)

Le président:

Blake, vous rappelez-vous quelque chose du processus lors de la dernière législature?

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Je pense que Tom l'a pas mal bien expliqué. Je ne crois pas qu'il y ait grand-chose à ajouter, pour être honnête avec vous.

Le président:

Bien, ça va.

J'attends les suggestions.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

C'est intéressant d'avoir l'histoire de tout ça, je t'en remercie, Tom.

Je pensais vous proposer de parcourir les neuf pages du rapport d'André et d'indiquer quels sujets on souhaite défendre devant le Comité au moment des délibérations, lesquels on trouve intéressants en tant que représentant d'un parti ou député, pour ensuite en choisir un, déterminer si la modification peut être adoptée et établir ensuite s'il y a consensus pour son application. Chacun déclare simplement lesquelles il veut préconiser. L'idée consiste à parcourir la liste et que chacun dise ce qu'il aime. C'est par là que je commencerais pour ensuite défendre ma position.

Une voix: Avez-vous proposé les lumières sur la caméra? Est-ce que l'idée vient de vous?

Le président:

Elle vient de M. Baylis.

Une voix: L'idée a été suggérée plusieurs fois.

Une voix: Oui, j'aime cette idée.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Que s'est-il passé quand l'idée a germé? Manifestement, rien n'a changé, donc il n'y a pas eu consensus.

Y a-t-il eu une raison particulière pour son rejet?

M. Tom Lukiwski:

Bonne question, David! Je ne me souviens pas s'il y avait une raison précise.

Une des choses qui est arrivée à ce comité multipartite, c'est que l'entreprise a avorté, au fond. Il y a eu tellement d'autres dossiers qui se présentaient que le Comité devait étudier et que le Parlement en bloc devait étudier qu'après avoir apporté les premières modifications, on a comme cessé de s'en occuper.

J'étais bien sûr favorable à la présence de la caméra. Je ne sais pas ce qui avait motivé cette idée.

J'ai proposé, en particulier pour les nouveaux députés, mais ce serait bon pour tout le monde, qu'une caméra avec signal lumineux permettrait de savoir où porter le regard, comme dans un studio de télévision. Il arrive que ce soit tout simplement embarrassant, si vous regardez d'un côté... La caméra devrait suivre le locuteur, mais, des fois, elle ne le fait pas.

L'autre avantage secondaire qui m'est apparu, bien que les députés ne devraient pas avoir besoin d'être guidés, c'est que les députés qui ne sont pas attentifs pendant la période des questions ou lors des délibérations se secoueront peut-être un peu s'ils voient une lumière rouge pointée sur eux. Ils seront peut-être plus attentifs et ne craindront pas de se voir endormis à la caméra.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je pense que ça aiderait aussi l'équipe image d'avoir cette interaction avec la personne qui s'adresse à l'assemblée.

M. Tom Lukiwski:

Nous en avons parlé. Je pense qu'on en est venu à vérifier auprès des technocrates si c'était dans l'art du possible, et ce l'était. Ça ne s'est tout simplement pas fait. Je demeure convaincu que c'est une bonne idée.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il y a neuf caméras là-dedans. Ce serait bien de l'avoir.

Le président:

Combien de personnes siégeaient à votre comité spécial?

M. Tom Lukiwski:

Je crois que nous n'étions que nous trois: moi, Joe Comartin et, qui représentait les Libéraux? Kevin Lamoureux. Comment ai-je pu oublier Kevin? Ce n'est pas qu'il veuille parler, mais...

Adam et moi-même, avec quelques autres membres de notre groupe parlementaire et de notre personnel, formions un groupe de travail et nous avons parcouru toutes les dispositions du Règlement. Nous avons produit une très longue liste d'éléments qui, à notre avis, méritaient d'être modifiés ou révisés. Tous les partis ont fait la même chose.

Comme je l'ai déjà indiqué, nous avons soumis ces modifications et nous avons examiné toutes les suggestions. Si un parti, à un moment donné, pour une raison ou une autre, disait ne pas aimer la modification proposée ou ne pas y être favorable, nous n'en discutions même pas. Les modifications acceptées faisaient ensuite l'objet de discussions et on décidait s'il y avait lieu d'apporter les modifications, ou non.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je serais prêt à faire un bout de chemin et à débattre de ces sujets. Si une personne élève une objection, essayons au moins de connaître ses raisons et de voir si on peut aller au-delà. Si l'opinion demeure négative, c'est bon, mais, au moins, parlons-en.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires sur la proposition de David de parcourir la liste et de voir s'il y a...

Est-ce que votre idée consiste à parcourir la liste pour voir si chaque sujet est défendu par quelqu'un et, dans le cas contraire, de le laisser tomber?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, c'est comme le programme Adoptez une autoroute, sauf que c'est Adoptez une modification au Règlement.

(1115)

Le président:

Y a-t-il des commentaires sur ce processus? Ainsi, on commencerait avec une liste, celle du rapport, on la parcourrait et, pour chaque sujet, on demanderait si quelqu'un est intéressé et, dans la négative, le sujet serait supprimé de l'ordre du jour et on passerait au...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

On y reviendrait plus tard, si quelqu'un disait vouloir s'en occuper rétrospectivement. Par exemple, David est absent...

Le président:

Avant de poursuivre, j'aimerais obtenir l'autorisation du Comité de faire part de cela à nos groupes parlementaires afin de connaître leur réaction.

M. Tom Lukiwski:

Monsieur le président, j'allais poser la question. Je m'excuse de poser des questions qui ont sans doute déjà été posées. Est-ce que chaque parti, chaque député a eu l'occasion de soumettre cela à son groupe parlementaire? Je sais qu'une fois, j'ai fait une présentation à mon groupe parlementaire portant sur toutes les modifications proposées, afin de connaître sa réaction. En raison de sa réaction, des suggestions ont été rejetées. Mon groupe n'y était tout simplement pas favorable. Je ne sais pas si...

Le président:

Non, pas encore.

M. Tom Lukiwski:

Il serait bon de le faire, sinon, vous pouvez en être certain, alors que vous pensez avoir une idée magnifique, une fois que les membres de votre groupe parlementaire découvrent...

Le président:

[inaudible] permission du Comité.

Monsieur Davies.

M. Don Davies (Vancouver Kingsway, NPD):

Monsieur le président, je ne suis pas tout à fait sûr de comprendre l'idée de David voulant qu'on détermine cela et qu'on défende une modification proposée. Je ne comprends pas vraiment ce que ça veut dire.

On demande...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous devenez le parrain de modifications proposées. Les analystes pourraient dresser une liste à notre intention et de manière à se débarrasser de ce qui n'intéresse personne, on indiquerait seulement celles qu'on va soumettre au Comité. C'est une façon de supprimer des choses de la liste plus rapidement.

M. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

C'est simplement une combinaison de tout ce que tout le monde...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui. Chaque idée, chaque question et chaque discours est là. Il y a beaucoup d'idées. Certaines sont plus intéressantes que d'autres.

M. Don Davies:

La proposition, c'est qu'en autant qu'une personne affirme envisager d'appuyer l'idée, le sujet continue de figurer sur la liste.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En effet.

M. Don Davies:

Si personne donne son appui...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Alors, on le laisse tomber.

M. Don Davies:

Alors, on le raye de la liste. C'est un mode de sélection.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est tout à fait cela.

M. Don Davies:

Je comprends.

Le président:

Pour que tout soit clair, le rapport contient tout ce qui a été soulevé dans les discours pendant les délibérations, donc il y a des tas de choses là-dedans.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Oui, en plus des questions.

Le président:

En effet, les questions aussi.

On dirait qu'on s'entend là-dessus, mais avant, je veux savoir si on s'entend pour discuter de cela avec nos groupes parlementaires respectifs. Je ne vois pas pourquoi on ne le ferait pas, mais...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le document dans son état actuel n'est pas confidentiel?

Une voix: Nous tenons une séance publique...

M. David de Burgh Graham: Le document lui-même...

Le président:

Je me sentirais mieux si nous étions tous d'accord.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je pensais que le document était disponible, étant donné que le débat est public.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est la question que j'allais poser. S'il n'est pas disponible, est-il possible de le publier?

M. Arnold Chan:

Oui, je sais.

Une voix: [inaudible]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans le cas présent, c'est simplement une liste de ce qui s'est produit lors des délibérations de la Chambre de toute façon.

Le président:

Revenons à la liste.

Ginette.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Tout ce que je veux savoir, c'est pourquoi il faut trouver une personne qui appuiera les éléments sur lesquels nous sommes tous d'accord? S'il y a des sujets sur lesquels nous sommes tous d'accord, ne pourrions-nous pas simplement affirmer que nous sommes bel et bien d'accord.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si nous l'appuyons tous, c'est facile, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Le Comité donne son appui.

Le président:

Monsieur Davies.

M. Don Davies:

Monsieur le président, je ne fais que remplacer M. Christopherson; tout ça est nouveau pour moi.

Mon souci, c'est que nous ne sommes pas retournés dans nos groupes parlementaires pour connaître leur sentiment à ce sujet, donc il me semble que l'on met la charrue devant les boeufs. Je peux difficilement vous dire de renoncer complètement à quelque chose ou que nous allons l'appuyer, alors que je n'ai pas eu l'occasion d'obtenir la rétroaction de mon groupe parlementaire. Je me demande si quelqu'un d'autre a ce...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne vois pas d'inconvénient à ce qu'une personne vienne me voir ultérieurement pour me dire ce qu'elle va appuyer.

Le président:

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je suis du même avis que David. Rien ne vous oblige à adopter une position en particulier. Vous pouvez toujours revenir et nous le dire... La question est de savoir si on envoie simplement promener toute suggestion qu'on juge stupide?

En ce qui concerne la question soulevée par Ginette, encore une fois, je pense que l'important pour nous, c'est de simplement essayer de faire une première sélection. Tout ce que je dis, c'est que même si nous appuyons tous une idée en particulier, il arrive qu'il faille tenir compte du lien entre toutes les dispositions du Règlement. Même si nous tombons tous d'accord sur le fait qu'une idée est fantastique, il faudra s'assurer d'examiner en détail ses répercussions en général par rapport à l'ensemble des dispositions du Règlement. Nous pouvons dire que c'est bien, mais je pense qu'il faudra tout de même étudier le tout en bout de ligne, n'est-ce pas?

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Je suis tout à fait d'accord.

Le président:

M. Davies, suivi de M. Graham.

M. Don Davies:

Je dirais qu'il y a une ou deux façons de procéder. On peut par exemple parcourir la liste et déterminer les sujets qui, de l'avis de tous, doivent être abandonnés. On réduit ainsi la liste.

(1120)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En effet, on parcourt la liste et on demande si quelqu'un parraine le sujet; si c'est non, le sujet est supprimé de la liste.

M. Don Davies:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est la même chose.

M. Don Davies:

Comme le disait Mme Petitpas Taylor, nous pourrions par ailleurs décider des choses qui nous semblent à tous devoir être discutées à fond.

La différence est que la liste est plus courte dans le deuxième cas. Nous pourrions nous retrouver avec les 10 ou 20 propositions d'articles du Règlement qui sont sérieuses et que nous voulons étudier à fond. L'autre façon est de voir tout simplement ce que nous sommes d'accord pour supprimer.

Une foule de ces points, selon moi, nécessiteront un plus ample examen. Je m'en remets à votre bon jugement.

Le président:

Bonne suggestion. Nous devons consulter nos caucus, aussi, avant de décider quoi que ce soit.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous avons l'occasion d'apporter de grands changements à long terme, si bien qu'il serait utile, à long terme, de discuter de chaque point, selon moi.

Le président:

Voulez-vous aborder la liste, alors?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous voulez dire pour voir comment cela ira et ce qui se passera?

Le président:

Essayons-en quelques-uns et voyons comment cela va et si nous sommes tous d'accord ou tous en désaccord.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Certains des changements ici ne touchent pas nécessairement le Règlement. Que faire alors? Le tout premier point sur la liste est le recours à un article du règlement. On n'adopte pas un nouvel article pour recourir à un article existant. Le règlement est déjà là. Je ne sais pas trop comment aborder...

Le président:

Tout ce qui est positif pour le Parlement, le comité PROC peut en traiter.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous pouvons faire une recommandation à ce sujet.

Le président:

Nous pouvons faire des recommandations.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je serai la championne dans ce cas-ci.

Le président:

Parfait.

Y a-t-il un parti qui exclut ce premier point?

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Le défendons-nous ou le rejetons-nous?

Le président:

Nous allons lui trouver un champion pour le premier tour.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Juste donner un champion, au premier tour.

Le président:

Le tableau 1 a trait aux projets de loi.

Le sujet 1 est le renvoi des projets de loi à un comité avant la deuxième lecture: recommander que le gouvernement ait plus souvent recours à l'article 73 du Règlement.

Anita? D'accord.

Le sujet 2 concerne les projets de loi omnibus: envisager de limiter le dépôt de projets de loi omnibus ou de les déclarer irrecevables, exception faite des projets de loi d'exécution du budget, à condition que le libellé du projet de loi traite strictement de questions budgétaires.

Avons-nous un champion?

M. Davies.

Le tableau 2 concerne les comités.

Le sujet 1 est les projets de loi émanant des comités: donner aux comités le pouvoir de rédiger et de déposer des projets de loi.

Anita?

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Oui.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous voulez être la championne de tout.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Cela sort de mon discours, de fait.

Le président:

Nous allons avoir un long rapport.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

C'est moi qui ai inscrit cela pour les comités.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Au deuxième tour, vous pourriez éliminer plus de choses.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Nous en avons plus d'un.

Le président:

Vous pourriez quoi?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous pourriez éliminer certaines des choses dans un deuxième tour, mais voyons quand même cela. Dans le pire des cas, cela ne fonctionnera pas.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Cela vient de mon discours.

Le président:

Peut-être devrions-nous limiter le nombre de points dont Anita peut se faire la championne?

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Que voulez-vous dire?

Le président:

Nous sommes au tableau 2.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Que voulez-vous dire par un deuxième tour? Je ne comprends pas.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous aurons une courte liste, j'espère, après ceci. Quelqu'un pourrait parrainer des options, je ne sais pas. Puis nous pourrons revenir à l'étude, parce que je ne pense pas que nous allons en finir aujourd'hui — il est raisonnable de le supposer — puisque nous devrons retourner à nos caucus. Rien ne va vraiment débloquer avant l'an prochain. Nous avons une courte liste à étudier, et si voulons y mettre d'autres choses, alors soit.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

D'accord.

Le président:

D'accord, nous revenons au tableau 2.

Le sujet 2 est l'élection des présidents de comité par la Chambre: concevoir une procédure prévoyant que les présidents de comité soient élus par l'ensemble des députés.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Nous ne serions plus maîtres de notre comité.

Le président:

Anita.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

C'est comme cela au Royaume-Uni.

M. Jamie Schmale:

La Chambre avant le comité. Oui?

Le président:

Ensuite, il y a les documents des comités.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

J'allais proposer la double majorité.

Le président:

Le sujet 3 traite des documents des comités: permettre aux députés qui ne sont pas membres d'un comité de recevoir des documents de la part du greffier de ce comité.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le comité peut déjà faire cela.

Le président:

Très bien, je saute celui-là. Il faut bien éliminer quelque chose.

Le sujet 4 est les nominations par le gouverneur en conseil: permettre aux comités d'étudier les candidatures avant de procéder à la nomination.

M. Davies.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Ah, bien.

Le président:

Nous avons quelqu'un d'autre.

Le sujet 5 concerne les comités législatifs: confier l'examen des projets de loi aux comités législatifs. Les comités permanents se concentreraient sur les questions stratégiques et les budgets ministériels.

C'était une recommandation très importante. Vous avez presque deux sortes de comités: le premier qui ne s'occupe que d'un projet de loi particulier; et l'autre qui fait tout le reste. C'est une restructuration en profondeur du Parlement. Avons-nous un champion?

Très bien, sautons cela pour l'instant.

Le sujet 6 est le nombre de comités permanents: réduire le nombre de comités permanents.

M. Lukiwski.

Le sujet 7 concerne les secrétaires parlementaires: interdire que les secrétaires parlementaires siègent aux comités en qualité de membres.

M. Davies.

Le sujet 8 est la disposition des places en comité: modifier la disposition des places de manière à ce que les députés du parti ministériel et de l'opposition ne s'assoient pas les uns à côté des autres, mais se mélangent un peu.

C'est pour éviter d'avoir une sorte de confrontation...

(1125)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne vais pas défendre cela. J'allais seulement dire que le Règlement ne précise pas où nous nous assoyons. Nous nous assoyons où nous voulons. Je pourrais aller m'asseoir entre Jamie et Don tout de suite, si je voulais.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Nous pouvons quand même faire cette recommandation.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, en effet.

Le président:

Avez-vous dit non à quelque chose, Anita? Ah, c'était Ruby Sahota.

Le sujet 9 est le suivi des recommandations de comité: créer un mécanisme permettant aux comités d'assurer le suivi des recommandations qu'ils formulent dans les rapports.

M. Davies.

Le sujet 10 concerne les témoins: durant les délibérations des comités, interdire que les députés déposent une motion ou invoquent le Règlement pendant la comparution de témoins.

M. Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Nous passons tous, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Nous y reviendrons plus tard.

Le sujet 22 est une demande par écrit pour convoquer une réunion: réduire à deux le nombre minimal de membres devant signer une demande pour convoquer une réunion, mais imposer comme condition que ces deux membres représentent des partis différents.

D'accord, nous allons passer pour celui-là.

Nous sommes maintenant au tableau 3, dont le sujet est les débats.

Le sujet 1 est la limitation du débat: étudier les règles applicables aux motions de clôture et d'attribution de temps et le recours à ces motions.

M. Davies.

Le sujet 2 est le temps de parole pour les projets de loi « controversés » et « non controversés »: prévoir des périodes de débat plus longues pour les projets de loi controversés, et plus courtes pour les projets de loi non controversés.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Si personne ne se lève, ce n'est pas controversé et on s'arrête là; inutile, donc, de modifier le Règlement:

Une voix: Exactement.

Le président:

Ruby.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Ne laissons rien passer sans...

M. Don Davies:

Passons.

Le président:

Oui, passons, Ruby, oui.

Le sujet 3 est le temps de parole (généralités): étudier à la fois le temps de parole...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai un commentaire là-dessus.

Le président:

... et le temps consacré à la période des questions et observations. Au titre des changements proposés, notons: fixer tous les temps de parole à cinq minutes; fixer tous les temps de parole à 15 minutes (dont 10 minutes pour le discours et 5 minutes pour les questions et observations; transférer le temps inutilisé pour le discours d'un député au temps prévu pour les questions et commentaires. De plus, interdire que les whips puissent partager en deux temps de parole.

Il y a toute une série de choses là-dedans. Quelqu'un veut-il en parler?

Le sujet 4 est la liste des orateurs: limiter ou abolir le recours à la liste des députés qui prendront la parole transmise au président par les partis, à condition que le président accorde la parole aux députés selon un roulement équitable entre les partis.

À l'heure actuelle, lorsqu'il y a un débat sur un sujet, les whips décident qui prendra la parole. Voulez-vous en discuter?

Monsieur Lukiwski.

M. Tom Lukiwski:

C'est une question seulement, pas un appel au règlement ni une demande de clarification. Cela sera-t-il les seuls changements proposés, ou y aura-t-il quand même la possibilité de proposer d'autres changements au Règlement?

M. Arnold Chan:

J'aimerais avoir vos idées.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Permettez-moi de répondre à cela. Notre comité est maître de sa destinée. Nous sommes chargés du Règlement, et si quelqu'un veut soulever quelque point que ce soit, n'importe quand, et que nous avons consensus, je ne vois pas pourquoi nous ne pourrions pas le permettre. Ce n'est que l'occasion que prévoit le Règlement.

M. Tom Lukiwski:

Non, c'est excellent. Je ne savais pas comment vous fonctionniez, mais...

Le président:

Nous avons mandat d'examiner le Règlement, et vous pouvez donc ajouter des choses si vos caucus le désirent.

M. Tom Lukiwski:

J'aurais certainement quelque chose à ajouter, mais je pense que même mon caucus ne serait pas d'accord...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Arnold Chan:

Donc, nous devons appliquer vos règles.

M. Tom Lukiwski:

Non, non, je veux dire que les règles seraient...

J'aimerais voir un système, comme il en existe dans d'autres parlements dans le monde, où les notes sont interdites. Celui qui veut prononcer un discours n'a pas droit à ses notes.

Le président:

Très bien, sauf que nous n'en sommes pas aux nouvelles suggestions pour l'instant.

Oh, c'est ici!

Des voix: Oh, oh!

(1130)

M. Arnold Chan:

Mais vous reconnaissez que cela signifie invariablement que Garnet et Kevin domineront essentiellement.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Une voix: Garnet utilise des notes?

M. Arnold Chan: Garnet utilise des notes, oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mon seul objectif pour l'instant est de dépolluer un peu; donc une seule chose à la fois.

M. Tom Lukiwski:

Non, c'est très bien.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous pourrons dépolluer encore plus tard.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Je pense que c'est là.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, vous pouvez le parrainer maintenant.

Revenons à notre réunion.

Le président:

Le sujet 5 concerne les questions après les discours: limiter les députés auxquels le président peut donner la parole afin de poser des questions après un discours aux députés des autres partis que celui du député qui a fait le discours.

De fait, le président a déjà institué cette pratique.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mais si aucun député d'un autre parti n'intervient, il reviendra quand même du même parti. Cela nous débarrasserait de cela. Je ne défendrai pas cela.

M. Don Davies:

Je pense que c'est une mauvaise idée.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, moi de même.

Le président:

D'accord, c'est une chose que nous ne faisons pas.

Le sujet 6 est le partage ou la division du temps de parole.

Il n'y a pas de champion pour cela, parfait.

Je suis neutre, désolé.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

C'est très bien.

Le président:

Le sujet 7 porte sur les débats exploratoires tenus à la demande de l'opposition: permettre à l'opposition de demander deux débats exploratoires par session, et au troisième parti de demander un débat exploratoire par session.

Il n'y a pas de champion?

Monsieur Davies.

M. Don Davies:

Moi.

Le président:

Le sujet 8 concerne les débats exploratoires (décision de tenir un débat): permettre la tenue de débats exploratoires à la demande d'un certain nombre de députés du parti ministériel et de l'opposition.

M. Davies approuve, il est le champion.

Nous arrivons au tableau 4 concernant les suppressions (de dispositions du Règlement, de pratiques)

Le sujet 1 a trait au débat sur la motion d'adoption d'un rapport du Comité mixte permanent d'examen de la réglementation: supprimer l'article 128 du Règlement, qui prévoit la tenue d'un débat à la Chambre (à 13 h le mercredi par suite d'un avis de motion) pour la prise en considération d'un rapport du Comité mixte permanent d'examen de la réglementation.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est tiré de mon discours. Je serai heureux de le défendre.

Le président:

Le sujet 2 est la première lecture d'un projet de loi: abolir la pratique voulant que le président demande à la Chambre « Quand le projet de loi sera-t-il lu pour la deuxième fois? »

Y a-t-il un champion?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui. C'était dans mon discours.

Le président:

M. Graham.

Le sujet 3 est la prière: mettre un terme à la pratique consistant à lire la prière au début de chaque séance de la Chambre. Il a aussi été proposé de remplacer dans la prière le mot « amen » par « merci ».

Le président:

M. Davies.

Le sujet 4 est les projets de loi d'intérêt privé: supprimer le chapitre 15 du Règlement qui porte sur les projets de loi d'intérêt privé (articles 129 à 147 du Règlement).

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'était dans mon discours. Je m'en charge.

Le président:

Vous défendez cela.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne vois pas de raison...

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Ce n'est pas pour les projets émanant d'un député, c'est-à-dire d'initiative parlementaire.

Le président:

Non, ce n'est pas pour les projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Non, ce n'est pas pour les projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire. C'est pour les C-1000, que nous n'avons pas utilisés depuis des années. Cela existe toujours du côté du Sénat, et tout le monde s'adresse au Sénat pour cela de toute façon. Nous nous en sommes servi pour construire des chemins de fer et des canaux. Nous ne faisons plus cela.

Le président:

Parfait.

M. Arnold Chan:

Cela permet aussi...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous l'avons aussi utilisé pour les divorces. C'est ainsi que cela se faisait.

Le président:

Le sujet 5 concerne les étrangers détenus par le sergent d'armes: supprimer l'article 158 du Règlement qui autorise le sergent d'armes à détenir tout étranger qui n'observe pas le décorum à la Chambre ou dans les tribunes et prévoir que toute personne ainsi détenue ne peut être libérée sans un ordre spécial de la Chambre.

Dans l'ancien temps, on les mettait en prison au sous-sol. Si c'était juste avant l'ajournement d'été, ils y passaient tout l'été, car c'est la Chambre qui devait les libérer.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Est-ce déjà arrivé?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'était dans mon discours, mais je n'ai pas dit de le supprimer. J'ai dit que je voulais comprendre comment cela fonctionnait. Si nous voulons explorer la question, je serai heureux de m'en charger.

Le président:

D'accord, nous aiderons David.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je soulèverai le point, et nous pourrons le rejeter plus tard.

Le président:

Nous en discuterons.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous pouvons mettre quelque chose...

Le président:

Le tableau 5 concerne la procédure financière. Il y a un seul point ici: garantir la cohérence entre des budgets des dépenses et les comptes publics.

M. Davies.

Au tableau 6 concernant les députés, il y a trois sujets.

Le sujet 1 est la corruption (processus).

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il y a un processus pour...?

M. Arnold Chan:

Et dire que les députés sont « honorables ».

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'était dans mon discours également; en effet, il y a un article du Règlement qui dit que la corruption est un crime, mais il n'y a pas de processus pour en traiter. Je me suis demandé pourquoi nous avons ce point puisqu'il n'y a pas de processus. Je veux comprendre.

Le président:

L'explication se lit: établir un processus permettant à la Chambre d'agir en cas d'accusation de corruption portée contre un député.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'article du Règlement est une autre possibilité.

Le président:

Vous voulez être le champion?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne toucherai pas à cela.

Le président:

Oublions celui-là. Il n'y a pas de champion.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, je passe.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'est un crime.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je sais, et c'est justement le point. Pourquoi est-ce dans le Règlement si c'est un crime?

Le président:

À l'ordre. Nous avons sauté ce point. Il n'est plus là. Il est supprimé.

Le sujet 2 est le fait de se lever pour demander la parole: permettre aux membres de la direction d'un parti de prendre la parole depuis n'importe quel siège attribué à leur parti.

(1135)

M. Tom Lukiwski:

Comment définissez-vous « la direction »?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est dans mon discours. J'ai dit n'importe qui des équipes des leaders de la Chambre.

M. Tom Lukiwski:

Des leaders de la Chambre, des whips, des chefs de partis?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Des leaders de la Chambre, des whips, des leaders adjoints de la Chambre, des whips adjoints parce qu'ils se déplacent souvent dans la chambre, de tous les partis. C'est pour leur permettre de parler de n'importe quel endroit. Il est trop compliqué de permettre cela à tout le monde, mais celui qui se trouve à l'autre bout de la pièce et qui veut parler doit pouvoir se lever et parler. Cela vaudrait pour tous les partis.

M. Arnold Chan:

Parlez-vous aux équipes de la Chambre?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Aux équipes de la Chambre, aux leaders à la Chambre et aux leaders adjoints.

M. Arnold Chan:

Les dirigeants désignés de la Chambre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les dirigeants de la Chambre, oui.

M. Arnold Chan:

Si vous voulez être champion, soit.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, je vais le défendre.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Qu'est-ce qui serait si important qu'ils doivent prendre la parole?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si quelque chose se produit et que l'un des leaders parlementaires est à l'autre bout de la Chambre, et qu'il doit se prononcer sur un règlement, ce n'est pas possible en ce moment. Il doit s'empresser de revenir à son siège pour le faire. Pourquoi ne pas permettre au petit groupe qui gère la Chambre de prendre la parole, peu importe où ils se trouvent?

M. Jamie Schmale:

C'est un argument de vente pour l'équipe parlementaire de course à pied, je crois.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Chose certaine, je n'en suis pas membre.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Parfait. Alors, nous allons vous y inscrire et vous n'aurez plus à vous en faire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est le Règlement 17. Je vais le défendre.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Très bien.

Le président:

D'accord.

Le sujet 3 porte sur le milieu de travail exempt de harcèlement sexuel: examiner les mesures en place afin de s'assurer qu'elles sont suffisantes pour que les députés et le personnel bénéficient d'un milieu de travail exempt de harcèlement sexuel.

Ginette.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Oui, je m'en occupe.

Le président:

En ce moment, nous en sommes au tableau 7, qui porte sur les affaires émanant des députés. On y retrouve neuf suggestions.

Le sujet 1 traite des amendements à l'étape de la deuxième lecture.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Ne voulait-on pas plutôt dire « deuxième heure »?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela fait partie de ma longue intervention.

L'idée était la suivante: entre la première et la deuxième heure de débats, le parrain d'une motion pourrait proposer des amendements à son projet de loi suite à la première heure de débats. Ce n'était qu'un sujet de discussion, étant donné les projets de loi controversés que nous avons traités au moment de ce débat.

Si personne ne veut le faire, je vais m'en occuper.

Le président:

Laissez-moi d'abord le lire au complet pour que ce soit consigné dans le procès-verbal.

Celui que nous venons de faire visait à permettre au parrain d'un projet de loi d'y proposer des amendements au cours du débat en deuxième lecture.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Pendant la deuxième heure....

Le président:

Voulez-vous que ce soit changé pour « heure »?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Entre les deux heures de débat, entre la première et la deuxième heure du débat en deuxième lecture.

Le président:

Toujours dans le tableau des affaires émanant des députés, le sujet 2 porte sur la désignation d'une affaire comme non votable: renforcer les critères ou en ajouter selon lesquels les affaires émanant des députés sont désignées votables ou non votables.

David, est-ce que c'était aussi dans votre intervention?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Non, pas celui-ci. Le prochain l'est, par contre.

Le président:

Est-ce que quelqu'un veut le défendre? D'accord.

Le sujet 3 est la dissolution: permettre que les affaires émanant des députés figurant au Feuilleton y demeurent et conservent leur rang par suite d'une dissolution.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À condition que les députés soient sur la liste...

Le président:

Oui, et ici le sujet était.... Bon, vous pourriez être comme moi. Jusqu'à aujourd'hui, après 11 ans, c'est la première fois où j'ai vraiment un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire. Ce qui veut dire qu'au moment de la dissolution, si votre tour approche, vous restez là. Tout le monde pourrait éventuellement avoir sa chance.

M. Arnold Chan:

J'ai une question. Est-ce que c'est valide pour des législatures successives, ou seulement au cours d'une session spécifique?

Le greffier du Comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

La dissolution, c'est la fin d'une législature, donc ce serait d'une législature à la suivante.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je crois que vous pensez à la prorogation, ce qui n'est pas la même chose.

M. Don Davies:

Ce n'est pas la dissolution, mais bien la prorogation.

M. Arnold Chan:

C'est la prorogation.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comme je l'ai dit dans mon intervention, il y a quelque chose de semblable, mais ce n'est pas tout à fait la même chose. Ce pourrait en être l'origine. L'idée que je proposais dans mon intervention est la suivante: disons qu'un projet de loi est adopté en Chambre et envoyé au Sénat. Puis, la Chambre est dissoute. Qu'est-ce qui empêche le Sénat de finir le travail? Le Sénat ne change pas. Mon point n'était pas de le ramener en Chambre, mais plutôt de laisser le Sénat finir le travail.

M. Don Davies:

Les affaires émanant des députés.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, exactement. Dans le cas d'un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire envoyé au Sénat, et qui n'est pas complété par le Sénat lors de la dissolution de la Chambre, pourquoi ne peut-on pas laisser le Sénat le compléter, plutôt que de recommencer à zéro?

Une voix:Voulez-vous le défendre?

M. David de Burgh Graham: Oui, je vais le défendre, en tenant compte de ce que je voulais dire, et non pas de ce qui est écrit ici.

Le président:

Et c'est après la dissolution, puisqu'il est là depuis cinq ans....

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est bien cela. Après la dissolution.

Le président:

.... ou quatre ans, ou peu importe la durée d'une législature.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous pourrez le torpiller plus tard, si c'est ce que vous désirez.

Le président:

D'accord.

Le sujet 4 porte sur le principe directeur ou l'objectif des affaires émanant des députés: permettre à chaque député de présenter une initiative parlementaire par législature.

Monsieur Davies.

M. Don Davies:

Je vais le défendre.

Le président:

Le sujet 5 traite du nombre d'heures consacrées par semaine aux affaires émanant des députés: accroître le nombre d’heures consacrées par semaine aux affaires émanant des députés. Il a été proposé de créer une Chambre parallèle afin d’augmenter le temps disponible pour les affaires émanant des députés.

Anita.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Oui.

Le président:

Le sujet 6 concerne les motions portant production de documents: établir une échéance de 180 jours pour le dépôt des documents à la Chambre.

N'y a-t-il pas d'échéance en ce moment?

(1140)

M. Arnold Chan:

N'est-ce pas 120?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que c'est 120?

Le président:

Personne ne le défend?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce ne sera pas moi.

Le président:

D'accord, nous allons passer.

Le sujet 7 porte sur le tirage au sort....

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

[inaudible]

Le président:

Un instant, nous revenons au sujet 6. Anita le défend.

Le hic avec ce processus, c'est que nous avons tous prononcé nos interventions et nous allons choisir les choses dont nous avons parlé, mais les membres de nos caucus qui se sont prononcés ont effacé leurs sujets.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous allons quand même en parler à notre caucus.

Le président:

D'accord.

Le sujet 7 du tableau 7 est le tirage au sort tenu pour les députés réélus: créer un mécanisme pour accorder la priorité aux députés réélus par rapport aux nouveaux députés sur la Liste portant examen des affaires émanant des députés. Il a été proposé de tenir deux tirages au sort: un pour les députés réélus et un autre pour les nouveaux députés

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Celui-ci m'appartient aussi. Ce n'est pas tout à fait ce que j'ai dit.

Le président:

Il s'agit des députés réélus qui n'ont pas déposé de projet de loi, n'est-ce pas?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les députés réélus conserveraient leur place actuelle sur la liste, suivis par les gens qui ont été ajoutés à la liste, comme les gens qui ont quitté le cabinet entre deux élections. Viennent ensuite les nouveaux députés, via un nouveau tirage au sort. Une fois que vous avez votre place, vous la conservez jusqu'à ce que vous déposiez votre projet de loi, peu importe le temps nécessaire. En ce moment, nous avons des députés qui en sont à leur cinquième mandat et qui n'ont jamais déposé de projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire. D'autres députés en déposeront un dès leur première semaine en Chambre. Je ne crois pas que ce soit équitable. Je crois que tout le monde devrait être sur le même pied.

Voilà pourquoi je vais le défendre. Le sujet 7 m'appartient.

Le président:

D'accord. Le sujet 8 est le tirage au sort tenu pour les députés qui ont déjà fait inscrire un projet de loi ou une motion.

M. Don Davies:

Monsieur le président, qu'en est-il du sujet 6? Est-ce qu'il a été effacé?

Le président:

Anita.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je veux juste qu'il soit maintenu.

Le président:

Vous pouvez présumer qu'il l'est par défaut, s'il n'y a rien.

Le sujet 8 concerne le tirage au sort tenu pour les députés qui sont prêts à déposer un projet de loi ou une motion: lorsque la Liste portant examen des affaires émanant des députés est établie pour la première fois, donner préséance dans l’ordre de priorité aux députés qui ont déposé un projet de loi ou donné avis d’une motion.

Personne ne le défend.

Le sujet 9 porte sur l'échange de place avec un autre député sur la Liste: permettre aux députés de changer de place avec un autre député sur la Liste portant examen des affaires émanant des députés.

Arnold, est-ce que vous le défendez?

D'accord.

Nous en sommes maintenant au tableau 8, concernant la période des questions et les déclarations de députés. Quatorze sujets ont été proposés lors des débats.

Au sujet 1, il est question des applaudissements: interdire les applaudissements durant la période des questions.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Tout le monde va me détester, mais je vais le prendre.

Le président:

Anita.

Le sujet 2 concerne les réponses: donner au président le pouvoir de juger de la qualité et de la pertinence d'une réponse, par exemple, la réponse doit avoir trait à la question.

Monsieur Davies.

Le sujet 3 porte sur le vice-président: faire prendre place à un vice-président du côté opposé au fauteuil du président à la Chambre pendant la période des questions.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Comme dans la LNH, avec deux arbitres.

Le président:

Monsieur Davies, est-ce que vous le défendez? D'accord.

Le sujet 4 porte sur les députés du parti ministériel: permettre aux députés du parti ministériel de poser seulement des questions se rapportant à leurs électeurs.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si quelque chose se rapporte à ses électeurs.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Oui.

Le président:

Personne ne le défend? Bon.

Le sujet 5 est la lecture.

Monsieur Lukiwski.

Le sujet 5 est la lecture: interdire aux députés de lire le texte de leurs réponses ou questions.

M. Tom Lukiwski:

En douze ans et demi, je ne l'ai jamais fait. Je crois sincèrement qu'il s'agirait d'un excellent changement au Parlement. Ce serait un changement très positif, donc, je vais le défendre avec plaisir.

Le président:

En fait, c'était comme cela avant, d'après ce que....

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avant, nous avions des notes, et non pas des feuilles complètes, en plus des podiums pour le hansard.

Le président:

Le sujet 6 traite de la durée des questions et réponses: augmenter le temps alloué pour les questions et les réponses. Augmenter aussi le temps alloué à la période des questions.

Monsieur Davies.

Le sujet 7 porte sur la liste des orateurs: limiter ou abolir le recours à la liste des députés qui prendront la parole remise au président par les partis, à condition que le président accorde la parole aux députés selon un roulement équitable entre les partis

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je vais le prendre.

Le président:

Anita.

Le sujet 8 concerne les déclarations de députés dénuées de toute partisanerie: limiter les déclarations de députés à des sujets non partisans et/ou d’intérêt et d’importance pour les électeurs.

Il n'y a personne pour le défendre?

Le sujet 9 traite du préavis des questions: ajouter une exigence selon laquelle il faut déposer un préavis de question avant de pouvoir la poser.

M. Don Davies:

Puis-je poser une question à ce sujet?

Le président:

Oui.

M. Don Davies:

Je crois que c'est relié à l'article 31. N'y a-t-il pas déjà une règle souple régissant leur utilisation?

Le président:

Si c'est le cas, elle ne fonctionne pas.

M. Don Davies:

Oui, c'est vrai.

(1145)

M. Blake Richards:

Je crois que vous faites référence à la règle qui dit que vous ne pouvez pas l'utiliser pour attaquer un autre député en Chambre. Je crois que cette règle a été adoptée au cours de la dernière législature, n'est-ce pas?

M. Don Davies:

Oui, je crois qu'il y avait une règle quelconque là-dessus.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je vais citer l'article 31 du Règlement, qui dit simplement que: Un député peut obtenir la parole, conformément à l'article 30(5) du Règlement, pour faire une déclaration pendant au plus une minute. Le président peut ordonner à un député de reprendre son siège si, de l'avis du président, il est fait un usage incorrect du présent article.

Une voix:On ne définit pas l'usage correct.

M. Arnold Chan:On ne définit pas ce que tout cela signifie.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Voilà pourquoi il y a un président.

M. Arnold Chan:

En fait, c'est laissé à la discrétion du président.

M. Don Davies:

Je ne suis pas d'accord avec cette proposition, car je ne crois pas qu'il soit possible de définir précisément ce qu'est une « déclaration dénuée de toute partisanerie ».

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est trop suggestif.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Vous en êtes au sujet 9 après ceci.

Vous parlez du sujet 8, sa définition, si nous voulions le faire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En théorie, tout ce qui se passe au Parlement intéresse et préoccupe les électeurs, donc je ne... c'est tellement subjectif que c'est inutile.

Mme Dara Lithwick (attachée de recherche auprès du Comité):

Nous étions au sujet 8. Maintenant, vous allez commencer le sujet 9.

M. Don Davies:

Le président de la législature précédente rappelait parfois aux gens qui se servaient des déclarations de députés en vertu de l'article 31 du Règlement pour attaquer.... j'oublie.

M. Blake Richards:

Oui, il enguirlandait les gens qui le faisaient. Il a pris la parole et a statué qu'il ne le permettrait plus et que, si cela devait se reproduire, il retirerait le droit de parole au délinquant.

M. Arnold Chan:

Enfin, si vous attaquez un député en particulier.

M. Blake Richards:

Oui. Je crois que c'était peut-être même un peu plus large qu'un seul député en particulier. Il s'agissait d'attaquer un député ou d'utiliser un... « partisan » n'est pas tout à fait le mot que je cherche, mais si vous les utilisiez pour attaquer les autres partis ou quelque chose du genre.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Selon moi, il serait judicieux de discuter plus longuement de ce sujet. Alors je vais le parrainer, question de maintenir le dialogue.

Le président:

Faites ajouter votre nom sur la liste.

Numéro 9.

M. Don Davies:

Alors il est défendu?

Le président:

Oui.

Le sujet 9 porte sur le préavis des questions: ajouter une exigence selon laquelle il faut déposer un préavis de question avant de pouvoir la poser.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pas une exigence.

Le président:

Il n'y a personne pour le défendre?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous devriez le faire si vous voulez obtenir une réponse, mais ce n'est pas obligatoire.

Le président:

Le sujet 10 porte sur la journée des questions au premier ministre: désigner une période de questions pour les questions au premier ministre.

M. Blake Richards:

Je ne me prononcerai pas en faveur de ce sujet, mais le premier ministre ne se présente en chambre qu'une fois par semaine.

Le président:

Le sujet 11 concerne la répétition: limiter le nombre de fois où la même question peut être posée. Interdire la répétition des réponses.

Monsieur Chan, allez-vous le défendre?

M. Arnold Chan:

Non.

M. Blake Richards:

Dans ce cas, il devra se présenter plus d'une fois par semaine.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La période de questions ne dure que 15 minutes.

Le président:

Nous en sommes au sujet 11 maintenant.

M. Blake Richards:

Je dis que, si personne ne l'a défendu, alors il devra vraiment se présenter plus d'une fois par semaine.

Le président:

Blake, est-ce que vous faites référence au sujet 10?

M. Blake Richards:

Bon, je demandais tout simplement si quelqu'un l'avait défendu.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. Blake Richards:

Je ne vais pas le défendre, car je crois qu'il le fait déjà et qu'il devrait se présenter en chambre plus souvent.

Le président:

Pouvons-nous simplement défendre le sujet 11?

Le sujet 12 porte sur le parlementaire désigné pour répondre: permettre au député qui pose une question de désigner le ministre ou le secrétaire parlementaire qui y répondra.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aimerais en parler, rapidement. Vous ne pouvez pas le faire, parce que vous feriez alors référence à ceux qui sont présents en Chambre ou qui sont absents, ce qui va à l'encontre des règles. Selon moi, cela ne devrait pas être amendé.

Le président:

Monsieur Davies.

M. Don Davies:

Je vais le défendre. Je ne crois pas que c'est ce qu'on veuille dire.

Le président:

D'accord, il est défendu.

Le sujet 13, le moment choisi pour les déclarations de députés: déplacer les déclarations de députés à l’heure du débat d’ajournement— ou late show. Tenir le débat d’ajournement juste après la période des questions, le renommer, et exiger que ce soient les ministres responsables qui répondent aux questions plutôt que les secrétaires parlementaires.

Est-ce que quelqu'un le défend?

Le sujet 14, l'urgence des questions: examiner l’utilité de l'article 37(1) du Règlement, qui prévoit que le président peut ordonner qu’une question soit inscrite au Feuilleton s’il estime qu’elle ne comporte aucune urgence.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'était dans mon intervention, mais je ne vais pas le défendre aujourd'hui. Dans mon intervention, je demandais pourquoi nous ne l'utilisons pas, alors qu'il est là? C'est simplement trop politique, alors oublions-le.

Le président:

Il n'est pas défendu.

Nous en sommes maintenant au tableau 9 concernant les votes par appel nominal. Il y a trois suggestions dans ce tableau.

Le sujet 1 porte sur le système de mise aux voix électronique ou statu quo: étudier les systèmes de mise aux voix électronique dans l’optique de mettre en place une procédure de vote électronique— p. ex. les députés votent en se servant de leur iPad codé. D’autres députés ont dit privilégier le statu quo.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais inscrire vote électronique. Ce sera amusant.

Le président:

Si vous ne l'aviez pas fait, je l'aurais fait.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que le président peut s'en occuper? J'imagine que oui.

M. Arnold Chan:

Considérant d'où il vient, bien sûr.

Le président:

Le sujet 2, le vote par procuration: établir un système permettant aux députés de voter par procuration— p. ex. permettre aux députés qui s’occupent d’un enfant en bas âge de voter depuis l’antichambre.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Conciliation travail-famille.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je vais le défendre.

Le président:

D'accord.

Le sujet 3, le moment choisi pour les votes par appel nominal: au titre des suggestions à cet égard, notons: interdire la tenue de votes par appel nominal après midi le vendredi; interdire la tenue de votes par appel nominal les lundis, jeudis et vendredis; tenir les votes par appel nominal à des jours de la semaine précis, p. ex. les mardis et mercredis, comme c'est le cas en Suède; tenir les votes par appel nominal immédiatement après la période des questions.

Est-ce que quelqu'un le défend?

(1150)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui, bien sûr.

Le président:

Ce sont certaines des choses que nous tentons déjà de faire, mais nous devons les inclure dans le Règlement. Je crois que nous avons convenu de cela à une réunion précédente.

Le tableau 10 porte sur les affaires courantes. Il comprend sept sujets de discussion possibles.

Sujet 1, réponses aux questions écrites: donner au Président le pouvoir de juger de la qualité et de la pertinence des réponses aux questions inscrites au Feuilleton, p. ex. la réponse doit avoir trait à la question.

M. Davies.

Sujet 2, réorganisation de l'ordre des rubriques des Affaires courantes: déplacer la rubrique Motions à la fin des Affaires courantes. Placer les Questions inscrites au Feuilleton immédiatement avant le Dépôt de documents.

Il n'y a pas de champion?

Je pense que le but visé par ce sujet est peut-être de mener les affaires courantes sans être interrompu par une motion dilatoire, comme nous l'avons fait aujourd'hui. Nous avons débattu pendant trois heures d'un sujet, faisant en sorte que d'autres n'ont pas pu être abordés. Toutefois, il n'y a pas de champion.

Sujet 3, dépôt de documents par les députés de l'opposition: autoriser les députés de l'opposition à déposer des documents, quels qu'ils soient.

M. Davies.

Sujet 4, dépôt de pétitions non conformes au Règlement: permettre aux députés de déposer à la Chambre des pétitions non conformes au Règlement.

De quoi s'agit-il?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vingt-cinq signatures sont requises. Cela n'a pas de sens.

Le président:

Vous allez défendre ce sujet? D'accord.

Sujet 5, questions écrites (demander que toutes les questions restent au Feuilleton): abolir l'obligation du gouvernement de demander, chaque jour, que toutes les questions restent au Feuilleton.

Y a-t-il un champion?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il s'agit de l'une de ces choses absurdes, Kevin demandant qu'elles puissent rester au Feuilleton, et les autres devant approuver. Qu'arrive-t-il s'ils n'approuvent pas? Je ne sais pas.

M. Tom Lukiwski:

Le Président n'autoriserait pas cela, toutefois.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela s'est produit au tout début. Quelqu'un a répondu non, ce qui a entraîné un chaos à la table parce qu'on tentait de déterminer quoi faire.

M. Tom Lukiwski:

Si le Président sait ce qu'il fait, il ne le permettra pas.

M. Arnold Chan:

C'est un genre d'automatisme.

Le président:

Est-ce que vous seriez prêt à défendre cela, David?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, je ne vois pas pourquoi cela devrait demeurer ainsi.

Le président:

Nous allons passer au sujet 6 du tableau 10.

M. Don Davies:

Qu'est-il arrivé au sujet 5?

Le président:

David s'est proposé pour le défendre.

Sujet 6, questions écrites (question portée comme avis de motion): supprimer le paragraphe 39(6) du Règlement, qui permet au Président, sur demande faite par le gouvernement, d'ordonner qu'une question inscrite au Feuilleton de nature à nécessiter une longue réponse soit portée comme avis de motion et transférée à ce titre au Feuilleton.

Y a-t-il un champion? Nous pouvons y revenir.

Sujet 7, questions écrites (question transformée en ordre de dépôt): supprimer le paragraphe 39(7) du Règlement, selon lequel la Chambre peut autoriser que la réponse à une question complexe fasse l'objet d'un ordre de dépôt.

Y a-t-il un champion?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

[inaudible] réponse.

Le président:

Nous sommes au tableau 11, qui porte sur le calendrier parlementaire. Le tableau comporte sept sujets possibles de discussion.

Sujet 1, éliminer les séances du vendredi ou continuer à siéger cinq jours par semaine: éliminer les séances du vendredi à la Chambre. Prolonger les heures de séance le reste de la semaine pour s'acquitter des travaux parlementaires effectués le vendredi, p. ex. siéger des jours supplémentaires durant l'année, siéger certaines fins de semaine, ajouter une heure de séance à chacun des autres jours de la semaine. D'autres députés ont expliqué pourquoi ils préconisent le maintien de cinq jours de séance par semaine.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je vais défendre celui-là.

Le président:

Anita se propose pour le défendre.

Sujet 2, calendrier parlementaire (ajustement): reprendre les semaines de séance plus tôt à l'automne et ajourner plus tôt à la fin du printemps. Augmenter le nombre de semaines de séance en janvier, et les diminuer en juin.

Oh, c'est un des miens.

Arnold.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je m'en occupe.

Le président:

Merci.

Sujet 3, calendrier parlementaire (blocs de séances): fixer les jours de séance en blocs de sorte que la Chambre siège deux semaines d'affilée, puis ne siège pas les deux semaines suivantes. Éviter les longs blocs de nombreuses semaines de séance consécutives.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais m'occuper de la deuxième partie de ce sujet.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Nous pouvons peut-être le modifier.

Le président:

Pourquoi ne pas le modifier et discuter uniquement de la deuxième partie?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, seulement pour éviter les blocs de cinq et de six semaines, lorsque les choses commencent à se corser ici.

Le président:

Est-ce que tous sont d'accord?

M. Don Davies:

Voulez-vous vous en charger, David [inaudible] envisager de siéger pendant deux semaines?

(1155)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, seulement la deuxième partie, c'est-à-dire éviter les longs blocs de semaines de séance consécutives. Je ne promets pas de pouvoir le faire, mais essayons d'éviter cela.

M. Don Davies:

Cela ne me dérangerait pas d'examiner des blocs de deux fois deux.

Le président:

Tout est encore là. Rien n'est modifié.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela me semble bien.

Le président:

David est le champion.

Sujet 4, calendrier parlementaire (dépôt): exiger que le Président dépose le calendrier parlementaire en juin avant la relâche estivale.

À l'heure actuelle, cela a lieu à l'automne.

Ginette se chargera de défendre cela.

Je crois que le Comité était assez favorable. Nous en avons discuté une fois, et nous étions assez favorables.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous avons demandé cela dans notre rapport.

Le président:

Oui, on souhaitait ainsi que les gens puissent planifier leur emploi du temps.

Sujet 5, affaires émanant des députés (les vendredis): augmenter le temps réservé aux affaires émanant des députés les vendredis.

M. Davies défendra ce sujet.

Sujet 6, prorogation: étudier les règles applicables à la prorogation et le recours à cette pratique.

M. Davies... nous avons à peu près trois personnes qui sont prêtes à le défendre.

Sujet 7, horaire d'une semaine de séance (proposition): l'horaire d'une semaine de séance qui suit a été proposé durant le débat exploratoire: Réserver le lundi et le mercredi pour les travaux des comités. Le mardi et le jeudi, la Chambre siège de 10 h à 18 h. Tenir tous les votes par appel nominal le mardi après la période des questions. Le jeudi serait consacré à l'étude des projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire et aux journées de l'opposition. La période des questions aurait lieu chaque jour de la semaine (du lundi au vendredi).

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Même les jours où la Chambre ne siège pas?

Je ne me propose pas pour défendre celui-là.

Le président:

Il n'y a pas de champion pour ce sujet?

D'accord.

Nous en sommes au tableau 12, qui porte sur l'élection du président. Le tableau comporte trois sujets.

Sujet 1, acclamation: modifier l'article 4 du Règlement afin d'y inclure une disposition pour les cas où un seul député se porte candidat à la présidence.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais m'en occuper. Cela vient du fait que lorsque Peter Milliken a été réélu comme président, il l'a été par acclamation. Je me rappelle avoir vu à la télévision Bill Blaikie se lever comme doyen de la Chambre pour dire qu'il n'existait pas de règle à ce sujet et qu'il souhaitait qu'il y ait consentement unanime. Mais que serait-il arrivé si quelqu'un avait dit non? Il faut corriger cela.

Le président:

Sujet 2, élection du vice-président et des vice-présidents adjoints: prévoir un processus officiel ou des directives pour l'élection du vice-président et des vice-présidents adjoints; veiller à ce que chaque parti soit représenté par un occupant du fauteuil.

Une voix: À l'heure actuelle, nous suivons la convention.

M. Don Davies:

[inaudible]

Une voix: Ce n'est pas le cas maintenant; il s'agit juste d'une convention.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous suivons juste la convention à l'heure actuelle.

Le président:

M. Davies est le champion.

Sujet 3, problèmes relatifs au libellé: clarifier ou reformuler le paragraphe 7(1.1) du Règlement portant sur la mise aux voix de la motion pour élire le vice-président, le paragraphe 7(2) portant sur les connaissances linguistiques du vice-président, et le paragraphe 7(3) portant sur le mandat du vice-président et la disposition en cas de vacance de ce poste.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais m'occuper de ce sujet, qui faisait aussi partie de mon discours. J'ai lu la partie 7 du Règlement, et je l'ai trouvée totalement alambiquée. Cela ne me dérangerait pas de la formuler dans un meilleur anglais.

Le président:

D'accord.

Nous passons au tableau 13, qui porte sur le rôle, les pouvoirs et les fonctions du président. Ce tableau comporte 10 sujets.

Sujet 1, code vestimentaire: inclure dans le Règlement un code vestimentaire pour les députés.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela figure déjà dans la Procédure et les usages de la Chambre des communes.

Le président:

Il s'agit d'un code vestimentaire pour les hommes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le code vestimentaire s'appliquant aux députés prévoit de porter une tenue de ville au goût du jour. Il se limite à cela.

Le président:

D'accord. Y a-t-il un champion pour ce sujet?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pour les hommes, on parle de veston et cravate, mais pour les femmes, d'une tenue de ville au goût du jour.

M. Arnold Chan:

Ou un costume traditionnel correspondant à nos antécédents ethnoculturels.

M. Don Davies: Cela est déjà prévu.

Une voix: Oui.

M. Don Davies:

Est-ce que nous supprimons ce sujet?

Le président:

Personne ne l'a défendu, n'est-ce pas?

M. Don Davies:

Non.

Le président:

D'accord.

Sujet 2, enfants en bas âge dans l'enceinte de la Chambre: admettre les enfants en bas âge accompagnés d'un député dans l'enceinte de la Chambre lorsqu'elle siège.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je vais défendre celui-là, parce que si je ne peux pas voter par procuration dans l'antichambre, alors...

Le président:

Sujet 3, interruptions, chahut: interdire aux députés de parler quand un autre député a la parole, sauf durant la période des questions.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Un bon sujet pour Don; il sera à la hauteur.

M. Don Davies:

Je m'en charge.

Le président:

Don. D'accord.

Sujet 4, liste des orateurs: limiter ou abolir le recours à la liste des députés qui prendront la parole transmise au Président par les partis, à condition que le Président accorde la parole aux députés selon un roulement équitable entre les partis. Pénaliser les députés qui perturbent les débats en ne leur laissant pas la parole.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je vais me charger de celui-là.

Le président:

D'accord, Anita.

Sujet 5, langues officielles: interdire aux députés de mentionner la langue officielle employée par un autre député.

David.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est un des miens. Je n'ai pas dit « capacité de parler ». Je faisais mention au langage déjà utilisé par quelqu'un. Je ne crois pas que cela soit approprié. Les deux langues ont un poids égal à la Chambre, et il ne devrait pas être possible de tourner quelqu'un en dérision en raison de la langue qu'il parle, ce qui s'est déjà produit.

(1200)

Le président:

D'accord. Vous vous proposez pour ce sujet.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il est pour moi, oui.

Le président:

Sujet 6, ordre de décorum: élargir les pouvoirs conférés au Président pour maintenir l'ordre et le décorum. Encourager le Président à employer plus souvent les mesures disciplinaires actuelles, p. ex. interdire la lecture du texte d'une question ou réponse, les mesures relatives aux répétitions et à la pertinence, cesser de donner la parole aux députés qui perturbent les débats.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je vais m'occuper de celui-là.

Le président:

Anita se propose pour défendre ce sujet.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur le président, ces mesures sont-elles un genre de châtiment corporel moderne?

Le président:

Sujet 7, questions de privilège: donner au Président le pouvoir de rendre les décisions finales sur les questions de privilège plutôt que le député qui soulève la question doit présenter une motion pour que l'affaire soit étudiée plus avant.

Y a-t-il un champion pour ce sujet? Non.

Sujet 8, rapports sur le comportement des députés: charger le Président de produire un rapport consignant le comportement de chaque député et devant être publié tous les trimestres.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Qui s'occupe de ce sujet-là? Cela m'a échappé.

Le président:

Y a-t-il un champion pour ce sujet?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Des bulletins pour la Chambre des communes... Intéressant.

Le président:

Anita, je ne peux pas croire que vous ne vous proposerez pas pour le défendre.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je n'irai pas jusque-là.

Le président:

Sujet 9, motions d'attribution de temps et de clôture: investir le Président, avec l'appui du Bureau de régie interne, du pouvoir ou de la discrétion nécessaire pour trancher sur l'utilisation des motions d'attribution de temps et de clôture.

Vous vous êtes chargé de celui-là, Anita.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Oui, il est tiré de mon discours.

Le président:

Sujet 10, reprise vidéo: fournir au Président un système de reprise vidéo afin qu'il puisse examiner les cas présumés de mauvaise conduite.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Une chaîne de sports avec cela?

M. Jamie Schmale:

Nous avons deux arbitres et maintenant des reprises vidéo.

Le président:

Était-ce Frank?

M. Don Davies:

C'est lui.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Pouvons-nous décliner les premières tentatives? Désolé... règles du jeu.

Le président:

Nous en sommes au tableau 14, qui porte sur les modifications de forme.

Cela a dû être une journée très productive à la Chambre.

Sujet 1, modification au paragraphe 28(1) du Règlement: dans le paragraphe du Règlement portant sur les jours où la Chambre ne siège pas, remplacer « la fête du Dominion » par « la fête du Canada ».

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais m'en charger.

Le président:

C'est David qui est le champion.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela nous permettra de nous rendre à la fin du XXe siècle à tout le moins.

Le président:

Sujet 2, correction du paragraphe 68(3) du Règlement: dans la partie du Règlement traitant du dépôt et des lectures des projets de loi d'intérêt public, en anglais, on peut lire qu'un projet de loi ne peut être présenté dans une forme imparfaite (imperfect form), alors qu'en français, il ne peut être présenté dans une forme « incomplète ».

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je m'en occupe.

Le président:

David est le champion.

Sujet 3, correction de l'article 71 du Règlement: dans la partie du Règlement traitant du dépôt et des lectures des projets de loi d'intérêt public, en anglais, on peut lire que tout projet de loi doit être soumis à « three several readings ». En français, on peut lire que tout projet de loi doit être soumis à « trois lectures ». On a suggéré de remplacer « several » par « separate ».

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce sujet a été complètement abandonné. Il vient aussi de mon discours. Je m'en occupe.

Le président:

D'accord, David est le champion.

Le tableau 15 porte sur la technologie et il comprend deux sujets.

Sujet 1, « boutons d'appels » sur les pupitres: installer des « boutons d'appels » sur les pupitres pour appeler les pages ou attirer l'attention du Président.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'était dans mon discours.

M. Arnold Chan:

David est...

Le président:

Il pourrait arriver que des centaines de personnes appuient sur les boutons en même temps.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous pourrons en discuter de façon plus approfondie lorsque nous serons rendus là, mais j'ai des choses à dire à ce sujet.

Le président:

D'accord.

Sujet 2, vote et dépôt de documents à distance: permettre aux députés atteints d'une incapacité temporaire de travail, aux députées enceintes ou à ceux qui s'occupent d'une personne en fin de vie de voter et de déposer des documents à distance.

Est-ce que quelqu'un veut discuter de cela?

Il nous reste une page, puis nous pourrons peut-être prendre une petite pause de cinq minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Devrais-je donc soumettre cela à nouveau au caucus? Je ne sais pas ce que nous pouvons faire une fois arrivés au bout de la liste.

Le président:

Nous sommes à la dernière page, au tableau 16, portant sur les divers sujets d'ordre administratif, interne, juridique, procédural. Le tableau comprend 20 sujets.

Sujet 1, Bureau de régie interne: tenir toutes les réunions du Bureau en public.

M. Davies.

Sujet 2, télédiffusion des réunions de comités: télédiffuser les réunions de comités le plus souvent possible.

M. Davies.

Sujet 3, télédiffusion du chahut: enregistrer et télédiffuser les extraits où des députés chahutent.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je crois que cela aura l'effet contraire à celui attendu.

Une voix: Oui.

Le président:

D'accord, il n'y a pas de champion.

Sujet 4, garderie: ajouter du matériel de terrain de jeu.

C'est le mien.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce pour nous ou pour les enfants?

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Arnold Chan:

Nous avons suffisamment d'outils.

Le président:

C'est pour les enfants.

Est-ce que quelqu'un le défend?

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Nous pouvons.

Le président:

D'accord, merci, Ginette.

Je crois qu'il devrait y avoir un terrain de jeu à l'extérieur, parce que les gens amènent leurs enfants ici l'été.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

J'aimerais bien qu'on ait une tyrolienne.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord, appelons le sujet 5 une colline pour mourir.

Le président:

La tyrolienne devrait être reliée au Château Laurier ou au 1 Wellington.

M. Arnold Chan:

On pourrait peut-être passer au sujet 5. Il est défendu par David. Allons.

(1205)

Le président:

D'accord, le sujet 5, horloges dans la Chambre: installer dans la Chambre des horloges numériques synchronisées qui pourraient être contrôlées par le Bureau. Installer une horloge indiquant le temps de parole qui reste.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est mon sujet favori. Oui, je m'en charge.

Le président:

Il y a beaucoup de mots dans votre discours, n'est-ce pas?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai réussi à faire un discours de 20 minutes en 10 minutes. Voilà le résultat.

Le président:

David est le champion.

Sujet 6, budgets des comités: attribuer à chaque comité permanent son propre budget de fonctionnement, et veiller à ce que l'attribution des allocations soit équitable pour tous les comités.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

N'avons-nous pas déjà cela?

Le président:

Le Comité de liaison sert déjà à cela, n'est-ce pas?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Personnellement, je crois que cela dépasse notre mandat.

M. Arnold Chan:

Oui.

Le président:

D'accord, il n'y a pas de champion.

Sujet 7, tribune et visiteurs: permettre aux visiteurs de rester à la tribune après la période de questions.

Est-ce qu'on les met à la porte?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Laissez-moi parler de ce sujet, qui faisait partie de mon discours.

Ce qui est arrivé, c'est que le jour précédent mon discours, j'avais des visiteurs dans la tribune réservée aux groupes, qui est située au-dessus du fauteuil du Président. À trois heures, des responsables de la sécurité y sont allés et ont demandé à tout le monde de sortir, ce qui m'a offusqué. Dans les autres tribunes, les gens peuvent rester, mais dans la tribune réservée aux groupes qui, comme son nom l'indique, accueille les groupes nombreux, comme les groupes scolaires, les visiteurs ne peuvent rester que de deux à trois heures. La tribune n'est pas utilisée le reste du temps.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

On les escorte à la porte.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

On les escorte vers l'extérieur. Si vous regardez cette tribune...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Habituellement, ils y vont à la fin de la période des questions.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

... à la fin de la période de questions, vers trois heures moins cinq, vous verrez que s'il y a un gros groupe là, les responsables de la sécurité viennent tranquillement faire sortir tout le monde...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'est vrai.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

... et je crois que cela ne devrait pas se produire. Je n'ai pas reçu de réponse satisfaisante à ce sujet.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'est seulement à la fin de la période des questions qu'ils...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui. Je veux donc qu'on règle ce problème.

Le président:

D'accord. Nous avons beaucoup de champions pour ce sujet et nous allons en discuter. Nous allons inclure Ruby. Son nom n'est pas encore là.

Sujet 8, participation des sénateurs indépendants aux activités des associations interparlementaires: revoir les procédures afin de permettre aux sénateurs indépendants de prendre part aux activités des associations interparlementaires.

Est-ce que cela relève de nous?

Une voix: Non.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je ne crois pas que cela relève de nous, mais...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ils sont maîtres de leur...

M. Arnold Chan:

Ils sont maîtres de leur destinée. Je crois que cela dépasse notre mandat.

M. Don Davies:

En effet.

Le président:

D'accord, nous n'avons donc pas de champion parce que cela ne relève pas de nous.

Sujet 9, dans le tableau 16, peuples autochtones: étudier le fonctionnement des sociétés et des gouvernements autochtones.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Cela fait partie des règlements.

Le président:

C'est moi qui l'ai soumis.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est vraiment tout un règlement.

Le président:

Je ne pensais pas vraiment à une modification du règlement; il s'agissait d'une suggestion, mais cela me va.

Je ne veux pas revenir sur la question, mais aux États-Unis, la constitution est fondée dans une large mesure sur la confédération des six nations. Beaucoup de leurs règles ont été prises là. Dans notre région, nous avons des modes de gouvernance traditionnels des Premières Nations, que nous avons approuvées dans des traités modernes, et je proposais simplement que nous les examinions pour la direction du Parlement, mais nous n'avons pas à en discuter.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Nous pouvons, si vous le voulez.

Le président:

C'est autre chose; il s'agissait seulement d'une suggestion de réflexion.

Le sujet 10 porte sur la salle de repas commune: créer un endroit où les députés de tous les partis pourront manger ensemble.

M. Jamie Schmale:

On appelle cela une cafétéria.

Le président:

Non, mais lorsque vous êtes à la Chambre...

Une voix: Y a-t-il une salle à manger?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce n'est pas moi qui défends ce sujet, mais je peux expliquer d'où il vient.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

C'est [inaudible].

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, l'idée est que... Auparavant, plutôt que de prendre notre repas dans nos propres locaux, il y avait une salle de repas pour que les deux côtés puissent se réunir, ce qui créait une atmosphère de plus grande collaboration. Cela a changé, il n'y a pas si longtemps...

Le président:

Où cette salle serait-elle située?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne sais pas, peut-être au 237-C, par exemple. On se rendrait là pour manger, plutôt que de rester dans nos locaux.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Oui, il s'agit du restaurant dans la cafétéria, je crois.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Bien, il y en a un nouveau...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

De toute façon, je ne défends pas ce sujet. Je ne fais que vous expliquer que...

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'accord, c'est de cela que ce sujet est parti.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

[inaudible]

M. Don Davies:

Est-ce que ce n'est pas là la fonction du restaurant parlementaire, toutefois?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Là-bas, il faut payer. Dans nos locaux, il n'y a que la nourriture que nous apportons.

M. Don Davies:

Oh, je vois.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Plutôt que de manger dans nos propres locaux, il y aurait un local mixte, c'est tout. C'était comme cela auparavant.

Le président:

Donc, vous dites, dans l'édifice de l'Ouest, le restaurant qui est juste à côté...

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Ce n'est pas une mauvaise idée.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce n'est pas une mauvaise idée [inaudible]

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Lorsque nous avons visité l'édifice de l'Ouest, le restaurant n'était-il pas...?

Le président:

D'accord, il n'y a pas de champion pour ce sujet.

Le prochain sujet concerne les dépenses des députés: prévoir une plus grande divulgation des dépenses des députés.

Je ne suis pas certain que cela dépend de nous non plus.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Non, je ne crois pas... Je crois que nous faisons très bien les choses déjà.

Le président:

D'accord, il n'y a pas de champion.

Le prochain sujet concerne les bureaux des députés: augmenter les budgets de bureau des députés, p. ex. fonds suffisants pour que chaque député puisse embaucher quatre employés.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si vous ne pouvez pas embaucher quatre employés, vous vous faites avoir.

Le président:

Cela ne nous concerne pas non plus, n'est-ce pas? Il s'agit du Bureau de régie interne.

Le prochain sujet porte sur les ministres (partage des fonctions): mettre en place un système selon lequel les ministres ne siégeraient pas à la Chambre, et se verraient plutôt affecter un député « remplaçant » pour s'acquitter de leurs fonctions parlementaires.

Cela faisait partie de mon discours. C'est ce que l'on fait en Suède. Là-bas, les ministres ne sont pas autorisés à siéger à la Chambre. Ils sont représentés par un autre député. On considère que les ministres sont tellement occupés qu'ils ne peuvent pas bien faire les deux choses, ce qui fait qu'on leur attribue un autre député et qu'ils ne siègent pas à la Chambre. Je crois qu'ils s'y rendent un jour par semaine.

M. Blake Richards:

Qui sont « ils »?

Le président:

Les ministres...

(1210)

M. Blake Richards:

Oui, mais qui sont « ils »? Est-ce que les ministres choisissent qui ils veulent?

Le président:

Je ne sais pas très bien comment les personnes sont choisies pour représenter les circonscriptions.

M. Blake Richards:

Je crois que ça réduirait un peu l'aspect démocratique, n'est-ce pas?

M. Jamie Schmale:

Pourrait-on juste demander à un député voisin de...?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Voulez-vous défendre ce sujet?

M. Blake Richards:

[inaudible] réellement un problème maintenant.

M. Don Davies:

La Suède a un système de RP, toutefois, ce qui fait qu'il est plus facile de faire des changements dans la liste. Ici, toutefois, il ne serait pas possible de faire partie du Cabinet avant que le gouvernement soit élu...

M. Jamie Schmale:

C'est bien vrai.

Le président:

Je serais prêt à discuter de ce sujet, si quelqu'un veut le défendre. Je ne suis pas sûr de vouloir le faire, en tant que président.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je peux le défendre, à condition qu'il soit entériné. Il vaudrait mieux qu'il soit défendu, mais je ne le ferai pas moi-même.

Le président:

D'accord, je vais le défendre et abandonner mes fonctions de président à ce moment-là. Ce sera Blake qui présidera.

Le sujet 14 porte sur la motion visant à outrepasser des dispositions du Règlement: interdire les motions visant à outrepasser une règle ou un usage, ou en limiter le recours, à moins que ces motions n'atteignent un seuil de consentement supérieur à 50 % plus un, p. ex. exiger le consentement unanime.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

[inaudible]

Le président:

Je crois que cela découle de... Certaines choses exigent un consentement unanime, qui peut avoir pour effet de paralyser le Parlement. Si au début ici, le consentement du Bloc n'était pas unanime... ne serait-ce que pour nommer des présidents de comités, et des membres des comités, etc.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vois où cela s'en va, et je n'ai pas l'intention de défendre ce sujet.

Le président:

D'accord, il n'y a pas de champion pour ce sujet.

Le prochain porte sur les agents supérieurs du Parlement: examiner le financement et le fonctionnement des bureaux des agents supérieurs du Parlement, y compris celui du directeur parlementaire du budget.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela ne fait pas partie de notre mandat, d'après ce que je peux voir.

Le président:

Je crois que cela relèverait du Bureau de régie interne.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

Le président:

Le prochain sujet porte sur un guichet unique: rouvrir le guichet unique dans la Cité parlementaire.

De quoi s'agit-il?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est moi qui l'ai soumis. J'appelle cela un règlement d'un autre ordre.

Jusqu'à il y a trois ans, nous avions un guichet unique, où est situé l'actuel bureau de poste, et il était possible d'y obtenir toutes les fournitures, plutôt que d'avoir à utiliser eway.ca. Pour les stylos, le papier ou les cartables, c'est là qu'il fallait aller. Je m'y suis rendu souvent, et cela était beaucoup plus pratique. Lorsque nous l'avons perdu, cela a compliqué considérablement le fonctionnement au quotidien des bureaux, ce qui fait que je veux que ce guichet revienne. Cela dépasse le mandat de la présente étude, mais j'aimerais qu'on y revienne.

Le président:

Pouvons-nous modifier le libellé pour qu'il se lise: « guichet unique pour les fournitures de bureau »? On parle bien de cela, n'est-ce pas?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, c'est bien cela. Peu importe comment on le formule.

Le président:

Fournitures de bureau?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, mais encore une fois, il s'agirait tout au plus d'une recommandation au BRI.

Le président:

C'est vrai, mais on pourrait faire cette recommandation.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Demandez au personnel d'expérience.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Est-ce que le personnel du bureau de circonscription a encore la possibilité d'obtenir des fournitures chez Bureau en gros, ou dans un endroit du genre?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, je l'ai fait.

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'accord.

Le président:

Est-ce que vous défendez ce sujet?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, je vais le défendre.

Le président:

D'accord. Il s'agissait du sujet 16, David.

Sujet 17, disposition des sièges à la Chambre: envisager d'autres options que la disposition des sièges actuelle, en position d'affrontement.

Dans des pays comme la Suède, et à la Chambre des représentants aux États-Unis, les personnes sont assises en demi-cercle, ce qui fait qu'elles font toutes face au président. De cette façon, on donne l'impression de s'attaquer ensemble aux problèmes du pays, alors qu'ici, l'aménagement donne plutôt lieu à la confrontation.

C'est sur cela que porte ce sujet.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

[inaudible] parce que parfois un parti siège du côté du gouvernement, alors que lorsqu'il est en minorité, c'est l'inverse.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

[inaudible] lorsque le nouvel édifice du Centre sera terminé?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le nouvel édifice du Centre est déjà...

Le président:

[difficulté technique]

Monsieur Davies. D'accord, c'est bien.

Rappelez-moi, Anita, de faire un commentaire concernant le nouvel édifice du Centre, lorsque nous aurons épuisé la liste.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

D'accord.

Le président:

Sujet 18, parties reconnues à la Chambre: permettre que les partis comptant moins de 12 députés élus soient reconnus, accroître leurs ressources et leur allouer des sièges au sein des comités.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je me demande de qui cela vient.

M. Don Davies:

Onze devinettes.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Arnold Chan:

Qui défend le sujet 19?

Le président:

Personne ne s'en est occupé jusqu'à maintenant.

Le sujet 19 porte sur les sièges à la Chambre: modifier le modèle des sièges à la Chambre, p. ex. les sièges actuels ont tendance à déchirer les poches des vestons.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comme j'ai déchiré six poches depuis les dernières élections, je vais défendre ce sujet.

M. Tom Lukiwski:

Parlez-vous de vos poches de veston ou de vos poches de pantalon?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mes poches de pantalon.

Cela ne s'est plus produit depuis que j'ai fait le discours. Je dois avoir appris ma leçon.

M. Don Davies:

Il s'agit peut-être d'un lien de cause à effet.

Le président:

D'accord, David défend ce sujet.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais le défendre.

M. Don Davies:

Je vous seconde.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci, Don.

Cela nous est arrivé à tous, sauf à Scott Reid.

Le président:

Le sujet 20 porte sur les travaux du Sénat durant la dissolution.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est ce dont je parlais plus tôt.

Le président:

Permettre au Sénat de poursuivre son étude des projets de loi dont il est saisi avant et durant une dissolution.

Voulez-vous dire après les élections, lorsqu'il y a des élections?

(1215)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je parlais uniquement des projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire. Si la Chambre adopte un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire et l'envoie au Sénat, je ne crois pas que le Sénat le torpillera juste parce que la Chambre arrête de siéger, étant donné que le Sénat ne change pas au moment des élections. Je dis que nous devrions permettre au Sénat de terminer ses travaux relativement à ce genre de projets de loi lorsqu'il en est saisi.

Le président:

Est-ce que vous défendez cela?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais le défendre.

M. Don Davies:

David, on parle de « projets de loi ». On ne se limite pas aux projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire, donc en irait-il de même pour les projets de loi du gouvernement?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je parle seulement des projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire.

M. Don Davies:

D'accord, le sujet devrait donc en faire mention.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, en effet.

Le président:

D'accord. Nous allons modifier le sujet 20. Nous allons le modifier pour qu'il porte sur les « projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire ».

Avant d'aller plus loin, et cela s'écarte un peu du sujet, Anita a mentionné l'édifice du Centre, et cela m'a rappelé que des gens pensent que les députés n'ont pas suffisamment leur mot à dire en ce qui a trait au réaménagement.

Par exemple, notre Comité a visité l'édifice de l'Ouest, mais les plans étaient déjà faits et la construction assez avancée. Je ne sais pas si aucun d'entre nous ici... Je suis ici depuis 11 ans.

Tom, vous êtes ici depuis longtemps, tout comme Blake. Croyez-vous que nous avons eu suffisamment notre mot à dire concernant le nouvel aménagement des édifices? Quelqu'un s'en charge et va de l'avant. Je ne dis pas qu'ils sont mal aménagés, mais les députés ont...

M. Tom Lukiwski:

Je ne crois pas que nous ayons eu notre mot à dire, mais je ne sais pas si...

Le président:

C'est approprié?

M. Tom Lukiwski:

Je ne sais pas si cela serait utile, bien franchement. Comme on le dit, trop de chefs gâtent la sauce. On conclut des contrats avec des professionnels, qui s'inspirent d'autres parlements et tiennent compte de toute une gamme de facteurs, avant de soumettre leur plan final.

J'ai jeté un coup d'oeil à l'édifice de l'Ouest. Je l'ai visité au tout début, et j'y suis retourné deux ou trois fois depuis. Je crois qu'il sera magnifique. Je le pense réellement. J'aime beaucoup l'aménagement, particulièrement celui de la Chambre des communes. Nous ne voudrons plus retourner à l'édifice du Centre.

En ce qui a trait à nous faire participer à la conception, je crois que nous sommes très peu nombreux au Parlement à avoir des compétences en architecture, au départ, ce qui fait que je ne pense pas que nous pourrions contribuer... Je ne sais pas ce que nous viendrions ajouter. Peut-être des commentaires généraux au sujet de la taille des bureaux ou des installations dont les députés ont besoin, mais pour ce qui est des plans proprement dits, je ne vois pas où cela...

Le président:

Je ne pensais pas aux aspects techniques, mais plutôt à des choses qui nous ennuient, comme déchirer nos pantalons sur les fauteuils.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je crois qu'il serait utile que les changements majeurs soient soumis à un comité, qu'il s'agisse d'un comité spécial ou du PROC, afin qu'on les examine, à tout le moins. Voilà ce que nous voulons faire. Est-ce acceptable pour les députés? Autrement, nous devons étudier la question et, si tout va bien, aller de l'avant. Nous n'avons pas besoin de 338 députés qui donnent leur opinion. Juste un comité qui dit « Cela a du bon sens ou cela n'a pas de bon sens ».

Autrement, pour les petites choses... Les designers ne s'assoient pas sur ces fauteuils. Ils ne sont pas au courant du problème des poches déchirées, n'est-ce pas? Ce n'est pas leur problème. C'est comme les logiciels des compagnies qui tiennent compte du design, mais pas des utilisateurs. En fin de compte...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

On ne peut pas savoir avant d'avoir utilisé l'endroit, et avant de s'être assis dans les fauteuils et d'avoir franchi la porte. Il est difficile d'examiner un plan et de dire « Je peux voir des problèmes ici, ici, ici », à moins d'être un architecte ou un designer. Une personne normale doit vivre un peu dans un endroit avant d'en découvrir les défauts.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous comprends, mais il doit y avoir une forme de... Des choses comme le problème des poches déchirées. Je vais me prendre en exemple, parce que c'est facile. Les fauteuils comportent trois arêtes. Cela est très décoratif, très joli, et parce que les fauteuils sont comme cela, nous ne pouvons pas les changer, parce qu'ils font partie de la tradition.

On pourrait les modifier légèrement et plus personne ne déchirerait ses poches. Il s'agirait d'un changement très mineur. Comment peut-on arriver à faire faire ces choses?

Le président:

Dans un autre ordre d'idées, qu'arriverait-il si, dans le nouvel édifice du Centre, on décidait qu'il n'y aura plus de salles pour les comités, parce qu'on veut aménager cela autrement? Beaucoup d'entre nous pensent que l'édifice du Centre est un bon endroit où tenir les réunions de comités.

Le Bureau de régie interne a son mot à dire. Je crois que c'est lui qui décide de ces choses. Je ne me rappelle pas avoir été consulté, comme député d'arrière-ban, pour ces choses, ni d'avoir eu un veto ou quoi que ce soit, mais on devrait au moins pouvoir faire des commentaires. C'est notre lieu de travail.

Monsieur Davies.

M. Don Davies:

Je crois qu'il devrait y avoir un processus. Dans le moment, c'est tout ou rien, et vous avez probablement... même dans ce processus, vous pouvez voir trois, quatre ou cinq propositions de fond qui peuvent avoir influencé la conception. Par exemple, la...

Le président:

la Chambre.

M. Don Davies:

Oui, la forme de la Chambre, circulaire ou non, avec deux chambres, ou avec une salle commune.

Je sais qu'au NPD, nous avons été embêtés par une chose, à savoir ne pas pouvoir tenir de réunion de caucus dans l'édifice du Centre. Une fois que les deux salles principales sont occupées, il n'y a pas réellement d'autre endroit. Nous nous réunissons dans l'édifice de la Promenade.

Il faudrait qu'il y ait une façon de faire une distinction entre les suggestions de fond utiles et les 5 000 suggestions qui seront faites au sujet de la couleur de la peinture dans les toilettes...

Il faut peut-être les recueillir toutes et les soumettre aux designers et aux décideurs pour qu'ils fassent le tri. Je ne crois pas que ce soit une mauvaise idée de suggérer cela.

(1220)

Le président:

Pouvons-nous juste ajouter que comme...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Notre rapport à ce sujet comporte une suggestion précise, à savoir le pouvoir de faire des recommandations au Bureau de régie interne. Nous pouvons recommander au Bureau de régie interne que, lorsque les plans seront faits pour revenir à l'édifice du Centre, dans 10 ans, ils devraient l'être beaucoup plus rapidement, afin que nous ayons au moins la possibilité de les voir avant qu'ils soient approuvés. Il s'agissait d'une demande pour une période de commentaires.

Le président:

Pourquoi n'ajoutons pas cela comme sujet 21 à la dernière page?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Qui a le numéro 22?

Le président:

Il y a le sujet 20 aussi.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est ce que je dis.

Le président:

Il s'agirait du numéro 21 et on en discuterait. Don, vous seriez le champion parce que c'est vous qui l'avez suggéré.

Vous pouvez peut-être soumettre le libellé correspondant à ce que vous venez de dire, en vue de la discussion.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je tente de faire valoir que nous ne devrions pas nous limiter à ce que nous avons ici.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si nous retournons en caucus et soumettons de nouvelles idées, profitons-en pour en discuter. Je crois que notre idée est d'améliorer les règles. Faisons-le correctement.

Le président:

Parmi les idées qui ont été abandonnées, la personne...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pourrait souhaiter qu'elles reviennent.

Le président:

... pourrait souhaiter qu'elles reviennent. Si elles ont été abandonnées.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ceci étant dit, je ne vois pas de raison de poursuivre là-dessus, tant que nous n'aurons pas eu la chance de retourner à nos caucus.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne sais pas si vous êtes d'accord avec cela.

Le président:

David est d'avis que notre travail est à peu près terminé pour aujourd'hui, jusqu'à ce que nous retournions à nos caucus. Nous ne serons pas réellement capables de retourner à nos caucus avant la prochaine réunion, soit mardi.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous pouvons attendre jusqu'à la semaine prochaine pour cela. Je ne vois pas de raison d'aller de l'avant. Si nous pouvons avoir accès à la ministre, à midi, mardi prochain, je crois que cela ira.

Le président:

Blake.

M. Blake Richards:

Je ne suis pas certain d'avoir entendu tout ce que vous avez dit. Je dirais qu'étant donné que nous n'avons pas réellement... Nous devrions tenter de joindre la ministre et voir s'il est possible de passer deux heures avec elle. Comme nous l'avons souligné l'autre jour, nous n'avons pas suffisamment de temps pour résoudre les préoccupations et les questions que nous avons. Je crains que nous ne puissions aller plus loin sans cela.

Le président:

Je crois qu'Arnold a répondu à cela la dernière réunion.

M. Arnold Chan:

J'ai dit que la ministre était au Cabinet, n'est-ce pas?

M. Blake Richards:

Évidemment, elle y est. Tant pis. J'imagine que nous n'obtiendrons pas nos réponses alors. Nous ne devrions pas, de toute façon, cela n'est donc pas pertinent.

Le président:

La proposition est la suivante. Nous avons presque terminé maintenant. Comme nous devons retourner à nos caucus, et que les caucus ne tiennent pas de réunion avant mardi prochain, l'heure qui reste mardi ne nous sera pas utile.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À moins que vous ayez une objection, je ne...

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Puis-je faire une suggestion? Il faudra probablement attendre après la relâche. Peut-être que l'analyste pourrait examiner cela, et si certains sujets comportent un contenu évident concernant ce que font d'autres parlements, ou quelque chose qui a été étudié auparavant par ce Comité, elle pourrait peut-être en récupérer une partie, ce qui ferait que nous aurions un peu plus de contexte lorsque nous reviendrons à certains de ces points.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Beaucoup de cela vient de [inaudible].

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Oui, le [inaudible].

Le président:

Parlez-vous de mardi?

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Non, je ne crois pas que nous puissions faire cela pour mardi.

Mme Dara Lithwick:

Non, nous pourrions le faire après.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Cela pourrait probablement être fait pendant la relâche.

Le président:

Nous pourrions aussi passer une autre heure sur notre rapport de la sécurité, mardi.

Monsieur Davies.

M. Don Davies:

Je suis désolé, mais je vous ai mal compris, monsieur le président. Lorsqu'il s'agit de la ministre, je ne sais pas si vous avez utilisé les mots « à huis clos », mais nous parlons d'une réunion publique.

Le président:

Oui.

M. Don Davies:

Serait-elle télévisée?

Le président:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il serait surprenant qu'une ministre soit présente sans que cela soit télévisé.

M. Don Davies:

Oui.

Le président:

Y a-t-il des témoins particuliers auxquels les gens ont pensé concernant l'étude sur la sécurité que nous...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si nous discutons de cela, j'aimerais que cela se fasse à huis clos.

Le président:

Non, mais y a-t-il des témoins auxquels vous pensez, si nous tenons une séance d'une heure mardi?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Voulez-vous dire l'étude sur le Service de protection parlementaire?

Le président:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Qui s'est déroulée entièrement à huis clos. Je crois que nous devrions discuter de cela à huis clos.

Le président:

Oh, parce que nous ne sommes pas à huis clos.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est cela. Nous ne sommes pas à huis clos maintenant.

Le président:

Pouvons-nous prendre une pause de quelques minutes puis revenir à huis clos?

Lorsque nous serons à huis clos, pensez à la première heure de la séance de mardi, pendant laquelle nous devrions continuer notre étude de la sécurité, et pensez aux témoins que vous aimeriez inviter.

Nous allons prendre une pause de deux minutes avant de revenir à huis clos.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on December 08, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.