header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-05-09 PROC 57

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1005)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning, and welcome to the 57th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. This meeting is in public.

Today the meeting is to continue our study on the question of privilege regarding the free movement of members of Parliament within the parliamentary precinct. The meeting will begin with a briefing from the analyst about previous questions of privilege related to this topic.

At 11 a.m. the Speaker, the Acting Clerk, and the acting director of PPS will attend to respond to members' questions regarding the administrative framework on the Hill. Finally, at noon, Ms. Raitt and Mr. Bernier will be here to discuss the circumstances that led to the question of privilege.

We're also making good progress on getting the estimates either on the 16th or the 18th, next week, so that looks very probable.

With that, I'll turn the floor over to Mr. Barnes, our analyst from the Library of Parliament. The analyst is not a witness, and so we don't have to do the rounds if you don't want. We can do our informal questioning of him once he has finished his presentation.

Mr. Andre Barnes (Committee Researcher):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

As members of the committee will no doubt recall, at our last meeting the committee asked the library to provide a briefing on past instances of questions of privilege that are similar to the one that has been referred to the committee by the House on May 3 of this year. With that in mind, I will provide a summary of the seven past instances involving members being impeded or delayed from accessing Parliament Hill and the parliamentary precinct freely.

I will be going over these incidents in reverse chronological order, so if you were to follow along in the briefing note that was provided to the committee, it would actually be the other way around. You would have to start at the end of the briefing note. The reason for that is that you'll find the most recent cases to be the more relevant ones as compared to the ones that are 20 or 30 years old.

Of note, four of these incidents took place in the most recent Parliament, one incident in 2012, one in 2014, and two in 2015. The other incidents that I will review are the 2004 visit of the President of the United States, which was probably the most egregious instance of members being denied or having their access delayed to Parliament Hill. There is also a case from 1999 involving the Public Service Alliance of Canada protest. Perhaps what's interesting about that particular incident was that PROC's report in 1999 indicated that the right of members to access the parliamentary precinct was not well known at that time. The report, in fact, states: We note that it is rare in Canada for Members of Parliament to be obstructed or impeded in carrying out their parliamentary functions. It is not surprising, therefore, that some Members or PSAC picketers may not have been fully aware of the right of Members to unimpeded access, and this may have occasioned some delay.

That was in 1999.

Lastly, I'll review the incident that took place during the 1988 protest on the Hill over the GST.

With that I will begin. If committee members have any questions or would like any clarification while I am talking, please feel free to ininterrupt at any time.

I'm hoping to provide a few more details than are in the briefing notes. It may be a little longer than the actual briefing note itself.

The two most recent incidents were dealt with in a single ruling by the Speaker on May 12, 2015.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Mr. Speaker, on a point of order. I was waiting to see where you would start. Is there a page 6?

The Chair:

Go ahead.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

I'm sorry, this particular instance I did not include in the briefing note.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, I noticed. That would be my point.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

In getting the briefing note ready in one day, there wasn't time to cover all of them, so I thought I would cover this one in this particular briefing.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's fine. I wanted to make sure I wasn't missing a page that I should have. Thank you.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

I'm sorry about that.

(1010)

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's fine. I understand.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

The Speaker ruled on the incident on May 12, 2015. The House adjourned in June of that year, and then the election was in the fall.

Two instances were dealt with in a single ruling. The first was a bus being delayed from entering the Elgin East Block entrance, with members on board the bus. That happened on April 30. The second case occurred during the visit of the President of the Philippines on May 8, 2015.

The details of the incidents are as follows. On April 30 the member from Skeena—Bulkley Valley rose in the House on a question of privilege. He told the House that he was chairing a meeting in the Valour Building when the bells sounded for a vote. He and five other members boarded a bus in front of the Valour Building and proceeded east down Wellington. The bus attempted to turn left into the East Block entrance, and was prevented from reaching the gate by the parliamentary protective service. I suppose in their communication by radio it wasn't clear from the debates how they were talking. The bus driver was told by the PPS that they couldn't enter the precinct and that their access was to be delayed by three to five minutes. No reason was given. The members could not get off the bus because they were stuck in the middle of traffic. The bus driver was unable to pull over to the side to let them off because they were in the middle of traffic. No reason was given, as I mentioned, and it was not clear, when the member rose on the question of privilege, whether or not he was able to make it to the vote. The Speaker reserved his decision on that matter that day.

Just over a week later, on May 8, at 10:30, a Friday, the member from Toronto—Danforth was walking to Centre Block. He had indicated to the House that he wanted to participate in a debate that was going on. He was walking on the west part of the ring road on Parliament Hill. He saw up ahead that the PPS was holding up a crowd, just across from the House of Commons. When he got to the crowd, he attempted to cross there. The member of the PPS stopped him. He showed the member his lapel pin and his ID. The response from the PPS was that her orders were to stop everyone, and it did not matter if he was an MP or not. The member was told that the delay was caused by the expected arrival of VIPs, which it turned out was the President of the Philippines.

On May 12 the Speaker ruled on both cases, finding that both constituted prima facie questions of privilege. The member from Toronto—Danforth was invited to move the motion to refer the matter to procedure and House affairs; however, the motion was defeated in the House, 145 to 117.

The Chair:

For both of them?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

Yes. They were handled together as a single motion. That concludes the first incident.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

When he was told that he could not enter because of the presence of the President of the Philippines, where was that?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

Where was the member?

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes, where did that happen on the precinct?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

He would have been on the sidewalk toward the members' entrance, right at the very top—

Mr. Scott Simms:

On the House of Commons side.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

On the west side of Centre Block, on the House of Commons side.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay.

The Chair:

David.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you.

To underscore as we move through, to the best of my knowledge almost every incident, if not all, involves foreign dignitaries, and the security is beefed up to recognize the protection we owe them. I want to raise this now because it's the thread all the way through. The answer is not that there's an immediate instance and the security people have stepped in and we don't want them to. No matter what's going on it's not that immediate situation that needs to be decided at the moment in the best interest of the priority. At that time the priority is our visiting dignitary; that's understood.

The issue here is the absolute continuing lack of planning. You know these visits are coming. We know the disruption that's going to be caused, but the security service also knows that this place still functions. We don't grind to a halt, and so they need to build into their plans that ability for every member, no matter where they might be, to get into this House. Consistently, that's where it's failed, in my opinion. That's what I'll be homing in on, that it's not a matter of “don't do the right thing to protect a secure moment”. That's nuts, and that's not what we're talking about. We're saying you know what's going to happen on the Hill, you're planning for every minute and movement of our guest, you can also build into those plans how the members are going to get around to continue their business.

We keep being told—and you'll hear this, colleagues—that we're going to do that from now on. Yet I keep finding myself sitting here, over and over again, in the same kinds of circumstances. It's because we haven't yet gotten the message through that the planning for members having access to the House of Commons is as important as planning for the security of our guest. It's a constitutional requirement, not some polite Canadian niceness. I'll be homing in on this all the way through, Chair, because to me, that's the answer. It's the planning that needs to take place but isn't taking place, and we inevitably get into these clashes.

(1015)

The Chair:

Just so that people know, apparently the bells are going to ring at 10:40 for a vote, a 30-minute bell.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Chair, I was going to raise that same point.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Blake Richards:

What are your intentions, then, for the way we'll handle the second two hours? Obviously we have a fairly large group of witnesses for a one-hour time slot in that 11:00 to 12:00 time slot. I'm curious as to what you would plan to do to ensure that they get a proper hearing, because there won't be a lot of time left in that one hour.

The Chair:

David.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Well, that's the point that I think we all want to raise.

Oh, that David? I'm sorry.

The Chair:

We'll hear this David and then that David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I was just going to say that I have no problem. I'd encourage us, whatever time we lose to the vote, to make up for it between 1:00 and 2:00, if we can displace that hour and if the witnesses are amenable to it.

I don't know whether that's possible.

The Chair:

It depends whether the guests are available.

Mr. David Christopherson:

We picked 10 o'clock so that we'd still preserve the 1:00 to 2:00 slot, and I have filled it, so it's a bit of a problem to extend this one. I think, though, that this is important enough that we should be looking....

If we don't have enough time to complete what we're doing, the time limit is not what's absolute; it's our goal that's absolute. If it takes us a little more time and we have to have another meeting because we were interrupted by bells, so be it. The one thing we're not going to do, however, is not have any part of the discussion that we should have because we ran out of time in going to vote. That's not going to happen.

The Chair:

My hope is that we get back as quickly as possible and see how much work we can get done.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I would suggest that if there isn't enough time, if members at the end of that 11:00 to 12:00 slot.... I would guess it's going to be close to 11:30 by the time we reconvene. It's probably only going to leave half an hour. I assume we won't have enough time, with that many witnesses—

The Chair:

Right.

Mr. Blake Richards:

—but if members at the end feel that this is the case, what we might have to do, although I don't know what the schedule is on Thursday, is invite the guests back for another hour on Thursday. I think that's likely what will have to occur.

The Chair:

Concerning the Speaker in particular, if we get all the questions for him done, we could invite the others back for Thursday, if we have to.

Filomena.

Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Mr. Chair, I'm not sure procedurally how this takes place and whether it requires unanimous consent, but is it possible that once the bells go, given that the House is just down the hall, can we continue, still giving ourselves enough time that we get to the House but not suspending right when the bell goes?

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's not the issue, though, of this hour; it's the hour following the vote. That's when we're going to lose the time with the witnesses. Whether we sit through part of the bells or not is actually not going to fix the problem.

The Chair:

If we're not finished this, we could sit for part of the bells.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, certainly, but it's more a question of the other part.

The Chair:

Yes, I understand.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

—and then of resuming right away as soon as we're done.

The Chair:

Ruby.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Actually, Filomena took the thought out of my mind at that point. That's what I was going to say, but in addition I would ask, is it possible, Mr. Christopherson, that you can change around that 1:00 to 2:00 time today? Then, if all the witnesses.... I mean, that should be the first priority. I feel we have so much on our agenda that we should do as much as we can do, and of course, whatever time is remaining we can move into Thursday. Thursday, though, we also have a lot to do: we have to get through this really important topic.

Mr. David Christopherson:

If I'm the only one, then I would find a way to deal with it—if I'm the only one.

Mr. Blake Richards:

We also have to recognize the situation of the witnesses. Some of them are scheduled from 11:00 to 12:00, and those are the ones we're going to shortchange. The ones who are here at noon, we won't be shortchanging. Unless we're going to shift it all around, then, and I don't know how you do that at this point, I really think there's a pretty good chance—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

We can lengthen each period.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I know the government members seem to want to avoid that, for some reason—I don't know why—but I really think we're going to need that other hour on Thursday now; I just don't see any way around it. We can see what happens in that time frame, but you can't adjust all the witnesses' schedules at this point, either. It's likely the case that we're going to need to have that other hour.

The Chair:

Yes.

(1020)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

There's no ill intent behind this, I assure you. It's just that we've spent so much time, as we all know, on—

Mr. David Christopherson:

—“other business”?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

—the previous issue.

There's the Chief Electoral Officer's report that we have to get to eventually, and we want to get through the privilege issue. That's the only intention.

If we can expand the next Thursday meeting to three hours and perhaps keep doing that for a little while until we get through to a comfortable place wherein we know we're going to get through our agenda, I would suggest doing that. It's not wanting to avoid having the witnesses or going through the material; it is just a timing thing.

Let's expand the meetings, then, to three hours each meeting until we get to that comfortable point, I would say.

The Chair:

Okay. Let's get going to see how much we can get done.

I have a quick question. Did we ever find out why the bus, seeing that it didn't reach here, wasn't let through?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

No, it was not indicated in the member from Skeena—Bulkley Valley's intervention.

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I have a question regarding that. You had said they were informed that they would have to wait from three to five minutes. How long did they have to wait in actuality?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

On reading the Debates, the government House leader commissioned a report, and I believe the delay—don't quote me—was in the neighbourhood of 74 seconds.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Oh, I had heard something else.

Mr. David Christopherson:

They wouldn't know that at the time.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

No.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Once they are stopped, they don't know whether it's one minute or half an hour.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Half a minute feels like a long time when you don't know when it's going to end.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's especially true if you're racing to vote or speak.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Maybe you have a whip waiting for you.

The Chair:

Let's move to the next incident.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

If you're following along on your briefing note, we would pick up on page 5 with “F. 2014 - President of Germany”. That incident occurred in September 2014. The matter was referred to PROC by the House on September 25, 2014.

Three meetings were held by PROC to gather evidence. Something for the committee to keep in mind for its study is that there were about four groupings of witnesses. The member from Acadie—Bathurst would be one kind of group of witness, officials from the House of Commons. Then there was the acting clerk, the Sergeant-at-Arms, and the deputy sergeant-at-arms. We also had the commissioner of the RCMP accompanied by the assistant commissioner and the deputy commissioner. Finally, the chief of police of Ottawa plus an inspector appeared.

This resulted in the 34th report from the 41st Parliament's second session.

As for the incident itself, on September 25 the member from Acadie—Bathurst was in his office in the Justice Building. The bells began to ring for a vote. He boarded a bus in front of the Justice Building. The bus proceeded towards Parliament Hill. It was stuck in a traffic jam in front of the Confederation Building. Apparently, the RCMP were holding vehicles at the vehicular checkpoint in anticipation of the arrival of the motorcade of the President of Germany.

Fearing he would miss the vote, the member and other members exited the bus and proceeded on foot to the Hill. When crossing Bank Street north of Wellington, an RCMP member intercepted the member from Acadie—Bathurst, further delaying him from accessing Parliament Hill and making him wait until the motorcade had passed.

It was noted by the Sergeant-at-Arms during his appearance before the committee that the delay of the member of Acadie—Bathurst's right to access the parliamentary precinct freely in fact began during the traffic jam, which caused the buses to be held back from Parliament Hill.

It may also be worth mentioning that the member felt he was treated rudely by the member of the RCMP. The member did, however, make it to the House in time for the vote.

In respect of recommendations made by the committee in its report and changes made to security protocols on the Hill, during his appearance before the committee, RCMP Commissioner Paulson stated that since 2012 when a similar incident occurred, which we will get to in a moment, involving members being impeded from accessing the Hill freely, a number of changes have been implemented. These include the distribution to all RCMP members posted on the Hill of a directory of members of the House of Commons—that's the booklet that contains the names and pictures of all the members of the House—ensuring that all newly assigned RCMP members to the Hill are thoroughly briefed on parliamentary privilege and ensuring the prompt dismantling of security parameters established during major events and demonstrations at the conclusion of every event.

Also, Assistant RCMP Commissioner Michaud during his appearance before the committee stated that following the incident involving the member from Acadie—Bathurst two security protocols were put in place. First, motorcades were to begin using an alternative gate to enter and exit Parliament Hill. He noted that this was successfully employed during a visit by the President of the Republic of Finland. The second protocol established that last-minute changes to the movement of motorcades were to be communicated to House of Commons security services by an RCMP vehicle that would arrive ahead of the motorcade.

PROC's report on the matter made the following recommendations: first, that the office of the Sergeant-at-Arms provide all members with a phone number they can call in case of an emergency related to an obstruction that they experience in accessing the parliamentary precinct; and second, that a paragraph focusing solely on parliamentary privilege be included in the operational plans employed by security partners on the Hill.

The report concludes that members have had their right to unimpeded access to the parliamentary precinct denied with all too great a frequency. The committee considered the best solutions to this to be improved planning, greater coordination, and increased education and awareness on the part of security services and the members.

(1025)

Mr. David Christopherson:

If I may, Mr. Chair, I'll just point out...and it's not due to anything other than making sure that we see the difference.

To the best of my knowledge, and I stand to be corrected, it was never the former parliamentary security people we have had a problem with. That has never been an issue. They understand, because they've been here so long.

It's when we get into the interface of the RCMP and the House. At one of the last meetings, they told us that merging the two was going to be the great solution and was going to solve a lot of things, but it hasn't.

I just wanted to point out that one of the issues right now is who ultimately controls the security in this place. Let's just understand, as we're going through this, that those who made the decision to intervene with MPs were not the former security staff who were dedicated just to the Hill.

I'm not blaming the RCMP. We ran into the same thing at Queen's Park when we had the interface of the security people at Queen's Park, along with the OPP and the Toronto police. We have the same thing here because there's that merger.

I just think, with everything going on right now in terms of the former Hill dedicated staff fighting for respect, that it's important for us to acknowledge that it was not them, at any time that I'm aware of, who stepped in and prevented members.

The Chair:

Andre.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

Carrying on, the third and final incident from the 41st Parliament—E on page 5 of the briefing note—was the visit of the Prime Minister of Israel. That incident was referred to PROC on March 2, 2012. There were two meetings held to gather evidence. In terms of grouping of witnesses, there were the officials from the House of Commons, the Clerk, and the Sergeant-at-Arms, and there was the assistant commissioner of the RCMP. It did result in a report, the 26th report of the 41st Parliament, first session. In terms of a summary of that incident, the committee heard that at least three incidents occurred during that visit.

The first was a member attempting to access the Hill from the east gate nearest Elgin, and an RCMP officer prevented him from accessing the Hill. The RCMP officer did not have the directory of members of the House of Commons. The member himself did not have any identification. The RCMP officer did admit that he knew who the member was, but he was not allowed to permit him to pass without proper identification.

A second incident was when a member was attempting to access Centre Block using the lane that goes up the middle with the Centennial Flame. She was intercepted and told to go to East Block and take the tunnel to Centre Block.

A third incident occurred following the departure of the prime minister in which a member was leaving the Hill, and his preferred route was to take the east part of the ring road. He was told that he needed to go down the centre lane because they were still dismantling some of the security apparatus that was still there. He was told to go down the middle lane where the Centennial Flame was. So the incident was sent to PROC. During her appearance before the House, the Clerk apologized for the entire incident and the inconvenience, especially for the east tunnel instruction that apparently ran counter to the agreed-upon security plan.

During his appearance before PROC, assistant commissioner of the RCMP, Mr. Malizia, identified several changes that were in the process of being made to the standard operating procedure for visits from foreign dignitaries: working with the House and Senate security to have their personnel at key checkpoints to assist RCMP officers in identifying parliamentarians; placing experienced Parliament security members at key access points; and updating the orientation for RCMP members to further enhance their visual recognition of parliamentarians. He noted that each RCMP officer would be equipped in the future with a directory of members of the House of Commons.

In terms of recommendations made by the report, I would note that the report did not find a breach of parliamentary privilege. It was noted that such a finding should not be made lightly and that the committee was hesitant to draw any conclusions from the evidence it heard, especially because the members identified in the question of privilege declined to appear before the committee to provide evidence during the study.

The committee's report also stated the following: members were to be encouraged to carry their House of Commons ID cards and wear their House of Commons pins, especially when special measures were known to be in place on the Hill; the obligation to recognize and identify MPs as MPs belongs to the RCMP; and House of Commons security services should provide assistance to the RCMP in identifying members, and once a member is identified as a member, that person should be granted access to the Hill. The RCMP was strongly encouraged to call upon the assistance of House of Commons security service to help identify members at the various access points to the Hill. Lastly, all members of the RCMP on duty must be made aware of parliamentary privilege and the right that members have of unfettered access to the Hill and that this right is a fundamental pillar of the Canadian parliamentary democracy.

That is that for that particular incident.

If there are no questions, we'll go back in time to what is probably the most egregious incident back in 2004, which was a visit of the President of the United States. The matter was referred to PROC September 25, 2004. There were five groups of witnesses for the committee's information, and there four meetings held to gather evidence. The Sergeant-at-Arms gave a preliminary briefing. The two members who rose on a question of privilege, the member from Charlevoix—Montmorency and the member from Elmwood, were also at a meeting to give testimony. The Ottawa police were invited, and three members showed up, and a mix of witnesses including the RCMP, the Sergeant-at-Arms, and the major events coordinator for parliamentary precinct appeared before the committee.

(1030)



A report resulted from that study, the 34th report of the 38th parliamentary session.

In a summary of what occurred, it was the first visit by the President of the United States, then president George W. Bush, since the U.S. invaded Iraq in 2003, and a large protest was planned on the Hill. According to the RCMP, the security in place at the time was the strictest and highest ever. Security forces on the Hill that day appeared to be the House and Senate security services, the RCMP, the Ottawa police, and the Toronto police.

On November 30, the member from Charlevoix—Montmorency rose in the House on a question of privilege, citing numerous examples of members being prevented or delayed from accessing Parliament Hill. Some of the delays lasted hours.

At issue was that most if not all the police officers providing security that day did not know the members' right to access the Hill. Members were halted, refused access at security barriers, even after showing their pins and their identification cards. As an example, one member apparently tried to gain access and spoke with 50 different police officers at 10 different access points over the course of three hours and nonetheless missed a vote.

The member from Charlevoix—Montmorency also noted there were cases of members interrupted while in the bathroom or in their offices, and advised that they could not use the hallways during the visit of the President. There were also complaints about lack of bilingual police officers on the Hill. While most members were eventually able to access the Hill, a number experienced substantial delays and some missed votes in the House.

In recommendations made by the committee, the committee report concluded that the privileges of the members of the House had been breached and that this denial and delay to access the Hill constituted a contempt of Parliament.

The committee, in terms of remedies, requested reports be prepared by the Sergeant-at-Arms and the RCMP about preventive measures they planned on instituting in the future to mitigate against a similar situation, and the Speaker and the Board of Internal Economy requested as a matter of urgency to enter into discussions to merge the House of Commons and Senate security services into a unified parliamentary security service before January 1, 2006.

That is it.

(1035)

Mr. Scott Simms:

I have a quick comment on that.

I was caught up in that as well. I was newly elected. I was at the Westin Hotel, and was not allowed to cross the street. I was told by the Ottawa police in no uncertain terms I could not cross. Now granted, I didn't turn around and do the old, “Do you know who I am?” deal. I suspect if I had it would have gotten me nowhere, such as was the case with many other members.

The scuttlebutt at the time—and I don't know if this is true or not, but nevertheless it's worth addressing—was that the presidential delegation had said that nobody had access within a certain distance, effectively quashing our privilege.

My question is going to be, and this is probably not the place, but maybe at some point, I want to say, “What if...?” As Mr. Christopherson pointed out, this all comes down to when these people visit, heads of state or similar, like the Pope, if they look at, say, the Prime Minister's protocol, or whoever the people are working in the PMO and say they don't want anybody coming into these areas because of security reasons, do we remind them that we as members have a privilege? I'm not looking for an answer now, but at some point I think it should be addressed. What do we respond with? I don't know.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Mr. Simms is right at the heart of the issue.

The other thing I want to underscore is that it doesn't get any more egregious than missing a vote. It makes me wince to think that someone missed a vote because they couldn't get here, which of course is why MPs have unfettered access, because who knows where that leads, ultimately, if it's okay to physically stop members from getting into the House?

The other thing I want to mention, on a positive note, since we're kind of going backwards and you can that see each time we visit it, it gets worse, up to the point now where we have hours and hours, members who missed votes.... It didn't get to that degree as we move closer to modern time, so it does show that we're making progress, but we're still not there. I have to tell you that I'll be shocked if this is the last time we ever deal with it before we finally get to the point where the planning for the security of guests has a secondary priority, that is, make sure that MPs can get to the House. We have to keep saying that over and over.

It made some gains, given the fact that we just heard that most of the RCMP back in that day and the other police—and probably a whole lot of other people—had no idea that this right existed. Now, we're at least at the point where they know that this has existed, and it's just still being curtailed in ways that are unacceptable. Just to be as positive as we can, we are making some headway. We're getting closer and closer, but “closer” is not good enough when it's an absolute right.

The last thing I want to say on this fight is that one of the things we risk when we do this is having people sitting back and saying, “Bloody MPs who are so special and elite.” You know what? That's a risk that we have to run. We need to take that heat, because for everybody who came before us, they were prepared to take their heat to make sure that for the future—for us, who they didn't even know—they were protecting our rights. When we're doing this, it's not just for us while we're here. More importantly, it's for the institution and for members of Parliament in the future. It's up to us on each of our watches to make sure that those rights are preserved. Otherwise, they are lost.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

We don't know when the bells are going to ring, and you have to suspend when that occurs, so could we get in advance unanimous consent to continue sitting till the top of the hour? That would allow us to continue discussing.

The Chair:

Do we have unanimous consent?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Okay. That was a good point.

Mr. Scott Reid:

There are two things I wanted to deal with that are utterly different from each other.

The next thing is also a matter where I'm seeking unanimous consent. The matter of privilege we'll be discussing today is one that was brought through an unusual means. Mr. Nater is sitting here with us and it's his motion, but of course it's not his privileges that were interfered with here, and there is no precedent as to whether he should be appearing as a witness, or as a member of the committee, or in any other capacity. I wondered about this. I discussed it with John earlier.

You can correct me if I have this wrong, John, but essentially your preference was to not be appearing as a witness but rather to be sitting here as an observer and perhaps a participant.

In order to make sure that this unprecedented way of handling it does not become a precedent, could we get unanimous consent again so that what Mr. Nater would do would be to sit here, as opposed to appearing as a witness. Would that be satisfactory to members as well?

(1040)

The Chair:

Does anyone have any problem with that? No?

That's fine.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

Is that okay with you, John?

Mr. John Nater: Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid: Okay.

We've been discussing the substance of the issue here—what Mr. Christopherson and Mr. Simms have been doing—the question writ large.

Turning to the question writ as narrowly as possible, what strikes me is that there are considerable differences between the situation in 2004 with President Bush and the situation on March 21 or 22. Thinking of the more closely proximate or more homologous situations, I wonder if this might not be a question to think about. It seems to me that, basically, this committee administers the relationship between security and the access of MPs to Parliament Hill.

It comes up, although it's an awkward way of doing it, via motions of privilege. It's just the way these things come to us. We have to administer it as circumstances continue to change. One of the most obvious ways in which they change is that visitors coming up here require various degrees of security. We have to dispense with their motorcades. Roadways are blocked. There are weather conditions. We are also shifting what buildings are being used for what purpose, so a year and a bit from now, the House of Commons will be meeting in the West Block.

Having said all of that, what I want to suggest is this. It seems to me that there are some practical similarities that are worth taking note of, one of which is that, in a number of these incidents, people were on a bus on their way to Parliament Hill. The bus got delayed. There was a lack of information about why it was being delayed and whether it was going to be delayed longer. When they realized there was a problem, they then had the option of hopping off the bus, at which point they were prevented from crossing the street. Most obviously, this is the case in Mr. Godin's situation.

What occurs to me is that, at a practical level, we might be able to resolve some of these problems if, when buses are delayed, people can be shepherded up the side of the street. If you get out at the car wash, you can be shepherded up the side of the street, and that doesn't involve crossing a road and potentially getting run over by somebody. That might resolve the situation in a very practical, low-profile way, which doesn't require the education of people from other police forces, or anything except a practice of letting people out so that they can walk up that north side of the little road at the top of the Hill and avoid traffic that might have resulted in about half of these cases. If we could, let's just put that thought into our intellectual baggage as a potential way of resolving this in a low-profile way.

The Chair:

Okay, good. When we get to recommendations....

Let's try to get through the report here, if we can.

Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Did the Sergeant-at-Arms or the RCMP provide a written report? The recommendation was that they each provide a report. Were those reports provided?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

I will look into that.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay. If so, can we have a copy of those?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

Sure.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you.

The Chair:

David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a quick question for the clerk and analyst. Do we have a video of the incident that we're going to be viewing today?

The Chair:

No.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We do not.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It doesn't exist.

The Chair:

My understanding is that they're not bringing a video, but I don't know if there is one or not. I'm sorry. We could ask them when they get here.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You could ask them ahead of time too, if you see them.

The Chair:

Yes. The clerk thinks there is a video, but because we asked them to come to talk just about the administrative structure today and not the incident, it may not be here today. It doesn't mean we won't have access to it.

(1045)

Mr. David Christopherson:

I suspect we're going to want to see it. You might want to give them a heads-up, clerk, if you see them when they first come in.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

The remaining two incidents, as alluded to by Mr. Christopherson, begin to get a little further away from the problems that members experience currently because we're going back now 20 years and, in one case, closer to 30 years, but nonetheless, there may be information that is of some use.

The next incident, the second last incident, involved a strike by the Public Service Alliance of Canada. That question was sent to PROC to study. I do not know how many meetings were held on it, but I do have a copy of the report. These are not available online because it was back in 1999. I went to 125 Sparks Street and printed off a copy from a book. As for the groups of witnesses, there were the members who raised the questions of privilege, Mr. Reynolds and Mr. Pankiw. There was as a second group, the general legal counsel of the House of Commons and Mr. Joseph Maingot, former law clerk and parliamentary counsel. The representatives from the Public Service Alliance of Canada and the Sergeant-at-Arms also appeared as well as a fourth grouping of witnesses.

As a summary of the incident, I'll try to make it quick. It was kind of a quirky incident. There was an ongoing labour dispute between PSAC and their employer, the Government of Canada. As part of this dispute, early February 17, 1999, members of PSAC set up picket lines at strategic locations on Parliament Hill and the Wellington Building, which, I guess, was open then, and then closed, and now reopened.

During the course of its study, the committee was told that the strategy was to slow down vehicle traffic onto the Hill but allow unimpeded movement of pedestrians. At the Wellington Building, the intention was to prevent employees and members of the public from entering. As members were required to be given access to Parliament Hill, security personnel were positioned in order to help identify members and to allow them to pass unimpeded. Nonetheless, the picket lines resulted in some difficulties for some members in accessing Parliament Hill and their offices.

On that day, the Speaker ruled that these allegations constituted a prima facie case, and the matter was referred to PROC. The committee reported to the House on April 17, 1999. With respect to the matter of contempt, the committee concluded that there was no deliberate intention to contravene parliamentary privilege in this case, that any contempt that occurred was technical and unintended, and that this was not an appropriate case for sanctions.

The committee nonetheless suggested the following preventative measures: that there be greater communication and coordination among the different police and security services responsible for security in and around the Hill; and that the Parliament of Canada Act be amended to extend the definition of Parliament Hill so that all buildings where members have their offices be included in that definition. The committee also suggested that a general level of awareness be raised about security issues and members' access to Parliament Hill. No further action was taken.

Last but not least, to keep it quick, the GST protest of October 30, 1989 was, again, a fairly unusual situation. The question of privilege was referred to PROC. There was no report, and as far as I could tell, having gone through the books in the library at 125 Sparks Street, there was no meeting even held on the matter. At the time, in case you're curious, the meetings in October 1989 were focusing on an order of reference from the House to study all aspects of radio and television broadcasting in the House and its committees.

In December 1989—so even when that study concluded, they did not pick up this study—they embarked on a study of the rights, immunities, and privileges of the members of the House of Commons that actually did not focus on this. The first meetings in 1990 were on the topic of parliamentary procedure in committees.

I could not find any evidence about the incident from procedure and House affairs. What happened that day, October 30, was a large demonstration. Apparently there were thousands of protestors in attendance on the Hill. Apparently hundreds of cab drivers were attempting to have a procession that would go onto Parliament Hill, do a loop, and come back down. They were prevented from accessing Parliament Hill by the RCMP.

Certain members, including the member who rose on the question of privilege, Mr. Gray, were present at the protest and saw that the cab drivers were not being permitted to enter onto the Hill, so they entered into the cabs and asked the cab drivers to drive them onto Parliament Hill. The RCMP still did not lift the roadblock, so someone went and fetched the Sergeant-at-Arms in the House, and the Sergeant-at-Arms came down to the roadblock. They had a negotiation with the sergeant of the RCMP in charge, and it was agreed that 30 cabs with members in them would be allowed to proceed. However, the cab drivers said that, if they all didn't get to go, none of them would go. The members got out of the cabs and walked. Eventually, apparently, the cabs were allowed to go up onto the Hill, and corollary to that, apparently a member who was arriving on the Hill in a cab outside of the process was prevented from entering onto the Hill, although the cab had no business with this other procession.

(1050)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Wasn't that the same year as the bus incident on the Hill? There was a bus hijacking that ended on the Hill.

Mr. Andre Barnes:

I don't know.

I could let you know what the Speaker said in sending it to the committee, although the committee never studied the matter.

As a final wrap-up of the presentation, I would mention that in the time I had, I did look at other jurisdictions to see if I could find anything that might guide the committee in what is done in other places. I checked the website on Australia's House of Representatives' committee on privileges. It went back to November 1998, and I couldn't find a report on a similar subject matter.

In the U.K., of course, you have Erskine May, which makes reference to the privilege itself and gives you the history of the privilege, but it gives no information about incidents that have occurred recently.

I did check, and there were two very important studies conducted by joint committees in the U.K., one in 1999, and one in 2013. There is a reference to unimpeded access in the 2013 report. About that, they mention that the House of Lords passes an order on the first day of every session to remind the metropolitan police commissioner that the “House be kept free and open and that no obstruction be permitted to hinder the passage of Lords to and from this House during the sitting of Parliament”.

Why it made it into the report is that the House had ceased doing that in 2004. The joint standing committee thought they should recommence issuing this order, similar to what the House of Lords does.

I scoured other jurisdictions. I used Google to try to find out if anything had happened in Ontario, and the words “protests, members' privileges, impeded access” produced no hits. That might be a witness worth calling, if members were interested in finding out what has happened in the provinces.

The Chair:

David.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you very much, Andre. That's a great report, exactly what we expect from you and the excellent standard you have.

I just want to observe that in listening to the whole thing, it seems to me that it's 9/11. It's pre-9/11 and post-9/11. If you look at pre-9/11, the circumstances suggest that things weren't as tight. Most of the matters here, to use your word, were “quirky” situations. They were one-offs. It wasn't this consistent thing that we're seeing, and it really didn't start until after 9/11, when the world changed and security became the absolute priority that it is. I think that's probably a good part of this. We've had all but an overreaction, to the extent that it's such a blanket security mindset. This idea that there's an exception just doesn't fit into that. I get that. I think we all do.

If this were easy, we wouldn't have an ongoing problem. The trick, again I'll just say it—and you're going to get sick of it—is the planning at the beginning. That's what this is all about, making sure that the planners understand where members are likely to be at the time that our guest is here, and ensuring that part of the planning guarantees them safe and timely access, at all times, to the Hill.

That's where it keeps falling down. We just don't get that emphasis. We're getting better, but we're not there. When I look at the history, I really think a lot of this has to do—because we're dealing in big time spans here, relative North American times—with after 9/11. We're getting all of this ratcheting down so tight that we can't even get around.

That was an observation more than anything, Chair.

Thanks.

(1055)

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Our analyst didn't find relevant examples from the jurisdictions he looked at, which doesn't surprise me. For example, in the case of the Ontario legislature, you would not normally be dealing with people who have the same security issues that we have federally. They do have a security presence, but I think they're able to keep it at a lower level, based on the realistic assessment that they are less of a target for terrorist attack than we are.

I've visited the Australian Parliament. It is a single enormous building with everybody connected through underground passages. Hence, they simply would not have the kinds of issues that arise here.

I think this is a uniquely problematic situation, which has to do with the fact that we have a series of 19th century buildings mostly connected by above-ground communication. People have to cross public thoroughfares. This will never be resolved until we have something that I'm not actually recommending, which is an elaborate network of underground tunnels, at great expense. That, I think, is just the nature of it. We're going to have even more problems, and they will be largely unique to ongoing infrastructure changes.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, go ahead.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

On the same point as Scott's, I believe that most of the buildings are connected by tunnels; we just don't have access to them. That might be an interesting thing to—

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When I was a staffer, they built a new tunnel between Confed and Justice. It's a walkable tunnel, but it's not open even to members to go through.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's interesting, but it doesn't resolve the problem of getting from Justice and Confed to Centre Block.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No, but I believe those tunnels exist among all buildings. The reason the East Block tunnel was open, from what I understand, was that a member going through it hurt himself when it was a heating tunnel, so they decided to make it a real tunnel. Perhaps part of the longer-term process would be to open up these tunnels to be legit.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's not a bad idea. That's actually a reasonable recommendation, although if we decide to recommend this direction, we might want to exercise some caution on costs. As you know, the East Block tunnel is panelled in wood and has a few other features that perhaps aren't really necessary. I am told it was inordinately expensive.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Also, of most concern in the East Block tunnel is that my cellphones work there, so I don't know how thick that ceiling is under the road.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Are you saying the problem there is that it's not secure enough?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No, I'm just curious how thick that ceiling is, because my phones work perfectly well in that tunnel.

Mr. David Christopherson:

If Elon Musk wanted to build all these really cheap, boring things, we'd be able to do all that tunnel stuff.

Mr. Scott Reid:

We'd have pneumatic tubes among all the buildings. It's an excellent idea.

Mr. David Christopherson:

There we go. You know what? You go down to the States.... Anybody who's ever been to Congress knows that they have a whole train system underground, literally with the “choo-choo”—not that we are suggesting this. I agree with you about the cost.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think we're going off the rails.

The Chair:

Before we suspend for the vote.... When we get the report—if we get the report—from the PPS that was done and that we asked for from the Speaker, and also the video, I would suggest—and they'll probably ask—that it be in camera, because we are giving out security secrets to some extent, so we don't want to reduce our protection by doing that. If everyone agrees, when those two items come up, we'll do it in camera.

Mr. David Christopherson:

As long as we give an assurance to everybody that the scope of what we're talking about is going to be very narrow and it's only security.... Having said that, yes.

The Chair:

Is there anything else related to this report before we break?

Let's try to get back as quickly as we can after the vote so we can start right away and get as much done as we can.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We should learn to prepare as a committee for these things.

The Chair:

Okay, the meeting is suspended.

(1055)

(1130)

The Chair:

Welcome back to the 57th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. For your information, the meeting is now being televised. We are pleased to have with us today the Honourable Geoff Regan, Speaker of the House of Commons. He is accompanied by the acting clerk Marc Bosc and officials from parliamentary protective service: acting director Mike O'Beirne, and Robert Graham, administration and personnel officer.

On behalf of the committee I would like thank you for making yourselves available on short notice. Your expertise and input in this matter is invaluable. I know you are all very busy so we appreciate your being here today. I'll ask the Speaker for his opening remarks. At this meeting we're talking about the structure of administration and security, not a particular issue at this time but the overall structure.

I would ask committee members when you're doing your questioning to try to exhaust any questions for the Speaker at this meeting. We may have to ask these witnesses back because we got truncated by half an hour, but the Speaker may not come back if we can get those particular questions finished today.

Mr. Speaker, thank you for coming. [Translation]

Hon. Geoff Regan (Speaker of the House of Commons):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Ladies and gentlemen, I am pleased to be here today as part of your study on the question of privilege regarding the free movement of members of Parliament within the Parliamentary Precinct. Thank you for the invitation.

As you said, Mr. Chair, I am joined today by Mark Bosc, Acting Clerk of the House of Commons and by Mike O'Beirne, Acting Director of the Parliamentary Protective Service.

My understanding is that members of the committee wanted me to take a few minutes to elaborate on the current structure and governance of the Parliamentary Protective Service and its mission throughout the Parliamentary Precinct and the grounds of Parliament Hill.[English]

Since its creation in 2015, the parliamentary protective service has been working to establish itself as an independent parliamentary entity. As members will know, the PPS is responsible for the physical security of the parliamentary precinct. While the director of the new service is a member of the RCMP, the parliamentary protective service is legally separate from the RCMP, and the director is directly accountable to the Speakers of both Houses of Parliament.

For the House of Commons, it is my role as Speaker to determine the objectives, priorities, and goals relating to the security of the precinct. This is done in consultation with the director of the PPS. In turn, the director works with the House administration to define our security and access requirements. In this regard, the corporate security office acts as our liaison and main point of contact with the parliamentary protective service.[Translation]

Pursuant to the Parliament of Canada Act, the governance of the new service was given to the Speakers of the Senate and of the House of Commons. Through the memorandum of understanding signed in 2015, it was determined that: [...] the authority of the Parliamentary Precinct is vested in the Speaker of the Senate and Speaker of the House of Commons, as the custodians of the privileges and rights of the Members.

The Director of PPS is consulted by both Speakers when setting objectives and priorities, and the director is also responsible for planning, managing and controlling operational parliamentary security.[English]

At the core of its mandate, the parliamentary protective service must provide for the security of all members, while respecting the privileges, rights, immunities, and powers of the House of Commons and the Senate. As indicated in the memorandum of understanding, the parliamentary protective service shall “be sensitive and responsive to, and act in accordance with, the privileges, rights, immunities and powers of the Senate and the House of Commons and their Members”.

Those privileges, rights, immunities, and powers include the right of members of the House of Commons to unimpeded access to Parliament Hill and the parliamentary precinct at all times and for all purposes. In addition, members of the PPS must not deny or delay access to a member and are expected to identify members by visual recognition. In doing so they may rely on the directory of members of the House of Commons or on their own knowledge. Failing this, they are to look for the member's pin, and if not in view, ask to see their House of Commons identification card, or any other piece of identification. I think we can assume that means normally government identification, of course government-issued ID.

(1135)

[Translation]

While I know the Parliamentary Protective Service is working hard to ensure the protection of all members of Parliament, there is still room for improvement on how best this can be achieved. I look forward to an upcoming report from this committee, so that security services can be improved and long-term solutions can be implemented.

Both I and the Speaker of the Senate will continue to work closely with PPS on any recommendations coming from the committee or the House.[English]

In closing, I am confident that Superintendent Mike O'Beirne, acting director of the parliamentary protective service, will be more than pleased to make himself available to the committee throughout your study in order to help you with your deliberations and answer any questions you may have.

Mr. Chair, I thank you for the opportunity to appear before you. If you agree, I will give the floor to the acting director of the parliamentary protective service for a few comments. Then, I would be happy to answer questions from members of the committee—unless you want to deal with my questions first and wait to deal with him later, whichever you like.

The Chair:

How long are your remarks, Mr. O'Beirne?

Superintendent Mike O'Beirne (Acting Director, Parliamentary Protective Service):

Mr. Chair, they are probably about six minutes.

The Chair:

What is the committee's will?

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's probably helpful to hear his comments first.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. O'Beirne, you are on. [Translation]

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

I would like to begin by thanking the committee for the opportunity to appear before you today to discuss the parliamentary privilege issue stemming from an incident that occurred on March 22, 2017.[English]

I'd like to start by stating that the parliamentary protective service remains committed to ensuring that the rights, privileges, and immunities afforded to parliamentarians remain protected. In the execution of our physical security mandate—

Mr. David Christopherson:

I apologize for interrupting. Is there a copy of the remarks?

The Chair:

No, we don't have a copy.

Carry on.

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

In the execution of our physical security mandate throughout the precinct and the grounds of Parliament Hill, we strive to uphold the doctrine of privilege so as to ensure that the integrity of both Houses is protected from outside influences attempting to alter the proceedings of Parliament.[Translation]

With that, I will now provide an overview of the events leading up to the incident that has raised the question of privilege, occurring on March 22, 2017.

As you all know, our operating environment is complex, and that is only amplified by the evolving nature of the global and domestic threat environment.[English]

In the end, I can offer no excuse for the delay, and I accept all responsibility.

On March 22, the PPS was in the process of making necessary adjustments to and operationalizing a security posture to support the tabling of budget 2018 at 16:00 hours. With the primacy of security operations in mind, the PPS was striving to balance the openness and accessibility of the grounds, which included the unobstructed access of parliamentarians and ensuring that the freedoms associated with the press were maintained, with the critical need to ensure that the posture reflected the needs of the global threat environment.[Translation]

I would now like to focus on the circumstances surrounding the point of order that was tabled by members of Parliament Raitt and Bernier.

The issue of privilege was raised as a result of delays these two MPs experienced because of the temporary closure of the vehicle screening facility on March 22. As a result of this delay, the two MPs were late for a procedural affairs vote that was occurring in the House of Commons.[English]

It was initially believed that the closure of the VSF and resulting delays stemmed from the movement of the Prime Minister's motorcade; however, it was later concluded, based on documented timings of the Prime Minister's motorcade movements on that day, that the delay was in fact caused by the arrival of the media bus and the security motorcade that was escorting the bus, under the parliamentary protective service escort, on the grounds, to continue and maintain the continuity from the budget lockdown and destined for the budget announcement.

As the media bus was transiting through the bollards at the south street entrance, traffic at the VSF was erroneously paused for approximately eight minutes. According to the communications centre camera footage, this closure impacted the movements of three parliamentary buses arriving between 15:48 and 15:54 and departing the VSF between 15:56 and 15:57. We can confirm that the three buses were impacted by the closure of the vehicle screening facility.

The reason that the vehicle screening facility is paused is strictly for vehicular safety reasons, so as to avoid collisions between the VSF, which is very proximate to the south Sank bollards exit.... That exit was used due to the large media bus that was transiting through. It was a coach bus. It's also used for articulated construction vehicles or larger construction vehicles, as the turning radius and ground clearance at other entrances can be impediments. During these delays, the PPS can confirm that it was directly associated with this event.

On March 24, the PPS undertook a review of the additional footage from the command centre that corroborates the interaction that took place between MP Bernier and the PPS member when the MP approached the PPS to seek clarification as to why the buses were not being permitted through the VSF.

(1140)

[Translation]

Unfortunately, MP Bernier was told that the causes of the delay were unknown. So Mr. Bernier returned to the bus shelter located on lower drive at the Bank Street extension. The PPS can confirm that this interaction took place between 3:53 p.m. and 3:54 p.m., concurrent to the bus delays owing to the temporary closure of the vehicle screening facility. [English]

Based on the investigation that the PPS conducted into the question of privilege surrounding this incident, which included a thorough review of OCC camera footage, the acquisition of timings associated with the movements of the PM's motorcades, and interviews with the PPS employees involved, the PPS concluded that the delays experienced on March 22 were due to the erroneous and extended temporary closure of the VSF in order to accommodate the movement of the media bus up to Centre Block in time for the budget announcement that was scheduled for 16:00 hours.

In light of this conclusion, the PPS would like to apologize to MP Raitt and MP Bernier for the delays they experienced and the subsequent impacts that this delay caused, and to reiterate the PPS's commitment to uphold the doctrine of parliamentary privilege by ensuring their unfettered and unimpeded access to their House, especially for votes. The PPS remains committed to ensuring that the rights, powers, and immunities afforded to parliamentarians are protected while balancing the physical security requirements necessitated by the unique needs of our operating environment, which is defined by the evolving needs of the domestic and global threat environment.

I'd now like to take just a few moments to outline the steps that were taken prior to and also after the incident to prevent a reoccurrence.

In addition to our existing training curriculum for PPS personnel, which provides all PPS recruits with an overview of parliamentary privilege and the democratic necessity of ensuring full adherence to this doctrine throughout the execution of our mandate, the PPS has also developed, in consultation with both administrations, a parliamentary privilege pamphlet, which is shared with its partners who are operating within the precinct in support of PPS for major operations. Information on parliamentary privilege is reiterated at all operational briefings and remains included in all operational plans.

However, the PPS remains committed to improvements, and the unfortunate events of March 22 remind us that there exists an opportunity to further enhance our efforts to ensure that all PPS employees are familiar with the doctrine of privilege and its application throughout the PPS operating environment. As such, the PPS continues to develop ways, in partnership with the House of Commons administration, to improve our existing curriculum and to expand on our awareness familiarization efforts, so as to ensure incidents of this nature are prevented in the future. In addition, from an operational perspective, the PPS has also formalized the process that will include an overarching radio broadcast to all PPS personnel on the frequencies to alert PPS members of a pending vote, so that all measures can be taken to ensure unfettered access.

In closing, and as acting director of the parliamentary protective service, I'd like to once again extend my apologies to MP Raitt and MP Bernier, and in fact to the broader institution of Parliament, for the unnecessary delays they experienced. I'd also like to express my gratitude to all committee members for the opportunity to be here today. Despite the circumstances surrounding this appearance, it has provided the PPS with the chance to further enhance our commitment, ensuring that we remain accountable to a mandate that exceeds physical security, but rather encompasses all elements, including privilege, that are critical to ensuring that the integrity of both Houses is protected.

(1145)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Normally we have seven-minute first rounds. Would it possible to have five, so we can make sure everyone gets a chance?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Okay, we'll start with Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't have a lot of time so I'll get into it fairly quickly. I'd like to know, Mr. O'Beirne, if you could tell us in your words, under what circumstances may a PPS officer, an RCMP officer, obstruct, detain, arrest, or otherwise interfere with a member of Parliament in the precinct? Is there ever a circumstance where you could obstruct a member?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

I'm sorry, you're asking if there's ever a circumstance that—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, from your perspective is there ever a time that a PPS officer or an RCMP officer can stop a member, arrest a member, detain a member, delay a member? Is there ever a time that you can do that?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

For the PPS and the RCMP that is part of the PPS, I would say as acting director, that would be no.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In that case, when there's a vote taking place, the buses have to wait in the VSF like everybody else. Why wouldn't they transit the bollards, for example?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

In this particular case, because there was the media bus arriving under police escort from our partners, the Ottawa city police, there was a transference of control of the motorcade to ensure continuity at the south Bank bollards. That bus entered through the south Bank bollards because that's essentially one of the only places that they can enter due to the size of the bus and ground clearance. It was at that point, and only for that reason, again due to vehicular safety concerns, that the VSF is paused. It was intended to be paused for a moment only. It was erroneously paused for an extended period of time which totalled eight minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Right, but my point was that I have seen many times where the VSF is delayed because you have a truck sitting there, so the buses simply can't get in no matter what they do. Buses contain members; they're usually trying to get somewhere. Why wouldn't the buses be allowed to go around and use the bollards as a course of practice?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

Certainly we can explore that to make sure that's something we can do. I think we'd have to explore, again, the vehicular safety aspect of it. The VSF can see hundreds of vehicles per day, sometimes up to 800 during a business day, so that's a great deal of vehicular traffic. Our concerns are multi-layered there. There's of course providing the safety and security of the grounds, the security envelope that encompasses all of Parliament Hill. However there is also, as I mentioned, vehicular traffic safety because the exit is so close, very proximate, to the entrance. That is a concern for us.

That's certainly something we can explore moving forward.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Could you have it explored that members be allowed to get off buses when they're stopped in the VSF for one reason or another? I know that the bus drivers generally do not let you get off except at a designated spot, which can lead to obvious obstructions. I put the idea to you that we be able to get off anywhere, especially during a vote.

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

I would look forward to discussing that with the administration to coordinate that. The buses don't necessarily fall under the authority of the PPS. However, as our concern is always your and everyone else's safety on Parliament Hill, we'd certainly be interested in looking for opportunities there and ensuring that this can be done in a safe and secure manner.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In your comments, you mentioned that there's going to be a system in place to warn all PPS officers when there's a vote taking place. Up until now, what has been the practice? When a vote takes place, how are the PPS members informed?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

It was done in a sporadic fashion, if and as required. I have, as of yesterday, passed a command to our forces so that as soon as there is any sign of a vote taking place, we're alerted. As I mentioned, there is an overarching radio broadcast to all PPS personnel so they are aware to take all measures to ensure unfettered access to the House.

(1150)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In 2014, a similar incident resulted in a recommendation that a phone number be created in order to have a member be able to call somebody and say,“There's an obstruction taking place now. Can I get it resolved?” Has that ever been done?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

I could tell you that since the creation of the PPS, as I mentioned in prior appearances to the committee, we went from three operational command centres, which we still try to operationalize on a daily basis.... We're trying to go from three to two to one. What we've been able to do is instead of having parliamentarians, visitors, guests, call three different call centres for potentially the same event, is have all calls for service go to one operational command centre. If there's ever any kind of issue, you are able to call that central number and then we can turn to that with the urgency that it requires.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

And—

The Chair:

That's time, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Superintendent, just to be clear, the media bus was coming onto Parliament Hill, and you mentioned that there was an eight-minute delay in total. I have to assume that most of the minutes of the delay were after the bus had passed through. Would that be correct? How many minutes after the bus had passed through would this have been?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

The delay exceeded approximately six minutes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That was the part after the bus had passed through. Or was that was the total amount?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

The total amount was eight minutes. As a matter of course, what happens in most instances is that if we're receiving a head of a state, let's say, or a large motorcade, and they're arriving by the same fashion, we would close the VSF in the perhaps 30 seconds or one minute leading out to a motorcade arriving, just to ensure that all vehicular traffic has stopped.

In this case, it was a total of eight minutes, yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right. Okay. The majority of it must have been afterwards, because the two members who were delayed, Ms. Raitt and Mr. Bernier, were at a bus shelter waiting, with no obvious....There was no vehicle passing through that would alert them to the fact that this was the initial reason.

Mr. Bernier could hardly have crossed the street to make an inquiry about what was up, had there been a bus passing through at that time or about to do so. When he did cross over and make an inquiry, he was informed that the delay was as a result of the Prime Minister's empty motorcade leaving the Hill.

I assume that was incorrect information that was provided to him. Is that correct?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

Well, the information that we have does not reflect that. So if Mr. Bernier was given erroneous information, then I—

Mr. Scott Reid:

Now, I'm not quoting Mr. Bernier here, I'm quoting Ms. Raitt. On March 22 she said the following: I was told by security at the bottom of the Hill that we were unable to access the House of Commons through our normal transport, because they were holding the buses on account of empty cars for the Prime Minister needing to return in order for us to be brought to the House of Commons.

In all fairness, that's Ms. Raitt's testimony, and I gather that she must have asked one of the other officers. Is that possibly the source of the incorrect information? Perhaps it was one of the officers on that side of the street?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

Sir, that's possible. We don't have information that would confirm that there was an interaction in that regard. The information that we have and the verification of the video shows that it was solely the media bus that created the delay, and the—

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right. Understood.

Let me ask this question. Had the motorcade been leaving at this time, would this then have caused a similar delay? Is that how that process works? You understand why I'm asking this: I think we're dealing with one problem, and there may be a second problem out there that could potentially arise in the future.

If the motorcade is leaving, does it take some kind of priority? This is an empty motorcade, of course.

(1155)

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

Again, as a matter of course in daily operations, given that we have 700 to 900 vehicles going through the VSF, quite often the VSF is paused temporarily when we have vehicles leaving. Is it possible that in the future the vehicle screening facility will be paused for any number of things—parliamentary buses, construction vehicles, several other vehicles? It's entirely possible, yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

When you say it's “paused”, I assume what that means is that the officers on site are not authorized to allow vehicles through. They have to wait for some kind of command to once again allow vehicles to pass through. Or do they make these decisions at their own discretion?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

It depends on any given circumstance. For instance, if it's an articulated construction vehicle that's of extended length, the vehicle screening facility supervisor can make that determination. It becomes a traffic control issue more than anything else, and—

Mr. Scott Reid:

In that case it's local discretion, I'm assuming. What about in this case? Was it their discretion or was the discretion exercised at a higher level?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

Perhaps I can say that the PPS currently has five operational divisions. The uniformed divisions ensure the safety and security of the precinct and the grounds. These divisions are currently operationally led by former members of the RCMP's Parliament Hill security unit, the House of Commons security, and Senate security. They all came together as a result of the creation of the PPS.

On a daily basis, the command framework involves the linkages between those five operational divisions in the PPS. That means that any and all aspects of security are discussed and analyzed, as I mentioned, against the backdrop of the domestic and international threat environment and based on information and intelligence.

On budget day, March 22, the divisions that were affected by the budget event formed a unified command to ensure that all aspects of the budget security operation unfolded as expected. This unified command oversaw the decision-making process of halting the VSF timings with the Ottawa police, and timings with the PPS motorcade escort that took the bus onto the Hill. They were also responsible for all the moving parts of the rest of the parliamentary operations.

As I mentioned, sir, the delay and the extent of the delay was an error, and it's one that I accept responsibility for.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson, please dispense with any questions you have for the Speaker first.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you for being here. It's unfortunate that we're back again.

I want to say right at the top, though, that I appreciate your comments, Director O'Beirne. It's not so much that we need you to demonstrate your fealty by apologizing to us in person, but it goes a long way to establishing, going forward into history, the priority of this. Your comments are just one more piece and they're appreciated, as is the fact that there's no dodging or trying to avoid this. You straight-up said that there was no excuse for this delay, you apologized, and you took responsibility. That's appreciated, and I just want you to know that.

I really only have a couple of questions for the Speaker. Before I get there, I need just one more clarification. In the Speaker's remarks he makes note of the MOU, the memorandum of understanding, from 2015 that says the “authority...of the Parliamentary precinct is vested in the Speaker of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Commons, as the custodians of the privileges...[and] rights...of the members...”.

As we have established in previous discussions, most of which were in camera—and I hope there's no need to go back and rebuild the argument—it needs to be clear that, notwithstanding the memorandum of understanding, you, sir, as a sworn officer of the RCMP, should you receive a direct order from the commissioner of the RCMP, have no choice but to follow that order.

Also, given the fact that the RCMP commissioner takes direction from one person—well, two, but primarily one—at the end of the day on the big things, and that's the Prime Minister, there remains this issue that the control of the security of this House is not in our hands anymore. Notwithstanding this memorandum of agreement, the reality is that the executive branch, through the Minister of Public Safety and the Prime Minister, can give direction to the commissioner of the RCMP, who can give a direct order to the director of our protective service. They are the people who ultimately have the power to control this place, and let's not be under any other illusion.

My question, Speaker, having established that...you know exactly what I'm doing, sir, and probably could have written out how this was going to go before it started.

Here's the thing, though, sir. You are, of course, first among equals. We look to you to preserve our rights. I'm wondering about this lack of detailed planning and giving that planning priority—simple things. For instance, it seems to me that in the past—and I haven't seen it in a while, but I say this for the other veterans, especially Mr. Reid, who has been around longer than any of us here—when there were votes called...We didn't have the car wash then, but as you kind of went through and went up, rather than going all the way around by East Block, if there was a vote on, the bus would hang a quick left and go up the west access to the Hill because it gets you there quicker. This doesn't seem to happen anymore, but that's the kind of thing that, once we know there are issues going on....

I'm wondering, Mr. Speaker—and I put this to you—if we should ask that there be a separate plan for a guest or of anything, which I just labelled as a MAP, a members access plan, that would specify where members are going to come from and how they're going to get in. I don't know. We need to think this thing through. For instance, if we have guests on the Hill and there's an unusual security circumstance, a bell is on, and there are members on a bus, maybe that driver, because he or she has communication, contacts somebody and says there are members on the bus. At that time, some kind of protocol kicks in and—as I think was previously suggested by someone—they suddenly go off the regular path and, rather than remaining stuck in a pause, they take an emergency alternate route that's planned, and the access for that vehicle and for those who are walking....

Maybe, sir, we'd need a sign-off by you. I was thinking maybe you could come here to PROC, though that could get a bit tedious. However, maybe just our knowing that you've looked at the plan and signed off on it, and that ultimately you're responsible—as you are anyway—we'd know our rights have been considered in the planning of this because there was a separate stand-alone members access plan that you personally have agreed covers all the contingencies. Then, in an ideal world, if we get into these kinds of circumstances, rather than having crisis, it would be a matter of modifying plans that didn't work, whereas right now we always seem to be coming back to the beginning and reinventing the wheel.

I throw this out as a couple of things for now, Mr. Chair.

(1200)



I'm sure, Mr. Speaker, that you want to never be here again on this issue as much as we do not want to be seized of it, but we have to do something different. We're into an Einstein thing here. If you take a look at the presentation we had earlier, if we keep doing the same things over and over again we're going to get the same outcomes. If we want a different outcome, we have to do things differently. That planning aspect, somehow, has to be different than it has been because we're still not there yet.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Time is up. I don't know if the Speaker wanted to comment.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Mr. Chairman, through you to Mr. Christopherson, in the same way that you suggest that I might have been able to write your opening comments, I think that when it comes to my desire to not have this sort of thing happen again and not have to appear on this sort of thing, you've read my mind as well.

In relation to the question of the current set-up in terms of the legislation that governs the PPS, that is a matter for Parliament to decide, of course, and not a matter around which I as Speaker, of course, would comment on because it could conceivably be debated in the House of Commons, obviously.

I think that what I can say is that I appreciate your suggestion in terms of what it might mean. First of all, this is largely about the day-to-day management of the PPS, which is under the control of the director. However, I think we can take your suggestion and consider it.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Speaker.

(1205)

The Chair:

Our next questioner only has one question. Perhaps we could do that and then go on to the witnesses. Is that okay?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Okay, Filomena.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Just stepping back from this particular case, because this is something where we want to go beyond the facts of this case, what I found when I was looking at the reports of the past and the cases that happened, there was some ambiguity as to where the onus lies with respect to identity. That's really the only question I have.

In the 26th report, there are mixed messages there. One says that the security official should be able to identify the member, that they should have a book. At the same time it says the member should have ID or a pin.

My question is, where does the onus lie with respect to identity? If you have a member.... In that particular case, in fact, there was knowledge that the member was a member, but there was refusal to let that person go because they did not actually have identification on their person.

My question is this: From the security perspective, where does the onus lie with respect to identifying a member? Is it with the security official? If the member has no identity, doesn't have a pin, doesn't have their card but they are in fact a member, and the security official blocks them, who's at fault there? Is it the security official who doesn't have the book and have the pictures memorized, or names and identity, or is it the member of Parliament who does not have ID?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I think I should take this for a moment. Normally, as I understand it, members of the PPS have with them, if they're at a point where members are going to be passing, the directory of members with their photographs. You'll recall that I said in my opening comments that it's up to members of the PPS to recognize members, to be familiar with them, and if they don't recognize a member, to look for the pin, and if they don't see the pin—because we don't always wear them, obviously, as you know—then to ask for ID. Frankly, I believe that at the same time, we as members ought to ensure that we either wear our pin or have a card with us. However, it is the responsibility of the PPS to recognize us, and I'd expect they would have that directory with them, but I'll let the superintendent better inform us on that.

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

I'm not familiar with the exact circumstances that you outline of a few years ago, but what I can state, to reiterate Mr. Speaker's point, all efforts at any time are made to identify visually the members of Parliament. Again, it's kind of a sequential thing. If they don't readily visually recognize, then they try to look for a pin or they look for the ID card. If not that, then a respectful interaction takes place to determine who they might be. In the unfortunate circumstance that they wouldn't visually recognize them, the members are to have on their person a booklet that identifies the members of Parliament by picture and by name. That's a matter of course, and if that isn't happening I would turn myself to that and be very interested in resolving that issue.

The Chair:

If it's okay with the members, Blake has a very short question.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thanks, Mr. Chair. I appreciate the indulgence there.

I have a number of questions for the other witnesses, but I'll save them for when they return.

Mr. Speaker, in your ruling you refer to a couple of reports you had received. One was from the deputy sergeant-at-arms, and I think the other one was from Mr. O'Beirne, the acting director of the parliamentary protective service.

Did you commission those reports, or were they provided to you unsolicited? Also, could you provide copies of those reports to the committee for our work here?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

It's a normal procedure to provide those to the Speaker.

Did I hear you request that they be provided to the committee?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Correct.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I would be happy to do that.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you for coming.

I think we'll probably ask some of you to come back.

Mr. Bosc, could you get back to the committee in some way on Mr. Graham's question about whether buses could let members off at different locations on occasion?

Mr. Marc Bosc (Acting Clerk, House of Commons):

We're happy to work with the PPS on that point, but I should point out that we want to keep members safe, and it's not always safe to let members off just in any old location.

This is a question that has arisen before, and drivers are very careful to keep people safe. We'll look at it for sure, but it's not a matter of stopping a bus any time a member wants to, unfortunately.

(1210)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Thank you all for coming today. I know you're busy.

If we could quickly have our next witnesses, Ms. Raitt and Mr. Bernier, come so we don't lose any time, that would be great.

Thank you all.

(1210)

(1210)

The Chair:

Colleagues, so we don't lose any time for the witnesses who are very busy these days, we're continuing meeting 57 of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. This meeting is being televised.

As we continue our study of question of privilege, we are pleased to be joined by Lisa Raitt, MP for Milton, and Maxime Bernier, député de Beauce.

I would like to thank you both for making yourselves available to the committee on short notice. Thank you very much for coming.

I'll now turn the floor over to Ms. Raitt, who moved the initial motion to refer the matter to PROC.

Hon. Lisa Raitt (Milton, CPC):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair. I appreciate the invitation to appear today. I will be brief because the facts are brief.

I did find it necessary and important to rise on the issue in the House, not only because it was about a vote, but also because it was budget day, and there was uncertainty as to whether or not I would be able to get to the House in a timely fashion.

I appreciate the committee taking this to consideration. I appreciate the Speaker's ruling as well.

The main reason is that I truly believe that if you don't measure something, then you can't manage it. What I see from the testimony this morning is that that's exactly what you are all doing. As a member of Parliament, I really appreciate what you're doing here.

I do know there is a balance that needs to be struck in terms of safety and security, and the ability for members of Parliament to move freely within the precinct. In this case, I do think it was imbalanced, and that's why I rose on a question of privilege. I hope that, having learned the lessons we may be learning now, we'll have a better outcome next time.

In short, I arrived at the foot of the Hill and waited in the bus shelter for a couple of minutes. I spoke to a member of House of Commons staff. My colleague from Beauce, Monsieur Bernier, came over, and we chatted a little bit more. We noticed that the buses were piling up at the checkpoint. They were not being released. Max said we should figure out what to do. He went over and inquired as to the reason why. A reason was given. He came back and said that they were not going to be moving the buses, and we ended up taking our leave and proceeding up to the Hill.

When we arrived, I was able to see the presentation of the budget, and after that I rose on the point of personal privilege. That's where it ended for me, except for what happened in terms of procedure in the House, and I'm grateful to be here today.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Bernier. [Translation]

Hon. Maxime Bernier (Beauce, CPC):

Thank you very much.

The facts are very clear, and our parliamentary privilege was breached on March 22. I completely agree with what my colleague, the member for Milton, said.

I arrived around 3:50 p.m. to take the bus to go vote. We waited for a few minutes and could see that there were many buses waiting at the gate before they could come through. I went to talk to a security officer, and I asked him what was happening. He told me that he was waiting for the escort of the Prime Minister's motorcade, which was coming in without passengers. Not knowing when the gates would be opened and realizing that time was running out, we decided, around 3:54 p.m., to walk to Parliament. We arrived late for votes, and that is why my colleague the MP for Milton and I rose on a question of privilege at the end of debates.

Today, I am very happy that you are assessing what happened to ensure that other colleagues of ours do not have the same experience in the future.

Thank you.

(1215)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for being with us today. It sheds a little bit more light on the facts of what happened that day. My question is about how we just heard from the director of the PPS that according to their information, they had no knowledge that there was anything to do with the Prime Minister's motorcade and the motorcade leaving, and that they are unaware of who may have told you about that, and that in fact it was actually a press bus that caused the delay in the VSF. Can you explain to this committee how you became aware that it was the Prime Minister's motorcade, or how you were informed of that, and why you were led to believe that and say it in the House that day?

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

Max was the one who had the face-to-face conversation so I'll let him talk to what he heard directly. [Translation]

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Yes, absolutely.

When I talked to the security officer, he was not sure what was happening or why the gate had been closed for a while. I did not talk to the RCMP people; I really talked to the House of Commons officer. He was not sure what was happening and told me that it should be the Prime Minister's motorcade, which was empty, but he also told me that he would find out.

When we saw that the information on what was taking place was vague and that the gate was still closed, we decided to walk to the House of Commons.

However, you are correct in saying, after this morning's testimony, that we were rather made to wait because of journalists. However, according to the information given to me at that time—as the clerk clearly indicates in his decision—it was due to the Prime Minister's empty motorcade. But the employee was not 100% sure and told me that he would find out.

Since we had no further news, we left to go vote as quickly as possible, but we arrived late, as you know. [English]

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Just to clarify, you were told this by an officer in the VSF area?

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Yes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

So they were uncertain and unclear as to why they were causing delay at that point.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

They were guessing at that time I imagine, because at the end that person told me they would ask for more details.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Was this the driver on the bus? No, it was the actual officer on the ground who you had walked up to.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

It was an official on the ground.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

We weren't on a bus, we were in the bus shelter.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

They had allowed you to get out there.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

No, we were not on the bus at all. We just approached from the road. We came across from Confederation and there's a little bus shelter on the bottom of the hill. So we were not on a bus. That's why we were able to escape and make our way to the House because we weren't held on the bus.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'm confused. So at no point were you ever on a bus.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

No.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

No, we were trying to get on the bus. We wanted the bus to come and pick us up at the bus shelter across from Confederation on the Hill.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes, understood. That bus shelter is right in front of the VSF area.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

That's right.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

What I did is I crossed the street to go see an official and ask what's happening.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Where were you arriving from before you got to that bus shelter? What was your previous engagement?

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

I was at a meeting and stopped off in an Uber at the bottom of the Hill on the corner where the Confederation Building is and Wellington.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Before that I was in my office in the Confederation Building.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

So you were waiting for a bus and the bus hadn't arrived because the buses couldn't get through and then you walked up.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

The buses were there but we didn't know why they were not coming through.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I understand.

This has clarified quite a lot for me because I thought that you weren't allowed off a bus. It was being delayed at the time.

I'm going to share my time with Ms. Tassi.

(1220)

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you both for being here today.

We're trying to think of prevention, how to stop this from happening. When you got to that bus shelter, you thought you had sufficient time to get to the House if a bus were to pick you up.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

Yes.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Then you looked over and you saw they were being stopped there. So at that point you walked over to the security person, and I presume you said you were a member of Parliament and needed to get to the House.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

I asked him why we were waiting and why the buses were not going through.

The official told me he thought it was because of the Prime Minister's motorcade but he wasn't sure; he'd ask. The official spoke to an RCMP officer at the time but I left. Time was running on, and we decided to walk to Parliament.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

How long did that take from the moment you stood at the bus and looked over and said they're not coming through?

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Maybe two or three minutes.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

I was there before Max.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

So at that point, you realized—did the security person say to you, they had no idea how long this was going to be, you might be stuck there? You just made a decision on your own that you had to get moving.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Absolutely.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

I don't know if Max was there at the time. I saw the media bus pass me by as I was standing at the bottom. The media bus hadn't passed through before I started waiting for the bus at the bottom of the Hill.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I see.

So the first bus to be stopped was the bus that you wanted to get on?

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

Yes, for sure.

Then the media bus went through.

To be honest, I think it's fair to say that perhaps somebody in the protective service knew that it had to do with the motorcade and perhaps the person made an assumption it was the Prime Minister's motorcade and not the motorcade associated with the media bus that was preventing the buses from going up on the Hill. That's a fair mistake.

But what we were told is what we were told.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Hearing the new evidence certainly makes sense to you, and you wouldn't dispute that. Okay.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

I don't dispute the facts but I do dispute the decision that was taken to not let us onto the Hill.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

What suggestion would you make to prevent that from happening?

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

First of all, the communication between the security agency and the security on the ground and the RCMP was not very conclusive. They didn't know and I was waiting for a real answer. The official who asked a question didn't get an answer. Nobody was able to answer why they were waiting. I think the communication between the House security people and the RCMP is lacking.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

I don't know what happened on the buses. I assume there were members on the bus because that's what I heard in the investigation report. I would assume a conversation with those who were either waiting and were visible to the officers...because we were clearly visibly waiting in a bus shelter for them to explain to us that there was not going to be access to the Hill through the bus system.

However, that being said, I don't know whether or not they knew there was a vote and the importance of getting to the vote.

I would suggest that the committee think a little about education on that side of it; the importance of a vote and what it means. I'm hoping that this kind of discussion prompts that awareness.

The Chair:

That's your time, Filomena.

Mr. Richards, you're next.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

It's an exciting day for this committee because potentially we have the future leader of the Conservative Party here with us today, one of these two members, and probably the Prime Minister of Canada in 2019. It's a great start because you're being far more open and accountable than the current Prime Minister by being here and answering their questions fully and completely.

This is wonderful. Here would be a great start for our future leader and a future Prime Minister.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Which one? Which one are you endorsing?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Well, I guess that remains to be seen. I've sent my ballot in, and both were on my ballot. I won't say in which order, but both were on my ballot.

There are a couple of things I want to ask.

First, I'll get into some logistics, but I want to talk after that—just so you are prepared—a little bit about what breach of parliamentary privilege means. Obviously, what it means is, it's not just your rights, it's the rights of your constituents that were prevented from being exercised when you were prevented from voting. I want to get to some logistics first, but I want you to maybe have an opportunity at the end to tell us about the impact that had on your constituents, if you have heard concerns from constituents about the fact that you were prevented.

First of all, I want to follow up on some of the questions already. In regard to the media bus, I know, Lisa, you mentioned already that you had actually seen the bus.

(1225)

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

I did.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'll ask you and then Maxime to tell me if you actually saw the bus as well. Was the bus coming in or was it exiting?

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

The bus turned off.... I don't know the name of the street that comes off Wellington that you go on in order to come up to the Hill, but it turned off of that street, and it just went right past us. The bollards came down, and the bus proceeded up onto the Hill.

Mr. Blake Richards:

So it was entering onto the Hill.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

It was entering in, and it was full of reporters and journalists.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It seems a bit odd that there was some confusion about.... They were talking about the PM's empty motorcade leaving, and then what you saw was the media bus entering. I'm just wondering if maybe there isn't more to this than we realize. I'm not suggesting there is, and something we might want, Mr. Chair, is get the video footage from whatever angles exist so we can actually see if there was, in fact, anything outside of the media bus that was interfering, because it does seem like there was some confusion amongst the parliamentary protective service as to what did occur. I'll mention that we should maybe request that video.

Max, did you see the bus as well?

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

No, I didn't see the media bus. I arrived at the bus shelter just a little bit after my colleague the MP from Milton.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Now, Lisa, when you saw the bus enter, there was obviously a delay after that and prior to the gates being opened, so you don't know exactly how long it was before they were opened. You decided to make your way up the Hill on foot, but from the time you saw that bus go through until the time that you would have arrived at the members' doors to enter the Parliament Buildings, how long was that?

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

Seven minutes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That was about seven minutes?

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

Yes, and I know because I have my Uber receipt.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, so you're quite certain it was seven minutes.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

Yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It does seem a bit odd for those gates to remain closed seven minutes after the bus entered.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

Yes, and that's what I couldn't figure out. I couldn't figure out why I could see the bus at the checkpoint. I didn't understand why it wasn't coming to us, and I guess I could have approached the folks, but my colleague from Beauce was far more energetic, I would say, and I was wearing heels so I wasn't walking much further than I needed to walk that day, and he went over. He said, “I'll find out what's going on,” because it was a long time.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Clearly, the time that you would have gone over there, Max, would have been after the bus because you weren't there when the bus passed through.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Absolutely.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You were given that information by the officer, and it just all seems a little odd to me. There's something kind of off on it. That's why the video would be helpful, because you were told that it was the motorcade. The bus had already gone through, so why they were keeping the gates closed.... There's something there that's odd. I'm not saying that anything malicious occurred, but it just seems like something didn't work. The procedures didn't work, or there's some information we don't seem to have. The video would probably be quite helpful.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

I must add also, the official was not so sure. He told me that must be the empty motorcade from the Prime Minister, but he wasn't sure. He said, “I'll ask”. He went to an RCMP officer, and they were on their walkie-talkies to try to find out what was happening.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Did either of you see the Prime Minister's motorcade or any evidence of it being on the Hill or exiting the Hill?

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

I did not.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

[Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. Blake Richards:

Maybe if I have a little bit of time I will return to what I mentioned at the beginning, which is, obviously, this is a serious matter, and I think it's good for both of you to be here. You have the opportunity to express what it means when your privileges are breached and to talk about your constituents, if you want to speak to that. Have you heard from constituents who obviously are disappointed in the fact that you were prevented from being able to vote on their behalf? You could speak to that.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

I will, very quickly, and then I'll leave it to Max.

The reality is that budget day is a very high-profile day. Despite the fact that we are running for leader of our party, it was extremely important to be there that day. I had left enough time, and Max had left enough time, for us to get up on the Hill, even with the extra vote in between that and the four o'clock announcement, and we did not get on the Hill to watch the minister rise and give the speech. That would be a really big issue, not only because of our constituents, but because of the fact that we are seeking the leadership of the party and we need to be there on those big days.

I was beginning to get more and more worried as time went by, and when Max came back and said that it had to do with an empty motorcade of the Prime Minister's, I thought this made no sense. I've never heard of this security issue before, about buses not being allowed on the Hill because of a prime ministerial motorcade, and I grew concerned. Max said, “Let's walk”, and we were able to walk up.

I was just very concerned about getting there in time for the budget. I was also very much afraid of the whip yelling at us for missing the vote, quite frankly, because it was an important vote. When I saw Gord, he was extremely agitated, but he just said, “If you were withheld from coming, then you need to rise on a point of privilege”. I consulted with the whip when I first came in, to explain why I was late, and he said, “Then you should proceed to think about a point of privilege”.

(1230)

[Translation]

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

I would just like to add that we are all members of the House of Commons and that we are here to represent our constituents.

It is true that, during this leadership race, I have already missed several votes because I was travelling across Canada to meet with Conservatives. However, important votes are held on certain days, and we have to be there. On that budget day, there were several important votes, and I wanted to fulfill my duty as a member of Parliament. People from Beauce and from my riding expected the member they have elected to be able to vote and represent them well. The people of Beauce are well aware that I have been absent this year a bit more often than usual. That was due to the leadership race, and they forgive me for it.

However, on that day, I was here and I wanted to exercise my right to vote and represent my constituents. That is why we say that the vote is a privilege of the members of the House of Commons. It is a privilege to be elected, to vote and to represent our constituents. I was unable to exercise that privilege, that right to vote. This is why we rose together and raised a question of privilege: our privileges had been breached. It is important for members to be able to vote and represent their constituents, and we were unable to do so.

Today, I am very happy that we have had an opportunity to clarify all this and to consider what can be done in the future. However, I personally believe that a communication problem arose between the RCMP and the House of Commons officers. That is why the buses were left waiting for several minutes before the gates were opened. I will carefully read the recommendations you will issue to assure myself that, in the future, other members will not have to go through what Ms. Raitt and I experienced on March 22. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you to both of you for being here, and best of luck as we lead up to May 27 and choosing the next Conservative leader and the next Prime Minister of Canada.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson, go ahead.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks for taking the time, given how busy you both are. Hopefully, we've been helpful in trying to accommodate your schedules because we're very sensitive to the added pressure of running for leader.

I want to start by saying that I agree. We do need to review some of the security aspects that are on the video, and I accept that we may need to do that in camera.

Here's something that troubles me as we're going through this. My first elected position ever, when I was 22, was to become chair of the health and safety committee at my workplace. At a very early age I became aware of the fact that we are all temporarily able-bodied, those of us who are; and that ultimately we're all going to be disabled, even if it's the final act that makes us totally disabled. When I hear, well, it was okay because they can disembark from the bus and walk, I say not everybody can walk.

I just went through the last five or six weeks of hell with sciatica. It finally has subsided now. Anybody who's had that knows how painful that is and how debilitating it can be. I'm used to being physically healthy, I've been very fortunate in my life, but I actually had to make some changes in my routine working with my staff because I could only walk so far. I remember another time, and it didn't get recorded, but we got stopped again, and nobody decided to make an issue of it because it was only for a moment, but the answer was that we all walked across the field. At that time, Diane Finley, our colleague, was in a leg brace, and there she is marching across the front lawn of Parliament to get to the House to vote because the bus had been stopped.

I don't think we quite picked up enough on this issue about disembarking and walking out. We have problems with walking access, where people have been stopped, and we need to deal with that. I really think that accepting, oh, well, just get off the bus and go, that's not an answer for a lot of people. You have your partisan stuff; and I have my digs in about the buses not being frequent enough, about staff and members, late at night, having to walk across, and the security of it. It just makes no sense to me. I haven't seen any move by the new government to reinstate those buses or hire back the drivers who were laid off.

This issue is important.

Can I get your thoughts, colleagues, and any solutions you have on the fact that saying you can get off the bus and walk is not necessarily an answer for everybody?

(1235)

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

Sure.

It's not sciatica, but as I did mention, I was wearing inappropriate walking shoes that day, I have to admit, that went into the calculation of whether or not I was going to walk up to the Hill. Quite frankly, it's more than just comfort; it is about walking long distances in inappropriate footwear and those kinds of things. Yes, it was my choice for that footwear that day, but I should have the ability to rely upon the transport and make the according plans to go with whatever I was feeling that day, and be able to depend upon it. That was the reason that I ended up staying there so long. If I had had more appropriate footwear, I probably would have taken the opportunity, when I realized they were taking so long to go up to the Hill, to go under my own steam.

That being said, Dave, what I do appreciate very much is the fact that in some cases when we get close to the votes you can notice that those buses are moving a bit more frequently in their time frame, and I commend the House of Commons for making sure this happens. But for this absolute stoppage for no real reason, even if it was an empty motorcade belonging to the Prime Minister or an empty motorcade that was guarding a media bus, I don't think either of them are good enough reasons to prevent people from being able to access the Hill in a form and a manner that they are used to and deserve to have, regardless of the reason that you're on it. It doesn't have to be about whether we have a debilitating injury that day. It can be whatever reason the person may have, quite frankly.

Mr. David Christopherson:

And the weather.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

Yes, because then we talk about my hair. Absolutely.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Well said.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

It's part of the game.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You can't show up looking like a drowned rat.

Go ahead.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

I must admit it was a bit frustrating for us because we were waiting and we could see the bus. You wonder, can we wait a little longer or will they come? They were over there so we waited and waited. I went over and asked what was happening. What they told us at that time was not decisive. They didn't know what was happening. That was the frustrating part of all that. After that we decided to walk.

We were waiting because we could see the bus and thought it would come. After two, three, four minutes, we said, okay, let's go.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you so much.

The Chair:

Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you to our guests. It's good to see you again.

I know this is very busy for you because, as your system dictates, like ours, in a leadership you pretty much have to get to all 338. So good luck. It is not easy with the point system that you have, and it calls for a lot of travel.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I'm listening to the conversation going on, and the one theme that seems to be coming through time and time again is uncertainty. Am I reading this correctly, that when you asked the person why are we stopped here, I really have to go to the House and why are we stopped, which is a legitimate question, it seemed to be accompanied by a shrug? It was like, oh, a motorcade. Was that the impression you had? Was it the level of uncertainty that was uncomfortable?

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Yes. They didn't know what was happening.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Right. That goes back to the situation we have now, where we have the RCMP on the outside, we have the fairly newly created PPS on the inside, and the communication back and forth. As my colleague pointed out, when I come to the House, and I want to know how much time is left, I find the most reliable person is the person who drives the bus, because they do radio in.

(1240)

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I get the feeling that our security don't have that same luxury, or at least are not informed of such, which I think is a big problem, because I think they should be in tune with it. We also have a situation now where there's a lot of stress in the system. We have a new system, and with all newness comes a level of stress. It's unprecedented. We now have someone in charge, who's from the RCMP, over a service in this House. That was never the case until two years ago. And we see a lot of new faces; a lot of new Mounties, a lot of new PPS. There are a lot of new faces, and they look pretty stressed. I think at this point that communication, that uncertainty, is probably going to get worse, if that's the case, unless we do something about how we communicate.

In the testimony that you heard earlier—I know he's acting, but obviously he has to give his best advice to the new director—what would you say to him?

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

In the uncertainty piece, having gone through what we went through in 2014, your first thought is: is there something wrong on the Hill? Have they stopped the buses for a reason other than a motorcade, meaning, is something going on up there that we don't know about and therefore they're sealing the Hill off? That's a valid concern, having gone through what we went through. We were in this room when that gentleman approached. That's the first thought I had: is the Hill being shut down? Is there something wrong? Max went over and found out what it was, so that uncertainty went away.

The advice I would have is this. Yes, you are here to protect a precinct, and it does have geographical boundaries. But it also has a very unique set of circumstances in how it functions, and you should be aware of the function, and that certain functions supersede decisions that you may normally take in pursuit of security.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Do you feel they are aware?

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

They had no clue there was a vote going on, and of the importance of it or if it mattered or not. Maybe they understand it's a vote, but they don't know what it means. As I said to Filomena, I think what makes sense is to have more awareness as to what it means. You're doing a great job right now, as a committee, of making sure that people are aware of it and the importance of it.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Yes, I agree, a little bit more education. I think they didn't understand the importance for us of being in Parliament at that time, so that will be important.

Mr. Scott Simms:

And that would be your advice in this particular situation where there seems to be uncertainty. But circumstances change, too. Mr. Christopherson pointed out earlier that when we first got here in 2004, the buses did take a different route when the bells were ringing. I was in Confederation, I think you were in Confederation as well, and they would go along and just go up the west side. Now, obviously, there's a lot of construction in the way. The second element to that now is that, for lack of a better term, our buses are playing in traffic. They never did back then. Now we go out there on Wellington. We stop in front of Wellington. I don't believe we did that back then. What do we do there? That's a big problem, I think, and it just leads to the uncertainty of it.

The piece about the communication and the function of the PPS, and how it relates to our privilege, which is why you're here, I think should be addressed. The current leadership right now seems to be so new that maybe some of this should be changed. That's just my thought.

Anyway, thank you very much.

The Chair:

I'm not sure why we couldn't have had the bells or the lights flashing at the car wash there, so that everyone knew there was a vote coming.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's funny you say that, Mr. Chair, because the same thought had occurred to me, and in fact formed the basis of the first of my two questions. I'll first advise you that as I'm likely to be the last Conservative slot, according to the clerk, I'll divide my time with Mr. Schmale.

It occurred to me that, in the event you had known how much time you had, you might have made the decision to start walking at an earlier point in time, so I'll just ask this question of each of you. If you had just made the decision, when you got to the spot you got to, “I'm just going to walk—forget about buses”, would you have made it in time?

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

Yes, absolutely.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Yes, for sure.

Mr. Scott Reid:

All right, so effectively, the lack of knowledge about how far away the vote was, coupled with the lack of knowledge about how fast the buses were going to be, were the two things that had to happen in order to cause the MPs to stay there, thinking the buses would be faster. At each individual moment, had the buses behaved as appropriate, you would have made it.

(1245)

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It was a bit like that nightmare where you're trying to get to an exam and you're late. Everybody's had that nightmare. It feels a bit like that.

The second thing I wanted to ask is about the RCMP. The director gave us a very long-winded answer. When I asked him whether the decision was made locally—at the car wash security point—or centrally, he basically took a long way of saying it was made centrally. It sounds like your testimony confirms that, because it appears that the people on the spot literally had no idea why they were doing what they were doing. They were waiting for an order, almost certainly.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Absolutely, yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Could I ask one last question? We didn't get a chance to ask him, but he's going to come back and we will then get a chance to ask him.

I've asked myself, why would they stop you after the bus was already through? Is it possible they were concerned about something like off-loading all the journalists and that tying up the entrance area? Could that have been it? Maybe that's not a fair question to ask.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

You know, I could never figure out why it mattered that the bus went up on the Hill, and why that would stop MPs or the buses from flowing up on the Hill. It doesn't make any sense to me at all, Scott. That was the reason given, and there was much confusion.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

I have a couple of observations, just listening to the testimony from you two and the security detail. First, I think what we see is that this incident happened, regardless of the reason. The fact is it happened and it shouldn't have happened. Whether it was a media bus or whether it was the Prime Minister's empty entourage, it doesn't really matter. The fact is it happened and should not have happened.

You were in the position that you were able to walk up. Uncomfortable footwear excluded, you were able to do that. Had you not been able to walk up, that would have been another problem we would be dealing with. That's something we need to deal with, because if it were someone else, this would be a bigger problem.

There are a couple of other things. The fact that the traffic was stopped for a media bus concerns me. Not that I don't like the media, but the fact that they had to stop the actual buses and the members from going up is questionable, because I think that's a bit extreme. I would love to see that video footage if we get a chance. It just seems extreme that you would stop MPs from getting up there, just for the media bus. Again, not that the media is.... I have friends in the media. That is questionable.

Also, there is the Speaker's report. I don't have it in front of me, so I won't quote directly. He said, I believe, three buses were stopped and held up, and his report alluded to other MPs being on the bus. Did you happen to see any, just out of curiosity? No one else has come forward.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

No.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

We were able to see the buses, but I don't know who was inside.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

You had mentioned, Mr. Bernier, the security being on their walkie-talkies and the telephone, trying to figure it out. One thing we were dealing with as a committee before, in our review of the PPS, is the fact that they are all on different communications systems. They're on three different communications systems, and that might be a significant problem we need to deal with as a committee. As you said, no one really seemed to know what was going on, or had any clue. I believe they just knew they had to stop traffic, they had to stop the buses. Nobody could get through, and they were not sure why.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Yes.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

They were all trying to, on their different frequencies....

I agree with whoever said that about the bus drivers. I have noted before that the bus drivers know when a vote is coming. My office is in the Confederation Building. I leave via the back. The bus driver once picked me up at the back, looked to his left, and saw some members coming out of the Justice Building. He looked around, saw that there were no other buses, and went back to pick up the Justice people. We did a U-turn and went right up there. I thought it was very forward-thinking of that driver to realize that there was a vote and that he had better go back and get those members.

I think there's a lesson there. These drivers must know something. We need to move that to the security detail as well, so that everybody knows it. The people in the Centre Block know it because they'll say that it's 10 minutes to the vote and we have a lot of time and that kind of thing. I think we do need to move forward.

(1250)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Schmale.

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you.

I agree with my friend Mr. Schmale. The bus drivers do have a great communication mechanism by which they know how many minutes are left to get to a vote. I've been in a similar situation. They're able to update you while you're on the bus, because you're very worried at that time and you want to make it for that important vote. I sympathize with the situation.

However, I also know that it is incumbent upon members to give themselves a certain amount of time. I'd like to ask you how much time you think should be allotted for any given member to leave from down below on the Hill, or from their office, for access to the House of Commons. That's a question that I sometimes wonder about. How much time should I leave myself? Is 15 minutes enough? Is 20 minutes enough for me to make it or can I do it in five minutes?

How much time do you usually give yourself?

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

Having been here since 2008, I have never missed a vote because of a timing issue. I know where I am and I know my surroundings, so I build in the travel time. It depends on where you are in the precinct. When I had offices on the other side, in Gatineau, I knew how much time I needed to get here. It's the same as being in the Justice Building. I know how much time I need.

If I may point something out to the members of the committee that we haven't talked about specifically, but that I did tell you in my testimony—and I don't know whether or not you followed up with the officials—the bus did not go through security, right? The bus didn't go through the security at all. Perhaps that's the reason the Hill became sterilized at that point and they didn't let anybody else up on the Hill: because that bus was not secured. No one inspected the bus. No one identified the people on the bus. That's why there was a motorcade with the bus: in order to bring it up onto the Hill.

If that's the case, then you should have a conversation with security about checking that bus, because the expediency for journalists attending a budget on the Hill should not be greater than it is for members going to the Hill for the presentation of the budget. If it's too much work to investigate everybody on the bus or to look over the bus, or to do the little mirror thing under the bus, that's their calculation, but it seems to me that it was in the balance of convenience for security as opposed to the balance of our privilege as members.

That's the key point that I wanted to bring out today.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

When I'm in my office in the Confederation Building, 12 minutes is enough to go to the House and be able to vote. I did the same thing at that time.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

How many minutes late for the vote were you?

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

Oh, not many. It was under way when we got there.

Hon. Maxime Bernier: Yes.

Hon. Lisa Raitt: We wanted to go in, but it had already started.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Yes, it was four or something like that....

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

Yes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Your votes were denied as a result of this?

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

Yes. We couldn't get in. We didn't vote.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Yes. We didn't vote.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

We voted on the budget, but not on.... We missed that vote.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I don't know about the security checking that happened with the press bus, because up until very recently we were led to believe that it was the Prime Minister's motorcade, so I did not have information about that. This helps inform the committee's further investigation as to what can be done.

The bells are a great idea. I was wondering if you would like to leave any other advice with this committee as to what can be done in order to avoid this situation. I know myself that we don't have access to buses all the time at any given second of the day. It has happened many times for all of us that we have had to walk our way up to the Hill for a vote because the bus is en route somewhere and we're not going to make it at the right time. We have to allow ourselves that time to get up there.

Are there any other recommendations you can leave with this committee as to what can be done by either party?

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

It would be great if people at the security gate knew that there was a vote. As you just said, the bus drivers for the members of Parliament know that, so I think they must also know when there is a vote. That will help also.

However, the communication between the RCMP and the officials of the House must be better.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

The access of the members to the Hill has precedence over any security measures or plans that have been put in place for whatever odd thing was happening that day. I don't think this would have happened on a normal day. I think it happened because it was budget day, and we had strangers on the Hill.

(1255)

The Chair:

Thank you.

We have some more time for Mr. Schmale if you want.

Then, I want to talk about what we do at the next meeting.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I think Mr. Nater has a question.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

I have just one question, and it's more to seek your comments.

The process of this privilege debate took a unique turn. It actually stands in my name, rather than your names as it ought to have. Privilege is an ancient concept. We can trace it back to 1689 to the English Bill of Rights, and certainly our British North America Act, the Constitution Act, 1867, section 18 preserves it.

If you review the journals from the day of the Speech from the Throne, there is an elegant statement of the Speaker reasserting privileges of Parliament to the crown, to the Governor General of that day, so it's an important concept.

There was this unfortunate incident where both of you were denied your right to vote because of these matters. Then the issue was never dealt with in the House of Commons. The ability to vote on your initial question of privilege was denied by a vote to proceed to orders of the day, which is unprecedented in Canadian history, causing us to revive it through an alternate means.

I would like your comments on that, that is, how that affected your thinking on this matter. Your privileges were violated, and then they were almost further violated by the inability to vote on this important question of privilege.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

When you rise on a question of privilege, part of it is because you're personally affected; therefore, you feel the need to bring it forth to the House of Commons. The second part is that you don't want it to happen again. You rise as a member of Parliament to ensure that whatever procedure or process caused it is redressed and that you can move on.

I'm grateful, Mr. Nater, for saving us and making sure that we could have this discussion today. I think we'll have very good outcomes if only for having notifications on the timing that is left for those who work for us and protect us at the security checkpoint. In this way, there will be a greater awareness that there is not only a place or people to protect but also a process and an institution to protect.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

You're right that it is too bad that we were not able to have this debate in the House. However, we're having this debate here, so that's very important. I'm looking forward to your recommendation.

What's most important for me is that my privilege, as a member of Parliament, has been denied. We must know what happened, and I don't want that to happen to another member of Parliament in the future.

The Chair:

Are there any other quick questions from anybody before we go?

Thank you very much. I think this has given us the exact details we need to make good recommendations. We appreciate your taking the time during this busy leadership race. Good luck to you both.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

Thank you very much.

We didn't cut a deal. That was no deal.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

I want to make sure of what we do at the next meeting. It looks like we can have the estimates a week today. Next Tuesday both the Speaker and the CEO from Elections Canada can make that, so Thursday we'll go on with this as planned.

We'd like to get the reports. The Speaker said we could have the reports, so we'll have those. Hopefully we can get the video, as Blake asked for from PPS. I assume we want PPS to come back on Thursday.

Maybe with all of that, we could give some—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Shall we do three hours on Thursday then?

The Chair:

Would that be possible? Maybe we can give directions for a report after that if we start at 10 and go to 1 again.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can we do 11 until 2?

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm subbing for somebody else.

Mr. Blake Richards:

The one o'clock time time frame is when many members have question period preparations to do and whatnot, so that's a bad idea.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

So 10 to 1?

Mr. David Christopherson:

I can't do that. I'm filling in for somebody else on another committee.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Mr. Chair, I would think there is a high likelihood that there could be other witnesses as well, so I don't think we're going to get to our report.

I think two hours might be sufficient for what you've described anyway. Why don't we just do that? Then if we need another meeting, we'll have another meeting.

(1300)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

We could fit more in on Thursday in that one hour.

Who knows? I mean most of the people we want to talk to are on the Hill anyways, so it's a lot easier to get here without notice.

Mr. Blake Richards:

But we don't know who those other witnesses will be yet. That's the thing. We won't really be able to fit them in on Thursday. It will probably require a different day, right?

Mr. David Christopherson:

It went fairly smoothly today timewise, so let's give the two hours a shot.

We're probably going to need at least one more after that anyway.

The Chair:

Do we want PPS for the whole two hours?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, I think that makes sense.

I mean, even though we may be viewing video or looking at a report in part of that time, there may be questions that arise from the video or from the report that they can help us with. I think it makes sense.

The Chair:

Because we're going to be hopefully looking at the video and the report, maybe we'll start in camera, as we agreed earlier today, because of security reasons.

Mr. David Christopherson:

As long as we're doing security, that's fine.

Is that when we would be viewing the video too?

The Chair: Hopefully, yes.

Mr. David Christopherson: Sure, that makes sense.

The Chair:

We'll start out with the video, and the reports—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Then, if we can, we need to get back out into public.

Mr. Blake Richards:

The only clarification I would make would be much the same as that.

If it's required to watch the video and required to view a report, fine, but there needs to be a commitment that as soon as that is completed, there won't be anything else occurring in camera. It would only be for the purpose that it's absolutely necessary.

The Chair:

Is that okay with everyone?

Some hon. members: Yes.

The Chair: Okay, the meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1005)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour et bienvenue à la 57e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Cette réunion est publique.

Nous allons poursuivre notre étude de la question de privilège concernant la libre circulation des députés au sein de la Cité parlementaire. Nous débuterons la réunion par un exposé de notre analyste sur d'anciennes questions de privilège ayant porté sur ce sujet.

À 11 heures, le Président et le greffier par intérim ainsi que le directeur par intérim du Service de protection parlementaire, le SPP, répondront aux questions des députés au sujet du cadre administratif en vigueur sur la Colline. Enfin, à midi, Mme Raitt et M. Bernier se joindront à nous pour parler des circonstances ayant entouré le dépôt de la question de privilège.

Nous avançons bien du côté du budget des dépenses, également, que nous devrions étudier fort probablement la semaine prochaine, le 16 ou le 18.

Sur ce, je cède la parole à M. Barnes, notre analyste de la Bibliothèque du Parlement. Comme il n'est pas un témoin, nous n'aurons pas à tenir de séries de questions, si vous ne le souhaitez pas. Nous pourrons toujours poser des questions à titre informel à la fin de son exposé.

M. Andre Barnes (attaché de recherche auprès du comité):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Comme les membres du Comité s'en souviendront sans doute, lors de notre dernière réunion, le Comité a demandé à la Bibliothèque du Parlement de nous donner une séance d'information sur les anciennes questions de privilège semblables à celle dont le Comité a été saisi par un renvoi de la Chambre le 3 mai dernier. C'est dans cet esprit que je vais résumer sept cas de députés n'ayant pu accéder librement à la Colline et à la Cité parlementaires ou qui ont été retardés à l'entrée.

Je vais prendre ces incidents du plus récent au plus ancien afin de vous permettre de me suivre dans la note d'information qui a été remise au Comité. En fait, je vais plutôt progresser dans l'ordre inverse de la note d'information et vous devrez donc commencer par la fin du document. Nous commencerons ainsi par les cas les plus pertinents, plutôt que par ceux qui datent de 20 ou 30 ans.

Il convient de remarquer que quatre de ces incidents se sont produits dans le périmètre de la Cité parlementaire, tel que nous le connaissons aujourd'hui, soit un en 2012, un en 2014 et deux en 2015. Les autres incidents dont je vous parlerai remontent à 2004, pour l'un, et il s'est produit lors de la visite du président des États-Unis. Ce fut sans doute l'un des cas les plus flagrants où des députés ont été indûment retardés ou se sont vu refuser l'accès à la Colline. En 1999, un autre cas s'est produit à l'occasion d'une manifestation de l'Alliance de la Fonction publique du Canada. Il faut retenir de cet incident que, dans son rapport déposé en 1999, le Comité précise que le droit des députés à accéder à la Cité parlementaire n'était pas encore bien connu à l'époque. Voici d'ailleurs ce que dit le rapport à ce sujet: Nous observons qu'il est rare au Canada que des députés soient empêchés d'exercer leurs fonctions parlementaires. Il n'est donc pas surprenant que certains députés ou des grévistes de l'AFPC n'aient pas été entièrement au courant du droit des députés à un accès sans entraves, et que cela ait pu occasionner certains retards.

C'était en 1999.

Enfin, je vous parlerai de l'incident de 1988 qui s'est produit sur la Colline lors d'une manifestation contre la TPS.

Sur ce, je vais commencer. Si les députés veulent me poser des questions ou me demander des éclaircissements pendant mon exposé, qu'ils n'hésitent pas à m'interrompre.

J'espère vous fournir un peu plus de détails qu'il y en a dans la note d'information. Donc, ce sera peut-être un peu plus long que ne le laisse penser la note d'information.

Les tout derniers incidents ont fait l'objet d'une seule décision par le Président, le 12 mai 2015.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Monsieur le président, j'invoque le Règlement. J'attendais pour savoir où vous alliez débuter. Est-ce à la page 6?

Le président:

Allez-y.

M. Andre Barnes:

Excusez-moi, ce cas-là ne se trouve pas dans la note d'information.

M. David Christopherson:

Je l'ai remarqué, effectivement. C'est précisément ce que je voulais dire.

M. Andre Barnes:

Comme nous n'avons eu qu'une journée pour préparer la note d'information, nous avons manqué de temps pour traiter de tous les cas, et je m'étais dit que je vous parlerais de celui-ci lors de cette séance d'information.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est bien. Je voulais être certain d'avoir bien toutes les pages en main. Merci.

M. Andre Barnes:

Vous m'en voyez désolé.

(1010)

M. David Christopherson:

Ça va, je comprends.

M. Andre Barnes:

Le Président a rendu sa décision au sujet de cet incident le 12 mai 2015. La Chambre a ajourné en juin de la même année et les élections ont eu lieu à l'automne.

Le Président a disposé des deux cas dans une seule décision. Le premier cas était celui d'un autobus transportant des députés qui a été retardé à l'entrée du côté de l'édifice de l'Est, à hauteur de la rue Elgin, tandis que des députés se trouvaient à bord. Cet incident s'est produit le 30 avril. Le second remonte à la visite du président des Philippines, le 8 mai 2015.

Voici ce qui s'est passé dans les deux cas. Le 30 avril, le député de Skeena—Bulkley Valley, a soulevé une question de privilège à la Chambre. Il a déclaré qu'il était en train de présider une séance dans l'édifice de la Bravoure quand la sonnerie a retenti pour appeler au vote. Lui-même et cinq autres députés sont montés à bord d'une navette en face de l'édifice de la Bravoure, en direction de l'est, le long de Wellington. Arrivé à la hauteur de l'entrée de l'édifice de l'Est, le chauffeur a voulu tourner à gauche, mais le SPP l'a empêché de parvenir jusqu'au portail. D'après les débats, on ne connaît pas vraiment le mode de communication entre les agents et le chauffeur, mais on peut penser que celui-ci s'est fait dire par radio qu'il ne pouvait pas pénétrer tout de suite dans la cité et qu'il serait retardé de trois à cinq minutes. Aucune raison n'a été fournie. Les députés n'ont pas pu descendre de l'autobus, parce que celui-ci était en plein milieu de la circulation. Le chauffeur de la navette n'a pas pu se ranger sur le côté, parce qu'il était au milieu de la chaussée. Comme je l'ai dit, aucune raison n'a alors été donnée et, d'après l'intervention du député sur la question de privilège, il ne nous a pas été possible d'établir si ce retard l'avait ou non empêché de participer au vote. D'ailleurs, le Président a pris la décision en délibéré.

Un peu plus d'une semaine plus tard, le vendredi 8 mai à 10 h 30, le député de Toronto—Danforth se dirigeait à pied vers l'édifice du Centre. Il avait indiqué à la Chambre qu'il souhaitait participer au débat en cours. Il cheminait le long de la voie de desserte de la Colline parlementaire, du côté ouest. Il a aperçu des agents du SPP qui contrôlaient une foule à la hauteur de l'entrée du côté de la Chambre des communes. Quand il est arrivé à ce niveau, il a essayé de passer. Une agente du SPP l'a arrêté et le député lui a montré son épinglette ainsi que sa carte d'identité. L'agente lui a répondu qu'elle avait reçu pour ordre d'arrêter tout le monde et qu'il importait peu qu'il soit député. Elle lui a expliqué que le retard était occasionné par l'arrivée prévue de personnalités; il s'est avéré plus tard qu'il s'agissait du président des Philippines.

Dans sa décision qu'il a rendue le 12 mai sur les deux cas, le Président a déclaré qu'il s'agissait de questions de privilège fondées de prime abord. Le député de Toronto—Danforth a été invité à déposer une motion pour que l'affaire soit renvoyée au comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Toutefois, cette motion a été défaite en Chambre par 145 voix contre 117.

Le président:

Pour les deux cas?

M. Andre Barnes:

Oui. Les deux cas ont été regroupés dans une seule et même motion. Voilà qui conclut mes explications au sujet du premier incident.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Où se trouvait-il quand on lui a dit qu'il ne pouvait pas entrer à cause du président des Philippines?

M. Andre Barnes:

Vous parlez du député?

M. Scott Simms:

Oui, où était-il dans l'enceinte parlementaire?

M. Andre Barnes:

Il se trouvait sur le trottoir en direction de l'entrée des députés, tout à fait en haut...

M. Scott Simms:

Du côté de la Chambre des communes.

M. Andre Barnes:

Du côté ouest de l'édifice du Centre, du côté de la Chambre des communes.

M. Scott Simms:

Parfait.

Le président:

David.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

Je tiens à souligner une chose. D'après ce que je sais, dans presque tous les cas, si ce n'est dans la totalité des cas, il était question de visites de dignitaires étrangers ayant occasionné un renforcement de la sécurité pour assurer leur protection. Je tiens à le souligner maintenant, parce que c'est le trait commun à toutes ces affaires. Nous ne sommes pas en présence de cas où les agents de sécurité sont intervenus spontanément, ce que nous ne voulons pas qu'ils fassent. Peu importe ce qui se produit, il ne s'agit pas de décisions spontanées prises en fonction des priorités du moment. Nous comprenons bien que, dans ce genre de situation, la priorité est accordée à la visite de dignitaires.

Le problème réside dans l'absence chronique de planification. De telles visites sont pourtant prévues. Nous savons le genre de perturbations qu'elles causent, et le service de sécurité sait pertinemment que le Parlement continue de fonctionner par ailleurs. Tout ne s'arrête pas d'un coup et les services de sécurité devraient, dans leurs plans, tenir compte du fait qu'il faut permettre à chaque député d'accéder à la Chambre, peu importe l'endroit où il se trouve. Je dirais que c'est toujours à cet égard que les choses n'ont pas fonctionné. Voilà pourquoi je vais me concentrer là-dessus, parce qu'il n'est pas question de nous demander de ne pas faire ce qu'il faut au nom de la sécurité. C'est complètement fou et ce n'est certainement pas ce dont nous parlons ici. Nous estimons que vous savez ce qui va se produire sur la Colline, que vous planifiez chaque minute et chaque mouvement de nos invités; vous pourriez donc, dans vos plans, tenir compte du déplacement des députés qui vont participer aux travaux de la Chambre.

On ne cesse de nous dire — et vous allez l'entendre, chers collègues — que les choses se feront ainsi désormais. J'ai l'impression de vivre Le jour de la marmotte parce que nous ne sommes pas encore parvenus à faire passer le message, soit qu'il est tout aussi important de planifier l'accès des députés à la Chambre des communes que d'assurer la sécurité de nos invités. Il s'agit d'une obligation constitutionnelle et non de l'expression d'une politesse et d'une amabilité toutes canadiennes. Voilà quel sera essentiellement mon propos, monsieur le président, parce que j'estime que nous tenons là la réponse. Tout est une question de planification, une planification qui ne se fait pas et qui, par son absence, provoque ces incidents.

(1015)

Le président:

Je vous informe qu'apparemment la sonnerie de 30 minutes annonçant la tenue d'un vote devrait résonner à 10 h 40.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Monsieur le président, j'allais justement parler de la même chose.

Le président:

Parfait.

M. Blake Richards:

Quelles sont alors vos intentions pour notre deuxième heure? Il semble que nous devions accueillir un grand nombre de témoins lors de cette deuxième heure, de 11 heures à 12 heures. J'aimerais savoir ce que vous envisagez de faire pour qu'ils participent à une véritable audience, parce que nous ne disposerons pas de toute une heure.

Le président:

David.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est précisément ce dont nous voulons tous parler.

Ah, ce David? Excusez-moi.

Le président:

Nous allons écouter ce David et nous entendrons l'autre ensuite.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je voulais juste dire que je n'ai pas de problème. Je propose que nous rattrapions le temps perdu à voter entre 13 heures et 14 heures, s'il nous est possible de déplacer cette heure-là et si les témoins sont d'accord.

Je ne sais pas si c'est possible.

Le président:

Cela dépend de la disponibilité de nos témoins.

M. David Christopherson:

Nous avons décidé de commencer à 10 heures pour nous réserver de 13 heures à 14 heures, et comme je vais occuper pleinement ce créneau, je vois un problème à rallonger la deuxième heure. Cependant, j'estime que c'est assez important pour que nous examinions...

Si nous ne disposons pas de suffisamment de temps pour terminer nos travaux, il faut savoir que l'heure buttoir n'est pas absolue, c'est notre objectif qui est incontournable. S'il nous faut prendre un peu plus de temps pour cette étude et que nous devons organiser une autre réunion parce que nous aurons été interrompus par la sonnerie, alors, qu'il en soit ainsi. Ce qu'il faut éviter, c'est d'éclipser une partie quelconque de cette discussion parce que nous aurons manqué de temps à cause du vote. Sûrement pas.

Le président:

J'espère que nous pourrons revenir le plus vite possible pour voir dans quelle mesure nous pouvons avancer dans notre ordre du jour.

M. Blake Richards:

Si nous manquons de temps à la fin du créneau de 11 heures à 12 heures, je recommande que... Je suis prêt à parier qu'il sera près de 11 h 30 quand nous reprendrons la séance. Il ne nous restera probablement qu'une demi-heure et je suppose que nous n'aurons pas le temps d'entendre autant de témoins...

Le président:

C'est vrai.

M. Blake Richards:

... mais si, à la fin, les députés parviennent au même constat, nous devrons peut-être — bien que je ne connaisse pas le programme de jeudi — réinviter nos témoins pour une autre heure, jeudi prochain. Je crois que c'est sans doute ce que nous allons devoir faire.

Le président:

Si nous arrivions à poser toutes nos questions au Président aujourd'hui, nous pourrions réinviter les autres témoins jeudi, si c'est nécessaire.

Filomena.

Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Monsieur le président, je ne sais pas exactement comment cela pourrait se dérouler sur le plan de la procédure et si vous avez besoin d'un consentement unanime pour ce faire, mais étant donné que la Chambre est tout à côté, ne nous serait-il pas possible, après le début de la sonnerie, de poursuivre nos discussions ici, tout en nous réservant suffisamment de temps pour aller à la Chambre? Cependant, nous ne suspendrions pas dès le début de la sonnerie.

M. Blake Richards:

Le problème n'est pas celui de l'heure en cours, mais de celle qui suivra le vote. C'est à ce moment-là que nous allons manquer de temps avec nos témoins. Que nous continuions de siéger après le début de la sonnerie ou pas ne nous permettra pas de régler ce problème.

Le président:

Si nous n'avons pas fini cette partie, nous pourrions continuer de siéger après le début de la sonnerie.

M. Blake Richards:

Très certainement, mais c'est surtout l'autre créneau horaire qui est préoccupant.

Le président:

Oui, je comprends.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

... après quoi, nous pourrions tout de suite reprendre une fois le vote terminé.

Le président:

Ruby.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

En fait, Filomena m'a enlevé les mots de la bouche. C'est précisément ce que je voulais dire, mais en plus, j'aimerais savoir, monsieur Christopherson, s'il ne vous serait pas possible de changer le contenu du créneau de 13 à 14 heures. Si tous les témoins... Personnellement, je crois que ce serait la première chose à faire. Notre ordre du jour est tellement chargé que nous devrions en couvrir un maximum aujourd'hui et, s'il nous reste des choses ensuite, nous pourrions revenir jeudi. Cela étant, la séance de jeudi sera également très chargée: nous devrons passer au travers de cette question très importante.

M. David Christopherson:

Si je suis le seul concerné, je vais trouver un moyen de moyenner... Encore une fois, si je suis le seul.

M. Blake Richards:

Nous devons également tenir compte de la situation des témoins. Le témoignage de certains d'entre eux est prévu entre 11 heures et 12 heures et ce sont eux que nous allons pénaliser, contrairement à ceux qui viennent à midi. À moins que nous n'inversions l'ordre de comparution, mais je ne sais pas comment on s'y prendrait pour cela au stade où nous en sommes, je crois qu'il y a un véritable risque...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Nous pouvons rallonger chaque période.

M. Blake Richards:

Je sais que les députés du côté gouvernemental semblent vouloir éviter cette solution, pour une raison ou une autre — je ne sais pas pourquoi au juste — mais j'estime que nous allons devoir tout de suite prévoir une autre heure jeudi. Je ne pense pas que nous y échapperons. Nous allons voir ce qui se passera d'ici là, mais nous ne pouvons pas, maintenant, modifier les horaires de nos témoins d'aujourd'hui. Il est fort probable que nous allons devoir rajouter une heure.

Le président:

Oui.

(1020)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Nous n'avons pas de mauvaises intentions, je vous l'assure. Nous savons tous que nous allons devoir consacrer beaucoup de temps à...

M. David Christopherson:

... aux « autres travaux »?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

... à la question précédente.

Et puis, à un moment donné, nous allons devoir traiter du rapport du directeur général des élections et de la question de privilège. Voilà, notre seule intention.

Je recommande que nous rallongions la séance de jeudi pour qu'elle dure trois heures et que nous maintenions peut-être ce rythme pendant un certain temps, jusqu'à ce que nous ayons la certitude de pouvoir passer au travers de tout notre programme. Ce n'est pas pour éviter certains témoins ou pour ne pas passer au travers des documents, c'est juste une question de temps.

Je propose donc que nous rallongions de trois heures nos prochaines séances jusqu'à ce que nous nous sentions à l'aise.

Le président:

Parfait. Voyons combien de travail nous pouvons abattre aujourd'hui.

J'ai une petite question. A-t-on fini par savoir pourquoi le SPP a bloqué la navette?

M. Andre Barnes:

Non, le député de Skeena—Bulkley Valley ne l'a pas indiqué.

Le président:

Madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'ai une question à ce sujet. Vous avez dit qu'on avait indiqué au chauffeur qu'il devait attendre trois à cinq minutes, mais quelle a été la durée d'attente en fin de compte?

M. Andre Barnes:

Selon le hansard, le leader du gouvernement à la Chambre a commandé un rapport, et je crois que l'attente, je ne voudrais pas être mal cité, a été d'environ 74 secondes.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oh, j'avais entendu quelque chose de différent.

M. David Christopherson:

Ils n'étaient probablement pas au courant à ce moment-là.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Non.

M. David Christopherson:

Une fois arrêtés, ils ne savaient pas si cela allait durer une minute ou une demi-heure.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Une attente d'une demi-minute peut sembler longue lorsqu'on ne sait pas quand elle prendra fin.

M. David Christopherson:

Particulièrement lorsque vous vous dépêchez pour aller voter ou pour prendre la parole.

M. David Christopherson:

Le whip vous attend peut-être.

Le président:

Passons à l'incident suivant.

M. Andre Barnes:

Si vous suivez dans votre note d'information, nous allons reprendre à la page 5 au point « F. 2014 - Président de l'Allemagne ». Cet incident s'est produit en septembre 2014. La question avait été soumise au Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, par cette dernière, le 25 septembre 2014.

Le Comité avait tenu trois réunions pour recueillir des preuves. Il serait bon que le Comité se rappelle, aux fins de son étude, qu'il y avait eu environ quatre groupes de témoins, notamment des responsables de la Chambre des communes, y compris le député d'Acadie—Bathurst. Il y avait aussi le greffier par intérim, le sergent d'armes et le sergent d'armes adjoint. Avaient aussi comparu le commissaire de la GRC, accompagné par le commissaire adjoint et le sous-commissaire, de même que le chef de police d'Ottawa et un inspecteur.

Cela avait donné lieu au 34e rapport de la deuxième session de la 41e législature.

En ce qui a trait à l'incident proprement dit, le 25 septembre, le député d'Acadie—Bathurst se trouvait dans son bureau de l'édifice de la Justice. Les cloches ont commencé à sonner pour un vote. Il est monté à bord d'un autobus devant l'édifice de la Justice, qui est parti en direction de la Colline du Parlement. L'autobus est resté bloqué dans un bouchon de circulation devant l'édifice de la Confédération. Apparemment, les agents de la GRC arrêtaient les véhicules au point de contrôle, en prévision de l'arrivée de l'escorte motorisée du président de l'Allemagne.

Craignant de manquer le vote, le député et d'autres sont sortis de l'autobus et se sont rendus à pied sur la colline. Au moment de traverser la rue Bank, au nord de Wellington, un agent de la GRC a intercepté le député d'Acadie—Bathurst, l'empêchant encore une fois d'accéder à la Colline du Parlement et lui demandant d'attendre jusqu'à ce que l'escorte motorisée du président de l'Allemagne soit passée.

Il avait été mentionné par le sergent d'armes, pendant sa comparution devant le Comité, que la difficulté pour le député d'Acadie—Bathurst d'accéder à la Cité parlementaire était liée au bouchon de circulation qui avait empêché les autobus de se rendre sur la Colline du Parlement.

Il convient aussi de souligner que le député était d'avis qu'il avait été traité de façon cavalière par l'agent de la GRC. Il avait toutefois pu se rendre à temps à la Chambre pour voter.

En ce qui a trait aux recommandations soumises par le Comité dans son rapport et aux changements apportés aux protocoles de sécurité sur la Colline du Parlement, pendant sa comparution devant le Comité, le commissaire Paulson de la GRC avait indiqué que, depuis 2012, au moment où un incident similaire s'était produit, dont nous parlerons dans un moment, et avait empêché des députés d'accéder facilement à la Colline du Parlement, un certain nombre de changements avaient été mis en oeuvre. Cela comprenait la distribution à tous les agents de la GRC en poste sur la Colline d'un répertoire des députés de la Chambre des communes, contenant les noms et les photos, afin que tous ceux nouvellement affectés sur la Colline soient rigoureusement informés des privilèges parlementaires et que l'on assure le démantèlement rapide des périmètres de sécurité créés pendant des événements majeurs et des manifestations, dès la fin de l'événement.

Par ailleurs, le commissaire adjoint Michaud de la GRC, pendant sa comparution devant le Comité, avait mentionné qu'après l'incident vécu par le député d'Acadie—Bathurst, deux protocoles de sécurité avaient été mis en place. Tout d'abord, les escortes motorisées devaient commencer à emprunter une autre entrée pour accéder à la Colline du Parlement. Le commissaire avait d'ailleurs mentionné à ce moment-là que cette mesure avait été appliquée avec succès pendant une visite du président de la République de Finlande. Le deuxième protocole prévoyait que les changements de dernière minute dans le déplacement des escortes motorisées soient communiqués aux Services de sécurité de la Chambre des communes par le conducteur du véhicule de la GRC précédant l'escorte motorisée.

Le rapport du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre comprenait les recommandations suivantes: tout d'abord, que le bureau du sergent d'armes communique à tous les députés un numéro de téléphone où ils peuvent appeler en cas d'une urgence liée à une entrave à leur accès à la Cité parlementaire; et en deuxième lieu, qu'un paragraphe axé exclusivement sur les privilèges parlementaires soit inclus dans les plans opérationnels utilisés par les partenaires de la sécurité sur la Colline du Parlement.

Le rapport concluait que les députés s'étaient vu refuser leur droit d'accès sans restriction à la Cité parlementaire trop souvent. Le Comité avait déterminé que la meilleure façon de remédier à cela était d'améliorer la planification, d'accroître la coordination entre les partenaires, et d'éduquer et de sensibiliser davantage les services de sécurité et les députés.

(1025)

M. David Christopherson:

Si vous le permettez, monsieur le président, j'aimerais souligner... et cela uniquement pour m'assurer que nous voyons la différence.

À ma connaissance, et corrigez-moi si je me trompe, nous n'avons jamais eu de problèmes avec les anciens responsables de la protection parlementaire. Les choses se sont toujours bien passées. Les responsables de ce service comprennent bien la situation, parce qu'ils sont ici depuis longtemps.

Les problèmes ont commencé à se poser au moment où des interactions ont eu lieu entre la GRC et le Service de protection parlementaire. Dans le cadre de l'une des dernières réunions, ils nous avaient mentionné que la fusion des deux représenterait une bonne solution et allait résoudre un grand nombre de problèmes, ce qui n'a pas été le cas.

J'aimerais seulement souligner que l'un des enjeux à l'heure actuelle a trait aux responsables ultimes de la sécurité ici. Comprenons bien que ceux qui ont pris la décision d'intervenir auprès des députés n'étaient pas les anciens responsables de la sécurité, qui s'occupaient exclusivement de la Colline du Parlement.

Je ne blâme pas la GRC. Nous avions fait face au même problème à Queen's Park, lorsqu'il y avait eu interactions entre les responsables de la sécurité de Queen's Park, les agents de la police provinciale de l'Ontario et ceux de la police de Toronto. Nous sommes aux prises avec les mêmes problèmes ici en raison de la fusion.

Je crois qu'il est important pour nous de comprendre, avec tout ce qui se passe à l'heure actuelle du point de vue du respect que souhaitent obtenir les anciens responsables de la sécurité sur la Colline, que ce ne sont pas eux, selon ce que je sais, qui sont intervenus et ont empêché les députés de se rendre où ils voulaient.

Le président:

Andre.

M. Andre Barnes:

Poursuivons avec le troisième et dernier incident de la 41e législature, au point E de la page 5 de la note d'information, à savoir la visite du premier ministre d'Israël. Cet incident avait été soumis au Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre le 2 mars 2012. Deux réunions avaient été tenues pour recueillir des preuves. En ce qui a trait aux groupes de témoins, il y avait des représentants de la Chambre des communes, le greffier et le sergent d'armes, ainsi que le commissaire adjoint de la GRC. Ces réunions avaient donné lieu à un rapport, le 26e de la première session de la 41e législature. En résumé, le Comité avait pris connaissance d'au moins trois incidents qui s'étaient produits pendant cette visite.

Le premier concernait un député qui avait tenté d'accéder à la Colline à partir de l'entrée située près de la rue Elgin et avait été empêché de le faire par un agent de la GRC. Ce dernier n'avait pas le répertoire des députés de la Chambre des communes. Le député ne portait pas de pièce d'identité. L'agent de la GRC avait admis reconnaître le député, mais avait indiqué qu'il n'était pas autorisé à lui permettre de passer sans pièce d'identité appropriée.

Un deuxième incident s'était produit lorsqu'une députée avait tenté d'accéder à l'édifice du Centre à partir de l'allée sur laquelle se trouve la Flamme du centenaire. Elle avait été interceptée et on lui avait dit de se rendre à l'édifice de l'Est, puis d'emprunter le tunnel vers l'édifice du Centre.

Un troisième incident s'était produit après le départ du premier ministre, lorsqu'un député avait tenté de quitter la colline en utilisant son chemin préféré, à savoir la partie est de la route de ceinture. On lui avait dit qu'il devait emprunter l'allée centrale, où se trouve la Flamme du centenaire, parce que l'on était encore à démanteler certains des dispositifs de sécurité qui se trouvaient toujours là. L'incident avait été soumis au Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Pendant sa comparution, la greffière s'était excusée de l'incident et des inconvénients, particulièrement en ce qui a trait aux instructions concernant le tunnel de l'édifice de l'Est, qui apparemment allaient à l'encontre du plan de sécurité convenu.

Au moment de sa comparution devant le Comité, le commissaire adjoint de la GRC, M. Malizia, avait énoncé plusieurs changements qui étaient en voie d'être apportés au mode courant de fonctionnement dans le cas des visites de dignitaires étrangers, à savoir, collaborer avec les responsables de la sécurité de la Chambre et du Sénat, afin que des employés se trouvent aux points de contrôle clés pour aider les agents de la GRC à identifier les parlementaires; placer des représentants expérimentés de la sécurité du Parlement aux points d'accès clés; et mettre à jour l'orientation des agents de la GRC, afin qu'ils soient mieux en mesure de reconnaître les parlementaires. Le commissaire adjoint avait mentionné que chaque agent de la GRC aurait en sa possession à l'avenir un répertoire des députés de la Chambre des communes.

Du point de vue des recommandations comprises dans le rapport, j'aimerais mentionner que ce dernier ne faisait pas état d'atteinte au privilège parlementaire. Il avait été mentionné qu'une telle constatation ne devait pas être faite à la légère, et que le Comité était réticent à tirer des conclusions des témoignages qu'il avait entendus, particulièrement parce que les députés concernés par la question de privilège avaient refusé de comparaître pour soumettre des preuves en vue de l'étude.

Le rapport du Comité comprenait en outre ce qui suit: la recommandation que les députés se munissent de leur carte d'identité de la Chambre des communes et portent leur épinglette, particulièrement s'ils étaient au courant que des mesures spéciales étaient en place sur la Colline; l'obligation pour la GRC de reconnaître et d'identifier les députés; ainsi que la nécessité pour les Services de sécurité de la Chambre des communes de fournir de l'aide à la GRC, en vue d'identifier les députés, et une fois cela fait, de leur donner accès à la Colline du Parlement. On avait fortement incité la GRC à solliciter l'aide des Services de sécurité de la Chambre pour qu'ils les aident à identifier les députés aux différents points d'accès de la Cité parlementaire. Enfin, tous les agents de la GRC en devoir devaient être informés du privilège parlementaire et du droit des députés à un accès sans entraves à la Cité parlementaire, ce droit représentant un pilier fondamental de la démocratie parlementaire canadienne.

C'est tout pour cet incident particulier.

S'il n'y a pas de questions, nous allons revenir en arrière à l'incident qui a probablement été le plus grave et qui s'est produit en 2004, au moment de la visite du président des États-Unis. La question avait été soumise au Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre le 25 septembre 2004. Au total, cinq groupes de témoins avaient comparu, et quatre réunions avaient été tenues pour recueillir des preuves. Le sergent d'armes avait présenté un exposé préliminaire. Les deux députés qui avaient soulevé la question de privilège, le député de Charlevoix—Montmorency et celui d'Elmwood, avaient aussi participé à la réunion pour présenter leur témoignage. La police d'Ottawa avait aussi été invitée, et trois agents s'étaient présentés, en plus d'un ensemble de témoins, y compris la GRC, le sergent d'armes et le coordonnateur des événements majeurs des Services de la Cité parlementaire.

(1030)



Cette étude avait donné lieu à un rapport, le 34e de la 38e session parlementaire.

Voici en résumé ce qui s'était produit. Il s'agissait de la première visite du président des États-Unis d'alors, George W. Bush, depuis l'invasion de l'Irak par les États-Unis, en 2003, et une importante manifestation était prévue sur la Colline du Parlement. Selon la GRC, les dispositifs de sécurité en place à ce moment-là étaient les plus stricts et les plus élevés jamais utilisés. Parmi les forces de sécurité en devoir sur la colline ce jour-là figuraient les services de sécurité de la Chambre des communes et du Sénat, la GRC, la police d'Ottawa et la police de Toronto.

Le 30 novembre, le député de Charlevoix—Montmorency avait soulevé une question de privilège en Chambre, citant de nombreux exemples de députés ayant été empêchés d'accéder à la colline du Parlement ou ayant été retardés. Certains de ces retards avaient duré des heures.

Le problème était que la majorité, sinon la totalité, des agents de police assurant la sécurité ce jour-là n'étaient pas au courant du droit d'accès des députés. Des députés avaient été interceptés et on leur avait refusé l'accès lorsqu'ils s'étaient présentés aux barrières de sécurité, même après qu'ils eurent montré leur épinglette et leur carte d'identité. Par exemple, il semble qu'un député, dans ses tentatives en vue d'avoir accès, ait parlé à 50 agents de police différents, à 10 points d'accès différents, cette démarche ayant duré trois heures et l'ayant néanmoins fait manquer un vote.

Le député de Charlevoix—Montmorency avait aussi souligné des cas de députés qui avaient été abordés, pendant qu'ils étaient aux toilettes ou dans leurs bureaux, afin de les informer qu'ils ne pourraient pas circuler dans les couloirs pendant la visite du président. Il y avait aussi eu des plaintes concernant le manque d'agents de police bilingues sur la Colline du Parlement. Même si la plupart des députés avaient fini par accéder à la Cité parlementaire, un certain nombre avaient connu des retards importants et certains avaient manqué des votes à la Chambre.

À partir des recommandations soumises par le Comité, le rapport avait conclu que les privilèges des députés de la Chambre avaient été violés et que cette impossibilité d'accéder ou ces retards pour accéder à la Chambre des communes constituaient un outrage au Parlement.

À titre de solutions, le Comité avait demandé que des rapports soient préparés par le sergent d'armes et la GRC sur les mesures devant permettre de prévenir ce genre de situation à l'avenir, et avait recommandé que le Président et le Bureau de régie interne tiennent des discussions urgentes, en vue de fusionner les services de sécurité de la Chambre des communes et du Sénat et d'en faire un service de sécurité unifié, au plus tard le 1er janvier 2006.

Voilà.

(1035)

M. Scott Simms:

J'aimerais faire une brève observation à ce sujet.

J'étais présent aussi lorsque cela s'est produit. Je venais d'être élu et je me trouvais à l'hôtel Westin et on m'avait interdit de traverser la rue. La police d'Ottawa m'avait barré le passage en utilisant des termes non équivoques. Je vous accorde que je ne me suis pas retourné pour dire l'habituel: « Ne savez-vous pas qui je suis? ». Je crois bien que cela n'aurait rien donné, comme l'ont constaté de nombreux autres députés.

Je me suis laissé dire qu'à ce moment-là, et je ne sais pas si cela est vrai ou non, mais il vaut certainement la peine de le mentionner, que la délégation présidentielle avait exigé une interdiction d'accès absolue, à l'intérieur d'un certain périmètre, ce qui effectivement venait à l'encontre de notre privilège.

Ma question est la suivante, et ce n'est probablement pas l'endroit pour la poser, mais j'aimerais quand même dire: « Que serait-il arrivé si...? » Comme l'a souligné M. Christopherson, cela se résume essentiellement à ce qui suit: lorsque des personnes sont en visite, chefs d'État ou autres, comme le pape, et que les responsables examinent le protocole entourant le premier ministre ou quiconque d'autre travaille au Cabinet et disent qu'ils veulent interdire l'accès pour des raisons de sécurité, devons-nous leur rappeler qu'en tant que députés, nous avons un privilège? Je n'attends pas de réponse maintenant, mais je crois qu'on devrait se pencher sur cette question à un moment donné. Comment doit-on réagir? Je ne sais pas.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

L'intervention de M. Simms se situe au coeur du débat.

L'autre chose que j'aimerais souligner est qu'il n'y a rien de plus grave que de manquer un vote. Il me fait sourciller de penser que quelqu'un a manqué un vote parce qu'il n'a pas pu se rendre, ce qui constitue l'essence même de l'accès sans entraves pour les députés. Qui sait où cela nous mènera, ultimement, si on décide qu'il est justifié d'empêcher des députés de se rendre à la Chambre des communes.

L'autre chose que j'aimerais mentionner, sur une note positive, étant donné que plus nous revenons en arrière, et chaque fois que nous examinons la question, la situation empire, au point qu'il s'agit maintenant de nombreuses heures et de députés qui manquent des votes... Au fur et à mesure que nous nous rapprochons d'aujourd'hui, les incidents perdent en gravité, ce qui montre que nous faisons des progrès, mais la bataille n'est pas encore gagnée. Je dois vous dire que je serais surpris qu'il s'agisse de la dernière fois où nous aurons à traiter de cette question, jusqu'à ce que nous arrivions finalement au point où la planification de la sécurité des invités comportera une priorité secondaire, à savoir, s'assurer que les députés peuvent se rendre à la Chambre. Nous ne devons cesser de le répéter.

Des progrès ont été réalisés, compte tenu du fait que nous venons d'entendre que la plupart des agents de la GRC et des autres services de police à l'époque, et probablement beaucoup d'autres gens, n'avaient aucune idée que ce droit existait. Nous sommes maintenant arrivés au point où tous savent que ce droit existe, même s'il continue d'être restreint de façon inacceptable. Soyons les plus positifs possible et disons-nous que nous faisons des percées. Nous nous approchons de la solution, mais il ne suffit pas de s'approcher lorsqu'il est question d'un droit absolu.

La dernière chose que j'aimerais mentionner au sujet de ce débat, c'est que nous risquons que des gens disent: « Ces damnés députés qui sont si spéciaux et qui font partie de l'élite. » Vous savez quoi? C'est un risque que nous devons courir. Nous devons être prêts à supporter la pression, parce que tous les gens qui ont comparu devant nous ont été prêts à le faire pour s'assurer que nos droits étaient protégés pour l'avenir, pour notre bénéfice, même s'ils ne nous connaissent pas. Dans cette démarche, nous ne devons pas nous limiter au présent. Nous devons plutôt agir pour l'institution et pour les députés à venir. C'est à nous qu'il revient de veiller à ce que ces droits soient préservés. Autrement, nous les perdrons.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Nous ne savons pas quand les cloches vont commencer à sonner, et il faudra lever la séance lorsque cela se produira. Serait-il possible d'obtenir à l'avance un consentement unanime pour continuer à siéger jusqu'à la fin de l'heure? Cela nous permettrait de continuer à discuter.

Le président:

Avons-nous un consentement unanime?

Des députés: Oui.

Le président: D'accord. Le député a soulevé un bon point.

M. Scott Reid:

Il y a deux choses que j'aimerais parler, qui diffèrent complètement l'une de l'autre.

Le prochain élément en est un pour lequel je demande aussi un consentement unanime. La question de privilège que nous allons aborder aujourd'hui a été soulevée au moyen d'une méthode inhabituelle. M. Nater est présent ici parmi nous, et il s'agit de sa motion, mais évidemment, ce ne sont pas ses privilèges qui ont été violés, et il n'existe pas de précédent quant à son obligation de participer, que ce soit comme témoin, comme membre du Comité ou à un autre titre. Je m'interroge à ce sujet. J'en ai parlé avec John plus tôt.

John, vous pouvez me corriger si je me trompe, mais essentiellement, vous préférez ne pas comparaître comme témoin, mais être plutôt présent comme observateur et peut-être participant.

Afin de s'assurer que cette façon unique d'aborder les choses ne crée pas un précédent, serait-il possible d'obtenir un consentement unanime à nouveau pour confirmer que M. Nater agit ici comme participant et non pas comme témoin? Cela serait-il acceptable pour les députés?

(1040)

Le président:

Est-ce que quelqu'un est en désaccord avec cela? Non?

C'est bien.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Est-ce que cela vous convient, John?

M. John Nater: Oui.

M. Scott Reid: D'accord.

Nous avons discuté du fond de la question ici, M. Christopherson et M. Simms l'ont fait, de la question dans son ensemble.

En abordant la question de la façon la plus stricte possible, ce qui me frappe, c'est qu'il existe des différences considérables entre la situation qui s'est produite en 2004 avec le président Bush et la situation du 21 ou du 22 mars. Je me demande s'il convient d'examiner l'incident le plus rapproché dans le temps ou le plus similaire. Essentiellement, il me semble que ce comité doit se pencher sur le rapport entre la sécurité et l'accès à la Colline du Parlement pour les députés.

Cela est le résultat de motions de privilège, même s'il s'agit d'une façon inhabituelle de procéder. C'est comme cela que ces choses nous sont soumises. Nous devons nous en occuper, mais la situation continue d'évoluer en même temps. Cela vient de toute évidence du fait que les visiteurs exigent des degrés de sécurité divers. Nous devons composer avec leurs escortes motorisées. Les routes sont fermées. Il y a aussi les conditions atmosphériques. La vocation des divers édifices où nous nous trouvons change, ce qui fait que, dans un an environ, la Chambre des communes siégera dans l'édifice de l'Ouest.

Ceci étant dit, j'aimerais proposer ce qui suit. Il me semble qu'il existe des similitudes pratiques dont il convient de prendre note, l'une d'elles étant que nombre de ces incidents ont touché des personnes qui étaient à bord d'un autobus se dirigeant vers la Colline du Parlement. L'autobus a été retardé. Il y a eu des lacunes dans l'information quant à la raison du retard et à la durée de celui-ci. Lorsque les personnes en cause se sont rendu compte qu'il y avait un problème, elles ont eu la possibilité de descendre de l'autobus, mais à ce moment-là, elles ont été empêchées de traverser la rue. De toute évidence, c'est ce qui s'est produit dans le cas de M. Godin.

À un niveau pratique, il me semble que certains de ces problèmes seraient résolus si, lorsque les autobus sont retardés, les personnes qui en descendent pouvaient être escortées vers le bord de la rue. Lorsque vous descendez de votre voiture au lave-auto, vous n'avez pas à traverser de rue, ni à risquer de vous faire frapper, pour vous mettre en sécurité. Cela pourrait résoudre le problème de façon très pratique et simple, sans nécessiter la formation de membres d'autres forces de police, ni quoi que ce soit d'autre, sauf de laisser les gens descendre de l'autobus, afin qu'ils puissent emprunter le côté nord du petit chemin en haut de la colline et éviter la circulation, dans à peu près la moitié des cas. Essayons d'intégrer cela dans nos paramètres quant à la façon possible de résoudre ce problème simplement.

Le président:

D'accord. Merci. Lorsque nous arriverons aux recommandations...

Essayons de terminer l'étude de l'ensemble du rapport, si possible.

Madame Tassi.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Un rapport écrit a-t-il été fourni par le sergent d'armes ou la GRC? La recommandation était que chacun fournisse un rapport. Cela a-t-il été fait?

M. Andre Barnes:

Je vais vérifier.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'accord. Le cas échéant, pouvons-nous en obtenir des copies?

M. Andre Barnes:

Bien sûr.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci.

Le président:

David.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une brève question pour le greffier et l'analyste. Avons-nous une vidéo de l'incident que nous pourrions visionner aujourd'hui?

Le président:

Non.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous n'en avons pas.

M. David Christopherson:

Il n'en existe pas.

Le président:

Si je ne me trompe pas, il n'y aura pas de vidéo présentée, mais je ne sais pas s'il en existe une ou non. Je suis désolé. Nous pourrions leur demander lorsqu'ils arriveront ici.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous pourriez aussi leur demander d'avance, si vous les voyez.

Le président:

Oui. Le greffier croit qu'il y a une vidéo, mais comme nous leur avons demandé de venir ici pour parler uniquement de la structure administrative, et non pas de l'incident, la vidéo ne sera pas disponible aujourd'hui. Cela ne signifie pas que nous n'y aurons pas accès.

(1045)

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai l'impression que nous allons vouloir la visionner. Vous pourriez les prévenir, monsieur le greffier, si vous les voyez à leur arrivée.

M. Andre Barnes:

Les deux autres incidents auxquels M. Christopherson a fait allusion commencent à être assez éloignés dans le temps par rapport aux problèmes que les députés connaissent actuellement, étant donné qu'ils remontent à 20 ans maintenant et, dans un cas, à presque 30 ans, néanmoins, certains renseignements s'y rapportant pourraient être utiles.

L'incident suivant, soit l'avant-dernier, était lié à une grève de l'Alliance de la Fonction publique du Canada. La question avait été soumise à l'étude du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Je ne sais pas combien de réunions se sont tenues à ce sujet, mais j'ai une copie du rapport. Ces rapports ne sont pas disponibles en ligne parce qu'on parle de 1999. Je me suis rendu au 125, rue Sparks et j'en ai imprimé une copie à partir d'un recueil. En ce qui a trait aux groupes de témoins, ils comprenaient notamment les députés qui ont soulevé les questions de privilège, soit M. Reynolds et M. Pankiw. Il y avait un deuxième groupe, constitué de la conseillère juridique de la Chambre des communes et de M. Joseph Maingot, ancien légiste et conseiller parlementaire. Des représentants de l'Alliance de la Fonction publique du Canada et le sergent d'armes avaient aussi comparu, dans le quatrième groupe de témoins.

Je vais tenter de résumer rapidement l'incident, qui était assez particulier. Un conflit de travail était en cours entre l'AFPC et son employeur, le gouvernement du Canada. Dans le cadre de ce conflit, tôt le 17 février 1999, des membres de l'AFPC avaient dressé des piquets de grève à des endroits stratégiques sur la Colline du Parlement et devant l'édifice Wellington qui, j'imagine, était ouvert à ce moment-là, a été fermé et est maintenant rouvert.

Pendant cette étude, on avait indiqué au Comité que la stratégie était de ralentir la circulation automobile sur la Colline, sans nuire aux déplacements des piétons. À l'édifice Wellington, le but visé était d'empêcher les employés et les membres du public d'entrer. Comme les députés devaient avoir accès à la Colline du Parlement, le personnel de sécurité avait été positionné pour pouvoir les identifier et leur permettre de circuler sans entraves. Néanmoins, les piquets de grève avaient entraîné certaines difficultés pour certains députés lorsqu'était venu le temps d'accéder à la Colline du Parlement et à leurs bureaux.

Ce jour-là, le Président était arrivé à la conclusion que l'incident constituait de prime abord un outrage à la Chambre et la question avait été renvoyée au Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Le Comité avait fait rapport à la Chambre le 17 avril 1999. Quant à la question de savoir s'il y avait eu outrage, le Comité était arrivé aux conclusions suivantes: il n'y avait eu aucune intention délibérée de porter atteinte au privilège parlementaire; s'il y avait eu outrage au Parlement, il était de caractère purement technique et non intentionnel; et l'affaire ne devait pas faire l'objet de sanctions.

Le Comité avait toutefois suggéré les mesures préventives suivantes: qu'il y ait une meilleure communication et une meilleure coordination entre les différents services de police et de sécurité responsables d'assurer la sécurité à l'intérieur et autour de la Colline du Parlement; et que la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada soit modifiée, afin d'élargir la définition du terme Colline du Parlement, de manière à ce que tous les bâtiments abritant les bureaux des députés y soient inclus. Le Comité avait également proposé que le niveau général de sensibilisation aux questions de sécurité et d'accès des députés à la Colline du Parlement soit rehaussé. Aucune autre mesure n'avait été prise.

Le dernier incident, mais non le moindre, s'est produit au moment d'une manifestation contre la TPS, le 30 octobre 1989, dans des circonstances encore une fois assez inhabituelles. La question de privilège avait été soumise au Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Aucun rapport n'avait été produit, et pour autant que je sache, après avoir consulté les ouvrages de la bibliothèque du 125, rue Sparks, aucune réunion n'avait été tenue à ce sujet. Pour le cas où cela vous intéresserait, les réunions tenues en octobre 1989 étaient axées sur un ordre de renvoi de la Chambre concernant l'étude de tous les aspects de la radiodiffusion et de la télédiffusion des travaux de la Chambre et de ses comités.

En décembre 1989, c'est donc dire une fois cette étude terminée, sans être utilisée, on avait entrepris une étude des droits, immunités, et privilèges des députés de la Chambre des communes, qui n'avait pas porté sur cette question. Les premières réunions tenues en 1990 concernaient la procédure parlementaire en comités.

Je n'ai pas pu trouver aucune preuve de l'incident dans les notes du Comité. Ce jour-là, le 30 octobre, une grande manifestation avait eu lieu. Apparemment, il y avait des milliers de manifestants sur la Colline. Apparemment aussi, des centaines de chauffeurs de taxi avaient décidé de former un cortège de voitures en direction de la Colline du Parlement, de faire une boucle et de revenir. La GRC avait formé un barrage routier pour les empêcher d'accéder à la Colline du Parlement.

Certains députés, y compris celui qui avait soulevé la question de privilège, M. Gray, étaient présents à la manifestation et, en constatant qu'on empêchait les chauffeurs de taxi d'accéder à la Colline, avaient pris place à bord des taxis pour se faire conduire sur la Colline. La GRC avait maintenu le barrage routier, et certains étaient allés demander au sergent d'armes d'intervenir. Des négociations avaient eu lieu avec le sergent de la GRC en devoir, et il avait été convenu que les 30 taxis à bord desquels se trouvaient les députés pourraient passer. Toutefois, les chauffeurs avaient répliqué que tous devaient passer, ou sinon aucun. Les députés étaient descendus des taxis et s'étaient rendus à pied. En fin de compte, apparemment, les taxis avaient été autorisés à accéder à la Colline, mais en corollaire de cela, apparemment, un député qui arrivait au Parlement à bord d'un taxi qui ne faisait pas partie de la manifestation avait été empêché d'y accéder, même si le chauffeur n'avait rien à voir avec le cortège.

(1050)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Était-ce la même année que l'incident impliquant un autobus sur la Colline? Une prise d'otage dans un autobus avait pris fin sur la Colline.

M. Andre Barnes:

Je ne sais pas.

Je pourrais vous indiquer ce que le Président avait dit au moment du renvoi au Comité, même si le Comité n'a jamais étudié la question.

Pour conclure la présentation, j'aimerais mentionner que, compte tenu du temps dont je disposais, j'ai procédé à un examen d'autres secteurs de compétence, afin de déterminer si je pouvais trouver quelque chose susceptible de guider le Comité relativement à ce qui se fait ailleurs. J'ai vérifié le site Web du comité des privilèges de la Chambre des représentants de l'Australie. Ce site remonte à novembre 1998, mais je n'ai pu trouver aucun rapport sur un sujet similaire.

Au Royaume-Uni, évidemment, vous avez Erskine May, qui renvoit au privilège proprement dit et en fait l'historique, mais qui ne fait aucune mention d'incidents récents.

J'ai constaté que deux très importantes études ont été menées par des comités mixtes au Royaume-Uni, dont une en 1999 et l'autre en 2013. Il est fait mention de l'accès sans entraves dans le rapport de 2013. À ce sujet, il est mentionné que la Chambre des lords adopte une ordonnance, le premier jour de chaque session, pour rappeler au commissaire de police métropolitain que la Chambre doit être libre et ouverte et qu'aucune obstruction ne doit être autorisée pour entraver l'accès à la Chambre pour les lords pendant que le Parlement siège.

Cela figurait dans le rapport parce que la Chambre a cessé de procéder de cette façon en 2004. Le comité permanent mixte était d'avis que l'on devait recommencer à émettre cette ordonnance, tout comme le faisait la Chambre des lords.

J'ai consulté les documents d'autres secteurs de compétence. Je me suis servi de Google pour tenter de déterminer si quelque chose de similaire s'était produit en Ontario, mais les termes « manifestations, privilèges des députés, obstacles à l'accès » n'ont produit aucun résultat. Il vaudrait peut-être la peine de convoquer des témoins, si les députés souhaitent savoir ce qui s'est produit dans les provinces.

Le président:

David.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci beaucoup, André. Il s'agit d'un excellent rapport, exactement comme ceux que vous produisez habituellement, selon les normes d'excellence que vous appliquez.

J'aimerais seulement faire observer qu'en écoutant tout cet historique, il me semble qu'il y ait une période précédant le 11 septembre et une période suivant le 11 septembre. Lorsque l'on regarde la situation qui prévalait avant le 11 septembre, il semble bien que les choses n'étaient pas aussi rigides. Dans la plupart des cas, pour utiliser vos mots, il s'agissait de situations « particulières », de cas isolés. On n'avait en aucun cas affaire à une situation aussi systématique que celle que nous voyons aujourd'hui, et tout cela a commencé réellement après le 11 septembre, lorsque le monde a changé et que la sécurité est devenue la priorité absolue qu'elle est maintenant. Je crois que cela tient pour une large part à cela. Il s'agissait de tout sauf d'une réaction exagérée, compte tenu de l'état d'esprit axé sur la sécurité globale qui règne. L'idée qu'il s'agit d'une exception ne cadre pas avec cela. Je le comprends et je crois que nous le comprenons tous.

Si la situation était si simple, nous n'aurions pas un problème permanent. Tout tient, et je vais le répéter encore une fois, au risque de vous déplaire, dans la planification dès le départ. Tout repose sur cela, soit veiller à ce que les planificateurs comprennent que les députés sont susceptibles d'avoir à se présenter, même lorsqu'il y a des invités, et s'assurer que cette partie de la planification leur garantira un accès sécuritaire et au moment opportun, en tout temps, à la Colline du Parlement.

C'est là que le bât blesse. Nous ne mettons pas suffisamment l'accent sur cette question. Nous nous améliorons, mais nous n'avons pas encore réussi. Lorsque je regarde l'histoire, je crois réellement que nombre d'incidents sont liés à l'après 11 septembre, parce que nous avons affaire à des périodes relativement longues, dans le contexte de l'Amérique du Nord. Nous nous concentrons tellement sur un aspect qu'il nous est impossible de contourner le problème.

Il s'agissait davantage d'une observation que d'autre chose, monsieur le président.

Merci.

(1055)

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Notre analyste n'a pas trouvé d'exemples pertinents dans les secteurs de compétence qu'il a examinés, ce qui ne me surprend pas. Par exemple, dans le cas de l'Assemblée législative de l'Ontario, les gens ne font pas face aux mêmes problèmes de sécurité qu'à l'échelle fédérale. Des services de sécurité sont présents, mais je crois qu'il est possible de les maintenir à un faible niveau, sur la base de la simple constatation réaliste que des attaques terroristes sont moins susceptibles de s'y produire.

J'ai visité le Parlement de l'Australie. Il s'agit d'un immense bâtiment, dans lequel tous les secteurs sont reliés par des passages souterrains. Cela fait en sorte qu'il est impossible que les problèmes qui se posent ici arrivent là-bas.

Je crois qu'il s'agit d'une situation problématique unique, qui est liée au fait que nous utilisons un ensemble de bâtiments remontant au XIXe siècle, qui sont principalement reliés par des voies de communication en surface. Les gens doivent traverser des voies publiques. Cela ne sera jamais résolu tant que nous n'aurons pas quelque chose que je ne recommande pas dans les faits, à savoir un réseau complexe de tunnels souterrains, très coûteux. Je crois que cela tient à la nature de l'environnement. Nous allons avoir encore davantage de problèmes, et ils seront liés dans une large mesure aux changements d'infrastructure en cours.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, vous avez la parole.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans le même ordre d'idées que Scott, je crois que la plupart des immeubles sont reliés par tunnels; nous n'y avons tout simplement pas accès. Il pourrait être intéressant de...

M. Scott Reid:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Lorsque j'étais adjoint politique, un nouveau tunnel avait été construit entre l'édifice de la Confédération et celui de la Justice. Il s'agit d'un tunnel dans lequel il est possible de marcher, mais les députés ne peuvent pas l'emprunter.

M. Scott Reid:

Intéressant, mais cela ne résout pas le problème des déplacements entre l'édifice de la Justice, celui de la Confédération et celui du Centre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Non, mais je crois que ces tunnels relient tous les édifices. La raison pour laquelle le tunnel de l'édifice de l'Est a été ouvert, si je ne me trompe pas, c'est que lorsqu'il s'agissait d'un tunnel servant au chauffage, un député qui l'avait emprunté s'était blessé, et la décision avait alors été prise d'en faire un vrai tunnel. Dans le cadre d'un processus à plus long terme, il faudrait peut-être rendre ces tunnels utilisables.

M. Scott Reid:

Cela n'est pas une mauvaise idée. Il s'agit en fait d'une recommandation raisonnable. Toutefois, si nous décidions de recommander cette solution, nous devrions être prudents en ce qui a trait aux coûts. Comme vous le savez, le tunnel de l'édifice de l'Est est doté de boiseries et de quelques autres choses qui ne sont peut-être pas nécessaires. On m'a dit que sa construction avait été extrêmement coûteuse.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En outre, j'ai constaté que mes téléphones cellulaires fonctionnent lorsque je m'y trouve, ce qui me fait m'inquiéter de l'épaisseur du plafond et de la proximité de la route qui passe au-dessus.

M. Scott Reid:

Êtes-vous en train de nous dire que le problème, c'est le manque de sécurité?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Non, je me demande simplement si le plafond est épais, parce que mes téléphones fonctionnent parfaitement dans ce tunnel.

M. David Christopherson:

Si Elon Musk voulait construire toutes ces choses vraiment pas chères et ennuyantes, on serait capable de faire toute cette histoire de tunnel.

M. Scott Reid:

Des convoyeurs pneumatiques relieraient tous les immeubles. L'idée est excellente.

M. David Christopherson:

Ça y est. Vous savez, vous allez aux États... Tous ceux qui ont visité le Congrès savent que, en dessous, il existe tout un réseau ferroviaire, locomotive comprise. Je ne voudrais pas qu'on entende par là que c'est ce qu'on veut. Je suis d'accord avec vous, quant au coût.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aimerais qu'on se remette sur les rails.

Le président:

Avant de suspendre la séance pour se rendre voter... Quand nous recevrons le rapport — si nous le recevons — du SPP que nous avons demandé au Président de la Chambre, ainsi que la vidéo, je propose — et eux-mêmes le demanderont probablement — que nous les entendions à huis clos parce que nous diffusons des secrets d'une certaine manière et que nous ne voulons pas réduire notre sécurité en agissant ainsi. Si tout le monde est d'accord, lorsque nous arriverons à ces deux sujets à l'ordre du jour, cette partie de la séance se déroulera à huis clos.

M. David Christopherson:

À condition que tout le monde soit assuré que la portée des discussions sera très circonscrite et ne concernera que la sécurité, je suis d'accord.

Le président:

Y a-t-il autre chose au sujet du rapport dont on veut traiter avant de faire une pause?

Revenons le plus tôt possible après la tenue du vote, afin de reprendre tout de suite la séance et d'avancer le plus possible.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

On devrait savoir comment préparer une séance de comité dans ces situations.

Le président:

La séance est suspendue.

(1055)

(1130)

Le président:

La 57e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre reprend. À titre d'information, la séance est télévisée. Nous sommes heureux d'accueillir l'honorable Geoff Regan, Président de la Chambre des communes. Il est accompagné du greffier par intérim, Marc Bosc, et de représentants du Service de protection parlementaire, soit Mike O'Beirne, directeur par intérim, et Robert Graham, officier responsable de l'administration et du personnel.

Au nom de tous les membres du Comité, je tiens à vous remercier de vous être mis à notre disposition dans un court délai. Votre expertise et votre contribution en la matière seront d'une aide précieuse. Je sais que vous êtes tous très occupés, donc je vous sais gré d'être présents aujourd'hui. Je vais demander au Président de la Chambre de nous faire sa présentation. Dans cette séance, nous parlerons de la structure de l'administration et de la sécurité, non d'un point de vue en particulier pour le moment, mais de la structure en général.

Je demanderais à mes collègues du Comité d'essayer de poser toutes leurs questions destinées au Président de la Chambre à cette séance-ci. Il se pourrait que nous devions convoquer de nouveau ces témoins parce que la séance a été interrompue pendant une demi-heure, mais le Président de la Chambre ne serait pas obligé de revenir si nous réussissions à lui poser toutes nos questions aujourd'hui.

Monsieur le Président de la Chambre, je vous remercie d'être là. [Français]

L'hon. Geoff Regan (Président de la Chambre des communes):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Mesdames et messieurs, je suis heureux d'être devant vous aujourd'hui pour contribuer à votre étude sur la question de privilège concernant la libre circulation des députés dans la Cité parlementaire. Merci de m'avoir invité.

Je suis accompagné aujourd'hui, comme vous l'avez dit, monsieur le président, de M. Mark Bosc, greffier intérimaire de la Chambre des communes, et de M. Mike O'Beirne, directeur intérimaire du Service de protection parlementaire.

Selon ce que je comprends, les membres du Comité souhaitent que je prenne quelques minutes pour expliquer la structure et la gouvernance actuelles du Service de protection parlementaire, ou SPP, et parler de sa mission dans la Cité parlementaire et sur les terrains de la Colline du Parlement.[Traduction]

Depuis sa création, en 2015, le Service de protection parlementaire, le SPP, travaille à s'établir en tant qu'entité parlementaire indépendante. Comme les membres du Comité le savent, le SPP est responsable de la sécurité physique à l'intérieur de la Cité parlementaire. Et même si le directeur du nouveau service est un membre de la GRC, le Service de protection parlementaire est juridiquement distinct de la GRC et son directeur relève directement des Présidents des deux chambres du Parlement.

En ce qui concerne la Chambre des communes, j'ai pour rôle, en tant que Président, de fixer les objectifs, les priorités ainsi que les buts qui touchent à la sécurité de la cité. Je le fais en consultation avec le directeur du SPP. Pour sa part, le directeur du SPP collabore avec l'Administration de la Chambre pour cerner nos besoins en matière de sécurité et d'accès. À cet égard, le Bureau de la sécurité institutionnelle sert de liaison et de principal point de contact avec le Service de protection parlementaire.[Français]

Conformément à la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada, la gouvernance du nouveau service incombe aux Présidents du Sénat et de la Chambre des communes. Comme le précise le protocole d'entente que nous avons signé, en 2015: Le Président du Sénat et le Président de la Chambre sont investis de la responsabilité de la sécurité de la cité parlementaire, en leur qualité de gardiens des pouvoirs, droits, privilèges et immunités de leur chambre respective et de ses membres [...]

Le directeur du SPP est consulté par les deux Présidents lorsque ceux-ci fixent les objectifs et les priorités de leur chambre respective. De même, le directeur est chargé de la planification, de la gestion et du contrôle des opérations de sécurité. [Traduction]

Comme mandat de base, le Service de protection parlementaire doit assurer la sécurité de tous les députés, tout en respectant les privilèges, les droits, les immunités et les pouvoirs de la Chambre des communes et du Sénat. Comme le précise le protocole d'entente, le Service de protection parlementaire doit, et je cite, « tenir compte des privilèges, droits, immunités et pouvoirs du Sénat et de la Chambre des communes et de leurs membres et agir en conséquence. »

Ces privilèges, droits, immunités et pouvoirs comprennent le droit des députés d'accéder librement à la Colline du Parlement ainsi qu'à la Cité parlementaire en tout temps et quelle qu'en soit la raison. En outre, le personnel du Service de protection parlementaire ne doit pas refuser ou retarder l'accès des députés et devrait être en mesure de reconnaître visuellement les députés. Pour ce faire, les employés du SPP peuvent consulter le répertoire des députés ou se fier à leur mémoire. S'ils n'y parviennent pas, ils doivent chercher l'épinglette du député et, si elle n'est pas visible, demander une carte d'identité de la Chambre des communes ou une autre pièce d'identité. Je pense qu'on entend habituellement par là une pièce d'identité délivrée par le gouvernement, une pièce d'identité officielle.

(1135)

[Français]

Je sais que le Service de protection parlementaire travaille très fort pour assurer la protection de tous les députés, mais il est toujours possible d'améliorer les façons d'y parvenir. Je suis impatient de lire le rapport qui fera suite à votre étude afin que les services de sécurité puissent être améliorés et que l'on puisse appliquer des solutions à long terme.

Le Président du Sénat et moi-même continuerons à travailler en étroite collaboration avec le SPP pour appliquer les recommandations que votre comité ou la Chambre pourrait formuler.[Traduction]

En terminant, je suis convaincu que M. Mike O'Beirne, le directeur intérimaire du Service de protection parlementaire, sera plus qu'heureux de se mettre à la disposition du Comité tout au long de votre étude pour enrichir vos délibérations et répondre à vos questions.

Monsieur le président, je vous remercie de m'avoir donné l'occasion de comparaître devant vous. Si vous le voulez bien, je cède maintenant la parole au directeur intérimaire du Service de protection parlementaire, qui prononcera quelques mots, puis je répondrai avec plaisir à vos questions, à moins que vous ne préfériez m'interroger d'abord et l'entendre ensuite. C'est comme vous voulez.

Le président:

Monsieur O'Beirne, combien de temps durera votre présentation?

Surintendant Mike O'Beirne (directeur par intérim, Service de protection parlementaire):

Monsieur le président, je dirais cinq à six minutes.

Le président:

Qu'est-ce qu'en pensent les autres membres du Comité?

M. Blake Richards:

Il serait sans doute utile de l'entendre d'abord.

Le président:

D'accord.

Monsieur O'Beirne, nous vous écoutons. [Français]

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

J'aimerais commencer par remercier le Comité de m'avoir offert la possibilité de comparaître aujourd'hui afin de discuter de la question de privilège parlementaire découlant d'un incident qui s'est produit le 22 mars 2017.[Traduction]

Avant tout, je tiens à vous dire que le Service de protection parlementaire est toujours soucieux d'assurer la garde des droits, des privilèges et des immunités dont bénéficient les parlementaires. Dans l'accomplissement de notre mandat d'assurer la sécurité physique...

M. David Christopherson:

Je me permets de vous interrompre. Avons-nous une copie de sa présentation?

Le président:

Non, nous n'en avons pas.

Veuillez poursuivre.

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Dans l'accomplissement de notre mandat d'assurer la sécurité physique dans la Cité parlementaire et sur les terrains de la Colline du Parlement, nous nous efforçons de maintenir la doctrine du privilège afin que l'intégrité des deux chambres soit protégée contre tout élément extérieur qui essaierait de modifier la procédure du Parlement.[Français]

Cela étant précisé, je souhaiterais maintenant vous présenter un résumé des événements ayant mené à l'incident qui s'est produit le 22 mars dernier, et qui a donné lieu à une question de privilège.

Comme vous le savez tous, notre environnement opérationnel est complexe, et cela est amplifié par l'évolution de la menace à l'échelle nationale et internationale.[Traduction]

Au bout du compte, je n'ai aucune excuse pour le retard et je m'en attribue toute la responsabilité.

Le 22 mars, le SPP était en cours d'exécution des aménagements nécessaires et des activités de sécurité en raison du dépôt du budget de 2018 à 16 heures. Les esprits étant mobilisés par les opérations de sécurité, le SPP tentait de trouver un juste équilibre entre, d'une part, la capacité et la facilité d'accès aux terrains de la Colline, ce qui comprend le libre accès des parlementaires et la protection de la liberté de la presse, et, d'autre part, le besoin essentiel de tenir compte des exigences qu'impose un contexte de menaces à l'échelle mondiale.[Français]

Je souhaiterais maintenant revenir sur les circonstances entourant la question de privilège qui a été soulevée par les députés Raitt et Bernier.

Cette question de privilège a été soulevée en raison du retard de ces deux députés à la suite de la fermeture temporaire du poste de contrôle des véhicules, le 22 mars. À cause de ce retard, les deux députés n'ont pas pu participer à un vote sur les affaires de la Chambre qui se déroulait à la Chambre des communes.[Traduction]

Au début, on croyait que la fermeture du poste de contrôle des véhicules et les retards ainsi occasionnés étaient attribuables à l'escorte de protection motorisée du premier ministre; toutefois, plus tard, sur la base des heures enregistrées des déplacements de l'escorte du premier ministre ce jour-là, on a établi que le retard avait été causé en fait par l'arrivée sur la Colline de l'autobus des médias et de sa protection motorisée, une escorte du Service de protection parlementaire, qui assurait ainsi le maintien des mesures de confinement jusqu'à la divulgation du budget.

Au moment où l'autobus des médias franchissait les bornes de protection à l'entrée sud, la circulation au poste de contrôle des véhicules a marqué un temps d'arrêt par erreur pendant huit minutes environ. Selon les caméras du Centre des communications, cette fermeture a eu une incidence sur les déplacements de trois navettes parlementaires dont les heures d'arrivée s'échelonnaient de 15 h 48 à 15 h 54 et qui ont quitté le poste de contrôle entre 15 h 56 et 15 h 57. Nous sommes en mesure de confirmer que le mouvement des trois navettes a été ralenti par la fermeture du poste de contrôle des véhicules.

La fermeture temporaire du poste de contrôle des véhicules tient uniquement à des raisons de sécurité des véhicules, afin d'éviter les collisions, le poste de contrôle étant situé tout à côté de la sortie donnant sur Bank. On avait utilisé cette sortie, parce que l'autobus transportant les médias était de type autocar. Cette sortie est utilisée également pour les semi-remorques ou les gros véhicules de construction, le rayon de braquage et la garde au sol aux autres entrées pouvant être insuffisants. Le SPP est en mesure de confirmer que les retards dont il est question sont directement reliés à cet événement.

Le 24 mars, le SPP a entrepris un examen des séquences enregistrées au poste de contrôle des opérations. Elles confirment que le député Bernier s'est bel et bien adressé à l'agent du SPP lorsqu'il s'est approché de ce dernier pour obtenir des éclaircissements sur le motif du temps d'arrêt au poste de contrôle des véhicules.

(1140)

[Français]

Malheureusement, le député Bernier a été informé que les raisons du retard étaient inconnues. Il est alors retourné à l'abribus qui se trouvait sur la voie d'accès inférieure, à la hauteur du prolongement de la rue Bank. Le SPP peut confirmer que l'échange s'est déroulé entre 15 h 53 et 15 h 54, alors que les autobus accusaient un retard en raison de la fermeture temporaire du point de contrôle des véhicules. [Traduction]

Sur la base de l'enquête conduite par le SPP sur la question de privilège liée à cet incident, enquête qui a consisté notamment à examiner en détail les séquences enregistrées par les caméras du centre de contrôle des opérations, à obtenir les heures des déplacements de l'escorte motorisée du premier ministre et à interroger les employés concernés du SPP, le SPP en a conclu que les retards subis le 22 mars étaient attribuables à la fermeture erronée et prolongée du poste de contrôle des véhicules pour permettre à l'autobus des médias de se rendre à l'édifice du Centre à temps pour entendre le discours du budget prévu à 16 heures.

À la lumière de cette conclusion, le SPP tient à s'excuser auprès des députés Raitt et Bernier des retards subis et des répercussions ultérieures entraînées par ce retard et à réitérer son engagement de respecter la doctrine du privilège parlementaire en assurant le libre accès des membres des deux chambres en tout temps, en particulier lors d'un vote. Le SPP est toujours soucieux d'assurer la garde des droits, des pouvoirs et des immunités dont jouissent les parlementaires tout en tenant compte des mesures de sécurité physique rendues nécessaires par les besoins particuliers de notre cadre opérationnel, lequel est fonction des besoins en constante évolution d'un environnement où planent les menaces sur le plan intérieur et mondial.

J'aimerais maintenant prendre quelques instants pour expliquer les mesures prises avant et après l'incident pour éviter qu'il ne se reproduise.

En plus du programme de formation actuel destiné au personnel du SPP, lequel donne à tous les nouveaux employés un aperçu du privilège parlementaire et du besoin, en démocratie, d'assurer le total respect de ce principe, le SPP a élaboré, en consultation avec les deux administrations, un livret sur le privilège parlementaire, lequel est remis aux partenaires dont les activités dans la cité soutiennent celles du SPP lors d'opérations majeures. L'information sur le privilège parlementaire est répétée à chaque réunion opérationnelle préparatoire et continue de faire partie de tous les plans opérationnels.

Toutefois, le SPP continue de s'engager à apporter des améliorations, et les événements malheureux du 22 mars nous rappellent qu'il est toujours possible d'intensifier ses efforts pour que tous les employés du SPP connaissent la doctrine du privilège et son application dans l'ensemble du cadre de fonctionnement du SPP. Ainsi le SPP, en partenariat avec l'Administration de la Chambre des communes, continue de chercher des moyens d'améliorer son programme de formation actuel et de développer ses efforts de sensibilisation afin de prévenir des incidents de ce genre à l'avenir. De plus, d'un point de vue opérationnel, le SPP a formalisé le processus qui permettra de radiodiffuser à tous les membres du personnel du SPP branchés un préavis de mise aux voix, ce qui permettra de prendre toutes les mesures nécessaires pour assurer un accès absolu.

Finalement, en qualité de directeur par intérim du Service de protection parlementaire, je tiens à renouveler mes excuses aux députés Raitt et Bernier et à l'ensemble de l'institution qu'est le Parlement pour les retards inutiles subis. J'aimerais également remercier tous les membres du Comité de l'occasion offerte d'être entendu. En dépit des circonstances de cette comparution, le SPP a ainsi eu la chance de renforcer son engagement; il est redevable d'un mandat qui va au-delà de la simple sécurité physique et englobe plutôt tous les éléments, dont le privilège parlementaire, qui sont essentiels à la protection de l'intégrité des deux chambres.

(1145)

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Normalement, la première période de questions est d'une durée de sept minutes. Serait-il possible de limiter cela à cinq minutes, afin que chacun ait l'occasion de parler?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: Bien, nous allons commencer par M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'ai pas beaucoup de temps, donc je vais m'y mettre assez rapidement. J'aimerais que vous nous disiez dans vos propres mots, monsieur O'Beirne, dans quelles circonstances un agent du SPP ou de la GRC peut-il gêner, retenir, arrêter ou entraver de quelque façon un député dans la cité? Y a-t-il quelque circonstance pouvant justifier l'entrave d'un député?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Pardon, vous me demandez s'il existe une seule circonstance dans laquelle...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, de votre point de vue, y a-t-il un moment où l'agent du SPP ou de la GRC est en droit de procéder à l'arrestation d'un député, de le placer sous garde ou de le retarder? Y a-t-il un moment où vous pouvez intervenir de la sorte?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

En ce qui concerne le SPP et les agents de la GRC qui en font partie, je répondrais, en qualité de directeur par intérim, par la négative.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans ce cas, lorsqu'il y a un vote, les navettes doivent attendre au poste de contrôle des véhicules comme tous les autres. Pourquoi ne franchissent-elles pas les bornes de protection, par exemple?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Dans ce cas en particulier, parce que l'autobus des médias était escorté par nos partenaires, le Service de police d'Ottawa, il y a eu passation du contrôle de l'escorte motorisée aux bornes de protection de Bank. L'autobus a franchi ces bornes de protection parce que c'est, en gros, un des seuls endroits où il est possible d'entrer un autobus de cette taille, étant donné la garde au sol nécessaire. C'est à ce moment-là et pour cette seule raison, soit la sécurité des véhicules, que le poste de contrôle des véhicules a marqué un temps d'arrêt. Ça ne devait durer qu'un instant. L'arrêt a duré plus longtemps, par erreur, soit huit minutes en tout.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je veux bien, mais ce que je voulais dire, c'est que j'ai vu bien souvent le contrôle des véhicules retardé parce qu'un camion est à l'arrêt et les navettes ne peuvent tout simplement pas passer. Les navettes ont des députés à bord; ces derniers souhaitent normalement se rendre quelque part. Pourquoi les navettes n'ont-elles pas la permission de faire le tour et d'utiliser les bornes comme chemins de pratique?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Nous pouvons sûrement envisager cette possibilité et voir si c'est une option. Je crois que nous devrons, encore une fois, nous pencher sur l'aspect sécuritaire pour les véhicules. Le poste de contrôle des véhicules peut contrôler des centaines de véhicules par jour; un jour ouvrable, on peut en contrôler jusqu'à 800, donc il y a une forte circulation de véhicules à cet endroit-là. Nos préoccupations sont multiples à cet endroit. Il faut bien sûr assurer la protection et la sécurité des terrains, la zone de sécurité qui comprend toute la Colline du Parlement. Cependant, il y a aussi, comme je l'ai indiqué, la sécurité de la circulation automobile, parce que la sortie est près, tout à côté de l'entrée. C'est un problème pour nous.

C'est bien sûr une chose qu'on peut envisager dans les années à venir.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Peut-on envisager la possibilité d'autoriser les députés à descendre de la navette lorsque cette dernière est retenue au poste de contrôle pour une raison ou pour une autre? Je sais que les conducteurs, habituellement, ne permettent pas que les passagers descendent ailleurs qu'aux endroits convenus, ce qui peut entraîner des entraves évidentes. Je vous soumets l'idée d'autoriser la descente en tout lieu, en particulier lorsqu'il y a un vote.

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

J'aimerais en discuter avec l'administration afin d'en assurer la coordination. Les navettes ne sont pas nécessairement sous la responsabilité du SPP. Cependant, étant donné que nous nous préoccupons toujours de votre sécurité et de celle de tous ceux qui sont sur la Colline du Parlement, nous serions certainement intéressés à étudier les options à cet égard et à veiller à ce que cela se fasse de manière sûre et sécuritaire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Lors de votre présentation, vous avez indiqué qu'il va y avoir un système mis en place pour prévenir les agents du SPP de toute mise aux voix. Jusqu'à présent, quelle a été la pratique? Lorsqu'il y a un vote, comment en informe-t-on les membres du SPP?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Ça se fait de manière sporadique, au besoin. Depuis hier, mon personnel a l'ordre de nous prévenir dès qu'il y a un signe qu'un vote est éminent. Comme je l'ai indiqué, une radiodiffusion généralisée à l'intention de tout le personnel du SPP prévient tout le monde qu'il faut faire le nécessaire pour assurer le libre accès à la Chambre.

(1150)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En 2014, un incident similaire a motivé une recommandation suggérant la création d'un numéro de téléphone unique pour prévenir de tout incident lié à la libre circulation des députés. Y a-t-on donné suite?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Je peux vous répondre que la création du SPP, comme je l'ai indiqué lors de comparutions antérieures devant le Comité, a été suivie d'une tentative de fusion des trois centres de contrôle des opérations, ce que nous tentons toujours de réaliser au quotidien. Nous voulons passer de trois centres à deux, puis à un seul. Ce que nous avons réussi à faire, c'est de centraliser tous les appels de service, au lieu d'obliger les députés et sénateurs, les visiteurs ou les invités à téléphoner à trois endroits différents pour signaler ce qui peut être un même incident. En cas de problème, il est toujours possible de composer ce numéro pour qu'on s'en occupe avec la diligence nécessaire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Et...

Le président:

Votre temps est écoulé, monsieur Graham.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Surintendant, par souci de clarté, l'autobus des médias arrivait sur la Colline parlementaire, et vous avez mentionné que le retard était de huit minutes en tout. Je dois supposer que la plupart des minutes du retard sont survenues une fois que l'autobus a eu franchi le poste de contrôle. Est-ce exact? Combien de minutes se sont écoulées une fois que l'autobus a eu franchi le poste de contrôle?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Le retard était d'un peu plus de six minutes environ.

M. Scott Reid:

Donc, une fois que l'autobus a eu franchi le poste de contrôle. Ou s'agit-il du nombre total de minutes du retard?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Le retard total était de huit minutes. En fait, ce qui se passe dans la plupart des cas, c'est que si nous recevons un chef d'État, disons, ou une importante escorte motorisée, et si l'arrivée se fait de la même façon, nous fermerions le PCV au cours des 30 à 60 secondes précédant l'arrivée de l'escorte motorisée, tout simplement pour nous assurer que toute la circulation automobile est arrêtée.

En l'occurrence, le retard total était de huit minutes, oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Parfait. Très bien. La majorité du retard s'est produite après, parce que les deux députés qui ont été retardés, Mme Raitt et M. Bernier, attendaient à l'abribus, sans aucune... Il n'y avait aucun véhicule qui franchissait le PCV et qui aurait pu les informer qu'il s'agissait de la raison initiale.

M. Bernier ne pouvait pas vraiment traverser la rue pour s'enquérir de ce qui se passait au cas où un autobus aurait franchi le poste à ce moment-là ou aurait été sur le point de le faire. Lorsqu'il a traversé la rue et posé des questions, on l'a informé que le retard était attribuable aux véhicules vides de l'escorte motorisée du premier ministre qui quittaient la Colline.

Je suppose qu'il s'agit d'une information erronée qui lui a été fournie. Est-ce exact?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Eh bien, les renseignements dont nous disposons ne reflètent pas cela. Donc, si on a donné des renseignements erronés à M. Bernier, alors je...

M. Scott Reid:

Maintenant, je ne cite pas M. Bernier, mais Mme Raitt. Le 22 mars, elle a dit: Un agent de sécurité au bas de la Colline m'a dit que nous ne pouvions pas nous servir de notre moyen de transport habituel pour nous rendre à la Chambre des communes parce que les autobus ne pouvaient pas nous amener à la Chambre tant que les véhicules vides attendant le premier ministre bloqueraient l'entrée.

En toute équité, il s'agit du témoignage de Mme Raitt, et je crois comprendre qu'elle doit avoir posé la question à l'un des autres agents. Est-ce vraisemblablement la source des renseignements erronés? Peut-être qu'il s'agissait de l'un des agents de ce côté-là de la rue?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Monsieur, c'est une possibilité. Nous n'avons pas les renseignements qui confirmeraient qu'il y a eu une interaction à ce sujet. Les renseignements dont nous disposons et la vérification de la bande vidéo indiquent que seul l'autobus des médias a créé ce retard, et le...

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. Bien compris.

Permettez-moi de vous poser la question suivante. Si l'escorte motorisée avait quitté à ce moment-là, est-ce que cela aurait causé un retard semblable? Est-ce ainsi que le processus fonctionne? Vous comprenez pourquoi je vous pose cette question: je pense que nous nous occupons d'un problème, et qu'il peut y avoir un deuxième problème qui pourrait survenir à l'avenir.

Si l'escorte motorisée quitte, a-t-elle une priorité? Il s'agit bien entendu d'une escorte motorisée dont les véhicules sont vides.

(1155)

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Dans le cadre des activités quotidiennes, étant donné que de 700 à 900 véhicules franchissent le PCV, il arrive assez souvent que l'on interrompe temporairement les activités du PCV lorsque des véhicules quittent. Est-il possible qu'à l'avenir le poste de contrôle des véhicules interrompe ses activités pour diverses raisons — les autobus de la Colline, des véhicules de construction, plusieurs autres véhicules? C'est tout à fait possible, oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Lorsque vous dites que le poste « interrompt ses activités », je suppose que cela signifie que les agents sur place ne sont pas autorisés à laisser passer des véhicules. Ils doivent attendre une instruction pour permettre à nouveau aux véhicules de passer. Ou est-ce que ces décisions relèvent d'eux?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Tout dépend de la situation. Par exemple, s'il s'agit d'un véhicule de construction articulé plus long, le superviseur du poste de contrôle des véhicules peut prendre cette décision. Cela devient une question de contrôle de la circulation plus qu'autre chose, et...

M. Scott Reid:

Dans un tel cas, je suppose que c'est à la discrétion des personnes sur place. Qu'en est-il dans le cas qui nous occupe? Est-ce que cela relèverait de leur discrétion ou est-ce que la décision a été prise à un échelon supérieur?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Je peux peut-être préciser que le SPP compte à l'heure actuelle cinq divisions opérationnelles. Les divisions des agents en uniforme assurent la sûreté et la sécurité de la Cité parlementaire ainsi que des terrains. Ces divisions sont actuellement dirigées sur le plan opérationnel par d'anciens membres du Groupe de la sécurité de la Colline du Parlement, des services de sécurité de la Chambre des communes, et des services de sécurité du Sénat. Ils ont tous été réunis suite à la création du SPP.

Tous les jours, le cadre de commandement fait intervenir les liens entre ces cinq divisions opérationnelles du SPP. Cela signifie que tous les aspects liés à la sécurité sont discutés et analysés, comme je l'ai mentionné, avec en toile de fond l'évolution du contexte de menace au pays et à l'étranger en fonction de l'information et du renseignement que l'on obtient.

Le jour de la présentation du budget, le 22 mars, les divisions concernées par la présentation du budget ont formé un commandement unifié afin de s'assurer que tous les aspects liés à la sécurité du budget se déroulent comme prévu. Ce commandement unifié a supervisé le processus décisionnel au sujet de l'interruption des activités à des moments précis au PCV avec le Service de police d'Ottawa, et la coordination avec l'escorte motorisée du SPP qui a accompagné l'autobus sur la Colline. Il était également chargé de tous les mouvements pour le reste des activités sur la Colline parlementaire.

Comme je l'ai mentionné, monsieur, le retard et la durée du retard constituent une erreur dont j'assume toute la responsabilité.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson, veuillez d'abord poser vos questions à l'intention du Président.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vous remercie d'être venu. Il est malheureux que nous soyons à nouveau de retour.

Je tiens à préciser dès le départ que je vous suis reconnaissant de vos observations, monsieur O'Beirne. Ce n'est pas tellement que nous ayons besoin que vous nous démontriez votre fidélité en vous excusant devant nous en personne, mais cela contribue grandement à établir, pour l'avenir, la priorité de tout cela. Vos observations constituent un élément de plus et nous vous en savons gré, tout comme le fait que personne n'essaie de s'esquiver ou d'éviter cela. Vous avez dit dès le départ qu'il n'y avait aucune excuse pour ce retard, vous vous êtes excusé et vous avez assumé la responsabilité. Je vous en sais gré, et je tiens tout simplement à ce que vous le sachiez.

Je n'ai vraiment que deux questions à poser au Président, mais avant tout, j'ai besoin d'une clarification. Dans son allocution, le Président fait référence au PE, le protocole d'entente, de 2015, qui précise que « Le Président du Sénat et le Président de la Chambre des communes sont investis de la responsabilité de la sécurité de la Cité parlementaire en leur qualité de gardiens des pouvoirs, droits... [et] immunités... de ses membres. »

Comme nous l'avons établi dans des discussions précédentes, dont la plupart étaient à huis clos — et j'espère qu'il n'est pas nécessaire de revenir là-dessus et de présenter de nouveau l'argument —, il ne doit subsister aucun doute à cet égard, indépendamment du protocole d'entente, vous, monsieur, en tant qu'agent assermenté de la GRC, si vous recevez un ordre direct du commissaire de la GRC, vous n'avez d'autre choix que d'y obtempérer.

De plus, étant donné que le commissaire de la GRC reçoit ses directives d'une personne — eh bien, deux, mais principalement une — en ce qui concerne les choses importantes, et je parle du premier ministre, il reste donc la question du fait que le contrôle de la sécurité de la Chambre ne relève plus de nous. Indépendamment du protocole d'entente, la réalité est que l'exécutif, par l'entremise du ministre de la Sécurité publique et du premier ministre, peut donner une directive au commissaire de la GRC, qui peut donner un ordre direct au directeur de notre service de protection. Ce sont ces personnes qui en fin de compte ont le pouvoir de contrôler l'endroit où nous sommes, et ne nous faisons pas d'illusions à cet égard.

Monsieur le Président, ayant établi que... vous savez exactement ce que je fais, monsieur, et vous auriez probablement pu écrire comment tout cela allait se passer avant que la situation ne survienne.

Voici donc, monsieur. Évidemment, vous êtes le premier parmi des égaux. C'est à vous qu'il revient de protéger nos droits. Je me pose des questions au sujet de ce manque de planification détaillée et compte tenu de la priorité de la planification — des choses simples. Par exemple, il me semble que par le passé — et, à ma connaissance, cela ne s'est pas produit depuis un bout de temps, mais je le dis à l'intention des autres qui sont ici depuis longtemps, en particulier M. Reid, qui est ici depuis plus longtemps que n'importe lequel d'entre nous —, lorsque nous étions convoqués pour un vote... Nous n'avions pas le lave-auto à l'époque, mais lorsque nous arrivions et commencions à monter, au lieu de faire le tour et de passer par l'édifice de l'Est, s'il y avait un vote, l'autobus effectuait un virage immédiat à gauche et empruntait la voie ouest jusqu'à la Colline, parce que cela était plus rapide. Il semble que cela ne se fasse plus, mais c'est le genre de chose qui, une fois que nous savons qu'il y a des problèmes...

Monsieur le Président — et c'est à vous que je le dis —, je me demande si nous devrions demander qu'il y ait un plan distinct pour un invité ou qui que ce soit d'autre, plan que j'ai baptisé PAD, ou plan d'accès des députés, qui préciserait d'où vont venir les députés et comment ils vont entrer à la Chambre. Je ne sais pas. Nous devons y songer sérieusement. Par exemple, si nous avons des invités sur la Colline et s'il survient une situation inhabituelle sur le plan de la sécurité, une sonnerie se fait entendre et des députés sont à bord d'un autobus, peut-être que le conducteur ou la conductrice, ayant un moyen de communication à sa disposition, communique avec quelqu'un et lui dit qu'il y a des députés à bord de l'autobus. À ce moment-là, un protocole quelconque entre en action et — comme quelqu'un l'a suggéré plus tôt, je pense — l'autobus quitte automatiquement la voie habituelle et, au lieu d'être immobilisé parce que le poste interrompt provisoirement ses activités, il emprunte une voie de remplacement d'urgence qui est planifiée, et l'accès pour ce véhicule et ceux et celles qui marchent...

Peut-être, monsieur, nous faudrait-il votre autorisation. Je pensais que vous pourriez peut-être venir nous rencontrer ici, en comité, quoique cela pourrait s'avérer un peu fastidieux. Toutefois, peut-être que le simple fait que nous sachions que vous avez examiné le plan et l'avez autorisé, et qu'en fin de compte vous êtes la personne responsable — ce que vous êtes de toute façon —, nous saurions que nos droits ont été pris en considération dans cette planification, parce qu'il y a un plan d'accès distinct autonome pour les députés que vous avez personnellement autorisé et qui couvre toutes les situations d'urgence. Alors, dans un monde idéal, si une telle situation se présentait, au lieu d'avoir une crise, il s'agirait de modifier des plans qui n'ont pas fonctionné, alors qu'en ce moment nous semblons toujours revenir au point de départ et réinventer la roue.

Monsieur le président, je formule ces suggestions pour l'instant.

(1200)



Je suis convaincu, monsieur le Président, que vous ne voulez plus jamais revenir ici pour cette question, tout comme nous ne voulons plus en être saisis, mais nous devons faire quelque chose de différent. Cela n'a rien à voir avec les calculs savants d'Einstein. Si vous jetez un coup d'oeil à l'exposé qui a été présenté plus tôt, si nous continuons de répéter les mêmes choses, nous allons obtenir les mêmes résultats. Si nous voulons un résultat différent, nous devons faire les choses différemment. En quelque sorte, cet aspect de la planification doit être différent de ce qu'il a été jusqu'à maintenant, parce que nous n'y sommes toujours pas encore.

Le président:

Merci.

Le temps est écoulé. Je ne sais pas si le Président voulait faire des observations.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Monsieur le président, par votre entremise pour M. Christopherson, de la même façon que vous laissez entendre que j'aurais pu rédiger vos remarques liminaires, je pense que lorsqu'il s'agit de mon souhait qu'une telle situation ne se reproduise plus et que je n'aie pas à comparaître pour ce genre de chose, vous avez très bien lu dans mes pensées.

Concernant la question du contexte actuel pour ce qui est du texte législatif qui régit le SPP, il appartient au Parlement de décider, bien entendu, et il ne s'agit pas d'une question à laquelle, en tant que Président, je ferais des commentaires parce que cette question pourrait, de toute évidence, faire vraisemblablement l'objet de débats à la Chambre des communes.

Je pense que ce que je peux dire, c'est que je vous remercie de votre suggestion quant à ce qu'elle pourrait signifier. Tout d'abord, il s'agit en grande partie de la gestion au quotidien du SPP, qui relève du directeur. Cependant, je pense que nous pouvons prendre votre suggestion et l'examiner.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le Président.

(1205)

Le président:

Notre prochaine intervenante n'a qu'une question à poser. Peut-être que nous pourrions faire cela, puis passer aux témoins. Sommes-nous d'accord?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: Parfait, Filomena.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Si l'on prend du recul par rapport à cette situation particulière, parce que nous voulons aller au-delà des faits de cette affaire, ce que j'ai constaté à l'examen des rapports du passé et des incidents qui sont survenus, il y avait une sorte d'ambiguïté quant à savoir qui est chargé de l'identité. Voilà ma seule question.

Dans le 26e rapport, il y a des messages ambigus. L'un dit qu'il devrait revenir au responsable de la sécurité d'identifier le député, et qu'il devrait avoir un répertoire. En même temps, on dit que le député devrait avoir une carte d'identité ou une épinglette.

Ma question est de savoir qui a la responsabilité ultime de l'identification? Si vous avez un député... Dans le cas en question, on savait de fait que le député était effectivement un député, mais on lui refusait le droit de passer parce qu'il n'avait pas effectivement une pièce d'identité sur lui.

Ma question est donc la suivante: du point de vue de la sécurité, qui assume la responsabilité d'identifier un député? S'agit-il de l'agent responsable de la sécurité? Si le député n'a aucune pièce d'identité, n'a pas d'épinglette, n'a pas sa carte, mais qu'il est effectivement un député, et l'agent de sécurité lui interdit le passage, à qui la faute? Est-ce l'agent de sécurité qui n'a pas le répertoire et qui n'a pas mémorisé les photos, ou les noms et l'identité, ou est-ce le député qui n'a pas de pièce d'identité?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je pense que je devrais prendre ceci pendant un instant. En temps normal, d'après ce que je comprends, les membres du SPP ont avec eux, s'ils se trouvent à un endroit où les députés vont passer, le répertoire des députés ainsi que leurs photos. Vous vous rappellerez que j'ai dit dans mes remarques liminaires qu'il incombe aux membres du SPP de reconnaître les députés, de savoir qui ils sont, et s'ils ne reconnaissent pas un député, de rechercher l'épinglette, et s'ils ne la voient pas — parce que nous ne les portons pas toujours, de toute évidence, comme vous le savez —, alors de demander une pièce d'identité. Bien honnêtement, je crois qu'en même temps, nous, en tant que députés, devrions nous assurer de porter notre épinglette ou d'avoir une carte d'identité sur nous. Toutefois, il appartient aux membres du SPP de nous reconnaître, et je m'attendrais à ce qu'ils aient ce répertoire avec eux, mais je vais laisser au surintendant le soin de mieux nous informer à ce sujet.

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Je ne suis pas au courant de la situation exacte survenue il y a quelques années, mais ce que je peux dire, pour réitérer ce qu'a fait valoir monsieur le Président, tous les efforts doivent être déployés en tout temps pour identifier visuellement les députés. Encore une fois, il y a une séquence. S'ils ne vous reconnaissent pas immédiatement, alors ils doivent rechercher une épinglette ou une carte d'identité. S'il n'y a rien de cela, alors une interaction respectueuse se fait afin de déterminer l'identité de la personne. Dans la situation malheureuse où l'on ne vous reconnaît pas visuellement, les membres du service doivent avoir sur eux un répertoire qui permet d'identifier les députés par leur nom et au moyen d'une photo. Cela va de soi, et si cela ne donne pas de résultat, je me saisirai de l'affaire et je ferai en sorte de régler le problème.

Le président:

Si les membres n'y voient pas d'objection, Blake a une très brève question.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci, monsieur le président. Je vous sais gré de l'indulgence dont vous faites preuve.

J'ai quelques questions à l'intention des autres témoins, mais je les mettrai en réserve pour leur retour.

Monsieur le Président, dans votre décision, vous renvoyez à des rapports que vous aviez reçus. L'un d'eux provenait du sergent d'armes adjoint et je pense que l'autre provenait de M. O'Beirne, le directeur par intérim du Service de protection parlementaire.

Avez-vous commandé ces rapports, ou vous ont-ils été présentés sans que vous en ayez fait la demande? De plus, pourriez-vous nous remettre des copies de ces rapports pour nos travaux?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

La procédure normale veut que l'on remette ces rapports au Président.

Vous ai-je entendu demander qu'ils soient remis au Comité?

M. Blake Richards:

Tout à fait.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je serai heureux de le faire.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci d'être venus.

Je pense que nous demanderons probablement à certains d'entre vous de revenir.

Monsieur Bosc, relativement à la question de M. Graham, pourriez-vous répondre aux membres du Comité et indiquer si les autobus pourraient laisser les députés descendre à des endroits différents à l'occasion?

M. Marc Bosc (greffier par intérim, Chambre des communes):

Nous sommes heureux de collaborer avec le SPP à ce sujet, mais je dois signaler que nous tenons à assurer la sécurité des députés, et il n'est pas toujours sécuritaire de laisser descendre les députés à n'importe quel endroit.

Cette question a déjà été soulevée, et les conducteurs font tout en leur pouvoir pour garder les gens en sécurité. Nous examinerons cette situation de près, mais malheureusement, on ne peut pas faire arrêter l'autobus chaque fois qu'un député le souhaite.

(1210)

Le président:

Merci.

Merci à tous d'être venus aujourd'hui. Je sais que vous êtes très occupés.

Si nous pouvions accueillir rapidement nos prochains témoins. Madame Raitt, monsieur Bernier, si vous pouviez vous approcher afin que nous ne perdions aucun instant, ce serait fantastique.

Merci à tous.

(1210)

(1210)

Le président:

Chers collègues, afin de ne perdre aucun instant pour les témoins qui sont très occupés ces jours-ci, nous poursuivons la 57e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Notre séance est télévisée.

Comme nous continuons notre étude de la question de privilège, nous sommes heureux d'accueillir Lisa Raitt, députée de Milton, et Maxime Bernier, député de Beauce.

J'aimerais vous remercier tous les deux de vous être mis à la disposition du Comité à court préavis. Je vous remercie beaucoup d'être venus.

Je donne la parole à Mme Raitt, qui a présenté la motion initiale de renvoyer l'affaire à notre comité.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt (Milton, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président. Je vous sais gré de l'invitation à comparaître aujourd'hui. Je serai brève, parce que les faits sont brefs.

J'ai jugé qu'il était nécessaire et important de soulever la question à la Chambre, non seulement parce qu'il s'agissait d'un vote, mais aussi parce que c'était le jour de présentation du budget, et qu'il y avait une incertitude quant à savoir si je serais en mesure ou non de parvenir à la Chambre en temps opportun.

Je remercie le Comité d'examiner ma demande. Je sais gré également au Président de sa décision.

La raison principale est que je suis fermement convaincue que l'on ne peut pas vraiment gérer quelque chose qu'on n'a pas mesuré. Ce que je constate dans les témoignages de ce matin, c'est que vous faites précisément tous cela. En tant que députée, je vous suis réellement reconnaissante de ce que vous faites.

Je sais effectivement que l'on doit parvenir à un équilibre pour ce qui est de la sûreté et de la sécurité, et de la capacité des députés de circuler librement dans la Cité parlementaire. Dans le cas qui nous intéresse, je pense qu'il y avait déséquilibre, et c'est pour cette raison que j'ai soulevé une question de privilège. J'espère sincèrement que, ayant tiré les leçons que nous tirons peut-être en ce moment, le résultat sera meilleur la prochaine fois.

Bref, je suis arrivée au pied de la Colline et j'ai attendu dans l'abribus pendant quelques minutes. Je parlais à un membre du personnel de la Chambre des communes. Mon collègue de la Beauce, M. Bernier, s'est joint à nous, et nous avons discuté un peu plus. Nous avons remarqué que les autobus attendaient au point de contrôle. On ne les laissait pas passer. Max a dit que nous devrions voir ce qui se passe. Il s'est rendu au point de contrôle et a demandé ce qui se passait. On lui a donné une raison. Il est revenu et il a dit qu'on ne laissait pas circuler les autobus, et nous avons finalement décidé de marcher jusqu'au Parlement.

Lorsque nous sommes arrivés, j'ai pu assister à la présentation du budget, et c'est après cela que j'ai soulevé ma question de privilège. C'est là que cela s'est terminé pour moi, sauf pour ce qui s'est produit au niveau de la procédure à la Chambre, et je suis reconnaissante d'être parmi vous aujourd'hui.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Bernier. [Français]

L'hon. Maxime Bernier (Beauce, PCC):

Merci beaucoup.

Les faits sont très clairs, et notre privilège parlementaire a été bafoué le 22 mars dernier. Je suis complètement d'accord sur ce que dit ma collègue, la députée de Milton.

Je suis arrivé vers 15 h 50 pour prendre l'autobus afin d'aller voter. Nous avons attendu quelques minutes et nous avons pu voir qu'il y avait beaucoup d'autobus qui attendaient à la barrière avant de pouvoir la franchir. Je suis allé rencontrer un agent de sécurité, je lui ai demandé ce qui se passait et il m'a dit qu'il attendait, à ce moment-là, l'escorte de protection motorisée du premier ministre qui rentrait sans passagers. Ne sachant pas quand les barrières allaient être ouvertes et nous apercevant que le temps filait, nous avons décidé, vers 15 h 54, de marcher jusqu'au Parlement. Nous sommes arrivés en retard pour les votes, et c'est pourquoi ma collègue la députée de Milton, et moi-même, avons soulevé une question de privilège à la fin des débats.

Aujourd'hui, je suis bien heureux que vous fassiez une évaluation de ce qui s'est passé afin de s'assurer que d'autres de nos collègues ne subissent pas la même situation à l'avenir.

Merci.

(1215)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci d'être parmi nous aujourd'hui. Vos propos jettent un peu de lumière sur les faits survenus ce jour-là. Ma question a trait à ce que nous venons d'apprendre du directeur du SPP. Selon leurs renseignements, cela n'avait rien à voir avec le départ de l'escorte motorisée du premier ministre, qu'on ne sait pas qui peut vous avoir dit cela, et qu'en réalité, c'est un autobus des médias qui a occasionné ce retard au PCV. Pouvez-vous nous expliquer comment vous avez su qu'il s'agissait de l'escorte motorisée du premier ministre, ou comment on vous l'a dit, et pourquoi vous avez été amenés à croire cela et à le dire à la Chambre ce jour-là?

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Comme c'est Max qui a eu cette conversation en personne, je vais lui laisser le soin de vous rapporter ce qu'il a entendu directement. [Français]

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Oui, absolument.

Lorsque je suis allé m'informer auprès de l'agent de sécurité, il ne savait pas trop ce qui se passait ni pourquoi la barrière était fermée depuis un bout de temps. Je n'ai pas parlé aux gens de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada, j'ai vraiment parlé à l'agent de la Chambre des communes. Lui-même n'était pas trop au courant et m'a dit que ce devait être l'escorte de protection du premier ministre qui était vide, mais il m'a dit aussi qu'il allait aller s'informer.

Lorsque nous avons vu que les informations relativement à ce qui se passait étaient floues et que la barrière était toujours fermée, nous avons décidé de nous rendre à pied la Chambre des communes.

Toutefois, vous avez raison de dire, à la suite des témoignages de ce matin, que c'était plutôt à cause des journalistes qu'on nous faisait attendre. Par contre, selon l'information qu'on m'a fournie à ce moment-là — comme le dit bien le greffier dans sa décision —, c'était à cause de l'escorte de protection sans passagers du premier ministre. Cependant, l'employé n'en était pas certain à 100 % et m'a dit qu'il allait s'informer.

Puisque nous n'avions pas d'autres nouvelles, nous sommes partis pour aller voter le plus rapidement possible, mais nous sommes arrivés en retard, comme vous le savez. [Traduction]

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Par souci de clarté, c'est un agent dans la zone du PCV qui vous a dit cela?

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Oui.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Donc, il ne connaissait pas au juste la cause de ce retard à ce point.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Je suppose qu'ils devinaient à ce moment-là, parce qu'à la fin, cette personne m'a dit qu'elle allait aller se renseigner.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Est-ce que c'était le conducteur de l'autobus? Non, c'était l'agent sur place à qui vous vous êtes adressé.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Il s'agissait d'un responsable sur place.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Nous n'étions pas à bord d'un autobus, nous attendions à l'abribus.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Ils vous ont laissé passer.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Non, nous n'étions pas du tout à bord de l'autobus. Nous arrivions de la rue. Nous étions de l'autre côté de l'édifice de la Confédération et il y a un petit abribus au bas de la Colline. Nous n'étions donc pas à bord d'un autobus. C'est d'ailleurs pour cette raison que nous avons pu passer et nous rendre à la Chambre, parce que nous n'étions pas à bord de l'autobus.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je suis confuse. Vous n'avez en aucun temps été à bord d'un autobus.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Non.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Non, nous essayions de prendre l'autobus. Nous voulions que l'autobus vienne nous prendre à l'abribus de l'autre côté de l'édifice de la Confédération, sur la Colline.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord, j'ai compris. Cet abribus est immédiatement en face de la zone du PCV.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Exact.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Ce que j'ai fait, c'est que j'ai traversé la rue pour aller voir un responsable et lui demander ce qui se passait.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'où arriviez-vous avant d'atteindre cet abribus? Quel était votre engagement précédent?

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

J'assistais à une réunion et je suis descendue d'un Uber au bas de la Colline, au coin de l'édifice de la Confédération et de la rue Wellington.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Avant, j'étais dans mon bureau de l'édifice de la Confédération.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Donc, vous attendiez un autobus et l'autobus n'est pas arrivé parce que les autobus ne pouvaient pas franchir le PCV, et vous avez ensuite marché jusqu'à la Chambre.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Les autobus étaient là, mais nous ne savions pas qu'ils ne pouvaient pas franchir le PCV.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je comprends.

Cela clarifie bien des choses pour moi, parce que je pensais que l'on ne vous laissait pas descendre d'un autobus. Il était retardé à ce moment-là.

Je vais partager mon temps avec Mme Tassi.

(1220)

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci à tous les deux d'être venus aujourd'hui.

Nous essayons de penser à la prévention, comment faire en sorte que cela ne se reproduise pas. Lorsque vous êtes arrivés à cet abribus, vous pensiez avoir suffisamment de temps pour arriver à la Chambre si un autobus passait.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Oui.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Ensuite, vous avez regardé du côté du PCV et vous avez constaté qu'ils étaient arrêtés là. À ce moment-là, vous vous êtes rendu à la personne chargée de la sécurité et je suppose que vous avez dit que vous étiez un député et que vous deviez vous rendre à la Chambre.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Je lui ai demandé pourquoi nous attendions et pourquoi les autobus n'avançaient pas.

Il m'a dit qu'il pensait que c'était parce que l'escorte motorisée du premier ministre s'en venait, mais il n'en était pas certain; il allait se renseigner. Il a parlé à un agent de la GRC à ce moment-là, mais j'ai quitté. Nous allions manquer de temps et nous avons décidé de marcher jusqu'au Parlement.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Combien vous a-t-il fallu de temps à partir du moment où vous êtes arrivés à l'abribus et que vous avez jeté un coup d'oeil et que vous vous êtes dit que les autobus ne passaient pas?

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Peut-être deux ou trois minutes.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

J'étais là avant Max.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Donc, à ce moment-là, vous vous êtes rendu compte — est-ce que la personne chargée de la sécurité vous a dit qu'on n'avait aucune idée du temps qu'il faudrait? Vous avez donc décidé de marcher.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Tout à fait.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Je ne sais pas si Max était arrivé à ce moment-là. J'ai vu l'autobus des médias passer devant moi alors que j'étais au bas de la Colline. L'autobus des médias n'avait pas franchi le PCV avant que je commence à attendre l'autobus au bas de la Colline.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Je vois.

Donc, le premier autobus qui a été arrêté était celui que vous vouliez prendre?

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Oui, bien entendu.

Ensuite l'autobus des médias est passé.

En toute honnêteté, je pense qu'il est juste de dire que peut-être quelqu'un du service de protection savait qu'il s'agissait de l'escorte motorisée et peut-être que la personne a supposé que c'était celle du premier ministre et non celle de l'autobus des médias qui empêchait les autobus de franchir le PCV et de se rendre sur la Colline. Il s'agit d'une erreur bien compréhensible.

Mais on nous a dit ce que l'on nous a dit.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Le fait d'entendre les nouveaux éléments de preuve éclaircit donc les choses, et vous ne les contesteriez pas. D'accord.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Je ne conteste pas les faits, mais je conteste la décision prise de ne pas nous laisser monter sur la Colline.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Quelle serait votre suggestion pour que cette situation ne se reproduise pas?

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Tout d'abord, la communication entre l'agence de sécurité et les services de sécurité sur place et la GRC n'a pas été très concluante. Ils ne savaient pas et j'attendais une véritable réponse. Le responsable qui a posé une question n'a pas obtenu de réponse. Personne ne pouvait répondre et dire pourquoi ils attendaient. Je pense que la communication entre les responsables de la sécurité de la Chambre et la GRC est déficiente.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Je ne sais pas ce qui s'est produit à l'intérieur des autobus. Je suppose qu'il y avait des députés dans l'autobus, parce que c'est ce que j'ai entendu selon le rapport d'enquête. Je supposerais une conversation avec soit ceux qui attendaient et étaient vus par les agents... parce que nous étions de toute évidence en attente dans un abribus pour qu'ils nous expliquent que le système d'autobus ne pouvait pas accéder à la Colline.

Cependant, ceci étant dit, je ne sais pas s'ils savaient ou non qu'il y avait un vote et qu'il était important d'être présents pour le vote.

Je suggérerais que le Comité songe à une forme d'information de ce côté; l'importance d'un vote et ce que cela signifie. J'espère que cette forme de discussion incite cette sensibilisation.

Le président:

Filomena, votre temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Richards, vous avez la parole.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Voilà un grand jour pour notre comité, parce que nous avons devant nous potentiellement le prochain chef du Parti conservateur, un de ces deux députés, et probablement le premier ministre du Canada en 2019. C'est un excellent départ, parce que vous êtes beaucoup plus ouverts et redevables que l'actuel premier ministre en étant ici aujourd'hui et en répondant totalement aux questions.

C'est magnifique. Notre comité serait un excellent départ pour notre futur chef et un futur premier ministre.

M. David Christopherson:

Lequel? Lequel favorisez-vous?

M. Blake Richards:

Eh bien, je pense que cela reste à voir. J'ai déjà fait parvenir mon vote et le nom de ces deux députés y figurait. Je ne dirai pas dans quel ordre, mais les deux noms y étaient inscrits.

J'aimerais poser quelques questions.

Premièrement, un peu de logistique, mais j'aimerais parler après cela — tout simplement pour que vous vous y prépariez — un peu au sujet de ce que signifie la violation du privilège parlementaire. De toute évidence, ce que cela signifie, ce n'est pas seulement vos droits, ce sont les droits de vos électeurs que vous n'avez pas pu représenter lorsque l'on vous a empêchés de voter. J'aimerais donc aborder d'abord quelques aspects de logistique, mais je tiens à ce que vous ayez peut-être à la fin l'occasion de nous parler de l'incidence que cela a eue sur vos électeurs, si vous avez entendu des préoccupations de vos électeurs au sujet du fait que vous n'avez pas pu voter.

Premièrement, je tiens à faire un suivi à l'égard de certaines questions. Pour ce qui est de l'autobus des médias, je sais, Lisa, que vous avez déjà mentionné que vous avez effectivement vu l'autobus.

(1225)

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

En effet.

M. Blake Richards:

Je vais vous demander, et ensuite à Maxime, de me dire si vous avez effectivement vu aussi l'autobus. Est-ce que l'autobus arrivait ou quittait?

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

L'autobus a tourné... Je ne connais pas le nom de la rue qui donne sur Wellington et que vous empruntez pour monter sur la Colline, mais il provenait de cette rue, et il a passé directement devant nous. On a descendu les bornes, puis l'autobus a poursuivi sa route sur la Colline.

M. Blake Richards:

Donc, il entrait sur la Colline.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Il entrait, et il était rempli de journalistes.

M. Blake Richards:

Il semble un peu curieux qu'il y ait eu tant de confusion au sujet... Ils parlaient de l'escorte motorisée du premier ministre qui quittait, puis ce que vous avez vu, c'est l'autobus des médias qui entrait. Je me demande s'il y a plus que ce que nous voyons. Je ne le laisse pas entendre. Quelque chose que nous pourrions vouloir, monsieur le président, c'est d'obtenir la bande vidéo de tous les angles possibles afin que nous puissions constater s'il y avait effectivement autre chose que l'autobus des médias qui causait le problème, parce qu'il semble qu'il y avait une certaine confusion parmi les membres du Service de protection parlementaire quant à ce qui s'est passé. J'ajouterais que nous devrions peut-être demander cette bande vidéo.

Max, avez-vous aussi vu l'autobus?

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Non, je n'ai pas vu l'autobus des médias. Je suis arrivé à l'abribus peu de temps après ma collègue, la députée de Milton.

M. Blake Richards:

Lisa, lorsque vous avez vu l'autobus entrer, il y a de toute évidence eu un retard après cela et avant que les barrières s'ouvrent, de sorte que vous ne savez pas au juste combien de temps il a fallu avant qu'elles soient ouvertes. Vous avez décidé de marcher jusqu'au Parlement, mais à partir du moment où vous avez vu cet autobus passer jusqu'au moment où vous êtes arrivée aux portes des députés pour entrer dans les édifices du Parlement, combien de temps s'est-il écoulé?

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Sept minutes.

M. Blake Richards:

C'était environ sept minutes?

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Oui, et je le sais parce que j'avais mon reçu d'Uber.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord, donc vous êtes passablement certaine qu'il s'agissait de sept minutes.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Oui.

M. Blake Richards:

Il semble un peu curieux que ces barrières soient restées fermées pendant sept minutes après le passage de l'autobus.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Oui, et c'est ce que je ne comprenais pas. Je ne pouvais pas comprendre pourquoi je pouvais voir l'autobus au poste de contrôle. Je ne comprenais pas pourquoi il ne s'avançait pas vers nous, et je suppose que j'aurais pu m'approcher des personnes présentes, mais mon collègue de la Beauce était beaucoup plus énergique, je dirais, et je portais des talons hauts de sorte que je ne voulais pas marcher plus que nécessaire ce jour-là, et c'est lui qui est allé les voir. Il a dit: « Je vais aller voir ce qui se passe », parce que cela a été long.

M. Blake Richards:

De toute évidence, le temps de vous rendre là, Max, aurait été après l'autobus parce que vous n'étiez pas là lorsqu'il a franchi le poste.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Tout à fait.

M. Blake Richards:

L'agent vous a donné cette information, et tout cela me semble un peu bizarre. Il y a quelque chose qui cloche. C'est pourquoi la bande vidéo serait utile, parce que l'on vous a dit qu'il s'agissait de l'escorte motorisée. L'autobus avait déjà franchi le PCV, donc pourquoi est-ce que l'on gardait les barrières fermées... Il y a quelque chose de bizarre. Je ne dis pas que quoi que ce soit de malicieux s'est produit, mais il semble tout simplement que quelque chose cloche. Les procédures n'ont pas fonctionné, ou il y a des renseignements que nous ne semblons pas avoir. La bande vidéo serait probablement très utile.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Je dois aussi ajouter que l'agent n'était pas tellement certain. Il m'a dit qu'il devait s'agir des véhicules vides de l'escorte motorisée du premier ministre, mais il n'en était pas certain. Il a dit: « Je vais aller aux renseignements. » Il est allé voir un agent de la GRC et ils parlaient dans leurs émetteurs-récepteurs portatifs afin de savoir ce qui se passait.

M. Blake Richards:

Est-ce que l'un ou l'autre d'entre vous a vu l'escorte motorisée du premier ministre ou quoi que ce soit d'autre sur la Colline ou qui en sortait?

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Pas moi.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

[Inaudible]

M. Blake Richards:

S'il me reste un peu de temps, je reviendrai à ce que j'ai mentionné au début, à savoir, de toute évidence, que cette question est grave, et je pense que c'est bien que vous soyez tous les deux ici. Vous avez l'occasion d'exprimer ce que cela signifie lorsqu'il y a violation de vos privilèges et de parler de vos électeurs, si vous voulez en parler. Avez-vous entendu parler de vos électeurs qui, de toute évidence, sont déçus du fait que l'on vous a empêchés de pouvoir voter en leur nom? Vous pourriez nous en parler.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Je vais le faire très rapidement et je céderai ensuite la parole à Max.

En réalité, le jour du budget est une journée très importante. Même si nous sommes candidats à la direction de notre parti, il était extrêmement important que nous soyons présents ce jour-là. J'avais prévu suffisamment de temps, Max également, pour pouvoir aller sur la Colline, compte tenu du vote supplémentaire avant l'annonce du budget, à 16 heures, et ce n'était pas seulement pour entendre le ministre faire son discours. C'est un sérieux problème, non seulement vis-à-vis de nos électeurs, mais aussi parce qu'en tant que candidats à la direction du parti, il faut que nous soyons présents pour ces événements importants.

Plus le temps passait, plus je m'inquiétais et quand Max est revenu en disant que c'était à cause des limousines vides du premier ministre, j'ai trouvé cela insensé. Je n'avais encore jamais entendu parler de ce problème de sécurité, du fait qu'on ne laissait pas les navettes monter sur la Colline à cause des voitures du premier ministre et cela a commencé à m'inquiéter. Max m'a dit alors: « Allons-y à pied » et nous avons pu monter à pied.

J'avais peur de ne pas pouvoir arriver à temps pour le budget. J'avais également très peur que le whip nous reproche d'avoir raté le vote, car c'était un vote important. Quand j'ai vu Gord, il était très agité, mais il m'a dit simplement: « Si on vous a empêchés de venir, vous devez soulever la question de privilège ». J'ai consulté le whip à mon arrivée pour lui expliquer la raison de mon retard et il m'a dit: « Vous devriez songer à soulever la question de privilège ».

(1230)

[Français]

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

J'aimerais simplement ajouter que nous sommes tous des députés de la Chambre des communes et que nous sommes ici pour représenter les gens de notre circonscription électorale.

C'est vrai que, durant cette course au leadership, j'ai déjà raté plusieurs votes parce que je me suis promené dans tout le Canada pour rencontrer des conservateurs. Cependant, il y a des jours où se tiennent des votes importants et nous devons alors être présents. En ce jour du budget, il y avait plusieurs votes importants et je voulais assumer mon devoir de député. Les gens de la Beauce et ceux de ma circonscription s'attendent à ce que le député qu'ils ont élu puisse voter et bien les représenter. Les Beaucerons sont bien conscients que j'ai été absent cette année, un peu plus souvent que d'habitude. C'est dû à la course au leadership et ils m'en excusent.

Toutefois, ce jour-là, j'étais présent et je voulais exercer mon droit de vote et représenter mes électeurs. C'est pour cela qu'on dit que le vote est un privilège des députés de la Chambre des communes. C'est un privilège d'être élu, de voter et de représenter nos électeurs. Je n'ai pas pu exercer ce privilège, ce droit de vote. C'est pour cela que nous nous sommes levés ensemble et que nous avons soulevé une question de privilège: nos privilèges avaient été bafoués. C'est important pour les députés de pouvoir voter et de représenter leurs électeurs, et nous n'avons pas pu le faire.

Aujourd'hui, je suis bien heureux que nous ayons l'occasion de clarifier tout cela et de considérer ce qui peut être fait à l'avenir. Cependant, je crois personnellement qu'un problème de communication s'est produit entre la Gendarmerie royale du Canada et les agents de la Chambre des communes. C'est ce qui a fait en sorte qu'on a laissé les autobus attendre plusieurs minutes avant d'ouvrir les barrières. Je vais lire avec attention les recommandations que vous allez formuler pour avoir l'assurance qu'à l'avenir, d'autres députés n'auront pas à vivre ce que Mme Raitt et moi avons vécu, ce jour du 22 mars dernier. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci à vous deux d'être ici et je vous souhaite bonne chance, le 27 mai, lorsque nous choisirons le prochain chef conservateur et le prochain premier ministre du Canada.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci d'avoir pris le temps de venir étant donné que vous êtes tous les deux très occupés. J'espère que nous vous avons aidés à inclure cette réunion dans votre emploi du temps, car il est déjà difficile de participer à la course à l'investiture.

Je commencerais par dire que je suis d'accord. Nous devons examiner certaines questions de sécurité qui figurent dans la vidéo, et je reconnais que nous devrons peut-être le faire à huis clos.

Une chose me préoccupe au sujet de cette affaire. Le premier poste auquel j'ai été élu, à l'âge de 22 ans, était celui de président du comité de la santé et de la sécurité dans mon lieu de travail. J'ai pris très tôt conscience du fait que nos capacités physiques sont seulement temporaires, pour ceux d'entre nous qui sont valides, et que finalement, nous finissons tous par les perdre, même si c'est seulement quand nous tirons notre révérence. Quand j'entends dire que cela ne posait pas de problème étant donné qu'ils pouvaient descendre du bus et marcher, je dirais que tout le monde ne peut pas marcher.

Je viens de vivre cinq ou six semaines d'enfer à cause d'une sciatique. La douleur s'est enfin calmée. Quiconque a déjà eu une sciatique sait combien c'est douloureux et handicapant. J'ai l'habitude d'être en bonne santé physique, j'ai eu beaucoup de chance dans ma vie, mais j'ai dû apporter quelques changements dans mes habitudes de travail, avec mon personnel, parce que je ne pouvais pas marcher loin. Je me souviens d'une autre occasion, dont on n'a pas fait mention, mais où nous avons également été arrêtés. Néanmoins, personne n'a décidé d'en parler, parce que c'était seulement pendant quelques instants, mais nous avons dû tous marcher à travers la pelouse. Notre collègue, Diane Finley, avait une attelle à la jambe et elle a dû traverser la pelouse du Parlement pour aller voter à la Chambre parce que la navette avait dû s'arrêter.

Je ne pense pas que nous ayons suffisamment insisté sur le fait de devoir descendre de la navette et marcher. Des gens ont dû faire le chemin à pied et c'est un problème que nous devons résoudre. Je pense vraiment qu'il n'est pas satisfaisant, pour beaucoup de gens, de s'entendre dire qu'ils n'ont qu'à descendre du bus et marcher. Le problème se pose pour vous vis-à-vis de votre parti et il se pose pour moi parce que les navettes ne sont pas suffisamment fréquentes pour le personnel et les députés, tard le soir, ce qui oblige à marcher et peut être risqué. Je trouve cela tout simplement insensé. Le nouveau gouvernement ne semble pas avoir l'intention de remettre des bus en service et de réembaucher les chauffeurs qui ont été congédiés.

Cela pose un sérieux problème.

Chers collègues, pourriez-vous dire ce que vous en pensez et quelles solutions vous proposez étant donné que descendre de la navette et marcher n'est pas forcément une solution pour tout le monde?

(1235)

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Certainement.

Ce n'était pas la sciatique, mais comme je l'ai mentionné, les chaussures que je portais ce jour-là ne se prêtaient pas à la marche et pour cette raison, je me suis demandé si j'allais pouvoir ou non marcher jusqu'en haut. Ce n'est pas seulement une question de confort; il est difficile de marcher de longues distances sans des chaussures appropriées et pour d'autres raisons de ce genre. Oui, j'avais choisi de porter ces chaussures ce jour-là, mais j'aurais dû pouvoir compter sur le transport en commun et porter les chaussures que j'avais envie de porter ce jour-là. C'est la raison pour laquelle j'ai attendu aussi longtemps. Si j'avais eu des chaussures mieux adaptées, je serais sans doute partie à pied dès que je me suis rendu compte que la navette allait mettre aussi longtemps à monter sur la Colline.

Cela dit, Dave, j'apprécie beaucoup que dans certains cas, quand le vote a lieu bientôt, nous voyons les navettes passer un peu plus fréquemment et j'en félicite la Chambre des communes. Néanmoins, quand les navettes s'arrêtent totalement sans raison vraiment valide, même si c'est à cause des voitures vides du premier ministre ou des voitures vides qui gardaient un autobus de journalistes, je ne pense pas que, dans un cas comme dans l'autre, ce soit des raisons pour empêcher les gens d'accéder à la Colline comme ils en ont l'habitude et sont en droit de le faire, quel que soit le motif de leur présence dans la navette. Il n'est pas nécessaire que ce soit parce que vous souffrez d'une blessure ce jour-là. Cela peut être pour n'importe quelle raison.

M. David Christopherson:

Et le mauvais temps.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Oui, car nous parlons de mes cheveux. Absolument.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Bien dit.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Cela compte aussi.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous ne pouvez pas arriver trempée comme une soupe.

Allez-y.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Je dois reconnaître que c'était un peu frustrant pour nous, car nous attendions et nous pouvions voir les navettes. Nous nous sommes demandé si nous devions attendre un peu plus longtemps ou si une navette allait venir. Comme elles étaient là, nous avons attendu. J'ai demandé ce qui se passait. On ne nous a pas fourni alors de réponse précise. Personne n'a pu nous renseigner. C'était frustrant. Nous avons finalement décidé de marcher.

Nous avons attendu parce que nous pouvions voir la navette et nous pensions qu'elle allait venir. Au bout de deux, trois ou quatre minutes, nous avons décidé d'aller à pied.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

Je remercie nos invités. C'est agréable de vous revoir.

Je sais que c'est une période très chargée pour vous, car comme votre système l'exige, de même que le nôtre, pour la course à l'investiture, vous devez faire le tour des 338 circonscriptions. Alors bonne chance. Ce n'est pas facile avec le système de points, car cela exige beaucoup de voyages.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

En effet.

M. Scott Simms:

J'écoute la conversation, et le thème qui en ressort régulièrement est l'incertitude. Ai-je bien compris que lorsque vous avez demandé pourquoi vous étiez bloqués là alors que vous deviez vraiment vous rendre à la Chambre, votre question légitime a été prise à la légère? On vous a répondu que c'était simplement à cause des voitures du premier ministre. Est-ce l'impression que vous avez eue? Est-ce cette incertitude qui vous a mis mal à l'aise?

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Oui. Les agents ne savaient pas ce qu'il se passait.

M. Scott Simms:

Très bien. Cela nous ramène à la situation actuelle où nous avons la GRC à l'extérieur, le SPP, un service relativement nouveau, à l'intérieur et la communication entre les uns et les autres. Comme l'a souligné ma collègue, quand je viens à la Chambre, je veux savoir combien de temps il me reste et la personne la plus fiable, selon moi, est celle qui conduit la navette, parce qu'elle communique par radio.

(1240)

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Oui.

M. Scott Simms:

J'ai l'impression que notre service de sécurité n'a pas le même privilège ou du moins qu'il n'est pas informé de ce qui se passe, ce qui pose un gros problème, selon moi, car je pense qu'il devrait l'être. D'autre part, la situation actuelle met le système à rude épreuve. Nous avons un nouveau système et toute cette nouveauté s'accompagne de tensions. C'est une situation sans précédent. Nous avons maintenant quelqu'un de la GRC qui dirige un service à la Chambre. Cela n'a jamais été le cas jusqu'à il y a deux ans. Nous voyons un grand nombre de nouveaux visages; un grand nombre de nouveaux agents de la GRC et de nouveaux agents du SPP. Cela fait beaucoup de personnes nouvelles et elles ont l'air assez stressées. Je crois que le manque de communication et l'incertitude vont probablement s'aggraver à moins que nous n'améliorions la façon dont nous communiquons.

À propos du témoignage que vous avez entendu plus tôt — je sais qu'il est nommé à titre suppléant, mais il doit bien sûr donner les meilleurs conseils possible au nouveau directeur — que lui suggéreriez-vous?

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Au sujet de l'incertitude, après avoir vécu ce que nous avons vécu en 2014, on commence par se demander: se passe-t-il quelque chose de grave sur la Colline? Ont-ils arrêté les navettes pour une raison autre que la présence d'un convoi officiel, autrement dit, se passe-t-il en haut quelque chose que nous ignorons et qui leur a fait sécuriser la Colline? C'est une inquiétude légitime étant donné ce qui s'est passé. Nous étions dans cette salle quand cet homme s'est approché. C'est la première pensée qui m'est venue à l'esprit: a-t-on barricadé la Colline? Se passe-t-il quelque chose de grave? Max est allé voir ce qu'il en était et a donc dissipé mes craintes.

Je ferais la suggestion suivante. Oui, vous avez pour rôle de protéger la Colline parlementaire et elle a des limites géographiques. Néanmoins, le Parlement a des fonctions très particulières dont vous devriez tenir compte et dont certaines doivent primer sur les décisions que vous prenez normalement au nom de la sécurité.

M. Scott Simms:

Pensez-vous qu'ils en sont conscients?

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Les agents n'avaient aucune idée qu'un vote avait lieu ni de son importance. Ils savent peut-être qu'il y a un vote, mais sans comprendre ce que cela veut dire. Comme je l'ai dit à Filomena, il serait souhaitable de mieux leur faire comprendre ce que cela signifie. Le travail que fait votre comité va largement faire en sorte que les gens en soient informés et comprennent que c'est important.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Oui, je suis d'accord, il faudrait sensibiliser un peu mieux le personnel. Je pense qu'il n'a pas compris combien il était important pour nous d'être présents au Parlement à ce moment-là et ce serait donc la chose à faire.

M. Scott Simms:

C'est ce que vous recommandez dans cette situation particulière qui semble susciter des incertitudes. Néanmoins, les circonstances évoluent aussi. M. Christopherson a mentionné plus tôt que lorsque nous sommes arrivés ici pour la première fois, en 2004, les navettes suivaient un itinéraire différent lorsqu'il y avait un vote. J'étais à l'édifice de la Confédération et vous aussi, je crois, et les navettes remontaient simplement par le côté ouest. Il est certain que maintenant, il y a beaucoup de travaux dans le chemin. Un deuxième facteur est que maintenant, nos navettes roulent en pleine circulation. Elles ne le faisaient jamais à l'époque. Maintenant, elles circulent dans la rue Wellington. Nous nous arrêtons devant l'édifice Wellington. Je ne pense pas que nous le faisions à l'époque. Que faire dans ce cas? À mon avis, cela pose un sérieux problème et contribue à l'incertitude.

Je pense qu'il faudrait se pencher sur les communications, le rôle du SPP et la façon dont cela se rapporte à nos privilèges, la question pour laquelle vous êtes ici. Les dirigeants actuels semblent être tellement inexpérimentés qu'il faudrait peut-être changer certaines de ces choses. C'est simplement mon avis personnel.

Quoi qu'il en soit, merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Je ne vois pas pourquoi nous n'aurions pas pu faire retentir la sonnerie ou faire clignoter les lumières au poste de contrôle des véhicules afin que tout le monde sache là-bas qu'un vote était pour bientôt.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est amusant que vous disiez cela, monsieur le président, car je pensais la même chose et c'est d'ailleurs ce qui m'a inspiré mes deux premières questions. Comme je serai sans doute le dernier conservateur d'après le greffier, je vais d'abord vous signaler que je vais partager mon temps avec M. Schmale.

Si j'ai bien compris, si vous aviez su combien de temps il vous restait, vous auriez peut-être décidé plus tôt de monter à pied et je vais donc poser la question suivante à chacun de vous. Si une fois là où vous étiez, vous aviez aussitôt décidé de partir à pied, seriez-vous arrivés à temps?

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Oui, absolument.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Oui, certainement.

M. Scott Reid:

Par conséquent, le fait de ne pas savoir combien de temps il restait avant le vote ni avec quelle rapidité les navettes pourraient monter sont les deux facteurs qui ont incité les députés à rester là parce qu'ils pensaient que les navettes seraient plus rapides. À chaque moment, si les navettes s'étaient comportées de la façon voulue, vous seriez arrivés à temps.

(1245)

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

C'était un peu comme dans un cauchemar où l'on essaie de se rendre à temps pour un examen sans pouvoir y arriver. Tout le monde a déjà fait ce cauchemar. C'est un peu la même impression.

Ma deuxième question porte sur la GRC. Le directeur nous a donné une très longue réponse. Quand je lui ai demandé si la décision avait été prise sur place — au poste de contrôle des véhicules — ou au poste de commande, il a fini par dire que c'était au poste de commande. Votre témoignage semble le confirmer, car les agents sur place n'avaient aucune idée des raisons pour lesquelles ils faisaient ce qu'ils faisaient. Ils attendaient probablement un ordre.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Oui, absolument.

M. Scott Reid:

Puis-je poser une dernière question? Nous n'avons pas eu l'occasion de la lui poser, mais il va revenir et nous pourrons alors le faire.

Je me suis demandé pourquoi on vous a arrêtés alors que la navette était déjà en route? Craignait-on que tous les journalistes débarquent et encombrent l'entrée? Cela pourrait-il être la raison? Je ne devrais peut-être pas vous poser cette question.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Vous savez, je n'ai jamais réussi à comprendre ce qui empêchait de laisser la navette monter la Colline et les députés ou les navettes d'aller jusqu'en haut. Cela me semble tout à fait insensé, Scott. Telle était la raison donnée et ce n'était vraiment pas clair.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien. Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Schmale.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aurais une ou deux observations à faire après avoir écouté vos deux témoignages et celui du service de sécurité. Premièrement, cet incident a eu lieu, quelle qu'en soit la raison. Le fait est qu'il s'est produit et qu'il n'aurait pas dû se produire. Peu importe que ce soit à cause de l'autobus des médias ou des voitures vides du premier ministre. Le fait est que c'est arrivé et que cela n'aurait pas dû se produire.

Vous avez pu marcher jusqu'en haut. Si l'on fait abstraction de vos chaussures inconfortables, vous avez pu le faire. Si vous n'aviez pas pu marcher, la situation aurait été différente. C'est une chose que nous devons examiner, car dans le cas de certaines personnes, le problème aurait été encore plus grave.

Il y a d'autres éléments. Le fait que la circulation des navettes a été arrêtée à cause d'un bus des médias me préoccupe. Non pas que je n'aime pas les médias, mais le fait qu'on ait empêché les navettes et les députés de monter la Colline soulève des questions, car cela me paraît plutôt extrême. J'aimerais beaucoup voir la vidéo si nous en avons l'occasion. Il semble extrême qu'on empêche les députés de monter, juste à cause du bus des médias. Encore une fois, ce n'est pas parce que les médias… J'ai des amis dans les médias. Cela soulève des questions.

D'autre part, il y a le rapport du Président. Je ne l'ai pas sous les yeux et je ne vais donc pas le citer directement. Il a dit, je crois, que trois navettes ont été arrêtées et retenues et que d'autres députés étaient présents dans le bus. Juste par curiosité, en avez-vous vu? Personne d'autre ne s'est plaint.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Non.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Nous avons pu voir les navettes, mais j'ignore qui était à l'intérieur.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Vous avez mentionné, monsieur Bernier, que les agents de sécurité s'étaient servis de leurs walkie-talkies et de leurs téléphones pour essayer de savoir ce qu'il se passait. Nous avons vu, lors de notre examen du SPP, au comité, que les services de sécurité ont tous des systèmes de communication différents. Ils ont trois systèmes de communication différents et cela pourrait être un sérieux problème que nous devons examiner. Comme vous l'avez dit, personne ne semblait vraiment savoir ce qui se passait. Les agents de sécurité semblaient seulement savoir qu'ils devaient arrêter la circulation, arrêter les navettes. Personne ne pouvait passer, mais ils ne savaient pas vraiment pourquoi.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Oui.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Ils essayaient tous de s'informer, sur des fréquences différentes…

Je suis d'accord avec ce qui a été dit au sujet des chauffeurs des navettes. J'ai déjà remarqué que les chauffeurs savent quand un vote va avoir lieu. Mon bureau se trouve dans l'édifice de la Confédération. Je sors par la porte arrière. Un jour, le chauffeur de la navette est venu me chercher devant cette porte, il a regardé à sa gauche et a vu des députés qui sortaient de l'édifice de la Justice. Il a regardé autour et constaté qu'il n'y avait pas d'autres navettes. Il est donc retourné chercher les gens à l'édifice de la Justice. Nous avons fait un virage en U et nous sommes arrivés jusqu'ici. J'ai trouvé que ce chauffeur avait fait preuve de beaucoup d'initiative en décidant de retourner chercher ces députés parce qu'un vote devait avoir lieu.

Je crois que nous pouvons en tirer une leçon. Les chauffeurs savent probablement ce qui se passe. Nous devrons faire en sorte que le service de sécurité en soit également informé afin que tout le monde sache qu'il y a un vote. Les agents de l'édifice du Centre le savent parce qu'ils nous disent que le vote a lieu dans 10 minutes et que nous avons beaucoup de temps devant nous, par exemple. Je crois qu'il faut agir sur ce plan-là.

(1250)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Schmale.

Madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci.

Je suis d'accord avec M. Schmale. Les chauffeurs des navettes ont un excellent système de communication qui leur permet de savoir combien il reste de minutes avant un vote. J'ai déjà été dans la même situation. Ils peuvent vous renseigner pendant que vous êtes dans la navette, car vous êtes alors très inquiet et tenez à arriver à temps pour un vote important. Je sympathise avec votre situation.

Néanmoins, je sais aussi qu'il incombe aux députés de prévoir un délai suffisant. Je voudrais savoir de combien de temps vous pensez qu'un député doit disposer entre le moment où il arrive en bas de la colline ou quitte son bureau et celui où il entre à la Chambre des communes. C'est une question que je me pose parfois. Combien de temps devrais-je prévoir? Quinze minutes suffisent-elles? Ai-je besoin de 20 minutes ou puis-je le faire en cinq minutes?

Combien de temps prévoyez-vous habituellement?

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Je siège ici depuis 2008 et je n'ai jamais raté un vote pour une question de temps. Je prévois un délai suffisant en fonction du lieu où je me trouve et de mon environnement. Cela dépend de l'endroit où vous vous trouvez dans la cité parlementaire. Lorsque j'avais mon bureau de l'autre côté, à Gatineau, je savais de combien de temps j'avais besoin pour arriver ici et c'est la même chose depuis que je suis dans l'édifice de la Justice. Je sais de combien de temps j'ai besoin.

Je voudrais signaler aux membres du comité une chose dont nous n'avons pas vraiment parlé, mais que j'ai mentionnée au cours de mon témoignage — je ne sais pas si vous en avez discuté ou non avec les responsables — mais l'autobus n'est pas passé par la sécurité. Il n'est pas du tout passé par le poste de contrôle. C'est peut-être la raison pour laquelle l'accès à la Colline a été fermé et qu'on a laissé personne d'autre monter. C'est peut-être parce que l'autobus n'a pas été contrôlé. Personne ne l'a inspecté. Personne n'a vérifié l'identité de ses passagers. Voilà pourquoi des voitures de sécurité accompagnaient l'autobus pour lui faire monter la Colline.

Si tel est le cas, vous devriez en parler au service de sécurité, car les journalistes qui assistent à l'annonce du budget sur la Colline ne devraient pas avoir priorité sur les députés qui se rendent à la Chambre pour la présentation du budget. Si les services de sécurité trouvent trop difficile d'identifier toutes les personnes présentes dans l'autobus ou de passer le petit miroir sous ce véhicule, c'est à eux de voir, mais je pense qu'ils ont fait passer leurs intérêts avant les privilèges des députés.

C'est la principale chose que je tenais à dire aujourd'hui.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Quand je suis dans mon bureau, dans l'édifice de la Confédération, 12 minutes me suffisent pour pouvoir aller voter à la Chambre. J'ai fait la même chose à ce moment-là.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous étiez en retard de combien de minutes pour le vote?

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Pas beaucoup. Il avait commencé quand nous sommes arrivés.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier: Oui.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt: Nous voulions entrer, mais il avait déjà commencé.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Oui, depuis quatre minutes environ…

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Oui.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous n'avez donc pas pu voter pour cette raison?

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

En effet. Nous n'avons pas pu entrer. Nous n'avons pas voté.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Oui. Nous n'avons pas voté.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Nous avons voté sur le budget, mais pas sur… Nous avons manqué ce vote.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'ignore à quel contrôle de sécurité l'autobus de la presse a été soumis, parce que jusqu'à tout récemment, nous pensions qu'il s'agissait des voitures du premier ministre et je n'étais donc pas au courant. Cela aidera le Comité à examiner les mesures à prendre.

La sonnerie est une excellente idée. J'aimerais savoir si vous avez d'autres conseils à donner au Comité quant aux mesures à prendre pour éviter ce genre de situation. Je sais que nous n'avons pas accès aux navettes en tout temps, à tout moment de la journée. Nous avons tous été souvent dans l'obligation de monter la Colline à pied pour aller voter parce que la navette était en route quelque part ailleurs et que nous risquions de ne pas arriver à temps. Nous devons prévoir le temps nécessaire pour faire le trajet.

Auriez-vous d'autres recommandations à faire au Comité quant à ce qui pourrait être fait d'un côté ou de l'autre?

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Il serait souhaitable que les agents du poste de contrôle sachent qu'il y a un vote. Comme vous venez de le dire, les chauffeurs des navettes le savent et il faudrait donc qu'ils sachent aussi quand un vote doit avoir lieu. Cela serait utile.

Néanmoins, il faudrait améliorer la communication entre la GRC et les agents de la Chambre.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

L'accès des députés à la Colline aurait dû primer sur les mesures ou les plans de sécurité mis en place pour ce qui se passait ce jour-là. Je ne pense pas que ce serait arrivé un jour normal. Je crois que c'est arrivé parce que c'était le jour de la présentation du budget et que nous avions des étrangers sur la Colline.

(1255)

Le président:

Merci.

Il nous reste du temps pour M. Schmale, si vous le désirez.

Je voudrais ensuite parler de ce que nous ferons à la prochaine séance.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je crois que M. Nater a une question.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

J'ai seulement une question et c'est surtout pour savoir ce que vous en pensez.

Ce débat sur la question de privilège a pris un tour très particulier. Il est inscrit à mon nom plutôt qu'à vos noms à vous, comme il aurait dû l'être. Le privilège est un concept ancien. Il remonte à 1689, à la Déclaration des droits anglaise et notre Acte de l'Amérique du Nord britannique, la Loi constitutionnelle de 1867 le protège à l'article 18.

Si vous examinez les journaux datant du jour du discours du Trône, le Président y fait une élégante déclaration dans laquelle il réaffirme les privilèges du Parlement, vis-à-vis de la Couronne, du gouverneur général, et c'est donc un concept important.

Il y a eu un incident malheureux où vous avez été tous les deux privés de l'exercice de votre droit de vote à cause de ces problèmes. Ensuite, la question n'a jamais été résolue à la Chambre des communes. Il n'a pas été possible de voter sur votre question de privilège initiale à cause d'un vote pour passer à l'ordre du jour, un fait sans précédent dans l'histoire du Canada, ce qui nous oblige à réexaminer la question par d'autres voies.

Je voudrais savoir ce que vous en pensez, quels sont vos sentiments à cet égard. Vos privilèges ont été violés et ils ont été ensuite presque violés de nouveau parce que nous n'avons pas pu voter sur cette importante question de privilège.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Lorsque vous soulevez la question de privilège, c'est en partie parce que vous êtes touché personnellement; par conséquent, vous estimez nécessaire de soumettre le cas à la Chambre des communes. En deuxième lieu, vous ne voulez pas que cela se reproduise. Vous protestez en tant que député pour faire en sorte que l'on remédie à ce qui a porté atteinte à vos privilèges, afin que vous puissiez passer à autre chose.

Je vous suis reconnaissante, monsieur Nater, d'avoir fait en sorte que nous puissions tenir cette discussion aujourd'hui. Je pense que cela aura un très bon résultat, ne serait-ce que si ceux qui travaillent pour nous et nous protègent au poste de contrôle sont avertis du temps restant pour le vote. Ils comprendront mieux ainsi que le Parlement n'est pas seulement un lieu ou des gens à protéger, mais aussi un processus et une institution à protéger.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Vous avez raison de dire qu'il est regrettable que nous n'ayons pas pu tenir ce débat à la Chambre. Néanmoins, nous le tenons ici et c'est donc très important. J'ai hâte de voir vos recommandations.

Le plus important est que j'ai été privé de mon privilège de député. Nous devons savoir ce qui s'est passé et je ne voudrais pas que cela arrive à l'avenir à un autre député.

Le président:

Quelqu'un a-t-il d'autres brèves questions à poser avant que nous arrêtions?

Merci beaucoup. Je pense que cela nous a fourni les précisions dont nous avons besoin pour formuler de bonnes recommandations. Nous apprécions que vous ayez pris le temps de venir en pleine course à l'investiture. Bonne chance à vous deux.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Merci beaucoup.

On ne nous a pas fait un traitement de faveur. Il n'y en a pas eu.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président:

Je veux être sûr de ce que nous ferons à notre prochaine séance. Il semble que nous pourrons avoir le budget des dépenses dans une semaine. Mardi prochain, le Président et le directeur général des élections pourront venir et jeudi nous allons donc procéder comme prévu.

Nous voudrions obtenir les rapports. Le Président de la Chambre a dit que nous pourrions les avoir et nous les verrons donc. J'espère que nous pourrons obtenir les vidéos, comme Blake l'a demandé au SPP. Je suppose que nous voulons faire revenir le SPP jeudi.

Peut-être qu'avec tout cela, nous pourrions donner un peu…

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Allons-nous alors siéger trois heures jeudi?

Le président:

Est-ce que ce serait possible? Nous pourrions peut-être donner ensuite nos instructions pour un rapport si nous siégeons de nouveau de 10 heures à 13 heures.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pouvons-nous siéger de 11 heures à 14 heures?

M. David Christopherson:

Je remplace quelqu'un d'autre.

M. Blake Richards:

Si nous finissons à 13 heures, c'est parce que de nombreux députés doivent se préparer pour la période des questions et le reste et c'est donc une mauvaise idée.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Donc, de 10 heures à 13 heures?

M. David Christopherson:

Ce n'est pas possible pour moi. Je remplace quelqu'un à un autre comité.

M. Blake Richards:

Monsieur le président, il est très probable, je pense, que nous pourrions aussi avoir d'autres témoins et je ne pense donc pas que nous allons pouvoir préparer notre rapport.

Je pense que deux heures pourraient suffire pour ce que vous avez décrit, de toute façon. Pourquoi ne pas s'en contenter? Si nous devons ensuite tenir une autre réunion, nous en tiendrons une.

(1300)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Nous pourrions progresser davantage jeudi au cours de cette heure.

Qui sait? La plupart des gens à qui nous voulons parler sont sur la Colline, de toute façon, et il leur est donc beaucoup plus facile de venir ici sans préavis.

M. Blake Richards:

Mais nous ignorons qui seront les autres témoins. Voilà le problème. Nous ne pourrons pas vraiment les faire venir jeudi. Cela exigera sans doute une autre réunion, n'est-ce pas?

M. David Christopherson:

Les choses se sont bien déroulées aujourd'hui dans le temps disponible, alors essayons de nous limiter à deux heures.

Nous aurons sans doute besoin d'au moins une séance de plus après cela, de toute façon.

Le président:

Voulons-nous faire comparaître le SPP pendant la totalité des deux heures?

M. Blake Richards:

Oui, cela semble raisonnable.

Même si nous consacrons une partie du temps disponible à regarder la vidéo ou examiner un rapport, les témoins du SPP seront là pour nous répondre si la vidéo ou le rapport suscitent des questions. Cela me paraît raisonnable.

Le président:

Comme nous allons examiner la vidéo et le rapport, nous pourrions peut-être commencer à huis clos, comme nous en avons convenu plus tôt aujourd'hui, pour des raisons de sécurité.

M. David Christopherson:

Du moment que nous nous assurons de la sécurité, c'est bien.

Allons-nous regarder la vidéo à ce moment-là également?

Le président: J'espère que oui.

M. David Christopherson: Certainement, cela semble logique.

Le président:

Nous allons commencer par la vidéo et les rapports…

M. David Christopherson:

Ensuite, si c'est possible, nous devrons nous réunir en public.

M. Blake Richards:

La seule précision que j'apporterais est à peu près du même ordre.

Si c'est nécessaire pour regarder la vidéo et examiner un rapport, très bien, mais nous devons nous engager à ce que rien d'autre ne se passe à huis clos. Ce sera seulement si c'est absolument nécessaire.

Le président:

Tout le monde est d'accord?

Des voix: Oui.

Le président: Très bien, la séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on May 09, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.