header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-12-13 PROC 46

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1205)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

I call this meeting to order.

Good morning, and welcome to the 46th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. This meeting is being held in public and it's televised.

Pursuant to the order adopted by the committee on November 29, we have with us today the Minister of Democratic Institutions, the Honourable Maryam Monsef, to discuss the provisions contained in Bill C-33, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act and to make consequential amendments to other acts.

The minister is accompanied by Natasha Kim, director, democratic reform, Privy Council Office; and Robert Sampson, senior policy adviser, counsel, democratic reform, Privy Council Office.

Before giving the floor to the minister, I want to make a couple of points.

I'm sure you all received the document sent to you by the Library of Parliament researcher comparing the recommendations in the Chief Electoral Officer's report and the items in Bill C-33.

Although Bill C-33 has not been referred to our committee by the House, the committee has invited the minister to discuss the content of the bill, pursuant to its permanent mandate under Standing Order 108(3)(a). Members will note similarities between some of the provisions of the bill and the recommendations contained in the Chief Electoral Officer's report, which the committee has been studying. Much of that study has been carried out in camera so members should exercise caution if they refer to the committee's deliberations.

The Chief Electoral Officer's report and all the recommendations are public. You could talk about them and talk about Bill C-33, which is public, but not what we discussed about the Chief Electoral Officer's recommendations.

Minister, welcome. Thank you for coming. The floor is yours.

Hon. Maryam Monsef (Minister of Democratic Institutions):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair, and thank you, colleagues, for your invitation to be here with you today.

The last time I was here we talked about the Senate appointment process and the government's mandate and commitments on ways we can improve our democracy and our democratic institutions.

I'm very much grateful for the opportunity to be here with you today for a number of reasons. You've had more than 40 meetings; it has been about a year since this Parliament began sitting, and you and I very much walk the same path. We have the same challenges and we have the same goals of protecting what's working and what we are so fortunate to have and improving it further.

As always, your input and perspective are greatly appreciated. As my parliamentary secretary Mark Holland and I have travelled the country and studied the work we're doing, time and time again the testimony that has come before this committee comes up, around a family-friendly Parliament, for example. The work this committee has done and the conversations you've had come up again and again. As you know, my work on this file is shaped mostly by a desire to make this place more inclusive, to make the voting process more accessible. I know that together we share these objectives. We have a lot of work to do, and we've begun some of that work.

I also know that you have been reviewing the recommendations our Chief Electoral Officer made based on the results of the last election. I'm really looking forward to the results of that study. I'm looking forward to the possibility of hearing more about that work today. As I've said, we're very proud of the phase one reforms that we've introduced through Bill C-33. We believe it's a strong bill, but I'm also mindful of the fact that the bill could be further strengthened, and if your committee and the work you've done could contribute to that, I think we would serve Canada well.

Now, before I move on I think it's really important, given that it's the middle of December, Mr. Chair, that I take this opportunity to express how much I value—and I think we all share this—the work we've been able to do with our Chief Electoral Officer. He has served this country and Canadians for a decade, and his professionalism and dedication to this country and to the health and integrity of our democracy, I believe, are a model for public service. I'm sure we all wish him well in his retirement, which is imminent.

As you know, Bill C-33 proposes amendments to the Canada Elections Act. We introduced it in the House recently, and it's important to talk a little about the current Canadian context for Bill C-33.

You've been involved in this conversation, colleagues, as has the electoral reform committee. What Mark Holland and I have heard across the country is that, while it's important to enhance the way we vote, it's also really important to make it easier for people to get to the polling station, to prove their identity, to have the right information, and to remove unnecessary barriers that exist. This is in line with what we've heard across the country.

As we work towards electoral reform, while it's clear there are sometimes contradictory perspectives on process and many different perspectives, I think something we can all agree on is that our democracy is connected very much to who we are as individuals and to our sense of identity as Canadians. Canadian democracy continues to be a model for the world.

That's why I think it's really important that any improvements we make be in the best interests of all Canadians, and that's what Bill C-33 is all about. The changes we're proposing in Bill C-33 are about empowering Canadians with the knowledge they need and encouraging greater engagement in our democracy.

(1210)



Bill C-33 is about helping more Canadians learn about the value of voting. It's about empowering more Canadians who qualify in casting a ballot. It's about breaking down barriers that don't need to be there, that currently prevent too many Canadians from voting. While it's true that the democracy and culture we have here in Canada are the envy of the world, and they work, we can't be complacent. The pressing challenge for us ahead I believe is to make sure that our democracy works for all Canadians without exception.

We want to make it easier for Canadians to vote, because when that happens, democracy is better. This is a goal that I believe we can all agree on. It can only be accomplished if we all work together. You may recall the conversation I had with the good folks at the press gallery after introducing Bill C-33, when I mentioned how important it is for me for this bill to have benefited from the expertise and contributions of all parliamentarians. I want to reinforce that here today. I am counting on your deep expertise and knowledge of electoral reform to achieve that.

To paint the picture of this suite of reforms that I have been mandated to ask for, I'm going to set aside Bill C-33 for just a moment, just to let you know what we've done in the past year and what's ahead of us. I have a feeling I'll be coming back to this committee again and again, and I think it's helpful for you to know what initiatives are likely to come before you for deliberation.

As you know, the Prime Minister set a rather ambitious agenda for democratic reform. While it brings many complex challenges, we are making progress on this agenda.

A non-partisan, merit-based appointment process for the Prime Minister to be advised on Senate appointments so that accomplished Canadians from all walks of life from across the country would be considered for the Senate has been established.

A parliamentary committee has studied electoral reform. The committee's report was received on December 1. The government will be responding in detail to that report in the new year.

The matter that brings me here today is an item that is in my mandate letter. As you know, the Fair Elections Act has unfair aspects which were controversial in nature but also unhelpful in engaging Canadians and allowing them to participate in their democracy in their ability to vote. These are things I have been asked to address through repealing those elements of the Fair Elections Act. These again are things that make it harder for Canadians to vote and easier for lawbreakers to evade punishment.

With Bill C-33, the government has introduced some amendments to advance these commitments. The focus was on making changes to those areas that we heard most loudly on from Canadians. We've heard from the debates that took place in the House and in committees like this one, during the last election, and from people, frankly, who I've met across the country in talking about electoral reform, that changes need to be made. There was no good reason why some of those changes were introduced in the first place.

There are other changes that have been suggested and the government will be looking to introduce further legislation going forward. I look forward to the input and advice of this committee to make sure that we're putting the best possible legislation forward to benefit all Canadians.

What is Bill C-33 about? It responds to the concerns that I've just shared with seven important reforms.

The first two reforms focus on making it easier for eligible Canadians to vote. Ultimately, it would increase voter participation through reinstating the voter information card and the vouching process.

The third reform is about engaging Canadians through education about Canada's electoral process.

(1215)



The fourth, and this is something that I've heard across the country, is about engaging youth further by providing an opportunity for Elections Canada to pre-register youth ages 14 to 17, so that they can be invited to be part of the democratic institutions at an earlier age.

The fifth reform is about building more integrity into our voting system by giving Elections Canada the resources it needs to clean up the data in the national list of electors.

Our sixth reform would make the administrative adjustments necessary to formally return the commissioner of Canada elections to Elections Canada.

Finally, our seventh reform would make it easier for Canadians working and living abroad by expanding the right to vote to over a million Canadians, even if they've been away from home for more than five years.

Again, I want to be clear. I believe these are strong reforms that we've introduced. There's more work to be done and we'll be introducing further legislation, but Bill C-33 is the first of a series of reforms that will come before you for consideration.

Another area that is a priority for Mark and me is to focus on ways to improve access to the democratic process for Canadians who are often on the margins of our society. I'm talking about homeless people, young people, seniors, indigenous Canadians, new Canadians, those with physical disabilities, those with various abilities and exceptionalities, and of course, those who come from lower socio-economic backgrounds.

Bill C-33 aims to address some of those challenges for these groups by making voting easier for groups that traditionally and consistently experience difficulty proving their identity. There is also a great deal invested in enhancing youth participation through a future list of electors being generated, but as always, there's more work to be done.

Something that we can look forward to in the future is a commitment to bring forward options to create an independent commissioner to organize political party debates. The options that we present need to be informed by the input of Canadians, political parties, broadcasters, journalists, and others as we work towards this goal. We've learned that knowledge is key to democratic participation, and leaders' debates are an important piece of the puzzle when it comes to educating Canadians. I know that the Chief Electoral Officer's recommendations are before you. You'll be working together to enhance the accessibility of our elections. I very much look forward to hearing your recommendations on the Chief Electoral Officer's advice.

I want to thank you, again, for the opportunity to be here, Mr. Chair. I'm very happy to answer any questions that colleagues may have.

(1220)

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

We'll go to Mr. Graham for the first round of seven minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Minister, for being here.

I find Bill C-33 is a very important bill. As staff to the Liberal critic for democratic reform in the last Parliament, I was very heavily involved in fighting the unfair elections act. That said, you are aware that we were studying the election office's report and from the announced report there are five overlapping sections of the bill with our study.

I don't want to get too much into that, but I wanted to make sure you're aware of that part, which you've addressed, and I thank you for that. There are 132 recommendations in that report, of which there are 127 left. You just said there are going to be more bills coming. I'd like to get a sense from you of what the priorities are for us to study so we don't have the situation again where the bill comes before our study is complete.

I'd really like to make sure that we have the opportunity to study it in advance. I'd like to know, of those 127 remaining recommendations that didn't get addressed in Bill C-33, where your priorities lie for us to get through.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Mr. Chair, I thank my colleague for his very thoughtful question.

While I'm not privy to the conversations you folks have through your in camera deliberations, I understand that reviewing and making recommendations on the Chief Electoral Officer's report is very much within your mandate. It's something I'm counting on. These changes we put forward in Bill C-33 I believe are straightforward. I'm not sure where you are in your review of them, but you're right that there's quite a bit more work to be done. I understand that you will be providing a report to the House in the new year. We're eagerly awaiting your recommendations.

On this particular bill, too, there were areas where we could have gone further, but the decision we considered to be the most thoughtful one was to just wait. An example is expanding the right to vote to Canadians living and working abroad for more than five years. We've expanded the right to those Canadians who have at one time lived here in Canada, but something that we're counting on this committee to study further and provide its recommendations on is the status of the children of those Canadians living abroad who are still Canadians but who have never lived in Canada. Do we expand the right to vote to them?

Ultimately, I believe my main goal with my mandate letter, the reason we all work very hard every day, is that we want to see more Canadians participating in their democratic process, whether as engaged and informed voters or as active participants and candidates. That is an area of key priority for me: accessibility and inclusion. That is something I think we can do in the months, if not years, ahead. That's something we can improve upon. These are some of my priorities that I think are important for you to know, but I'm also happy to have conversations with colleagues around this table about what you would collectively like to see moving forward.

I know that what you do in this committee, one of the things that's quite impressive, is you're able to work collegially. You're able to put partisan interests aside. You see the big picture and you move forward based on what's in the best interests of all Canadians. That's the spirit that I think we need to work towards to improve democratic participation. If there are areas you believe need to be at the heart of our focus, then talk to me.

(1225)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The last three sections of Bill C-33 deal with the Frank decision and repositioning the elections commissioner. None of those topics were addressed in the election officer's report. What I'd like to know from you is, what approach you think we should take to reconcile our recommendations, which we cannot disclose at this time, with the bill that is already out. You're open to amendments, but they could become quite significant, so I want to get your take on that.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Okay. Not having seen the report—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We can't obviously as we're not in camera.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

I understand. I believe the work that you've done, whatever areas of the recommendations they've been on, will be really important for everyone. The bill's going to come before you and we are open, as I mentioned from the very beginning, to thoughtful amendments, to further strengthen this bill. That's what the democratic process is all about. That's why committees are tasked with doing the important work they do, so that together we can make sure we put the best legislation forward for Canadians.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you for taking the time to have this conversation with us. I think it's a very important one to have.

I have a few minutes left, and I'd like to give them to Ms. Petitpas Taylor.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Thank you.

Once again, thank you so much, Minister, for joining us this morning. I realize you're busy, and we appreciate having you at the committee.

Over the course of the summer, I had an objective that I was going to have one town hall on electoral reform. When I had my first town hall, I realized that many people at that town hall were oftentimes the same people I had at most of my town halls. I took it upon myself, however, to go out and to meet with different groups of people I wanted to meet with, specifically our marginalized population, our youth, and people who are oftentimes not engaged in the political process. Could you please specify how this legislation, Bill C-33, would involve more Canadians in the electoral process, especially among disproportionately under-represented groups?

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Ginette, the first two measures are all about ID requirements. We know that homeless people don't have a fixed address. We know that students, for example, who are first-time voters, who are away from home and studying in a different community, may not always have their most recent address on their ID. We know there are individuals, for example, indigenous persons, who have been counting on vouching as a way of being able to participate. We know there are a lot of older adults. I'm from Peterborough—Kawartha, one of the oldest CMAs in Canada, where there are a lot of retirement residences, a lot of long-term care facilities. There were seniors who showed up with their voter information card during the last election thinking that they could use it as ID, and they were turned away.

The Chair:

We're out of time for this round.

We'll go to Mr. Reid.

(1230)

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Thank you, Minister. Glad to see you here.

I wanted to ask you, have you had a chance to read the letter I sent to you yesterday? Excellent. Would you be willing to answer questions today regarding MyDemocracy.ca?

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

I want to thank my colleague for the very thoughtful letter that he sent and for the very important questions that he raised. I'm happy to answer broadly any questions you may have about MyDemocracy.ca, but also, Mr. Reid, I'm happy to come back to this committee and have an in-depth conversation about electoral reform, as you folks see fit.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Does that include, Minister, coming back, as the motion I had put forward on Friday suggests, to answer questions regarding MyDemocracy.ca and the government's planned agenda for electoral reform?

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Yes, if you believe that's a good use of your time, and if you think that is a good idea, I can make sure that I have the right time frame set aside, but also we'll make sure that we have officials in the room who can provide any technical explanations or descriptions as you see fit.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's fantastic.

I do want to move to Bill C-33. In order to facilitate that, now that we know you'd be willing to come back, Mr. Chair, I move: That the Committee invite the Minister of Democratic Institutions to appear for not less than two hours to answer questions regarding MyDemocracy.ca and the government’s planned agenda for electoral reform.

I take it, Mr. Chair, because we moved off the topic, that we can conclude that I haven't used up my seven minutes yet. I'm not using up the time for the questions to the minister.

The Chair:

Right.

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

I have a question on the motion. Is it the exact one that you filed? Is it verbatim?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes. If I deviated in any way, regard the written text as the one that is being moved here.

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

I have a comment on the motion. It's written in a way where it says “not less than two hours”. To me, I understand that the intent may be to have the minister here for a full two hours, but the way it reads, you could suggest six hours, eight hours, or whatever. I was just wondering if you'd be open to a friendly amendment to say “for two hours”.

Mr. Scott Reid:

For two hours. Yes, I would be agreeable to that.

The Chair:

Are people ready for the question?

(Motion as amended agreed to)

The Chair: You can carry on with your questions.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair. We were at one minute and 45 seconds when we stopped.

First of all, Minister, thank you for coming here to talk about Bill C-33.

Minister, I've been on this committee for over a decade, through a number of election cycles, starting under the Chrétien government, and every election cycle, the minister, or rather, I correct myself, the Chief Electoral Officer submits a report on recommended changes subsequent to the election and the experiences that he—it's been a he so far, so that's not sexist language—Mr. Kingsley or Mr. Mayrand, thinks ought to be made based on the experience.

Then the procedure and House affairs committee engages in an exhaustive review of that report, makes recommendations based on a riffing off, if you like, of the CEO's recommendations, submits those, and the government responds. It may respond in a way the committee judges to be satisfactory or unsatisfactory, but the fact is that you wait for that process.

You moved ahead without waiting for our report, and although we're not permitted to say what we were discussing, I can tell you that some of what we were discussing in our report was, I thought, of enormous use, and cannot be dealt with in some supplemental piece of legislation because it very much featured some of the key issues that you're dealing with and setting in stone in this piece of legislation.

May I ask why you didn't follow the precedent of all your predecessors in this regard and wait until our report had been submitted? If I may say so...well, let me just stop there and ask that question, Minister.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Mr. Chair, first, I'm thankful to the honourable member for his decade of service on this committee. I used to watch committee proceedings like this on television, and I'm continuously in awe of the work that you do and the collegial way in which you do it. I've been following the work of this committee closely. I know that you've been working on a review of all the recommendations—over 100—that the Chief Electoral Officer made. I can assure you that nothing is set in stone.

As you understand the parliamentary process, introducing the bill is step one. There will be ongoing debate, and your recommendations and the work that you've done can be formulated into thoughtful amendments to the bill. As I've indicated, I'm interested in making sure that the strongest possible legislation moves forward, and that includes input from you as well.

(1235)

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, I will split my time with Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you very much, Minister. It's always good to have my geographical neighbour here at this committee.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

We're neighbours. That's right.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

It's nice to see you again. Given the fact that you're here at this committee to talk about Bill C-33, and the fact, as Mr. Reid was saying, that it kind of jumped ahead of the study we're doing in committee, you also mentioned in your speech that there is further legislation coming. I think Mr. Graham asked the question, but I just want to clarify a little sooner, based on the timeline that we don't come back until the end of January, and you said, I believe, that in the spring you're coming.... That doesn't really give us much time to get the study done, get the information to you or to Parliament, and allow that to be incorporated into your legislation. Given the fact that you're here because you kind of jumped ahead, how are you going to have the correct information in front of you and be able to get in a piece of legislation in time to actually make our work worthwhile?

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Mr. Chair, I want to thank my neighbour for his question. The work that I'm doing is guided by my mandate letter. I think it was the Clerk of the Privy Council who said that, of all the government web pages, the page with our mandate letters is the most frequently visited one. So there's some interesting trivia for you, if that's helpful in any way to guide the work that you do.

Repealing the unfair aspects of the Fair Elections Act is part of my mandate. Putting together a process for appointments to the Senate has been part of my mandate. The establishment of an all-party committee was part of my mandate. Moving forward, creating the office of a debates commissioner is something that is going to require significant deliberation, coordination, consultation, and study. That's something that I'm counting on this committee to help support. Moving forward, areas around the review of the Elections Act itself as it pertains to various ways that our elections are governed is in line with my mandate. I'm looking forward to working with this committee.

The changes that we proposed in Bill C-33 were relatively straightforward.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I don't mean to cut you off. I do only have a limited amount of time, and you did mention a few things.

How do we have a guarantee that this will not happen again with what we are working on?

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

When is your report going to be delivered? Perhaps that's an area that you can provide me with some clarity on, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Our time is up, but if you have any answer to that, go ahead.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I was going to say that was the first part of my question.

The Chair:

I'm happy to respond.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

That was the first part of my question, how this has happened, and we jumped ahead of the process, and the fact that, as I mentioned, we come back at the end of January. You're saying in the spring there's more legislation coming, so how do we have a guarantee here as a committee that you're not going to jump ahead? If that is the case, what is the point in our doing this work, as Mr. Reid pointed out?

The Chair:

Maybe you could wait until later because his time is up.

Mr. Christopherson, you have seven minutes.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Minister, thank you very much for coming. We very much appreciate it.

I have to tell you, you being here is a complete shemozzle. I am so confused. I am further confused as to why you're here talking to us about this bill.

The fact of the matter is there's only so much I can say in terms of our in camera talks, but there are smart people in this room, such as Kady O'Malley, who can look very carefully at the chronology of what has happened to get some idea of why you're in front of this committee. I can assure you that it wasn't to talk about the pleasantries of Bill C-33.

The fact of the matter is you say things such as “eagerly awaiting”, “walk the same path”, “if we all work together”, and “collegial”. The fact is that we started an excellent process of working together on this committee to review the recommendations of the Chief Electoral Officer. We were going along working, and we have dual tracks and lots of stuff. We're doing good work; we thought we were doing good work. We're feeling good about it. That's not to say we've agreed on everything, but in terms of process, we were working as a team trying to come up with rules that everybody thought would be fair. Then, all of a sudden, out of nowhere, thump, and Bill C-33 lands in the middle of the floor of the House of Commons on the very same day that we're about to meet and continue working. We're left, or at least I was left, wondering what the hell? What is going on?

On the one hand, we have a committee that's working together. Your government, Minister, promised that you were going to treat parliamentary committees with the respect they deserve, that you were going to bring back the importance of parliamentary committees, yet all we've seen are insults, especially with this committee as a result of Bill C-33. Then, I won't dwell on it but I have to say, we watched the absolute disgrace of the government's response to the electoral reform committee's tabling of that report, where you were on your feet apologizing.

Again, I'm kind of stuck here because I can't talk about what was said in camera, but I can say—and if somebody wants to hold me for telling tales out of school, fine, but I think I'm walking the line carefully—that Mr. Graham, to his credit, came to me immediately afterwards, when we were seized of the bill being tabled, and said, “How can we fix this? What can we do?” I said my goal was to get us back to work, that after all these decades in public life I didn't need another headline, and that what I wanted to do was some good work.

Then I happened to bump into you, Minister. I won't talk about the full conversation, but I think it's fair to say that we actually bumped into each other twice in the hallway on that day, and you were asking the same as Mr. Graham, “How can we fix this?” My response was the same, that an apology would be a good way to start. I still haven't heard one.

You go on and on about Bill C-33. We didn't call you in here, Minister, to talk about Bill C-33, because it hasn't been referred to us yet.

What I as one member of this committee want to know is how do we continue to do the work that we're doing—which is supposed to show the respect and importance that this government was going to return to committees—when you drop that bill on the floor, looking for all intents and purposes as nothing but a diversion to get you and your government out of trouble for the heat you were taking on the broader file that was going down in flames?

If it's not that, at best it's a lack of respect or consideration for this committee. At worst, it's a total disregard for committee work, which happens to have been reinforced by the comments. I accept that you've apologized; nonetheless, it happened. I happened to walk into the House as you were beginning and I couldn't believe that was the response.

Minister, I am still angry about the process. At least the previous government didn't pretend to want to make the committees important. They at least were clear about their disdain for parliamentary committees and the work they do. Fair enough; that has been dealt with. Those chickens came home to roost, and that's why you, Minister, are sitting where you are sitting, in large part because of that attitude. You can say you're going to do something different, but so far we hear talk, talk, talk, but none of the walk.

So, Minister, I need a couple of things from you, starting with an apology to this committee, as you apologized to the last committee, for the way you have treated the work of this committee. Second, I'd like to get some idea of how you think this parliamentary committee is going to continue to do its work in light of you dropping bills on the floor that cherry-pick issues we're working with.

I'll end on this final point. When you say things such as, “When will your report be ready,” it is a very good question, but that is the kind of question that should be asked at the beginning of the process of our work if your ministry is serious about coordinating it with the work of your government. Right now, there's a disconnect.

(1240)



I need to hear from you, Minister, how you think we are going to respond and get back on track, or are we not going to be able to? Are we just going to continue to have this government pitted against its own parliamentary committees?

The Chair:

Minister, you have about 45 seconds.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Mr. Chair, I want to thank my colleague for his work and clarify that the repealing of the unfair aspects of the Fair Elections Act did not come out of nowhere. They were very much publicly shared through my mandate letter, as given to me by the Prime Minister.

I continue to have a great deal of respect for the work that you do. There are areas within Bill C-33, which I outlined earlier, that I'm counting on you to do further analysis and study on.

Can we do things better? Absolutely. Am I committed to that? I can guarantee that to you, Mr. Christopherson.

I will end on this. In March 2014, I watched you advocate for the very changes that we brought forward in Bill C-33. That's the important work that we're here to do. Mr. Christopherson, I'm going to count on your expertise and wisdom to make sure that more of the recommendations from the Chief Electoral Officer make it into legislation so that we can improve access and engagement for all Canadians.

(1245)

Mr. David Christopherson:

Wow. If that's the approach, Minister, to responding to everything that's happened, I'm sorry, but your government is just not getting it.

The Chair:

Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Thanks very much, Minister, for being here today and for being so willing to come before our committee to answer our questions.

I'd like to take a moment to pick up on what Mr. Christopherson said. My understanding from your testimony just now is that you are very open to having amendments to Bill C-33 that could be informed by the discussion that we have been having. We can't discuss what we've been doing in camera, but if there are aspects where we've had deliberations and dialogue, the work that we've done is going to be useful when we receive Bill C-33, and we're able to put forward amendments.

Could I clarify that you would be open to amendments that are informed by the dialogue we've been having?

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

We believe this is a strong bill, Anita, but absolutely. That's why the bill is coming to you. We're counting on your deliberations to further enhance it.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you.

I'd also like to ask about an element that is not in the Chief Electoral Officer's report, but is in Bill C-33. It is one that is of personal interest to me, having worked overseas for many years with the United Nations and other organizations. There are some very good Canadians who are abroad, who are doing work promoting Canadian values. In my case, I even received a peacekeeping service medal from the Governor General for the work that I was doing in Kosovo with OSCE, and yet, had I continued that work, I would have become ineligible to vote in Canadian elections, as have many other Canadians, because of the changes that were made by the previous government.

I understood you to say earlier that you were looking to our committee, not only to look at that aspect of Bill C-33, but to decide on some of the parameters and how this would actually apply.

I also know there is a court case right now, a charter challenge, Frank v. Canada.

Could you elaborate on why it is important that a young generation of Canadians who are going around the world and starting businesses...? We have doctors and teachers who are going around the world. There are all kinds of Canadians who are doing very good work around the world. To lose your right to vote because you have gone abroad to promote Canadian values, I think, is wrong.

Could you elaborate on that and tell us what you see our committee doing in that regard?

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Mr. Chair, the world is changing. Globalization means that people, especially younger people, frankly, are travelling abroad to see the world, to contribute to the complex challenges that exist, and also to bring different ways of doing things, different ways of thinking, back to Canada.

We want to promote that. We want to promote the sharing of Canadian values abroad. The right to vote is protected for Canadians. This is one of those fundamental rights that we have as Canadian citizens. Our government believes that a Canadian is a Canadian is a Canadian.

Yes, there is a court case that will be heard in February. We are mindful of that, but I've heard stories like yours, Anita, and I've also heard stories of young people whose parents are working abroad. These are people who didn't choose to go abroad. They went because they had to.

I'm getting letters and emails from them saying, “We're paying attention to what's happening to our country. When we're old enough to vote, we want to be able to, but right now we can't. That's not right, and it's not fair.” We agree.

These are young people who have lived in Canada at one time, and so the provisions that we've introduced here will grant them the ability to vote, just as it will for over a million Canadians. As I mentioned earlier, what we need deeper analysis on from this committee is this: the children of those Canadians living and working abroad who may have come to Canada to visit, but have never actually resided in Canada, have never lived here. Do we extend the franchise to them, too?

That's an area that requires cross-party conversations, something that this committee is very well positioned to do.

(1250)

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

How much time do I have left?

The Chair:

You have one minute and 15 seconds.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I'll pass that on to Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you.

Thank you, Minister, for being here with us today.

Bill C-33 is great legislation. I've been long awaiting for these changes to take place, but I think, as Mr. Christopherson said, that the upset was the timing of the legislation, not so much the content of the legislation.

I'm very much in favour of the content of this legislation. I just want to hear from you why you felt it was important to put forward this legislation and to reverse those portions of the Fair Elections Act at this time. What was the thinking of the government, or the ministry, behind that?

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

These are really important changes that need to be made. They're changes that we campaigned on, frankly. They're changes that are outlined in my mandate letter. They're changes that we heard from Canadians over the past year. But they're just the beginning. A great deal of work needs to continue to be done. More legislation needs to be introduced. Although the system that we have, the democratic institutions we have now are good and they're serving us well, we have many areas of improvement that need to be worked on, and there's a legislative agenda to be mindful of. Given that we have so many thoughtful recommendations from the Chief Electoral Officer that require further thinking, for us these were the more straightforward changes that we knew would have an immediate impact.

This is just the beginning, and the rest of the work moving forward requires more digging and more research. I think that's where this committee's work is going to be essential.

The Chair:

You only have 10 seconds.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I just want to say thank you.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Thank you, Ruby.

The Chair:

We'll move to Mr. Reid for five minutes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, I hope to be splitting my time with Mr. Schmale, depending on the minister's answer.

Minister, this evening there will be a vote on concurrence in the second report of the electoral reform committee, which asks you to include on the MyDemocracy.ca website the same questions that were on the committee's questionnaire. These include specific questions that deal with what people think about individual kinds of electoral systems. There's also a question relating to whether people feel that a referendum would be an appropriate way of dealing with this issue once the government has come forward with its proposed legislation, so that Canadians get the final say on whether or not to switch to a new system.

My question is this: How will Liberal members be voting? Could you provide us with the reasons they will be voting the way they will be voting?

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Mr. Chair, I can't speak for all Liberal members, but I want to acknowledge—

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is it a free vote then?

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

I'm not sure. I want to acknowledge that the issue of a referendum is referenced in the report of the electoral reform committee, and the government will be responding to that particular question.

As far as MyDemocracy.ca goes, we're asking questions. We worked with political scientists who have various preferences themselves. We were asking questions based on the values that make up our democratic institutions, and we're asking Canadians to engage in this conversation in a new way.

Canadians are engaging. This is a more inclusive and accessible way for them to have this conversation with us. Again, as your motion earlier allowed, Mr. Reid, I'll be coming back to this committee to talk further about electoral reform and MyDemocracy.ca. I'm happy to get into greater detail then.

(1255)

Mr. Scott Reid:

I had the opportunity, Minister, to speak with one of the academic experts. That individual advised me that, in fact, the kinds of questions they were permitted to put forward were constrained by the government and did not include questions on specific electoral systems. In fact, the suggestion that the experts made the decision to not include questions on individual electoral systems, which you have said in the House of Commons, is, in fact, not merely misleading, but it is literally the opposite of the truth. In fact, you and your officials were the ones who made the decision to restrict the subject matter and to exclude specific electoral systems from MyDemocracy.ca. That was done at the very beginning so they never had the option of bringing them forward.

Is that not true?

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Mr. Chair, I'm going to take this opportunity to thank the academic advisory panel that has been working with us in collaboration to make sure there is science behind our approach. I'm really proud of the work we've been able to do with them.

Mr. Scott Reid:

With regard to the question, Minister, did you and your staff, in fact, restrict the range of questions that could be put on MyDemocracy.ca so that the academic experts from the very beginning were not able to put forward anything regarding individual questions?

You can answer any way you want, but a yes or a no has to occur here.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

We've been working in collaboration with them, and we've been asking the questions that are really important to ask, Mr. Reid.

If you would like to talk in greater detail about the process and the technicalities around MyDemocracy.ca, we have at least 120 minutes to do that in the near future. Today, I think—

Mr. Scott Reid:

We do, but the question I'm asking you today is did the academic experts make the decision on their own to exclude questions about specific electoral systems and about whether or not there should be a referendum on legislation, or were those questions, in fact, excluded by you and your bureaucrats in the nature of the survey, the umbrella of permissible questions they were then asked to design? Yes or no, please.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Working in collaboration means different people get together and everyone has an opportunity to provide their feedback. Working in collaboration with political scientists on this particular project, Mr. Reid, has been about making sure the questions we're asking are as accessible as possible.

There are Canadians who have a very easy time being able to have a conversation about the technicalities of the different systems, but we know that's not the case for most Canadians. We know many Canadians don't even know where to begin being part of the conversation on their electoral reform. That's the reason we chose the approach we took. Based on the evidence that exists out there and best practices, asking values-based questions, and about the impact of different systems on the way Canadians are governed is a more inclusive and a more accessible way, and I'm quite proud of that.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Ms. Petitpas Taylor.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

I have two very quick questions because I know we're running out of time.

To follow up on Mr. Christopherson's and Ms. Sahota's comments, what steps could we take to avoid this type of situation again?

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

I'm very much looking forward to your report. I think having conversations...come talk to me, and I'm happy to come and talk to you. I know as a government we committed to restoring the independence of committees, and I know that's been a really important measure towards a healthier democracy, but this relationship is an important one for me. Whatever it takes to make sure we work better together, I'm open to it.

Given that there are people who have been doing this work for more than a decade, I'm open to that feedback. Let's make sure we continue to work the same way you folks have been able to, which is this is not about the parties we represent; this is about what's in the best interests of Canadians and how we can improve democracy. I'm very much interested in that. So let's talk.

(1300)

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Do I have anymore time?

The Chair:

Yes, three and a half minutes.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Okay.

Are you satisfied with the process with regard to Bill C-33 and if not, what would you do differently?

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Recognizing the passion that I've heard from some of my colleagues here today, I'm mindful that things could be done better and things could be done differently. I'm open to hearing from you how we can improve this process. Ultimately, I think we're here to make things better for Canadians, and establishing a working relationship that works for everyone is really important to me.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Thank you.

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I don't have a lot to say, if we want to wrap it up at one o'clock.

I'm just mindful of the time before we start. How much time do I have left, roughly?

The Chair:

You have two minutes and thirty seconds.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

A lot can happen in—

(1305)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

A lot can happen in two minutes.

Minister, I just want to thank you for coming.

Of course, I didn't have the pleasure of being there when Bill C-33 was introduced in the House. I wasn't present and I apologize for that. As a result of my absence, I inadvertently missed it.

I might be in the minority relative to all of my colleagues, but I'm not fussed, David, by the minister's introduction of Bill C-33 in the House. From my perspective, the minister has a clear executive mandate, which is very publicly accessible. She has every right to introduce legislation that the political executive deemed is important.

We have clear work, which is mandated legislatively and through the Standing Orders, for us to review the results of the previous Parliament and the report from the Chief Electoral Officer, and as legislation comes to this particular committee, when it finally gets referred to it from the House, we pivot accordingly. I actually don't see much substantive divergence. I think folks here are a bit fussed with respect to the process and the minister is committed to finding, I think, a better way to communicate that better.

I'm here to work with you. I think we want to achieve the same substantive outcomes at the end of the day and I think we should just get on with it and get that particular work done. When Bill C-33 comes from the House, we'll make adjustments accordingly. As I've already indicated, I am not fussed by what has transpired.

I think there are substantive questions that my Conservative friends would like to ask and I think the government has already demonstrated more than it's willingness and openness to deal with any substantive questions that they want to pose, so we'll get answers from the minister accordingly.

My invitation to my colleagues on the opposite side is, when we come back in the new year, let's get back on to the work that we're doing and when Bill C-33 is referred to us from the House, we will then pivot accordingly. Until the House has spoken and we are seized of that legislation, I think it's premature for us to get into a lot of the details, without knowing the substance of what we're allowed to actually review and study. From my perspective, the work that we're already doing is good work and let's get on with it.

The Chair:

That's your time, Arnold.

You have the floor, Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Thank you very much, Chair.

I do disagree, unfortunately. I like you a lot, Mr. Chan, but I do disagree with what you're saying. But I'm not going to waste my time in debate.

Minister, I do apologize, since my time is short, that I may jump in here and there.

In order to move this committee forward, we want to study this legislation. I agree with everyone here that we're doing good work. We didn't agree on everything, but we were, I think, doing some good work.

At the end of the day, although I doubt this will happen now because the marching orders have been given, if the committee does disagree with a recommendation that you have already included in Bill C-33, will you amend the legislation to reflect that?

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Mr. Chair, as I mentioned since the very beginning when the bill was introduced, yes, we believe this is strong legislation. It is up to Parliament and this committee to help further improve it. If you have thoughtful improvements that you would like to be considered, of course, I'm open to that.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Based on that response, and since you're expecting a report, and given the fact that this happens in every Parliament after every election, why did you move forward with Bill C-33 before we were done our study?

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

The elements that are outlined in Bill C-33, as I've mentioned, are rather straightforward. Many of us campaigned on them. This is in my mandate letter.

I knew that you folks were reviewing the recommendations that came before you from the Chief Electoral Officer, not knowing which ones you were studying at what time. I knew that the work you were doing on this committee would allow you to provide that further level of detail to the bill once it came before you. I remain open to any amendments that you believe will further strengthen this bill.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Again, going forward, how do we stop this from happening again? Will you commit that no further legislation will be tabled until the committee gets to forward our report? Otherwise, I don't see the point in continuing to study the Chief Electoral Officer's report. If you're going to do what you're going to do anyway, we can just do something else or figure out something else to do.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

I don't think you can do something else. You're mandated to study the recommendations from the Chief Electoral Officer, and I'm counting on you to do that.

One area with Bill C-33 is the piece around expats voting.

Another area is around the commissioner of Canada elections. For example, do we grant them the power to compel testimony to address election fraud in a more comprehensive way? That's an area that I believe is really important for this committee to study.

I can assure you that if we do what we've discussed here today, which is to come up with processes that work for everyone, then moving forward we're going to continue to improve the working relationship between this committee and me. I'm very much open to that.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Given the fact that after an election we would be examining this, wouldn't it be fair to say that possibly, very possibly, there would be something in the report changing a bunch of things? Again, why didn't you just wait? Give me something to keep us going here.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Well, keep going because Canadians are counting on you to keep going.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I need an assurance that this won't happen again.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Keep going because we're all trying to create a healthier democracy, Mr. Schmale. Keep going because I have asked you, and I'm counting on your support.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

But are you going to make a change if the committee decides...? Will you make the change? If the committee decides that something in Bill C-33 isn't something that the committee would like, would you amend the legislation?

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

As I've mentioned, of course I'm open to any amendments that would improve this bill further.

The Chair:

Thank you, everyone. That's it.

Thank you very much for coming, Minister. We appreciate it.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Thank you very much.

Happy new year, merry Christmas, and happy Hanukkah.

The Chair:

We'll see everyone in the new year.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1205)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Je déclare la séance ouverte.

Bonjour à tous. Je vous souhaite la bienvenue à la 46e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Cette réunion est publique et télédiffusée.

Conformément à l’article adopté par le Comité le 29 novembre, nous accueillons aujourd’hui la ministre des Institutions démocratiques, l’honorable Maryam Moncef, pour discuter des dispositions du projet de loi C-33, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada et d’autres lois en conséquence.

La ministre est accompagnée de Mme Natasha Kim, directrice, Réforme démocratique, et de M. Robert Sampson, conseiller principal en politiques, conseiller juridique, Réforme démocratique, tous deux du Bureau du Conseil privé.

Avant de céder la parole à la ministre, j’ai quelques remarques à vous faire.

Je suis certain que vous avez tout reçu le document préparé par les chercheurs de la Bibliothèque du Parlement qui compare les recommandations figurant dans le rapport du directeur général des élections aux propositions du projet de loi C-33.

Même si ce dernier ne nous a pas été transmis par la Chambre, notre Comité a invité la ministre à venir discuter de son contenu avec nous, conformément au mandat qui lui a été conféré en vertu des sous-alinéas 108(3)a) du Règlement. Les membres du Comité constateront un certain nombre de similitudes entre les dispositions du projet de loi et les recommandations figurant dans le rapport du directeur général des élections, que nous avons déjà étudiées. Vous vous souviendrez qu’une partie importante de cette étude s’est déroulée à huis clos et j’invite donc les membres à faire preuve de prudence s’ils font allusion à ces délibérations du Comité.

Le rapport et les recommandations du directeur général des élections sont du domaine public. Vous avez donc toute liberté d’en parler, ainsi que du projet de loi C-33, qui est lui aussi public, mais vous ne pouvez pas faire état de nos discussions sur les recommandations du directeur général des élections.

Madame la ministre, je vous souhaite la bienvenue. Je vous remercie d’être venue nous rencontrer aujourd’hui. La parole est à vous.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef (ministre des Institutions démocratiques):

Je tiens à vous remercier, monsieur le président, ainsi que tous vos collègues, de m’avoir invitée à comparaître devant vous aujourd’hui.

Lors de mon dernier passage parmi vous, nous avions parlé du processus de nomination des sénateurs et du mandat du gouvernement, ainsi que des engagements qu’il avait pris pour améliorer notre démocratie et nos institutions démocratiques.

Je vous suis très reconnaissante de l’invitation d’aujourd’hui pour un certain nombre de raisons. Vous avez maintenant tenu au-delà de 40 réunions et il s’est écoulé environ une année depuis que ce Parlement a commencé à siéger. Vous et moi suivons pour l’essentiel le même cheminement. Nous sommes confrontés aux mêmes défis et avons les mêmes objectifs, soit de protéger ce qui donne de bons résultats et de tenter d’améliorer les outils et les modalités de fonctionnement dont nous avons déjà la chance de disposer.

Comme à l’habitude, je vous suis reconnaissante de votre apport et de vos points de vue. Comme mon secrétaire parlementaire, M. Mark Holland, et moi avons sillonné le pays et réfléchi sérieusement au travail que nous faisons, il est arrivé très fréquemment que nous entendions les mêmes commentaires que vous, par exemple sur une vie parlementaire plus respectueuse de la vie familiale. Les sujets que vous avez abordés dans le cours de vos travaux et les conversations que vous avez eues font surface régulièrement. Comme vous le savez, mon travail sur le sujet qui nous occupe aujourd’hui vise à rendre ce lieu plus inclusif et à rendre la mécanique électorale plus accessible. Je sais que nous avons les mêmes objectifs et il nous reste beaucoup de travail à faire. Nous avons commencé à nous atteler à cette tâche.

Je sais également que vous avez étudié les recommandations de notre directeur général des élections pour évaluer les effets qu’elles auraient pu avoir sur les résultats de la dernière élection. J’attends avec impatience les résultats de vos travaux. J’aimerais bien que vous puissiez m’en apprendre un peu plus à ce sujet aujourd’hui. Comme je l’ai déjà dit, nous sommes très fiers des réformes de la phase un que nous proposons avec le projet de loi C-33. Nous sommes d’avis que c’est là un projet de loi qui sera efficace, mais j’ai également conscience que nous pourrions encore l’améliorer et je suis convaincue que les travaux de votre Comité pourront y contribuer. Je suis d’avis que nous pourrions ainsi bien servir le Canada.

Avant de poursuivre, il est également très important que je prenne le temps, alors que nous sommes rendus à la mi-décembre, de rappeler combien j’accorde de valeur, comme nous tous j’en suis convaincue, au travail que nous avons fait jusqu’à maintenant avec le directeur général des élections. Cela fait maintenant une décennie qu’il est au service de ce pays et des Canadiens, et son professionnalisme et son engagement envers notre pays et envers la santé et l’intégrité de notre démocratie sont un modèle pour toute fonction publique. Je suis certaine que vous vous joignez tous à moi pour lui souhaiter une agréable retraite, qui approche à grands pas.

Comme vous le savez, le projet de loi C-33, que nous avons déposé récemment à la Chambre, propose d’apporter des modifications à la Loi électorale du Canada. Il est donc important de parler un peu du contexte dans lequel ce projet de loi C-33 fait son apparition.

Chers collègues, tout comme les membres du Comité spécial sur la réforme électorale, vous avez participé à nos discussions sur ce sujet. En sillonnant ce pays, Mark Holland et moi nous sommes faits dire à maintes occasions que s’il est important d’améliorer nos modalités de vote, il est également très important de faciliter l’accès des gens au bureau de scrutin, de leur permettre de s’identifier plus facilement, d’accéder à l’information voulue et d’éliminer les entraves inutiles auxquels ils peuvent se heurter actuellement. Ce sont là des desiderata conformes à ceux que nous avons entendus en sillonnant le pays.

Alors que nous poursuivons notre travail sur la réforme électorale, et que nous constatons que c’est parfois l’occasion de faire état d’un grand nombre de points de vue manifestement contradictoires, je crois que nous pouvons tous convenir qu’il y a des liens très étroits entre la vision que nous avons de notre démocratie et la perception que nous avons de notre identité de Canadiens. Dans le monde, la démocratie canadienne continue à représenter un modèle.

C’est pourquoi il me paraît vraiment important que les améliorations que nous apporterons à notre système soient dans le meilleur intérêt de tous les Canadiens, et c’est précisément la raison d’être du projet de loi C-33. Les modifications que nous proposons de mettre en œuvre avec celui-ci visent en effet à permettre aux Canadiens d’obtenir les informations dont ils ont besoin et à favoriser une plus grande implication dans notre démocratie.

(1210)



Le projet de loi C-33 veut aider un plus grand nombre de Canadiens à prendre conscience de l’importance de leur vote. Il veut pousser un plus grand nombre de ceux qui ont le droit de vote à l’exercer. Il vise à abattre des barrières qui sont là inutilement, qui en empêchent actuellement beaucoup d’exercer ce droit. S’il est exact que notre démocratie et notre culture font l’envie du monde, et qu’elles sont efficaces, cela ne suffit pas à nous accorder un satisfecit. Le défi auquel nous sommes confrontés pour l’avenir, avec un certain sentiment d’urgence, est de veiller à ce que notre démocratie fonctionne pour tous les Canadiens, sans exception.

Nous tenons à faciliter le vote des Canadiens et des Canadiennes, parce que cela aura pour effet de renforcer notre démocratie. C’est là un objectif auquel nous pouvons tous adhérer, j’en suis convaincue. Nous ne l’atteindrons que si nous y travaillons tous ensemble. Vous vous souviendrez peut-être que, après avoir déposé le projet de loi C-33, j’ai expliqué aux membres de la presse parlementaire combien il était important pour moi que ce texte bénéficie des compétences et de l’apport de tous les parlementaires. Je tiens à insister à nouveau sur cet aspect des choses aujourd’hui. Je tiens à profiter de votre expertise indiscutable et de vos connaissances de la réforme électorale pour y parvenir.

Afin de vous brosser le portrait de cet ensemble de réformes que j’ai eu le mandat de mener à bien, je vais laisser de côté pendant un moment le projet de loi C-33 pour vous préciser ce que nous avons fait au cours de la dernière année et vous dire ce qu’il nous reste à faire. J’ai bien l’impression que je vais revenir à de maintes occasions témoigner devant vous et je crois qu’il importe que vous sachiez quelles sont les initiatives dont vous aurez probablement à délibérer à l’avenir.

Comme vous le savez, le Premier ministre a défini un programme passablement ambitieux pour cette réforme démocratique. Si cela nous amène à faire face à des défis complexes, il faut que vous sachiez que nous réalisons des progrès dans la mise en œuvre de ce programme.

Nous avons mis en place un processus au mérite et non partisan pour proposer au Premier ministre des noms de Canadiens accomplis à nommer éventuellement au Sénat et venant d’horizons divers et de toutes les régions du pays.

Un comité parlementaire a étudié la réforme électorale. Nous avons reçu son rapport le 1er décembre. Le gouvernement y réagira en détail au cours de la nouvelle année.

La raison pour laquelle je suis venu vous rencontrer aujourd’hui relève d’une question abordée dans ma lettre de mandat. Comme vous le savez, la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections comporte des dispositions injustes, qui soulèvent la controverse, mais qui s’avèrent aussi totalement inutiles pour impliquer davantage les Canadiens et les Canadiennes et leur permettre de participer à leur démocratie en votant. Ce sont là des questions que cette lettre de mandat m’invite à résoudre en abrogeant ces aspects de la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections. Encore une fois, il s’agit ici de s’attaquer aux éléments « qui font en sorte qu’il est plus difficile pour les Canadiens et les Canadiennes de voter et plus facile pour les contrevenants à la loi électorale d’éviter d’être punis. »

Avec le dépôt du projet de loi C-33, le gouvernement propose certaines modifications qui vont dans le sens de ces engagements. Il s’agissait essentiellement pour nous de proposer les modifications que les Canadiens réclamaient le plus énergiquement. Nous avons entendu ce qui s’est dit pendant les débats qui se sont déroulés à la Chambre et dans les comités comme celui-ci, pendant la dernière élection, et ce que nous ont dit les gens que nous avons rencontrés dans toutes les régions du pays en parlant de la réforme électorale, soit qu’il était nécessaire d’apporter des modifications. Il n’y a pas de justification particulière à avoir commencé par proposer ces changements.

On nous a suggéré d’apporter d’autres modifications au régime actuel et le gouvernement va étudier la possibilité de déposer d’autres textes de loi sur ces questions. J’ai hâte de prendre connaissance de l’apport et des commentaires de ce Comité pour nous assurer que nous allons disposer de la meilleure législation possible à l’avenir pour le bien de tous les Canadiens.

Quel est l’objet du projet de loi C-33? Il cherche à répondre aux préoccupations que je viens de partager avec vous en proposant sept réformes importantes.

Les deux premières réformes visent avant tout à faciliter l’exercice du droit de vote par les Canadiens qui y ont droit. Il devrait, au bout du compte, permettre d’accroître la participation aux élections en rétablissant la carte d’information de l’électeur et la pratique des répondants.

La troisième réforme est destinée à impliquer les Canadiens par l’éducation sur le processus électoral de notre pays.

(1215)



La quatrième, dont j’ai entendu parler dans tout le pays, vise à impliquer davantage les jeunes en offrant la possibilité à Élections Canada de préinscrire les jeunes âgés de 14 à 17 ans pour qu’on puisse les inviter à participer plus jeunes à la vie des institutions démocratiques.

La cinquième réforme vise à insuffler davantage d’intégrité dans notre système électoral en accordant à Élections Canada les ressources dont elle a besoin pour nettoyer les données de la liste nationale des électeurs.

Notre sixième réforme propose les modifications administratives nécessaires pour ramener officiellement le commissaire aux élections fédérales dans le giron du bureau du directeur général des élections.

Enfin, notre septième et dernière réforme veut permettre aux Canadiens qui vivent et travaillent à l’étranger de voter plus facilement en élargissant le droit de vote à plus d’un million de nos concitoyens, même s’ils sont installés à l’étranger depuis plus de cinq ans.

Permettez-moi à nouveau d’insister sur cet aspect des choses. Je suis convaincue que les réformes que nous venons de déposer se révéleront efficaces. Il reste bien évidemment beaucoup de travail à faire et nous déposerons bientôt d’autres mesures législatives, mais le projet de loi C-33 propose la première d’une série de réformes qui seront soumises à votre étude à l’avenir.

M. Holland et moi jugeons aussi une autre question prioritaire, soit l’amélioration de l’accès au processus démocratique des Canadiens qui se situent souvent aux marges de notre société. Je pense ici aux sans-abri, aux jeunes, aux personnes âgées, aux Autochtones, aux nouveaux Canadiens, aux personnes souffrant d’un handicap physique, à celles qui se distinguent par des capacités et des caractéristiques exceptionnelles et, bien évidemment, à celles originaires de milieux socio-économiques moins favorisés.

Le projet de loi C-33 veut s’attaquer à certaines des difficultés auxquelles sont confrontés les membres de ces groupes en facilitant le vote des personnes qui ont régulièrement de la difficulté à prouver leur identité. Nous faisons également beaucoup d’efforts pour améliorer la participation des jeunes en proposant de dresser une liste des électeurs de demain, mais, là aussi, il nous reste beaucoup de travail à faire.

Il y a aussi une question que nous pourrions étudier à l’avenir pour nous conformer à l’engagement que nous avons pris d’étudier diverses solutions pour créer un poste de commissaire indépendant qui aurait pour mandat d’organiser les débats entre les partis politiques. Les solutions que nous envisageons en travaillant sur cette question doivent être enrichies par l’apport des Canadiens, des partis politiques, des télédiffuseurs, des journalistes et des autres parties intéressées. Nous avons appris avec les années que la participation démocratique dépend dans une large mesure de la connaissance des enjeux qu’a le grand public. Les débats des leaders des divers partis sont un élément essentiel de la solution lorsqu’on veut faire l’éducation des Canadiens. Je sais que vous disposez des recommandations du directeur général des élections. Vous allez collaborer pour améliorer l’accessibilité à nos élections. J’ai hâte de prendre connaissance de vos recommandations sur celles formulées par le directeur général des élections.

Je tiens à nouveau à vous remercier de cette occasion de m’entretenir avec vous, monsieur le président. Je vais maintenant me faire un plaisir de répondre aux questions de vos collègues.

(1220)

Le président:

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre.

Nous allons maintenant passer à la première série de questions, avec M. Graham, qui dispose de sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, madame la ministre d’être venue nous rencontrer.

Je trouve que le projet de loi C-33 est très important. Ayant été l’un des députés libéraux chargés de la réforme démocratique lors du dernier parlement, je me suis battu énergiquement contre cette loi électorale inique. Cela dit, vous savez que nous étudions le rapport du directeur général des élections et il appert que cinq de ses recommandations traitent des mêmes sujets que des propositions du projet de loi sur lesquelles nous nous penchons.

Sans vouloir trop entrer dans les détails, je tenais à m’assurer que vous le saviez. Vous avez abordé ces questions et je vous en remercie. Ce rapport comporte 132 recommandations, et 127 n’ont donc pas encore suscité de réaction gouvernementale. Vous nous avez annoncé que d’autres projets de loi seront déposés. J’aimerais que vous nous donniez des indications sur les questions que nous devrions étudier en priorité. J’aimerais beaucoup que nous puissions entamer leur étude à l’avance pour éviter d’être à nouveau contraints d’approuver un projet de loi avant d’en avoir terminé l’étude.

J’aimerais beaucoup que nous puissions étudier ces questions à l’avance. C’est pour cela que j’aimerais savoir, parmi les 127 recommandations dont le projet de loi C-33 ne traite pas, quelles sont celles que vous jugez prioritaires et que nous devrions examiner en premier.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Monsieur le président, je tiens à remercier mon collègue de cette question fort opportune.

Même si je ne dispose d’aucune information sur les discussions que vous avez tenues à huis clos, je crois savoir que l’étude du rapport du directeur général des élections et la formulation de recommandations sur celui-ci relèvent tout à fait de votre mandat. En tout cas, je compte bien recevoir vos recommandations. Les modifications que nous proposons dans le projet de loi C-33 me paraissent plutôt simples. Je ne sais pas où vous en êtes de votre examen de celles-ci, mais vous avez tout à fait raison de dire qu’il reste passablement de travail à faire. Si j’ai bien compris, vous allez remettre un rapport à la Chambre au cours de l’année qui vient. Nous allons attendre vos recommandations avec impatience.

En ce qui concerne précisément ce projet de loi, il y a des domaines dans lesquels nous aurions pu aller plus loin, mais il nous a semblé que la meilleure décision que nous puissions prendre à ce moment-là était tout simplement d’attendre. Je peux vous donner comme exemple celui de l’élargissement du droit de vote aux Canadiens qui vivent et travaillent à l’étranger depuis plus de cinq ans. Nous avons élargi le droit de vote aux Canadiens qui ont déjà vécu au Canada, mais un sujet pour lequel nous comptons sur les recommandations de votre Comité est celui de l’attitude à adopter envers les enfants de ces Canadiens vivant à l’étranger qui sont toujours canadiens mais qui n’ont jamais vécu au Canada. Faut-il leur accorder le droit de vote?

Le principal objectif que je me suis fixé en application de ma lettre de mandat, la raison pour laquelle nous travaillons très fort tous les jours, est que nous voulons que davantage de Canadiens participent à notre processus démocratique, que ce soit comme des électeurs impliqués et éclairés ou comme des participants et des candidats actifs. Les questions d’accessibilité au processus électoral et d’inclusion dans celui-ci sont prioritaires à mes yeux. C’est une question que nous devrions pouvoir régler au cours des mois ou des années à venir. C’est là un domaine dans lequel nous pouvons améliorer les choses. Voilà donc certaines de mes priorités qu’il me paraît important que vous connaissiez, mais je me ferai également un plaisir de discuter avec mes collègues autour de cette table des sujets que vous aimeriez collectivement voir aller de l’avant.

Je sais que, à ce Comité, et c’est une chose qui m’impressionne, vous êtes en mesure de travailler de façon collégiale. Vous parvenez à mettre vos intérêts partisans de côté et analyser l’ensemble de la situation. Vous êtes ensuite en mesure de travailler dans le meilleur intérêt de tous les Canadiens. C’est exactement là l’état d’esprit qui me paraît nécessaire pour travailler à l’amélioration de la participation démocratique. Si vous estimez qu’il y a des sujets qui doivent être au cœur de notre action ou de notre réflexion, n’hésitez pas à me le dire.

(1225)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les trois derniers articles du projet de loi C-33 traitent de la décision Frank et du rattachement du commissaire aux élections fédérales au bureau du directeur général des élections. Aucun de ces sujets n’est abordé dans le rapport du directeur général des élections. J’aimerais que vous nous disiez quelle est l’approche que nous devrions adopter, à votre avis, pour rapprocher nos recommandations, que nous ne sommes pas en mesure de vous donner aujourd’hui, du texte du projet de loi qui est déjà connu. Vous êtes prête à recevoir des modifications, mais celles-ci pourraient se révéler passablement importantes. Dans quelle mesure êtes-vous prête à faire preuve de souplesse?

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Eh bien, sans avoir vu le rapport…

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C’est malheureusement impossible parce que nous ne siégeons pas à huis clos.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Je comprends. Je crois que le travail que vous avez fait, quelles que soient les recommandations auxquelles vous êtes parvenus, sera vraiment important pour tout le monde. Le projet de loi va être soumis à votre étude et nous sommes ouverts, comme je l’ai indiqué dès le tout début, à des modifications qui seraient le fruit de réflexions attentives, pour lui donner encore plus de poids. C’est la nature même du processus démocratique. C’est la raison pour laquelle les comités se voient confier le travail important qu’ils font, afin que, tous ensemble, nous puissions nous assurer de mettre en place la meilleure législation possible pour les Canadiens.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous remercie d’avoir pris le temps de discuter avec nous de ces questions, car cela me paraît très important.

Je dispose encore de quelques minutes et j’aimerais en faire profiter Mme Petitpas Taylor.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Je vous remercie.

Je tiens, moi aussi, à vous remercier de vous être jointe à nous ce matin, madame la ministre. Je sais combien vous êtes occupée et nous apprécions à sa juste mesure le temps que vous nous consacrez.

Au cours de l’été, je voulais inviter les habitants de ma région à venir discuter de la réforme électorale. Lorsque je l’ai fait, j’ai constaté que nombre des personnes étaient les mêmes qu'aux autres réunions que j’avais déjà organisées. J’en ai néanmoins profité pour m'entretenir avec des membres de divers groupes de personnes que je tenais à rencontrer, en particulier des personnes marginalisées, des jeunes et des gens qui trop souvent ne sont pas impliqués dans le processus politique. Pourriez-vous, s’il vous plaît, m’indiquer comment ce texte de loi, le projet de loi C-33, pourrait impliquer davantage de Canadiens dans le processus électoral, en particulier au sein des groupes largement sous représentés?

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Madame Petitpas Taylor, les deux premières mesures portent intégralement sur les exigences en matière d’identification. Si nous prenons le cas des étudiants, qui votent pour la première fois, nous savons qu’ils résident souvent loin de leur domicile pour faire des études dans une autre ville et que ce n’est pas toujours leur dernière adresse qui figure sur leurs papiers d’identité. Nous savons qu’il y a des personnes, par exemple des Autochtones, qui comptaient recourir à la pratique des répondants pour pouvoir exercer leur droit de vote. Nous savons qu’il y a beaucoup de personnes âgées. Je suis originaire de Peterborough—Kawartha, l’une des régions métropolitaines de recensement les plus âgées au Canada, où il y a quantité de maisons de retraite, quantité d’installations de soins de longue durée. Lors de la dernière élection, des personnes âgées se sont présentées au bureau de scrutin avec leur carte d’information de l’électeur en croyant qu’elles pourraient s’en servir comme pièce d’identité, et elles n’ont pas été autorisées à voter.

Le président:

Le temps que nous avions prévu de consacrer à cette série de questions et de réponses est épuisé.

Je dois maintenant donner la parole à M. Reid.

(1230)

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Je vous remercie. C’est un plaisir, madame la ministre, de vous avoir parmi nous.

Je voulais vous demander si vous avez eu la chance de lire la lettre que je vous ai adressée hier. C’est parfait. Accepteriez-vous alors de répondre à des questions concernant MaDémocratie.ca?

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Je tiens à remercier mon collègue de la lettre très sérieuse qu’il m’a adressée et des questions très importantes qu’il y soulève. Je serais ravie de répondre de façon générale à toute question que vous pourriez avoir sur MaDémocratie.ca, mais je serai aussi heureuse, monsieur Reid, de revenir devant ce Comité et d’avoir alors un débat en profondeur sur la réforme électorale, lorsque votre Comité le jugera utile.

M. Scott Reid:

Cela veut-il dire, madame la ministre, que vous êtes prête à revenir devant nous, comme le demande la motion que j’ai déposée vendredi, pour répondre aux questions concernant MaDémocratie.ca et le programme prévu par le gouvernement pour réaliser sa réforme électorale?

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Oui, si vous estimez que c'est là un bon emploi de votre temps, et si vous croyez que c'est une bonne idée. Je peux m’assurer de vous réserver le temps nécessaire à ce débat, mais je veillerai également à ce que des fonctionnaires de mon ministère soient avec nous pour qu’ils vous fournissent des explications ou des descriptions techniques si vous le souhaitez.

M. Scott Reid:

C’est fantastique.

J’en viens maintenant au projet de loi C-33. Afin de faciliter les choses, maintenant que nous savons que vous êtes prête à revenir nous voir, je propose, monsieur le président : Que le Comité invite la ministre des Institutions démocratiques à comparaître pendant au moins deux heures pour répondre à des questions sur MaDémocratie.ca et sur les intentions du gouvernement concernant la réforme électorale.

Je fais l’hypothèse, monsieur le président, parce que nous sommes éloignés du sujet, que vous conviendrez que je n’ai pas utilisé la totalité de mes sept minutes. Je ne m’en suis pas servi pour interroger la ministre.

Le président:

D’accord.

Monsieur Chan, la parole est à vous.

M. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

J’ai une question à poser qui concerne la motion. S’agit-il là mot pour mot du texte que vous avez déposé?

M. Scott Reid:

Oui. Si je me suis éloigné de quelque façon du texte écrit, veuillez considérer que c’est celui-ci qui constitue la version officielle de la motion.

Le président:

Madame Sahota, nous vous écoutons.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

J’ai un commentaire à faire sur le texte de la motion. On y lit en effet « pendant au moins deux heures ». À mon sens, il s’agit d’obtenir la présence de la ministre pendant deux heures complètes, mais cette formulation pourrait laisser croire que vous vous attendez à ce qu’elle reste parmi nous pendant six heures, ou peut-être huit ou que sais-je. Accepteriez-vous que nous nous contentions de dire « pendant deux heures ».

M. Scott Reid:

Pendant deux heures. Oui. Cela ne pose pas de problème.

Le président:

Les honorables sénateurs sont-ils prêts à se prononcer?

(La motion modifiée est adoptée.)

Le président: Vous pouvez poursuivre avec votre question.

M. Scott Reid:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président. Nous en étions à une minute et 45 secondes lorsque nous nous sommes interrompus.

Je tiens tout d’abord à vous remercier, madame la ministre, d’être venue nous entretenir du projet de loi C-33.

Cela fait maintenant plus d’une décennie que je siège à ce Comité, y revenant d’élection en élection. J’y suis arrivé à l’époque du gouvernement Chrétien et, après chaque élection, la ministre, je devrais plutôt dire le directeur général des élections, présente un rapport sur les modifications qu’il recommande pour tirer les leçons du dernier scrutin. Quand je dis « il », cela n’a rien de sexiste, mais il se trouve que jusqu’ici ces directeurs ont été des hommes, MM. Kingsley et Mayrand.

Le Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre se lance alors dans une étude approfondie de ce rapport, formule dans son propre rapport des recommandations inspirées de celles du directeur général des élections, dépose son rapport auquel le gouvernement répond. Le Comité peut juger cette réponse satisfaisante ou non. C’est la démarche à laquelle on s’attend d’habitude.

Vous, vous avez décidé d’aller de l’avant sans attendre notre rapport, et même si nous ne sommes pas autorisés à révéler le contenu de nos discussions, je peux vous préciser que certains des sujets que nous avons abordés dans notre rapport me sont apparus de la toute première importance et qu’il ne sera pas possible d’y apporter des correctifs en se contentant d’un projet de loi additionnel parce le texte que nous avons sous les yeux traite d’un grand nombre de questions importantes qui, après son adoption, seront coulées dans le béton.

Puis-je vous demander pourquoi vous n’avez pas procédé comme tous vos prédécesseurs et attendu le dépôt de notre rapport? Je m’en tiens là pour l’instant, madame la ministre, dans l’attente de votre réponse.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Monsieur le président, je tiens tout d’abord à remercier le sénateur Reid d’avoir étais au service de ce Comité pendant une décennie. J’avais l’habitude de suivre vos délibérations à la télévision et j’ai toujours été en admiration devant la nature collégiale de votre fonctionnement. J’ai suivi attentivement vos travaux et je sais que vous avez passé en revue l’ensemble des recommandations du directeur général des élections, qui dépasse la centaine. Je peux vous garantir que rien n’est coulé dans le béton.

Comme vous connaissez fort bien le processus parlementaire, je peux vous assurer que le dépôt de ce projet de loi n’est que la première étape. Le débat va se poursuivre et vos recommandations, et tout le travail que vous avez fait, pourront être transposés sous forme de modifications à ce texte. Comme je vous l’ai déjà indiqué, je tiens à m’assurer que nous disposions de la législation la plus efficace possible, et j’ai prévu qu’elle tiendra compte de votre apport sur ces questions.

(1235)

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, je vais céder le reste de mon temps de parole à M. Schmale.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, madame la ministre. C’est toujours un plaisir de retrouver une payse à ce Comité.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Nous sommes en effet voisins.

M. Jamie Schmale:

C’est un plaisir de vous revoir parmi nous. Puisque vous êtes ici pour parler du projet de loi C-33, parlons-en. Comme le rappelait M. Reid, son dépôt a précédé celui de l’étude que nous réalisons en comité, et vous nous avez indiqué dans vos commentaires préliminaires que nous devons nous attendre à d’autres projets de loi au printemps. Je crois que M. Graham vous a déjà posé cette question, mais j’aimerais connaître votre réponse un peu plus tôt car nous n’allons pas siéger à nouveau avant la fin janvier… Cela ne nous laissera pas vraiment beaucoup de temps pour terminer notre étude, vous remettre notre rapport, à vous comme au Parlement, et permettre d’intégrer nos conclusions dans vos projets de loi à venir. Puisque vous êtes présente parmi nous et que vous avez en quelque sorte sauté des étapes, comment allez-vous procéder pour disposer de l’information voulue et parvenir à déposer un texte de loi en temps pour que notre travail vous soit réellement utile?

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Monsieur le président, je remercie le député de la circonscription voisine de la mienne de sa question. Mon travail obéit aux directives qui m’ont été données dans ma lettre de mandat. Je crois que c’est le greffier du Conseil privé qui a indiqué que la page où l’on peut consulter nos lettres de mandat est la page Web des sites gouvernementaux la plus visitée. Si cela peut vous aider à orienter votre travail, vous y trouverez peut-être des indications intéressantes pour vous.

L’abrogation des aspects injustes de la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections fait partie de mon mandat, tout comme la proposition pour créer un nouveau processus non partisan fondé sur le mérite pour conseiller le Premier ministre au titre des nominations au Sénat. Ce mandat me confiait aussi la tâche d’établir un comité parlementaire spécial de consultation sur la réforme électorale et celle de créer un poste de commissaire indépendant chargé d’organiser les débats des chefs des partis politiques. La création de ce poste va nécessiter passablement de débats, de coordination, de consultations et d’études. Sur ce sujet précis, je compte d’ailleurs sur l’aide de votre Comité. Pour l’avenir, les questions concernant l’examen de la Loi électorale elle-même, dans la mesure où elles touchent à divers aspects de nos élections, entrent également dans mon mandat. J’ai d’ailleurs hâte de travailler avec vous sur celle-ci.

Les modifications que nous proposons dans le projet de loi C-33 sont relativement simples.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je ne veux pas vous couper la parole, mais je dispose de peu de temps et vous avez fait état de plusieurs choses.

Pouvez-vous nous garantir que la situation dans laquelle nous nous retrouvons actuellement ne se reproduira pas?

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Quand prévoyez-vous de rendre public votre rapport? C’est peut-être un sujet sur lequel vous pouvez me donner des précisions, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Vous avez épuisé le temps dont vous disposiez, mais allez-y si vous êtes en mesure de répondre à cette question.

M. Jamie Schmale:

J’allais dire que cela constituait la première partie de ma question.

Le président:

Je vais me faire un plaisir de répondre.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Cela constituait la première partie de ma question. Comment en est-on arrivé là en sautant des étapes du processus. Comme je l'ai rappelé, nous ne reprendrons nos travaux qu'à la fin janvier. Vous nous avez annoncé votre intention de déposer d’autres projets de loi au printemps, et je vous demande donc quelle garantie vous pouvez nous donner que nous n’allons pas à nouveau sauter les étapes. Si ce devait être le cas, quel serait l’intérêt de notre travail, comme se l’est demandé M. Reid?

Le président:

Vous pouvez peut-être, madame la ministre, reporter votre réponse à plus tard parce que le temps de parole de M. Schmale est épuisé.

Monsieur Christopherson, vous disposez de sept minutes.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Madame la ministre, je vous remercie beaucoup de vous être déplacée. Nous y sommes très sensibles.

Je dois vous dire que je suis complètement déboussolé par votre présence. Je suis encore plus perdu quand j’essaie de comprendre pourquoi vous êtes ici à nous parler de ce projet de loi.

Le nœud du problème tient pour moi au fait que nous ne pouvons pas vous parler de nos discussions à huis clos, mais il y a des personnes intelligentes dans cette pièce, comme Mme Kady O’Malley, qui peut examiner très attentivement la chronologie de ce qui s’est produit pour avoir une idée de la raison de votre présence devant ce Comité. Je peux vous assurer qu’il ne s’agissait pas pour nous d’échanger des civilités sur le projet de loi C-33.

Le nœud du problème tient au fait que vous dites des choses comme « nous attendons avec impatience », « nous suivons le même cheminement », « si nous y travaillons tous ensemble » et vous nous parlez de « collégialité ». Dans les faits, nous avons commencé à fort bien travailler en comité pour étudier les recommandations du directeur général des élections. Nous poursuivons notre travail en suivant deux voies différentes et nous avons recueilli quantité d’informations. Nous travaillons bien. Nous pensions bien travailler. Nous avons bonne opinion de notre travail. Cela ne veut pas dire que nous sommes d’accord sur tout, mais en ce qui concerne le processus, nous travaillions comme une équipe s’efforçant d’élaborer des règles que tout un chacun pourrait trouver justes. Et puis, tout d’un coup, sorti de nulle part, voici le projet de loi C-33 qui est déposé à la Chambre des communes le jour même où nous devions nous réunir pour poursuivre notre travail. Nous n’avions plus qu’à nous demander, en tout cas c’était mon cas, que se passe-t-il?

D'un côté, nous avons un comité dont les membres travaillent bien tous ensemble. Votre gouvernement, Mme la ministre, a promis qu’il allait traiter les comités parlementaires avec le respect qu’ils méritent, que vous alliez leur redonner leur importance, et tout ce que nous avons vu et entendu sont plutôt des insultes, en particulier en ce qui concerne ce Comité à la suite du dépôt du projet de loi C-33. Je n’entends pas creuser la question, mais je dois vous dire que nous avons trouvé particulièrement honteuse la réponse du gouvernement à la suite du dépôt du rapport du Comité spécial sur la réforme électorale, à laquelle vous avez participé en présentant vos excuses.

Encore une fois, je me trouve coincé parce que je ne pas pas vous parler de ce que nous avons dit à huis clos, mais je me permets de vous dire, et si quelqu’un veut me tenir responsable de divulguer des informations, mais je pense être prudent, que M. Graham, et c’est tout à son honneur, est venu me voir immédiatement quand nous avons appris le dépôt du projet de loi et m’a dit : « Comment allons-nous pouvoir corriger cela? Que pouvons-nous faire? » Je lui ai répondu que mon objectif était de nous remettre au travail, qu’après avoir passé toutes ces décennies dans la vie publique, je n’avais pas besoin de voir d’autres manchettes, et que ce qui nous restait à faire était de bien travailler.

Je vous ai ensuite croisée accidentellement, madame la ministre. Je ne vais pas révéler la totalité de notre conversation, mais je crois pouvoir dire que nous nous sommes croisés deux fois dans le couloir ce jour-là, et vous vous posiez la même question que M. Graham : « Comment allons-nous pouvoir corriger cela? » Ma réponse a été la même qu’aujourd’hui, soit qu’il serait bien de commencer par présenter des excuses, mais je n’en ai pas encore entendu.

Vous parlez sans cesse du projet de loi C-33. Nous ne vous avons pas demandé de comparaître, madame la ministre, pour nous parler de ce texte, tout simplement parce que nous n’en avons pas encore été saisis.

Ce que je tiens à savoir comme membre de ce Comité est comment nous allons continuer à faire notre travail, qui est censé illustrer le respect et l’importance que ce gouvernement devait nous redonner, alors que vous déposez ce projet de loi qui, quelque soit la façon dont on l’aborde, n’est rien d’autre qu’une diversion pour vous sortir de la situation délicate dans laquelle vous êtes vous-mêmes enfermés sur ce dossier beaucoup plus vaste qui allait manifestement apparaître comme un cuisant échec.

Si ce n’est pas le cas, c’est pour le moins un manque de respect ou de considération envers ce Comité. Dans le pire des cas, il s’agit d’un mépris total de notre travail, qui a été encore renforcé par les commentaires que nous avons entendus. J’accepte que vous vous excusiez, mais cela n’empêche que cela s’est produit. Il se trouve que j’entrais dans la Chambre alors que vous commenciez à donner des explications et je n’ai pas pu croire que c’était tout ce que vous trouviez à dire.

Madame la ministre, je n’ai pas encore décoléré de toute cette histoire. Le gouvernement précédent, lui, ne prétendait pas accorder un rôle important aux comités. Il avait au moins la franchise de dire ouvertement son mépris des comités parlementaires et du travail qu’ils font. Ils en ont payé les pots cassés et c’est une des raisons pour laquelle vous, madame la ministre, êtes assise là où vous trouvez, dans une large mesure à cause de cette attitude. Vous pouvez bien dire que vous allez faire les choses différemment mais, jusqu’à maintenant, nous n’avons eu le droit qu’à des mots.

Il y a donc, madame la ministre, un certain nombre de choses que je veux entendre de vous, en commençant par des excuses envers ce Comité, comme vous vous êtes excusée auprès du dernier comité, pour la façon dont vous avez traité son travail. Ensuite, j’aimerais avoir une idée de la façon dont, à votre avis, ce Comité va pouvoir poursuivre son travail alors que vous entendez continuer à déposer des projets de loi qui auront pour effet de nous imposer votre sélection des sujets sur lesquels nous allons travailler.

Pour terminer, permettez-moi de vous dire que lorsque vous nous demandez « Quand votre rapport sera-t-il prêt? », c’est une très bonne question, mais vous auriez dû la poser au début de nos travaux si votre ministère entend sérieusement les coordonner avec ceux de votre gouvernement. Actuellement, il n’y a pas de coordination.

(1240)



Ce que je veux savoir de vous, madame la ministre est comment, à votre avis, nous allons réagir et nous remettre sur les rails, ou si cela sera impossible. Allons-nous simplement continuer à voir ce gouvernement se dresser contre ses propres comités parlementaires?

Le président:

Vous disposez de 45 secondes pour répondre, madame la ministre.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Monsieur le président, je tiens à remercier mon collègue de son travail et à préciser que l’abrogation des volets injustes de la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections ne sort pas de nulle part. Notre volonté d’abroger ces dispositions figure explicitement dans la lettre de mandat que m’a remise le premier ministre. Nous n’avons jamais caché nos intentions en la matière, bien au contraire.

Je continue à avoir énormément de respect pour le travail que vous faites. Comme j’ai déjà eu l’occasion de vous le dire plus tôt, il y a des dispositions du projet de loi C-33 pour lesquelles je compte sur une analyse et une étude plus détaillée de votre part.

Est-il possible de faire mieux les choses? Très certainement. Suis-je décidée à mieux les faire? Je peux vous le garantir, monsieur Christopherson.

Je vais en terminer avec ceci. En mars 2014, je vous ai observé défendre précisément les mêmes modifications que celles que nous proposons dans le projet de loi C-33. C’est là le travail important qui nous incombe. Je vais devoir, monsieur Christopherson, compter sur vos compétences et sur votre sagesse pour veiller à ce qu’un plus grand nombre de recommandations du directeur général des élections soit repris dans la législation afin de nous permettre d’améliorer l’accès au vote de tous les Canadiens et d’accroître leur implication dans la vie politique.

(1245)

M. David Christopherson:

Ouah! Si c’est l’approche que vous retenez, madame la ministre, pour réagir à tout ce qui s’est passé, je suis navré, mais vous êtes loin du compte.

Le président:

Madame Vandenbeld, la parole est à vous.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre, d’être venue comparaître aujourd’hui devant notre Comité et d’accepter si volontiers de répondre à nos questions.

J’aimerais prendre un moment pour revenir sur ce qu’a dit M. Christopherson. À ce que je comprends de votre témoignage, vous êtes maintenant tout à fait prête à apporter des modifications au projet de loi C-33 qui pourrait ainsi bénéficier des discussions que nous avons ici. Nous ne pouvons discuter ici de nos travaux à huis clos, mais nous avons délibéré sur certaines questions et je suis d’avis que le travail que nous avons fait va se révéler utile lorsque nous aurons le mandat d’étudier le projet de loi C-33 et que nous pourrons alors y proposer des modifications.

Afin de bien préciser les choses, je peux donc répéter que vous serez prête à accepter des modifications découlant des discussions que nous aurons eues.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Madame Vandernbeld, nous sommes d’avis qu’il s’agit là d’un projet de loi efficace, mais oui, vous avez tout à fait raison. C’est pourquoi ce projet de loi va vous être soumis. Nous comptons sur vous pour l’améliorer encore à la suite de vos délibérations.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je vous remercie.

J’aimerais également vous interroger sur un élément qui ne figure pas dans le rapport du directeur général des élections, mais que l’on retrouve dans le projet de loi C-33. Il s’agit d’une question qui m’intéresse personnellement, puisque j’ai travaillé de nombreuses années outre-mer, que ce soit pour les Nations Unies ou pour d’autres organisations. Il y a à l’étranger des Canadiens qui sont de très bons citoyens et qui s’efforcent de promouvoir les valeurs canadiennes. Dans mon cas, j’ai même reçu la Médaille canadienne du maintien de la paix des mains du Gouverneur général pour le travail que j’ai fait au Kosovo avec l’Organisation pour la sécurité et la coopération en Europe, l’OSCE. Pourtant, si j’avais poursuivi ce travail, j’aurais perdu le droit de vote aux élections canadiennes, comme de nombreux autres Canadiens, à cause des modifications apportées à la législation par le gouvernement précédent.

Si j’ai bien compris ce que vous nous avez dit précédemment, vous comptez sur notre Comité non seulement pour étudier cet aspect du projet de loi C-33, mais également pour définir certains des paramètres à utiliser et pour préciser leurs modalités d’application.

Je sais également que le cas Frank c. Canada, une contestation fondée sur la Charte, va être jugé sous peu.

Pourriez-vous nous en dire un peu plus sur ce qui vous amène à penser qu’une génération de jeunes Canadiens, qui parcourt le monde et lance des entreprises…? Nous avons des médecins et des enseignants qui parcourent le monde. Il y a toutes sortes de Canadiens qui font un excellent travail partout sur la planète. Perdre son droit de vote parce que vous allez à l’étranger promouvoir les valeurs canadiennes me paraît une injustice.

Pourriez-vous nous en dire un peu plus à ce sujet et nous préciser ce que, à votre avis, notre Comité pourrait faire en la matière?

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Monsieur le président, le monde change. Avec la mondialisation, les jeunes voyagent pour découvrir la planète, pour participer à la résolution des défis complexes qu’on y trouve et, ensuite, pour nous faire profiter des façons de voir et de faire qu’ils ont découvert à l’étranger.

Nous voulons promouvoir ce phénomène. Nous voulons aider les Canadiens à partager nos valeurs à l’étranger. Leur droit de vote est protégé. C’est l’un des droits fondamentaux qu’ont les citoyens canadiens que nous sommes. Notre gouvernement estime qu’un Canadien est et sera toujours un Canadien.

Oui, je sais qu’une contestation fondée sur la Charte sera entendue en février prochain. Mais nous avons également entendu d’autres histoires comme la vôtre, madame Vandenbeld, et j’ai également entendu parler d’histoire de jeunes dont les parents travaillent à l’étranger. Eux n’ont pas choisi de résider à l’étranger. Ils ont dû suivre leurs parents.

Certains d’entre eux m’adressent des lettres et des courriels dans lesquelles ils me disent : « Nous suivons attentivement ce qui se passe dans notre pays. Lorsque nous aurons l’âge de voter, nous n’y serons pas autorisés. Ce n’est pas bien et ce n’est pas juste. » Nous sommes d’accord avec eux.

Il s’agit là de jeunes Canadiens qui ont vécu un certain temps au pays, et les dispositions que nous proposons en la matière leur accorderont le droit de vote, de la même façon que pour plus d’un million de Canadiens. Comme je l’ai indiqué précédemment, nous avons besoin que votre Comité fasse une analyse plus poussée de la problématique suivante: Les enfants de ces Canadiens qui vivent et travaillent à l’étranger, qui sont peut-être venus au pays en visite, mais n’ont en réalité jamais résidé au Canada, doivent-ils, eux aussi, avoir le droit de vote?

C’est là une question dont il faut que tous les partis discutent, et votre Comité me paraît en très bonne posture pour s’adonner à cet exercice.

(1250)

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Il vous reste une minute et 15 secondes.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

J’en fais cadeau à Mme Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je vous en remercie.

Merci à vous, madame la ministre, d’être venue nous rencontrer aujourd’hui.

Je trouve que le projet de loi C-33 est excellent. Cela faisait longtemps que j’attendais ces modifications, mais il me semble, comme l’a dit M. Christopherson, que le froid qu’il a évoqué est davantage imputable au calendrier qu’au contenu de ce texte.

Je suis tout à fait en faveur du contenu de ce projet de loi. J’aimerais que vous nous disiez pourquoi il vous a paru important de mettre de l’avant ce texte et d’abroger ces parties de la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections à ce moment-ci. Quelles sont les réflexions qui vous ont amené, vous-même ou le gouvernement, à prendre cette décision?

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Ce sont là des modifications vraiment importantes qu’il importe de mettre en œuvre. Elles faisaient d’ailleurs partie des thèmes de notre campagne électorale et elles sont indiquées clairement dans ma lettre de mandat. Ce sont des modifications que nous avons entendu réclamer par les Canadiens au cours de la dernière année. Ce ne sont toutefois que les premières. Il nous reste beaucoup de travail à faire dans ce domaine. Nous devrons déposer davantage de projets de loi. Même si le système dont nous disposons et les institutions démocratiques que nous avons maintenant sont bons et nous servent bien, nous devons faire des efforts dans de nombreux domaines pour les améliorer, et il y a un programme législatif qu’il faut garder à l’esprit. Comme nous avons reçu un nombre important de recommandations du directeur général des élections qui nécessitent qu’on y réfléchisse davantage, il s’agissait pour nous de changements plus simples qui, nous le savions, auraient des répercussions immédiates.

Ce n’est là que le début et pour le reste du travail que nous avons à faire, il nous faudra approfondir davantage les questions et faire davantage de recherches. Je crois que c’est en cela que le travail de ce Comité jouera un rôle essentiel.

Le président:

Il ne vous reste que 10 secondes.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il me reste simplement à vous dire merci.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Merci, madame Sahota.

Le président:

Je donne maintenant la parole à M. Reid qui dispose de cinq minutes.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, j’ai l’intention de partager mon temps de parole avec M. Schmale pourvu que la réponse de la ministre me le permette.

Madame la ministre, nous allons devoir voter ce soir sur l’adoption du second rapport du Comité spécial sur la réforme électorale, qui vous demande d’ajouter sur le site Web MaDémocratie.ca les questions qui figuraient sur le questionnaire du Comité. Il y avait parmi celles-ci des questions précises sur l’opinion qu’ont les répondants des divers types de systèmes électoraux. Une question leur demandait également s’ils étaient d’avis qu’a référendum serait une bonne façon de régler ce problème lorsque le gouvernement aura déposé la législation qu’il aimerait voir adopter, afin que les Canadiens aient le dernier mot sur l’adoption ou non d’un nouveau système.

Voici donc ma question : comment les députés libéraux vont-ils voter? Pouvez-vous nous donner les raisons qui vont les amener à voter de cette façon?

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Monsieur le président, je ne suis pas en mesure de m’exprimer au nom des députés libéraux, mais je veux ici prendre acte…

M. Scott Reid:

S’agit-il alors d’un vote libre?

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Je n’en suis pas certaine. Je veux ici prendre acte du fait qu’il est question d’organiser un référendum dans le rapport du Comité spécial sur la réforme électorale et vous dire que le gouvernement donnera bientôt sa réponse à cette proposition.

En ce qui concerne le site Web MaDémocratie.ca, nous nous posons des questions. Nous avons collaboré avec des politologues qui ont eux-mêmes chacun leurs préférences. Nous avons posé des questions sur les valeurs qui soutiennent nos institutions démocratiques et nous demandons aux Canadiens de s’impliquer de nouvelles façons dans cette discussion.

Les Canadiens s’y impliquent. C’est là pour eux une solution plus inclusive et plus accessible de discuter de ces questions avec nous. Une fois encore, comme votre motion l’a demandé plus tôt, je vais revenir devant ce Comité, monsieur Reid, pour parler plus en profondeur de la réforme électorale et du site Web MaDémocratie.ca. Je me ferai alors un plaisir de vous donner de plus amples détails.

(1255)

M. Scott Reid:

J’ai eu, madame, l’occasion de m’entretenir avec l’un des universitaires spécialistes de ces questions. Il m’a indiqué que le type de question qu’il était possible de proposer été limité par le gouvernement qui ne voulait pas qu’on pose des questions sur des systèmes électoraux précis. En vérité, lorsque vous nous avez laissés entendre en Chambre que les spécialistes avaient décidé de ne pas poser de questions sur des systèmes électoraux précis, vous n’étiez pas loin de nous induire en erreur parce que c’est en vérité le contraire de ce qui s’est passé. En vérité, ce sont vos fonctionnaires et vous qui avez décidé de limiter les sujets abordés et d’exclure des questions sur des systèmes électoraux précis de MaDémocratie.ca. Comme vous avez pris cette décision au tout début de ce processus, les spécialistes en question n’ont jamais pu aborder cette possibilité.

N’ai-je pas raison?

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Monsieur le président, je tiens à profiter de cette occasion pour remercier le groupe consultatif d’universitaires qui a collaboré avec nous pour s’assurer que notre approche repose sur des bases scientifiques. Je suis vraiment fière du travail que nous sommes parvenus à faire avec eux.

M. Scott Reid:

Pour en revenir à ma question, votre personnel et vous avez-vous ou non, madame, limité l’étendue des questions qu’il était possible d’afficher sur le site Web MaDémocratie.ca, ce qui a eu pour effet, dès le début du processus, d’empêcher les universitaires d’inviter les répondants à donner leurs opinions personnelles sur divers systèmes électoraux?

Vous pouvez répondre comme vous voulez, mais il va bien falloir que vous nous disiez oui ou non.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Nous avons collaboré avec eux et nous avons posé les questions qu’il importait vraiment de poser, monsieur Reid.

Si vous souhaitez que nous parlions plus en détail du processus et des aspects techniques entourant le site Web MaDémocratie.ca, nous devrons y consacrer au moins deux heures dans un avenir proche. Pour aujourd’hui, il me semble…

M. Scott Reid:

C’est bien ce que nous espérons, mais la question que je vous pose aujourd’hui est de savoir si les universitaires spécialistes de ces questions ont pris eux-mêmes la décision d’exclure des questions sur des systèmes électoraux précis et sur la tenue d’un référendum ou si ce ne sont pas plutôt vous et vos fonctionnaires qui aviez exclu ce type de questions de celles qu’ils pouvaient proposer? Soyez aimable de me répondre par oui ou par non.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Collaborer avec des gens implique que tous se réunissent et que chacun puisse faire part de ses commentaires. Dans le cas de ce projet précis, la collaboration avec ces politologues était destinée, monsieur Reid, à nous assurer que les questions que nous allions poser pouvaient, dans toute la mesure du possible, être comprises par tous.

Il y a des Canadiens qui n’ont aucune difficulté à se lancer dans une discussion technique des différents systèmes, mais nous savons fort bien que ce n’est pas le cas de la plupart d’entre eux. Ils sont même nombreux à ne pas savoir par où entamer une discussion sur la réforme électorale. C’est la raison pour laquelle nous avons choisi de retenir cette approche. Étant donné les éléments de preuve dont on dispose et les pratiques exemplaires en la matière, nous sommes parvenus à la conclusion qu’il valait mieux poser des questions basées sur les valeurs et sur les répercussions que pourraient avoir les divers systèmes électoraux sur les façons dont les Canadiens sont gouvernés. On obtient ainsi un ensemble de questions plus inclusives et plus accessibles, et c’est quelque chose dont je suis fière.

Le président:

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre.

La parole est à vous, madame Petitpas Taylor.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

J’ai deux brèves questions à vous poser parce que je sais que nous allons manquer de temps.

Pourriez-vous nous dire, dans le prolongement des questions de M. Christopherson et de Mme Sahota, quelles étapes nous devrions suivre pour éviter à l’avenir de nous retrouver dans ce type de situation?

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

J’attends votre rapport avec impatience. Je crois que le fait de discuter… venez me parler, et je serais heureuse de venir et de vous parler. Je sais fort bien que, comme gouvernement, nous nous sommes engagés à restaurer l’indépendance des comités et je sais que cela s’est révélé une mesure vraiment importante pour rendre notre démocratie plus saine. Je tiens à ce que vous sachiez que c’est une relation importante pour moi. Je suis ouverte à tout ce qui peut nous permettre de mieux travailler ensemble.

Comme des gens se penchent sur ce dossier depuis plus d’une décennie, je suis prête à entendre leurs commentaires. Prenons bien soin de continuer à travailler de la même façon que vous êtes parvenus à le faire, c’est-à-dire en vous gardant d’adopter une attitude partisane et en vous consacrant à ce qui est dans le meilleur intérêt des Canadiens et de l’amélioration de notre démocratie. Comme ce sont des questions qui m’intéressent beaucoup, parlons-en!

(1300)

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Me reste-t-il encore du temps?

Le président:

Oui, vous avez encore trois minutes et demie.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Très bien.

Êtes-vous satisfaite de la façon dont les choses se passent pour le projet de loi C-33, et si ce n’est pas le cas, que feriez-vous différemment aujourd’hui.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Étant donné la passion dont certains de mes collègues ont fait preuve aujourd’hui, je n’ai d’autre choix que de convenir que nous pourrions améliorer et modifier notre façon de faire. Je suis d’ailleurs prête à entendre vos suggestions à ce sujet. Au bout du compte, la raison de notre présence ici est de vouloir améliorer les choses pour les Canadiens, et d’instaurer des relations de travail qui fonctionnent bien pour tout le monde. C’est un point très important à mes yeux.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Je vous remercie.

La parole est à vous, monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je n’ai pas le temps de dire grand-chose si nous voulons terminer à 13 heures.

Avant de débuter, pourriez-vous m’indiquer de combien de temps je dispose environ?

Le président:

Vous avez deux minutes et demie.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Beaucoup de choses peuvent se produire en…

(1305)

M. Arnold Chan:

Beaucoup de choses peuvent se produire en deux minutes.

Madame la ministre, je tiens à vous remercier de nous avoir rendu visite.

Je n’ai malheureusement pas pu être présent en chambre lorsque vous avez déposé le projet de loi C-33. Je vous prie de bien vouloir m’en excuser, mais le fait est que je n’étais pas là.

Il se peut que je sois minoritaire parmi l’ensemble de mes collègues, mais, monsieur Christopherson, je ne m’inquiète pas outre mesure du fait que la ministre ait déposé son projet de loi C-33 à la Chambre. À mon avis, la ministre avait reçu un mandat très clair de son chef, que tout un chacun pouvait consulter. Elle avait parfaitement le droit de déposer un projet de loi jugé important par la direction de son parti.

Le travail que nous avons à faire est clair. Ce sont à la fois la législation et le Règlement qui nous confient le mandat d’étudier les résultats du Parlement précédent et le rapport du directeur général des élections. Lorsque la Chambre renvoie devant notre Comité un texte de loi donné, nous nous ajustons en conséquence. En vérité, il ne me semble pas y avoir beaucoup de divergences sur le fond. J’ai l’impression que mes collègues mettent un peu trop l’accent sur le processus, mais la ministre s’est engagée, je crois, à trouver une meilleure façon de communiquer plus efficacement avec nous.

Je suis ici pour travailler avec vous. Je crois que nous voulons tous parvenir à un même résultat valable à la fin de la journée et que ce qui nous reste à faire est tout simplement de nous mettre au travail. Lorsque le projet de loi C-33 nous sera transmis par la Chambre, nous y apporterons les modifications qui nous paraîtront utiles. Comme je l’ai déjà indiqué, cela ne me donne pas beaucoup de matière à inquiétude.

Je crois comprendre que mes amis conservateurs aimeraient poser des questions de fond et je crois que le gouvernement a déjà donné la preuve de sa bonne volonté et de son ouverture à traiter de n’importe quelle question de fond qu’ils voudront poser. Nous aurons donc les réponses de la ministre aux questions qu’ils poseront.

Lorsque nous reprendrons le travail après les fêtes, j’inviterai donc mes collègues des autres partis à reprendre nos travaux et, lorsque nous aurons reçu le projet de loi C-33 de la Chambre, nous nous ajusterons en conséquence. J’ai l’impression que, avant d’être saisi de l’étude de ce projet de loi, il serait prématuré d’entrer trop dans les détails, sans connaître le contenu réel du texte que nous allons devoir examiner et étudier. À mes yeux, le travail que nous faisons déjà est bon et nous n’avons qu’à poursuivre sur la même voie.

Le président:

Vous avez épuisé votre temps de parole, monsieur Chan.

Votre tour est maintenant venu, monsieur Schmale.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Malheureusement, même si je vous apprécie beaucoup, monsieur Chan, je suis ici en profond désaccord avec vous, mais je ne vais pas gaspiller mon temps de parole à me lancer dans ce débat.

Madame la ministre, je vous prie de m’en excuser, mais, comme je dispose de peu de temps, il se peut que je saute du coq à l’âne.

Pour permettre à ce Comité d’aller de l’avant, nous allons devoir étudier ce projet de loi. Je conviens avec vous tous que nous faisions du bon travail. Nous n’étions pas d’accord sur tout, mais je crois effectivement que nous faisions du bon travail.

Au bout du compte, même si je doute que cela se produise parce que nous sommes maintenant en ordre de marche, si le Comité n’est pas d’accord avec une recommandation que vous avez déjà inscrite dans le projet de loi C-33, allez-vous modifier votre texte pour tenir compte de notre désaccord?

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Monsieur le président, comme je l’ai indiqué depuis le moment où j’ai déposé ce projet de loi, oui, nous pensons qu’il s’agit là d’un texte de loi efficace. C’est au Parlement et à ce Comité de nous aider à l’améliorer. Si vous voulez proposer des améliorations auxquels vous avez sérieusement réfléchi, j’y suis bien sûr ouverte.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Étant donné la réponse que vous nous demandez de vous donner, et comme vous comptez recevoir un rapport, et que c’est une situation qui se reproduit après chaque élection, pourquoi avez-vous déposé ce projet de loi C-33 avant que nous ayons terminé notre étude?

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Les modifications que comporte le projet de loi C-33, et je me répète, sont plutôt simples. Nombre d’entre nous les avons promises lors de notre campagne électorale. Ce sont des questions qui figurent dans ma lettre de mandat.

Je sais que vous avez passé en revue les recommandations que le directeur général des élections vous a soumises, sans savoir à ce moment-là lesquelles vous alliez devoir étudier. Je savais que le travail que vous faisiez en comité allait vous permettre d’analyser le projet de loi de façon plus poussée lorsque vous le recevriez. Je suis toujours prête à accepter toute modification qui, à votre avis, aurait pour effet de renforcer ce projet de loi.

M. Jamie Schmale:

La question est donc, encore, de savoir comment empêcher que cela se reproduise à l’avenir. Êtes-vous prête à vous engager à ne plus déposer aucun projet de loi tant que notre Comité ne vous aura pas adressé son rapport? Sans cette promesse, je ne vois pas l’intérêt de poursuivre l’étude du rapport du directeur général des élections. Si vous avez l’intention de continuer à procéder de la même façon, nous pourrions alors tout simplement faire autre chose ou chercher autre chose à faire.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Je ne crois pas que vous puissiez faire quoi que ce soit d’autre. Vous avez le mandat d’étudier les recommandations du directeur général des élections et je compte sur vous pour cela.

L’un des sujets qu’aborde le projet de loi C-33 est celui du vote des expatriés.

Un autre encore est le commissaire aux élections fédérales. Par exemple, devons-nous lui accorder le pouvoir de contraindre les témoins à témoigner pour lui permettre de s’attaquer plus sérieusement aux fraudes électorales? Je suis d’avis que c’est là une question qu’il importe que votre Comité étudie.

Je peux vous assurer que si nous faisons effectivement ce dont nous avons discuté ici aujourd’hui, c’est-à-dire de mettre en œuvre des processus qui fonctionnent pour tout le monde, nous pourrons alors à l’avenir poursuivre l’amélioration de la relation de travail entre votre Comité et moi-même. J’y suis tout à fait ouverte.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Comme il s’agit là de questions que nous devons étudier après chaque élection, serait-il juste de dire que, très probablement, notre rapport proposera des modifications un certain nombre de sujets? Une fois encore, pourquoi n’avez-vous tout simplement pas attendu? Donnez-moi, s’il vous plaît, un argument pour poursuivre ce travail.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Eh bien, poursuivez votre travail, parce que les Canadiens comptent sur vous pour le faire.

M. Jamie Schmale:

J’ai besoin d’une garantie que cela ne se reproduira pas.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Poursuivez votre travail parce que, monsieur Schmale, nous nous efforçons tous de rendre notre démocratie plus saine. Poursuivez-le parce que je vous ai demandé de le faire et que je compte sur votre appui.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Mais vous allez apporter des modifications si le Comité décide… Le ferez-vous? Si le Comité décide qu’il n’est pas partisan d’un élément quelconque du projet de loi C-33, allez-vous modifier son texte?

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Comme je vous l’ai déjà indiqué, je suis bien sûr ouverte à toute modification qui aurait pour effet d’améliorer encore ce projet de loi.

Le président:

Merci à tous. Nous en avons terminé.

Merci beaucoup, madame la ministre, de nous avoir rendu visite. Nous vous en sommes reconnaissants.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Merci beaucoup à vous.

Bonne année, joyeux Noël et heureuse Hannoucah.

Le président:

Lorsque nous nous reverrons, ce sera la nouvelle année.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on December 13, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.