header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-05-10 PROC 20

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1145)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. This is meeting number 20 of the Standing Committee of Procedure and House Affairs for the first session of the 42nd Parliament. This meeting is in public and is being televised.

In our first 15 minutes today, we'll continue our inquiry into the question of privilege related to the matter of premature disclosure of the contents of Bill C-14. In the second hour, we will resume our study of initiatives towards a family-friendly House of Commons. The Clerk of the Ontario Legislative Assembly will appear by video conference.

What we're planning to do, because our time has been truncated, is to just have the opening statements by the Clerk and the Law Clerk.

You have lots of time, because we're not going to do the hour of questioning now. We'll postpone that to another time—so we don't infringe on anyone's privilege by not getting questions and start another case.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: We'd like to welcome again our regular visitor, Marc Bosc, the Acting Clerk of the House of Commons.

Thank you for making so much time for us on our study and for other reasons.

We also have Philippe Dufresne, Law Clerk and Parliamentary Counsel.

Hopefully you'll both have a few things to say to us.

Whoever wants to start could start.

Mr. Marc Bosc (Acting Clerk of the House of Commons, House of Commons):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

In fact, I have prepared remarks. We were both prepared to answer your questions, but we will obviously put that off to another time.

We're pleased to be here to follow up on the question of privilege that was referred to the committee on April 19, 2016.[Translation]

Questions of privilege are important opportunities for the House to debate and define both individual and collective privileges and, if the case warrants, to consider how a specific breach of privilege may be avoided in future. In order to fully understand the role that the committee plays in this process, it may be helpful to review the procedures governing questions of privilege and, particularly, the difference between the role of the Speaker and role of the House and its committees in this regard.[English]

As Speaker Regan clearly stated in his ruling of April 19, the role of the Speaker in relation to questions of privilege is a very defined and limited one.

The citation from page 141 of House of Commons Procedure and Practice, Second Edition, cited by the Speaker in his ruling bears repeating:

Great importance is attached to matters involving privilege. A Member wishing to raise a question of privilege in the House must first convince the Speaker that his or her concern is prima facie (on the first impression or at first glance) a question of privilege. The function of the Speaker is limited to deciding whether the matter is of such a character as to entitle the Member who has raised the question to move a motion, which will have priority over Orders of the Day; that is, in the Speaker's opinion, there is a prima facie question of privilege. If there is, the House must take the matter into immediate consideration. Ultimately, it is the House which decides whether a breach of privilege or a contempt has been committed.

(1150)

[Translation]

In short, the role of the Speaker is limited to deciding whether, at first glance, the matter complained of merits priority treatment. It is then up to the House itself to decide on the matter. In most instances where the Speaker finds a prima facie case of privilege, the resulting motion debated in the House directs the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs to consider the matter, where a more detailed examination of the circumstances surrounding the breach can be considered.[English]

In many ways, a study on a question of privilege is analogous to any other study conducted by the committee. The Standing Orders permit the committee to send for the necessary persons, papers, and records, and, as “master of its own agenda”, the committee is free to organize its study as it wishes. The committee may choose to dedicate one or several meetings to the consideration of the matter, and may, but is not required to, report back to the House with its findings or recommendations.

On previous occasions where this standing committee has undertaken a study on a question of privilege, the committee has often invited the member who raised the question of privilege to appear as a witness. If other members are directly implicated or affected by a question of privilege, they are often also invited to appear to describe the effect of the breach on their work. When departments or ministries of the government may have relevant information to provide, the appropriate minister has appeared before the committee, accompanied by senior departmental officials.[Translation]

In 2001, a similar question of privilege was referred to the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs by the House after the Speaker ruled that the disclosure of details about a bill to the media before its introduction in the House constituted a prima facie question of privilege.

In conducting its study, the committee heard from the member who initially raised the question and ultimately moved the motion. The Minister of Justice, as well as senior officials from the Privy Council Office, also appeared.

In response to a previous question of privilege that same year on a similar topic, the government had already initiated an administrative review by a private company regarding the disclosure. Therefore, to aid in its study, the committee exercised its right to request documents and receive a copy of the report.[English]

As a result, in terms of process, a summary of the committee's hearings, or any other documents or reports examined in the course of its study, then becomes the basis for a report should the committee wish to prepare one. The report may then be presented to the House, and a motion for concurrence in the report may eventually be moved, debated, and ultimately subject to a decision by the House. In the past, reports on questions of privilege have usually included the context surrounding the question of privilege and any concrete recommendations that the committee feels are helpful.

The committee may, but is not required to, recommend specific sanctions against a particular member of the House, a member of the public, or any other agency or group. As an example, the 40th report of the committee prepared in 2001, in relation to the case I described earlier, summarized its findings but did not recommend any sanctions. Ultimately, the committee concluded that it could not find that a contempt of the House had been committed or that the privileges of the House and its members had been breached.

If the House of Commons then proceeds to concur in the committee's report, either by unanimous consent or following the normal rules of debate for such matters, its contents are formally adopted by the House, and, where the recommendations or sanctions are specific, they become formal orders of the House requiring action or response.

(1155)

[Translation]

As the committee considers how it would like to approach its study of this question of privilege, the House administration remains ready to provide the committee with the process support it requires.

We look forward to answering any questions you may have next time.

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Does the committee mind if I ask a technical question on what he just said?

An hon. member: By all means.

The Chair: When you said that the sanctions could be against a member or anyone in the public, does anyone in the public include any staff who are on the Hill, and any senators?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Yes. Well, senators.... I mean, the committee can state what it wishes, but you have to think of how you accomplish those sanctions.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Are there any other technical questions?

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

I gather that both our witnesses will be back at the beginning of the next meeting, Chair?

The Chair:

At a time we set aside for them, yes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's fine. Mine would be content questions.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Mr. Chair, do we have a sense of when we can expect this? Are we shooting for next week, or...?

The Chair:

I think once we let the witnesses go, we'll talk about that. Is that okay?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Fair enough.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We appreciate this. We know you're busy. Sorry to have to call you back again. Someone called a vote, and there you go.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

We're available at the committee's wishes.

The Chair:

Okay.

Everyone now has their calendar. The three open slots here are May 19 for the first hour, May 31 for both hours, and June...well, virtually all of June, but June 2.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

My preference would be May 31, because I can't be here on the 19th.

The Chair:

Any other input?

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

We have drafting instructions. You're suggesting—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I was saying May 31 only because I'd like to be here, and I can't be here on the 19th.

The Chair:

I wouldn't be surprised if drafting instructions took longer than an hour, too, because we have a lot of stuff.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, that was my feeling too.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We should take the full two hours for that.

A voice: [Inaudible--Editor]

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is that a yes?

The Chair:

My understanding is yes. They're going to be proposing a number of recommendations, and I think if we...in the fall, and I think we should use our time wisely to make sure we have influence on those.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You know what? I don't think there's any reason to avoid May 31. That sounds fine.

The Chair:

Is that agreed? We'll see if they're available on May 31 for an hour? Okay.

We're tying up business before we go on. The emergency hours motion I think we should try to get done as quickly as we can.

I saw Andrew; I wrote him a note yesterday in the House, and he went up to talk to the Speaker, Scott, so I think he hadn't done anything until that. I think he went up to talk to the Speaker to set up a time to meet. Hopefully they'll get back to us soon.

Mr. Scott Reid:

All right. That sounds good.

(1200)

The Chair:

Yes.

David, did you have something to say?

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, I'm just drumming the table.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

Blake.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm okay with May 31. My only concern is that we're then getting to the point where there aren't a lot of meetings left. I do think it's important this gets dealt with.

I understand the committee hasn't made a decision to have the minister, although I believe the committee should be making that decision. We've had some trouble in the past with this committee in getting ministers to come. They indicate their scheduling is difficult.

I would suggest we might want to ask the minister to provisionally set aside some time when one of our meetings might be occurring in June, so we can be sure it would be possible for that to happen should the committee decide to have the minister. I sure would not want to see another one of these excuses that the minister is not available for several months. We can't have that. That'll be unacceptable. I think it would be advisable we do everything we can to prevent that from occurring.

The Chair:

Any comments?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't have a problem with that. [Inaudible--Editor] it's a preparation, that's fine.

The Chair:

Sure. We will let her know.

Yes, Scott.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I would like to invite Laura Stone, the reporter at the Globe and Mail to whom this information was leaked, as a witness as well.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

[Inaudible--Editor] claim journalistic privilege and—

Mr. Scott Reid:

There's actually no legal journalistic privilege. That is a convention, and I have no doubt she'll honour that convention.

But it is very hard to believe, reading what's written here, that this was not meant as very much a deliberate strategy that came from the very top. About the information that was leaked, Mr. Chan asserted at a previous meeting that it was purely negative—that is, it only said what wasn't in the bill—but it said so in a very thorough and exhaustive manner.

I'm reading from the article, that says it's “a bill that will exclude those who only experience mental suffering, such as people with psychiatric conditions”. It goes on to say this: The bill also won’t allow for advance consent, a request to end one’s life in the future, for those suffering with debilitating conditions such as dementia. In addition, there will be no exceptions for “mature minors” who have not yet reached 18 but wish to end their own lives.

These prompted, in the very same story in which this was leaked, a response from Kay Carter's daughter, and that set the tone for all initial discussion of the legislation—which was that such condemnation as occurred, such criticism as occurred, was entirely on the bill not going far enough.

So this was a brilliant exercise, I think a brilliant and very successful exercise, in misdirection of the public debate on what is the most important piece of legislation in the 42nd Parliament. That could not have occurred because some low-level staffer leaked it out. This was very much part of a strategy. My guess is that it came directly out of the Prime Minister's Office. I do not blame the Minister of Justice, per se, for this, although she may or may not have known what was going on.

This deserves a proper investigation. Speaking to the reporter seems a reasonable place to start.

The Chair:

I think we should wait until we ask Law Clerk the questions before we discuss witnesses, and also decide whether or not we're doing that in public. Is that okay?

So can we suspend for a minute until we get our...?

Yes, David.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I just want to clarify where we are.

Mr. Reid made a recommendation, but it's not a motion. Calling in the reporter is a big deal, I think. I'm not sure we've done that before. That's the direction I was going to go in—

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have no idea if we have, to be honest.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay. All right. I just wanted to make sure nothing was decided now.

It's all going to be decided later? Okay.

The Chair:

I think so, yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, I would like to deal with something that Mr. Christopherson didn't say but must be on his mind.

It is not my intention to put the reporter in the kind of position that has occurred in the past, where an assertion is made that if they fail to reveal their source, we're going to take some kind of...they're in contempt of Parliament or something like that. That's not my purpose. My purpose is to try to get more information about how this happened.

This is, I fear, the first of what might become a pattern if it's allowed to go on—that is, not the revelation of all information in the bill in advance but rather of select details that help frame the debate, so as to effectively mislead the public and redirect debate, through the selective release of information, to a body other than Parliament.

There's a reason why bills are introduced in Parliament first, and there's a reason why the entire bill is released, not just the bits the government wants to get out in order to set the stage so they can get the best publicity when dealing with a piece of legislation. That's without reference to the actual content of this bill. I'm trying to be agnostic as to what I think of the bill itself when I make this explanation.

(1205)

Mr. David Christopherson:

Fair enough, and I appreciate the clarification. It's just that, again, the media does have an independent role. It doesn't mean they can run roughshod over anything any time they want, but, boy, I've been around here a while, as you have, Mr. Reid, and I'm just not aware that this has been done. Virtually every issue of privilege comes here because some reporter reported something, and our issue is the sending of that information, the releasing of that information, not the reporter's side of it, which is kind of the catcher's mitt part of it.

We just want to be very, very careful about starting to haul in reporters as witnesses, because Parliament has an incredible amount of power, and as a committee of Parliament we have that power. We have to be very, very careful about how that power is exercised, especially when we're starting to run into the rights and role of the media in a democracy. That's not to say that we can never go there, but we have to deal with this with the greatest of sensitivity and consideration.

The Chair:

I'm going to suspend. We have our witness here in a couple of minutes, and we'll continue this discussion.



The Chair:

I'd like to welcome Deb Deller, the Clerk of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario.

Thank you very much for taking the time to speak to us via video conference. I know you're quite busy there.

You may make an opening statement, and then we'll have a round of questioning from the three parties present at the table here.

(1210)

Ms. Deborah Deller (Clerk of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario, Legislative Assembly of Ontario):

My statement will be fairly brief. I'm not sure how much our experience here at the Ontario Legislative Assembly can help you.

In and around 2008, we had a committee that was having similar discussions to yours around how to improve work-life balance for MPPs. I will say I think it was clear through the deliberations of that committee that the job that you folks do is by its very nature not particularly family friendly. There are challenges that are different, depending on whether you're an in-town member, for example, or an out-of-town member, and whether you have families where your children are school-aged or younger than that.

I think it is quite a difficult subject to kind of come to terms with. I think what we found, too, was that there really isn't any kind of cookie-cutter approach that could be applied that would solve the problem for all members. Every member has a different situation. What we at the Legislative Assembly, in terms of the administration, have tried to do is to offer whatever assistance and service we can to try to improve that for members.

That being said, I will give you a little bit of commentary on what kinds of procedures we have in place and what kind of services are available to members in an attempt to try to improve work-life balance. I can start with the administrative or physical plant area that you're considering. I've looked at the questions you've provided me, and I can tell you that we have an employee assistance program at the Ontario Legislature. It's available to all employees and it's available to the members as well. That program will provide individuals with financial advisers, elder care resources, mental health counselling referrals, and in some instances child care referrals.

We are corporate members of an organization called Kids and Company. That organization provides child care options that can be tailored to suit specific needs. This is particularly beneficial to members, or would be particularly beneficial to members; it provides full-time and part-time child care. There is an emergency child care backup service. There's a nanny placement service. There is extended child care for hours outside the regular nine to five. There are some summer programs that are offered and, again, this organization also provides some elder care.

Having said that, it is a service that is available to all members and all staff. We have found, though, that there is very little uptake in that service. There is a day care that is in the Queen's Park complex. It is not in the legislative building; it's two buildings east of us. It is a day care that is privately run. The Legislative Assembly has no involvement in the operation of that day care, but it is available to members and staff.

In terms of the physical plant, we have over the last several years converted all of our washrooms to make them family friendly. They all, including the male washrooms, have change tables for babies. There are highchairs in the dining room. We have a quiet room that's really intended for meditation and religious rites. Then, in terms of the members' allowances, there is an allowance that is provided for family trips between their residence and Queen's Park.

I should probably add here that there is a very tolerant legislative staff who sometimes get pressed into service for short periods of time when a member might have his or her child in attendance and has to run to the House for a vote. We also provide lots of children's programs, March break programs, tour programs, and that kind of thing that members' children are certainly allowed to avail themselves of.

(1215)



In terms of our procedure or our schedule, in 2008 the House hours were changed and the calendar was changed somewhat. Our calendar currently sees the House sitting from the Tuesday following Family Day, which is the third Tuesday in February, to the first Thursday in June, except this year where they've extended it to the second Thursday in June, then from the Monday after Labour Day in September to the second Thursday in December.

The sitting schedule was changed in 2008, so we currently sit four days a week, Monday through Thursday. On Monday we start at 10:30 in the morning going right into question period. The House meets until roughly noon. We come back then at 1 p.m. and sit through until 6 p.m. On Tuesday and Wednesday, the House commences at 9 o'clock in the morning. We sit until 10:15 a.m., break for a short 15 minutes, and come back for question period until roughly noon. Then the House reconvenes again at 3 p.m., again until 6 p.m. Thursday it is 9 a.m. until noon, and then 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. for private members' business.

The morning meetings that we now have replaced what was probably an average of two meetings in the evening every week, and that was the discussion about whether it was more family friendly to sit more regular hours. I will say that the reviews on that have been mixed. I think it's still the subject of debate. I think family-friendly hours mean something entirely different to an out-of-town member than to an in-town member.

On your list of things to talk about, you also had voting. Our voting is much like yours. It's either a voice vote or a recorded division. A recorded division always takes place immediately or it can be deferred by any whip of any party to the next sessional day, so we have a proceeding on each sessional day that is called deferred votes. Any votes held over from the previous day will be taken up at that point.

Members must be in the chamber to vote, and in committees the votes occur very similarly. They are immediate, although any member can ask for a 20-minute waiting period before the vote is taken.

In terms of technology, probably our experience hasn't been particularly great. We haven't leveraged technology to the fullest extent that we maybe could. We are currently working on a mobile strategy, which we hope will allow greater access to parliamentary documents from members' tablets and phones. Members currently do have access to the Assembly's network from home or from their constituency offices via VPN, and our broadcast and web streaming of House proceedings allows offsite monitoring of the business of the House.

Last, you also had some discussions about alternate debating chambers, and I'm assuming by that you mean the Federation Chamber in Australia and Westminster Hall in the U.K. I don't have much to add on that except we do not have an alternate debating chamber. It has been discussed from time to time in legislative committee, but so far the members haven't really settled on a particular usefulness of that idea.

That's all I have by way of presentation. I'm happy to answer questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. We appreciate your taking the time.

We'll start with Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Thank you.

Thank you very much for touching on most of the issues in your presentation that we've been addressing in this committee.

I'd like to talk a little bit about the hours and the changes that were made in 2008. You noted that was when it went to a four-day week. I just want a clarification. Is the period on Thursday afternoon from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. specifically dedicated to private members' business?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

We did not go to a four-day week in 2008; we'd previously had a four-day week. In 2008 the calendar changed somewhat to create morning sittings as opposed to evening sittings.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Okay.

Ms. Deborah Deller:

To answer your specific question, Thursday afternoon private members' business commences right after routine proceedings, which start at 1 p.m. and usually last about half an hour. We do three items of private members' business on Thursday afternoon. That lasts two and a half hours. There is then a possibility of government business occurring after private members' business. Private members' business usually ends sometime between 4:30 p.m. and 5 p.m. on Thursday, and then we move into government business.

(1220)

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Okay.

With the change in the hours, what was the impact on the people who had families?

I'd also still like to go back to the fact that it's four days. Have you found that, since doing that, more women have run and been successful? Has the number of women gone up because of that?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

We've seen an increase in the number of members in our legislature in the last two elections. I don't think, though, I can point to the reason for that, specifically.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

You mentioned that there's very little uptake on the child care provisions. Is that because there aren't that many members with children? Or are there quite a few?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

I think there are quite a few members with children. I do think, though, that for most of them, they have already made their own arrangements. Many of them, particularly if their children are school-aged, don't bring their children to Toronto with them regularly, so their child care issues are in the riding. I think most of them have already made arrangements that satisfy them.

The uptake we could see would potentially be around emergency child care or last-minute arrangements that somebody might need to make in a pinch.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I also notice that question period is earlier in the day. What was the reason for that?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

There was a desire, I think particularly on the part of the government, to have a more specified time for question period. Previously it followed routine proceedings, and routine proceedings could take anywhere from 40 minutes to an hour and a half, so there was a little bit of uncertainty about when question period would start and end. There was a desire on the part of particularly the government members to have more certainty about that. In order to do that, it had to be separated from routine proceedings. It was made a stand-alone proceeding and moved to the morning.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Do you find it makes members' time more efficient by having question period early in the day?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

I know that everybody's day starts earlier. Whether or not it's more efficient, that's probably something you'd have to ask members.

Again, members who have different roles in the House have a different experience. I think probably for cabinet ministers it's good for them. By noon their responsibility in the House, unless they have legislation that's related to their ministry, is done. They can get on with the business of their ministry.

On the other hand, for the opposition, for some of those members it's the same situation. If they have things to do in the afternoon, their afternoon can be largely free. At the same time, it does require a much earlier start time for things like question period and the committees that each caucus has.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

So in fact it's the predictability of the timing that's more important than the specific time of the day.

Ms. Deborah Deller:

Whether it's more important or not, I can't say, but that was what led to the change.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

In terms of the timing of votes, you mentioned that the votes can be deferred to the next day. How often are votes happening spontaneously, where committees have to be suspended and people's schedules are interrupted, or particularly votes that are late in the day?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

We very rarely anymore have a vote that actually occurs spontaneously. There are some votes that cannot be deferred—on an adjournment motion, for example—but most votes can, and they almost always are.

That said, we typically have one or two votes during deferred votes after question period on any given day. In very rare circumstances, we might have as many as four.

(1225)

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

And that gives a measure of predictability, in terms of the timing of votes, for the purposes of members scheduling their day?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

Absolutely.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

And you've found that's been a positive change?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

I think it was positive for the members. As you say, it gives them some predictability.

I should say that the votes on private members' business are not deferrable, so those votes always occur on Thursday afternoon.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

All of the votes are on Thursday afternoon for all the—

Ms. Deborah Deller:

Private members' business.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

That's because private members' business only occurs one day of the week?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

Thursday afternoon, that's right.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Is that something members have found to be a positive thing? Obviously, for us, we have private members' business each day. By having it all together, is that something that members have typically said is a good thing?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

We've never experienced anything but having private members' business on a single day, so they don't really have anything to compare it to. However, I think they do like it. I think Thursday afternoon ends up having a different tone to the debate. The members have guests who are there specifically for private members' business.

I think they do enjoy the fact that it is all on one single day.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

And they would they be able to leave for their constituencies earlier if they weren't attending the private members' business, because there are rarely government votes on Thursday afternoon. Would that be—

Ms. Deborah Deller:

Yes. If any government business comes to a vote, it's almost always deferred until Monday, but on Thursday each item of private members' business is voted on.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Schmale, seven minutes.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you very much for your comments. I appreciate your time here today for this very valuable conversation we're having.

The first question might be a little difficult for you to answer, but I'm curious, because it might lead into my next round. In terms of the amount of members who have their spouses in Toronto, do you know roughly—it doesn't need to be exact—how many that would be?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

I am sorry, I don't know.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

No problem.

Ms. Deborah Deller:

Do you mean in Toronto regularly, or—

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Through their secondary residence in Toronto. They would actually move their family to Toronto to take part in—

Ms. Deborah Deller:

There are very few of those.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Okay.

Now, during this process, I spoke to a few staff members who had talked about question period being moved to earlier in the day. Many said that means their day starts early, but the end time did not change. They were actually working longer.

I see you smirking, so probably you have heard that too.

For families, I can see that for those with children, it would be very difficult to spend the morning with their child, even see them in the morning at all, if they're working as staff and have to be ready for question period right at around 10:30 or 11:00, I believe you said.

Ms. Deborah Deller:

Yes.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I'm curious; with you being part of the staff, what does that do to your day, if anything?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

That's a good question.

Look, you have to be careful, I think, when you're thinking about hours, because as I say, what suits some members doesn't suit others, and there is an impact on staff as well.

What we did was that we effectively traded two evenings a week, which was the average that the House would sit during any sitting period, for three mornings a week, three two-hour periods, that are always.... We ended up in fact increasing the number of hours that the House actually sits.

You're right, it does create this situation where the staff in and around the chamber can't just arrive right at the time that the House is scheduled to sit. They have to be there ahead of time to make sure that they're prepared, that the microphones are all working and so on. So I think for the staff, it created some issues around scheduling for us—for Hansard staff, broadcast staff, some of the clerks. They might have previously been able to come in a bit later in the morning to compensate for the later night, but now we can't do that, so we've had to alter shifts.

With all of that said, though, one of the things I said to the committee, when they were considering that here, is that we will make the adjustment to make sure the House works. The more important thing is that the House works for the members.

(1230)

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Right.

You mentioned a few things in terms of the House and said you haven't used technology well. I'm curious when you say that, because we're having constant debates on the members' calendar, in order for our staff, our spouses, our families, whomever, to see the calendar. It's somewhat of a complicated process here right now.

Can I ask how you were dealing with that? How do members share their calendars with their families and staff?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

The parliamentary calendar is posted. I think yours is too.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I meant personal calendars, sorry, my apologies.

Ms. Deborah Deller:

Really, the personal calendar of members is left up to the member and his or her staff. I think most members have a staff person who's responsible for scheduling. Many times those staffers are in communication with the member's family to make sure that they're aware of any events. Sometimes they're consulted with, because a lot of events are in the evening or on the weekend.

To my knowledge, and in my experience, the constituency staff, as well as the staff at Queen's Park, work in coordination with each other in developing the calendar. But beyond that, I would say for us, for the assembly staff, we have little or no involvement in members' personal calendars.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

To your knowledge, are members on their own to use whatever method, like a Google calendar, so to speak, or do you have a provided calendar through your House intranet?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

[Inaudible--Editor] calendar is Microsoft Outlook, but members are free to use any other application they want or any other calendar app.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

To your knowledge, you haven't heard of any security issues with that or any other problems that have arisen by using just Outlook?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

No, none.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Okay.

In terms of the legislative calendar—I don't have it in front of me, I do apologize—and the sitting weeks, blocks of sitting weeks, on average do you sit for two weeks straight, then a constituency week? Or is it three? Is there a set pattern?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

In 2008 we actually used the House of Commons model to have more constituency weeks and then fewer sitting weeks in a block. It is roughly three or four weeks, and then a week's break, another three or four weeks, and then a week's break. Every now and then, for example this year, the calendar doesn't work particularly well because there are certain specific weeks, like March break week, Easter week, that kind of thing. I think this spring we ran into a situation where the House would have been sitting for seven weeks straight, and then would have a week off, and then a week on, and then another week off. By motion the House made an amendment to the calendar to alter that.

The Chair:

Just on a point of order, we don't have any off weeks or break weeks. We just have constituency weeks here.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Ms. Deborah Deller:

Constituency weeks: I know better than anyone that constituency weeks are not exactly holidays.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

It was a suggestion as well.

I guess I only have a few seconds left.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Then I will say thank you very much for your comments. I do appreciate them.

The Chair:

Next up is Mr. Christopherson, your old friend.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Deb, it's good to see you again.

Ms. Deborah Deller:

It's good to see you.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It's been a while.

I'm just going to jump into a couple of things here and pick up on Jamie's last question. We had a long-time staffer come in, a veteran, who talked about how he thought the three weeks worked best in terms of the demeanour of politicians, the demeanour of the place, the tone and everything.

I've taken into account the variation in the way you do it now at Queen's Park. The recommendation was that less than three and we're not as efficient, more than three and we start to get into some tensions just being together that long, given the things we do. Do you have any thoughts on that, Deb?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

I think it's a valid point. I think what I've noticed is that since we've had more constituency weeks built into the calendar in fact there is this kind of cooling-off period that occurs every now and then. Everybody goes away, finds out what's happening in the constituency and what's really important in the job they do, and then they come back ready to get the business of the House.

I think in that respect, yes, it's made an improvement in the overall climate of the legislature. On the occasion when we've had only one or two weeks in between constituency weeks, I think it's true that it's not a very productive period of time. There isn't enough time for committees to get really anything of any value done.

So I'm inclined to agree that a three-week block of sitting time is probably minimal, and I would say you don't probably want to go past seven weeks.

(1235)

Mr. David Christopherson:

Seven? We're nowhere near seven. My goodness.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson: It reminds me of my mom's saying, which was, “Don't go away mad, just go away.”

Moving on, another issue that came up, Deb, was the number of points. You may recall that back in the day—I think you were deputy clerk at the time—we brought in the point system. We adopted the system that's here. We transported that to Queen's Park, and I understand it's working well. One of the issues that has come up—and it's one that stays with me, again, just from having been around so long—is the number of members who are maybe not bringing their family here as often as they would like because of the politics around the reporting mechanism.

Again, you will recall that back in the day we moved to the point system because there was an inherent unfairness in reporting dollar values. Howie Hampton, who had to come from Rainy River, spent a lot more money going to the capital than I did when I was an hour or so down the road from Toronto. We moved to that point system, but now what we're finding is that especially younger members—they're getting younger—with a number of kids are worried about the politics of that reporting mechanism.

The suggestion was made about whether there is some way we can modify the point system, not in any way to prevent the transparency that's there now, but so there isn't this standout number that one of my counterparts with three or four kids is going to generate. Denise is coming up in June, and I think it's the first time this year she's had a chance to come up, but that's one or two points over the course of the year. It hardly even gets noticed, but if I had three kids, that one trip alone.... Also, the younger your kids are, the more you want them to be with you to experience it.

Anyway, there are two points. One, do you have this issue? Has it come up at all since the point system has been in place at Queen's Park? Second, do you have any thoughts that come to your mind as to how that can be reported in a way that doesn't make it stand out for the member but the public still doesn't lose their right to transparency and accountability?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

It's not something that has come up either at the Board of Internal Economy or with me privately with members. It may be that the way we report it, which is sort of in aggregate, so you can't really see individual trips, might be the reason why it's not as much of an issue here. I don't know.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Well, get ready, because you're probably not quite caught up to the full disclosure pattern we're into, but if you're not there yet, it's coming. Take that with you.

By the way, it's so great to see you again. It really is. It has been a long time. I was Deputy Speaker for a year as part of the 13 years I was there, and I was a House leader, so we worked together very closely. It's great to see a long-time friend.

The last point would be, again, the presentations from staff talking about their kids and their participation, and how much it meant to them as a staff member to be able to bring their children here. We have gone in the opposite direction over the last while. Stoffer's no longer here to give us the all-party party, and “Hilloween” is gone, although there's some semblance of it. But it's not like it used to be.

It sounds like it's still going full steam ahead at Queen's Park. I wondered if you would either recap or elaborate on that for us.

Ms. Deborah Deller:

I'm a good case in point, I think. For me, too, the job has not been particularly family friendly. When my kids were little, I had long hours and spent long days away from them—I missed my son's first birthday, in fact—but they also had the benefit of having some experiences that other kids just didn't get. They were frequently at this building and got to know it and the people in it very well. They still talk about their experiences in those days.

Just yesterday I ran into one of our members who has a little girl who's about two. She's very comfortable here. She and I had a conversation. I think there was a time when she was afraid of the black robe, but she's gotten used to that now. She too is very used to being here. You will remember that when Chris Stockwell was the Speaker, he had two young children, and they used to play ball hockey in the hallway right outside the Speaker's apartment on the third floor.

(1240)

Mr. David Christopherson:

I have pictures of my daughter dribbling a basketball down the hallways.

Ms. Deborah Deller:

Not much has changed. We make a real effort to welcome the children of members and the children of staff. As I say, there are certain programs—the March break program, for example, which we make available to the public—that we make available particularly to the children of staff and members. They come in, they make paper maces, they do scavenger hunts and all kinds of things.

We also have some colouring books about the building—crayons, connect the dots, that kind of thing—so that if a staffer's child is there visiting, or a member's child, we have things they can use to help them keep busy.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Throw that in front of some of the members sometimes, too.

Deb, thanks so much. I really enjoyed discussing this. It was great to see you again. Take care.

Ms. Deborah Deller:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Now we'll move on to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I'll take up where David left off. How does travel by family work? Do the points apply to the individual, or can a whole family go on a single point? Is each dependant given their own point, or do they travel as a group on a point?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

One return trip equals one travel point. If there's more than one individual, they're using more than one point.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So a member with four kids will use an awful lot of points in a trip.

Ms. Deborah Deller:

They are entitled to 64 travel points, or at least round trips within their 64-trip travel allotment. There is a list of qualifying family members who can use the points.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How many members fly rather than drive? Federally, obviously most members fly, but in Toronto it's probably quite a few less.

Ms. Deborah Deller:

Yes, that's one other thing to keep in mind, that the federal House of Commons has a different challenge. You have members from much longer distances. I would say that we have members who, if they can make the drive within about four hours, more typically drive. For anything longer than that, they're flying back and forth.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If they drive, do they have to report their family members in the car with them as separate points, or do they go on the one point?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

No, they don't have to report them.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You said that the day care is private and operationally independent of the chamber, but I'm curious, if you can answer some of the questions, about operationally how it works. Is there a long waiting list? Is there any capacity for drop-in? Does it stay open long, if the House sits long? It's this kind of operational question, about usability to members.

Ms. Deborah Deller:

No, it's not tailored to the House, so it sits the regular hours that any day care sits. I think you need to pick up your child by six o'clock in the evening. The last time I checked, there was a wait list—not a long wait list, but a wait list nevertheless. As I say, it operates independently of the Legislative Assembly.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is it open to members and their staff, or all staff of the House? How does it work?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

It's open to the public, but it's predominantly used by staff. There have been members who have used it. I don't think there's any member currently using it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Understood.

On another topic, when we have a bill here, it typically takes four days to get through a government bill, this kind of thing. There are less than a third of the number of members in Queen's Park than are here. How long does each member get, because they speak more than once, and how long does it take to get through a bill, typically, in terms of sitting days or sitting hours?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

For debate time, each caucus gets a one-hour lead-off on any piece of legislation; thereafter it's a 20-minute allotment of time. After seven hours of debate, it reduces to 10 minutes per member. Following every speech, there is then a 10-minute period for questions and comments.

As to the length of time for a typical bill, we see many bills now being time-allocated. In order to time-allocate a bill, the government has to have allowed for.... Second reading either has to have occurred, with the debate having collapsed naturally, or they have to allow for at least six and a half hours of debate at second reading before they can move a time allocation motion. Time allocation then requires a two-hour debate, and after that, whatever amount of time they've allocated to the further consideration of that bill is what we'll see.

I guess typically we would see.... I've seen bills, with unanimous consent, pass in the blink of an eye and others take months and months. If the government were pressed and wanted to get a bill through the House and committees, they could usually do it in about six days.

(1245)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. Thank you.

I was going to share my time with Ms. Petitpas Taylor.

The Chair:

Ms. Petitpas Taylor.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Ms. Deller, first of all, thank you so much for joining us this morning. As you're well aware, PROC has been asked to look at policies to make Parliament more family friendly. That was the first part of the work that was given.

After the past few weeks or few months, we've seen that it's more than that. It's also looking at improving work-life balance for us and also looking at making Parliament more inclusive. For that, I have a bit of a potpourri of questions for you. They may not really follow, but they're just important questions that I really want to ask.

First and foremost, what is the average age of your sitting members right now in Ontario?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

I'm going say first of all that we don't have a defined benefit pension plan here for members, so the average age is getting higher. At this point I would say it's probably in the mid-fifties.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Do you think this is perhaps why not many people are using the Kids and Company program—because their kids are probably a lot older?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

It could be. We haven't polled the members, so I can't really say for sure. Certainly there are a number of members with young children, but as I say, by and large they already have their own arrangements in place.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

What's the percentage of female members in Ontario?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

We currently have 38 female members out of a House of 107.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

At one point during your presentation, you talked about washrooms, saying that all of your washrooms were suited for both men and women, if they had young children. I have a specific question: do you guys have any gender-neutral washrooms in your House?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

Yes. We have gender-neutral washrooms, and those same washrooms are fully accessible. They're single washrooms, so that visitors and staff members who require a little bit of extra space can manoeuvre in them.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Here is one last question, with respect to decorum in the House. Do you guys have any specific policies with respect to keeping the House a bit more civilized in Ontario?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

If you're suggesting that our House is a bit more civilized than yours, I'll pass that along to the Speaker, and he'll thank you.

Aside from the normal rules around decorum in the House, which are quite similar to the ones you have yourself, and a Speaker who makes a valiant attempt to make sure those rules are adhered to and that there is at least a level of civility going into the debate in the House, I don't think we're doing anything special here that other parliaments aren't.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Thank you so much.

The Chair:

Mr. Richards, you have five minutes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thanks.

Thank you for being here. I wanted to start with a couple of questions surrounding some of the private members' business and the question period. The first question I have, though, is how many MPPs are in the Legislative Assembly there?

(1250)

Ms. Deborah Deller:

There are 107.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's about a third, then, of what we have in the House of Commons. I was noting, looking at your typical calendar for a week, that the hours you sit on Monday to Thursday, I would say, are quite similar to the number of total hours we would sit Monday through Thursday here in the House of Commons. Of course, we have a Friday on which we sit as well.

It looks as though the main difference is that there would be one fewer question period by not having a Friday sitting. Also, you have about two and a half hours less time for private members' business in the Legislative Assembly there than we have. Of course, you have a third of the members, so proportionally that still probably gives you more per member by way of time for private members' business.

I can see the impact we would have here, if we were to approach this the way the Liberal government is hoping to do, which is to get rid of the Fridays; that's something they're seeking to do. I think the effect we would have would be to see less time for private members' business here. We would also see less time for question period, and therefore the opposition would lose those opportunities and so would individual members of the governing party. That's obviously a concern that I have.

I want to move to question period. Typically, your question period now is at 10:30 Monday through Thursday. When would it have been held prior to the changes that you made?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

It was in the afternoon. We used to come into the House at 1:30 p.m. and do routine proceedings, and question period was part of routine proceedings. So it could occur any time between 2 p.m. and 2:30 p.m.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Understood. You've obviously already indicated that one of the consequences of moving it earlier in the day is that the start time is much earlier for many people to prepare for question period. I guess the one difference you would have there...and it sounds like you've had some concerns and feedback around that, with people feeling that it hasn't been helpful to them. I think that's what I was hearing. I'll let you tell us if that is actually the case.

One further thing to consider is that people are coming from different time zones. Everyone coming in to Toronto to sit there would be coming from the same time zone. In our case, we have people coming from two-hour or three-hour time zone changes. I happen to be from Alberta so it's a two-hour change for me. For my colleagues in British Columbia, it's a three-hour change. For Monday, my flight gets in around one o'clock in the morning. A lot of people coming from B.C. on a Sunday evening would get in around the same time, at one o'clock in the morning. The impact of an earlier start on someone coming from British Columbia on a Monday could be pretty significant, with their day starting at seven o'clock in the morning when they're still at four o'clock in the morning Pacific time. I can see the potential challenges this could create.

In relation to question period, have you had feedback on starting earlier? It sounded like you had. Has it been problematic for some people? Have you had feedback on other unintended consequences of those changes?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

I think it was an adjustment in the beginning. We had to make adjustments in order to accommodate that. We had to make adjustments in committee time, for example, because mornings were typically used for committee meetings. After making those adjustments, there were still mixed reviews. I think some members prefer it because their day is much more predictable, or as predictable as a member's day can get.

Other members who just really don't like it.... Members will tell you that as the day progresses, and the news cycle progresses, things can come up later, after question period is done, and they have to wait till the next day before there's any consideration of it in question period.

There's that issue. There is the very early morning start time. Reviews with respect to the legislative staff are mixed. We made some adjustments to schedules, and I think we have handled it very well, with very minimal disruption. I'm not sure you can say that the decision was good or bad. It depends on whom you speak with. You make a good point about time zones. There are considerations that you have to take into account that we didn't have take into account. Those are important considerations.

(1255)

Mr. Blake Richards:

From the statements you made earlier about being careful when we're making changes to hours, I think any change we make may be friendly for some members and their families and not so friendly for others, so we should be proceeding carefully. Is that a fair comment?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

That would be my advice, yes.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Hello. Thank you for being here today.

First of all, I find that the programs and services you offer at the Ontario Legislature are amazing. The summer program, the March break program—they sound very exciting. As Mr. Christopherson said, they would be fun even for some members.

Do those programs usually take place when the kids are off school in a sitting week? Is that when you find them most beneficial?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

It's good when the kids are off school—when the House is sitting and and even when it's not. At March break, for example, the House doesn't sit but the program is offered and many members avail themselves of it. Some out-of-town members find March break a perfect time to bring the kids to Toronto and spend the week there.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

And you're finding high levels of participation in this program over the day care program you have?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

Those programs are always fully booked.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I definitely think it's a good idea, and something that maybe we should try here. I don't know how many members will fly into Ottawa on an off week, but certainly there are other opportunities where we could have it throughout the year. It's something to talk about, for sure.

I'd like to find out when you removed the Friday sittings. You said it wasn't 2008. Do you remember what year it was, and if you were the clerk at that time or the deputy?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

I was here, because I remember the Friday sittings. When the House sat on Fridays it did not meet on Wednesdays, so it was still a four-day week. Wednesdays were reserved for cabinet and caucus meetings, and some committees would meet in the afternoon, but the House did not meet and it met for half a day until one o'clock on Fridays.

The change to sitting on Wednesday and dispensing with the Friday occurred sometime in the early eighties, but I'd have to check.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

That sounds similar to our week, in a way; however, the House does sit on Wednesday, but we do have our caucus meetings and it starts a little later in the day.

Do you know what the debate was around the main purpose of changing the hours, creating more predictability, and perhaps at that point, even if you weren't around, why the Wednesday was switched to the Friday?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

Yes. It had to do with out-of-town members not being able to spend enough time with family. There was a push to get rid of the Friday sitting so that those members who had to travel could get home in a decent time to spend with their family and have some constituency office hours.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

From what you may know, do a lot of the members have constituency hours on the Fridays?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

A lot of them have constituency office hours on Friday, and many of them even on Saturday.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It's not brought up a lot, but there is hesitation to make change. You know, we have to be careful about what change we make because it does affect everyone differently, but that doesn't mean we shouldn't strive to make changes that may be for the overall good of family friendliness and inclusiveness just because we may be afraid to make a mistake. We should always be willing to adapt and change and try new things.

Oftentimes we're worried about political blowback, about what people will think, about public perception. It's not brought up often, but that is the internal fear that a lot of members may have to even bring up this topic or to speak up. They hesitate because they don't want to be seen as that person who wants to work less, quote-unquote.

Was that a similar fear for your legislature, and how did you resolve that?

(1300)

Ms. Deborah Deller:

You know, it's always a fear. It's too bad. I'm going to be completely blunt here and say that I think this bashing of politicians and the work they do has become a popular sport. It's really unfortunate. I wish members would stand up for themselves. The hours are terrible. They spend lots of time away from their families, particularly out-of-town members.

And you're right that frequently, whenever there is a change, there is an attempt by those who are commenting on it to suggest that maybe the change is made in order to somehow give the members some undeserved benefit. What happened here in 2008, when they wanted to get rid of the night sittings, was that they felt they wouldn't be able to withstand the public criticism of having fewer hours in the legislative chamber, so the question was not so much about whether they needed that many hours in the legislative chamber, but about what would have the least negative reaction from the public. That's why they were keen to replace the evening sittings with morning sittings. We ended up, in fact, with more hours of House time in the week rather than fewer hours. I'm not sure in the end how that necessarily improved work-life balance.

You made a comment at the beginning of your question about resistance to change. I think that's largely true, especially in a parliament. However, I think it has to be considered change, and you have to think about what might be the unintended consequences.

A small example of that is what happened here in 2008. Initially they had every day, including Monday, start at 9 a.m. Those were the hours when the House first adopted them. The out-of-town members then argued that previously they might have been able to travel on Monday morning to get to Queen's Park on time. With a 9 o'clock start time, they were now having to leave their homes Sunday evening, in many cases missing Sunday dinner with their families in order to be here for 9 o'clock on Monday morning. There was an amendment made to the hours, so now on Monday we start at 10:30. It was a small compromise, but it was something the committee hadn't really considered when it made the recommendation to change the hours.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you so much for all the detail you've provided.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Our time has expired, but I have one follow-up question.

On the Thursday afternoons, when you have private member votes and the government votes are deferred, do all the members stay for those votes, or do some who go a long way away try to sneak out Thursday afternoons?

Ms. Deborah Deller:

With private members' business on Thursday afternoon, for those three votes we take for private members' business, not all the members are in the legislature. But they also typically cross party lines, so the vote is not necessarily party by party. I think there isn't as much of a need for all members to be there. If we move on to government business on Thursday afternoon, if there is a vote, it will in all likelihood be deferred until Monday.

The Chair:

Thank you very much for appearing today. I know you're busy, but this has been very helpful for us. We really appreciate your time.

We are adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1145)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour et bienvenue à la 20e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, en cette première session de la 42e législature. Cette réunion est publique et sera télédiffusée.

Pour les 15 premières minutes, nous allons continuer à étudier la question de privilège concernant la divulgation prématurée de la teneur du projet de loi C-14. Au cours de la deuxième heure, nous allons reprendre l'étude des initiatives visant à favoriser une Chambre des communes propice à la vie de famille. La greffière de l'Assemblée législative de l'Ontario sera avec nous par vidéoconférence.

Par manque de temps, nous allons aujourd'hui nous limiter aux déclarations préliminaires du greffier et du légiste.

Vous avez beaucoup de temps parce que nous ne comptons vous interroger pendant l'heure que nous réservons normalement à cela. Nous allons remettre les questions à un autre moment. Ainsi, personne ne sera privé de son privilège, et nous n'aurons pas à entendre les plaintes de membres qui ne peuvent pas poser de questions.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président: J'aimerais souhaiter la bienvenue à un habitué de la Chambre, Marc Bosc, greffier par intérim de la Chambre des communes.

Merci de nous consacrer tout ce temps et de participer aux travaux du Comité et à d'autres questions.

Je souhaite également la bienvenue à Me Philippe Dufresne, légiste et conseiller parlementaire.

J'imagine que vous avez quelques petites choses à nous dire.

J'invite l'un ou l'autre à prendre la parole.

M. Marc Bosc (greffier par intérim de la Chambre des communes, Chambre des communes):

Merci, monsieur le président.

En fait, j'ai préparé une déclaration. Nous étions prêts tous les deux à répondre à vos questions, mais de toute évidence, nous allons reporter cela à un autre moment.

Nous sommes ravis d'être ici et de faire un suivi sur les questions de privilège qui ont été soumises au Comité le 19 avril 2016.[Français]

Pour la Chambre, les questions de privilège sont des occasions importantes de débattre des privilèges tant individuels que collectifs, de les définir et, le cas échéant, de voir comment éviter que ne se reproduise une atteinte à un privilège en particulier. Pour comprendre pleinement le rôle du Comité dans ce processus, il convient de rappeler la procédure entourant les questions de privilège et, notamment, la différence entre le rôle du Président et celui de la Chambre et de ses comités à cet égard.[Traduction]

Comme l'a clairement énoncé le Président Regan dans sa décision du 19 avril dernier, le rôle de la présidence est très précis et limité en ce qui concerne les questions de privilège.

L'extrait provenant de la page 141 de la deuxième édition de La procédure et les usages de la Chambre des communes, qu'a cité le président, mérite d'être répété; le voici:

On attache une grande importance aux allégations d'atteinte aux privilèges parlementaires. Un député qui désire soulever une question de privilège à la Chambre doit d'abord convaincre la présidence que de prime abord, sa préoccupation peut faire l'objet d'une question de privilège. Le rôle du président se limite à décider si la question qu'a soulevée le député est de nature à autoriser celui-ci à proposer une motion qui aura priorité sur toute autre affaire à l'Ordre du jour de la Chambre, autrement dit, que le Président pourra considérer de prime abord comme une question de privilège. Le cas échéant, la Chambre devra immédiatement prendre la question en considération. C'est finalement la Chambre qui établira s'il y a eu atteinte au privilège ou outrage.

(1150)

[Français]

Bref, le rôle du Président se limite à déterminer si, à première vue, la question soulevée devra être traitée en priorité. Il reviendra ensuite à la Chambre de se prononcer sur la question. Dans la plupart des cas où le Président conclut qu'une question de privilège est fondée de prime abord, la motion débattue à la Chambre qui en découle demande au Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre d'étudier la question, c'est-à-dire d'examiner en détail les circonstances entourant l'atteinte au privilège.[Traduction]

À bien des égards, l'examen d'une question de privilège ressemble à n'importe quel autre examen entrepris par le Comité. Le règlement permet au Comité de demander à entendre les personnes et avoir les documents et dossiers qu'il estime nécessaires et, comme il est « maître de son ordre du jour » le Comité est aussi libre d'organiser son examen comme il l'entend. Ainsi, il peut décider de consacrer une ou plusieurs réunions à l'étude de la question et de présenter ensuite ses conclusions et recommandations à la Chambre, même s'il n'est pas obligé de le faire.

À plusieurs reprises par le passé, lorsque ce comité permanent s'est penché sur une question de privilège, il a souvent invité à comparaître le député qui avait soulevé la question. Si d'autres députés sont directement touchés ou visés par une question de privilège, ils sont également souvent invités à témoigner pour expliquer les conséquences de l'atteinte au privilège sur leur travail. Lorsque des ministères fédéraux ont des données pertinentes à fournir, le ou les ministres concernés comparaissent devant le Comité, accompagnés de hauts fonctionnaires.[Français]

En 2001, la Chambre des communes avait saisi le Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre d'une question de privilège semblable après que le Président eut conclu que la divulgation aux médias de détails concernant un projet de loi avant son dépôt à la Chambre constituait, de prime abord, une question de privilège.

Durant son examen, le Comité avait entendu le député ayant d'abord soulevé la question, puis présenté la motion. Le ministre de la Justice et de hauts fonctionnaires représentant le Bureau du Conseil privé avaient aussi comparu devant le Comité.

En réponse à une autre question de privilège sur un sujet semblable soulevée plus tôt la même année, le gouvernement avait déjà mandaté une entreprise privée d'entreprendre un examen administratif concernant cette divulgation de renseignements. Ainsi, pour l'aider dans son étude, le Comité avait exercé son droit d'obtenir des documents, et il avait reçu une copie du rapport.[Traduction]

Par conséquent, en ce qui concerne le processus, un résumé des audiences du Comité, ou tout autre document ou rapport étudié dans le cadre de son examen, servira de base à l'élaboration d'un rapport, si le Comité souhaite en produire un. Le rapport en question pourra ensuite être déposé à la Chambre et une motion portant adoption du rapport pourra ultimement être présentée, être débattue, puis faire l'objet d'une décision de la Chambre. Dans le passé, les rapports sur les questions de privilège donnaient habituellement le contexte entourant les questions ainsi que des recommandations concrètes que le Comité jugeait utiles.

Le Comité peut recommander que des sanctions particulières soient prises à l'encontre d'un député, d'un membre du public, d'un bureau ou d'un groupe quelconque, mais il n'est pas tenu de le faire. Par exemple, dans son 40e rapport produit en 2001 dans l'affaire que je viens d'évoquer, le Comité a résumé ses conclusions, mais n'a recommandé aucune sanction. En fin de compte, le Comité a conclu qu'il n'y avait eu ni outrage à la Chambre ni atteinte au privilège de la Chambre et de ses députés.

Si la Chambre des communes approuve le contenu du rapport du Comité, que ce soit par consentement unanime ou en suivant les règles normales du débat qui s'appliquent en pareils cas, ce rapport sera officiellement adopté par la Chambre et les recommandations ou les sanctions précises qu'il pourrait prévoir deviendraient des ordonnances officielles de la Chambre des communes et appelleraient une intervention ou une réponse.

(1155)

[Français]

L'Administration de la Chambre reste à la disposition du Comité pour lui offrir le soutien dont il a besoin alors qu'il examine l'approche qu'il privilégiera dans l'étude de cette question de privilège.

Nous nous ferons un plaisir de répondre la prochaine fois à toutes vos questions en la matière.

Je vous remercie de votre attention. [Traduction]

Le président:

Le Comité me permet-il de poser une question d'ordre technique sur ce qu'il vient tout juste de dire?

Un député: Absolument.

Le président: Quand vous dites qu'il pourrait y avoir des sanctions à l'encontre d'un député ou d'un membre du public, est-ce que « membre du public » comprend les employés qui travaillent sur la Colline du Parlement et les sénateurs?

M. Marc Bosc:

Oui. Des sénateurs... En fait, cela veut dire que le Comité peut nommer qui il veut, mais il faut réfléchir à comment prendre ces sanctions.

Le président:

Merci.

Y a-t-il d'autres questions d'ordre technique?

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Je crois comprendre que nos deux témoins seront présents au début de la prochaine réunion, monsieur le président?

Le président:

À l'heure où nous les convoquerons, oui.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord. Mes questions portent sur le contenu.

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Monsieur le président, à peu près à quel moment aura lieu la prochaine réunion? La semaine prochaine, ou...?

Le président:

Nous en discuterons une fois que les témoins seront partis, d'accord?

M. Blake Richards:

Très bien.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous savons que vous êtes très occupés. Je suis désolé d'avoir à vous convoquer de nouveau. Quelqu'un a demandé un vote, alors nous n'avons pas le choix.

M. Marc Bosc:

Nous restons à la disposition du Comité.

Le président:

D'accord.

Tout le monde a son calendrier. Il y a trois possibilités: le 19 mai pour la première heure, le 31 mai pour les deux heures et, en juin... en fait, nous avons tout le mois de juin, mais allons-y pour le 2 juin.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je préfère le 31 mai, car je ne suis pas disponible le 19.

Le président:

D'autres observations?

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Nous devons donner des instructions de rédaction. Vous proposez...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suggérais le 31 mai simplement parce que j'aimerais être présent, et que ce n'est pas possible pour moi le 19.

Le président:

Je ne serais pas surpris que les instructions de rédaction nous prennent plus d'une heure, car il y a beaucoup de matière.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, c'est ce que je crois également.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous devrions utiliser les deux heures au complet.

Une voix: [Inaudible]

M. Scott Reid:

Est-ce que c'est un oui?

Le président:

C'est ce que je crois comprendre. Un certain nombre de recommandations vont être formulées à l'automne, et j'estime que nous devrions utiliser notre temps à bon escient pour nous assurer de pouvoir exercer une influence sur ce processus.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous savez quoi? Je ne vois aucune raison d'éviter le 31 mai. Cela me conviendrait.

Le président:

Est-ce que tout le monde est d'accord? Nous allons voir s'ils sont disponibles pour une heure le 31 mai? C'est bien.

Avant de poursuivre, il y a la question de la motion sur les heures du Parlement en situation d'urgence que nous devrions tenter de régler dès que possible.

J'ai écrit une note à Andrew hier à la Chambre et je l'ai vu aller parler au Président. Je pense que c'était sa première démarche. Il a sans doute voulu fixer un rendez-vous, et nous espérons avoir des nouvelles sous peu.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien. Cela me semble acceptable.

(1200)

Le président:

Oui.

David, vous aviez quelque chose à ajouter?

M. David Christopherson:

Non, je pianotais simplement sur la table.

Des voix: Ah, ah!

Le président:

Blake.

M. Blake Richards:

Le 31 mai me convient. Ma seule crainte c'est que nous en arrivons à un point où il nous reste très peu de séances. J'estime important que nous réglions cette question.

Je sais que le comité n'a pas encore déterminé si la ministre devait être convoquée, mais je crois effectivement que c'est ce que nous devrions faire. Il est arrivé par le passé qu'il soit difficile pour nous de faire comparaître des ministres en raison de leur horaire très chargé.

Je suggérerais donc que nous demandions à la ministre de nous réserver à l'avance du temps pour une réunion qui pourrait avoir lieu en juin, ce qui nous assurerait de sa présence si le comité décide effectivement de la faire comparaître. Je suis persuadé que nous ne souhaitons pas entendre encore une fois une ministre nous répondre qu'elle ne sera pas disponible avant plusieurs mois. Nous devons absolument éviter cela. Ce serait inacceptable. Je crois qu'il convient de tout mettre en oeuvre pour empêcher qu'une telle chose se produise.

Le président:

Des commentaires?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela me convient parfaitement. [inaudible] en guise de préparation, c'est très bien.

Le président:

Certainement. Nous allons l'en informer.

Oui, Scott.

M. Scott Reid:

J'aimerais que nous convoquions Laura Stone, la journaliste du Globe and Mail qui a bénéficié de cette fuite.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

[inaudible] invoquer le secret professionnel du journaliste et...

M. Scott Reid:

D'un point de vue juridique, le secret professionnel du journaliste n'existe pas. C'est une simple convention, mais je suis persuadé qu'elle voudra la respecter.

En lisant ce que j'ai sous les yeux, j'arrive pourtant difficilement à croire que cela ne découle pas d'une stratégie délibérément dictée par les plus hautes instances. Lors d'une réunion précédente, M. Chan a affirmé que l'information divulguée s'inscrivait dans une perspective totalement négative en traitant uniquement de ce que l'on ne retrouvait pas dans le projet de loi, mais en le faisant d'une manière très approfondie et tout à fait exhaustive.

On peut lire dans cet article que le projet de loi « ne s'appliquera pas aux personnes dont les souffrances sont uniquement mentales, par exemple les personnes atteintes de troubles psychiatriques ». Elle écrit plus loin: Le projet de loi ne permet pas non plus le consentement préalable, c'est-à-dire qu'il ne permet pas que des personnes souffrant de maladies débilitantes comme la démence demandent à l'avance de mettre fin à leurs jours. En outre, il n'y aura pas d'exceptions pour les « mineurs matures », les moins de 18 ans qui voudraient mourir.

Dans le même article, la journaliste présente la réaction que cette fuite a suscitée chez la fille de Kay Carter, ce qui a donné le ton à l'amorce du débat sur le projet de loi. Ainsi, toutes les condamnations et les critiques parlaient d'un projet de loi qui n'allait pas suffisamment loin.

Voilà donc un brillant exemple d'un stratagème qui a très bien fonctionné en faussant le débat public au sujet de la mesure législative la plus importante de cette 42e législature. Ce n'est pas un simple employé qui aurait pu orchestrer tout cela en divulguant l'information. Cela s'inscrit plutôt dans une vaste stratégie. Je dirais d'ailleurs que cela émane directement du Cabinet du premier ministre. Je ne blâme donc pas la ministre de la Justice à proprement parler, même s'il est possible qu'elle ait été au courant de tout cela.

Une enquête en bonne et due forme s'impose. Dans ce contexte, il m'apparaît raisonnable de parler d'abord à la journaliste concernée.

Le président:

Je pense que nous devrions d'abord nous enquérir de la marche à suivre auprès de notre légiste avant de discuter des témoins que nous souhaiterions convoquer et de déterminer si nous allons nous réunir en public ou à huis clos. Est-ce que cela vous convient?

Nous pouvons donc interrompre nos travaux un instant jusqu'à ce que... ?

Oui, David.

M. David Christopherson:

Je veux simplement m'assurer de bien savoir où nous en sommes.

M. Reid a formulé une recommandation, mais n'a pas présenté de motion. À mon avis, la convocation de cette journaliste n'est pas une mince affaire. Je ne suis pas certain que cela ait déjà été fait. C'était le sens de mon intervention...

M. Scott Reid:

En toute franchise, je ne sais pas si nous l'avons déjà fait.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est d'accord. Je voulais seulement m'assurer que nous n'allions rien décider pour l'instant.

Toutes ces décisions seront prises ultérieurement? D'accord.

Le président:

C'est ce que je crois effectivement.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais réagir à ce que M. Christopherson a laissé sous-entendre sans l'exprimer ouvertement.

Contrairement à ce qui a pu se faire par le passé, je n'ai pas l'intention de placer cette journaliste dans une position délicate en affirmant qu'elle risque d'être accusée d'outrage au Parlement ou de quelque chose du genre si elle ne révèle pas ses sources. Ce n'est pas du tout ce que je veux faire. Je souhaite simplement en apprendre le plus possible sur la manière donc cela a pu se produire.

Si nous permettons que de tels agissements se répètent, j'ai bien peur que cela devienne une nouvelle tendance. Ainsi, on ne révélera pas tout le contenu des projets de loi, mais seulement quelques détails triés sur le volet pour berner la population et orienter le débat public en permettant à une entité extérieure au Parlement d'avoir accès à certains éléments d'information seulement.

Ce n'est pas pour rien que les projets de loi sont présentés d'abord au Parlement, et ce n'est pas pour rien non plus qu'un projet de loi est toujours diffusé dans sa totalité, plutôt qu'en parcelles choisies par le gouvernement pour préparer le terrain en vue de bénéficier de la meilleure publicité possible dans le débat qui s'ensuit. Je note que je ne fais même pas allusion à la teneur du projet de loi dont il est question. Je vous explique tout cela en essayant de faire totalement abstraction de mon opinion au sujet du projet de loi.

(1205)

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien. Merci de cette clarification. C'est seulement que, encore une fois, les médias ont un rôle indépendant. Cela ne signifie pas qu'ils peuvent bafouer tout ce qu'ils veulent, mais cela fait longtemps que je suis ici, et vous aussi, monsieur Reid, et je n'ai jamais vu une telle chose. Pratiquement chaque fois que nous sommes saisis d'une question de privilège, c'est parce qu'un journaliste a rapporté quelque chose, et la question qui nous concerne, c'est l'envoi de cette information, sa divulgation, pas ce qu'en a fait le journaliste.

Il faut être extrêmement prudent avant de contraindre des journalistes à comparaître comme témoins, car le Parlement a un immense pouvoir et, en tant que comité du Parlement, nous avons aussi ce pouvoir. Nous devons faire très attention à la manière dont nous l'exerçons, surtout lorsqu'il est question des droits et des responsabilités des médias dans une démocratie. Je ne dis pas qu'il ne faut jamais le faire, mais il faut que ce soit avec la plus grande sensibilité et avec la plus grande considération.

Le président:

Je vais maintenant suspendre la réunion. Notre prochain témoin nous joindra dans quelques minutes et nous poursuivrons ensuite notre discussion.



Le président:

Je souhaite la bienvenue à Mme Deb Deller, greffière de l'Assemblée législative de l'Ontario.

Je vous remercie de prendre le temps de nous parler par vidéoconférence. Je sais que vous êtes très occupée.

Je vous invite à faire une déclaration préliminaire, puis nous enchaînerons avec les questions des membres des trois partis présents autour de la table.

(1210)

Mme Deborah Deller (greffière de l'Assemblée législative de l'Ontario):

Ma déclaration sera assez brève. Je ne sais pas jusqu'à quel point notre expérience à l'Assemblée législative de l'Ontario pourra vous être utile.

Autour de 2008, nous avions un comité qui, comme le vôtre en ce moment, se demandait comment aider les députés à mieux concilier le travail et la famille. Je pense que les délibérations de ce comité ont fait voir clairement que le travail de député, par sa nature même, n'est pas très propice à la vie familiale. Les difficultés ne sont pas les mêmes selon que vous êtes ou non un député local, que vous avez ou non des enfants ou que ceux-ci sont ou non d'âge scolaire.

Il n'y a pas de façon simple d'aboutir à un meilleur équilibre. Nous avions également conclu à l'époque que la solution pouvait différer pour chaque cas. La situation de chaque député est unique. À l'Assemblée législative, l'administration essaie d'offrir toute l'aide et tous les services susceptibles d'améliorer la situation des députés.

Cela dit, je vais vous donner un aperçu du type de mesures et de services en place pour aider les députés à mieux concilier le travail et la famille. Je peux vous parler d'abord du côté administratif ou de l'installation physique des lieux. J'ai regardé les questions que vous m'avez fournies, et je peux vous dire que nous avons un programme d'aide aux employés à l'Assemblée législative de l'Ontario. Il est offert à tous les employés ainsi qu'aux députés. Ils peuvent obtenir des conseils financiers ou des ressources pour les soins aux aînés ou encore se faire aiguiller relativement à des services de santé mentale ou, dans certains cas, de garderie.

Nous sommes membres d'un organisme appelé Kids and Company, qui propose des options de garde d'enfants pouvant être adaptées en fonction des besoins de chacun. Ce service est — ou serait — particulièrement utile aux députés, car il offre la garde d'enfants à plein temps ou à temps partiel. Il y a un service de garde pour les situations imprévues et un service d'embauche de bonnes d'enfants. Des services de garderie sont également offerts en dehors des heures de travail ordinaires. Cet organisme propose aussi des programmes d'été et certains services de soins aux aînés.

Ces services sont destinés à tous les députés et à leur personnel. Nous avons toutefois remarqué qu'ils sont très peu utilisés. Il y a une garderie dans le complexe de Queen's Park. Elle n'est pas située dans l'Édifice de l'Assemblée législative, mais juste à l'est, à deux édifices de là. Cette garderie est une entreprise privée. L'Assemblée législative n'a aucun lien avec elle, si ce n'est que ses services sont offerts aux députés et à leur personnel.

En termes d'installation physique, nous avons au cours des dernières années aménagé toutes nos salles de toilette pour qu'elles tiennent compte des besoins des familles. Toutes les salles, y compris celles des hommes, sont dotées de tables à langer. La salle à manger est équipée de chaises hautes. Nous avons une salle de recueillement pouvant servir à la méditation ou à des rites religieux. De plus, les députés ont droit à une allocation pour les déplacements familiaux entre leur lieu de résidence et Queen's Park.

Je devrais sans doute ajouter que nous avons un personnel législatif très tolérant auquel on fait parfois appel pour de courtes périodes, par exemple lorsqu'un enfant se trouve sur place et que le député ou la députée doit se rendre à la Chambre pour un vote. Nous offrons également de nombreux programmes destinés aux enfants, comme des activités pendant la semaine de relâche et des tours organisés, pour ne donner que quelques exemples des services dont peuvent se prévaloir les enfants des députés.

(1215)



Au niveau de la procédure et du calendrier, en 2008, on a modifié l'horaire de la Chambre et, dans une moindre mesure, les périodes de session. À l'heure actuelle, la Chambre siège du mardi suivant le Jour de la famille, c'est-à-dire le troisième mardi de février, jusqu'au premier jeudi de juin — exceptionnellement cette année, elle siégera jusqu'au deuxième jeudi de juin. Ensuite, elle siège du lundi suivant la Fête du travail en septembre jusqu'au deuxième jeudi de décembre.

Depuis la modification de 2008, la Chambre siège quatre jours par semaine, du lundi au jeudi. Le lundi, les députés siègent à partir de 10 h 30 jusqu'à la fin de la période des questions, c'est-à-dire autour de midi. Ils reviennent ensuite de 13 heures à 18 heures. Le mardi et le mercredi, la séance s'ouvre à 9 heures. Les députés siègent jusqu'à 10 h 15, puis prennent une pause de 15 minutes. Ensuite, c'est la période des questions jusqu'à environ midi. La séance reprend à 15 heures pour se poursuivre encore une fois jusqu'à 18 heures. Le jeudi, c'est de 9 heures à midi, puis de 13 heures à 18 heures pour l'étude des initiatives parlementaires.

Les séances matinales qui figurent maintenant à l'horaire viennent remplacer les séances qui avaient lieu en soirée, au compte de deux par semaine, en moyenne. Il y a eu des discussions pour déterminer si des heures de séance plus régulières faciliteraient la conciliation travail-famille. Je dirais que les opinions sont partagées et je crois même que le sujet est encore matière à débat. Je pense que les députés locaux et ceux de l'extérieur ont des opinions très différentes de ce qui constitue un horaire favorable à la famille.

Sur la liste des sujets que vous m'avez proposés, il y avait aussi la question des votes. Nos votes ressemblent beaucoup aux vôtres. Nous avons des votes par oui ou non et des votes par appel nominal. Les votes par appel nominal ont lieu sur-le-champ ou peuvent être différés au jour de séance suivant par le whip de n'importe quel parti. Chaque jour de séance, il y a donc un moment consacré à la tenue des votes différés, qui sont les votes qui ont été reportés lors de la séance précédente.

Les députés doivent se trouver dans l'enceinte pour voter, et les votes en comité se déroulent d'une manière très semblable. Ils ont lieu sur-le-champ ou peuvent être repoussés de 20 minutes à la demande d'un député.

Au chapitre de la technologie, on ne peut pas parler d'une immense réussite. Nous n'avons pas su tirer parti de tout le potentiel qu'elle aurait pu nous offrir. Nous travaillons actuellement à améliorer l'accès aux documents parlementaires sur les tablettes et téléphones cellulaires des députés. Les députés n'ont pas encore d'accès RPV au réseau de l'Assemblée législative à la maison ou dans leur bureau de circonscription. Il est toutefois possible de suivre les travaux de la Chambre à distance grâce à la télédiffusion et à la webdiffusion des délibérations.

Enfin, vous avez parlé de l'adoption de nouveaux lieux de débats, et je suppose que vous faisiez allusion à la Chambre de la fédération en Australie et à Westminster Hall au Royaume-Uni. Je n'ai pas grand-chose à ajouter à ce sujet. Nous n'avons qu'un seul lieu de débat. La question a été soulevée à quelques reprises en comité législatif, mais les députés n'y voient pas encore d'utilité.

Voilà qui clôt ma présentation. Je serai heureuse de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Nous sommes ravis que vous nous accordiez votre temps.

Nous allons commencer par Mme Vandenbeld.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Merci.

Je vous remercie d'avoir abordé dans votre présentation la plupart des sujets auxquels notre comité s'intéresse.

J'aimerais revenir sur les heures de séance et sur les changements de 2008. Vous avez indiqué que c'est à ce moment que la semaine a été réduite à quatre jours. J'aimerais seulement clarifier une chose. La période de 13 heures à 18 heures les jeudis après-midi est uniquement consacrée à l'étude des initiatives parlementaires?

Mme Deborah Deller:

Nous ne sommes pas passés à une semaine de quatre jours en 2008; nous avions déjà une semaine de quatre jours. En 2008, nous avons modifié légèrement l'horaire pour remplacer les séances en soirée par des séances matinales.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

D'accord.

Mme Deborah Deller:

Pour répondre à votre question, le jeudi après-midi, l'étude des initiatives parlementaires débute immédiatement après les affaires courantes, qui commencent à 13 heures et durent habituellement environ une demi-heure. Pendant les deux heures et demie consacrées aux initiatives parlementaires, nous étudions trois affaires à l'ordre du jour. Il est possible d'étudier des initiatives ministérielles après les initiatives parlementaires. Les initiatives parlementaires se terminent habituellement entre 16 h 30 et 17 heures, et l'on passe ensuite aux initiatives ministérielles.

(1220)

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

D'accord.

Quel impact le changement d'horaire a-t-il eu sur les gens qui ont des familles?

Et pour revenir encore une fois à la semaine de quatre jours, avez-vous constaté une hausse du nombre de femmes candidates et élues? Le nombre de femmes a-t-il augmenté en raison de cela?

Mme Deborah Deller:

Nous avons constaté une augmentation lors des deux dernières élections, mais je ne suis pas en mesure de dire précisément à quoi elle pourrait être due.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Vous avez indiqué que les services de garderie sont très peu utilisés. Est-ce parce que les députés qui ont des enfants sont plutôt rares? Ou sont-ils nombreux?

Mme Deborah Deller:

Je pense que beaucoup de députés ont des enfants, mais dans la plupart des cas, ils s'arrangent eux-mêmes. Beaucoup n'emmènent pas leurs enfants régulièrement à Toronto, surtout lorsqu'ils sont d'âge scolaire. C'est donc dans la circonscription que la question de les faire garder se pose. Dans la plupart des cas, les députés ont déjà pris des dispositions qui leur conviennent.

Ce qui les intéresserait peut-être davantage, ce sont les services de garde en cas d'imprévu ou les arrangements de dernière minute.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

J'ai aussi remarqué que la période des questions a lieu plus tôt dans la journée. Pourquoi?

Mme Deborah Deller:

Le gouvernement, en particulier, voulait que la période des questions se tienne à une heure plus précise. Avant, elle avait lieu après les affaires courantes, qui peuvent durer de 40 minutes à une heure et demie. On ne savait donc jamais tout à fait quand la période des questions allait commencer et finir. Le gouvernement, surtout, voulait que ce soit un peu plus prévisible, c'est pourquoi la période des questions a été rendue indépendante des affaires courantes. Elle a maintenant sa propre rubrique et elle a lieu le matin.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Trouvez-vous que le fait de tenir la période des questions le matin aide les députés à utiliser leur temps plus efficacement?

Mme Deborah Deller:

Je sais que tout le monde débute sa journée plus tôt, mais est-ce qu'on utilise son temps de manière plus efficace? Il faudrait demander aux députés.

Encore une fois, je signale que chaque député vit les choses différemment selon la fonction qu'il occupe à la Chambre. Pour les ministres, cela peut être avantageux, car à midi, si aucun projet de loi relatif à leur ministère n'est débattu, leur devoir à la Chambre a été accompli. Ils peuvent ensuite se concentrer sur les affaires de leur ministère.

Dans l'opposition, ce peut être la même chose pour certains députés. S'ils ont des choses à faire l'après-midi, ils peuvent se libérer. En revanche, il faut commencer beaucoup plus tôt la période des questions et les réunions des comités des caucus.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

En fait, ce qui importe, ce n'est pas tant le moment de la journée que le fait que ce soit prévisible.

Mme Deborah Deller:

Je ne saurais pas dire si c'est plus important, mais c'est ce qui a motivé ce changement.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Vous avez aussi indiqué que les votes peuvent être différés au prochain jour de séance. Est-il fréquent qu'on vote sur-le-champ, qu'on doive suspendre une réunion de comité ou interrompre ce qu'on est en train de faire? Je pense surtout aux votes qui pourraient avoir lieu tard dans la journée.

Mme Deborah Deller:

Il est très rare maintenant qu'un vote soit tenu sur-le-champ. Certains votes ne peuvent pas être différés — lorsqu'ils portent sur une motion d'ajournement, par exemple —, mais la plupart peuvent être différés et le sont presque toujours.

Cela dit, il y a habituellement un ou deux votes différés chaque jour après la période des questions. Dans de rares circonstances, il peut y avoir jusqu'à quatre.

(1225)

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Et j'imagine que cela rend la tenue des votes plus prévisible, de sorte que les députés peuvent mieux planifier leur journée?

Mme Deborah Deller:

Exactement.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Vous en avez constaté des bienfaits?

Mme Deborah Deller:

Je pense que c'est un changement positif pour les députés. Comme vous le dites, ils savent davantage à quoi s'attendre.

Je devrais préciser que les votes sur les initiatives parlementaires ne peuvent pas être différés, alors ils se tiennent toujours le jeudi après-midi.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Tous les votes se tiennent le jeudi après-midi, pour toutes les...

Mme Deborah Deller:

Les initiatives parlementaires.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Est-ce parce que l'étude des initiatives parlementaires n'a lieu qu'une fois par semaine?

Mme Deborah Deller:

Oui, le jeudi après-midi.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Est-ce que cela semble convenir aux députés? Ici, nous consacrons chaque jour du temps aux initiatives parlementaires. Les députés voient-ils un avantage à tout faire d'un seul coup?

Mme Deborah Deller:

Nous avons toujours fait ainsi, alors les députés n'ont pas vraiment de point de comparaison. Toutefois, cette formule semble leur convenir. Le jeudi après-midi, les débats prennent un autre ton, et les députés ont des invités qui viennent expressément pour les initiatives parlementaires.

Je pense qu'ils aiment bien cette formule.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Et ils peuvent partir plus tôt dans leur circonscription s'ils n'assistent pas au débat sur les initiatives parlementaires, puisqu'il y a rarement des votes sur les initiatives ministérielles le jeudi après-midi. Serait-il...

Mme Deborah Deller:

Oui. Les votes sur les initiatives ministérielles sont presque toujours différés au lundi, mais le jeudi, chaque initiative parlementaire qui est étudiée fait l'objet d'un vote.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Schmale, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Je vous remercie de vos commentaires et d'avoir accepté de nous accorder votre temps pour prendre part à cette importante discussion.

Il vous sera peut-être difficile de répondre à ma première question, mais je suis curieux, car cela pourrait m'inspirer pour la suite. Savez-vous combien de députés sont accompagnés par leur conjoint à Toronto — approximativement?

Mme Deborah Deller:

Je regrette, mais je ne le sais pas.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Ce n'est pas grave.

Mme Deborah Deller:

Voulez-vous dire à Toronto régulièrement ou...

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je veux dire dont la famille serait venue habiter à Toronto, dans leur résidence secondaire, pour prendre part au...

Mme Deborah Deller:

Il n'y en a pas beaucoup.

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'accord.

Au cours de nos travaux, j'ai parlé à des employés concernant le fait que la période des questions commence désormais plus tôt. Ils étaient nombreux à me dire que leur journée commence plus tôt sans finir plus tôt pas autant. En fait, ces gens doivent faire une journée plus longue.

Je vois que vous souriez, donc vous l'avez probablement entendu également.

Je comprends que pour les gens qui ont des enfants, il serait très difficile de passer du temps avec eux le matin, ou même de les voir du tout, s'ils travaillent et doivent être prêts pour la période des questions à 10 h 30 ou à 11 heures, si je vous ai bien compris.

Mme Deborah Deller:

Oui.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je suis curieux: vu que vous faites partie du personnel, quelle en est l'incidence éventuelle sur votre journée?

Mme Deborah Deller:

C'est une excellente question.

À mon avis, il faut faire très attention lorsqu'on parle des heures, parce que comme je l'ai dit tantôt, ce qui convient à certains députés ne convient pas à d'autres, et il y a aussi une incidence sur les employés.

Ce que nous avons fait, c'est de troquer deux soirs par semaine, ce qui correspond à la moyenne de l'Assemblée législative pendant la session, contre trois matins par semaine, c'est-à-dire trois périodes de deux heures qui sont toujours... Dans les faits, il y a eu une hausse du nombre d'heures de séance de l'Assemblée législative.

Vous avez raison, on crée donc une situation dans laquelle les gens qui travaillent à l'Assemblée législative ne peuvent pas arriver juste au moment où on doit siéger. Il faut arriver à l'avance afin de s'assurer que tout est prêt, que les microphones sont allumés, et ainsi de suite. Les employés comme les équipes du hansard et de la télédiffusion et certains greffiers ont donc connu des problèmes d'horaire. Avant, il leur était peut-être possible d'arriver un peu plus tard le matin pour compenser le fait d'être resté tard la veille, mais maintenant c'est impossible, et il a fallu réaménager les heures de travail.

Cela dit, j'ai indiqué au comité que nous ferons les changements nécessaires afin que tout fonctionne à l'Assemblée législative. Le plus important, c'est que l'Assemblée législative fonctionne pour les députés.

(1230)

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'accord.

Vous avez indiqué que vous n'avez pas utilisé la technologie à bon escient à l'Assemblée législative. Vous avez piqué ma curiosité, parce que nous parlons constamment du calendrier des députés, afin de trouver un moyen qui permette à nos employés, à nos conjoints, à nos familles, à quiconque de le consulter. Le processus est compliqué actuellement.

Puis-je vous demander comment vous vous y prenez? Comment vos députés partagent-ils leur calendrier avec leur famille et leur personnel?

Mme Deborah Deller:

Le calendrier parlementaire est affiché. Il me semble que c'est le cas chez vous également.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je vous demande pardon, je parlais des calendriers personnels.

Mme Deborah Deller:

Chez nous, c'est le député et son personnel qui gèrent le calendrier personnel. Je crois que la plupart de nos députés ont un employé qui s'en charge. Bien souvent, ces employés communiquent avec la famille du député afin d'être sûrs qu'elle est au courant des activités. Parfois on consulte la famille, parce que de nombreuses activités ont lieu le soir ou la fin de semaine.

À ma connaissance, et selon mon expérience, le personnel du bureau de circonscription, ainsi que le personnel qui travaille à Queen's Park, travaillent de concert sur le calendrier. Outre cela, je vous dirais que nous, qui travaillons à l'Assemblée législative, ne touchons pas ou à peine au calendrier personnel des députés.

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'après ce que vous en savez, les députés sont-ils libres d'utiliser n'importe quel outil, comme un calendrier Google, par exemple, ou prévoyez-vous un calendrier sur votre intranet?

Mme Deborah Deller:

[inaudible]... le calendrier de Microsoft Outlook, mais les députés sont libres d'utiliser toute autre application ou calendrier électronique.

M. Jamie Schmale:

À votre connaissance, y a-t-il eu des problèmes en matière de sécurité ou autres qui sont survenus à cause de l'utilisation d'Outlook?

Mme Deborah Deller:

Non, aucun.

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'accord.

J'aimerais vous parler du calendrier législatif, que je n'ai pas devant moi, je m'en excuse, et des semaines de séance, en fait des blocs de semaines de séance. En moyenne, y a-t-il deux semaines de séance de suite suivie d'une semaine de relâche? Ou est-ce trois semaines? Y a-t-il une alternance fixe?

Mme Deborah Deller:

En 2008, nous avons utilisé le modèle de la Chambre des communes afin d'avoir davantage de semaines de relâche et moins de semaines de séance de suite. Cela revient à une suite de trois ou quatre semaines suivie d'une semaine de relâche, ensuite encore trois ou quatre semaines et une autre semaine de relâche. De temps en temps, par exemple cette année, le calendrier civil pose problème à cause de certaines semaines, comme la semaine de congé de mars, la semaine pascale, et ainsi de suite. Il me semble que ce printemps, l'Assemblée législative aurait siégé sept semaines de suite, avec une semaine de relâche, une autre semaine de séance, et une autre semaine de relâche. L'Assemblée législative a adopté une motion pour modifier le calendrier et rectifier le problème.

Le président:

J'aimerais vous indiquer que nous n'avons pas de semaine de relâche ou de semaine de congé. Ici, nous avons des semaines de travail dans les circonscriptions.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Mme Deborah Deller:

D'accord, des semaines de travail dans les circonscriptions: je suis bien placée pour savoir que ces semaines ne sont pas de tout repos.

M. Jamie Schmale:

C'était aussi une suggestion.

Je devine qu'il ne me reste que quelques secondes.

Le président:

Oui.

M. Jamie Schmale:

J'en profite donc pour vous remercier de vos observations. Je vous en suis reconnaissant.

Le président:

Au tour maintenant de M. Christopherson, votre vieil ami.

M. David Christopherson:

Deb, quel plaisir de vous revoir.

Mme Deborah Deller:

Et moi pareillement.

M. David Christopherson:

Cela fait longtemps.

Je vais faire quelques observations et ensuite reprendre la dernière question de Jamie. Nous avons entendu un employé de longue date, un vétéran, qui pensait que la série de trois semaines était avantageuse pour ce qui est du comportement des politiciens, de l'ambiance, du ton, etc.

J'ai pris note de la façon dont vous vous organisez maintenant à Queen's Park. Selon la recommandation, à moins de trois semaines de suite, nous ne sommes pas aussi efficaces, mais à plus de trois semaines, des tensions se manifestent, compte tenu de la longue période de fréquentation et de la nature de notre travail. Avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter, Deb?

Mme Deborah Deller:

C'est une observation valide. Depuis que plus de semaines de travail dans les circonscriptions sont prévues dans le calendrier, nous avons un genre de période de réflexion ponctuelle. Les gens s'en vont, se mettent à jour sur ce qui se passe dans leurs circonscriptions, se rendent compte de ce qui importe dans leur travail et reviennent prêts à travailler à l'Assemblée législative.

C'est donc pour cette raison que je vous dis oui, nous avons constaté une amélioration dans l'ambiance générale de l'Assemblée législative. Lorsqu'il y a seulement une ou deux semaines entre les semaines de travail dans les circonscriptions, c'est vrai que ce n'est pas une période très productive. Les comités n'ont pas suffisamment de temps pour vraiment faire du travail.

Je suis donc prête à me prononcer d'accord avec vous qu'une période de trois semaines de séance est probablement la période minimale, et je vous dirais qu'il ne serait probablement pas utile d'aller au-delà des sept semaines.

(1235)

M. David Christopherson:

Sept? C'est beaucoup trop. Bonté divine.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David Christopherson: Ma mère disant bien: « Ne pars pas fâché, pars tout simplement. »

Poursuivons. Deb, nous avons également parlé du nombre de points. Vous vous souvenez peut-être que dans le passé, à l'époque vous étiez la greffière adjointe, il me semble, nous avons adopté le système de points de la Chambre des communes. Queen's Park l'a adopté et il paraît qu'il vous sert bien. L'un des problèmes qu'on a soulevés ici, et c'est peut-être parce que je suis là depuis tellement longtemps, c'est qu'il y a de nombreux députés qui ne font pas venir leurs familles aussi souvent qu'ils ne le voudraient à cause des politiques de production de rapports.

Vous vous souviendrez que dans le passé, nous avons adopté des systèmes de points, parce qu'il y avait une injustice inhérente dans la déclaration des valeurs exprimées en dollars. Howie Hampton, qui devait venir de Rainy River, dépensait beaucoup plus pour venir à la capitale que moi lorsque je vivais à une heure ou deux de Toronto. Nous avons adopté le système de points, mais nous trouvons maintenant que les députés, surtout ceux qui sont plus jeunes, et je constate qu'ils deviennent plus jeunes, enfin ceux qui ont une famille nombreuse, s'inquiètent des politiques de production de rapports.

On s'est donc demandé s'il y avait moyen de modifier le système de points, non pas pour embrouiller la transparence qui existe actuellement, mais de façon à ce que l'un de mes homologues qui a trois ou quatre enfants ne soit pas pointé du doigt. Denise va venir en juin, et je crois que c'est la première fois cette année qu'elle en aura l'occasion, mais cela ne prend qu'un ou deux points au cours de l'année. On ne le remarque presque jamais, mais si j'avais trois enfants, ce seul voyage... De plus, plus les enfants sont jeunes, plus on veut qu'ils viennent ici connaître l'endroit.

Quoi qu'il en soit, j'ai deux questions. La première, avez-vous ce problème? Est-il survenu depuis que Queen's Park a adopté le système de points? Deuxièmement, avez-vous des suggestions quant à la façon de produire des rapports qui ne mettent pas en exergue un député, tout en n'enlevant pas au public son droit à la transparence et à la reddition de comptes?

Mme Deborah Deller:

Ce problème n'est pas survenu à la Commission de régie interne, et aucun député n'est venu m'en parler de façon individuelle. Il se peut que notre façon de produire des rapports, qui est un genre d'agrégat, ne permet pas de voir les déplacements individuels, et c'est peut-être la raison pour laquelle ce n'est pas un problème chez nous. Je l'ignore.

M. David Christopherson:

Eh bien, préparez-vous, parce que vous n'êtes peut-être pas encore aux prises avec la tendance prônant la divulgation entière, mais elle s'en vient. Vous êtes prévenue.

Encore une fois, ce fut formidable de vous revoir. Vraiment. Nous ne nous étions pas vus depuis longtemps. J'étais vice-président pendant une année au cours des 13 années que j'étais à l'Assemblée législative, et j'ai également été leader, ce qui fait que nous avons eu l'occasion de collaborer de très près. C'est formidable de revoir une amie de longue date.

La dernière chose dont j'aimerais parler serait encore une fois les témoignages des employés qui ont parlé de leurs enfants et de leur participation, et à quel point il leur importait, en tant qu'employés ici, de pouvoir faire venir leurs enfants. Or, la tendance est contraire ici depuis quelque temps. Stoffer n'est plus là pour organiser le party de tous les partis, et l'Hillowe'en n'a plus lieu, même s'il y a quelque chose de semblable. Les choses ont changé.

La situation semble être différente à Queen's Park. Je me demandais si vous pourriez nous décrire vos efforts ou encore en parler de façon plus approfondie.

Mme Deborah Deller:

J'en suis un bon exemple. Dans mon cas également, mon emploi n'a pas particulièrement facilité ma vie de famille. Lorsque mes enfants étaient petits, je faisais de longues heures et j'étais partie toute la journée. J'ai même manqué le premier anniversaire de mon fils. Mes enfants ont pu toutefois profiter de certaines expériences que d'autres n'ont jamais eues. Mes enfants venaient souvent me voir au travail et ont pu en apprendre sur les lieux et les gens qui les fréquentaient. Ils parlent toujours de leurs expériences.

Hier, justement, j'ai croisé l'un de nos députés qui a une petite fille d'environ deux ans. Cette fille est très à l'aise chez nous. Nous avons parlé. Il fut un temps où elle avait très peur de ma robe noire, mais elle s'y est habituée. Elle a l'habitude de venir. Vous vous souviendrez de l'époque où Chris Stockwell était le président. Il avait deux jeunes enfants qui jouaient au hockey dans le corridor à l'extérieur de l'appartement du président au troisième étage.

(1240)

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai des photos de ma fille qui joue avec un ballon de basketball dans les corridors.

Mme Deborah Deller:

Pas grand-chose a changé. Nous nous donnons du mal pour accueillir les enfants des députés et du personnel. Comme je l'ai dit, nous avons certains programmes, dont le programme du congé de mars qui est offert au public, et nous y réservons des places pour les enfants du personnel et des députés. Les enfants viennent, ils font des masses en papier, des chasses au trésor et toutes sortes de choses.

Nous avons également des cahiers à colorier éparpillés dans le bâtiment, des crayons de cire, des cahiers d'activités, ce genre de chose, ce qui fait que si l'enfant d'un employé ou d'un député vient voir son parent, nous avons des choses pour le tenir occupé.

M. David Christopherson:

Certains députés pourraient s'en servir également.

Deb, merci tellement. Quel plaisir d'en parler avec vous et de vous revoir. Au plaisir!

Mme Deborah Deller:

Merci.

Le président:

Au tour maintenant de M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Je vais reprendre le thème de David. Comment organise-t-on les déplacements des familles? Les points sont-ils accordés à la personne, ou est-ce possible pour toute une famille de se déplacer avec un seul point? Les personnes à charge ont-elles chacune leur point, ou peuvent-elles se déplacer en groupe au moyen d'un seul point?

Mme Deborah Deller:

Un aller-retour équivaut à un point de déplacement. S'il y a plus d'une personne, il faut utiliser plus d'un point.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Donc un député qui a quatre enfants utilisera beaucoup de points pour un seul voyage.

Mme Deborah Deller:

Les députés ont droit à 64 points de déplacement, c'est-à-dire 64 points de déplacement qui permettent des allers-retours. On leur donne une liste des membres de la famille admissibles à l'utilisation des points.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Combien de députés se déplacent par avion plutôt qu'en voiture? Ici au gouvernement fédéral, c'est clair que la plupart des députés prennent l'avion, mais à Toronto, le chiffre est probablement beaucoup plus modeste.

Mme Deborah Deller:

Oui, la Chambre des communes est confrontée à un autre défi. Vous avez des députés qui viennent de régions beaucoup plus éloignées. Je vous dirais que nos députés qui vivent dans un rayon d'environ quatre heures de route prennent surtout leur voiture. Au-delà de ce rayon, les députés prennent l'avion.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si ces gens prennent leur voiture, sont-ils obligés de déclarer les membres de leur famille présents dans la voiture au titre de points séparés, ou peuvent-ils tous se déplacer au moyen d'un seul point?

Mme Deborah Deller:

Non, il n'est pas nécessaire de les déclarer.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez indiqué que la garderie est une entreprise privée qui ne relève pas de l'Assemblée législative, mais je me demandais si vous pouviez répondre à certaines questions quant à son fonctionnement. Y a-t-il une longue liste d'attente? Y offre-t-on des services de halte-garderie? Les heures d'ouverture sont-elles prolongées si l'Assemblée législative prolonge sa séance? J'aimerais savoir dans quelle mesure la garderie est adaptée aux députés.

Mme Deborah Deller:

Non, la garderie n'est aucunement adaptée au fonctionnement de l'Assemblée législative. Elle a les heures d'ouverture habituelles d'une garderie. Je crois qu'il faut aller chercher son enfant au plus tard à six heures le soir. La dernière fois que j'ai vérifié, il y avait une liste d'attente; elle n'était pas longue, mais tout de même. Comme je l'ai dit, cette garderie est indépendante de l'Assemblée législative.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Qui peut l'utiliser? Les députés et leur personnel, ou bien tout le personnel de l'Assemblée législative?

Mme Deborah Deller:

C'est une garderie publique, mais elle sert essentiellement au personnel. Certains députés l'ont utilisée, quoiqu'il n'y a aucun député qui l'utilise en ce moment.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Passons à autre chose. Lorsque nous étudions un projet de loi ministériel ici, il faut normalement prévoir quatre jours. Les députés de Queen's Park représentent moins que le tiers des députés fédéraux. Quel est le temps de parole accordé à chaque député, puisqu'ils ont la possibilité d'intervenir plus d'une fois, et combien de temps faut-il normalement pour étudier un projet de loi, exprimé en jours ou en heures de séance?

Mme Deborah Deller:

En ce qui concerne le temps accordé aux débats, chaque caucus dispose d'une heure pour parler du projet de loi dans un premier temps; ensuite, ce sont des blocs de 20 minutes. Au bout de sept heures de débat, chaque député a droit à 10 minutes. Il y a une période de 10 minutes réservée aux questions et observations qui suit chaque discours.

Quant à la période de temps prévu normalement pour un projet de loi, beaucoup de projets de loi font maintenant l'objet d'une motion d'attribution de temps. Pour ce faire, le gouvernement doit avoir prévu... La deuxième lecture doit être faite, et le débat doit s'éteindre naturellement, ou encore il faut prévoir au minimum six heures et demie de débat à la deuxième lecture avant de pouvoir déposer une motion d'attribution de temps. La motion prévoit un débat de deux heures suivi de la période attribuée.

En temps normal... J'ai vu des projets de loi adoptés rapidement à voix unanime, alors que pour d'autres, il faut des mois et des mois. Si le gouvernement est pressé et veut faire passer le projet de loi par les comités et l'Assemblée législative, il peut normalement le faire dans environ six jours.

(1245)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Merci.

J'allais partager mon temps avec Mme Petitpas Taylor.

Le président:

Madame Petitpas Taylor.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Tout d'abord, madame Deller, merci beaucoup d'être venue ce matin. Comme vous le savez bien, notre comité a été chargé d'examiner des politiques qui rendraient le Parlement plus propice à la vie de famille. C'était la première partie de l'étude dont nous sommes saisis.

Au bout de quelques semaines ou mois, nous avons constaté que la question est vaste. Nous avons cherché des façons qui nous permettent de mieux concilier le travail et la vie personnelle et également de rendre le Parlement plus inclusif. J'ai donc tout un pot-pourri de questions pour vous. Il n'y a peut-être pas de suite dans mes questions, mais elles sont valides et je veux vraiment vous les poser.

Tout d'abord, quel est l'âge moyen de vos députés actuellement en Ontario?

Mme Deborah Deller:

Je dirais d'emblée que nous n'avons pas de régime de pension à prestations déterminées pour nos députés, ce qui fait que l'âge moyen grimpe. En ce moment, l'âge moyen se trouve dans la mi-cinquantaine.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Pensez-vous que c'est la raison pour laquelle peu de gens ont recours au programme Kids and Company — parce que leurs enfants sont probablement bien plus âgés?

Mme Deborah Deller:

Peut-être. Nous n'avons pas sondé les membres, et je ne peux donc pas le dire avec certitude. Un certain nombre de membres ont de jeunes enfants, mais comme je l'ai dit, de façon générale, ils ont pris leurs propres arrangements.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Quel est le pourcentage de femmes à l'Assemblée législative de l'Ontario?

Mme Deborah Deller:

Sur 107 députés, 38 sont des femmes.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Durant votre exposé, vous avez parlé des salles de toilette en disant qu'elles ont toutes été adaptées — tant celles des hommes que celles des femmes — pour les gens qui ont de jeunes enfants. J'ai une question: avez-vous des salles de toilette qui peuvent être utilisées tant par les hommes que par les femmes?

Mme Deborah Deller:

Oui, et elles sont entièrement accessibles. Il s'agit de salles individuelles, de sorte que les visiteurs et les membres du personnel qui ont besoin d'espace supplémentaire peuvent les utiliser.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

J'ai une dernière question, et elle porte sur le décorum à la Chambre. Avez-vous des politiques visant à ce que les gens se conduisent de façon un peu plus civilisée, en Ontario?

Mme Deborah Deller:

Si vous laissez entendre que l'ambiance est plus civilisée dans notre Assemblée qu'ici, en Chambre, je ferai le message au Président et il vous remerciera.

Au-delà de nos règles normales du décorum, qui ressemblent aux vôtres, et du Président, qui tente courageusement de veiller au respect des règles et à ce qu'au moins, il y ait un certain degré de courtoisie dans les débats, je ne crois pas que nous fassions quoi que ce soit qui diffère de ce que font les autres parlements.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Monsieur Richards, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci.

Je vous remercie de votre présence. Je voulais commencer par poser deux ou trois questions sur les affaires émanant des députés et la période des questions. Voici cependant ma première question: combien de députés compte l'Assemblée législative?

(1250)

Mme Deborah Deller:

Elle en compte 107.

M. Blake Richards:

Cela représente alors environ le tiers des députés de la Chambre des communes. En consultant votre calendrier hebdomadaire, j'ai constaté que le nombre d'heures pendant lesquelles vous siégez, du lundi au jeudi, est assez similaire au nombre total des heures durant lesquelles nous siégeons les mêmes jours à la Chambre des communes. Bien entendu, nous siégeons également le vendredi.

Il semble que la principale différence, c'est que vous n'avez qu'une période des questions de moins que nous parce que vous ne siégiez pas le vendredi. De plus, vous disposez d'environ deux heures et demie de moins que nous pour les affaires émanant des députés. Bien sûr, puisque le nombre de députés correspond au tiers du nombre de députés de la Chambre de communes, proportionnellement, cela vous donne probablement plus de temps par député sur le plan des affaires émanant des députés.

Je peux imaginer quelles répercussions cela aurait pour nous ici, si nous devions adopter l'approche souhaitée par le gouvernement libéral, c'est-à-dire ne plus siéger le vendredi; c'est quelque chose qu'il veut faire. Je pense qu'il en résulterait que nous aurions moins de temps à consacrer aux affaires émanant des députés. De plus, nous disposerions de moins de temps pour la période des questions, et par conséquent, l'opposition perdrait ces occasions, de même que les députés du parti au pouvoir. Évidemment, cela m'inquiète.

Je veux maintenant parler de la période des questions. En règle générale, de votre côté, elle commence à 10 h 30, du lundi au jeudi. À quelle heure commençait-elle avant que vous apportiez les changements?

Mme Deborah Deller:

C'était en après-midi. Nous arrivions habituellement à 13 h 30 et nous commencions par les affaires courantes, ce qui incluait la période des questions. Elle pouvait donc commencer à n'importe quel moment entre 14 heures et 14 h 30.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Évidemment, vous avez déjà indiqué que déplacer la période des questions plus tôt dans la journée a entre autres comme conséquences que bon nombre de gens doivent commencer à s'y préparer plus tôt. J'imagine qu'une différence... et il semble que des gens ont exprimé des inquiétudes à cet égard et ont dit que ce n'est pas pratique pour eux. C'est ce que j'entendais dire. Je vais vous laisser nous dire si c'est le cas.

Une autre chose à prendre en considération, c'est que les gens ne vivent pas tous dans le même fuseau horaire. Tous les députés qui se rendent à Toronto pour siéger vivent dans le même fuseau horaire. Dans notre cas, des gens vivent un changement de fuseau horaire qui représente un décalage de deux ou trois heures. Comme je viens de l'Alberta, venir ici représente deux heures de décalage pour moi. Pour mes collègues de la Colombie-Britannique, on parle d'un décalage de trois heures. Le lundi, mon avion atterrit à 1 heure du matin. Bon nombre de personnes qui partent de la Colombie-Britannique le dimanche soir arrivent à peu près à la même heure que moi. Si nos travaux commençaient plus tôt le lundi matin, cela aurait d'importantes répercussions sur les députés de cette province: leur journée commencerait à 7 heures du matin alors qu'ils seraient toujours à l'heure du Pacifique, soit 4 heures du matin. Je peux imaginer les problèmes que cela pourrait créer.

En ce qui concerne la période des questions, vous a-t-on fait des commentaires sur l'idée de commencer les travaux plus tôt? On aurait dit que c'est le cas. Cela pose-t-il problème à certaines personnes? Y a-t-il eu des réactions sur d'autres conséquences imprévues de ces changements?

Mme Deborah Deller:

Je crois qu'il y a eu une période d'adaptation au début. Nous avons dû faire des ajustements. Nous avons dû en faire pour le temps consacré aux comités, par exemple, parce qu'ordinairement, des réunions avaient lieu le matin. Après que les changements ont été apportés, les opinions sont demeurées diverses. Je pense que certains députés préfèrent cet horaire parce qu'il rend le déroulement de leur journée plus prévisible, dans la mesure où le déroulement d'une journée d'un député peut être prévisible.

D'autres députés n'aiment vraiment pas cela... Certains vous diront qu'à mesure que la journée avance et que les événements se déroulent et alimentent le cycle des nouvelles, des choses peuvent se produire plus tard, après la période des questions, et il faut attendre jusqu'au lendemain avant qu'on en tienne compte dans la période des questions.

Il y a ce problème qui se pose. Il y a aussi que la journée commence très tôt. Les points de vue diffèrent au sein du personnel législatif. Nous avons apporté des ajustements aux horaires, et je crois que nous avons très bien géré cela en perturbant les choses le moins possible. Je ne sais pas si l'on peut dire que c'était une bonne ou une mauvaise décision. Tout dépend à qui l'on parle. Vous soulevez un bon point concernant les fuseaux horaires. Il y a des facteurs que vous devez prendre en considération et qui ne s'appliquaient pas dans notre cas. Ils sont importants.

(1255)

M. Blake Richards:

Si je reviens à ce que vous avez dit plus tôt, soit qu'il faut faire très attention lorsqu'il s'agit des heures, je crois que certains changements peuvent être positifs pour certains députés, mais négatifs pour d'autres, de sorte que nous devrions procéder avec prudence. Mon observation est-elle juste?

Mme Deborah Deller:

C'est ce que je conseillerais, oui.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Bonjour. Je vous remercie de votre présence.

Tout d'abord, les programmes et les services que vous offrez à l'Assemblée législative de l'Ontario sont incroyables. Le programme d'été, et celui sur les activités pendant la semaine de relâche — semblent très intéressants. Comme l'a dit M. Christopherson, même certains députés les trouveraient amusants.

Ces programmes ont-ils habituellement lieu lorsque les enfants sont en congé scolaire durant une semaine de séances? Est-ce dans cette situation qu'ils sont les plus utiles?

Mme Deborah Deller:

C'est bon lorsque les enfants sont en congé scolaire — lorsque la Chambre siège, et même lorsqu'elle ne siège pas. Pendant la semaine de relâche, par exemple, elle ne siège pas, mais le programme est offert et bon nombre de députés en profitent. Certains députés qui vivent à l'extérieur de la ville trouvent que c'est l'occasion idéale de passer la semaine à Toronto avec leurs enfants.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Et vous constatez que le taux de participation à ce programme est élevé par rapport à votre service de garderie?

Mme Deborah Deller:

Ces programmes sont toujours complets.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je pense vraiment que c'est une bonne idée et que nous devrions peut-être essayer de le faire ici. J'ignore combien de députés viendraient à Ottawa durant une semaine de congé, mais nous pourrions assurément avoir la possibilité de le faire au cours de l'année. C'est certainement un sujet à discuter.

J'aimerais savoir quand les séances du vendredi ont été retirées. Vous avez dit que ce n'était pas en 2008. Vous rappelez-vous en quelle année le changement a été apporté et si vous étiez greffière à l'époque?

Mme Deborah Deller:

J'étais ici, car je me souviens des séances du vendredi. Quand la Chambre siégeait le vendredi, elle ne siégeait pas le mercredi, de sorte qu'il s'agissait d'une semaine de quatre jours aussi. Le mercredi était réservé aux réunions du cabinet et du caucus, et certains comités tenaient des séances en après-midi, mais la Chambre ne siégeait pas ce jour-là et elle siégeait jusqu'à 13 heures le vendredi.

Le changement consistant à siéger le mercredi et à ne plus siéger le vendredi a eu lieu au début des années 1980, mais il faudrait que je vérifie.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Cela ressemble à nos semaines; cependant, notre Chambre siège le mercredi, mais nous tenons nos réunions de caucus ce jour-là et les travaux commencent un peu plus tard dans la journée.

Savez-vous quel était l'objectif principal de modifier les heures, d'accroître la prévisibilité et, peut-être à ce moment-là, même si vous n'y étiez pas, pourquoi les horaires du mercredi et du vendredi ont été inversés?

Mme Deborah Deller:

Oui. C'était parce que les députés de l'extérieur ne pouvaient pas passer suffisamment de temps avec leur famille. Certains voulaient éliminer les séances du vendredi pour permettre aux députés qui devaient voyager pour retourner à la maison d'arriver chez eux à une heure convenable afin de passer du temps avec leur famille et de travailler dans leur circonscription.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

À votre connaissance, est-ce qu'un grand nombre de députés travaillent dans leur circonscription le vendredi?

Mme Deborah Deller:

Oui, beaucoup le font, et même le samedi pour bon nombre d'entre eux.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

On ne le soulève pas souvent, mais on hésite à apporter des changements. Vous savez, nous devons être prudents concernant les changements parce qu'ils n'ont pas les mêmes répercussions pour tout le monde. Cela ne veut pas dire que nous ne devrions pas nous efforcer d'apporter des changements pour le bien des familles parce que nous craignons de faire une erreur. Nous devrions toujours être prêts à changer des choses et à essayer de nouvelles choses.

Souvent, nous nous inquiétons des réactions sur le plan politique, de ce qu'en penseront les gens, de la perception du public. On ne le dit pas souvent, mais bon nombre de députés craignent même de soulever le sujet ou de s'exprimer. Ils hésitent à le faire parce qu'ils ne veulent pas être considérés comme des gens qui veulent moins travailler.

Était-ce une crainte qui régnait dans votre Assemblée, et comment avez-vous réglé le problème?

(1300)

Mme Deborah Deller:

Vous savez, il y a toujours cette crainte. C'est regrettable. Je ne mâcherai pas mes mots. Je pense que les attaques contre les politiciens et le travail qu'ils font sont devenues un sport populaire. C'est vraiment malheureux. J'aimerais que les députés se tiennent debout. Leurs heures de travail sont horribles. Ils passent beaucoup de temps loin de leur famille, en particulier ceux qui viennent de l'extérieur.

Vous avez raison de dire que souvent, quand il y a un changement, des gens qui émettent leur opinion à cet égard essaient de laisser entendre que le changement est peut-être apporté en quelque sorte pour donner aux députés des avantages qu'ils ne méritent pas. Ici, en 2008, lorsqu'ils ont voulu éliminer les séances du soir, ils avaient le sentiment qu'ils ne résisteraient pas aux critiques de la population sur la réduction du temps qu'ils passent à l'Assemblée législative, de sorte que la question n'était pas tant de déterminer s'ils avaient besoin d'y passer autant de temps, mais bien de déterminer quelle solution susciterait la réaction la moins négative dans la population. C'est pourquoi ils tenaient à remplacer les séances du soir par des séances du matin. En fait, nous avons fini par travailler un plus grand nombre d'heures à la Chambre. Je ne sais pas dans quelle mesure cela a amélioré la conciliation travail-vie personnelle au bout du compte.

Au début, avant de poser votre question, vous avez parlé de la résistance au changement. C'est en grande partie la réalité, surtout dans un Parlement. Toutefois, je pense qu'il faut apporter des changements réfléchis, qu'il faut réfléchir aux conséquences imprévues.

Un exemple à cet égard, c'est ce qui s'est passé ici en 2008. Au départ, il était question de commencer les travaux à 9 heures tous les jours, y compris le lundi. Cela correspondait aux heures que la Chambre avait adoptées au début. Les députés de l'extérieur de la ville ont alors dit qu'auparavant, ils auraient pu être en mesure de partir le lundi matin et de se rendre à Queen's Park à temps. En commençant à 9 heures, il leur fallait partir de la maison le dimanche soir, et dans bien des cas, ils ne pouvaient pas souper avec leur famille le dimanche soir. Une modification a été apportée, de sorte que le lundi, nous commençons à 10 h 30. C'est un léger compromis, mais c'était un élément que le comité n'avait pas vraiment pris en considération lorsqu'il avait recommandé d'apporter des changements à l'horaire.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je vous remercie beaucoup de tous les renseignements que vous avez fournis.

Le président:

Merci.

Notre temps est écoulé, mais j'ai une question.

Le jeudi après-midi, lorsque des votes ont lieu et que ceux du gouvernement sont reportés, est-ce que tous les députés restent, ou est-ce que certains d'entre eux essaient de s'échapper?

Mme Deborah Deller:

Pour les affaires émanant des députés le jeudi après-midi, pour les trois votes qui ont lieu, les députés ne sont pas tous présents. Or, d'ordinaire, ils transcendent les partis politiques. Je pense que la présence de tous les députés n'est pas aussi essentielle dans ce cas. Si nous passons à des affaires émanant du gouvernement le jeudi après-midi, si un vote a lieu, ce sera fort probablement reporté au lundi suivant.

Le président:

Je vous remercie beaucoup de votre témoignage. Je sais que vous êtes occupée, mais votre comparution nous est très utile. Nous vous remercions beaucoup de votre temps.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on May 10, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.