header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-02-25 PROC 10

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. This meeting is meeting number 10 of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs for the First Session of the 42nd Parliament.

This meeting is being held in public and is televised. Today in the first hour of our meeting we continue our examination of federal appointees to the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments, pursuant to Standing Order 110 and 111.

In the second hour we will consider committee business, and that will be chaired by Mr. Blake Richards.

I remind members that in accordance with the Standing Orders of the House of Commons, this committee's role is limited to an examination of the qualifications and competence of the appointee to perform the duties of the post to which he or she has been appointed. Members may also refer to pages 1011-13 of House of Commons Procedure and Practice by O'Brien and Bosc.

Our witness this morning is Professor Daniel Jutras, who is appearing by video conference from Montreal.

Professor Jutras, you have up to 10 minutes for an opening statement, and then we will proceed to questions from committee members.

I don't know if you can see us, but the floor is yours if you can hear me.

Professor Daniel Jutras (Federal Member, Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments):

I can hear you and I can see a general view of the room.

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

I'm grateful for the opportunity to appear before your committee. If I may, as you indicated, I would like to take maybe five or ten minutes to offer a brief opening statement.

I understand that the objective of your committee is to assess my qualifications and competence. I would like to focus on that, if I may.[Translation]

As you have indicated, this meeting is being held to assess the contribution I can make to the work of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments based on a review of my career and qualifications. I know you have my resumé in hand, but I would first like to take a moment to describe my career path to date.

I completed my studies in law at the University of Montreal and graduate studies in constitutional law at Harvard University in the mid-1980s. I have been a lawyer and member of the Quebec bar since 1984. I have also been a professor at McGill University's faculty of law for nearly 32 years.

My field of expertise is civil procedure, private law, and comparative law, but as you have also seen on reading my resumé, I have a long-standing interest in constitutional law. I was able to pursue this interest most recently when the Supreme Court of Canada appointed me to serve as amicus curiae, a friend of the court, in the context of the Senate reference and the constitutional amendment process.

In addition, from 2002 to 2005, I took leave from McGill University to act as Executive Legal Officer to the Supreme Court of Canada in the office of Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin. My task was to assist her in all her duties as justice and chief justice, except, of course, judgment drafting, which was her responsibility.

For example, outside the court, I was responsible for relations with the Canadian Judicial Council and the National Judicial Institute, which is the training body for federally appointed judges. Within the court, my responsibilities related to communications, media relations, management of the Law Clerk Program, for clerks appointed as research assistants to the court, and relations between the court, judges, and the various operational services of the court.[English]

If you like, I'd be happy to answer questions on all of the elements of my CV which you have before you. I would like, before handing the floor back to you, to take a moment to try to connect my profile qualifications and competence to what I think might be helpful to the advisory board, and identify what I think those qualities might be.

It seems to me that key qualities to contribute to the work of the committee begin with a strong reputation of personal integrity, a reputation of sound judgment, and a reputation of absolute discretion. I want to underline that much of the work, in fact all of the work, I did with Chief Justice McLachlin and her colleagues at the Supreme Court of Canada, and within the Canadian Judicial Council as well, involved extraordinary confidentiality, significant confidentiality, and required a demonstration of sound judgment. And I don't think I would have been appointed to this position without a very strong reputation for personal integrity.

I point out that I think I have the respect of my peers and colleagues. I currently am the dean of the faculty of law at McGill and I'm also chair of the Council of Canadian Law Deans, and recently received the distinction of Advocatus Emeritus, which is awarded by the Quebec bar to distinguished members of the profession.

The second, I would say, and important qualification is independence and non-partisanship. I am not a member of any political party, nor am I a militant and haven't been.

Third, I think it's really critical to the work of the advisory board that its members have some experience with the evaluation of files, the ability to read CVs and letters of recommendation, to do so in both languages, to work effectively in a group in a collaborative manner, and I have to say this is pretty much my daily bread as dean. The work of the dean requires extensive participation and evaluation of confidential application files and candidacies, as well as work in groups and those kinds of assessments.

Finally, I would say it's useful to the work of the committee that some of its members, and ideally many of its members, have some understanding of the constitutional architecture of Canada, the role of the Senate, the legislative process at the federal level. The work I did in the Senate reference before the Supreme Court as amicus curiae obviously focused primarily on the amendment procedures, but in preparation for my oral argument and written briefs, I read just about everything that has been written in law and in political science about the Senate.

So even though the Senate was not my field of expertise at the time, and I think, to be fair, is not yet my field of expertise, I can fairly say that I have a significant interest in the Senate and parliamentary proceedings, and a good enough knowledge, I hope, to contribute significantly to the work of the advisory board.

With this, Mr. Chair, I'd be happy to answer questions, and I hand the floor back to you.

(1105)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Jutras.

On this committee, we have a round of four different people asking you questions for seven minutes each. Then in the next round, people will have five minutes each. The time limit includes both questions and answers, so if they ask a one-minute question and your answer takes six minutes, they don't get to ask you any more questions.

I just wanted to let you know how it works here and that we're tight on the timelines so that every committee member gets a chance to ask you questions.

We'll start with Anita Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Thank you, Professor Jutras, for being here today. You've obviously had a very distinguished legal career, and as you mentioned in your remarks, sound judgment and independence are things that would be very important in this position.

I wonder if you could elaborate a little bit on your background in law. Also, you mentioned that in your role as dean you do have to evaluate CVs, letters of recommendation. Could you give us more information about how you do that and how you work collaboratively in doing that?

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

Okay. I think the work in law is perhaps less relevant to the work of the committee than the second aspect of your question is, so let me be as brief as I can on the legal dimension.

My expertise, as I said, is in private law, comparative law, law of contracts, civil procedure, and law of wrongdoing, which is kind of remote from the conversation that we're having today, but nonetheless, as I mentioned, I have a significant interest in constitutional law. This was the focus of my graduate studies at Harvard Law School. I've kept up to date as much as I could, and also worked in some depth in constitutional law, in particular in my three years at the Supreme Court with Chief Justice McLachlin.

Very briefly, on the work of the dean and the ways in which this involves consideration of files, there are multiple aspects of academic life that require assessment of files, everything from admission of students to the process of promotion of professors and assessment of external institutions. Over the past seven years that I've been dean, I've assessed countless files with regard to promotion within my own faculty as well as several files from outside of my faculty. I've also done assessments and written letters of recommendation in a variety of contexts, both academic and professional. These were either to recommend university promotions and awards or to give professional recognition through such things as awarding the distinction of Advocatus Emeritus.

(1110)

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I see that you won the Queen Elizabeth medal in 2013. Can you tell us what that was for?

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

I think the medal, if I'm correct in this, is awarded to about 60,000 Canadians, which is a significant number of people, and I'm just one of 60,000. So I don't want to play this up too much, although I'm very proud of this. I think it was a recognition of significant contributions in the field of law and in academic life as well.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

You have a number of transferable skills, in addition to your legal background and your knowledge of the constitutional law, in terms of being able to bring people together, being able to assess, being able to judge different qualifications of various people. You spoke of the fact that, in addition to being dean of your faculty, you're part of a council of deans.

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

Yes, indeed. All of the law deans in Canada gather around a table, which is intended to address preoccupations and concerns of the deans. I'm also the spokesperson for the Council of Canadian Law Deans. For the past two years I've been the elected chair of this particular council of all deans of faculties in schools of law in Canada.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

You've been quite respected by your peers in doing that. Have you worked collaboratively? Could you talk about the collaborative work you've done?

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

I do hope I'm respected. We work collaboratively, indeed. To give you an example, yesterday we worked together through email on drafting a shared statement on the faculties' response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's call to action. That requires quite a bit of collaboration and consensus. There are over 20 law schools in Canada, and we all have to agree on the text of this document, so indeed it requires quite a bit of consensus and collaborative work.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I see you've done a significant amount of work with the Supreme Court, including being personal secretary to Justice McLachlin. What do you see as potential transferable skills in terms of the work that you've done in the Supreme Court?

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

The job of the executive legal officer is actually to be of assistance to the Chief Justice in whatever needs she may have. The Chief Justice, as you know, is an enormously busy person who has multiple responsibilities. In addition to her duties as a judge, she must run the court in operational terms as well as in collegial terms. She is the chair of the Canadian Judicial Council, which is the body that is made up of all chief justices of Canada and has responsibilities for all matters that are of significance to the judiciary. She also chairs the National Judicial Institute, which is, as I mentioned, the body that provides training to federal judges.

I think the transferable skills there are twofold. First, in this job, one has to be absolutely aware of the strict confidentiality of everything that happens within the institution. Of course, as you can imagine, being on the right-hand side of the Chief Justice in all of her responsibilities, sitting in an office right next to hers, helping her deal with the duties that I've just outlined, I was made aware of a number of things that had to be kept absolutely confidential. I think this is a transferable skill here, obviously given the significance of the process that we're engaged in and the need to preserve the privacy of the applicants and the confidentiality of the process.

The other dimension is that the Supreme Court is a very important institution in Canadian life and in our constitutional architecture. I think working in there, seeing the collegiality of the court and the way in which the court operates, gives me a pretty good idea of the ways in which individuals engaged in public life need to behave. I think I can apply that kind of understanding to my assessment of the files that we have before us.

(1115)

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Sound judgment, discretion, independence: are there other qualities you see that you have which you would be able to bring to this position?

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

No, I think that would sum it up.

I think the one you didn't mention is my familiarity with the constitutional role and structure of the Senate and its place in the Canadian government. Again, I don't want to claim expertise in this area. This is a very, very complex field. There are many legal experts in Canada who know much more about the Senate than I do. But the work I did for the reference I think gave me a sound preparation for this.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Ms. Vandenbeld.

Mr. Scott Reid is the next questioner.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Professor Jutras, thank you very much. While you are a very accomplished person, I suspect you're probably somewhat socially uncomfortable reading off your resumé as this committee requires. I can appreciate the somewhat awkward position that puts you in. Being accomplished does not mean one is an egomaniac.

The first question I want to ask you, just relating to today's subject matter, is whether or not you had the chance to watch the testimony of Minister Monsef last night before the Senate committee. It dealt to some degree with your mandate.

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

I saw the first 20 minutes. I had a meeting after that, so I missed the rest. I heard the presentations of both ministers and I think the first two or three questions.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It came out very early in the responses—in fact it may have been in Dominic LeBlanc's opening remarks—that you required some extra time in order to complete your submissions, and that they have not yet been made. Is that in fact the case, and do you have a deadline in mind of when you'd be making your submission to the Prime Minister?

Prof. Daniel Jutras: I'm not aware of—

The Chair:

Sorry, hold on a second.

We have a point of order from Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

The purpose of this examination today, Mr. Chair, is to look at the competency and the qualifications of the nominee. I'm not quite sure of the relevance of the questioning of Mr. Reid at this time, and whether in fact it is in order.

Taking into account, Mr. Chair, that you had provided some direction to the committee members at the beginning of this examination, I would again suggest that the line of questioning from Mr. Reid at this time is out of order.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, in response to that point of order, I will just observe that what is appropriate is if you think something is out of order then inform the witness that in your judgment, it's not necessary for them...that if they choose not to respond, it's up to their discretion.

I'll mention further that the witness has a very impressive record of having dealt with issues that require discretion. The witness is better qualified than anybody in this room to determine whether or not a question that one of us asks has the effect of putting him in a position of being unable to answer without violating his mandate.

I think that is the appropriate course of action. Actually not allowing the witness to answer and not allowing me to ask would be an inappropriate use of discretion.

The Chair:

I'm going to proceed that way for the moment. To remind you of what the committee is allowed to do, I'm going to reread a passage: The committee's role is limited to an examination of the qualifications and competence of the appointee to perform the duties of the post to which he or she has been appointed.

Based on that, you can choose or not choose to answer that question.

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I think it's possible for me to answer in a manner that connects the question to competence and qualification in the following way.

This is a demanding task, as I think members of the committee will understand. People who sit on the advisory board must have stamina, energy, and the ability to work promptly. I think my career until now demonstrates that I'm able to manage a very intense workload and to work as promptly as possible in the achievement of the mandates that I've been given.

(1120)

Mr. Scott Reid:

I actually did not mean that question, Professor Jutras, to suggest that you're incapable of moving quickly on issues. That was not the intent of the question. It was to determine when you expected to get back to the Prime Minister with your recommendations.

Do you feel that you're able to answer that question?

The Chair:

You don't have to.

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

Indeed. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'm not sure that it relates to the mandate of your particular committee. I can say that we're working as promptly as we can and will report in due course, having done due diligence in every respect.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

Mr. Chair, in the event that you continue to rule out of order questions that are germane to what's going on, what I'll do is, at the end of this witness's testimony, I'll be presenting a motion to invite him and the other members of the committee back to discuss these very issues that you keep on ruling out of order, because they are important. I'm just giving you notice of that, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

That's fine.

The committee has no choice. It cannot change its mandate for this particular meeting so much beyond that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

No, but there is an overly restrictive interpretation, which I notice is being applied very aggressively to Conservative members that has not been applied to government members on this same matter. It's quite striking, Mr. Chair.

To the witness, you were the private secretary of the Chief Justice. I believe that she also chairs the committee that makes decisions regarding the Order of Canada. Were you involved in any way in that? I'm not asking you to get into the mechanics, but I'm just asking if you were involved in that.

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

No, not at all. This is one mandate that she performs on her own.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

You mentioned that you had been involved as an amicus curiae with regard to the reference case. Was that on behalf of an organization or on your own behalf?

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

The amicus curiae is appointed by the Supreme Court, so I was not advocating on behalf of any organization. I was asked by the Supreme Court, along with co-counsel Mr. John Hunter from British Columbia, to present a brief and oral argument in addition to all of the briefs and oral arguments the court was receiving from a variety of attorneys general as well as intervenors in the Supreme Court.

The appointment came from the Supreme Court itself.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You have mentioned at some length your ability to understand—you didn't put it quite this way but.... The concept of discretion is actually one that requires some degree of subtle knowledge to understand what it means and where its parameters are located, and I think that's what you were trying to point out.

Keeping that in mind, I'd like to ask you if some of the proceedings you're engaged in on the committee you're involved in cause you to face rules regarding discretion and what you can disclose in the future.

Would you regard that as including the number of nominations that occurred in each province during the phase one process? That is to say, would you say that you will not in the future be able to disclose how many nominations you received—not anything else—in each of the three provinces?

The Chair:

Once again, that's a process question.

Mr. Scott Reid:

No, Mr. Chair, you are wrong. That is going to a matter that the witness himself raised. He therefore is required to respond to this question.

The Chair:

He's not required to because it's process, but he can if he wants to.

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

Thank you, Mr. Reid.

I think I will simply refer you back to article 13 of our terms of reference, which require the committee within three months of submitting names of qualified candidates to the Prime Minister, in the transitional process as well as in subsequent processes, to provide a report then in both official languages, a public report, that will be given to the Prime Minister that will contain information on the process, including the execution of the terms of reference, the cost relating to the advisory board's activities, and more pointedly, statistics relating to the applications received.

We have not written that report at this point, but I think it's fair to say that we will need to ascertain the level of disclosure that will be required in that context.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

In the same regard, then, would you regard this as.... This is a matter that the minister was asked about, although I think after you stopped watching. It's the names of nominating groups. It's not the names of people who were submitting their applications. That clearly is intended to be confidential, but the names of nominating groups is a matter that I do not think is stated in your mandate as being confidential. Indeed, I think that when your mandate was written, the phase one process hadn't actually been dreamed up yet.

Would you be willing to include that in your information in your report?

(1125)

The Chair:

You have 10 seconds.

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

I'm sorry. I missed the last intervention.

The Chair:

I said that you have 10 seconds.

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

Ten seconds?

Again, Mr. Reid, I would refer you back to the terms of reference and suggest that I don't think it's appropriate for me at this point to indicate in some detail what will be in that report before it's even written. I think it remains to be done at this point.

The Chair:

Thank you.

The next questioner will be David Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Professor, for being here today. I appreciate it.

For the purposes of full disclosure, you probably know that my party and I don't have a lot of use for the Senate. We would just as soon see the thing disappear and be gone; however, that's not the view that's prevailing right now.

What I want to ask you is very similar to the questions I asked your colleague the last time. I accept your qualifications. Quite frankly, given that any Canadian can be appointed, I think that just about any Canadian can be on a board that approves those Canadians, so I have no problem with your qualifications. Certainly, from a professional point of view, if what's wanted is a 100% professional person, I accept that you're that person.

I do want to speak to the issue of competency, and I want to approach it this way. One of the things about a democracy is accountability. We on the House side have accountability built in every weekend when we're in our ridings, and certainly every four years in elections. It's not so in the Senate, but given the fact that accountability is an important trait of a modern democracy, what sorts of traits would you be looking for in candidates so that they would understand the importance of accountability? That would be part of their role. It's not just to be lawmakers, but to be accountable for what they're doing.

When you're interviewing people and making these decisions, what sorts of traits are you looking for in them that would give you the assurance that they understand that accountability is an important part of our Parliament, on both sides?

The Chair:

Go ahead. You can talk about your traits and ability to do that, or whatever you want.

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

I confess that I think that question is also slightly outside of the mandate of the committee, unless I'm mistaken in my understanding of what the topic of our conversation is today. I'm not sure I understand how your question relates to my qualifications and competence. Could you clarify that for me?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Sure. You're the one who's going to be making decisions about people and whether they're in front of you. One of the things that I assume you're going to want to do is satisfy yourself that they can do the work and that they have the stamina to handle what can be a busy workload.

I'm suggesting that an important trait that Canadians want in senators is that they understand that accountability is part of being a parliamentarian. “Parliamentarian” covers both sides of Parliament, both Houses, so what I'm asking is, what are you looking for when you're interviewing someone to satisfy yourself that they understand the importance of accountability?

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

I think that goes to the mandate of our advisory board, as opposed to my personal qualifications and competence. The mandate of the committee is pretty clearly delineated in its terms of reference. I think the minister has made it very clear what the qualifications and merit-based assessment criteria are. Those have been made public.

I think that is one of the key features of the work we're doing. We're being as careful as we can to implement the criteria qualifications and merit-based elements that have been stipulated in our terms of reference.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, I have to tell you that—

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

Including, I might add, the idea of a proper understanding of legislative processes and the role of the Senate and its place in the constitutional order of Canada.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm not real impressed with these answers, sir.

I think it's very legitimate for me to ask you what you're looking for, because you're the one who's going to decide who our lawmakers are. It's not me. It's not the Canadian people. It's going to be this committee. You get to decide. All I asked you was how you are going to find certain traits—in this case, the trait was accountability—and all you want to do is play politics with it and tell me why you shouldn't answer the question. I don't understand.

It's a very reasonable question, Mr. Chair.

(1130)

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

On a point of order, Mr. Chair, I believe the witness has done an excellent job at answering that question within the mandate of this committee.

Mr. Christopherson is badgering the witness and continues to do so.

Mr. David Christopherson:

How can I be badgering when I can't get an answer?

All I'm asking.... It's a very legitimate question. How can it not be legitimate to ask them what they think, as they're looking at someone making a decision?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

The answer Mr. Christopherson is looking for goes to the qualifications of the potentially appointed senator and not to the qualifications of the witness before us.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I've played this straight, Mr. Chair, from the beginning of this process, even though we have no use for it or the Senate.

Unfortunately, the first engagement of games has come from the government's witness, who refuses and is trying to find a way not to answer a very reasonable question.

If I can't get the person choosing the senators to tell me how they're looking for accountability, how in the hell can we ever expect to have senators who believe accountability is part of being a parliamentarian?

The Chair:

Well, you can ask—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yeah, crickets.

You know what? I'm done, and I'll support any action the Conservatives want to make to show everybody what a joke this is.

The Chair:

The next questioner is David Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

I was reading over your CV.[Translation]

You have held three positions abroad as a visiting professor, namely at the Institut d’études politiques de Paris, Louisiana State University, and Université d'Aix-Marseille III. You also studied at Harvard University.

Could you tell us a bit more about your experience abroad and explain how that experience would help you contribute to the work of the advisory board?

Mr. Daniel Jutras:

Could you repeat your question? I did not quite hear it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You worked abroad on several occasions as a visiting professor and you studied at Harvard University.

Could you tell us a bit about that and explain how it is useful to your current work?

Mr. Daniel Jutras:

Excellent. Thank you.

Like many academics at major Canadian universities, I had the opportunity to travel abroad to teach and give lectures. The interesting aspect of this experience was becoming familiar with the different cultures that are also part of the Canadian community. There are people in Canada who come from very different cultures and it is important, when considering their files, to be able to correctly assess the contribution they can make to an institution like the Senate.

Beyond that, there were rather academic lectures and courses that have no bearing on the Senate. This international experience is not in itself a fully relevant or essential part of my qualifications.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I also wanted to add that I will be sharing my time with Ms. Sahota.

You worked several years in private practice with the Borden Ladner Gervais law firm.

Since you have spent most of your career in the education field, I would like you to tell us a bit more about your experience in the private sector.

Mr. Daniel Jutras:

Very well.

My position at Borden Ladner Gervais was not full time. I was legal counsel in that national law firm. I worked there after my time at the Supreme Court of Canada. I was hoping to gain a better understanding of class actions, in particular. As these are one of my areas of expertise, I thought it would be useful to get a better grasp of the realities of this phenomenon, to spend a few hours a week in a large firm. The people at the firm offered me the opportunity to work with them on some class action cases, and that is what I did for three years. However, I did that while continuing to work as a full professor at McGill University.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

There are several members on the board. Did you already know them? Had you worked with them before?

Mr. Daniel Jutras:

Are you referring to the other members of the advisory board?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, precisely.

Did you already know them? Had you worked with them before?

Mr. Daniel Jutras:

No. I did not know any of the members before we started working together a few weeks ago.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you think there is a good dynamic in this board?

(1135)

Mr. Daniel Jutras:

I am extremely proud of being part of this board because its members are remarkable individuals. If you have the list in front of you, you will see that many of them are members or companions of the Order of Canada. I am not one of them. In any case, I can tell you that Ms. Labelle's leadership is absolutely outstanding. [English]

The Chair:

Sorry. Point of order.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Who made the point of order, Mr. Chair, that caused you to stop that?

The Chair:

I did.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's peachy that you agree. That's swell, but irrelevant. You just called a point of order, Mr. Chair. That's for us to do. It's not for you to start calling points of order.

The Chair:

Mr. Chan, do you call that a point of order?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I'll call that a point of order.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, let Mr. Chan and others call the points of order. Let's not have you doing that.

Larry, I think you're an awesome guy, but you're not being an awesome chair. You're not being impartial at all. You've got to get back to being impartial. That's your job.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I was actually about to say that I don't think that last question was actually relevant either. To be fair, I'm calling a point of order on my own side here because I actually think it goes beyond the mandate of our examination.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Arnold, I believe you believe that, and it may very well be that you were about to press the button, but you hadn't done it yet, and that goes to our Chair being impartial at all times, which is not what's happening right now.

The Chair:

The Chair gets to rule on various things, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm ready to pass on to Ms. Sahota, if she'd like.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Professor Jutras, thank you so much for being with us here today.

I'd like to go back to your appointment as amicus curiae to the Supreme Court and your experiences. Could you talk about something particular that you learned from that argument and what you bring from that to this appointment to the independent advisory board?

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

As you know, the reference to the Supreme Court that I participated in was primarily a reference about the amendment process under part V of the Constitution Act, determining the level of provincial support that had to occur under our Constitution in order for certain amendments to the Constitution to be made, particularly amendments that relate to the structure of the Senate, all the way to the issue of the abolition of the Senate.

As I've said in another setting, it would be fair to say that it was more a reference about the constitutional amendment process than a reference about the Senate itself. The Supreme Court was not charged with the mandate or responsibility to assess various proposals for Senate reform, but asked under the reference to determine what processes for amendment needed to take place.

That was really the focus of the work that I did as amicus curiae, focusing on the structure of the Constitution Act and the provisions for amendment of the Constitution that we are working with.

Nonetheless, it's fair to say that in understanding the kinds of issues that are likely to have arisen in that conversation, I had to become quite familiar with the historical record with respect to constitutional amendments on the Senate. Part of that obviously involves consideration of a variety of concerns expressed about the Senate, it's current configuration and possible transformations for the future.

The thing that I might bring that might be relevant to an understanding of qualifications of individuals that would be appropriate senators, the understanding that I bring is this understanding that's based on having read very widely on the role of the Senate and on its position within our constitutional architecture.

The Chair:

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

I appreciate your being here today. Conducting what's essentially a job interview after the fact and in public is probably an awkward situation. We appreciate your putting yourself through that.

Obviously, we've heard your qualifications. I think I would be able to speak for everyone in this room when I say we are quite impressed with your background and experience you have.

One thing I always find helpful in assessing someone is what they would do in certain situations. I like to put people through scenarios or situations, and ask what they would do. Given the fact that this process is already well under way, there is going to be some element where I can't really ask you what would or should you do. It's going to be what have you done because it's already well under way.

There are a couple of different aspects of the job that I see as quite important and that I'd like to get an assessment of your thoughts on. The first one is that we have two stages to this process. There's this first stage, a transitional process I guess we're calling it, and then there's going to be a transition into a permanent process.

When there are enhancements being made, which is what's been indicated on the Democratic Institutions website, to that process when it becomes permanent I would assume that in your role on the board you will have some opportunity to make recommendations or suggestions about what those enhancements would be.

I wonder if you could give some indication as to what are some of the flaws or challenges that you've seen in the process you've been undertaking up to this point, and what you think would be good changes to be made to that process going forward. It helps us to assess your ability to make those kinds of suggestions and recommendations.

(1140)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

On a point of order, Mr. Chair, I think it's going to process once again and not to the competence of the witness or his qualifications.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It's the way they were.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It is. I should take that word “think” out completely, as in it does not follow the mandate.

The Chair:

You can judge.... We've been through this enough today. You can judge it, Mr. Jutras. Go ahead.

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

I think I'll confine myself to saying it's probably premature for me to answer that question. The process is still ongoing. There will be a report to the Prime Minister under our terms of reference that will assess the process and identify some of the possible improvements, but I don't think I can identify them now. We haven't had that conversation as a board, and I would prefer to wait until that's done before addressing that issue.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. I'll respect that.

You had mentioned, I think, in response to an earlier question—I believe it was from Mr. Reid—that the report you would be giving as a board about those recommendations would be made public, so we will have some idea as to the enhancements the board is suggesting, and we'll know in public.

Can you confirm that you will be making that report public?

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

That is my understanding. I think that is explicit in our terms of reference under article 13(3). The report must be made public under those terms of reference.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I appreciate that. Thank you.

Maybe we'll move to another area that I think is fairly important. There's this idea of consultations that will take place with various groups in the transitional process, and I'll quote from it. It “could include groups which represent”, and then it has a variety of different groups it could represent. Then it indicates that would be to ensure that “a diverse slate of individuals, with a variety of backgrounds, skills, knowledge” are brought forward.

I'm trying to get a sense of your previous experience in undertaking those types of consultations with organizations. It's a difficult situation because you have already undertaken some of the process here. I want to ask a bit about what you would or should do, but in some cases I'm going to be asking what you have done because it's already under way.

How have those consultations been undertaken? How should they be undertaken? I'll ask both, I guess.

Have groups been approached, or have they been required to apply? Based on what criteria have those groups been chosen and should those groups be chosen? How would the board interact, or has the board interacted with those groups? In your view should those groups that are participating be made public?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Again, Mr. Chair, I'll leave it to the discretion of the witness, but I think the latter part of Mr. Blake's question again drifts back into current processes as opposed to.... I was fine when we were talking about previous experience, and I think that goes to the examination of the competency and qualifications, and I'll leave it to the witness to decide if he wishes to respond.

(1145)

Mr. Blake Richards:

Mr. Chair, it's quite clear I'm trying to ask what should be done, but obviously the processes are under way, and that's a reality. We can't ignore the reality that's under way. So to ask what should be done, I have to ask what has been done, because it speaks to what's the reality.

The Chair:

Mr. Jutras.

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

I don't think I want to answer detailed questions about what should be done for reasons that I outlined in my previous response to you. I think that assessment needs to take place once we're done with this particular transitional phase, and it's too early to address this.

I think it would be preferable given our terms of reference if the different interlocutors were addressed in the appropriate sequence. The terms of reference require us to report to the Prime Minister. The Prime Minister, I assume, under the terms of reference will make that report public. And I assume that given our terms of reference, the report will highlight every dimension that may be relevant in terms of making recommendations for improvement.

Mr. Blake Richards:

May I ask you then whether these groups were approached or did they have to apply? On what criteria were the groups chosen and how has the board interacted with those groups?

The Chair:

This is the last question.

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

Thank you.

I think, again, those questions go to the process that will be reported on in the document I've just mentioned rather than to my qualifications.

I can refer back to what was said by our chair, Huguette Labelle, in her testimony before your committee, that the process was a very open one. As you know, the committee set up a website inviting nominations and applications, and I think it would be fairly easy for a person on your committee to identify the different elements that were engaged in by the committee in order to generate nominations and applications from very eminent Canadians and highly respectable Canadians.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Our next intervenor, for five minutes, will be Ms. Petitpas Taylor.

Just before you start, I want to say to the committee that I am normally a very flexible person, but I have called every party out of order on this. We should be strictly sticking to what the Standing Orders say we're allowed to do, because hundreds of orders in council will be coming up, and some committees look to us as a precedent. So of all committees, we, as much as possible, should stick to the directions in the Standing Orders.

Ms. Petitpas Taylor. [Translation]

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Good morning, Mr. Jutras. Thank you for coming before this committee.

Your professional skills are obviously up to par. Your resumé is very impressive. Could you talk a bit about your personal background and tell us how it will help you accomplish the tasks of the advisory board?

Mr. Daniel Jutras:

I am not sure I understand your question. What do you mean by “personal background”?

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

We have heard quite a bit about your professional achievements, but I would like to know something about your personal qualities. Perhaps you could tell us more about that and about your personal background.

Mr. Daniel Jutras:

That is a very difficult question. I am not sure I can give you an intelligent answer.

I am now part of an university environment associated with higher education. That is basically my professional life. That said, it may be useful to know that in my family, my generation is the first to have a university education. Neither my father nor my mother studied at university. Both my parents valued education enormously, but did not have themselves the opportunity to get that type of education.

On a personal level, I am an ordinary Canadian. I come from a middle-class family. My father was a municipal official and my mother a secretary in a school board. I completed my secondary education in a large high school, namely a public school on Montreal's south shore. I continued my studies at a public CEGEP in Quebec.

On a personal level, although my background is associated with academic life and institutions, there is an area of my life that is grounded in the reality of middle-class Canadians.

I do not know if I can tell you much more about this. I do not think the rest would interest you. Hobbies do not seem to be relevant to carrying out my duties in this board.

(1150)

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Indeed. Thank you.

In your view, which qualities are truly essential to carrying out your future duties?

Mr. Daniel Jutras:

Since there is a lot of work to be done, I consider it essential to be efficient in evaluating files, and reading resumés and letters of recommendation. There is also the ability to spot certain key elements of a person's life in these documents. That is not always easy to do with documents filed before this kind of board to help assess candidate applications.

It is a bit like the exercise you are going through today. You have my resumé, which is four or five pages long, and you are trying to evaluate who I am and what my qualifications are. The experience of having read candidate applications is, in my view, truly relevant to the exercise.

That said, I will go back to what I was saying earlier. The fundamental qualities are in particular a reputation for impeccable personal integrity—and I think I can lay claim to this quality—good judgment, ability to work independently and in a non-partisan manner, and a good understanding of the Canadian constitutional structure and of the role of the Senate and the people who will be called to sit in that chamber when they are appointed by the Governor General.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

The next questioner will be Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for taking our questions today, Professor. We do appreciate it.

I only have a few minutes, so I will be quick. It's unfortunate that we can't talk about the process, because I think with that under way, it's very important to get some answers on this. We can't talk about accountability, so using your experience, let's talk about the current makeup of the Senate.

You look around that room of current senators and you see all different backgrounds. Looking at the mandate letter, and what you're looking for, I'd like to say that education is very important but it's not everything, but I see it is weighted a lot toward the education part. I have a lot of business people in my riding who are very successful and have a lot of common sense.

How are you, using your experience, going to ensure that you're getting people not just from the academic side but also from other fields, who have a lot of common sense, I would say, but not a heck of a lot of letters after their names?

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

Again, I think that goes primarily to the criteria that we were asked to use and not necessarily to my own qualification. I'm going to refer you back to the annex that was provided by the minister on qualifications and merit-based assessment criteria. I think they're well defined and they're not all focused on letters after people's names. I think there's a very broad range of merit-based qualifications that the committee is required to assess.

Again, I go back to what I said to your colleague a few moments ago. The exercise that we're engaged in requires the ability to make judgment about individuals. It's not that different from the one you're engaged in right now, making an assessment of my qualifications and competence. I assume that not everybody in the room there is a person with numerous degrees. There must be a wide range of qualifications around your table, and I'm absolutely convinced that your committee is well equipped to make an assessment of my qualifications. I would say the same of my own competence to make that assessment.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Thank you, Professor.

That also goes back to democracy and how we're elected. We're based on our constituencies and people making that decision of whether or not we are qualified. That's why I asked you. I don't want it to be a Senate of elites. I want to see a wide range of backgrounds. As I said, one of the main things that we keep going back to—and we heard it yesterday at the Senate committee—is education. How do we ensure there is, in your experience and your background, accountability and also that you are representative of all aspects of Canada, including those who may be successful in business but may not have a huge number of degrees?

(1155)

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

What I want to say on this is that you're interviewing me, obviously, but there's a large committee that is addressing this. We have three committees, as you know, provincially constituted committees of five, and there's a very broad range of expertise and competence in this very fine group of people. Obviously, I'm one person; I have a particular profile and that profile is not replicated in the other members' careers. Everyone brings to the table something enormously valuable in making exactly the assessment that you've just identified.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

We talk about it being a new non-partisan Senate, which I think is very difficult to happen, because in any group, whether you're in a minor hockey association or chamber of commerce, you always migrate towards people with similar trains of thought.

Using your experience in looking at all of these CVs and letters of recommendation, the minister said yesterday that political experience will not necessarily disqualify you from being a candidate. However, using your experience , how are you going to ensure that they actually stay non-partisan after the fact?

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

Frankly, what happens after the fact is not something that the board can control. I'm not sure I can answer that particular question.

There are extraordinary Canadians from all walks of life who have applied for this, I can assure you. What we're trying to do, based on our own qualifications, is to make an appropriate assessment of the ways in which the individuals who have applied for this position meet the criteria that have been provided to us, the merit-based assessment criteria we must work with in making recommendations to the Prime Minister. That's the only thing I can say.

All of us are committed to abiding by the terms of reference and to doing this work very seriously. I think it requires each of us to step outside of ourselves for a minute and to think more broadly about those qualifications.

The Chair:

The next questioner is Mr. Arnold Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Thank you, Dean Jutras, for appearing before this committee. I want to reiterate what many of my colleagues around this table have indicated. We are incredibly impressed and thank you for putting yourself forward in public service in advancing this process that we are constitutionally bound to do.

I want to get back to some of your opening comments with respect to your experience, particularly as it relates to your experience in constitutional law. I note that you put on the record that this is not necessarily your core professional competence and that you focus more on civil procedure and law of contracts. I do want to explore your experience in the area of constitutional law in particular.

I recall in your opening remarks that you indicated this was a focus of your graduate work at Harvard Law School, and I note that you are a recipient of the Frank Knox scholarship, a very prestigious scholarship. I think my brother has one. I want to know more specifically about some of the research that you did, and how that might inform you in terms of the work you are doing now for this advisory board.

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

Very briefly, my graduate studies at Harvard were a little over 30 years ago. The focus in constitutional matters, as you can imagine back then, was the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. This was the mid-1980s, and everybody with an interest in public law was particularly focused on human rights and constitutional guarantees for civil liberties. That was the focus of my studies back then.

I wrote my masters thesis at Harvard on the scope of section 1 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and possible interpretations of limitations to rights as flowing from section 1. I should say that this piece was written well before the Supreme Court jurisprudence evolved on section 1, and has become obsolete 30 years after the fact.

After this, I really kept my focus on private law for the longest time, until I went as the executive legal officer of the Supreme Court of Canada, where I had the opportunity to work on constitutional matters, both in relation to charter issues and in relation to the division of powers and institutional aspects of the Constitution.

Since that time, I've kept my interest in and read widely in this area, even though I don't now publish or engage in research in this area.

(1200)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Thank you, Dean.

I want to look a little at your additional experience. You noted that you had been the principal investigator.... There was an anonymous research grant where you looked at rule of law in Russia.

Did that particular work get to the issue of division of powers, or help inform you in terms of dealing with bicameral parliaments or the drafting of constitutional processes, or the like?

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

No. That work that we did.... This is a group of McGill professors who are engaged in this effort and the work that we did had to do with judicial structures, the administration of justice issues, and also corruption aspects or corruption controls that one might imagine for a federation like Russia. So no, the focus was not on division of powers or bicameral governance at all.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I myself might be straying into something that is out of order, but I'm going to ask, based on your understanding obviously as a lawyer and as a professor, would the decisions of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments be binding on the Prime Minister and the executive council?

That may be a procedural question.

The Chair:

Sorry, but that's a procedural question.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Okay. I withdraw the question.

The Chair:

We're past noon, but if the witness would indulge us, we had a few points of order that took up some time, and we have one round left of three minutes if you wanted to ask any questions, Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Oh, absolutely. We'll give it a second shot.

I'd just like to remind our witness that his chair answered all my questions. She had no problem. She didn't try to hide behind anything. She just answered as best she could. I accepted that. That's all I was looking for.

I want to come back again and try the same kind of question on a different matter, because the chair will rule me out of order if I don't. It is on the issue of the primacy of the House of Commons. Now, under the Constitution, on which you're an expert and know more about than most of us, there are certain rights that are bestowed on each House. The current practice has been, since 1867, that the Senate, with very, very few exceptions, is very careful not to thwart the will of the elected chamber, recognizing in deference the fact that we are elected and have that mandate.

Now, we did have a circumstance whereby Jack Layton, the former leader of the NDP, brought forward his environmental bill of rights, which I believe passed the House of Commons twice. It was sent to the Senate and without any debate, they killed it.

My question for you would be, when you're interviewing someone, what are you looking for from them in terms of how they see the division of power between the House and the Senate? Would you be wanting to hear that they would exercise a deference to the elected House, or would you be looking to hear from someone who says no, that if they're appointed, they will exercise every single constitutional right that a senator has?

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

I think this is again a question that goes to process and a question that goes to the qualifications of individuals who will be appointed as senators rather than the qualifications of members, but let me try to answer it that way. The mandate of.... I'm sorry if I'm making you unhappy with my answers. I'm doing my best to address them within the mandate of the committee on which you sit.

Let me say this. The criteria that have been provided to us, the criteria that we work with, require us to assess very carefully the ways in which people meet the basic knowledge qualifications. I would say that those knowledge qualifications include not just the written mandate of the Senate, but also a sound understanding of its place in the constitutional order of Canada, and I think one would expect that it gets manifested in the way in which people describe their own profile, their own career, and their own expectations of the contributions that they might make in the Senate if they were selected.

(1205)

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I have another question. When you were doing your research, which was very impressive, did you do some research into the question of accountability and how senators should be more accountable? Did you study the aspect of a deference to the House of Commons out of respect to the Canadian people, who voted for the House of Commons? Did you research that, sir?

Prof. Daniel Jutras:

As I said at the outset, this is not an area of scholarship for me. I have not published on the Senate. Indeed, I don't think you will find anything under my signature that would address the kinds of questions you're raising.

That being said, I'm quite familiar with the concerns you express, because those figure prominently in all of the scholarship that I was reading in preparation for my work as amicus curiae before the Supreme Court of Canada in the Senate reference. I'm quite familiar with those questions, indeed, although I have not published on them.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Could I just—

The Chair: Yes?

Mr. David Christopherson: I have no more questions—my time is up—but I just want to say, though, that I find it totally unacceptable. You sense my frustration. It's not acceptable for you to say that's what we're going to look for in the candidates. You're the one who is replacing the Canadian people's judgment, and you're deciding whether they have the qualifications or not, and your refusal to tell me what template you're going to use—

Mr. Arnold Chan: Mr. Chair, I think Mr. Christopherson is clearly out of—

Mr. David Christopherson: —further makes a mockery of an unelected Senate.

Thank you, Chair.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Mr. Chair, I have a point of order.

I think we should thank the witness. If Mr. Christopherson wants to continue this conversation with the committee after the witness has been dismissed, I'm willing to entertain him ad nauseam, but again I think we're done.

The Chair:

I would like to thank the witness for coming. You're one of our first ones on this. We certainly appreciate your qualifications and your taking the time today to answer questions.

Good luck in your work.

Mr. Daniel Jutras:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

We'll suspend while we change the chair and then go on to committee business.

(1205)

(1210)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

I will call the meeting back to order. We are still televised and in public of course.

We have a couple of motions to deal with. I will point out that the clerk does have a budget for the one brief study. I believe it's in relation to the advisory board. We've had a couple of meetings and one more that is planned.

My intention is that we would quickly move in camera at the very tail end of the meeting with just a few minutes to go, and we can deal with the budget. I think it can be dealt with fairly expeditiously. That would be my intention, unless the committee would like to direct me otherwise. We'd go quickly in camera to deal with the budget, so that we can do that. We would do that five or six minutes before the end of the meeting and make sure we're finished right on time. I know that members have other meetings to get to, and we have to make sure we wrap up right on time.

Having said that, I'm letting you all know what I expect to do and when. We have a motion that has been put before the committee. There have been some amendments suggested, and the debate when we were last on it was on those amendments.

You've all received it; it's been passed around. The track changes that show the proposed amendments have been passed around. I would entertain a speakers list on that debate.

Mr. Scott Reid:

On a point of order, Chair, I had a motion as well that I wanted to introduce relating to today's subject matter.

I'm hoping that the mover of the motion, Mr. Christopherson, will indulge me in suggesting that I move this motion first. I can't imagine that it would not be a matter of consensus and easily dealt with.

It relates, of course, to bringing back the witnesses to deal with the substance that was not permissible under the standing order governing our meeting today, specifically Standing Order 111(2).

(1215)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Okay, you have a motion you'd like to move.

I can add you as my first speaker. If you'd like to move the motion, you're more than able to do that.

The clerk has asked that if you do so, please read it slowly for us so that we can make sure it gets recorded.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Certainly. I'll actually give you the text of the motion, because I have it written out.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you.

The floor is yours.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I guess my answer is that I'm first on the speakers list. Taking advantage of that, whereas members of the Senate advisory board have been, by reason of a provision of Standing Order 111(2), unable to answer questions relating to the administration of their responsibilities, I move: That the federal members of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments —that is to distinguish them from the provincial members— be invited to appear before the Committee before the end of March 2016, to answer all questions relating to their mandate and responsibilities.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you, Mr. Reid. The motion has been duly received.

We can proceed to debate on that motion if it's Mr. Christopherson's wish, because it would forgo his.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Chair, I'm fine deferring my motion to allow this motion to come before it. Then we can jump back to my motion.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Okay.

I would entertain speakers to this motion.

I see Mr. Christopherson, and then Mr. Chan.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Is Mr. Reid going to speak to his motion?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I kind of did, I think, in the course of editorializing during Monsieur Jutras' presentation.

Mr. David Christopherson: Okay.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Yes. That was my understanding, that he had. Obviously he has the right to speak again, if he chooses.

Mr. Christopherson, you are first on my list, followed by Mr. Chan.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I appreciate that. I don't intend to take too long, but you know what the Senate does to me.

I have to tell you that I didn't have the same problem in the first meeting that I had in this one. At the first meeting I asked, I believe, similar questions. I deliberately structured them in a way that I believed would get past the censorship of the government and pass muster with the Chair. That held the last time, so I can't see that my thinking was that far off. The chair of the advisory board, who has a lot more to be worried about than any of the members, answered quite quickly and openly. It's not necessarily what I wanted to hear, but she didn't make any attempt to not answer the question.

I don't want to cast aspersions against the previous witness; he sounds like an amazing academic and has made a wonderful contribution, but I have to tell you, it almost sounds like he was coached. Either that or he spends as much time keeping an eye on politics as he does on academia, because those were political moves. Most people don't normally have those at their fingertips.

Anyway, that's just an observation, not an accusation. I'll leave that there.

In terms of the substance of it, it is very frustrating and drives some of us insane that there are lawmakers chosen by the Prime Minister rather than the Canadian people. We forever have senators pointing to their good deeds and the good reports they have. The response is that we can have all the good deed, blue-ribbon committees that we want, but what you don't do is make them lawmakers. That's the point.

In fact, I would remind colleagues that the vote of a senator is worth more than ours, because there are fewer of them. It takes fewer votes to win the second chamber than it does our chamber. Therefore, anything that involves appointing them deserves a lot of serious scrutiny.

I didn't attempt to play any games. I don't think I left the impression that I was playing any games. With the last witness we had, it was very straightforward. I did my thing, and when the time was up, I shut up and we moved on. This time I had a witness on an issue very close to my heart, who is only one of a handful of people who replace all 35 million Canadians in deciding who our lawmakers are, and the witness wouldn't give me a straight answer.

At least answer the questions. I'm surprised that he, as a lawyer, made a bigger deal out of why he didn't want to answer it rather than providing a good lawyerly answer that didn't give me an answer. Goodness knows, we watch question period; professionals do it every day. I'm as guilty. I did it in my time when I was a minister. The better you are at not answering questions without it looking like that, the more successful you are in question period.

I'm fully prepared to accept that as a way to deal with the question, but to start playing games on a question of was it right or wrong what the Senate did to Jack Layton's bill.... Whether you like Jack Layton or the bill or not, it came from the House of Commons and the Senate rejected it without even a debate. I think it's fair for me to ask somebody who's going to be doing the hiring of senators—not the electing, the hiring—what they would think of a witness in response to that question. Do they think it's acceptable? Would they be looking for a candidate, an applicant, who says, “Oh, I think it's fine. Constitutionally, they have that right and there's no problem,” or would they be looking for somebody to say, “You know what? I think that really crosses the line between, yes it's our legal mandate, but there is a deference to the House in recognition that it has the legitimacy of a mandate from the Canadian people”?

As flawed as that is, it's the best we've got. They don't have that. They do not have the legitimacy of being elected. We could be the worst MPs in the world but we have legitimacy, and I remind you that Canadians can fire us at the end of four years. We have a small group of people who are hiring senators that we have to live with for decades, because they can't be fired.

I will end where I began. I had no interest in playing games with this. Ask Mel. You'll know when I'm playing games with something. It's as obvious as hell and I say so right up, or at least I try to. I wasn't playing games and it wasn't my intent. I am incredibly disappointed that we got answers of avoidance from somebody who's going to play such a critical role in our beloved democracy.

(1220)



That's why I'm going to support this motion. I want an opportunity to see if they're all going to do that. The chair didn't. If anybody was going to play games, it would have been the chair setting the precedent, “I'm not letting any questions come near here. We're going to stay this narrow.” No, she was very open-minded. She understood where I was coming from. She didn't give me the answers I was hoping to hear, but she attempted to answer my question in what I thought was as fulsome a way as she could, recognizing where she was coming from.

I stand to be corrected but I don't believe I went after that witness in any kind of redirect in a serious way, maybe for clarification, but not the way I did today. I was very disappointed and borderline angry that someone who has the role they've been given to play in our society.... Whether they like me or my politics or not doesn't matter; as long as my question gets through the chair, it's a legitimate question on behalf of Canadians and deserves to be answered as best as possible, not to have someone use their scholarly skills to try to avoid answering the questions. That's what we do. They're doing our job when they do that. We play those kinds of games. There shouldn't be those kinds of games there.

I'll end it there. I'm not going to turn this into a filibuster, but I am going to underscore how things shifted for me today and I am now 100% behind the Conservatives in wanting to pull in as many people as possible and to look in every corner. With the way the government is playing this, I know in their heart of hearts they know this is bull. They have to do what they have to do, but I'm telling you that when we have witnesses on a subject like this who come in and start answering questions like that from someone who is trying to be fair-minded, then we're going to have trouble. My way of helping with that trouble is to support this motion.

Thank you, Chair.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you, Mr. Christopherson.

Before we move to our next speaker, Mr. Chan, I will just read the motion. There have been a couple of requests for that. We have it finalized here. I'll read it very slowly. That the federal members of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments be invited to appear before the Committee before the end of March 2016, to answer all questions relating to their mandate and responsibilities.

Mr. Chan, the floor is yours.

(1225)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Mr. Chair, I'm going to start with the comments from Mr. Christopherson. I'm going to put it on the record that to some degree, I regret giving you and the members of the opposition as much discretion as you had on the line of questioning with respect to Madam Labelle. As I said, I could have objected, and I chose not to at the time.

The point I want to make, Mr. Christopherson, is that at the end of the day, we are prescribed by the current Standing Orders with respect to the conduct of this committee in respect to examining the qualifications and competency of a prospective appointee. These are not Standing Orders that I made up. These are Standing Orders that are the current rules of procedure that govern what this committee can do.

I simply want to put that on the record. If we stay within the confines of the Standing Orders that all of us inherit.... If you don't like it, Mr. Christopherson, you have a right to subsequently propose to make the appropriate changes as we go through our processes of reviewing our Standing Orders, but my point is that at the present time we are simply conducting the business we are prescribed to do under the current Standing Orders.

With respect to the substantive motion that has been put forth by Mr. Reid, my personal view at the end of the day is that the questions you are ultimately concerned about, the government is more than transparent in granting you the opportunity to have the minister and his officials appear before this committee on March 10 to answer those particular questions.

As a result, from my perspective we will not be supporting—at least I certainly will not be supporting—this particular motion. You can ask the minister and her officials any questions you wish with respect to your concerns about the process, but at this time, we are charged solely with dealing with competency and qualifications. That is our mandate, and as a result we will not—at least I certainly will not—be supporting the motion.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

We'll hear from Mr. Reid, and then Mr. Christopherson, you'll be next.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I want to respond to Mr. Chan's comment. In his last point he said that looking at the qualifications is our mandate. That is our mandate, he said. Under the terms of Standing Order 111(2), which governs our meeting today, that is correct. The preamble is not part of the formal motion, but I read it out to you and the point was, of course, that governed us and that restricted us today. But given the fact that these are germane and important questions, another meeting at which we deal with these questions would be a time at which we could deal with those things. So, we are not, by the nature of this committee, by the nature of our mandate.... And there are some things we ought not to be looking at. We should not be asking about international human rights questions, defence questions, questions relating to the status of women or the Library of Parliament. Those things are outside our mandate.

But the actions of people like members of advisory boards are very much under our mandate. How we choose to deal with this is the subject of any individual motion we would bring forward. So, this new motion would allow us to fill in the lacunae that were left by the nature of the original motion. I have to say, going back to it, that had I realized such restrictions would be in existence under the original motion, I would have raised these objections at the time and sought to broaden our mandate, because I could have told you from the start that I actually thought the members of the advisory committee, whose CVs were posted online, were impressive. So the questions regarding their qualifications were, quite frankly, unnecessary. I didn't doubt their qualifications or their objectivity, but I do have questions about their mandate.

Of course, they have a system for reporting to the Prime Minister. But it is not unreasonable for us to want to get separate information about this. I want to stress this because I think it's an important distinction that might be lost on a casual observer here. The fact that individuals have a mandate to report to the Prime Minister does not mean that they are exempted from a mandate to report to us. That is a general mandate. The Prime Minister is, at least in theory, an agent of the crown, and that is distinct from the House of Commons. So, reporting to the House of Commons is something that is not exhausted by the fact that some form of mechanism exists for reporting to the Prime Minister, an expectation that you report back to the House of Commons and, indeed, to the Senate should it choose to conduct any hearings of its own and invite in these individuals. None of that is exempted. That is a reasonable thing to ask for.

That brings me around to Mr. Chan's initial comment, which was that they're letting us speak to the minister. I have to say that was an odd way of phrasing it, but I don't want to fault him for that. We have a right to question the minister. She is coming here at a time and place that is, frankly, inconvenient from our point of view. She should have been here earlier. Inconvenient—I should use that word advisedly; I don't mean.... It's untimely. She should have been here earlier. The Liberal members insisted on writing into our invitation that she come at a time that fits with her schedule. Well, frankly, that's the way these things are always written. Actually, it's implicit. If ministers don't want to come, we can't force them. So, maybe we should be grateful. Maybe we should be—I don't know—kissing someone's ring in gratitude for having been allowed to summon a witness before this committee. I don't think that is what is conventionally understood, that is what the public understands to be the case here. I don't think the public believes that the ministers are responsible to the crown and the House of Commons represents the peasantry waiting outside who may or may not be permitted by the grandees to ask deferential questions, to humbly beseech a minister of the crown for a question. I think quite the contrary.

(1230)



I know the minister, who I actually like a lot. I kind of think she likes me too. She gave me her little pink flower yesterday because I forgot to wear a pink shirt. That's pretty cool.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's respect.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm glad I got that on the record. It was a nice thing she did. I appreciated that.

I think she doesn't view things this way, necessarily. Look, the important thing is this. The way their mandate is written, they're reporting to the Minister of Democratic Institutions. They're reporting to the Prime Minister.

I anticipate, when she comes here, the minister may well say that she can't answer this question or that question, that it's not in her remit, that it's not in her mandate letter. That is a separate mandate given by means of an order in council from the crown to these individuals. Not only ministers of the crown are commissioned by the crown, but many other people are as well. So is every military officer. So is every commissioner, every head of every board. Everybody who isn't commissioned by the House of Commons and Senate is commissioned by the crown. Most people who are out there, those thousands and thousands of people working for the Government of Canada. They aren't answerable to her. Indeed, I think she would make a point of saying that they aren't answerable to her: they're supposed to be independent. The word “independent” is actually written into their title or at least it's written to all the talking points about their title and their mandate, and therefore, she can't answer.

What do we do then? We go back again, and beg and plead with Mr. Chan to, I guess, kiss his ring and say, “Could we please, humbly beseech you and the ministers, or whoever, to come back and speak to us”.

What I want, and I may be speaking for some others here, is to have these individuals come back, because they do have a mandate and they are the only ones who can speak to their mandate.

While I respect Professor Jutras' discretion in choosing not to answer certain things certain ways, it seemed clear to me that what he was saying is that he was attempting—although it wasn't really his responsibility to do this—to be respectful of our mandate. In fact, he actually worded things to say exactly that, “the mandate of your letter”, “the standing order under which you've convened this meeting”.

Now, we would have a different meeting at which we would deal with all aspects of his mandate and likewise for the other two permanent members. That would include questions, such as the one that I raised before I was shut down by the Chair, which was: How many applications did you actually get? How many nominations did you get?

There are a series of things they can't answer. It's not their fault that any filled-out application or nomination form becomes a level B protected document. They really can't talk about that. That is why it's written in there. That's a secret that freezes them from saying anything on the nominal basis that harm would be done if the content of those letters was revealed. Of course, we would respect that.

We'd be asking: How many actual nominations did you get? I'm interested in knowing that because look at how this process was set up. This process was set up through a press release on January 29, 2016, that we would now be accepting phase one nominations. The whole process was announced at that time, a process which, until then, was a complete secret. We knew nothing about it. It's a process, I should add, that was designed by the government and not by the advisory board. That's just to lay the blame where the blame ought to be laid for this.

The phase one process was announced to the public on January 29, 2016, and we were told that nominations would be open until February 15, 2016. You can add it up. That is 15 days, if you count the 15th and if you count the 29th. You can check the date on the email when it was sent out. The 29th was a Friday, and Saturday and Sunday are on the weekend.

This information was not posted in the normal spots we'd expect to see it. It wasn't, for example, on the website of the Minister of Democratic Institutions. Knowledge that this process was in existence took a while to spread out. I didn't find out about it until I got an email from the minister after a weekend had gone by.

(1235)



You can't get appointed under this process, and your name cannot be passed on to the Prime Minister by the advisory board unless (a) you've submitted your application, and (b) this brand new nomination that nobody knew existed isn't filled out by an officer of an organization. So, someone fills it out and says he's from such and such organization and has such and such a title.

Now, I'm involved in a number of charitable organizations. This very Saturday I will be chairing, as I do every year, the annual cystic fibrosis fundraising dinner in Ottawa. I volunteer in an organization, a community kitchen called The Table, and I host a fundraising dinner for them at my house every year. It's not because I'm special or important. It's just because that's what happens when you're a member of Parliament and have been around for a long time. But I do know a little bit about how organizations work.

Let's say for the sake of argument that one of those two organizations had wanted to put forward the name of someone, and they wanted to do it responsibly. What they would have to do is send out notice of a meeting. They would use their rules of order, and everybody has different rules of order, but I submit that it might be Robert's Rules of Order. Those are the most commonly used rules of order, and others are very similar with regard to notice requirements for board of directors meetings. It would normally take two weeks to summon a board of directors meeting. Maybe they didn't learn about this until Monday—but why would they learn about it? Do you think that the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation or any other organization like that spends its time hunting through the various outlets through which these notices are put out? No, of course they don't. So they might not find out about it immediately.

You call your meeting. February 1 is a Monday. We have to call a meeting, and we have a two weeks' notice requirement. When would that be? Well, two weeks from February 1...oh, that would be February 14, which is a Sunday. February 15 at noon is your deadline, so I guess if we had an extraordinary meeting on the weekend we could pull this off and then submit it on Family Day. Now, it's not Family Day in every province, but it is in Ontario, and one of the vacancies is in Ontario. I don't know whether it's Family Day in Manitoba and Quebec. I'm just not up on their provincial holidays. It's one of those areas that I haven't researched perhaps as well as I should.

But there you are. So it would be literally impossible to appoint or nominate somebody on the advice of the board of most organizations. It's practically impossible for virtually everybody. On the other hand, if you're just submitting that so-and-so who's an officer of an organization should nominate someone, supposedly on behalf of that organization, because that is the cover story, then that person's name could go forward. So why the preposterously tight deadline? Why the lack of notification?

Normally, every time something minor is announced by this government, supposedly a step forward in terms of democracy or consultation, there's a national press release, they're thumping it, and it's an epoch-making moment in Canadian democracy. But there's nothing on this except a press release, which is not followed by a press conference, not put on the normal websites, nothing.

Perhaps you can see why I want to know the number of actual nominations that were made. I'm interested in the number of applications too, but the number of nominations, I want to see that, because my guess is it was really, really small.

In Quebec, where you actually have to be representing a district of the province, the 24 districts of the Senate, it must be tiny. How tiny? I don't know, but it must be tiny.

Let's say for the sake of argument you were trying to design a system that was ostensibly open, that was ostensibly about inclusion, ostensibly about removing the prime minister's control, which he had in the traditional system. The Prime Minister advises, by convention, the Governor General on who should be elevated to the Senate, and by convention the Governor General always takes the Prime Minister's advice.

(1240)



Okay. So the government is saying that this is a thing of the past here. We're doing things differently now. You submit your application. A board decides. They submit it to the Prime Minister. He chooses or doesn't choose, as he may see fit. But we want to have him choosing someone who's on the list as a way of showing our purity in this matter—and we only get a couple of names.

In fact, they only have enough names to make four or five submissions. The people on there would likely include those who knew in advance that this would be the system; those who were informed in advance. Now, those who knew in advance would therefore have.... Well, first of all, this would make a farce of the system. Certain people were notified. As tight a restriction as possible was placed upon the process to ensure that very few applications could occur. This would ensure that the names of the people the Prime Minister wanted are now going forward, are guaranteed to go forward, in phase one. I'm not saying this is true of the later phases. I'm saying this is true of phase one because of that ridiculously tight timeline and the novel innovation of the requirement for a nomination.

Any organization that knew could have dealt with this in advance. Did the organizations know? Well, in all fairness, the members of the advisory board won't know that, and probably the minister won't either. But it is reasonable to guess that this is the case—that some organizations indeed knew this would be happening, that some individuals knew this would be happening, that they knew to make their application and to have the nomination submitted at the same time.

Indeed, Mr. Chair, I will submit to you that it is beyond the realm of credible belief that you could have a situation in which the applicant and the nominating organization would not have known of each other and would not have been working in tandem. Can you imagine a situation, plausibly, where that would be occurring? I certainly can't.

Now, they know, and possibly they have been tipped off by the government ahead of time, that they should be doing something—all of which we can't ever know, because we are not allowed to summon the board members, or the minister will say it's outside of her mandate. So these individuals who are on the government's actual short list get rushed through.

I mean, if it's not plausible to believe that this is true in Ontario or Manitoba, think how implausible it is to believe that there wouldn't have been coordination in Quebec, where you actually have to be the owner of real estate in a specific senatorial election district, one of the old electoral districts of the province of Lower Canada way back before Confederation. In some of these districts, this is actually a real practical problem. It's hard to find available real estate, because these are districts that have very tiny populations. They were once populous. The land has been consolidated over time.

So this is just beyond the realm of plausible belief. The argument to be made here is this. It may very well be the case, when you have the government working closely in tandem...not with the applicant; that's fine. Or it may not be fine when you're pretending you weren't working with them, but it's fine constitutionally. Constitutionally, however, it is problematic, when you have a situation in which the nominating body or organization, or individual from that organization—president, chairman, or whomever—and we can't find out whether that was done....

Indeed, I'm not sure the advisory board is powered to make further inquiries and find out—I don't know—whether that person was speaking on behalf of the whole organization. Was there a vote taken? Was there a meeting of their board of directors? We don't know. We can't know. Maybe the advisory board doesn't know or can't know, although I would like to ask that question.

That the nominee, the applicant, is not in practice subject to a tremendous amount of limitation on his or her independence.... They had to compromise their independence in advance in order to get that name into the process. Maybe that's not true with someone who somehow managed to get in under the wire, discovering this at the last minute. Maybe that's not true there, but it has to be true of the people who were pre-selected by the government, as most certainly some individuals were.

Now, we can't ask about this here if Mr. Chan and his colleagues shut down our ability to bring back these advisory board members. If the minister says “I don't know”—and she probably won't know—it is outside of the Senate's ethics rules, as I understand it, to raise questions like this.

(1245)



We can have individuals whose independence is being compromised, and the Supreme Court has been very specific—and I did hear Professor Jutras say some of this in his testimony today—in saying that it is a requirement that senators be independent, a term that is not found in the Constitution Act, 1867, but which is, as the court said, implicit in its architecture. They must be independent.

This could very well be a compromise to their independence and a compromise to their independence that is, through the nature of the process, kept secret from everybody so that we can't know how their independence has been compromised. That is an irreparable harm. That is why I want to get the minister here before rather than after the point at which these appointments are made.

And why did I ask Professor Jutras how long it would take? I asked because I want to find out. Minister LeBlanc said yesterday that they are taking a little bit longer than we thought, so there may be time to ask them if this is a problem before it's too late, because they've had to submit the names. Perhaps this is why they are taking their time submitting the names. They have been stuck with a situation in which they don't think the candidates who are being presented to them are the right kind of candidates.

I'm not sure how they would express that, because I understand their requirement for discretion. But it may very well be something else on their mind. I wouldn't fault them if they didn't answer a question like that because that really would be a lapse of their discretion, but that implies that the rules that were designed for them are inappropriate, certainly when it comes to the first term round.

Finally, he said that he would be submitting a letter to the Prime Minister, or a report to the Prime Minister, that will be public. While it's reasonable for him to say, “I don't want to start making independent comments and I want to discuss this”, I think he meant to say “discuss this with my colleagues”, the other commissioners, first. That's a reasonable position, I think.

It is not unreasonable for them to know that we would likely be asking them questions like that an if they're all present, they could share something with us. It is not unreasonable for us to want to find out, rather than deferring to our betters and waiting for Justin Trudeau, in his imperial awesomeness, to look at this, see it first, and then let us peasants know what is permissible for us to know. We can all tug our forelocks, thank him for the privilege, and kiss the buckle of his shoe. That is not reasonable.

That's all I have to say. I'm not trying to filibuster on this. I would actually like a vote today, Mr. Chair, in part because we are going to be away for a week, and I don't want this motion to wait until then to be decided.

(1250)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Okay.

Well, we have about five minutes before I'll have to suspend and move us in camera to deal with the budget, but I do have two speakers, Mr. Christopherson and Mr. Chan. If they can both be brief, we may be able to have a vote on your motion.

Mr. Christopherson, you're first.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you. It was good that Mr. Reid did that and said that he wanted that vote today. I was getting ready to settle in, so I'm glad you gave me an early cue that your preference would be a vote. That's fine; I'm okay with that.

I have a couple of things. First of all, I'll take this opportunity to remind the government that I am the one who went out on a limb when you put forward your clause that the minister would come in as her schedule permits. I raised the initial concern that this is what governments do when they want to have the flexibility to not have the minister come in a timely fashion. The government member...and I believed they were sincere, and they were so sincere with “are you kidding, we would never do that”, that I supported it, if you recall. I supported the motion and said that I'm going to trust them. Well, Chair, look where my trust got me. We're still working on dates. I think we finally have one, but it's well after why the motion was moved in the first place. I wanted to mention that for the history.

Second, I want to ask Mr. Chan, through you, Chair...because my feeling was the witness today was almost pleading the Canadian equivalent of the U.S. fifth amendment in terms of not wanting to incriminate himself. I want to ask Mr. Chan where he sees the problem in asking somebody on that panel about competency. Why is it a problem to ask them how they view candidates? How is that not competency? Competency is the ability to do the job. Qualifications, nobody is questioning. The qualifications of all the candidates have been stellar and dizzying, with many letters after their names. It's truly impressive. I grant that to the government.

On the question of competency, it speaks to the ability of the individual in terms of how they see and do things. I'd like to know why it would be unacceptable to the government to be asking a question of someone under the rubric of competency and how they feel about, for instance, accountability in a parliamentary setting. I would ask him to be mindful of the time, unless he wants to filibuster. I was going to raise that when I had more time. I'll leave it rhetorical now if Mr. Chan wants to answer that, but that's where I'm having a problem. How is that not speaking to competency by asking someone on a particular subject how would they view this, and what were the traits and the characteristics they would look for in a candidate coming forward? To be told that this is not competency leaves me wondering what is competency if not that.

Those are my points. I'll defer to the time at hand so that we can have the vote.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Okay.

We have Mr. Chan, and we now have Mr. Graham added as well.

Mr. Chan, the floor is yours. I do hope that we can be brief and then we can have the vote it appears that the committee desires.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

First of all, I wanted to get back to Mr. Reid's point before I turn to Mr. Christopherson's point, with respect to the ring.

I want to note on the record that my wife has just arrived. Jean, welcome.

The only time I defer with respect to the ring is the vow that I made.

With respect to the broader point, I would simply say on the record again, Mr. Reid, that we find ourselves in this situation because of the actions of the previous government. We're now faced with the potential of, I understand now, 25 vacancies for the Senate because the previous prime minister chose not to make appointments for over two years. We are now faced with the situation where we have a constitutional requirement to have a functioning upper House, and where we need to appoint this large number of senators, including someone who will ultimately be the government's representative in the Senate, given that we have moved forward toward greater independence and recognizing the importance of the greater independence of senators. We are simply faced with this situation.

I would also note on the record that at the end of the day from a constitutional perspective—and this is why I raise the question and withdrew it, recognizing it was a process question—this advisory board's recommendations to the executive council and to the Prime Minister are ultimately not binding on the Prime Minister. It would fetter his discretion.

At the end of the day what we're trying to do is create a more open democratic process for people to apply into a process. Unfortunately, we're dealing with a problem we have right now on short notice with the interim process and subsequently trying to invite Canadians of exceptional competence throughout the land to consider serving in a public way on something that we are constitutionally mandated to do.

With respect to your question, Mr. Christopherson—

(1255)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Maybe before you get to that, Mr. Chan, I'll just interrupt you. If the committee does wish to deal with the budget today, I would probably have to interrupt us at this point and suspend briefly to go in camera to deal with that. If the committee would rather use the last four or five minutes of our time today to continue with this, it is something we can do.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Unless there's a problem, could we not just approve it with unanimous consent and be done in a blink? It shouldn't be controversial.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

The budget has been put before you. Do I see any objection to the budget?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I'll move the motion. Could I have a seconder on the other side?

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

We don't even really need a motion, necessarily, if the committee has agreed to the budget as presented. It's all been put before you.

(Motion agreed to)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards): Thank you to the committee.

Mr. Chan has the floor. We have a few minutes left, but keep that in mind if we do want to see a vote today.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I have the floor back. Thank you.

Again, I want to thank Mr. Christopherson for raising these issues. I understand the angle that the third party, the New Democratic Party, has historically held with respect to the Senate. I understand the kinds of questions you have ultimately been presenting. At the end of the day, throughout the electoral process, we made it very clear that we have to comply, ultimately, with the Constitution rules as they stand, which is to have a functioning Senate. At the end of the day, if we do not appoint these senators, we ultimately will be left with a situation where we will have one chamber that is incapable of responding to the passage of legislation coming from the House of Commons.

I appreciate the point that you are ultimately making with respect to the issues of legitimacy and so forth. As I say, with all due respect, the NDP can rail all they want with respect to the Senate.

Mr. David Christopherson:

[Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I have the floor right now, Mr. Christopherson, so please. I granted you the courtesy to say what you wanted to say. I granted Mr. Reid 20 minutes to say what he wanted to say. I've granted you the courtesy many times in the past to keep going, so I now have the floor and I think I have the right to continue, to get the points I want to get out. Thank you, Mr. Christopherson.

(1300)

Mr. David Christopherson:

You're welcome.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Getting back to the point that I was making, at the end of the day, we have a constitutional requirement to have a functioning upper chamber so that laws of this land can ultimately be passed. That is what we're going through right now, to get a process in place that ultimately attempts to create greater confidence in Canadians with respect to a chamber of sober second thought, meanwhile respecting both the constitutional practices and the conventions that associate themselves with respect to the appointment of senators, so that we don't get into the situation Mr. Reid had previously noted, that we are somehow violating or engaging in a process that is ultimately ultra vires.

With all due respect, at the end of the day we're obviously trying to work within the confines and the framework of the rules that are presented here with respect to the Standing Orders. I would also note, too, that we've been open in terms of allowing witnesses to appear before this committee, including the three federal appointees. By the way, it's something that the previous government never allowed. They shut down every single motion to call witnesses before committees for review, because they didn't want their witnesses to be subject to that kind of scrutiny. Ultimately, we are dealing with the terms that are set out under Standing Orders 110 and 111. That's the situation we're faced with.

Again, as I said earlier, as we go through the process, this committee will ultimately have the opportunity to review the Standing Orders. If you don't like the way they're written right now, we can make and propose those changes through that appropriate process.

Let's not rewrite the rules now simply because you find them inconvenient because you have a different political point to make.

Also, to answer your question with respect to what is competence, I think if you actually listened carefully to the witness we had today, Dean Jutras, he made it very clear: “Look at my historical practice. Look at the kinds of circumstances and situations in which I dealt with these particular types of issues.”

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Pardon the interruption, Mr. Chan. We are at one o'clock. I have had some members tell me they do have other meetings they have to get to. I think we'll probably have to end here for today. It doesn't appear as though we'll be able to have a vote today.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

May I just conclude my comments and then cede the floor?

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

How much time do you need, Mr. Chan?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

No. Actually, I'm prepared to now cede the floor to Mr. Graham, but we'll take it up at the next meeting.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

What I was going to suggest to help the committee with this, it appears as though we won't be able to have a vote today, unless we have consent to continue for some time. I know I do have members who need to leave.

Mr. Graham, do you wish to have the floor or can we proceed to a vote?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'd be happy to start at the next meeting, if you'd like.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

It doesn't appear as though I have consent from Mr. Graham to cede the floor to enable a vote, so we'll have to continue this.

I have a suggestion as a potential option. I see that on March 8 we have the other order in council appointee set for the first hour, and the supplementary estimates scheduled for the second hour. If the committee felt that we could shorten up each of those two things, go to 45 minutes or something along those lines for each of those two items, we could leave ourselves a bit of time at the end of that meeting to continue with this motion and have it dealt with.

I know there is some timeliness to it, given that it requires witnesses to be here prior to the end of March. It might be a good idea, given how little time we have in committee in March to try to deal with it.

Would this be agreeable to the committee, that we shorten those two to 45 minutes per panel, and then we could dispense with this during the March 8 meeting?

It sounds as though it would be agreeable, so we'll make that suggestion, and our clerk can make the necessary adjustments to the agenda.

Thank you all.

The meeting is adjourned for today.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour, et bienvenue à la dixième réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre dans le cadre de la première session de la 42e législature.

Cette réunion est publique et télévisée. Aujourd'hui, à la première heure de la réunion, nous allons continuer d'examiner les nominations du Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat, conformément aux articles 110 et 111 du Règlement.

À la deuxième heure, nous allons passer aux travaux du Comité, sous la présidence de Blake Richards.

Je rappelle aux membres que, conformément au Règlement de la Chambre des communes, le rôle de ce Comité se limite à déterminer si la personne nommée a les qualités et les compétences requises pour assumer les fonctions qui lui ont été attribuées. Les membres peuvent également se référer aux pages 1011 à 1013 de l'ouvrage d'O'Brien et Bosc intitulé La procédure et les usages de la Chambre des communes.

Ce matin, notre témoin est le professeur Daniel Jutras, qui témoignera par vidéoconférence à partir de Montréal.

Monsieur Jutras, vous avez jusqu'à 10 minutes pour faire votre déclaration préliminaire, puis des membres du Comité poseront des questions.

Je ne sais pas si vous pouvez nous voir, mais si vous pouvez nous entendre, la parole est à vous.

M. Daniel Jutras (membre fédéral, Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat):

Je peux vous entendre et j'ai une vue d'ensemble de la salle.

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je suis reconnaissant de pouvoir comparaître devant votre Comité. Si je peux me permettre, j'aimerais, comme vous l'avez suggéré, commencer par une brève déclaration préliminaire qui devrait durer cinq ou dix minutes.

Je crois comprendre que l'objectif de votre Comité consiste à évaluer mes qualités et compétences. J'aimerais, si vous le permettez, me concentrer sur cet aspect.[Français]

Comme vous l'avez indiqué, l'objectif de cette rencontre est d'évaluer la contribution que je peux apporter aux travaux du Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat à partir d'un examen de mon parcours professionnel et de mes compétences. Je sais que vous avez en main mon curriculum vitae, mais je voudrais d'abord prendre quelques instants pour vous décrire le parcours que j'ai suivi à ce jour sur le plan professionnel.

J'ai complété mes études de droit à l'Université de Montréal et des études supérieures en droit constitutionnel à l'Université Harvard au milieu des années 1980. Je suis avocat et membre du Barreau du Québec depuis 1984. Je suis également professeur à la Faculté de droit de l'Université McGill depuis bientôt 32 ans.

Mon champ d'expertise en droit est la procédure civile, le droit privé et le droit comparé, mais vous avez également pu constater, à la lecture de mon curriculum vitae, que j'ai un intérêt soutenu pour le droit constitutionnel. Cet intérêt s'est exprimé plus récemment lorsque la Cour suprême du Canada m'a confié le rôle d'ami de la cour dans le cadre du renvoi relatif au Sénat et aux procédures d'amendement à la Constitution.

Par ailleurs, entre 2002 et 2005, j'ai pris congé de l'Université McGill pour agir en tant qu'adjoint exécutif juridique à la Cour suprême du Canada dans le cabinet de la juge en chef Beverley McLachlin. J'avais comme tâche de l'assister dans toutes ses responsabilités de juge et de juge en chef, exception faite, bien entendu, de la rédaction des jugements, qui lui appartenait.

Par exemple, à l'extérieur de la Cour, j'avais la responsabilité des relations avec le Conseil canadien de la magistrature et l'Institut national de la magistrature, qui est l'organisme de formation des juges nommés par le gouvernement fédéral. Au sein de la Cour, j'avais des responsabilités liées aux communications, aux relations avec les médias, à la gestion du Programme des auxiliaires juridiques, qui sont nommés comme assistants de recherche à la Cour, ainsi qu'à la relation entre la Cour, les juges et les divers services opérationnels de la Cour.[Traduction]

Si vous le voulez, je serais ravi de répondre à vos questions sur tout élément de mon curriculum vitae, que vous avez sous la main. Avant de vous rendre la parole, j'aimerais prendre un instant pour tenter d'expliquer pourquoi j'estime que mes qualités et compétences seraient utiles à votre comité consultatif, et pour présenter les qualités qui me semblent pertinentes.

Il me semble que, parmi les principales qualités qui permettent de contribuer aux travaux du comité, il y a d'abord le fait d'avoir une solide réputation pour ce qui est de l'intégrité personnelle, du jugement et du respect absolu de la confidentialité. Je tiens à souligner qu'une bonne partie du travail —  voire tout le travail — que j'ai réalisé auprès de la juge en chef McLachlin et de ses collègues de la Cour suprême du Canada, ainsi qu'au Conseil canadien de la magistrature, ont nécessité que je fasse preuve d'une discrétion exceptionnelle et considérable ainsi que d'un bon jugement. En outre, je ne crois pas que l'on m'aurait nommé à ce poste si je ne jouissais pas d'une très solide réputation sur le plan de l'intégrité personnelle.

Je crois bénéficier de l'estime de mes collègues. Je suis actuellement le doyen de la faculté de droit à l'Université McGill, et je suis également président du Conseil des doyens et doyennes des facultés de droit du Canada. De plus, on m'a récemment décerné le titre d'avocat émérite, que le Barreau du Québec accorde à d'éminents membres de la profession.

Deuxièmement, je dirais que l'indépendance et l'impartialité sont des qualités importantes que je possède. Je ne suis membre d'aucun parti politique, je ne suis pas un militant et je ne l'ai jamais été.

Troisièmement, je crois qu'il est essentiel pour les travaux du comité que ses membres aient de l'expérience dans l'évaluation de dossiers, qu'ils soient en mesure de lire des curriculum vitae et des lettres de recommandation dans les deux langues, qu'ils sachent collaborer efficacement au sein d'un groupe, et je dois dire que cela fait essentiellement partie de mon quotidien en tant que doyen. La fonction de doyen exige de participer de façon soutenue à l'évaluation de demandes et de dossiers de candidature, ainsi que de travailler en groupe et de mener ce genre d'évaluation.

Enfin, je dirais qu'il serait utile pour le comité que certains de ses membres — idéalement, bon nombre d'entre eux — aient une certaine connaissance du régime constitutionnel du Canada, du rôle du Sénat et du processus législatif à l'échelle fédérale. Dans le cadre du travail que j'ai réalisé en tant qu'amicus curiae à l'égard du renvoi relatif au Sénat qui a été soumis à la Cour suprême, je me suis évidemment concentré avant tout sur les procédures de modification, mais, lors de ma préparation en vue de mon exposé oral et de mes mémoires, j'ai lu pratiquement tout ce qui a été écrit dans les domaines du droit et de la science politique à propos du Sénat.

Ainsi, même si le Sénat n'était pas mon domaine d'expertise à l'époque — à vrai dire, c'est toujours le cas — je crois pouvoir dire que j'ai beaucoup d'intérêt pour le Sénat et les délibérations parlementaires, et que j'ai des connaissances qui, je l'espère, sont suffisamment étendues pour que je puisse apporter une contribution importante aux travaux du comité consultatif.

Sur ce, monsieur le président, je serais ravi de répondre à des questions, et je vous rends la parole.

(1105)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Jutras.

Dans notre Comité, quatre personnes disposent chacune de sept minutes pour poser des questions. Ensuite, chaque personne dispose de cinq minutes pour la série de questions suivante. La limite de temps comprend les questions et les réponses, alors si une personne prend une minute pour poser une question et vous en prenez six pour répondre, cette personne ne peut plus vous poser de question.

Je tiens seulement à vous expliquer comment nous procédons ici, et à vous aviser que nous sommes stricts à propos de la limite de temps parce que nous voulons que tous les membres du Comité aient la chance de vous poser des questions.

Nous allons commencer par Anita Vandenbeld.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur Jutras, d'être des nôtres aujourd'hui. De toute évidence, vous avez mené une brillante carrière dans le domaine juridique. Comme vous l'avez dit dans votre déclaration, il est très important que la personne qui occupe ce poste fasse preuve d'un bon jugement et d'indépendance.

Je me demande si vous pourriez en dire un peu plus sur vos antécédents dans le domaine du droit. Par ailleurs, vous avez dit que, en tant que doyen, vous devez évaluer des curriculum vitae et des lettres de recommandation. Pourriez-vous nous en dire plus sur la façon dont vous effectuez ce travail de collaboration?

M. Daniel Jutras:

D'accord. Je crois que le travail dans le domaine du droit est peut-être moins lié aux travaux du comité que le deuxième aspect de votre question, alors je vais en parler le plus brièvement possible.

Comme je l'ai dit, mes domaines d'expertise sont le droit privé, le droit comparé, la procédure civile et le droit de la responsabilité délictuelle, ce qui est plutôt loin de la question que nous abordons aujourd'hui. Néanmoins, comme je l'ai souligné, je m'intéresse beaucoup au droit constitutionnel. C'était l'objet de mes études supérieures à la faculté de droit de l'Université Harvard. Je me suis tenu à jour autant que j'ai pu, et j'ai également travaillé dans une certaine mesure dans le domaine du droit constitutionnel, notamment pendant les trois années où j'ai travaillé à la Cour suprême avec la juge en chef McLachlin.

Je dirais très brièvement que, en ce qui concerne mon travail en tant que doyen, notamment la façon dont j'évalue des dossiers, il y a divers aspects du travail universitaire qui exige d'évaluer toutes sortes de dossiers, qu'il s'agisse du processus d'admission des étudiants, du processus de promotion des professeurs ou de l'évaluation d'institutions externes. Au cours des sept années pendant lesquelles j'ai assumé les fonctions de doyen, j'ai évalué d'innombrables dossiers dans le cadre du processus de promotion de ma propre faculté, ainsi que plusieurs dossiers provenant de l'extérieur de ma faculté. J'ai également fait des évaluations et rédigé des lettres de recommandation dans une foule de contextes universitaires et professionnels. Il s'agissait soit de recommander des promotions et des récompenses dans le domaine universitaire, soit d'accorder des marques de reconnaissance professionnelle, notamment par l'octroi du titre d'avocat émérite.

(1110)

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je vois qu'on vous a décerné la médaille de la reine Elizabeth en 2013. Pouvez-vous nous dire pour quelle raison?

M. Daniel Jutras:

Si je ne m'abuse, je crois que cette médaille a été décernée à environ 60 000 Canadiens. C'est un grand nombre de personnes, et je ne suis que l'une des 60 000 personnes qui ont reçu cette distinction. Je ne veux pas en faire grand cas, même si j'en suis très fier. Je pense que c'était pour récompenser des contributions importantes dans le domaine du droit ainsi que dans le milieu universitaire.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

En plus de vos antécédents en droit et de votre connaissance du droit constitutionnel, vous avez un certain nombre de compétences transférables qui vous permettent de travailler en collaboration, de faire des évaluations, de soupeser des qualités diverses chez différentes personnes. Vous avez dit que, en plus d'être doyen de votre faculté, vous faites partie d'un conseil de doyens.

M. Daniel Jutras:

En effet. Tous les doyens des facultés de droit du Canada se réunissent afin de faire part de leurs préoccupations. Je suis également porte-parole du Conseil des doyens et doyennes des facultés de droit du Canada. Il y a deux ans, j'ai été élu président de ce conseil qui regroupe les doyens de toutes les facultés de droit du Canada.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Vous avez gagné beaucoup de respect de la part de vos collègues dans ce domaine. Avez-vous travaillé en collaboration? Pourriez-vous en parler?

M. Daniel Jutras:

J'ose espérer que j'ai leur respect. Nous travaillons effectivement en collaboration. Par exemple, hier, nous avons échangé de la correspondance par courriel afin de rédiger la déclaration commune des facultés en réponse à l'appel à l'action qui a été lancé par la Commission de vérité et réconciliation. Ce genre de travail exige beaucoup d'efforts de collaboration et de conciliation. Il y a plus de 20 facultés de droit au Canada, et nous devons tous nous entendre sur le texte qui se trouvera dans ce document. C'est donc effectivement un travail qui exige beaucoup d'efforts de conciliation et de collaboration.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je vois que vous avez beaucoup travaillé avec la Cour suprême, notamment à titre de secrétaire personnel de la juge McLachlin. Dans quelle mesure croyez-vous que les compétences qui vous ont servi à la Cour suprême pourront vous être utiles au comité?

M. Daniel Jutras:

Le travail de l'adjoint exécutif juridique est d'offrir de l'aide à la juge en chef, quels que soient ses besoins. Comme vous le savez, la juge en chef est très occupée et doit assumer une foule de responsabilités. En plus de s'acquitter de ses fonctions de juge, elle doit administrer la Cour sur le plan tant opérationnel que professionnel. Elle préside le Conseil canadien de la magistrature, un organisme regroupant tous les juges en chef du Canada qui a comme responsabilité de traiter tous les dossiers importants pour la magistrature. Elle préside également l'Institut national de la magistrature, qui, comme je l'ai souligné, est l'organisme de formation des juges de nomination fédérale.

Je crois que les compétences transférables se déclinent en deux volets. Tout d'abord, dans le cadre de ce travail, il faut absolument respecter le caractère strictement confidentiel de tout ce qui se passe au sein de l'institution. Évidemment, vous pouvez vous imaginer que, lorsque j'aidais la juge en chef dans toutes ses fonctions, que j'occupais le bureau voisin du sien et que je l'aidais à s'acquitter des tâches que je viens d'énumérer, j'étais au fait de certaines choses qui devaient demeurer complètement confidentielles. Je crois que c'est là un exemple de compétence transférable, compte tenu, évidemment, de l'importance du processus auquel nous participons, et de la nécessité de protéger la vie privée des candidats et la confidentialité du processus.

Par ailleurs, la Cour suprême est une institution très importante pour les Canadiens et pour notre régime constitutionnel. Je crois que le fait d'y avoir travaillé et d'avoir été témoin de l'esprit de corps et du fonctionnement de la Cour me donne une très bonne idée de la manière dont ceux qui occupent des fonctions publiques doivent se comporter. Je crois pouvoir appliquer ce genre de connaissance à ma façon d'évaluer les dossiers dont nous sommes saisis.

(1115)

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Vous avez parlé de bon jugement, de discrétion et d'indépendance. Y a-t-il d'autres qualités que vous possédez et qui seraient utiles dans le cadre de ces fonctions?

M. Daniel Jutras:

Non, je crois que tout a été dit.

Je pense que la qualité que vous n'avez pas mentionnée est ma connaissance du rôle constitutionnel et de la structure du Sénat, ainsi que de la place qu'il occupe au sein du gouvernement du Canada. Encore une fois, je ne prétends pas être un expert de ce domaine, qui est fort complexe. Il y a de nombreux juristes au Canada qui en connaissent beaucoup plus que moi sur le Sénat. Cependant, j'estime que le travail que j'ai fait à l'égard du renvoi m'a bien préparé à ce genre de responsabilité.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, madame Vandenbeld.

C'est maintenant au tour de Scott Reid de poser des questions.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Jutras. Vous êtes une personne très accomplie, mais j'imagine que vous devez être un peu mal à l'aise de discuter publiquement de votre curriculum vitae, comme l'exige le Comité. Je suis conscient de la situation délicate dans laquelle vous place cette exigence. Une personne accomplie n'est pas forcément égocentrique.

Compte tenu du sujet à l'étude aujourd'hui, j'aimerais d'abord vous poser la question suivante: avez-vous regardé le témoignage de la ministre Monsef devant un comité sénatorial hier soir? Son témoignage a porté dans une certaine mesure sur le mandat qui vous a été confié.

M. Daniel Jutras:

J'ai vu les 20 premières minutes. Comme j'avais une réunion, je n'ai pas vu le reste. J'ai entendu les présentations des deux ministres et, je crois, les deux ou trois premières questions.

M. Scott Reid:

Dès les premières réponses — en fait, c'était peut-être dans la déclaration liminaire de Dominic LeBlanc —, il est apparu évident que vous auriez besoin de plus de temps pour dresser la liste des candidatures et que celle-ci n'a pas encore été présentée. Est-ce le cas et avez-vous pensé à une date limite pour la présentation des candidatures au premier ministre?

M. Daniel Jutras: Je ne suis pas au courant de...

Le président:

Un instant, je vous prie.

M. Chan invoque le Règlement.

M. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

Monsieur le président, la réunion d'aujourd'hui a pour objet d'examiner les compétences et les qualités de la personne nommée. Je m'interroge sur la pertinence des questions posées par M. Reid et, en fait, je me demande si elles sont recevables.

Monsieur le président, étant donné les directives que vous avez fournies aux membres du Comité au début de cette réunion, je crois que les questions posées par M. Reid à ce moment-ci ne sont pas recevables.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid, vous avez la parole.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, pour répondre au recours au Règlement, j'aimerais simplement dire que, si vous pensez qu'une question n'est pas recevable, vous pourriez informer le témoin que, selon vous, il n'est pas obligé de... qu'il lui appartient de décider s'il doit répondre ou non à la question.

J'ajouterais que le témoin présente un bilan très impressionnant en matière de gestion d'enjeux qui nécessitent de la discrétion. Le témoin est mieux placé que quiconque dans cette salle pour décider s'il vaut mieux pour lui ne pas répondre à une question afin de ne pas outrepasser son mandat.

Je pense que c'est la bonne marche à suivre. En fait, interdire au témoin de répondre à une question ou m'interdire de poser une question constituerait un recours inapproprié au pouvoir discrétionnaire.

Le président:

Je vais procéder ainsi pour l'instant. Pour vous rappeler ce que le Comité est autorisé à faire, permettez-moi de relire le passage suivant: Le rôle de ce comité se limite à déterminer si la personne nommée a les qualités et les compétences requises pour assumer les fonctions qui lui ont été attribuées.

Par conséquent, vous pouvez accepter ou refuser de répondre à cette question.

M. Daniel Jutras:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je pense pouvoir répondre à la question en établissant un lien avec mes compétences et qualités.

Je pense que vous comprendrez que la tâche est exigeante. Les membres du comité consultatif doivent avoir beaucoup d'énergie et être en mesure de travailler rapidement. Je pense que, jusqu'ici, mon expérience professionnelle a démontré que je suis capable de gérer une charge de travail très lourde et de travailler aussi rapidement que possible pour remplir les mandats qui me sont confiés.

(1120)

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur Jutras, en posant cette question, je ne voulais pas laisser entendre que vous n'étiez pas en mesure de faire les choses rapidement. Ce n'était pas l'intention de ma question. Je souhaitais plutôt savoir à quel moment vous pensiez être en mesure de présenter vos recommandations au premier ministre.

Pensez-vous être habilité à répondre à cette question?

Le président:

Vous n'êtes pas obligé de le faire.

M. Daniel Jutras:

En effet. Merci, monsieur le président.

Je ne suis pas sûr que cette question ait un lien avec le mandat de votre Comité. Je peux dire que nous travaillons le plus rapidement possible et que nous présenterons nos recommandations en temps et lieu, après avoir examiné tous les aspects de la question avec la diligence voulue.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Monsieur le président, si vous continuez de juger irrecevables certaines questions qui, pourtant, se rapportent au sujet dont nous sommes saisis, à la fin du témoignage de M. Jutras, je présenterai une motion tendant à inviter ce dernier et les autres membres du comité consultatif à comparaître de nouveau devant notre Comité. C'est important de discuter des questions que vous continuez de juger irrecevables. Je tiens simplement à vous en donner préavis, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Très bien.

Le Comité n'a pas le choix; il ne peut pas élargir le mandat qui lui a été confié pour la présente réunion.

M. Scott Reid:

Non, mais je remarque que le mandat est interprété d'une façon beaucoup trop contraignante pour les membres conservateurs du Comité, ce qui n'est pas le cas pour les membres du parti ministériel. C'est très frappant, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Jutras, vous avez été secrétaire personnel de la juge en chef de la Cour suprême. Je crois qu'elle préside aussi le comité qui prend des décisions au sujet de l'Ordre du Canada. Avez-vous participé à ce processus d'une manière ou d'une autre? Je ne vous demande pas de m'expliquer les rouages du comité; j'aimerais simplement savoir si vous avez participé à ce processus.

M. Daniel Jutras:

Non, pas du tout. Elle remplit ce mandat seule.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Vous avez mentionné avoir agi en tant qu'amicus curiae dans le renvoi sur le Sénat. Agissiez-vous alors au nom d'une organisation ou à titre personnel?

M. Daniel Jutras:

Comme l'amicus curiae est nommé par la Cour suprême, je ne défendais pas les intérêts d'une organisation. La Cour suprême a demandé à Me John Hunter, de la Colombie-Britannique, et à moi de présenter un mémoire et une plaidoirie en plus de ceux que la Cour a reçus de divers procureurs généraux et d'intervenants.

C'est la Cour suprême elle-même qui m'a nommé à ce titre.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous avez parlé assez longuement de votre capacité de comprendre — ce n'est pas tout à fait ce que vous avez dit, mais... Le concept de discrétion nécessite des connaissances subtiles afin de bien comprendre sa signification ainsi que ses paramètres. Je pense que c'est ce que vous avez tenté de souligner.

Sachant cela, j'aimerais vous demander si, dans le cadre de votre travail au sein du comité consultatif, vous devez vous conformer à des règles liées à la discrétion et à ce que vous serez autorisé à divulguer.

Selon vous, est-ce que cela inclut le nombre de candidatures présentées dans chacune des provinces pendant la phase 1? Plus spécifiquement, diriez-vous que vous ne pourrez pas divulguer le nombre de candidatures que vous avez reçues — et rien d'autre — de chacune des trois provinces?

Le président:

De nouveau, il s'agit d'une question portant sur le processus.

M. Scott Reid:

Non, monsieur le président, vous avez tort. Ma question porte sur un sujet que le témoin lui-même a soulevé. Par conséquent, il est tenu d'y répondre.

Le président:

Il n'est pas tenu de répondre à la question, car elle porte sur le processus. Il peut toutefois y répondre s'il le souhaite.

M. Daniel Jutras:

Merci, monsieur Reid.

Je vais simplement vous renvoyer à l'article 13 de notre mandat, qui exige que, dans les trois mois suivant la remise des noms de candidats qualifiés au premier ministre dans le cadre du processus de transition et suivant chaque processus de nomination subséquent, le comité consultatif lui présente un rapport dans les deux langues officielles — un rapport public —, contenant de l’information sur le processus, notamment sur l’exécution du mandat, sur les frais liés aux activités et, plus précisément, sur les statistiques relatives aux candidatures reçues.

Nous n'avons pas encore rédigé le rapport, mais je pense qu'il est juste de dire que nous devrons évaluer le degré de divulgation qui sera nécessaire dans les circonstances.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Dans le même ordre d'idées, considérez-vous qu'il s'agit de... On a interrogé la ministre à ce sujet, mais je crois que vous n'étiez plus à l'écoute à ce moment-là. Il s'agit des noms des membres des groupes chargés des nominations, plutôt que des noms des personnes qui présentent leur candidature. Dans ce dernier cas, il s'agit évidemment d'un processus confidentiel. Toutefois, je ne crois pas que le mandat du comité consultatif indique que les noms des membres des groupes chargés des nominations doivent rester confidentiels. En fait, je pense que, au moment de la rédaction du mandat, l'idée de la phase 1 n'avait pas encore été proposée.

Seriez-vous disposé à inclure ces renseignements dans votre rapport?

(1125)

Le président:

Vous avez 10 secondes.

M. Daniel Jutras:

Excusez-moi, mais je n'ai pas entendu ce que vous venez de dire.

Le président:

J'ai dit que vous aviez 10 secondes.

M. Daniel Jutras:

Dix secondes?

Encore une fois, monsieur Reid, je vous invite à consulter le mandat du comité consultatif. Pour l'instant, je ne pense pas que je devrais préciser le contenu du rapport avant même qu'il soit rédigé. Il reste à voir ce qu'il contiendra au juste.

Le président:

Merci.

M. David Christopherson est l'intervenant suivant.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Jutras, merci d'être ici aujourd'hui. Je vous en suis reconnaissant.

Pour que les choses soient bien claires, vous savez probablement que le NPD, dont je fais partie, et moi ne tenons pas le Sénat en très haute estime. Nous préférerions tout bonnement qu'il disparaisse. Toutefois, il ne semble pas que ce soit l'opinion dominante à l'heure actuelle.

J'aimerais vous poser des questions qui sont très semblables à celles que j'ai posées à votre collègue qui a déjà témoigné devant nous. Je suis conscient de vos compétences. Bien franchement, comme n'importe quel Canadien peut être nommé, je pense qu'à peu près n'importe quel Canadien peut faire partie du comité consultatif chargé d'approuver les nominations. Par conséquent, vos compétences ne me posent aucun problème. Si l'on cherche quelqu'un qui est entièrement professionnel, je crois que vous êtes la personne toute désignée.

J'aimerais parler de la question des compétences sous l'angle suivant. Un des éléments fondamentaux de la démocratie est la reddition de comptes. À la Chambre des communes, nous sommes tenus de rendre des comptes tous les week-ends, lorsque nous rentrons dans nos circonscriptions, et tous les quatre ans, lorsque nous sommes candidats aux élections. Ce n'est pas la même chose au Sénat, mais, comme la reddition de comptes est un élément important de la démocratie moderne, quelles caractéristiques recherchez-vous chez les candidats et qui vous indiqueraient qu'ils sont conscients de l'importance de ce facteur? Dans le cadre de leur rôle, ils devront rendre des comptes. Ils ne seront pas chargés simplement d'établir des lois, mais aussi de rendre des comptes sur ce qu'ils font.

Lorsque vous interviewez des gens dans le cadre du processus de nomination, quelles caractéristiques recherchez-vous et qui vous donneraient l'assurance qu'ils savent que la reddition de comptes fait partie intégrante des deux Chambres du Parlement?

Le président:

Allez-y. Vous pouvez parler de vos compétences et qualités à cet égard, ou de toute autre chose qui vous semble pertinente.

M. Daniel Jutras:

Je pense que votre question outrepasse un peu le mandat du comité, à moins que je ne comprenne pas bien le sujet à l'étude aujourd'hui. Je ne suis pas sûr de comprendre dans quelle mesure votre question porte sur mes qualités et compétences. Pourriez-vous me donner quelques précisions?

M. David Christopherson:

Bien sûr. Vous serez appelé à prendre des décisions sur les gens que vous allez interviewer. Je présume que vous allez notamment vous assurer que ces personnes ont l'énergie et les capacités nécessaires pour assumer une charge de travail pouvant être assez lourde.

Selon moi, les Canadiens estiment qu'il est important que les sénateurs soient conscients de leur obligation de rendre des comptes en tant que parlementaires. Le mot « parlementaire » s'applique aux deux Chambres du Parlement. Voici donc ma question: quelles caractéristiques recherchez-vous chez les candidats qui vous convaincraient qu'ils comprennent l'importance de la reddition de comptes?

M. Daniel Jutras:

Je pense que cette question s'applique au mandat du comité consultatif, plutôt qu'à mes compétences et qualités personnelles. Le mandat du comité consultatif est défini très clairement. Je pense que la ministre a énoncé très clairement les qualifications et les critères d'évaluation fondés sur le mérite, lesquels ont d'ailleurs été rendus publics.

Je pense qu'il s'agit d'une des caractéristiques fondamentales de notre travail. Nous faisons de notre mieux pour respecter les critères liés aux qualifications et au mérite qui sont précisés dans notre mandat.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, je dois vous dire...

M. Daniel Jutras:

Y compris, ajouterais-je, l'idée d'une connaissance approfondie des processus législatifs et du rôle du Sénat, notamment dans l'ordre constitutionnel au Canada.

M. David Christopherson:

Vos réponses ne m'impressionnent pas beaucoup, monsieur.

Je pense qu'il est tout à fait légitime de vous demander ce que vous recherchez, car c'est vous qui déciderez qui seront les législateurs. Ce n'est pas moi. Ce ne sont pas les Canadiens. Ce sera le Comité. Vous êtes ceux qui décideront. Tout ce que je vous ai demandé, c'est de dire comment vous vous y prendrez pour repérer certaines qualités, en l'occurrence la volonté de rendre des comptes, mais vous vous contentez de faire de la petite politique en m'expliquant pourquoi vous ne devriez pas répondre à ma question. Je ne comprends pas.

C'est une question très raisonnable, monsieur le président.

(1130)

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Monsieur le président, j'invoque le Règlement. Je crois que le témoin a répondu à cette question avec brio dans le respect du mandat du Comité.

M. Christopherson ne cesse de harceler le député.

M. David Christopherson:

Comment pourrais-je le harceler puisque je ne réussis pas à obtenir de réponse?

Tout ce que je demande... C'est une question tout à fait légitime. Pourquoi ne serait-il pas légitime de leur demander ce qu'ils pensent lorsqu'ils se penchent sur un candidat pour prendre une décision?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

La réponse que cherche M. Christopherson concerne la qualification de l'éventuel sénateur et non celle du témoin ici présent.

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai joué cartes sur table dès le début, monsieur le président, même si nous n'avons rien à faire du processus, pas plus que du Sénat.

Hélas, le premier accrochage vient du témoin du gouvernement, qui refuse de répondre à une question tout à fait raisonnable et qui cherche à se défiler.

Si je suis incapable d'obtenir de la personne qui choisira les sénateurs qu'elle m'explique comment on entend déterminer que les candidats rendront des comptes, comment diable pouvons-nous nous attendre à ce que les sénateurs estiment que la reddition de comptes fait partie intégrante du travail d'un parlementaire?

Le président:

Eh bien, vous pouvez demander...

M. David Christopherson:

Ouais, silence radio.

Vous savez quoi? J'ai mon quota. J'appuierai tout ce que voudront faire les conservateurs, ce qui montrera à quel point tout ceci est ridicule.

Le président:

Passons aux questions de David Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

J'ai lu votre CV.[Français]

Vous avez occupé trois postes à l'étranger comme professeur invité, soit à l'Institut d’études politiques de Paris, à la Louisiana State University et à l'Université d'Aix-Marseille III. Vous avez également étudié à l'Université Harvard.

Pourriez-vous nous en dire un peu plus sur votre expérience à l'étranger et préciser comment elle peut vous servir dans le cadre du travail de ce comité consultatif?

M. Daniel Jutras:

Pouvez-vous répéter votre question? Je ne l'ai pas bien entendu.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez travaillé à plusieurs reprises à l'étranger comme professeur invité et vous avez fait vos études à l'Université Harvard.

Pouvez-vous nous en parler un peu et nous dire comment cela est utile dans le cadre de votre travail actuel?

M. Daniel Jutras:

Très bien. Je vous remercie.

Comme beaucoup d'universitaires de grandes universités canadiennes, j'ai eu l'occasion de voyager à l'étranger, d'y enseigner et d'y donner des conférences. L'aspect intéressant d'une telle expérience est le fait de se familiariser avec des cultures différentes qui sont aussi présentes à l'intérieur de la communauté canadienne. Il y a au Canada des gens qui proviennent de cultures très différentes et il est important, quand on examine leur dossier, de pouvoir mesurer correctement la contribution qu'ils peuvent apporter à un organisme comme le Sénat.

Autrement, il y a eu des conférences et des cours de nature assez universitaire qui n'ont pas de lien avec le Sénat. Cette expérience internationale n'est pas en elle-même un élément absolument pertinent ou essentiel au chapitre de mes qualifications.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Je voulais aussi préciser que j'allais partager mon temps de parole avec Mme Sahota.

Vous avez travaillé plusieurs années en pratique privée au sein de la firme Borden Ladner Gervais.

Comme la plus grande partie de votre carrière s'est déroulée dans le secteur de l'éducation, j'aimerais que vous nous en disiez un peu plus sur votre expérience dans le secteur privé.

M. Daniel Jutras:

D'accord.

Le poste que j'occupais au cabinet Borden Ladner Gervais n'était pas à temps plein. J'étais avocat-conseil dans ce cabinet national. J'ai fait ce travail après mon séjour à la Cour suprême du Canada. J'espérais, en particulier, développer une meilleure compréhension du phénomène des recours collectifs. Comme ces derniers constituent l'un de mes champs d'expertise, j'ai pensé qu'il serait utile, pour mieux saisir la réalité de ce phénomène, de passer quelques heures par semaine dans un grand cabinet. Ces gens m'ont offert la possibilité de travailler avec eux sur quelques dossiers de recours collectif, et c'est ce que j'ai fait pendant trois ans. Toutefois, je l'ai fait tout en continuant à travailler comme professeur à temps plein à l'Université McGill.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Ce comité compte plusieurs membres. Les connaissiez-vous déjà? Aviez-vous travaillé avec eux?

M. Daniel Jutras:

Vous voulez parler des autres membres du comité consultatif?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, exactement.

Les connaissiez-vous déjà? Aviez-vous travaillé avec eux?

M. Daniel Jutras:

Non. Je ne connaissais aucun de ces membres avant que nous commencions à travailler ensemble il y a quelques semaines.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Trouvez-vous qu'il y a une bonne dynamique au sein de ce comité?

(1135)

M. Daniel Jutras:

Faire partie de ce comité représente pour moi une grande fierté parce que ses membres sont des personnes exceptionnelles. Si vous avez la liste devant vous, vous pourrez constater que plusieurs d'entre eux sont membres ou Compagnons de l'Ordre du Canada. Pour ma part, je n'en fais pas partie. Quoi qu'il en soit, je peux vous dire que le leadership de Mme Labelle est absolument exceptionnel. [Traduction]

Le président:

Pardon. Il y a appel au Règlement.

M. Scott Reid:

Qui invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président, pour que vous interrompiez cette intervention?

Le président:

C'est moi.

M. Scott Reid:

Je suis ravi que vous soyez d'accord. C'est super, mais ce n'est pas pertinent. Vous venez d'invoquer le Règlement, monsieur le président. Or, c'est notre prérogative. Il ne vous revient pas de commencer à invoquer le Règlement.

Le président:

Monsieur Chan, invoquez-vous le Règlement?

M. Arnold Chan:

Disons que j'invoque le Règlement.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, laissez le soin à M. Chan et aux autres d'invoquer le Règlement. Ce n'est pas à vous de le faire.

Larry, je pense que vous êtes un bon gars, mais vous n'êtes pas un bon président. Vous n'êtes pas du tout impartial. Vous devez redevenir impartial. C'est votre travail.

M. Arnold Chan:

En fait, j'allais dire que la dernière question ne me semblait pas pertinente, elle non plus. À vrai dire, j'invoque le Règlement contre mon propre parti, car je trouve que la question outrepassait effectivement notre mandat dans le cadre de cet examen.

M. Scott Reid:

Arnold, je crois que vous êtes sincère, et peut-être bien que vous étiez sur le point d'appuyer sur le bouton, mais vous ne l'aviez pas encore fait, ce qui nous ramène à l'impartialité absolue dont doit faire preuve le président du Comité, ce qui n'est pas le cas actuellement.

Le président:

Le président tranche diverses questions, monsieur Reid.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis prêt à laisser la parole à Mme Sahota, si elle le veut bien.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Monsieur Jutras, merci beaucoup d'être avec nous aujourd'hui.

Je veux revenir à votre nomination à titre d'ami de la Cour, ou amicus curiae, à la Cour suprême ainsi qu'à votre expérience à ce titre. Nous donneriez-vous un exemple précis de quelque chose que vous auriez appris lorsque vous occupiez ce rôle? En quoi cette expérience s'avérera-t-elle utile dans vos fonctions au Comité consultatif indépendant?

M. Daniel Jutras:

Vous n'êtes pas sans savoir que le renvoi à la Cour suprême auquel j'ai participé visait principalement le processus de modification prévu à la partie V de la Loi constitutionnelle, qui définit le degré de soutien exigé des provinces aux termes de la Constitution pour apporter certaines modifications constitutionnelles, en particulier en ce qui concerne la structure du Sénat, mais aussi l'abolition du Sénat.

Comme je l'ai expliqué dans un autre contexte, il serait juste de dire que le renvoi concernait le processus de modification de la Constitution plutôt que le Sénat lui-même. La Cour suprême n'avait pas le mandat ni la responsabilité d'analyser diverses propositions pour réformer le Sénat, mais plutôt de déterminer les processus nécessaires pour modifier la Constitution.

C'est essentiellement là-dessus qu'a porté mon travail en tant qu'ami de la Cour. Je me suis concentré sur la structure de la Loi constitutionnelle et sur les dispositions applicables à la modification de la Constitution.

Quoi qu'il en soit, il est juste de dire que, pour comprendre le genre de points susceptibles d'être alors soulevés, j'ai dû me familiariser avec l'histoire des modifications constitutionnelles relatives au Sénat. J'ai notamment étudié, évidemment, diverses critiques exprimées à l'égard du Sénat, de sa configuration actuelle et de son éventuelle transformation.

Ce que je pourrais apporter de pertinent pour comprendre la qualification des personnes qui feraient de bons sénateurs, c'est une compréhension du contexte, une compréhension qui vient de ce que j'ai beaucoup lu sur le rôle du Sénat, notamment au sein de notre régime constitutionnel.

Le président:

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Je vous sais gré de votre présence, aujourd'hui. Ce doit être bizarre de passer après coup ce qui s'apparente essentiellement à une entrevue d'embauchage, en public de surcroît. Nous vous remercions de vous plier à cette épreuve.

De toute évidence, nous avons pris connaissance de vos titres et qualités. Je crois m'exprimer pour tout le monde ici présent en disant à quel point votre expérience et votre bagage sont impressionnants.

Lorsque je procède à une évaluation, je trouve toujours utile de demander à la personne ce qu'elle ferait dans telle ou telle situation. J'aime proposer des scénarios ou des mises en situation, puis lui demander comment elle agirait. Étant donné que le processus est déjà bien entamé, dans certains cas, je ne pourrai pas vraiment vous demander ce que vous feriez ou ce que vous devriez faire. Il faudra demander ce que vous avez fait, car le processus est déjà en cours.

Diverses facettes de la fonction m'apparaissent cruciales, et j'aimerais avoir une idée de ce que vous en pensez. La première, c'est le processus en deux étapes. Il y a la première, je crois que c'est ce qu'on appelle la période de transition, puis il y a le passage à un processus permanent.

Lorsque, comme l'indique le site Web du ministère des Institutions démocratiques, des améliorations seront apportées au processus, lorsqu'il deviendra permanent, j'imagine que, en tant que membre du comité consultatif, vous aurez l'occasion de formuler des recommandations ou des suggestions sur ce qu'elles devraient être.

Nous donneriez-vous une idée des lacunes ou des difficultés que vous avez constatées jusqu'à présent dans le processus en cours? Selon vous, quels changements conviendrait-il d'apporter au processus? Votre réponse nous aidera à évaluer votre capacité à formuler des suggestions et des recommandations de ce genre.

(1140)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président. Je pense que, encore une fois, la question se rapporte au processus et non à la compétence ou aux qualités du témoin.

M. David Christopherson:

Tout comme eux l'ont fait.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'est vrai. Je retire carrément le mot « pense »: la question n'est pas conforme au mandat.

Le président:

À vous de juger... C'est loin d'être la première fois aujourd'hui. À vous de juger, monsieur Jutras. Allez-y.

M. Daniel Jutras:

Je pense que je vais m'en tenir à dire qu'il est sans doute prématuré pour moi de répondre à cette question. Le processus n'est pas terminé. Conformément à notre mandat, nous soumettrons au premier ministre un rapport où nous analyserons le processus et présenterons des améliorations possibles, mais je ne crois pas être en mesure de les nommer actuellement. Le Comité n'en a pas encore discuté, alors je préfère attendre que ce soit fait avant d'en parler.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Je respecte cela.

Vous avez mentionné, je crois, en répondant à une question précédente — celle de M. Reid, si je ne m'abuse — que le rapport que soumettrait le Comité à propos des recommandations serait rendu public. Nous aurons donc une idée des améliorations que le Comité suggérera d'apporter. Ce sera public.

Pouvez-vous confirmer que vous rendrez le rapport public?

M. Daniel Jutras:

C'est ce que je comprends. Je pense que le mandat le prévoit explicitement, au paragraphe 13(3). Aux termes du mandat, le rapport doit être rendu public.

M. Blake Richards:

Je comprends. Merci.

Passons à un autre sujet qui m'apparaît plutôt important. On semble dire que des consultations seront menées auprès de divers groupes au cours de la période de transition. Je cite: « [...] peuvent être menées auprès de groupes qui représentent [...] », puis il y a une liste de groupes éventuellement concernés. On lit ensuite que le processus permettra ainsi de « [...] veiller à ce qu’un éventail de personnes d’horizons variés et possédant les compétences, les connaissances [...] soient soumises à l’examen ».

Je tente de saisir l'ampleur de votre expérience au moment d'entreprendre des consultations de ce genre auprès d'organismes. C'est compliqué, car vous avez déjà entamé une partie du processus. Je veux en savoir un peu plus sur ce que vous entendez ou devriez faire, mais je vous demanderai parfois ce que vous avez fait parce que c'est déjà en cours.

Comment les consultations ont-elles été lancées? Comment devraient-elles se dérouler? Je pose les deux questions, j'imagine.

A-t-on contacté des groupes ou était-ce à eux de se manifester? Selon quels critères les groupes ont-ils été retenus? Auraient-ils dû être retenus? Comment le Comité entend-il interagir ou a-t-il interagi avec les groupes? Selon vous, le nom des groupes participants devrait-il être rendu public?

M. Arnold Chan:

Une fois de plus, monsieur le président, je m'en remets au témoin, mais je pense que la dernière partie de la question de M. Blake dérive aussi vers les processus actuels plutôt que... Je n'avais aucun problème lorsqu'il était question de l'expérience du témoin, car cela permet d'examiner ses compétences et sa qualification, mais je laisse le soin au témoin de décider s'il veut répondre.

(1145)

M. Blake Richards:

De toute évidence, monsieur le président, je cherche à demander ce qu'il faudrait faire, mais, bien sûr, les processus sont déjà en cours. C'est la réalité. Nous ne pouvons pas faire fi de la réalité actuelle. Pour savoir ce qu'il faudrait faire, je dois donc demander ce qui a été fait, car cela concerne la réalité.

Le président:

Monsieur Jutras.

M. Daniel Jutras:

Je crois que je préfère ne pas répondre à des questions détaillées sur ce qui devrait être fait, pour les raisons que j'ai évoquées dans la dernière réponse que je vous ai donnée. J'estime qu'il faudra procéder à une évaluation lorsque nous aurons terminé la période de transition et qu'il est encore trop tôt pour répondre.

Je trouve qu'il serait préférable, dans le contexte du mandat, de discuter avec les divers interlocuteurs en ordre logique. Le mandat exige que nous soumettions un rapport au premier ministre. Je suppose que le premier ministre le rendra public, conformément au mandat. Je suppose également que, compte tenu du mandat, le rapport fera ressortir chaque aspect susceptible d'être pertinent dans ses recommandations d'amélioration.

M. Blake Richards:

Puis-je alors vous demander si les groupes ont été contactés ou si c'était à eux de demander à participer aux consultations? Selon quels critères les a-t-on choisis? Comment le Comité a-t-il interagi avec eux?

Le président:

C'est la dernière question.

M. Daniel Jutras:

Merci.

Je pense encore une fois que les questions se rapportent au processus dont il sera rendu compte dans le rapport dont je viens de parler et non à ma qualification.

Je peux en revenir à ce qu'a dit la présidente du Comité, Huguette Labelle, lorsqu'elle a témoigné devant le vôtre: le processus était très ouvert. Comme vous le savez, le Comité a lancé un site Web pour inviter les gens à proposer des candidats et à soumettre des candidatures. Je pense qu'il serait assez simple pour les membres de ce comité-ci de cerner les divers moyens que le Comité a employés pour obtenir des nominations et des demandes visant d'éminents Canadiens et des Canadiens fort respectables.

Le président:

Merci.

La prochaine intervenante, qui disposera de cinq minutes, est Mme Petitpas Taylor.

Juste avant que vous ne commenciez, je tiens à dire aux membres du Comité que je laisse normalement beaucoup de latitude, mais que j'ai rappelé tous les partis à l'ordre à ce sujet. Il faut s'en tenir strictement à ce que le Règlement nous autorise à faire parce que des centaines de décrets s'en viennent et que d'autres comités s'inspireront du précédent que nous aurons établi. Par conséquent, de tous les comités, le nôtre doit autant que possible s'en tenir à ce qu'énonce le Règlement.

Madame Petitpas Taylor. [Français]

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Bonjour, monsieur Jutras. Je vous remercie de comparaître devant ce comité.

Il est évident que vos compétences professionnelles sont à la hauteur. Votre curriculum vitae est très impressionnant. Pourriez-vous nous parler un peu de votre parcours personnel et nous dire en quoi il va vous aider à accomplir les tâches de ce comité consultatif?

M. Daniel Jutras:

Je ne suis pas certain de comprendre votre question. Qu'entendez-vous par « parcours personnel »?

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Nous avons beaucoup entendu parler de vos réalisations sur le plan professionnel, mais j'aimerais savoir quelles sont vos qualités personnelles. Vous pourriez peut-être nous en dire davantage à ce sujet de même que sur votre parcours personnel.

M. Daniel Jutras:

C'est une question fort difficile à répondre. Je ne sais pas si je peux y répondre intelligemment.

Je fais maintenant partie d'un environnement universitaire qui est rattaché à l'enseignement supérieur. C'est l'essentiel de ma vie professionnelle. Cela dit, il est peut-être utile de savoir que, dans ma famille, ma génération est la première à avoir fait des études universitaires. Ni mon père ni ma mère n'en ont fait. Mes deux parents valorisaient énormément l'éducation, mais ils n'avaient pas eux-mêmes eu la chance de faire des études de ce genre.

Sur le plan personnel, je suis un Canadien ordinaire. Je viens d'une famille issue de la classe moyenne. Mon père était fonctionnaire municipal et ma mère était secrétaire dans une commission scolaire. J'ai fait mes études au niveau secondaire dans une grosse polyvalente, à savoir dans une école publique de la Rive-Sud de Montréal. J'ai poursuivi mes études dans un cégep public au Québec.

Sur le plan personnel, même si mon parcours est associé à la vie et aux institutions universitaires, un espace de ma vie est ancré dans la réalité des Canadiens et Canadiennes de la classe moyenne.

Je ne sais pas si je peux vous en dire beaucoup plus à ce sujet. Je ne pense pas que le reste vous intéresserait. Les passe-temps ne me semblent pas pertinents à la réalisation de mon mandat au sein de ce comité.

(1150)

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

En effet. Je vous remercie.

Selon vous, quelles qualités sont vraiment essentielles pour accomplir les tâches qui seront les vôtres?

M. Daniel Jutras:

Comme il y a un important volume de travail à réaliser, je considère essentielle d'avoir la capacité de réaliser de façon efficace l'évaluation des dossiers, la lecture des curriculum vitae et des lettres de référence. Il y a aussi la capacité de voir dans ces documents certains éléments essentiels de la vie d'une personne. Ce n'est pas toujours facile dans le cas de documents qui sont déposés devant un comité de ce genre pour que les candidatures soient évaluées.

C'est un peu le même exercice que celui auquel vous vous livrez aujourd'hui. Vous avez mon CV, qui fait quatre ou cinq pages, et vous essayez d'évaluer qui je suis et quelles sont mes compétences. Le fait d'avoir lu des dossiers de candidature est, à mon avis, une expérience vraiment pertinente à l'exercice.

Cela dit, je vais revenir à ce que je disais plus tôt. Les qualités fondamentales sont notamment une réputation d'intégrité personnelle irréprochable — et je pense pouvoir faire valoir cette qualité —, un bon jugement, la capacité de travailler de manière indépendante et non partisane, une bonne compréhension de la structure constitutionnelle canadienne ainsi que du rôle du Sénat et des gens qui seront appelés à y siéger lorsqu'ils seront nommés par le gouverneur général.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

C'est maintenant au tour de M. Schmale.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Merci beaucoup de répondre aujourd'hui à nos questions, monsieur Jutras. Nous vous en savons gré.

Je ne dispose que de quelques minutes, alors je serai bref. C'est dommage que nous ne puissions pas parler du processus. Il est déjà en cours, alors je trouve qu'il est primordial d'obtenir des réponses à ce sujet. Nous ne pouvons pas parler de reddition de comptes, alors, en nous en remettant à votre expérience, parlons de la composition actuelle du Sénat.

Lorsqu'on regarde la composition actuelle du Sénat, on constate que les sénateurs ont toutes sortes de bagages. Étant donné la lettre de mandat et ce que vous recherchez, je tiens à dire que les études revêtent beaucoup d'importance, mais que ce n'est pas tout ce qui compte. Or, le processus me semble faire des études le critère prépondérant. Il y a beaucoup de gens d'affaires dans ma circonscription. Ils sont florissants et ils ont beaucoup de jugeote.

Avec votre expérience, comment veillerez-vous à ne pas vous cantonner aux éléments intellectuels et à choisir des gens provenant de divers domaines qui ont beaucoup de jugeote, je dirais, mais très peu de diplômes?

M. Daniel Jutras:

Une fois de plus, je pense que la question concerne principalement les critères que l'on nous a demandé d'appliquer et non ma propre qualification. Je vous renvoie à l'annexe que la ministre a fournie à propos des qualités et des critères d'évaluation du mérite. Je crois que tout est clairement défini et que les critères ne sont pas tous axés sur les diplômes. Le Comité doit évaluer un vaste éventail de qualités fondées sur le mérite.

J'en reviens une fois de plus à ce que j'ai dit à votre collègue, il y a quelques instants. La tâche en cours exige que nous ayons la capacité de poser un jugement sur les gens. Ce n'est pas très différent de ce que vous faites actuellement. Vous évaluez ma qualification et ma compétence. Je suppose que tout le monde ici n'est pas bardé de diplômes. Il faut toutes sortes de bagages autour de la table, et je suis tout à fait convaincu que votre comité est bien outillé pour évaluer mes qualités. Je dirais qu'il en va de même pour moi.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Merci, monsieur Jutras.

Cela nous ramène à la démocratie et à la manière dont nous avons été élus. Tout repose sur l'électorat, les personnes qui décident si, oui ou non, nous avons les qualités voulues. C'est pourquoi je vous ai posé la question. Je ne veux pas que le Sénat soit réservé à l'élite. Je veux qu'il reflète toutes sortes de bagages. Comme je l'ai dit, nous en revenons constamment — il en a aussi été question hier au comité sénatorial — aux études, entre autres. Selon votre expérience et votre bagage, comment peut-on veiller à ce que l'on rende des comptes et à ce que l'on représente les différents visages du Canada, y compris les personnes qui ont du succès dans les affaires même si elles n'ont pas nécessairement beaucoup de diplômes?

(1155)

M. Daniel Jutras:

Ce que je tiens à dire à ce sujet, c'est que vous me faites passer une entrevue, bien sûr, sauf qu'un grand comité s'occupe de cela. Nous avons trois comités, comme vous le savez, des comités qui sont formés par province et qui comptent cinq membres. Ces éminentes personnes ont un vaste éventail d'expertise et de compétences. De toute évidence, je suis une personne. J'ai un profil donné et ce profil il ne correspond pas aux antécédents professionnels des autres membres. Tout le monde apporte à la table quelque chose d'immensément utile pour procéder exactement à l'évaluation dont vous venez de parler.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Il est question d'un Sénat renouvelé et non partisan, mais je pense que ce sera très difficile à accomplir, car, dans n'importe quel groupe, qu'il s'agisse d'une association de hockey mineur ou d'une chambre de commerce, on tend à aller vers les personnes qui sont sur la même longueur d'onde.

Considérant votre expérience dans l'analyse d'une multitude de CV et de lettres de recommandation, la ministre a affirmé hier que l'expérience politique n'entraînera pas nécessairement la disqualification d'un candidat. Cependant, considérant votre expérience, comment ferez-vous en sorte que les sénateurs restent bel et bien non partisans après coup?

M. Daniel Jutras:

Honnêtement, le Comité n'a aucun pouvoir sur ce qui arrivera après coup. Je ne suis pas certain de pouvoir répondre à cette question.

Je vous assure que des Canadiens extraordinaires, de tous les horizons, ont soumis leur candidature. Ce que nous tentons d'accomplir, grâce à notre propre qualification, c'est de bien évaluer en quoi chaque candidat satisfait aux critères qui nous ont été fournis, les critères d'évaluation selon le mérite que nous devons appliquer pour formuler des recommandations au premier ministre. C'est tout ce que je peux dire.

Tous les membres du Comité s'attachent à respecter le mandat, avec beaucoup de sérieux. Je pense que cela nous impose de prendre un instant de recul afin de réfléchir de manière plus générale aux qualités attendues.

Le président:

C'est au tour d'Arnold Chan de poser des questions.

M. Arnold Chan:

Merci, monsieur Jutras, de témoigner devant le Comité. À l'instar de nombreux collègues ici présents, je suis aussi très impressionné, et je vous remercie de vous mettre au service de la population dans l'intérêt de ce processus que la Constitution nous engage à suivre.

J'en reviens à vos observations préliminaires à propos de votre expérience, surtout dans le domaine du droit constitutionnel. Je remarque que vous avez dit que ce n'est pas nécessairement votre principal domaine de compétence, car vous vous concentrez surtout sur la procédure civile et le droit contractuel, mais je veux en savoir davantage sur votre expérience dans le domaine du droit constitutionnel, en particulier.

Si je me rappelle bien, vous avez dit que vos études supérieures à la Faculté de droit de l'Université Harvard avaient porté sur ce sujet. Je constate également que vous êtes lauréat d'une bourse d'études Frank Knox, une bourse très prestigieuse. Mon frère l'a reçue, si je ne m'abuse. Plus précisément, je veux en savoir davantage sur vos travaux de recherche et sur la manière dont ils pourraient vous aider dans le travail que vous accomplissez maintenant pour le Comité consultatif.

M. Daniel Jutras:

Très brièvement, mes études supérieures à l'Université Harvard remontent à un peu plus de 30 ans. À l'époque, les affaires constitutionnelles, comme vous pouvez l'imaginer, visaient principalement la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés. C'était le milieu des années 1980. Quiconque s'intéressait au droit public se concentrait en particulier sur les droits de la personne et les garanties constitutionnelles à l'égard des libertés civiles. À l'époque, c'est là-dessus que portaient mes études.

À l'Université Harvard, ma thèse de maîtrise portait sur la portée de l'article 1 de la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés et sur les interprétations possibles de la restriction des droits issus de l'article 1. Je me dois de dire que c'était bien avant que la jurisprudence de la Cour suprême évolue au sujet de cet article; 30 ans plus tard, ma thèse est devenue obsolète.

Par la suite, je me suis concentré pendant longtemps sur le droit privé, jusqu'à ce que je devienne adjoint exécutif juridique à la Cour suprême du Canada, où j'ai eu l'occasion de travailler à des dossiers d'ordre constitutionnel, qu'ils concernent la Charte, la répartition des compétences ou encore les aspects institutionnels de la Constitution.

Depuis ce temps, mon intérêt ne s'est jamais démenti. Je lis beaucoup à ce sujet, même si je ne publie plus rien et que je n'effectue plus de recherches dans ce domaine.

(1200)

M. Arnold Chan:

Merci, monsieur.

Je veux m'arrêter à votre expérience parallèle. Vous signalez que vous avez été chercheur principal... C'était une subvention de recherche anonyme, et vous avez étudié l'État de droit en Russie.

Ces travaux de recherche en particulier ont-ils abordé la question de la répartition des compétences? Vous ont-ils appris quelque chose sur le fonctionnement des Parlements bicaméraux ou l'élaboration de processus constitutionnels, ou quoi que ce soit du genre?

M. Daniel Jutras:

Non. Ce que nous faisions... Nous étions un groupe de professeurs de l'Université McGill et notre travail portait sur les structures judiciaires, les problèmes d'administration de la justice et la corruption, ou les contrôles de la corruption envisageable pour une fédération telle que la Russie. Alors non, cela n'avait absolument rien à voir avec la répartition des compétences ou la gouvernance bicamérale.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je m'aventure moi aussi à vous poser une question qui enfreindra peut-être le Règlement. Selon ce que vous comprenez comme avocat, bien sûr, mais aussi comme professeur, les décisions du Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat auront-elles force exécutoire pour le premier ministre et le conseil exécutif?

C'est peut-être une question de procédure.

Le président:

Désolé, mais c'est une question de procédure.

M. Arnold Chan:

D'accord. Je retire la question.

Le président:

Il est midi passé, mais nous nous sollicitons l'indulgence du témoin. Quelques points à l'ordre du jour ont quelque peu empiété sur le temps dont nous disposions, et il reste une série de trois minutes, Monsieur Christopherson, si vous voulez poser des questions.

M. David Christopherson:

Oh, certainement. Je vais me ressayer.

Je rappelle seulement au témoin que la présidente du comité où il siège a répondu à toutes mes questions. Elle n'y a pas vu de problème. Elle n'a pas essayé de se défiler de quelque façon que ce soit. Elle a simplement répondu du mieux qu'elle le pouvait. J'ai accepté cela. C'est tout ce que je demande.

Je veux en revenir au même genre de question, mais sur un autre sujet, sans quoi le président dira que j'enfreins le Règlement. C'est à propos de la primauté de la Chambre des communes. Vous êtes un expert de la Constitution et vous la connaissez mieux que la plupart d'entre nous. La Constitution confère certains droits à chaque Chambre. Depuis 1867, la pratique veut que le Sénat, à de quelques rarissimes exceptions, veille très assidûment à ne pas contrer la volonté de la Chambre élue, eu égard au fait que les députés sont élus et jouissent à ce titre d'un mandat.

Un cas est survenu où Jack Layon, ancien chef du NPD, a proposé une charte des droits environnementaux qui, si je ne m'abuse, a été adoptée à deux reprises à la Chambre des communes. Or, une fois que le Sénat en a été saisi, il l'a rejetée sans même en débattre.

Ma question serait la suivante. Lorsque vous faites passer une entrevue, que recherchez-vous au chapitre de la conception de la répartition des compétences entre la Chambre des communes et le Sénat? Voulez-vous que les candidats disent qu'ils respecteraient la volonté de la Chambre élue ou voulez-vous plutôt qu'ils disent que non et que s'ils étaient nommés, ils se prévaudraient du moindre des pouvoirs constitutionnels conférés aux sénateurs?

M. Daniel Jutras:

Encore une fois, je dirais que cette question se rapporte au processus ainsi qu'aux qualités des personnes qui seront nommées au Sénat plutôt qu'à celles des membres, mais laissez-moi essayer d'y répondre comme suit. Le mandat du... Je suis désolé que mes réponses ne fassent pas votre bonheur. Je fais de mon mieux pour répondre dans le respect du mandat du Comité auquel vous siégez.

Je dirai ceci. Les critères qui nous ont été fournis, ceux que nous devons appliquer, nous obligent à évaluer très soigneusement en quoi chaque personne possède les connaissances de base exigées. Selon moi, ces connaissances englobent non seulement le mandat écrit du Sénat, mais aussi une bonne compréhension de son rôle au sein de l'ordre constitutionnel du Canada. Il me semble que l'on s'attendrait à ce que cette compréhension se manifeste dans la manière dont chaque personne décrit son propre profil, sa propre carrière et la manière dont elle s'attend à contribuer au Sénat si sa candidature est retenue.

(1205)

Le président:

Vous avez 30 secondes.

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai une autre question. Lorsque vous meniez vos travaux de recherche, fort impressionnants d'ailleurs, vous êtes-vous intéressé à la question de la responsabilité et à la nécessité pour les sénateurs de rendre davantage de comptes? Avez-vous étudié la notion de respect de la volonté de la Chambre des communes par déférence envers les Canadiens, qui ont voté pour les personnes qui y siègent? Avez-vous mené des travaux de recherche à ce sujet?

M. Daniel Jutras:

Comme je l'ai dit dès le départ, ce n'est pas mon domaine de recherche. Je n'ai rien publié à propos du Sénat. Je ne crois pas que vous puissiez trouver quoi que ce soit portant ma signature qui permettrait de répondre aux questions du genre de celles que vous posez.

Cela dit, je suis très au fait des préoccupations que vous exprimez, car elles occupent une place de choix dans tous les documents que j'ai lus pour me préparer à faire mon travail d'ami de la Cour auprès de la Cour suprême du Canada relativement au renvoi sur le Sénat. Je suis très au fait de ces questions, oui, même si je n'ai rien publié à leur sujet.

Le président:

Merci.

M. David Christopherson:

Puis-je simplement...

Le président: Oui?

M. David Christopherson: Je n'ai plus de questions — mon temps de parole est écoulé —, mais je tiens cependant à dire que je trouve tout cela inadmissible. Vous sentez ma frustration. Il n'est pas admissible que vous disiez que vous rechercherez telle ou telle chose parmi les candidats. C'est vous qui vous substituez à la décision des Canadiens. Vous décidez si ces personnes ont ou non les qualités voulues, et votre refus de me dire quel modèle vous utiliserez...

M. Arnold Chan: Monsieur le président, je crois que M. Christopherson enfreint manifestement le...

M. David Christopherson: ... discrédite encore davantage le Sénat non élu.

Merci, monsieur le président.

M. Arnold Chan:

Monsieur le président, j'invoque le Règlement.

Je pense qu'il faut remercier le témoin. Si M. Christopherson veut poursuivre la conversation avec le Comité après que le témoin aura été excusé, je suis prêt à l'entendre ad nauseam, mais je répète que nous avons selon moi terminé.

Le président:

Je remercie le témoin de sa présence. Vous êtes l'un des premiers dans ce dossier. Nous prenons assurément la mesure de votre qualification et vous savons gré d'avoir pris le temps de répondre à des questions aujourd'hui.

Bonne chance dans votre travail.

M. Daniel Jutras:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

La séance est suspendue pendant que l'on change de président, puis nous passerons aux affaires du Comité.

(1205)

(1210)

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Reprenons. La séance demeure évidemment télévisée et publique.

Nous avons quelques motions à traiter. Je signale que la greffière a un budget à soumettre à un bref examen. Je pense qu'il concerne le Comité consultatif. Nous avons tenu quelques réunions, et une autre est prévue.

J'entends passer au huis clos pour quelques minutes, à la toute fin de la réunion, pour régler la question du budget. Je pense que ce sera très rapide. C'est ainsi que j'envisage les choses, à moins que les membres du Comité me demandent de procéder autrement. Il y aura un bref huis clos pour traiter de la question du budget. Nous pouvons procéder ainsi, cinq ou six minutes avant la fin de la réunion, en veillant à terminer à l'heure. J'ai conscience que les membres doivent assister à d'autres réunions, alors nous devons veiller à terminer à l'heure.

Cela dit, je vous préviens de ce que je m'attends à ce que nous fassions et à quel moment. Le Comité a été saisi d'une motion. Des amendements y ont été proposés, et le débat, la dernière fois, portait sur ces propositions d'amendement.

Vous avez tous reçu la motion amendée. Elle a circulé. Nous avons distribué la version en mode suivi des modifications, qui montre ce qui est proposé. Je suis prêt à dresser une liste d'intervenants dans ce débat.

M. Scott Reid:

J'invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président. Je voulais moi aussi présenter une motion sur le sujet actuellement à l'étude.

J'espère que l'auteur de la motion, M. Christopherson, aura l'indulgence de me laisser proposer d'abord cette motion. Je ne vois pas pourquoi elle ne ferait pas consensus, alors ce sera vite réglé.

Elle concerne bien sûr le rappel de témoins pour traiter sur le fond de ce qui n'était pas admis aujourd'hui aux termes des règles qui régissaient la réunion, plus précisément le paragraphe 111(2) du Règlement.

(1215)

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

D'accord, vous voulez proposer une motion.

Je peux vous inscrire en tant que premier intervenant. Si vous voulez présenter la motion, vous pouvez tout à fait le faire.

La greffière vous demanderait alors de lire la motion lentement afin qu'elle puisse bien la consigner.

M. Scott Reid:

Bien sûr. Je peux aussi vous donner le texte de la motion, parce que je l'ai écrit.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci.

Vous avez la parole.

M. Scott Reid:

Je suppose que cela veut dire que je suis le premier sur la liste des intervenants. Je présente donc ma motion. Compte tenu que, en raison du paragraphe 111(2) du Règlement, des membres du Comité consultatif sur les nominations au Sénat ont été incapables de répondre à des questions sur l'administration de leurs responsabilités, je propose: Que les membres fédéraux du Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat... — précision nécessaire pour les distinguer des membres provinciaux — ... soient invités à comparaître devant le Comité avant la fin de mars 2016, pour répondre à toutes les questions concernant leur mandat et leurs responsabilités.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci, monsieur Reid. La motion est dûment reçue.

Nous pouvons passer au débat sur cette motion si M. Christopherson le désire, parce qu'elle précéderait la sienne.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, je n'ai pas d'objection à permettre qu'on étudie d'abord cette motion. Nous pourrons ensuite revenir à la mienne.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

D'accord.

Nous allons entendre les intervenants sur cette motion.

Je vois que M. Christopherson veut prendre la parole, puis M. Chan.

M. David Christopherson:

M. Reid prendra-t-il la parole sur sa motion?

M. Scott Reid:

D'une certaine façon, je l'ai déjà fait, en faisant part de mes observations au cours de l'exposé de M. Jutras.

M. David Christopherson: D'accord.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

En effet, c'est aussi ce que j'avais compris, mais il a bien sûr le droit d'intervenir de nouveau s'il choisit de le faire.

Monsieur Christopherson, vous êtes le premier sur la liste. Ce sera ensuite le tour de M. Chan.

M. David Christopherson:

J'apprécie. Je n'ai pas l'intention de parler très longtemps, mais vous savez comment je deviens quand je parle du Sénat.

Je dois vous dire que je n'ai pas eu le même problème à la première réunion qu’à celle-ci. À la première réunion, je pense avoir posé des questions semblables. Je les ai volontairement structurées d’une manière qui allait leur permettre de défier la censure du gouvernement et d’être jugées recevables par la présidence. Cela a fonctionné la dernière fois, alors je ne devais pas être dans le champ à ce point-là. La présidente du comité consultatif, qui a beaucoup plus de raisons de s’inquiéter que tout autre membre, a répondu rapidement et ouvertement. Ce n’était pas nécessairement ce que je voulais entendre, mais elle n’a absolument pas tenté d’éluder les questions.

Je ne veux pas dénigrer le témoin précédent, un universitaire aux réalisations impressionnantes. Toutefois, je dois dire qu’il me donnait l’impression d’avoir bénéficié de conseils politiques. Si ce n’est pas le cas, il doit avoir autant d’intérêt pour la politique que pour les travaux universitaires, parce qu'il s’agissait vraiment de réponses politiques. La plupart des gens n’ont pas, spontanément, des réactions de ce genre.

Ce n’est qu’une observation, en aucun cas une accusation. Je vais m’en tenir à cela.

Sur le plan de la teneur, c'est très frustrant, et même insupportable pour certains d’entre nous, que des législateurs soient choisis par le premier ministre plutôt que par les Canadiens. On aura toujours des sénateurs soulignant leurs bons coups et leurs bonnes notes. Bien sûr, ils peuvent faire autant de bons coups et mettre sur pied autant de comités spécialisés qu’ils voudront, mais il ne faut pas que ce soient des législateurs. Voilà l’idée à retenir.

En fait, je rappelle à mes collègues que le vote des sénateurs vaut plus que le nôtre, puisqu’ils sont moins nombreux. Il faut moins de votes pour l’adoption d’une motion à la deuxième Chambre qu’à la nôtre. Par conséquent, tout ce qui a trait à la nomination des sénateurs mérite d’être étudié attentivement.

Je n’ai pas essayé de faire le fin finaud. Je ne crois pas avoir donné cette impression non plus. Les choses se sont passées très normalement avec le dernier témoin. J’ai dit ce que j’avais à dire et, quand mon temps a été écoulé, je me suis tu et le comité a poursuivi ses travaux. Cette fois, j’interrogeais un témoin sur une question qui me tient vraiment à coeur, l’un des quelques membres d’un comité qui agira en lieu et place de 35 millions de Canadiens pour décider qui seront nos législateurs, et le témoin refusait de me donner une simple réponse.

Qu’il réponde au moins aux questions! Je suis surpris que, en tant qu’avocat, il ait mis l’accent sur les raisons qu’il avait de refuser de répondre au lieu de me donner une bonne réponse d’avocat ne répondant pas à la question. Nous regardons la période des questions. Des professionnels le font tous les jours. Je dois plaider coupable aussi, parce que je l’ai fait à l’époque où j’étais ministre. Plus vous excellez à ne pas répondre aux questions sans que ça paraisse, plus vous vous en tirez bien à la période des questions.

Je suis tout à fait prêt à accepter ce genre de réponse à une question, mais de commencer à tergiverser sur une question à savoir si le Sénat a eu raison ou tort de faire ce qu’il a fait du projet de loi de Jack Layton… Qu’on aime ou non Jack Layton ou le projet de loi, cela venait de la Chambre des communes, et le Sénat l’a rejeté sans même un débat. Je pense qu’il est juste que je demande à quelqu'un qui engagera les sénateurs — non pas qui les élira, mais qui les engagera — ce qu’il penserait d’un témoin, selon sa réponse à cette question. Croit-il que c'est acceptable? Il faudrait savoir si le comité envisagerait la candidature d’une personne qui dirait « Oh, je pense que ça va; constitutionnellement, ils ont ce droit et ce n’est pas un problème », ou s’il préférerait une personne qui dirait « Savez-vous, je pense que c'est aller trop loin; cela relève du mandat légal du Sénat, mais il faut faire preuve de respect envers la Chambre étant donné que c'est la population canadienne qui lui a confié son mandat. »

Aussi bancal que soit ce régime, c'est encore ce qu’il y a de mieux. Le Sénat n’a pas cette légitimité. Les sénateurs ne sont pas élus. Nous pourrions être les pires députés du monde, il reste que nous avons cette légitimité. Je vous rappelle que les Canadiens peuvent nous congédier après quatre ans. Or nous avons un petit groupe de personnes qui engagera des sénateurs avec lesquels nous devrons vivre des décennies, parce qu'ils ne peuvent pas être congédiés.

Je vais terminer comme j’ai commencé. Je n’avais aucun intérêt à jouer au plus fin dans cette situation. Demandez à Mel. Vous le saurez quand je serai en train d’essayer de jouer au plus fin sur un enjeu quelconque. Je ne le cache absolument pas. Je n’ai pas cherché à faire le fin finaud et n’en ai jamais eu l’intention. Je suis extrêmement déçu d’avoir vu une personne tenter de se dérober aux questions alors qu’elle aura un rôle majeur à jouer dans notre démocratie qui nous tient à coeur.

(1220)



;C'est pourquoi je vais appuyer cette motion. Je veux pouvoir vérifier s’ils vont tous agir ainsi. La présidente ne l’a pas fait. S’il y a quelqu'un qui pouvait chercher à jouer au plus fin, la présidente aurait été toute désignée pour établir un précédent. Elle aurait pu laisser savoir qu’elle ne répondrait à aucune question, que le comité allait se limiter strictement à son mandat. Mais non, elle s’est montrée très ouverte d’esprit. Elle comprenait ma situation. Elle ne m’a pas donné les réponses que j’espérais entendre, mais elle a essayé de répondre à ma question de la façon la plus complète possible, étant donné sa situation — du moins c'est ce qu’il m’a semblé.

Qu’on me corrige si je me trompe, mais je ne crois pas avoir eu à revenir sur les questions avec cette témoin — peut-être pour clarifier ses propos, mais pas de la façon dont je l’ai fait aujourd'hui. J’ai été très déçu et presque fâché que quelqu'un qui jouera le rôle qu’on lui donnera dans notre société… Qu’il m’aime ou qu’il aime mes politiques importent peu. Si ma question est jugée recevable par la présidence, c'est une question légitime que je pose au nom des Canadiens et qui mérite la meilleure réponse possible. Il ne convient pas que la personne utilise ses connaissances d’érudit pour tenter d’éviter de répondre aux questions. C'est nous qui faisons cela. S’ils se mettent à le faire, ils jouent notre rôle. Nous devons parfois jouer au plus fin, mais ce genre de petit jeu n’a pas sa place dans ce comité-là.

Je termine là-dessus. Je ne veux pas faire de l’obstruction mais je veux faire remarquer à quel point le vent a tourné pour moi aujourd'hui, et je suis maintenant à 100 % avec les conservateurs pour tâcher de faire venir autant de gens que possible et de faire toutes les vérifications possibles. Étant donné la façon dont le gouvernement s’y prend, je sais qu’au fond il se rend compte que c'est n’importe quoi. Le gouvernement fait ce qu’il doit faire, mais je vous dis que, lorsqu’un témoin répond ainsi à des questions posées de bonne foi, il y a des problèmes à l’horizon. Je vais contribuer à éviter ces problèmes en appuyant la motion.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci, monsieur Christopherson.

Monsieur Chan, avant que nous passions au prochain intervenant, je vais lire la motion. J'ai reçu quelques demandes à cet effet. Nous en avons le texte final. Je vais la lire très lentement. Que les membres fédéraux du Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat soient invités à comparaître devant le Comité avant la fin de mars 2016, pour répondre à toutes les questions concernant leur mandat et leurs responsabilités.

Monsieur Chan, vous avez la parole.

(1225)

M. Arnold Chan:

Monsieur le président, je vais commencer par réagir aux propos de M. Christopherson. Je veux qu’on puisse lire au compte rendu que, jusqu’à un certain point, je regrette, monsieur, de vous avoir laissé, à vous ainsi qu’aux autres membres de l’opposition, autant de liberté pour interroger Mme Labelle. Comme je l’ai dit, j’aurais pu m’y objecter, et j’ai choisi de ne pas le faire à ce moment-là.

Ce que je veux faire valoir, monsieur Christopherson, c'est que, au bout du compte, en vertu des dispositions actuelles du Règlement applicables à notre comité, nous avons le mandat de vérifier les qualités et les compétences d'une personne dont on envisage la nomination. Je n’ai pas inventé ce règlement. Ce sont les règles de procédure figurant dans le Règlement qui définissent ce que notre comité peut faire.

Je voulais simplement le faire savoir. Si nous nous en tenons aux règles auxquelles nous sommes assujettis… Si cela ne vous plaît pas, monsieur Christopherson, vous avez le droit de proposer des modifications quand nous procéderons à l’examen de notre Règlement, mais pour le moment nous devons nous en tenir à ce que le Règlement nous impose de faire. C'est ce que je voulais dire.

Pour ce qui est de la teneur de la motion présentée par M. Reid, je considère personnellement que le gouvernement est tout à fait transparent au sujet des questions qui vous préoccupent, puisqu’il vous offre la possibilité de rencontrer, ici même au comité, le 10 mars, la ministre et des hauts fonctionnaires pour qu’ils puissent répondre à ces questions.

C’est pourquoi, selon moi, nous n’appuierons pas — du moins je n’appuierai certainement pas — cette motion particulière. Vous pouvez poser à la ministre et aux fonctionnaires du ministère toute question concernant vos préoccupations au sujet du processus mais, pour le moment, nous avons uniquement la responsabilité d’examiner les qualités et compétences des candidats. C'est notre mandat et c'est pourquoi nous n’appuierons pas cette motion — du moins je ne l’appuierai certainement pas.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Nous entendrons maintenant M. Reid, et vous aurez ensuite la parole, monsieur Christopherson.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je veux réagir aux propos de M. Chan. Il a terminé en disant que notre mandat consiste à examiner les qualités des candidats. C'est notre mandat, a-t-il dit. Selon le paragraphe 111(2) du Règlement, en vertu duquel nous tenons notre réunion d’aujourd'hui, c'est exact. Mon préambule ne fait pas partie du texte officiel de la motion, mais je vous l’ai lu. Il précisait que cette disposition régit et restreint nos travaux d’aujourd’hui. Comme il s’agit là de questions pertinentes et importantes, il pourrait y avoir une autre réunion durant laquelle nous traiterions ces questions parce que cette réunion serait consacrée à ces questions. Nous ne sommes pas limités par la nature du comité ou de son mandat… Il y a effectivement des sujets que nous ne devrions pas aborder. Nous ne devrions pas poser de questions sur les droits de la personne dans le monde, sur la défense, sur la situation de la femme ou sur la Bibliothèque du Parlement. Ces choses ne relèvent pas de notre mandat.

Cependant, l’attitude de personnes comme des membres de comités consultatifs relève absolument de notre mandat. La façon dont nous étudierons ce sujet est déterminée par la motion que nous présentons. Cette nouvelle motion nous permettrait donc de combler la lacune créée par la motion originale. Je dois dire que, si je m’étais rendu compte de ces restrictions attribuables à la motion originale, j’aurais tout de suite soulevé ces objections et cherché à élargir notre mandat, parce que j’aurais pu vous dire dès le départ que j’étais déjà impressionné par la qualité des membres du comité consultatif, dont les CV étaient publiés sur la Toile. Donc, franchement, les questions concernant leurs qualités n’étaient pas nécessaires. Je ne doute ni de leurs qualités et compétences ni de leur objectivité, mais je veux leur poser des questions au sujet de leur mandat.

Bien sûr, il existe un système selon lequel ils feront rapport au premier ministre. Il n’est pas déraisonnable pour nous de vouloir obtenir des renseignements distincts à cet égard. J’insiste là-dessus parce que je crois qu’il s’agit d’une distinction importante qui pourrait échapper à l’observateur moyen. Le fait que des gens aient pour mandat de présenter un rapport au premier ministre ne signifie pas qu’ils sont exemptés du mandat de faire rapport à notre comité. Il s’agit d’un mandat général. Le premier ministre est, du moins en théorie, un agent de la Couronne, distinct de la Chambre des communes. Donc, faire rapport à la Chambre des communes n’exclut pas qu’il existe un certain mécanisme de présentation de rapports au premier ministre et quand même une certaine attente que vous fassiez rapport à la Chambre et, bien sûr, au Sénat, s’il choisissait de tenir lui-même des audiences et d’inviter ces personnes. Rien de tout cela n’est exclu. C'est une demande raisonnable.

Cela m’amène à la première observation de M. Chan, soit qu’on nous permet de parler à la ministre. Je dois dire que c’était une formulation assez étrange, mais je ne veux pas lui reprocher cela. Nous avons le droit de poser des questions à la ministre. Elle viendra nous rencontrer à un moment qui, franchement, ne nous convient pas. Elle aurait dû venir plus tôt. Quand je dis que cela ne nous convient pas, je veux simplement dire que ce n’est pas au bon moment. Elle aurait dû venir plus tôt. Les députés libéraux ont insisté pour écrire dans notre invitation qu’elle pouvait venir à un moment qui lui convenait. Franchement, c'est toujours ainsi que ces invitations sont formulées. Cela va de soi. Si les ministres ne veulent pas venir, nous ne pouvons pas les y forcer. Par conséquent, nous devrions peut-être nous montrer reconnaissants. Nous devrions peut-être, je ne sais pas, embrasser la bague de quelqu'un en signe de reconnaissance pour avoir pu convoquer un témoin. Je ne crois pas que c'est la façon dont on comprend généralement nos travaux, que c'est ce que le public attend de nous. Je ne crois pas que la population considère que les ministres n’ont de comptes à rendre qu’à la Couronne et que la Chambre des communes représente la plèbe attendant à l’extérieur que Leurs Grandeurs veuillent bien accepter de répondre à des questions posées respectueusement par des députés les implorant de répondre. Je pense que c'est tout le contraire.

(1230)



Je connais la ministre, et je l'aime bien. Je pense qu'elle m'aime bien également. Hier, elle m'a donné une petite fleur rose parce que j'avais oublié de porter une chemise rose. J'ai apprécié.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est un signe de respect.

M. Scott Reid:

Je suis content d’avoir eu une chance de le dire. C’était gentil de sa part, et cela m’a fait plaisir.

Je ne crois pas qu’elle voie nécessairement les choses ainsi. L’important, c'est ceci: leur mandat est rédigé de telle façon qu’ils relèvent de la ministre des Institutions démocratiques et du premier ministre.

Si la ministre vient nous rencontrer, je pense qu’elle pourrait très bien dire qu’elle ne peut pas répondre à telle ou telle question, que cela ne relève pas de sa compétence, que ce n’est pas dans sa lettre de mandat. Mais il s’agit, pour ces personnes, d’un mandat distinct qui leur est confié par décret. Il n’y a pas que les ministres qui sont mandatés par l’État. Bien d’autres personnes le sont aussi. C'est le cas de tous les officiers militaires, de tous les commissaires et de tous les présidents de conseil. Tous ceux qui ne sont habilités dans leurs fonctions ni par la Chambre des communes ni par le Sénat le sont par l’État. C'est le cas de la plupart des gens que nous côtoyons, ces dizaines de milliers de personnes qui travaillent pour le gouvernement du Canada. Ces gens ne relèvent pas de la ministre. Je pense qu’elle insisterait même sur ce point. Ils ne relèvent pas d’elle car ils sont censés être indépendants. Le mot indépendant figure en fait dans leur titre, ou du moins il est écrit dans tous les exposés sur leur titre et leur mandat. C'est pourquoi elle n’est pas en mesure de répondre.

Que faire alors? Nous insistons auprès de M. Chan, nous nous agenouillons pour embrasser sa bague, et nous lui demandons humblement si lui ou un ministre ou quiconque pourrait venir nous rencontrer et nous parler.

Ce que je veux, et il se peut que je parle au nom de quelques autres ici présents, c'est faire revenir ces personnes, parce qu’elles ont un mandat et sont les seules à pouvoir parler de leur mandat.

Je respecte tout à fait la décision du professeur Jutras de ne pas répondre sur certains sujets. Il me semblait clair toutefois qu’il essayait en réalité, bien que cela ne soit pas vraiment de sa responsabilité, de ne pas aller au-delà de notre mandat. Il a même dit exactement cela: « votre mandat », « l’article du Règlement en vertu duquel vous avez convoqué cette réunion ».

Nous pourrions avoir une réunion différente, au cours de laquelle nous examinerions tous les aspects du mandat de cette personne et des deux autres membres permanents. On pourrait y poser des questions comme celle que j’ai posée avant que la présidence me demande de me taire, soit combien de personnes ont présenté leur candidature et combien il y a eu de mises en nomination jusqu’à présent.

Il y a bien des choses qu'ils ne peuvent pas dire. Ce n’est pas de leur faute si tout formulaire de mise en nomination ou de candidature rempli devient un document « Protégé B ». C'est vrai qu’ils ne peuvent pas en parler. C'est pourquoi c'est écrit. C'est un secret qui les empêche de dire quoi que ce soit parce que cela pourrait léser des personnes si le contenu de ces lettres était révélé. Bien sûr, nous respecterions cela.

Mais nous demanderions combien de mises en nomination ont été reçues. Cela m’intéresse en raison de la façon dont le processus a été conçu. Ce processus a été annoncé dans un communiqué publié le 29 janvier 2016 qui nous apprenait qu’on accepterait les nominations de la phase 1. Tout le processus a été annoncé d’un coup, de cette manière, alors qu’il avait été gardé complètement secret jusque-là. Nous n’en savions absolument rien. J’ajoute que ce processus a été conçu par le gouvernement et non par le comité consultatif. Je le dis simplement pour qu’on fasse porter le blâme aux véritables responsables.

Donc, la phase 1 du processus a été annoncée le 29 janvier 2016. Nous avons alors appris qu’on accepterait les mises en nomination jusqu’au 15 février 2016. Faites le compte. Si l’on compte la journée du 15 et la journée du 29, cela donne 15 jours. Vous pouvez vérifier la date d’envoi du courriel. Le 29 était un vendredi. Le samedi et le dimanche qui suivent sont des jours de congé.

Cette information n’a pas été affichée aux endroits attendus. Par exemple, on ne la trouve pas sur le site Web de la ministre des Institutions démocratiques. Il a fallu un bout de temps avant que l’existence de ce processus devienne un peu plus connue. Je n'en ai été informé que lorsque j’ai reçu un courriel de la ministre, une fois passée la première fin de semaine.

(1235)



Suivant ce processus, pour qu’un sénateur soit nommé ou que son nom puisse être proposé au premier ministre par le comité consultatif, il faut a) qu’il ait présenté sa candidature, et b) que cette nouvelle candidature dont personne ne connaît l’existence soit appuyée par une mise en nomination venant d’un représentant d’une organisation. Donc quelqu’un remplit le formulaire en indiquant qu’il représente telle organisation et a telle fonction.

Personnellement, j’œuvre au sein de plusieurs organismes de charité. Samedi qui vient, je présiderai, comme chaque année, le dîner annuel de financement pour la fibrose kystique, à Ottawa. Je suis aussi bénévole au sein d’une cuisine communautaire appelée « The Table », et j’organise annuellement un dîner de financement chez moi pour cet organisme. Ce n’est pas que je sois spécial ou important. C'est simplement ce qui se produit quand on est député depuis longtemps. Cela me permet toutefois d’en connaître assez long sur le fonctionnement de tels organismes.

Disons que l’un de ces deux organismes veut proposer une personne et veut le faire dans les règles de l’art. Il devrait d’abord convoquer une réunion conformément à son code de procédure. Tous les organismes ont leur propre code de procédure, mais cela pourrait être le Robert's Rules of Order. C'est le plus courant. D’autres codes semblables établissent sensiblement les mêmes exigences pour la convocation de réunions du conseil d’administration. Il faut normalement deux semaines de préavis pour la convocation d’une telle réunion. Il se peut que l’organisme n’ait pas été mis au courant de cette procédure avant le lundi. Et comment auraient-ils bien pu l’apprendre? Croyez-vous que la fondation de la fibrose kystique ou toute organisation semblable consacre du temps à lire tous les sites où de tels avis sont publiés? Bien sûr que non. Il se peut donc qu’il ne l’ait pas appris tout de suite.

Admettons qu’une réunion soit organisée. On est le lundi 1er février. Il faut aviser les membres deux semaines d’avance. Deux semaines à partir du 1er février, cela nous mène au 14 février, un dimanche. La date limite est le 15 à midi. Si l’on tient une réunion extraordinaire un dimanche, il est possible de soumettre une mise en nomination le jour de la Famille. Ce n’est pas le jour de la Famille dans toutes les provinces, mais c'est le cas en Ontario, et l’un des postes à combler est en Ontario. Je ne sais pas si c'est le jour de la Famille au Manitoba et au Québec. Je ne connais pas tous leurs congés provinciaux. Je n’ai pas fait cette vérification. J’aurais peut-être dû.

Voilà. Il serait pratiquement impossible de soumettre la nomination d’une personne sur l’avis du conseil de la plupart des organismes. C'est pratiquement impossible pour qui que ce soit. Si toutefois un représentant d’une organisation mettait une personne en nomination prétendument au nom de cette organisation, parce que ça paraît bien, il est possible que la candidature de cette personne soit proposée par le comité. Mais pourquoi ce délai ridiculement serré? Pourquoi un avis aussi peu annoncé?

Normalement, chaque fois que le gouvernement prend une petite mesure qui pourrait constituer un progrès sur le plan de la démocratie ou de la consultation, il publie un communiqué de presse national avec tambours et trompettes pour en faire un nouveau moment marquant dans l’histoire de la démocratie canadienne. Pour la nomination des sénateurs, on se contente d’un communiqué de presse qui n’est pas suivi d’une conférence de presse, qui n’est pas publié sur les sites où l’on s’attendrait à le voir, qui ne fait aucun bruit.

Vous comprenez peut-être maintenant pourquoi je veux savoir combien de nominations ont été faites. J’aimerais connaître aussi le nombre de candidatures, mais surtout le nombre de mises en nomination, parce que je crois que ce doit être un très petit nombre.

Au Québec, où un sénateur doit vraiment représenter une division de la province, une des 24 divisions sénatoriales, ce nombre doit être infime. À quel point, je ne sais pas, mais c'est sûrement infime.

Disons qu’on ait sincèrement voulu concevoir un système manifestement ouvert et inclusif, où le premier ministre n’a manifestement plus le contrôle qu’il avait avec l’ancien système. Par convention, le premier ministre conseille le gouverneur général quant aux nominations qu’il voudrait voir au Sénat et, par convention, le gouverneur général suit toujours les conseils du premier ministre.

(1240)



Bon. Le gouvernement dit maintenant que c'est chose du passé. Nous ferons dorénavant les choses différemment. Vous présentez votre candidature et un comité en décide. Il présente ses conclusions au premier ministre. Le premier ministre choisit, ou non, une personne figurant sur la liste. Nous voulons toutefois qu’il choisisse quelqu'un qui figure sur la liste, pour montrer que le gouvernement agit proprement — mais voilà, il y a très peu de noms sur la liste.

En fait, il n’y aura que quatre ou cinq noms sur la liste, et ces personnes seront celles qui savaient d’avance que le système fonctionnerait ainsi, ceux qui en ont été informés d’avance. Ceux qui le savaient d’avance auraient donc… Bref, ce système est une farce. Certaines personnes ont été avisées. Le processus a été aussi restrictif que possible pour qu’il ne puisse y avoir que très peu de mises en nomination. Ainsi, les personnes que le premier ministre voulait nommer ont l’assurance d’être mises en nomination au cours de la phase 1. Je ne dis pas que la même chose sera vraie pour les phases ultérieures. Je dis que c'est le cas de la phase 1, étant donné ce délai ridiculement court et cette idée nouvelle qu’est l’exigence de mise en nomination.

Toute organisation ayant été mise au courant peut avoir étudié la question d’avance. Les organisations ont-elles été mises au courant? Pour être juste, il faut admettre que les membres du comité consultatif ne le sauront pas, et probablement que la ministre ne le saura pas non plus. Mais on peut raisonnablement penser que ce fut le cas, que quelques organisations ou individus savaient comment les choses se passeraient et qu’ils pouvaient s’arranger pour que les formulaires de candidature et de mise en nomination puissent être présentés en même temps.

Je fais valoir, monsieur le président, qu’on ne peut pas humainement croire qu’un individu et une organisation qui ne se connaîtraient pas et n’auraient pas collaboré à cette fin puissent avoir présenté ces deux formulaires à temps. Pouvez-vous imaginer une situation plausible où cela aurait pu se faire? En tout cas, moi je ne peux pas.

Voilà, ils savent ce qu’ils devront faire. Il se peut que le gouvernement les en ait informés. Nous n’en saurons jamais rien, parce que nous n’avons pas le droit de convoquer les membres du comité, ou parce que la ministre dira que cela ne relève pas de son mandat. Donc, ces gens qui se trouvent sur la courte liste présentée au gouvernement deviennent rapidement sénateurs.

Et si c'est peu plausible en Ontario ou au Manitoba, pensons à quel point il serait incroyable qu’une telle coordination ait été possible au Québec, où le candidat doit être propriétaire d’un terrain dans une division en particulier, l’une de ces anciennes divisions sénatoriales de ce qui était la province du Bas-Canada, bien avant la Confédération. Dans certaines divisions, cela pose déjà un problème concret. Il est difficile de trouver des terrains à vendre, étant donné que ces divisions sont très peu populeuses. Elles l’ont déjà été, mais les terres ont été consolidées avec le temps.

C’est donc tout simplement peu crédible. Voici l’argument à faire valoir. Il se peut très bien que le gouvernement ait travaillé en étroite collaboration — non pas avec le candidat, c'est très bien. Ce n’est peut-être pas bien s’il fait croire qu’il n’y a pas eu de telle collaboration, mais c'est constitutionnellement acceptable. Sur le plan constitutionnel, cependant, il y a un problème si l'on a une organisation, ou une personne au sein de l’organisation — son président ou son chef de la direction, par exemple —, qui propose la nomination et qu’il n’y a pas moyen de savoir si cela s’est fait ainsi…

Évidemment, je ne suis pas certain que le comité consultatif aie le pouvoir d’enquêter plus à fond pour déterminer si cette personne agissait au nom de l’ensemble de l’organisation, s’il y a eu un vote, s’il y a eu une réunion du conseil d’administration. Nous ne le savons pas et ne pouvons pas le savoir. Il se peut aussi que le comité consultatif ne le sache pas et ne puisse pas le savoir, mais j’aimerais pouvoir lui poser la question.

Que le candidat n’ait pas été obligé, en pratique, d’accepter une profonde entrave à son indépendance… Ces candidats ont dû renoncer d’avance à leur indépendance pour que leur nom franchisse les étapes de ce processus. Ce n’est pas nécessairement vrai pour certains qui, d’une manière ou d’une autre, ont découvert l’existence de ce processus et ont réussi à en franchir toutes les étapes à la dernière minute. Ce n’est peut-être pas le cas de tous, mais c'est certain que c'est le cas pour ceux qui ont été présélectionnés par le gouvernement, et il y en a très certainement parmi les personnes mises en nomination.

Mais voilà, nous ne pouvons pas nous informer à ce sujet si M. Chan et ses collègues nous empêchent de faire revenir ces membres du comité consultatif. Si la ministre nous dit qu’elle ne le sait pas — et elle ne le sait probablement pas —, je crois comprendre que les règles d’éthique du Sénat interdiront à cette assemblée de poser ce genre de questions.

(1245)



L'indépendance de certaines personnes pourrait être compromise. La Cour suprême a d'ailleurs été formelle — et M. Jutras a abordé aujourd'hui cet aspect dans son témoignage: les sénateurs doivent être indépendants. Cette obligation ne se trouve pas explicitement dans la Loi constitutionnelle de 1867, mais, comme la Cour l'a dit, elle est implicite dans son architecture même. Les sénateurs doivent être indépendants.

Le processus actuel, de par sa nature, pourrait très bien compromettre leur indépendance. Comme ce processus est secret, nous ne pouvons pas savoir en quoi leur indépendance a été compromise. Il s'agit d'un tort irrémédiable. C'est pour cette raison que je souhaite que la ministre comparaisse devant nous avant que ces nominations soient faites.

Pourquoi ai-je demandé à M. Jutras combien de temps il faudra? Parce que je veux le savoir. Le ministre LeBlanc a déclaré hier que le processus prendra plus de temps que ce que nous croyions. Nous aurons alors peut-être le temps, avant qu'il ne soit trop tard, de demander aux membres du comité s'il y a un problème, parce qu'ils doivent soumettre le nom des candidats choisis. C'est peut-être ce qui explique qu'il leur faut du temps avant de donner les noms. Ils sont pris dans une situation où ils estiment que les candidatures qui leur sont présentées ne conviennent pas.

Je ne sais pas comment ils pourraient exprimer le problème, parce qu'ils sont tenus à la discrétion. Il se pourrait très bien qu'ils aient autre chose en tête. Je ne leur reprocherais pas de ne pas répondre à une question comme celle-là parce que ce serait manquer à leur devoir de discrétion, mais cela signifie que les règles qu'ils doivent respecter ne conviennent pas. C'est certainement le cas dans le cadre d'un premier mandat.

Enfin, M. Jutras a dit qu'il allait envoyer au premier ministre une lettre ou un rapport qui sera du domaine public. On peut comprendre qu'il ait dit ne pas vouloir commencer à faire des observations à titre indépendant et qu'il ait exprimé sa volonté d'en discuter. À mon avis, ce qu'il voulait dire, c'est en discuter d'abord avec ses collègues, les autres commissaires. À mon avis, c'est compréhensible

Il n'est pas déraisonnable qu'ils sachent que nous leur poserions vraisemblablement des questions comme celles-là, et s'ils sont tous présents, ils pourraient nous faire part de certaines choses. De notre côté, il n'est pas déraisonnable de vouloir savoir, au lieu de nous en remettre à nos supérieurs et d'attendre que le très magnanime Justin Trudeau s'en occupe d'abord et qu'il fasse connaître aux paysans que nous sommes ce qu'il nous est permis de savoir. Nous pourrions tous faire des courbettes et le remercier du privilège qu'il nous accorde. Ce n'est pas acceptable.

C'est tout ce que j'avais à dire. Je n'essaie pas de faire de l'obstruction. En fait, j'aimerais que nous puissions nous prononcer aujourd'hui, monsieur le président, notamment parce que nous serons partis pendant une semaine et que je ne veux pas que la mise aux voix de cette motion soit retardée tout ce temps.

(1250)

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

D'accord.

Eh bien, il reste environ cinq minutes avant le moment où je devrai suspendre la séance afin que nous puissions discuter à huis clos du budget. Deux personnes veulent prendre la parole: M. Christopherson et M. Chan. S'ils sont brefs, nous pourrons peut-être nous prononcer sur votre motion.

Monsieur Christopherson, vous êtes le premier.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vous remercie. C'est bien que M. Reid ait fait ce qu'il a fait et qu'il ait exprimé sa volonté de mettre aux voix la motion aujourd'hui même. Je m'apprêtais à faire une longue intervention. Je suis donc content qu'il m'ait fait comprendre que vous préféreriez que la motion soit mise aux voix. C'est bien beau; je suis d'accord.

Il y a quelques éléments dont je veux parler. Premièrement, j'en profite pour rappeler au gouvernement que c'est moi qui me suis retrouvé dans une situation délicate lorsque vous avez proposé que la ministre vienne comparaître lorsque son emploi du temps le permettra. J'ai alors signalé que c'est ce que font les gouvernements lorsqu'ils veulent avoir la marge de manoeuvre nécessaire pour qu'un ministre ne comparaisse pas rapidement. J'ai cru que les députés ministériels étaient sincères; ils avaient tellement l'air sincère lorsqu'ils ont dit qu'ils ne feraient jamais une chose pareille que j'ai appuyé la motion, si vous vous rappelez. J'ai appuyé la motion et j'ai dit que j'allais leur faire confiance. Vous voyez, monsieur le président, où ma confiance m'a mené. Nous en sommes toujours à fixer une date. Je crois que nous nous sommes finalement entendus, mais cette date est bien au-delà de ce qui était espéré et ne cadre plus avec l'intention initiale de la motion. Je tenais à ce que ce soit su.

Deuxièmement, je voulais poser une question à M. Chan en m'adressant à vous, monsieur le président... J'ai l'impression que le témoin invoquait presque l'équivalent canadien du cinquième amendement de la Constitution américaine, qui empêche qu'une personne ait à témoigner contre elle-même. Quel problème M. Chan voit-il à ce qu'on pose une question aux membres du comité sur la compétence des candidats? En quoi cela pose-t-il problème de leur demander leur façon d'évaluer les candidats? Ne s'agit-il pas de compétence? La compétence est la capacité d'accomplir les tâches demandées. Personne ne met en doute les qualifications. Les qualifications de tous les candidats sont exemplaires et impressionnantes, et ils ont tous une série de lettres après leur nom, sur leur carte professionnelle. C'est ô combien impressionnant. Je le concède au gouvernement.

La compétence d'une personne nous renseigne sur ses capacités et sur la manière dont elle conçoit les choses et agit. J'aimerais savoir pourquoi il ne serait pas acceptable que le gouvernement pose une question sur la compétence de quelqu'un et j'aimerais aussi savoir ce que les ministériels pensent, par exemple, de la reddition de comptes dans un contexte parlementaire. Je demanderais à M. Chan de tenir compte du temps écoulé, à moins qu'il ne veuille faire de l'obstruction. Si j'avais eu plus de temps, j'aurais soulevé cette question. Il s'agit donc d'une question rhétorique à laquelle je lui laisse le choix de répondre, mais c'est ce qui me pose problème. Comment se fait-il qu'on ne puisse pas parler de compétence lorsqu'on demande à quelqu'un sa façon de voir les choses ainsi que les traits et les caractéristiques que cette personne recherche chez un candidat? S'il ne s'agit pas de compétence, je me demande bien ce que désigne ce mot.

Voilà ce que j'avais à dire. Je m'arrête ici pour que nous puissions nous prononcer sur la motion.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

D'accord.

M. Chan voulait prendre la parole. M. Graham s'est aussi ajouté.

Monsieur Chan, vous avez la parole. Si les interventions sont brèves, nous pourrons nous prononcer sur la motion, comme le comité semble le souhaiter.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais d'abord revenir sur ce qu'a dit M. Reid avant de parler du point soulevé par M. Christopherson, à propos de la bague.

Je vous signale que ma femme vient d'arriver. Bienvenue, Jean.

La seule fois où j'ai accordé de l'importance à une bague, c'est lors de mes voeux de mariage.

Dans une optique plus générale, je rappellerais tout simplement que, si nous nous retrouvons dans la situation actuelle, monsieur Reid, c'est à cause des agissements de l'ancien gouvernement. Je crois comprendre qu'il y a maintenant 25 sièges vacants au Sénat parce que l'ancien premier ministre a décidé de ne nommer personne pendant plus de deux ans. Nous nous retrouvons alors dans la situation où la Constitution nous oblige à ce que le Sénat soit en état de fonctionner et où il faut nommer un grand nombre de sénateurs, dont un qui sera chargé de représenter le gouvernement au Sénat, puisque les sénateurs ont acquis une plus grande indépendance et que tout le monde s'entend pour qu'ils soient plus indépendants. C'est la situation dans laquelle nous nous trouvons, point à la ligne.

Je signale aussi que, du point de vue constitutionnel — c'est d'ailleurs pourquoi j'ai retiré ma question après l'avoir soulevée, parce qu'il s'agissait d'une question de procédure —, les recommandations que transmettra le conseil consultatif au conseil exécutif et au premier ministre n'engagent en rien le premier ministre. Si c'était le cas, elles limiteraient son pouvoir discrétionnaire.

Nous voulons créer un processus démocratique plus ouvert qui permette aux gens de participer. Malheureusement, dans l'intérim, nous devons remédier au problème de nomination à court terme. Par la suite, nous inviterons les gens les plus compétents des quatre coins du Canada à occuper une fonction dans la sphère publique et à s'acquitter du mandat qui leur sera conféré par la Constitution.

En ce qui concerne votre question, monsieur Christopherson...

(1255)

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Avant que vous changiez de sujet, je me permets de vous interrompre, monsieur Chan. Pour que le Comité puisse parler du budget aujourd'hui, comme il le souhaitait, je devrais interrompre ici les délibérations et passer à une séance à huis clos. Il est aussi possible de poursuivre la discussion pendant les quatre ou cinq minutes qui restent.

M. David Christopherson:

À moins qu'il y ait un problème, ne pourrions-nous pas régler la question en un clin d'oeil en approuvant le budget avec le consentement unanime des membres? Le budget ne devrait pas être controversé.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Un exemplaire du document vous a été remis. Avez-vous des raisons de vous opposer au budget?

M. Arnold Chan:

Je propose la motion. Un député de l'opposition pourrait-il l'appuyer?

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Nous n'avons pas forcément besoin d'une motion si les membres du Comité acceptent le budget tel qu'il leur a été présenté. Tout vous a été transmis.

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards): Je remercie les membres du Comité.

M. Chan a la parole. Il ne reste que quelques minutes; ne l'oublions pas si nous voulons nous prononcer aujourd'hui sur la motion.

M. Arnold Chan:

J'ai de nouveau la parole. Je vous remercie.

Je tiens encore une fois à remercier M. Christopherson d'avoir soulevé ces questions. Je comprends la position que le troisième parti, le Nouveau Parti démocratique, adopte depuis longtemps au sujet du Sénat. Je comprends les questions que vous posez. Mais nous avons très clairement dit, pendant la campagne électorale, qu'il faut absolument respecter les règles constitutionnelles dans leur forme actuelle, et ces règles exigent que le Sénat puisse fonctionner. Si nous ne nommons pas ces sénateurs, le Sénat ne sera pas en mesure d'adopter de son côté les mesures législatives de la Chambre des communes.

Je comprends le point de vue que vous défendez en ce qui concerne notamment les questions de légitimité. Comme je viens de le dire, avec tout le respect que je lui dois, le NPD peut protester tant qu'il veut au sujet du Sénat.

M. David Christopherson:

[Note de la rédaction: inaudible]

M. Arnold Chan:

C'est moi qui ai la parole, monsieur Christopherson. Je vous en prie. J'ai eu la courtoisie de vous laisser parler. J'ai aussi accordé 20 minutes à M. Reid. Je vous ai souvent laissé terminer. Maintenant, c'est moi qui ai la parole, et j'estime avoir le droit de continuer, pour pouvoir exprimer ce que j'ai à dire. Je vous remercie, monsieur Christopherson.

(1300)

M. David Christopherson:

Il n'y a pas de quoi.

M. Arnold Chan:

Pour revenir à ce que je disais, nous avons l'obligation constitutionnelle de faire en sorte que la Chambre haute fonctionne bien pour que les lois canadiennes puissent être adoptées. C'est ce que nous faisons actuellement: nous mettons sur pied un processus qui redonnera confiance aux Canadiens envers la Chambre de second examen objectif, tout en respectant les pratiques constitutionnelles et les conventions associées à la nomination des sénateurs. En procédant de cette façon, nous évitons de nous retrouver dans la situation que M. Reid a mentionnée, c'est-à-dire mettre en oeuvre un processus qui irait à l'encontre de la Constitution.

Avec tout le respect que je vous dois, nous essayons de mettre sur pied ce processus en respectant le Règlement. Je dirais aussi que nous sommes ouverts à ce que des témoins comparaissent, y compris les trois membres fédéraux. Soit dit en passant, l'ancien gouvernement ne l'a jamais permis. Il a rejeté systématiquement toutes les motions citant des témoins à comparaître devant les comités parce qu'il ne voulait pas que ses témoins fassent l'objet d'un examen aussi rigoureux que le nôtre. Tout cela pour dire que nous devons respecter les articles 110 et 111 du Règlement. Voilà la situation.

Comme je l'ai dit tout à l'heure, le comité aura un jour l'occasion de revoir le Règlement. Si vous n'aimez pas les règles telles qu'elles sont actuellement, vous pourrez proposer des modifications en suivant le processus indiqué.

Ne récrivons pas les règles parce qu'elles ne cadrent pas avec un point de vue politique différent.

Par ailleurs, pour répondre à votre question sur la compétence, je crois que, si vous aviez écouté attentivement le témoin, le doyen Jutras, vous auriez compris. Il a dit: « Voyez mon expérience. Voyez les circonstances et les situations dans lesquelles j'ai dû m'occuper de questions de ce genre. »

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Je m'excuse de vous interrompre, monsieur Chan. Il est 13 heures. Certains membres m'ont dit qu'ils devaient aller à d'autres réunions. Il faudrait probablement lever la séance dès maintenant. Il semble que nous ne pourrons pas nous prononcer sur la motion aujourd'hui.

M. Arnold Chan:

Puis-je seulement terminer mes observations et céder ensuite la parole?

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

De combien de temps avez-vous besoin, monsieur Chan?

M. Arnold Chan:

Non, en fait, je suis prêt à céder dès maintenant la parole à M. Graham, mais nous reprendrons la discussion à la prochaine séance.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

J'allais proposer un moyen d'aider le comité. Il semble que nous ne pourrons pas voter sur la motion aujourd'hui, à moins que les membres consentent à ce que nous prolongions un peu la séance. Je sais que certains doivent partir.

Monsieur Graham, voulez-vous avoir la parole, ou pouvons-nous procéder à la mise aux voix?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je serai heureux de commencer à la prochaine séance, si vous voulez.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Il semble que M. Graham n'accepte pas de céder son temps de parole pour que le Comité se prononce sur la motion.

J'ai une autre idée à proposer. Je remarque qu'à la séance du 8 mars, nous recevrons l'autre personne nommée par décret à la première heure de la séance, tandis que la deuxième heure sera consacrée à l'étude du budget supplémentaire des dépenses. Si les membres du Comité le souhaitent, nous pourrions écourter ces deux points, y consacrer peut-être 45 minutes chacun, ce qui nous laisserait un peu de temps à la fin de la séance pour terminer notre discussion sur la motion.

Dans la mesure où la motion prévoit que des témoins comparaissent devant le Comité avant la fin mars, je sais que les délais sont un peu serrés. Comme nous avons très peu de temps en mars pour discuter de cette motion, ce pourrait être une bonne idée.

Conviendrait-il au Comité d'écourter ces deux points en périodes de 45 minutes pour que nous puissions régler cette question lors de la séance du 8 mars?

Il semble que les membres y consentent. C'est donc ce que nous proposerons, et la greffière modifiera l'ordre du jour en conséquence.

Je remercie tous les membres du Comité.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on February 25, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.