header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-02-23 PROC 9

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. I call the meeting to order.

This is meeting number nine of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs in the first session of the 42nd Parliament. This meeting is being held in public.

Following from last week's appearance of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, our business today is a discussion of what, if any, work the committee wishes to undertake regarding the Conflict of Interest Code for Members of the House of Commons.

The commissioner sent in a letter and attachments outlining her priorities, etc., as we requested, which were distributed to the committee members yesterday afternoon. As mentioned at last Thursday's meeting, we are in public now, but we may decide to sit in camera depending on the issues we're discussing.

Go ahead, Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Before we move to that, I wonder if we could get an update on the minister's availability.

We've made two requests now, and we've been put off by the minister. It really seems as though the minister is making every effort to avoid the committee. I hope she's had a change of heart and is going to make an effort to be here and answer for some of the decisions that are being made. Can you give us an update on that?

The Chair:

I'll get the clerk to do that. I forgot to mention that I'd like to save 10 minutes at the end for readjusting the schedule a bit because of various appearances.

Would you like to report on the minister?

The Clerk of the Committee (Ms. Joann Garbig):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The minister's office has confirmed that she and senior officials will appear for one hour on Thursday, March 10.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Did they give a reason for not being present today? As I think you know—and I'm not referring to the clerk here, or the chair, obviously—we felt it was crucial to be able to ask her about the phase 1 Senate appointment process before it's expired, because of our constitutional concerns. It's all over by March 10. What's the pressing need that made it impossible for her to come today?

The Chair:

I wasn't involved, so the clerk can answer that.

I have Mr. Christopherson on the list.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Could you give an explanation as to why she's not available?

The Clerk:

The minister's office had simply informed us that she had been given notice of cabinet meetings which conflicted with the committee's meeting time.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That was Thursday. Are you saying for today as well? Remember that last week I intervened, and we went back and asked if she could come today if she couldn't make it Thursday.

The Clerk:

This was not possible, and my instructions were then to inquire about a date when she would be available to appear.

Mr. Scott Reid:

They indicated she wasn't available today for sure?

The Clerk:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay, that's all I wanted to know.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

I want to underscore that when I agreed to support this motion, I said exactly this was my concern. I saw all the sincere, earnest looks on the part of the government, and “Oh, no, we wouldn't do that.” I can't point to that and say she's deliberately dragging her heels, but I have to tell you that it's not like this wasn't predicted, and that was the problem with leaving the motion open-ended where it said “at the minister's availability”.

Madam Clerk, when did we originally invite the minister? When was that decision made?

The Clerk:

I can check.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Would you check that while I'm talking? I believe it's been at least a few weeks, and by the time the minister gets here, I have to believe that will have been a month. The whole thing was time-sensitive; there were deadlines to this issue. The motion, as I understand it from the official opposition, was to try to get the minister in before some of those critical deadlines, or at least as close to them as possible.

I just want to underscore that I did say, if you check the blues—not that anybody cares—that there's a good chance we're going to be in this situation, but I'll trust them anyway. I hear everything they're saying. However, the reality is that here we are again, and it's not unlike what we experienced with the last government, which is why I was so worried. I just underscore again that this government talks a great game about change, but we sure have to fight to get them to change any one little thing from the way it used to be done back in the dark ages in the last Parliament.

Thank you.

The Chair:

The clerk says it was February 4.

Mr. Chan is next.

Mr. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

I just simply had a question for the clerk.

I believe the last time we scheduled the Chief Electoral Officer to appear was on March 10. Are we still proceeding with that? I think the Chief Electoral Officer wanted two hours. With the minister's appearance and now that we know when she's available, is there an implication with respect to what we'd previously scheduled?

The Chair:

We were going to discuss that at the end of the meeting, but I think....

We've asked the elections officer to find another date so that we can get the minister. We'll talk at the end of the meeting about when we'll have the elections officer, etc., because of these changes. We're just jiggling things around.

I guess the other thing you can think of during the meeting—it gives the staff in the back something to do—is the new item you have in your mail. It's with regard to the estimates. There's a fairly tight timeline for when we're allowed to do that before they're approved by default. Keep that in mind when we discuss the schedule at the end of the meeting.

Is that okay, or do you guys just want to do that now? Since you brought it up, maybe we'll just get that over with.

The clerk will give you a schedule that you can write on. You may have it already. They'll just pass it around so that we can write in what we're doing.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I note that for procedure and House affairs, the Parliamentary Protective Service is our only reference. When do we have to deal with that? What's the deadline to react to that in terms of the estimates?

(1110)

The Chair:

It's related to the last allotment day. I don't think we know what it is yet.

For the estimates, it is as follows: ...no later than three (3) sitting days before the final sitting of the supply period ending March 26 (Monday, March 21, 2016) or three sitting days before the last allotted day in the current period (which has not been allotted yet). We don't know when the last allotted day is.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Then we don't have to deal with it today.

The Chair:

No, we don't have to deal with the estimates today, but if we want to do it, we have to do it soon.

For the Thursday meeting, it on depends how long we take today on conflict of interest; otherwise, the first hour would be in the Valour Building. We're doing a video conference with Daniel Jutras for one hour on the appointment to the independent advisory board.

Mr. Blake Richards:

On that one, Mr. Chair, were there not two or three other appointees? I see we only have one name. Why is that?

The Chair:

He was the only one available that day. The other ones are later in the schedule only because they weren't available now. We had wanted to have them both at once, actually, so we'll have another hour there. We talked about having committee business—Mr. Christopherson's motion—in that hour, or we could put something else in there.

For March 8, we were thinking of moving Elections Canada there, right?

As you see on the schedule, we tentatively have another order in council appointee, and initiatives towards our study, but Elections Canada is available that day. They're not available a lot of other days, so my suggestion is that we actually put Elections Canada in there. Otherwise, I think it's way into April when they could come.

Then we'd move those other two items later on.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Mr. Chairman, how do you view the time sensitivity of Elections Canada?

The Chair:

It's just a briefing on the most recent election. It probably would be good for us to have that knowledge as we look forward to electoral changes and things coming up, but it's not overly—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Well, exactly. I only ask because we're in the beginning of a four-year majority term. We don't want to get too far away from it. We want to deal with it when it's fresh, but given that there are things pushing against it—i.e., bringing in that witness—it seems to me that the priority would be going with that witness and pushing Elections Canada off, even by a month or two, if we have to. We have time on our side on that file.

Believe me, there's a whole lot of work to be done on that issue. Normally what happens is that the Chief Electoral Officer returns with a whole series of very time-consuming recommendations that we need to go through. That briefing is just the beginning of a rather longer process flowing from the last election.

The Chair:

My understanding is that of the reports he does, this is a factual one. Then sometime around June he'll do the one with all of his recommendations.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's where we roll up our sleeves. This is a courtesy visit or a background visit. I would suggest that if there's anything within what we're looking at that is flexible, this is something we could move around without losing anything.

The Chair:

Is there anyone else on that point?

Okay. We'll leave March 8 as you have it on your schedule, with the order in council appointment. Then we'll have the caucus reports on the family-friendly initiative before we forget what our caucuses said. I assume each party will have someone bringing that report from their caucus, or bringing someone from their caucus.

The next day would be Thursday, the 10th. We have the minister for the first hour. Then we could have initiatives toward the.... Did the Elections Canada person want an hour or two hours? Okay, it was two hours.

We have to discuss the witness list. We could do it on the 8th, because the 8th is the deadline for you to submit ideas for witnesses. After the family-friendly caucus reports to our committee, the clerk will have a huge list of witnesses that we have to winnow down. We have to decide how many meetings we want witnesses for and pick the witnesses from that list. If we have time, we can do that March 8. If not, then we can do that in the second hour on March 10.

(1115)

Mr. Blake Richards:

The minister is only indicating one hour of availability on the March 10. Is that what we understood?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay.

It's disappointing, obviously. We asked for two hours, and I don't think that's an unreasonable request, given the magnitude of some of the changes that we're talking about here. I'm sure there will be a lot of questions for her.

Could we not at least have the officials remain for the last hour of that meeting so that we could put any other questions that might be necessary to the officials at least?

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's not unusual.

The last government was adamant, and the Liberals before them, usually, on the one hour. That was the window we got. It wouldn't be unusual, though, for us to have the minister for an hour and then continue with officials for a second hour. I'm pointing out that it wasn't unusual to do that in previous times.

The Chair:

We can ask the minister. From talking to the clerk, I know there certainly wasn't any suggestion of that by the minister, but we'll ask.

If not, we'll leave what we have on the schedule you have in front of you. As for the witness list for initiatives for the family-friendly subject, if we haven't finished that on Tuesday, then we'll winnow down the list. If we have done that on Tuesday, we'll pick a couple of witnesses to see if they can come on that Thursday if we're not having ministerial staff.

Does that sound okay to everyone? Okay.

Now we're on to March 22. March 22 is budget day, which traditionally is in the afternoon. Normally committees often carry on their meetings in the morning.

What's the will of the committee for budget day?

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's highly unlikely that we'll have this room available to us. They tend to take rooms for budget lock-ups, so we'd have to move off site.

The Chair:

That's right.

Does the committee want to meet in another building on budget day or not?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Probably not.

The Chair:

Okay. We will carry on that meeting.

If we were doing that, we would have witnesses for our study that day. We also have to decide when we're going to schedule the estimates. I think we only need an hour for that. Traditionally I don't think we've taken more than an hour. We'd have the clerk—do the Clerk and the Speaker normally come?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can we do the estimates on budget day?

The Chair:

Yes. Whether that's a busy day for the Clerk and the Speaker, I'm not sure, but we can ask them and see, and if not, let's try them the other day that week. That's one hour on the 22nd—whichever hour is more convenient for the Clerk and/or the Speaker to come before us on the estimates—and in the other hour, we'd hear witnesses. If they can't come that day, we'll hear witnesses for the whole day, and on the 24th we will have an hour for the Speaker and/or the Clerk on the estimates, if they're available.

(1120)

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm kind of overhearing a little of the conversation you're having, and I recognize the problem that would be there as well.

Maybe I could make this recommendation. We are hoping to have the second of the appointees for the Senate advisory board on March 8 in the first hour, correct? So that we're not running into this trouble with the deadline for the estimates, could we maybe consider using that second hour of that day for the Clerk and the Speaker, and then the 22nd would become a planning day for the family initiative study.

The Chair:

Okay, yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

For our whole business in the second hour of the 10th, we would have the officials stay back when the minister is not willing to be here, and then the 22nd would become the time when we would discuss caucus reports and plan for witnesses. We could just make that a full meeting of planning for the study, and then begin on the 24th.

The Chair:

Okay, and if the officials aren't available, we can move forward some of that—

Mr. Blake Richards:

They will be, but if they're not, we....

The Chair:

Is that okay with everyone? Does that make sense?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Just while I have the floor, there's one other thing I would suggest.

It's with regard to the meeting this Thursday, as well as the meetings on the 8th and 10th. I see you have the minister being televised, and I believe that when we had the chair of the advisory board here, we had a televised meeting. We should probably extend the same courtesy to the two other appointees, so for this Thursday's meeting, as well as the meeting on the 8th with the two Senate advisory board appointees, we should have televised proceedings for those two appointees as well.

The Chair:

You have to remember, though, that they're both appearing by video conference, and the only place you can video conference and televise is at 1 Wellington, so we would have to move over there.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I think it's important that the same courtesy be extended to them, so if that's what is required, I think we should do it.

The Chair:

Are there any comments on that?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Maybe we could do the conferencing over at the Valour Building.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

But we couldn't televise at the same time.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm not sure about that, but okay, it doesn't matter.

The Chair:

Then we go to 1 Wellington for Thursday's meeting and the March 8 meeting. Then the second hour on March 8 will be the estimates. Then the first hour on the Thursday will be the minister. The second hour might be the officials; if not, we would move up the caucus reports and the planning of the study, and then whenever all that stuff is finished, we'll move on with the study for the rest of that week. That takes us up to March 24.

Are there any other comments on agenda?

Go ahead, David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a technical question. Is it possible to have this thing on an ongoing basis on the committee mobile page? I don't know if it's a technical possibility.

The Clerk:

Yes. There are times when it changes frequently and rapidly, and I do my best to keep it up to date.

The Chair:

That's the agenda we'll go with so far. That's the draft of the ever-changing agenda.

We'll go now to our discussion about whether we do anything related to the changes to the conflict of interest code, partly pursuant to the commissioner's priorities, which she has sent us and you got yesterday, or anything else that people have that is related to that conflict code.

I'll open the floor to anyone who would like to start discussions on this matter.

(1125)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

This is just a quick comment. As a committee, do we need to approve the changes she made to the forms?

The Chair:

Oh, yes. Let's do that. That's a good point.

We'll take a motion from Mr. Reid that we, the committee, approve the two forms.

Is there any discussion?

Mr. David Christopherson:

One of the recommendations that the commissioner made was:

That the requirement for approval of forms and guidelines by the House of Commons upon recommendation of the Procedure and House Affairs Committee set out in section 30 of the Code be removed.

I didn't know whether this is a good time to jump into that one, since we're actually dealing with it. I just raise that point.

The Chair:

We could vote on this, because it's happened in the past, and then we'll deal with that motion and decide for the future.

(Motion agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Mr. Christopherson, do you want to lead the discussion on that one?

Mr. David Christopherson:

There's probably an argument to go back to the beginning and start at the first one, rather than pull this one out of sequence.

The Chair:

Do people want to go...?

This isn't the limit of what we can discuss. These just happen to be her preferences. Maybe we should have a quick discussion as to whether or not we do anything. Are we going to make some recommendations?

Since we approved the forms, I have to report that to the House. Does anyone have a problem with that?

Do you go to House leaders' meetings, Mr. Reid?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I do.

The Chair:

Could you suggest that somehow the Bloc should learn about our reports, so they don't deny them all without at least knowing what they're denying?

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's a good point. I noticed that you got shot down. It was obvious that it was from the Bloc side, but when they did the all-party consultation, they didn't bother.

What happened the second time? Did you just wait until there was no Bloc member in the House?

The Chair:

Our whip talked to them and explained the report, and they agreed to leave the House.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You would be the most frequent victim of this, given the number of reports we generate here. It will eat up all your time.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Call Joe, after all the times that Joe would stand up, get shot down, stand up, get shot down.

Mr. Scott Reid:

There were only four Bloc members then.

Mr. David Christopherson:

To be fair, it wasn't always the Bloc doing the shooting.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I would know nothing about that.

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, you wouldn't. No.

The Chair:

Okay, so we're going to take that report. Maybe we'll have a brief discussion of whether or not we do anything on the conflict of interest code before we get into the nitty-gritty details.

Are there any comments?

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

If we're going to look at this and do something with it, I don't know that it's appropriate to begin with some recommendations and start deciding one way or the other without the committee having some of the background, context, and information that would be required to make those kinds of decisions. We heard from the commissioner, but we might want to hear from some other witnesses and get some more background, information, and opinions on some of these types of changes before we start making decisions about them.

The Chair:

Maybe we should hear from the caucuses, too.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That would probably be advisable, I would think.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I know that the evidence was taken in camera in the last Parliament. It would be helpful to at least have the opportunity to review that evidence. Maybe we could go in camera just to review the evidence—not to make any comment about it, but just to know what was on the table. Then we could come back in public. Alternatively, we could have an opportunity to review the transcript from the clerk's office, but I would like to know what was under consideration by the 41st Parliament.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Without violating the confidentiality of what happened, I can say that it was not really that we took evidence per se. There were no witnesses presenting before us at these in camera meetings. It was internal discussion.

It's largely a matter of going through transcripts. I would recommend that you allot a reasonable amount of time for just reading through the record. Also, like all transcripts, it tends to wander around in a somewhat undirected format.

(1130)

Mr. David Christopherson:

You can blame it on me.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's not on you in particular. All of us were guilty.

I'm sure our clerk has already thought of this, but it might be a good idea to organize the transcripts so that if someone comes to your office to look at them, they would know which ones to go through and could take those to a desk in the corner or something.

The Clerk:

Thank you. I'd just like to point out one thing.

The committee has a routine motion in effect currently that says that members can review an in camera transcript in the clerk's office. However, when we think about going back to a previous session, members who are currently members of the committee but were not members of the committee in the previous session do not have an automatic right to view those transcripts.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid is next, and then Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. Scott Reid:

There must be a technical workaround, if that's the case. We could adopt a motion or something that will let us go forward

Mr. David Christopherson:

We can do anything by unanimous consent. If we agree unanimously that we want to have them, we can do that.

Also, while I have the floor, Mr. Reid is offering very sage advice when he talks about the time commitment. There's a lot there, because the discussion was free-ranging. We were working together, trying to find solutions.

I've never seen it done, but I think we should be open to examining the transcripts at this session, because what's going to happen, Scott, is that we're going to come here, and half of us will not have done it and will have memory of it and will be playing with that, while some are going to go and actually read it because that's their work ethic. Then there are others who will come in and kind of skim over it because this isn't their priority committee. It's going to create a different knowledge base, which is exactly the opposite of what you're trying to achieve.

I'm trying to work with you. I don't know if there's some way to bring them forward, but perhaps we could take 20 minutes at the beginning of the meeting to peruse them, or do it section by section. Your point is well taken, but if we're going to go to the extraordinary length of pulling confidential records from a previous parliament to make them accessible, we ought to make sure it works, that's all.

Those are my thoughts.

The Chair:

I guess another consideration is whether the Bloc will give us unanimous consent to do that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is it unanimous consent of this committee, or is it the House?

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, it's this committee.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I think we're getting an answer to this right now from the experts.

The Chair:

Could you answer that question? Does this committee have the authority to bring forward those confidential statements before all of us, including the ones who were not on the committee before?

The Clerk:

What I could suggest is that if the committee wants to make an agreement that those transcripts be produced for the committee's review in an in camera meeting, then I would do that.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I've read most of these recommendations and I don't have a problem with most of them. However, my issue at the end of the day is that I would like to have a full understanding of why it was bypassed and what the substantive concerns might have been.

I have a few concerns in a couple of these items about the breadth of what the conflict of interest commissioner is asking for. However, above and beyond that, a lot of it seems reasonably sensible to me, so I want to understand the rationale for why these recommendations were not moved forward. I'm not saying there weren't legitimate reasons, but that's what I'm trying to get to the bottom of.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson was suggesting that if we do a study on this, we do that in the first 20 minutes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I guess so.

I put that out as a thought to work with, Chair.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's if we can do it in 20 minutes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Well, I don't recall ever going through it this way. It doesn't mean we shouldn't do it, but I don't have a precedent to apply that I can recall.

The Chair:

The clerk says there's a large volume of material.

Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Just for clarification, how many meetings were spent on this? How much testimony are we talking about?

Mr. Scott Reid:

None of us were at all of them. That's something else. If you were really being a stickler for it, I don't think any one of the three of us was at every single one. Sometimes Mr. Scott was there instead of yourself. I know sometimes I wasn't here.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I was chairing another committee at the time, so I was away often.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes. It's a lot. The other thing is that there is a system to it, but it's not that systematic. We jumped around a fair bit.

I think the first thing that makes sense is to have a meeting. I don't think 20 minutes will do it, but 20 minutes will let us get our heads around the problem.

I don't know for sure that this would happen, but common sense suggests we'll then find ourselves dealing with only a part of the code. Then we'd only be dealing with part of the transcript of material.

That's what I think would make the most sense.

(1135)

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

There are 10 recommendations that were accepted by the committee that are in the report. Do we have a copy of that report? I haven't seen it in our binder.

The Chair:

I think it was approved by the House committee. It's all done.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Oh, it's approved, so that's already been finished.

There were 13 recommendations that were not accepted. My interest would be to understand what the rationale was for the committee not to accept those 13 recommendations.

If there's a part of the transcript that deals with those 13 specifically, would it be possible to pull that part out of the testimony and just look at that? I think most of us are interested in knowing why those recommendations were not accepted so that we can then reflect on the reasons.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Everything has to be put in its time and context, so one of the things you will find is that we were running out of time in the last Parliament. The Parliament was grinding down, and the election was within sight.

There were two reasons that we would sometimes set things aside. One was because it was incredibly complex or not as straightforward as some might like to think. As well, the day-to-day experience of some members changed substantively.

I think what you're mostly focusing on is why they disagreed when it seems at first blush that they make some sense. That will be there, but you will also find that some things weren't dealt with just because they required a longer discussion. They may not even have been controversial, but we were desperate to get a report out. We were really worried that we would have gone the whole damn Parliament and not met our obligation at all.

That's why we said, “Look, we have this unfinished work. It is important. It's not right to just ignore it. Let's at least take a stab at finding the things we can agree on,” what we call the low-hanging fruit.

Anything that was controversial and/or required discussion and looked as though it wasn't going to be agreed to easily would just be set aside. Then we agreed to go back and revisit those, but by the time we had finished all the others, it was all we could do. We just said, “Okay let's call it a day. We've got something to put in. We're all in agreement. It's going to go through the House. It won't be an issue and it will make some important changes. Let's do that.”

We all agreed. We did that. We had the election. Now we're here.

Some of it is not because it's necessarily a bad idea. It may just have taken more time than we had to invest in it to talk it through.

The Chair:

If I could sum up, there seems to be agreement to look at this and study it at some time in the future. For the first bit of the meeting, which would be in camera, the clerk or researcher would get us that large volume of documents so that people could look at them, and we would then carry on the discussion.

Is that generally what I'm hearing?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Chair, the confidentiality aspect is important, because the documents reflect—think about yourself in the future—what you were saying when you expected no one else was going to read it except everyone in the room.

I would suggest that maybe we have enough copies for everyone to work with. Then we can collect the copies again and leave them with the clerk. Then, as we want to refer to them during our meeting, we could pull them out and have them, but nobody would walk out of here with a copy. That would not be acceptable.

The Chair:

While we're all in agreement on it, for when we do that, could I get a motion to do exactly what you just said? We would have the documents available, and it would be mandatory that they be returned. The meeting will be in camera, and it will be mandatory that they be returned to the clerk before we leave the room that day.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes.

The Chair: Is that all right?

Mr. David Christopherson: Also, they should be numbered and identifiable, so we know the one that was handed to Christopherson that he has to hand back.

The Chair:

They'll be numbered. Good. That's fair.

Is there any opposition to that motion? All in favour?

(Motion agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Because things keep coming up, maybe when we get closer to the end of the month that we've already programmed and we see what has come to our table, we can decide more of the timing.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, it's one of those things that is going to be around for a bit, folks.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Richards.

(1140)

Mr. Blake Richards:

I assume the same will apply to the Chief Electoral Officer as well, and that when we get closer to that month, we'll set aside a date with him at that point.

The Chair:

That's a good point. We'll ask about his next availability after the dates we've already programmed. That's good.

The researcher is suggesting that we also do a formal motion to bring to committee all the documentation that was under study in the previous study of the conflict of interest code . That's moved by Mr. Christopherson. Is anyone opposed?

(Motion agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

An hon. member: Do you need a wheelbarrow?

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: That's great. We have, in theory, finished today's business, which means that we could get something else done, if that's okay with people. We could maybe go on to Mr. Christopherson's proposal. We can't really do witnesses, because people have till March 8 to submit their witnesses for the list, which is already pretty large, but we could....

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Could I suggest that we just discuss informally what we're thinking so far and go in camera?

An hon. member: You mean about witness lists.

Mr. Arnold Chan: Just on witness lists. I don't think it's terribly controversial. You understand what I'm getting at. We already kind of said it on the record last time. I'm not talking about voting on it. It's just to signal where we're coming from with regard to the witnesses on the family-friendly initiative. I don't think it's terribly controversial, but I think we should talk about it in camera. We'd just go off the record, that's all.

The Chair:

Is it okay to spend a few minutes on it? Obviously there's going to be a lot of discussion later, but if there's something we can get out of the way now, is that okay?

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I just want to make sure that the reason we're going in camera to talk about witnesses is we're talking about members and their circumstances. We need to have a good rationale for going in camera, other than just wanting to.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

It could affect members' privileges. There are those kinds of issues. Once again, we're not voting on who's coming or not coming. I just want to table what we're thinking.

Mr. David Christopherson:

The issue, based on your campaign record and what we believe in, is that moving from a public meeting to an in camera meeting is something that matters, and I just wanted to be clear. I'm quite prepared to do that. We haven't settled those other things, but that won't come into play here.

I'm in agreement. I just wanted to put the rationale on the record. The reason is that we're talking about members, their personal circumstances, and their privileges and rights. If there's any chance that we might violate those, let's go in camera, given the nature of what we're doing. There's no decision-making or anything, so—

Mr. Arnold Chan:

We'll say that if there is decision-making, we'll come back to a public meeting if it's controversial. Is that okay?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Agreed.

The Chair:

Okay. Is everyone is agreed to go in camera for a few minutes?

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: We'll have to suspend for a minute to get that done technically.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

(1140)

(1205)



[Public proceedings resume]

The Chair:

We've just moved back into a public meeting after being in camera.

Go ahead, Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Are you referring to your notice of motion? We understood there was some discussion about some proposed changes. I don't have a black-lined version of that. Is there a black-lined version of some of the proposed changes to Mr. Christopherson's motion?

The Clerk:

Yes, I have a revision based on what was last before the committee.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

We'll take this offline. I'll speak to David about this. We'll follow up where we were chatting about it before. Thanks.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm always ready to make peace.

The Chair:

I was reading the sexual harassment policy that was approved near the end of the last Parliament, I think, and in it there are references to PROC that must remain in camera, so that should probably be on our list, just because it's the law.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I had proposed a bunch of amendments, and I think that was one of them.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Can you give us more context?

The Chair:

When you joined up as an MP this time, you had to sign a sexual harassment policy. It is a very long policy, but in that policy it says that under certain circumstances, the case comes to PROC, and if it comes to PROC, it has to be in camera.

I'm just reflecting the reality, so that we don't contravene a law.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I had added that, actually, to Mr. Christopherson's list. It was one of the amendments that I had proposed.

The Chair:

Do you want to circulate copies around the room so that people have it?

(1210)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Yes.

The Chair:

But we're not discussing this now, right?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

No.

The Chair:

Okay. Let me check on our long-term list of things that PROC normally deals with.

We have some people here who go to the whips' and House leaders' meetings. Are there any items that any of the parties had thought of bringing forward to this Parliament or that might come before this committee that they could think of off the top of their head?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Mr. Chair, I think I also had a substantive motion with respect to this committee rendering an opinion on Madame Labelle. I'm prepared to defer that motion. I would suggest that we might hold off until we've had the opportunity to examine the other two federal witnesses, and then I might consider amending my motion to dispense with all three in one shot, if that's acceptable to my friends on the other side.

My motion called upon this committee approve the appointment of Madam Labelle as being competent to serve on....

Mr. David Christopherson:

Oh, yes, and Quick Draw McGraw there ended the meeting before you got to the motion that we had gone into overtime to deal with. Yes, I recall that.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

My suggestion was simply that I would defer that motion until we've had the opportunity to examine the other two witnesses. I think that would be fair to everyone. We can discuss it at that time. I'm sure it will be interesting.

The Chair:

Is there anything else?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Anybody who understood that reference is getting old, by the way.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Yes.

The Chair:

Are there other things people want to discuss at this meeting?

I guess you get a sense of my modus operandi as chair. When I do those psychological tests, they show that I am task-oriented. Regardless of what anyone's agenda is, I just like to get things done and have some production from this committee. Otherwise we will be wasting our time. I think we're doing great on that, but that's just so people know where I'm coming from as I make decisions.

I would like to have some great things come out of the committee. I think we have been doing well. We're moving along quickly. We've done a lot of things. I think that's good.

Mr. David Christopherson:

As long as you're not going to psychologically test us, it's all right.

The Chair:

Is there anything else anyone wants to bring forward?

Someone can move that we adjourn, if there's nothing else we can dispense with and get done.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I so move.

The Chair:

It has been moved.

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Je déclare la séance ouverte.

Il s'agit de la neuvième séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre de la première session de la 42e législature. Cette séance se tient en public.

À la suite de la comparution de la commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique, la semaine dernière, nous discutons aujourd'hui du travail que le Comité souhaite entreprendre, le cas échéant, au sujet du Code régissant les conflits d'intérêts des députés.

La commissaire nous a envoyé une lettre accompagnée de documents où elle fait état de ses priorités, comme nous le lui avions demandé. Ces documents ont été remis aux membres du Comité hier après-midi. Comme nous l'avons indiqué au cours de la séance de jeudi, nous tenons aujourd'hui une séance publique, mais nous pourrions décider de déclarer le huis clos, selon la teneur de nos propos.

Vous avez la parole, monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Avant d'aborder ce dossier, je me demande si nous pourrions avoir une mise à jour sur la disponibilité de la ministre.

Nous lui avons envoyé deux demandes, que la ministre a déclinées. Il semble vraiment qu'elle s'évertue à éviter le Comité. J'espère qu'elle a changé d'attitude et qu'elle s'efforcera de comparaître afin de rendre des comptes sur les décisions prises. Pouvez-vous nous dire ce qu'il en est?

Le président:

Je demanderai à la greffière de le faire. J'ai oublié de préciser que j'aimerais réserver 10 minutes à la fin de la séance pour rectifier légèrement le calendrier en raison de diverses comparutions.

Voudriez-vous nous dire ce qu'il se passe du côté de la ministre?

La greffière du comité (Mme Joann Garbig):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le cabinet de la ministre a confirmé qu'elle comparaîtra en compagnie de ses hauts fonctionnaires pendant une heure le jeudi 10 mars.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Le cabinet vous a-t-il donné une raison pour laquelle la ministre ne comparaît pas aujourd'hui? Comme vous le savez, je pense — et je ne fais pas référence ici à la greffière ou au président, de toute évidence — que nous considérions qu'il était crucial de pouvoir l'interroger sur la phase 1 du processus de nomination au Sénat avant que cette phase n'arrive à échéance, parce que nous avions des préoccupations relativement à sa constitutionnalité. Or, ce processus prendra fin le 10 mars. Quel besoin pressant empêche la ministre de témoigner aujourd'hui?

Le président:

Je ne me suis pas occupé de la question; je laisserai donc la greffière vous répondre.

J'ai M. Christopherson sur la liste.

M. Scott Reid:

Pourriez-vous nous expliquer pourquoi elle n'est pas disponible?

La greffière:

Le cabinet de la ministre nous a simplement informés qu'elle avait reçu avis de réunions du Cabinet qui entraient en conflit avec l'heure de la séance du Comité.

M. Scott Reid:

C'était jeudi. Êtes-vous en train de nous dire que c'était le cas pour la séance d'aujourd'hui également? Souvenez-vous que je suis intervenu la semaine dernière, et nous lui avons demandé de comparaître aujourd'hui si elle ne pouvait le faire jeudi.

La greffière:

Ce n'était pas possible, et on m'avait indiqué de demander alors à quelle date elle serait disponible pour témoigner.

M. Scott Reid:

Le cabinet a indiqué qu'elle ne pouvait absolument pas comparaître aujourd'hui?

La greffière:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord, c'est tout ce que je voulais savoir.

Le président:

Vous avez la parole, monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Je veux souligner que lorsque j'ai accepté d'appuyer cette motion, j'ai expressément indiqué que c'était ce que je craignais. J'ai vu que le gouvernement semblait sincère et sérieux, disant: « Oh non, nous ne ferions pas cela. » Je ne peux faire cette remarque et affirmer que la ministre se traîne les pieds, mais je dois vous dire que ce n'est pas comme si on ne l'avait pas prévu. C'est le problème qui se présente quand on laisse la motion ouverte en y indiquant « selon la disponibilité de la ministre ».

Madame la greffière, quand avons-nous convoqué la ministre initialement? Quand cette décision a-t-elle été prise? 

La greffière:

Je peux vérifier.

M. David Christopherson:

Voudriez-vous vérifier pendant que je parle? Je pense que cela fait au moins quelques semaines, et d'ici à ce que la ministre témoigne, cela aura pris un mois. Or, le temps compte, car il y a des délais dans ce dossier. D'après ce que je comprends des propos de l'opposition officielle, la motion visait à entendre la ministre avant que ces délais cruciaux n'arrivent à échéance ou au moins aussi près de ces délais que possible.

Je veux simplement souligner que j'ai bel et bien indiqué, si vous consultez les bleus — pour l'intérêt qu'on leur porte —, que nous risquions fort de nous trouver dans cette situation, mais j'ai quand même fait un acte de foi. J'entends tout ce qu'il se dit. Mais le fait est que nous nous retrouvons de nouveau dans cette situation, et ce comportement ne diffère pas tellement de celui du gouvernement précédent. Voilà pourquoi j'étais si préoccupé. Je veux simplement souligner une fois de plus que le gouvernement parle énormément de changements, mais nous devons certainement faire des pieds et des mains pour le convaincre de changer, ne serait-ce que d'un iota, la façon de faire digne de l'âge des ténèbres du gouvernement précédent.

Merci.

Le président:

La greffière indique que c'était le 4 février.

M. Chan est le prochain à intervenir.

M. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

J'ai simplement une question à poser à la greffière.

Je pense que la dernière fois, nous avons prévu entendre le directeur général des élections le 10 mars. Poursuivons-nous les démarches à cet égard? Il me semble qu'il voulait que nous lui accordions deux heures. Comme la ministre doit comparaître — et nous savons maintenant quand elle est disponible —, cela a-t-il des répercussions sur les comparutions que nous avions déjà prévues?

Le président:

Nous allions en discuter à la fin de la séance, mais je pense...

Nous avons demandé au directeur général des élections de trouver une autre date pour nous permettre d'entendre la ministre. À la fin de la séance, nous discuterons de la date à laquelle il témoignera à cause de ces changements. Nous sommes simplement en train de jongler avec les dates.

Je suppose qu'au cours de la séance, vous pouvez également réfléchir au nouveau point que vous avez dans votre courrier: cela concerne les prévisions budgétaires. Cela tiendra le personnel occupé. Nous disposons d'un délai très serré pour les examiner avant qu'elles ne soient approuvées par défaut. Gardez ce fait à l'esprit quand nous discuterons du calendrier à la fin de la séance.

Cela vous convient-il ou voulez-vous en discuter immédiatement? Puisque vous avez soulevé la question, peut-être la réglerons-nous simplement maintenant.

La greffière vous remettra un calendrier sur lequel vous pouvez écrire. Vous l'avez peut-être déjà en main. On vous le remettra pour que vous puissiez y noter ce que nous faisons.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je remarque que le Service de protection parlementaire est le seul dossier renvoyé au Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Quand devons-nous régler cette question? De combien de temps disposons-nous pour réagir, si on tient compte des prévisions budgétaires?

(1110)

Le président:

C'est en fonction du dernier jour désigné. Je ne pense pas que nous connaissions encore la date.

Pour ce qui est des prévisions budgétaires, le délai est le suivant: ... au plus tard trois jours de séance avant la dernière séance de la période terminant le 26 mars (soit le lundi 21 mars 2016) ou trois jours de séance avant le dernier jour désigné de la période en cours (qui n'a pas encore été désigné). Nous ne connaissons pas encore la date du dernier jour désigné.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Alors nous n'avons pas à nous en occuper aujourd'hui.

Le président:

Non, nous n'avons pas à examiner les prévisions budgétaires aujourd'hui, mais si nous voulons le faire, nous devrons nous en occuper bientôt.

En ce qui concerne la séance de jeudi, tout dépend du temps que nous passons aujourd'hui à traiter des conflits d'intérêts; autrement, la première heure se déroulera dans l'édifice de la Bravoure. Nous tiendrons une vidéoconférence d'une heure avec Daniel Jutras sur la nomination au Comité consultatif indépendant.

M. Blake Richards:

À ce sujet, monsieur le président, ne devions-nous pas entendre deux ou trois autres membres? Je ne vois qu'un seul nom? Pourquoi?

Le président:

C'est le seul membre qui pouvait témoigner ce jour-là. Les autres comparaîtront plus tard seulement parce qu'ils n'étaient pas disponibles maintenant. En fait, nous voulions qu'ils témoignent tous ensemble; nous disposerons donc d'une autre heure. Nous avions proposé de traiter des affaires du Comité — soit la motion de M. Christopherson — au cours de cette heure, ou nous pourrions prévoir autre chose à ce moment.

Le 8 mars, nous pensions entendre le témoin d'Élections Canada, n'est-ce pas?

Comme vous le voyez sur le calendrier, nous devions entendre une autre personne nommée par décret et nous occuper d'initiatives en vue de notre étude, mais le représentant d'Élections Canada est disponible ce jour-là. Comme il y a de nombreuses dates auxquelles il ne peut témoigner, je propose de fixer la comparution d'Élections Canada cette journée-là. Sinon, je pense que ce témoin ne pourra comparaître avant avril.

Nous reporterions alors les deux autres points à une date ultérieure.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, à quel point la date de comparution du témoin d'Élections Canada est-elle importante?

Le président:

Il ne s'agit que d'une séance d'information sur les dernières élections. Ce serait probablement une bonne chose que nous ayons ces renseignements, puisque nous envisageons des modifications au processus électoral et d'autres initiatives futures, mais ce n'est pas trop...

M. David Christopherson:

Eh bien, exactement. Je pose la question simplement parce que nous sommes à l'aube d'un mandat majoritaire de quatre ans. Nous ne voulons pas trop nous éloigner des élections. Nous voulons nous en occuper pendant qu'elles sont encore fraîches dans notre esprit, mais puisque certains facteurs — comme la comparution de ce témoin — nous en empêchent, il me semble que nous devrions accorder la priorité à ce témoin et reporter la comparution du représentant d'Élections Canada, d'un mois ou deux s'il le faut. Le temps est de notre côté dans ce dossier.

Croyez-moi, nous avons beaucoup de pain sur la planche dans ce dossier. Normalement, le directeur général des élections présente toute une série de recommandations que nous devons examiner, et cela prend beaucoup de temps. Cette séance d'information n'est que le début d'un processus assez long qui fait suite aux dernières élections.

Le président:

Je crois comprendre que le rapport qu'il prépare est un exposé des faits. Puis, dans les environs du mois de juin, il rédigera celui comprenant toutes ses recommandations.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est à ce moment-là que nous nous retrousserons les manches. C'est d'une visite de courtoisie ou d'information dont il s'agit. Si nous cherchons un dossier qui nous autorise une certaine souplesse, celui-ci en est un que nous pourrions déplacer sans y perdre quoi que ce soit.

Le président:

Est-ce que quelqu'un souhaite ajouter quelque chose à ce sujet?

D'accord. Nous laisserons la question de la nomination par décret le 8 mars, comme c'est indiqué sur votre calendrier. Nous nous occuperons ensuite des rapports des caucus sur les initiatives visant à favoriser une Chambre des communes propice à la vie de famille avant d'oublier ce que nos caucus ont dit. Je présume que chaque parti enverra quelqu'un présenter son rapport.

La séance suivante aura lieu le jeudi 10 mars. Au cours de la première heure, nous entendrons la ministre. Nous pourrions ensuite examiner les initiatives visant à... Est-ce que le témoin d'Élections Canada veut une ou deux heures? D'accord, c'était deux heures.

Nous devons discuter de la liste des témoins. Nous pourrions le faire le 8, car c'est le dernier jour où vous pouvez proposer des témoins. Après que les caucus auront fait leur rapport sur les initiatives visant à favoriser une Chambre des communes propice à la vie de famille, la greffière nous présentera une longue liste de témoins que nous devrons raccourcir. Nous devrons décider du nombre de séances que nous voulons accorder aux témoins et choisir des témoins dans la liste. Si le temps nous le permet, nous pourrons le faire le 8 mars. Sinon, nous pouvons le faire au cours de la deuxième heure de la séance du 10 mars.

(1115)

M. Blake Richards:

La ministre a indiqué qu'elle n'était disponible qu'une heure le 10 mars. Est-ce bien ce que nous avons compris?

Le président:

Oui.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord.

C'est de toute évidence décevant. Nous lui avions demandé de nous accorder deux heures, ce qui ne me semble pas déraisonnable, compte tenu de l'envergure de certains des changements dont nous parlons ici. Je suis certain que nous aurons beaucoup de questions à lui poser.

Ne pourrait-on pas au moins demander aux fonctionnaires de rester pendant la dernière heure de cette séance pour que nous puissions leur soumettre les autres questions qu'il pourrait être nécessaire de leur poser?

M. David Christopherson:

Ce n'est pas inhabituel.

Le dernier gouvernement, et les libéraux avant lui, tenaient mordicus à ce que la rencontre soit d'une heure. C'est le temps dont nous disposions. Il n'y aurait cependant rien d'inhabituel à ce que nous entendions la ministre pendant une heure, puis que nous continuerions d'interroger les fonctionnaires pendant la deuxième heure. Ce n'était pas une façon de faire inhabituelle dans les législatures précédentes.

Le président:

Nous pouvons le demander à la ministre. Pour avoir parlé à la greffière, je sais que la ministre ne l'a certainement pas proposé, mais nous pourrons le lui demander.

Si ce n'est pas possible, nous laisserons ce qui est prévu dans le calendrier que vous avez devant vous. En ce qui concerne la liste de témoins relatifs aux initiatives visant à favoriser une Chambre des communes propice à la vie de famille, si nous n'avons pas terminé de l'examiner mardi, nous raccourcirons la liste. Si nous terminons mardi, nous choisirons quelques témoins pour voir s'ils peuvent comparaître jeudi si nous n'entendons pas le personnel de la ministre.

Cela convient-il à tout le monde? D'accord.

Nous en sommes maintenant au 22 mars. C'est le jour du dépôt du budget, qui a traditionnellement lieu en après-midi. Normalement, les comités tiennent leurs séances le matin.

Que souhaite faire le Comité le jour du budget?

M. Scott Reid:

Il est fort improbable que nous ayons cette pièce. On tend à utiliser des salles pour la tenue de huis clos budgétaires. Nous devrions donc nous réunir dans un autre édifice.

Le président:

C'est exact.

Le Comité veut-il ou non se réunir dans un autre édifice le jour du budget?

M. David Christopherson:

Probablement pas.

Le président:

D'accord. Nous maintiendrons cette séance.

Si nous agissons ainsi, nous entendrons des témoins dans le cadre de notre étude cette journée-là. Nous devons également décider quand nous allons examiner les prévisions budgétaires. Je pense que nous n'avons besoin que d'une heure pour le faire. Traditionnellement, cela ne nous prend pas plus d'une heure. Nous demanderions à la greffière... est-ce que le greffier et le Président de la Chambre viennent habituellement?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pouvons-nous examiner les prévisions budgétaires le jour du budget?

Le président:

Oui. J'ignore s'il s'agit d'une journée occupée pour le greffier et le Président, mais nous pouvons leur demander. Si ce n'est pas possible, essayons de les faire venir à l'autre séance de cette semaine. C'est une heure le 22, à l'heure à laquelle il convient le mieux au greffier et au Président de nous rencontrer au sujet des prévisions budgétaires, puis nous entendrons des témoins pendant l'autre heure. Si le greffier et le Président ne peuvent venir ce jour-là, nous entendrons des témoins toute la journée, et le 24, nous accueillerons le greffier et le Président, avec lesquels nous discuterons des prévisions budgétaires pendant une heure s'ils sont disponibles.

(1120)

M. Blake Richards:

J'entends un peu les échanges que vous avez, et je vois le problème qui se poserait à cet égard également.

Peut-être pourrais-je formuler une recommandation? Nous espérons rencontrer la deuxième personne nommée au Comité consultatif indépendant pendant une heure le 8 mars, n'est-ce pas? Pour ne pas rencontrer de problème avec le délai relatif aux prévisions budgétaires, nous pourrions envisager d'utiliser la deuxième heure de cette journée pour rencontrer le greffier et le Président. Le 22, nous pourrions planifier l'étude sur les initiatives visant à favoriser une Chambre des communes propice à la vie de famille.

Le président:

D'accord, oui.

M. Blake Richards:

Pendant la deuxième heure le 10, nous demanderons aux fonctionnaires de rester, puisque la ministre n'est pas disposée à être là, et nous discuterions des rapports des caucus et planifierions les comparutions pendant la séance du 22. Nous pourrions réserver toute cette séance à la planification de l'étude, puis commencer le 24.

Le président:

D'accord, et si les fonctionnaires ne sont pas disponibles, nous pourrions avancer une partie de...

M. Blake Richards:

Ils seront disponibles, mais si ce n'est pas le cas, nous...

Le président:

Cela convient-il à tous? Ce calendrier se tient-il?

M. Blake Richards:

Pendant que j'ai la parole, j'aimerais proposer autre chose.

Cela concerne la séance de jeudi prochain, ainsi que celles du 8 et du 10. Je constate que la séance au cours de laquelle la ministre témoignera sera télévisée, et je pense que lorsque la présidente du comité consultatif a comparu, la séance était aussi télévisée. Nous devrions faire preuve de la même courtoisie envers les autres membres du comité; ainsi, la séance de jeudi et celle du 8, au cours desquelles nous recevrons deux membres nommés au comité consultatif sur les nominations au Sénat, devraient également être télévisées.

Le président:

Vous devez toutefois vous rappeler qu'ils témoignent tous deux par vidéoconférence et que le 1, rue Wellington, est le seul endroit où on peut tenir une vidéoconférence télévisée. Il faudrait donc que nous tenions la séance là-bas.

M. Blake Richards:

Je pense qu'il importe que nous leur accordions la même courtoisie. Si c'est nécessaire, alors je pense que nous devrions le faire.

Le président:

Est-ce qu'il y a des commentaires à ce sujet?

M. David Christopherson:

Nous pourrions peut-être faire la vidéoconférence dans l'édifice de la Bravoure.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mais la séance ne pourrait pas être télévisée en même temps.

M. David Christopherson:

Je n'en suis pas certain, mais d'accord. C'est sans importance.

Le président:

Les séances de jeudi et du 8 se tiendront donc au 1, rue Wellington. La deuxième heure de la séance du 8 mars portera sur les prévisions budgétaires. Et la ministre témoignera au cours de la première heure de la séance de jeudi. Nous entendrons peut-être les fonctionnaires au cours de la deuxième heure; si ce n'est pas le cas, nous avancerions les rapports des caucus et la planification de l'étude. Une fois ces tâches accomplies, nous travaillerons à l'étude pour le reste de la semaine. Cela nous mène jusqu'au 24 mars.

Est-ce que quelqu'un souhaite ajouter quelque chose à propos du programme?

Allez-y, David.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une question d'ordre technique. Est-il possible d'afficher ce calendrier en permanence sur la page mobile du Comité? J'ignore si c'est techniquement possible.

La greffière:

Oui. Il arrive qu'il change fréquemment et rapidement, et je ferai de mon mieux pour le tenir à jour.

Le président:

Jusqu'à présent, c'est le programme que nous suivrons. C'est l'ébauche d'un calendrier en évolution perpétuelle.

Nous allons maintenant décider si nous allons faire quelque chose concernant les modifications au code régissant les conflits d'intérêts, en partie en fonction des priorités de la commissaire, qui nous les a communiquées et que vous avez reçues hier, ou de tout ce que les membres ont à proposer au sujet de ce code.

Je laisse la parole à quiconque voudrait lancer la discussion à ce sujet.

(1125)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'ai qu'une brève remarque. Le Comité doit-il approuver les modifications qu'elle a proposées aux formulaires?

Le président:

Oh, oui. Occupons-nous de cela. C'est une bonne remarque.

Nous allons recevoir une motion de M. Reid selon laquelle le Comité approuve les deux formulaires.

Y a-t-il des commentaires?

M. David Christopherson:

La commissaire a notamment recommandé ce qui suit:

Que l’exigence énoncée à l’article 30 du Code concernant l’approbation des formulaires et des lignes directrices par la Chambre des communes, sur recommandation du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, soit supprimée.

J'ignore si c'est le moment propice pour s'attaquer à cette question, puisque c'est ce dont nous nous occupons actuellement. Je fais simplement cette remarque.

Le président:

Nous pourrions tenir un vote à ce sujet, puisque cela s'est produit dans le passé, puis nous mettrons la motion aux voix et nous déciderons ce que nous ferons dans l'avenir.

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Monsieur Christopherson, voulez-vous lancer la discussion à ce sujet?

M. David Christopherson:

Nous pourrions revenir au début et commencer par la première recommandation, au lieu de nous occuper de celle-là sans respecter l'ordre.

Le président:

Les membres du Comité veulent-ils...

Nous ne sommes pas obligés de nous en tenir à ces recommandations. Ce sont simplement ses préférences. Nous devrions peut-être tenir une brève discussion pour décider si nous ferons quelque chose ou non. Allons-nous formuler des recommandations?

Puisque nous avons approuvé les formulaires, je devrai en faire rapport à la Chambre. Y a-t-il des objections?

Assistez-vous aux réunions des leaders à la Chambre, monsieur Reid?

M. Scott Reid:

Oui.

Le président:

Pourriez-vous proposer que les membres du Bloc prennent connaissance de nos rapports, pour qu'ils ne les rejettent pas sans au moins savoir de quoi il en retourne?

M. Scott Reid:

C'est un bon point. J'ai remarqué que vous aviez essuyé un refus. Il est évident que le coup venait des membres du Bloc, mais quand on a réalisé la consultation de tous les partis, ils n'ont pas pris la peine de se manifester.

Que s'est-il passé la deuxième fois? Avez-vous tout simplement attendu qu'il n'y a pas de membre du Bloc à la Chambre?

Le président:

Notre whip leur a parlé et leur a expliqué le rapport, et ils ont accepté de quitter la Chambre.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous seriez la victime la plus fréquente de cette attitude, compte tenu du nombre de rapports que nous préparons. Cela accaparera tout votre temps.

M. David Christopherson:

Appelez Joe, après tout le temps qu'il a passé à présenter des rapports et à les voir rejeter.

M. Scott Reid:

Il n'y avait que quatre membres du Bloc alors.

M. David Christopherson:

Pour être juste, ce n'était pas toujours le Bloc qui opposait son refus.

M. Scott Reid:

Je n'en sais rien.

M. David Christopherson:

Non, en effet.

Le président:

D'accord. Nous allons donc présenter ce rapport. Nous discuterons peut-être brièvement pour déterminer si nous faisons quelque chose ou pas au sujet du code régissant les conflits d'intérêts avant d'entrer dans les menus détails.

Des commentaires?

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Si nous allons examiner la question et faire quelque chose à ce propos, je ne suis pas certain qu'il convienne de commencer à formuler des recommandations et à prendre des décisions sur ce que le Comité fera ou non sans que ce dernier ait les renseignements de base, le contexte et les informations nécessaires pour prendre ce genre de décisions. Nous avons entendu la commissaire, mais nous pourrions vouloir entendre d'autres témoins et obtenir plus de renseignements et d'opinions sur ces types de changements avant de prendre des décisions à ce sujet.

Le président:

Nous devrions peut-être entendre également les caucus.

M. Blake Richards:

Je pense qu'il serait probablement sage de le faire.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je sais que des témoignages ont été recueillis à huis clos au cours de la dernière législature. Il serait utile d'avoir au moins l'occasion de les étudier. Nous pourrions peut-être nous réunir à huis clos expressément à cette fin, pas pour formuler des commentaires, mais simplement pour connaître la teneur des témoignages. Nous pourrions ensuite reprendre la séance publique. Nous pourrions également examiner la transcription du bureau de la greffière, mais j'aimerais savoir ce dont il a été question pendant la 41e législature.

Le président:

Vous avez la parole, monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Sans violer la confidentialité des échanges, je peux dire que nous n'avons pas vraiment reçu des témoignages comme tels. Aucun témoin n'a comparu devant nous lors des séances à huis clos. Nous tenions des discussions internes.

Il nous suffit largement de lire les transcriptions. Je vous recommanderais de nous accorder un délai raisonnable juste pour examiner le compte rendu. En outre, comme c'est le cas pour les transcriptions, les échanges tendent à digresser.

(1130)

M. David Christopherson:

Vous pouvez m'en attribuer le blâme.

M. Scott Reid:

Ce n'est pas de votre faute en particulier. Nous sommes tous coupables.

Je suis convaincu que notre greffière y a déjà pensé, mais ce pourrait être une bonne idée d'organiser les transcriptions pour que ceux qui viennent à son bureau pour les consulter sachent lesquelles parcourir pour les lire à un bureau, dans un coin ou ailleurs.

La greffière:

Merci. J'aimerais simplement faire une remarque.

Le Comité a une motion de régie interne actuellement en vigueur qui stipule que les membres peuvent examiner la transcription d'une séance à huis clos dans le bureau de la greffière. Cependant, si nous envisageons de revenir aux transcriptions de la session précédente, les membres actuels du Comité qui ne faisaient pas partie du Comité au cours de la session précédente n'ont pas automatiquement le droit de les voir.

Le président:

La parole est à M. Reid, puis à M. Christopherson.

M. Scott Reid:

Si c'est le cas, il doit exister un moyen technique pour contourner la situation. Nous pourrions adopter une motion ou quelque chose qui nous permettrait de les consulter.

M. David Christopherson:

Nous pouvons tout faire avec le consentement unanime. Si nous convenons à l'unanimité de consulter ces transcriptions, nous pouvons le faire.

En outre, pendant que j'ai la parole, je ferais remarquer que M. Reid prodigue de très sages conseils quand il parle du temps nécessaire. Les transcriptions sont longues, car il s'agissait de discussions libres. Nous travaillions ensemble pour essayer de trouver des solutions.

Je n'ai jamais vu cela se faire, mais je pense que nous devrions envisager d'examiner les transcriptions ici même, car ce qu'il va se passer, Scott, c'est que nous allons venir ici et la moitié d'entre nous ne les auront pas lues, se fieront à leur mémoire et joueront le jeu, alors que d'autres les consulteront vraiment en raison de leur éthique professionnelle. Certains se contenteront de les survoler parce que ce n'est pas leur priorité au sein du Comité. Ainsi, les connaissances varieront d'un membre à l'autre, ce qui est contraire à vos intentions.

J'essaie de collaborer avec vous. J'ignore s'il existe un moyen de les faire venir ici, mais nous pourrions peut-être prendre 20 minutes au début de la séance pour les examiner ou procéder section par section. Je comprends ce que vous voulez, mais si nous allons faire l'effort extraordinaire d'aller chercher les transcriptions confidentielles d'une législature précédente pour les rendre accessibles, nous devrions nous assurer que cela porte fruit, c'est tout.

Voilà ce que j'en pense.

Le président:

Reste à savoir si le Bloc nous accordera son consentement unanime.

M. Scott Reid:

Avons-nous besoin du consentement unanime du Comité ou de la Chambre?

M. David Christopherson:

C'est de celui du Comité.

M. Scott Reid:

Je pense que nous sommes en train d'obtenir une réponse des experts.

Le président:

Pourriez-vous répondre à cette question? Le Comité est-il autorisé à faire venir ces transcriptions confidentielles ici, devant tout le monde, même ceux qui n'étaient pas membres du Comité auparavant?

La greffière:

Si le Comité souhaite s'entendre pour que ces transcriptions lui soient présentées aux fins d'examen au cours d'une séance à huis clos, alors je pourrais les lui remettre.

Le président:

Vous avez la parole, monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

J'ai lu la plupart des recommandations et aucune ne me pose de problème. Ce qui m'embête, au bout du compte, c'est que j'aimerais comprendre pleinement pourquoi le processus a été contourné et savoir quelles étaient les préoccupations majeures qui ont été soulevées.

En ce qui concerne certaines recommandations, j'ai quelques préoccupations concernant l'ampleur des changements que la commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts propose. Une bonne partie de ces recommandations me semblent toutefois raisonnablement fondées; je veux donc comprendre pourquoi elles n'ont pas été présentées. Je ne dis pas qu'il n'existe pas de raison légitime, mais j'essaie d'aller au fonds des choses.

Le président:

M. Christopherson a proposé que si nous examinons la question, nous le fassions au cours des 20 premières minutes.

M. David Christopherson:

Je suppose que oui.

C'est une façon de procéder que j'ai proposée, monsieur le président.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Encore faut-il que nous puissions le faire en 20 minutes.

M. David Christopherson:

Eh bien, je ne me rappelle pas avoir jamais procédé ainsi. Cela ne signifie pas que nous ne devrions pas le faire, mais je ne me souviens d'aucun précédent que je puisse appliquer.

Le président:

Le greffière indique qu'il y a un gros volume de documents.

Madame Venderbeld.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

J'aimerais avoir un éclaircissement. Combien de séances ont porté sur le sujet? De quelle somme de témoignages parlons-nous?

M. Scott Reid:

Aucun d'entre nous n'a assisté à toutes les séances. C'est autre chose. Si on veut vraiment se montrer pointilleux, je ne pense pas qu'un de nous trois ait assisté à toutes les séances. Parfois, M. Scott vous remplaçait. Je sais que j'ai été absent quelques fois.

M. David Christopherson:

Je présidais un autre comité à l'époque; j'étais donc souvent absent.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, souvent. Je ferais également remarquer qu'il existe un système à cet égard, mais qu'il ne s'applique pas systématiquement. Il y avait beaucoup de va-et-vient.

Je pense que la première chose sensée à faire, c'est de tenir une réunion. Je doute que nous ayons assez de 20 minutes, mais ce temps nous permettra d'appréhender le problème.

Je ne suis pas certain que c'est ce qui va se passer, mais le bon sens veut que nous nous retrouvions ensuite avec seulement une partie du code. Nous n'aurions plus alors qu'à examiner une partie des transcriptions.

C'est ce qui me semble le plus logique à faire.

(1135)

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Le Comité a adopté 10 recommandations dans le rapport. Avons-nous un exemplaire de ce rapport? Je ne l'ai pas vu dans notre cahier d'information.

Le président:

Je pense qu'il a été approuvé par le comité de la Chambre. L'affaire est close.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Oh, il est approuvé. C'est donc déjà fini.

Treize recommandations n'ont pas été acceptées. J'aimerais comprendre pourquoi le Comité ne les a pas acceptées.

Si une partie des témoignages porte sur ces 13 recommandations, serait-il possible de les extraire des transcriptions pour que nous puissions y jeter un coup d'oeil? Je pense que la plupart d'entre nous aimeraient connaître les raisons de leur rejet pour pouvoir ensuite y réfléchir.

M. David Christopherson:

Tout doit être considéré en fonction de l'époque et du contexte; vous constaterez donc que le temps nous manquait au cours de la dernière législature. Cette dernière arrivait à son terme, et les élections étaient imminentes.

Il nous est parfois arrivé de rejeter certaines choses pour deux raisons. C'était d'abord parce qu'il s'agissait de points extrêmement complexes ou pas aussi simples qu'on aurait pu le croire, et, ensuite, parce que le vécu quotidien de certains membres avait changé considérablement.

Je pense que ce qui vous tracasse le plus, c'est la raison pour laquelle les membres ont rejeté des recommandations même si, de prime abord, elles semblent sensées. Ces raisons figureront dans les transcriptions, mais vous vous apercevrez également que certaines ont été mises de côté parce qu'elles exigeaient de longues discussions. Elles ne soulevaient peut-être pas la controverse, mais nous voulions à tout prix déposer un rapport. Nous craignions réellement d'avoir travaillé tout le long de la législature sans réussir à honorer notre obligation.

Voilà pourquoi nous avons dit: « Regardez, notre travail est inachevé. Or, il s'agit d'un dossier important, et il ne convient pas de le laisser en plan. Tentons au moins de régler les points sur lesquels nous nous entendons. », c'est-à-dire ceux qui sont faciles à régler.

Nous avons donc mis de côté tout ce qui portait à controverse, exigeait une discussion ou donnait l'impression qu'il s'agissait de points au sujet desquels il serait difficile de s'entendre. Nous avons convenu d'y revenir, mais nous n'avons pas pu le faire après avoir examiné toutes les autres recommandations. Nous avons alors décidé d'arrêter là notre examen. Nous avions des points à inclure dans notre rapport. Nous étions tous d'accord. Nous avons donc présenté le rapport à la Chambre. Cela ne poserait pas de problème et cela permettrait d'apporter des changements importants.

Nous étions unanimes, et c'est ce que nous avons fait. Les élections ont eu lieu, et nous sommes maintenant ici.

Certaines recommandations n'étaient pas nécessairement de mauvaises idées. Simplement, leur examen aurait exigé plus de temps que nous n'en avions pour en débattre.

Le président:

Si je peux résumer la situation, il semble que les membres s'entendent pour se pencher sur la question et l'étudier dans l'avenir. Pendant la première partie de la séance, qui se déroulerait à huis clos, la greffière ou l'attaché de recherche nous remettraient cet important volume de documents pour que nous puissions l'examiner, après quoi la discussion reprendrait.

Est-ce, de façon générale, ce que nous comptons faire?

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, la confidentialité est importante, car ces documents rendent compte de ce qu'on a dit alors qu'on pensait que personne ne les lirait, hormis les personnes présentes. Pensez à vous dans l'avenir.

Je propose de tirer suffisamment de copies pour que tout le monde puisse travailler. Nous pourrions ensuite les ramasser et les laisser à la greffière. Si nous voulons les consulter pendant notre séance, nous pourrions les ressortir et les examiner, mais personne ne pourrait partir d'ici en les emportant. Ce ne serait pas acceptable.

Le président:

Pendant que nous sommes tous d'accord sur la manière de procéder quand nous examinerons les transcriptions, pourrais-je recevoir une motion pour faire exactement ce que vous avez dit? Les documents seraient à notre disposition et devraient obligatoirement être remis. La séance se tiendra à huis clos, et il sera obligatoire de remettre les documents à la greffière avant de quitter la pièce ce jour-là.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui.

Le président: Cela vous convient-il?

M. David Christopherson: Les transcriptions devraient aussi être numérotées et identifiables pour que nous sachions quelle copie a été remise à M. Christopherson pour qu'il la redonne.

Le président:

Elles seront numérotées. Bien. C'est équitable.

Qui s'oppose à la motion? Qui l'approuve?

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Comme les dossiers continuent d'arriver, nous pourrions déterminer le reste du calendrier quand nous approcherons de la fin du mois, dont l'horaire est déjà établi. Nous verrons alors de quels dossiers nous devons nous occuper et établirons le reste du calendrier.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, c'est une de ces questions qui nous occuperont longtemps.

Le président:

Vous avez la parole, monsieur Richards.

(1140)

M. Blake Richards:

Je présume qu'il en ira de même pour le directeur général des élections. Quand le mois approchera, nous conviendrons avec lui de la date de sa comparution.

Le président:

C'est un bon point. Nous lui demanderons quand il sera disponible après les dates où nous avons déjà prévu quelque chose. C'est bon.

L'agent de recherche propose que nous adoptions également une motion officielle pour remettre au Comité tous les documents examinés au cours de l'étude précédente sur le code régissant les conflits d'intérêts. M. Christopherson propose la motion. Est-ce que quelqu'un s'y oppose?

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Une voix: Avez-vous besoin d'une brouette?

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président: C'est excellent. Nous avons, en théorie, terminé les affaires qui nous occupaient aujourd'hui. Cela signifie que nous pourrions faire autre chose, si cela vous convient. Nous pourrions examiner la proposition de M. Christopherson. Nous ne pouvons pas vraiment choisir les témoins, car les membres ont encore jusqu'au 8 mars pour en proposer. La liste est déjà assez longue, mais nous pourrions...

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Pourrais-je proposer que nous discutions de façon non officielle des idées que nous avons eues jusqu'à présent et de déclarer le huis clos?

Une voix: Vous voulez parler des listes de témoins.

M. Arnold Chan: Juste des listes de témoins. Je ne pense pas que cela porte énormément à controverse. Vous comprenez où je veux en venir. Nous l'avons en quelque sorte indiqué aux fins du compte rendu la dernière fois. Je ne propose pas de procéder à un vote; il s'agit simplement de donner son avis sur les témoins qui devraient comparaître au sujet des initiatives visant à favoriser une Chambre des communes propice à la vie de famille. Cela ne me semble pas très litigieux, mais je pense que nous devrions examiner la question à huis clos. Nous ne serions plus en séance publique, voilà tout.

Le président:

Vous conviendrait-il de prendre quelques instants pour en discuter? De toute évidence, il y aura beaucoup de discussions plus tard, mais si nous pouvons régler des questions maintenant, accepteriez-vous d'en discuter?

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Je veux simplement m'assurer que si nous nous réunissons à huis clos pour parler des témoins, il sera question des membres et de leur situation. Nous devons avoir un motif valable pour déclarer le huis clos. Il ne suffit pas de vouloir le faire.

M. Arnold Chan:

Les discussions pourraient porter sur les privilèges des membres. C'est le genre de questions que nous pourrions aborder. Je le répète, nous ne votons pas pour déterminer qui témoigne ou ne témoigne pas. Je veux simplement que vous nous fassiez part du fruit de vos réflexions.

M. David Christopherson:

D'après ce que vous avez affirmé pendant votre campagne et selon nos croyances, le fait de déclarer le huis clos pendant une séance publique est quelque chose d'important. Je tiens à être clair: je suis tout à fait disposé à le faire. Il y a d'autres points que nous n'avons pas réglés, mais cela n'entrera pas en ligne de compte ici.

Je suis d'accord, mais je voulais que la raison figure au compte rendu. Cette raison, c'est que nous parlons des membres, de leur situation personnelle, de leurs privilèges et de leurs droits. Si nous risquons de violer ces derniers, déclarons le huis clos en raison de la nature de nos discussions. Il ne s'agit pas de prendre des décisions ou de quoi que ce soit d'autre, alors...

M. Arnold Chan:

Disons que si nous prenons des décisions, nous reprendrons la séance en public en cas de controverse. Cela vous va-t-il?

M. David Christopherson:

Oui.

Le président:

D'accord. Est-ce que tous les membres conviennent de se réunir à huis clos pour quelques minutes?

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président: Nous suspendons la séance un instant pour régler une question d'ordre technique.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

(1140)

(1205)



[La séance publique reprend.]

Le président:

Nous reprenons la séance publique après nous être réunis à huis clos.

Vous avez la parole, monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Allez-vous faire référence à votre avis de motion? Il me semble qu'il avait été question d'y apporter des modifications. Je n'ai pas de version où figurent ces modifications. Y a-t-il une version indiquant les modifications proposées à la motion de M. Christopherson?

La greffière:

Oui, j'ai une version révisée en fonction des dernières modifications proposées au Comité.

M. Arnold Chan:

Nous en discuterons dans un autre contexte. J'en parlerai à David. Nous reprendrons la discussion là où elle en était rendue avant. Merci.

M. David Christopherson:

Je suis toujours disposé à faire la paix.

Le président:

Je lisais la politique sur le harcèlement sexuel qui a été approuvée vers la fin de la dernière législature, je pense, et il y est question de dossiers renvoyés à PROC qui doivent être traités à huis clos. Cela devrait donc figurer sur votre liste, juste parce que c'est la loi.

M. Arnold Chan:

J'ai proposé plusieurs modifications, et je pense que cela en était une.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. Scott Reid:

Pourriez-vous nous donner plus de contexte?

Le président:

Quand vous vous êtes joint à nous à titre de député cette fois-ci, vous avez dû signer une politique sur le harcèlement sexuel. Cette politique, très longue, stipule qu'en certaines circonstances, l'affaire est soumise à PROC, auquel cas la séance doit se dérouler à huis clos.

Je ne fais que vous mettre en face à la réalité pour que nous ne contrevenions pas à la loi.

M. Arnold Chan:

J'avais ajouté ce point à la liste de M. Christopherson, en fait. Cela fait partie des modifications que j'ai proposées.

Le président:

Voulez-vous distribuer des copies pour que tout le monde en ait une?

(1210)

M. Arnold Chan:

Oui.

Le président:

Mais nous n'en discutons pas maintenant, n'est-ce pas?

M. Arnold Chan:

Non.

Le président:

D'accord. Permettez-moi de vérifier sur notre liste à long terme de choses dont PROC s'occupe normalement.

Certains membres assistent aux réunions des whips et des leaders à la Chambre. Pourraient-ils nous dire, à brûle-pourpoint, s'il existe des questions que des partis ont envisagé de présenter au Parlement ou qui pourraient être renvoyées au Comité?

M. Arnold Chan:

Monsieur le président, je pense que j'avais aussi une motion de fond sur l'opinion que le Comité doit rendre sur Mme Labelle. Je suis disposé à la remettre à plus tard. Je propose que nous laissions ce dossier en suspens d'ici à ce que nous ayons l'occasion d'entendre les deux autres témoins fédéraux; je pourrais ensuite modifier ma motion pour régler la question des trois témoins d'un seul coup, si cela convient à mes amis de l'autre côté.

Ma motion demandait que le Comité approuve la nomination de Mme Labelle, puisqu'elle possède les compétences pour agir à titre de...

M. David Christopherson:

Oh oui, et Grand Galop a mis fin à la séance avant que vous puissiez présenter la motion pour laquelle nous avions des heures supplémentaires. Oui, je m'en souviens.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je propose simplement de différer ma motion jusqu'à ce que nous ayons l'occasion d'entendre les deux autres témoins. Je pense que cela serait équitable pour tout le monde. Nous pouvons en discuter une fois que nous serons rendus là. Ce sera certainement intéressant.

Le président:

Y a-t-il autre chose?

M. David Christopherson:

Soit dit en passant, quiconque a saisi cette allusion commence à se faire vieux.

M. Arnold Chan:

Oui.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres points dont les membres souhaiteraient discuter au cours de la présente séance?

Je suppose que vous commencez à comprendre la manière dont j'assume la présidence. Quand je fais ces tests psychologiques, cela montre que je suis axé sur les tâches. Peu importe les intentions de chacun, j'aime que les choses se fassent et que le Comité soit productif. Sinon, nous perdrons notre temps. Je pense que nous accomplissons un excellent travail, mais je tiens à ce que les membres sachent où je m'en vais quand je prends des décisions.

J'aimerais que le Comité accomplisse de grandes choses. Je pense que nous avons bien travaillé. Nous progressons rapidement. Nous avons fait beaucoup de choses. Voilà qui est bien.

M. David Christopherson:

Tant que vous ne nous soumettez pas à des tests psychologiques, ça va.

Le président:

Est-ce que quelqu'un souhaite ajouter quelque chose?

Un membre peut proposer de lever la séance. Nous pouvons partir s'il n'y a plus rien à ajouter.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je le propose.

Le président:

M. Chan propose de lever la séance.

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président: La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on February 23, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.