header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-05-04 PROC 56

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. Welcome to the 56th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

As members know, yesterday the House voted unanimously to refer the question of privilege regarding free movement of members of Parliament within the parliamentary precinct to this committee. I think you all have a copy of that in front of you. The order of reference specifies “that the Committee make this matter a priority over all other business including its review of the Standing Orders and Procedure of the House and its committees, provided that the Committee report back no later than June 19, 2017.”

This meeting is, at the moment, in public.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Thank you. This is a point of order of which I have given you previous notice, Mr. Chair.

This deals with the point of order that I had raised just as the last committee was being gavelled shut. I have several things to say.

First of all, since the cameras were still rolling, and the microphones, too, people will be aware that I used some terms that are not parliamentary. I'm not sure whether one withdraws non-parliamentary language after a meeting that took place outside of a parliamentary reading in the formal sense, so I guess I'm not in a position to withdraw it. But I am in a position to say the following. This is what I'd intended to raise in the point of order at that time. I believed, at that point, that had we sought it we might have been able to come to a unanimous consensus in which Mr. Simms might have been willing to withdraw his motion. I, of course, as a part of that, would have been happy to withdraw my amendment to his motion. I think if we try going around the table today, we might get success in that.

While I have the floor, Mr. Chair, I will just state publicly something you're already aware of, which is that I've given a letter to the clerk and to you outlining what I believe were four points in which you, in your capacity as chair, over the course of that epic meeting, were in violation of either the practices of the House, as enumerated in O'Brien and Bosc, or else of the Standing Orders. Those are enumerated, and I would like to raise that at a future appropriate time, after we deal with the matter of privilege before us and perhaps other matters that are of importance to the committee, and at a time that is deemed suitable by the members of the committee.

I do, however, want to say—and I take a fair chunk of the letter I've given to you to point this out—that while those specific problems are important to me as issues of privilege, I do not mean to denigrate your overall chairmanship of this extraordinary and indeed unique meeting. I thought that your chairmanship on the whole was absolutely outstanding. I already had a high regard for you as a parliamentarian, and indeed in leaving the 55th meeting, my regard is higher than it was before, based upon the overall way in which you handled things over that long period of time. But I do think it's important to deal with these matters, because I think it's important that we are clear as to which practices are acceptable and which are not.

That was really all I had to say, Mr. Chair. I thank you for the fact that you allowed me the time.

The Chair:

I appreciate that, Mr. Reid. Thank you very much.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you, Chair.

I'll begin, if I may, just by saying that I concur with the remarks of Mr. Reid in terms of your chairing of this. I would extend that, actually, to the whole group dynamic. The fact that in the midst of that major pitched battle—it doesn't get much more pitched than that—we were still able to find an amicable way to create what we called the Simms....

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

The Simms model.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes—the Simms model, where we found a way to allow colleagues to have a say and interact in a way that's not the usual way we do it, but it was felt that it was the healthiest way for us to deal with the situation we were in.

I want to extend your remarks, if I may Mr. Reid, not only to our chair but also to colleagues. That's about as good as it gets when you're in that bad a shape. To that degree, hopefully, lessons were learned and good things will carry forward.

Chair, the reason I asked you for the floor was that the government has indicated it is withdrawing, and Mr. Simms has indicated through a tweet, conversations, and public comments that it is his intent to withdraw his motion. Mr. Reid has said that if there's a withdrawal of Mr. Simms' motion the amendment would obviously be withdrawn too. Therefore, what I want to do is clean it up. If we just move forward now, technically, that motion is still on the books and could be recalled by Mr. Simms at any time he wishes, and it would be in order. That creates a problem because it can only leave us, on the opposition benches, with the impression that the government reserves the right to bring back this heavy hammer.

In order to allow us to have a clean airing and a fresh start and get on to some real work, I wouldn't say it's necessary but certainly critically important that we go through that formal process of getting the motion and the amendment off the books. Make it go away, let us get on with our work, and that matter will move to the House where the battle will continue, but in another arena under a different set of rules, and we can get back to work.

I ask, through you, Mr. Chair, if Mr. Simms would be prepared to seek unanimous consent to withdraw his motion, and by extension the same process for Mr. Reid, to clear the matter so that both the government and the opposition are starting from the same perspective and attitude going forward, without any lingering doubts as to whether or not anything else nefarious is at play.

(1110)

The Chair:

Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

It is May 4, and I am wearing a tie decorated with the face of Darth Vader, representing the Empire.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Simms: I say that jokingly, but I know it's a serious topic, and I apologize to my colleagues. Please don't take it as such.

First, I would like to say thank you for fixing my name to something that, in the future, I hope we use as an adult debate, as it were. Hopefully, during the pitched, fevered battle, among all that, I'd like to play my role not as the hard hammer but more the velvet hammer.

Before I do what I'm about to do, normally people would say, “I regret doing this”, but I don't have a lot of regret for several reasons. I like the content of the motion. I do. I like the content of the discussion paper. But further to that, I really enjoyed the content of something I would call a filibuster with a small “f”, because we managed to put forward a lot of ideas. We managed to put forward a lot of great discussion, some of it bordering on the best theatre I have ever seen in this place, and I mean that in a nice way—theatre as in good content. By way of example, two weeks ago, I purchased a copy of the Magna Carta.

The Chair:

You didn't have to. It's in the minutes.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's actually a valid point. I just wasted $20. No, I didn't waste it because—

Mr. David Christopherson:

You have 800 more years to go.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Anyway, I was inspired to buy it, and when I bought the thing I realized this was actually a useful exercise, and that's why I called it a filibuster with a lowercased “f”. I actually enjoyed a lot of the content, and not just from the opposition but from our side as well. I want to thank my colleagues on all sides of this.

That being said, I brought up a point of order for a very good reason. That is, I am seeking the unanimous consent of all my colleagues, with a great deal of respect, to withdraw the motion that I tabled on.... I can't remember the date.

(Motion withdrawn)

The Chair:

Mr. Reid, do we need unanimous consent to remove your amendment?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I don't know.

The Chair:

Let's just do it.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes.

The Chair:

Do we have unanimous consent to remove the amendment?

Mr. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

With the motion removed, there would be no amendment to the main motion.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

You can't amend thin air.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You could probably talk about it for several days, though.

The Chair:

Okay. Thank you, everyone.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Given that we've now dispensed of the matter, I think technically Mr. Graham noted that this would normally be March 25—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

March 23.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Yes, so we would need to see the clock now, finally, at May 4.

We have some substantive business, particularly the matter that has been referred from the House. Can I seek my colleagues' consent to perhaps have a bit of a discussion on how we move forward, given that we now have an empty table? All the dates that we had previously filled in on the calendar, obviously, have now passed us and we need to have some consideration of how we move forward.

Sorry, Mr. Graham. I'll cede the floor to you.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm just going to ask one quick question of my colleagues. Given the motion we passed at the beginning of PROC, do you want to proceed with this part of the discussions in camera or in public? I leave it to your discretion.

Mr. Scott Reid:

We're essentially moving to dealing with agenda, so that is a good question.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Given the nature, though, of the matter we're dealing with, which is our access, and everybody knows what it is, could I suggest maybe that, rather than just immediately diving in camera, we can at least start talking about the structure? I think we did that the last time. In fact, I believe the whole thing was public the last time.

I stand to be corrected, Chair, but my understanding is that we did the whole thing publicly, and then it was only when we were doing our report or our deliberations that we went in camera. At the very least I would suggest that we talk about the structure of how we're going to approach this. I would suggest that, unless we run into something that suggests that we need to go in camera—and this is the point at which we would normally find it—there is no reason to immediately go in camera. Given that—to again repeat myself—we did the whole process last time publicly. There's no reason we shouldn't at least start publicly, and if somebody wants to make a case along the way that we should go in camera, make your case.

For now there's no real reason to go in camera, so let's get at it.

(1115)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I agree. I'm fine with staying in public.

The Chair:

Is everyone fine with that?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think we're all on the same page. That's fine with me.

The Chair:

Okay. Good.

Just while everyone is so flexible and happy, could I go a little bit off the schedule, just for a second?

If we want to make a comment on the estimates, we have to do it before May 31. We should agree on what day we might try to get those witnesses, because we need the Clerk of the House, protective services, and electoral officer people.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I have a procedural question, Chair, to you and the clerk. I don't know the answer to this.

Given that it's an order of the House, and the House has actually directed that we deal with this, are we allowed to move off it to deal with anything else, given that the House is supreme to us? Even though technically we're the masters of our own destiny, the House is the boss. Could I get clarification on that, please?

The Chair:

That's a good question.

The clerk thinks that because this is a precedent, and because there is this extreme deadline on the estimates, that if we agreed unanimously it probably wouldn't be a problem.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's interesting, so by unanimous consent we can thwart the will of the House. That's good to know.

The Chair:

The House has also given this other deadline for estimates.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, so technically we'd go back to the House to ask which one is the priority.

I don't want to get lost in the weeds on this, but it's an interesting question when we're dealing with dictating our agenda.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We already set a precedent a second ago when we unanimously withdrew another motion. That was by unanimous consent outside of the scope of what we're supposed to be doing.

Mr. Scott Reid:

My understanding is that, whenever you do something by unanimous consent, part of what happens is that you are not setting a precedent, so that gets you around that difficulty. I think that in a sense that's a fiction; you actually are setting a precedent to some degree.

I think what would happen is that, if we were to do something that was actually egregious in the eyes of the House, someone could raise it in the House and say, “This represents a separate violation of privilege”, if there was some kind of ongoing problem with privilege that was being held up. Since this was actually Mr. Nater's point of privilege, and the rights therefore.... I realize that he was not the one who was delayed, but it's his point of privilege so he probably could speak to that. What I'm getting at here is that there is an avenue to deal with that, and my suspicion is that we won't have a problem in the House with someone raising that which we can get confirmation on.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I don't think it's going to be a problem. It's just interesting for those who care about these things. But I agree. I think by unanimous consent we can do just about anything. If we're all in agreement, who up there should have a problem? Things would have to be pretty wacky.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

My only point, too, is that it's theoretical. It depends on how long we think we need. We should have a conversation on how long we think it's going to take to dispense with Mr. Nater's privilege motion. My suggestion is that we might want to submit witness lists by, let's say, this Friday.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Is that tomorrow?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

It's tomorrow. This is not the first time. This has happened before, so we already have a sense of it. Even in the previous Parliament, there were two specific instances of similar incidents, and we knew what the witnesses.... We called the Speaker. We called the head of the PPS.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It's only 24 hours. That's pretty tight.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I don't think it precludes us from adding additional witnesses after that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If the witness testimony takes us to more witnesses, I don't think anyone's going to have a problem with calling more witnesses. What's the grounding? Let's get the first few meetings planned here.

(1120)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

We just have to figure out what to do for next Tuesday.

Mr. David Christopherson:

If we all agree on it, we can schedule that.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I think we need to know that we're definitely going to have to call somebody for maybe next Tuesday to get this thing going. Maybe we can have consent on who those obvious people are.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Maybe at the top of the meeting we can then deal with anything else we have thought about between now and then. I think that's just a practical way to move this forward because we haven't had a subcommittee meeting in a while.

The Chair:

Just as a point of information, I forgot to mention the researchers did a report when this came up previously, and the report's on that. It's at translation now, but you'll have it by Tuesday, so we'll know a lot of the background and we won't be starting from scratch.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

The question of privilege is uniquely in my name, even though it was not I who had my privileges initially offended, but I do have that unique opportunity to have that in my name.

I would suggest, going back to the original question of the estimates, that the motion from the House does indicate we make it a priority, but that's not to say that we can't, at the same time, review other issues as well, as long as this continues to be the priority of the committee. I think we would be consistent with the direction from the House to set aside a meeting to review the estimates prior to May 31. I think that would be consistent with maintaining this as a priority of the committee, nonetheless having the opportunity to review the estimates prior to the deemed May 31 deadline as well. That would be my suggestion, if that's the will of the committee. As the mover of the privilege motion, I'd be in favour of that.

The Chair:

Would it be okay if we approached the potential witnesses to see if they could come for either of our last two meetings in May?

Mr. Scott Reid:

For the last two meetings...?

The Chair:

You have the schedule in front of you. I think it's the 18th and the 30th.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, if I could, I suspect the two witnesses we're talking about are our colleagues, Ms. Raitt and Mr. Bernier. The obvious problem with that—

The Chair:

Sorry, I was talking about witnesses for estimates.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Oh, I'm sorry.

The Chair:

There are three witnesses. There would be protective services, who would be with the Clerk. They would cover two estimates. One is the House; one is protective services. Then there's the Chief Electoral Officer estimates for Elections Canada. These are busy people, so I was proposing that the clerk see if they were available on either the 18th or the 30th.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It seems reasonable to me.

Mr. David Christopherson:

How long are we looking at having them for?

The Chair:

What did we have before? In the past it's been an hour with the Clerk, and an hour with the Chief Electoral Officer.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, and here's the thing. We still have the study of the protective services that we started quite some time ago, not long after we were constituted as a committee. We started to get a little bit of traction and then it kind of fell by the wayside as other things got layered on top. This is an opportunity to deal with some of those same issues, so putting all my cards on the table, people know some of the issues that I care about, and I'm not sure that an hour is going to cover it this time.

On the other one, I don't know about you people, but I have no agenda on the Chief Electoral Officer other than I wouldn't mind getting some deadlines from him. There is more information I would seek from him than normally under estimates, given the work we're doing on that study that's now been pushed back. I'm very concerned. I've been very up front with Mr. Chan and others about the fact that we are united—at least I am—with the government in wanting to make serious changes to the election laws.

A lot of that is contained in the Chief Electoral Officer's report. A lot of it is withdrawing the ugliness, in my opinion, from Bill C-23. That work has to be done. It would break my heart if we got to the end of this Parliament, with a majority government and at least one of the two opposition parties seriously wanting to make reforms in those areas—progressive, positive reforms—and we hadn't ripped out that ugly stuff that was stuffed down our throats in the last Parliament.

All of that is to say that I, for one, might spend a little more time than I might otherwise at estimates, but I'm not seeking to have the tail wag the dog here. I'm just saying that, from my perspective, there may be a little more time needed, given the current situation on both those files.

(1125)

The Chair:

We'll go to Mr. Reid, and then Mr. Chan.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Leaving the editorials aside about the previous legislation, I'll just make the observation that I think Mr. Christopherson has a very good point that the CEO.... Of course, it's not the CEO; it's the acting CEO. The acting CEO and his eventual successor have a full plate and a change of command under way in a limited timeline, in addition to the concerns that Mr. Christopherson is expressing, which I think primarily revolve around Bill C-33. From his perspective, I think that would deal with the things he disliked the most about the existing legislation that was imposed in the last Parliament.

Would that be correct?

Mr. David Christopherson:

It's a good start.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. What I'm getting at is that there's Bill C-33 to deal with, and what kinds of deadlines its going to face. Additionally there is the issue of Minister Gould asking us to complete our study of the 42nd parliamentary report of the CEO to our chair, so that she could then take our report, work on legislation this autumn, produce a piece of legislation and get it to the CEO in order for the CEO to act on it prior to the next election. The CEO would be able to comment to us on that.

Finally, there is the issue of the financial reform legislation, the election finance reform, or party financing legislation that Minister Gould has promised to bring before the House. I get the impression.... Actually I had a chance to ask her this and while she was not unclear in answering, I can't remember what her answer was, to be honest, but the question was essentially, “Do you need this in place by the end of 2017 in order to have it take place in the 2018 calendar year because of the way party financing works on a calendar year basis?”

There are all of those balls in the air. All of them relate back to the CEO and I think, on that basis, it would be helpful to have the acting CEO for more than an hour. I think as well we probably should agree now that, in addition to dealing with the narrow scope of the estimates, we would give ourselves liberty to deal with those broader issues. Seeing as the CEO—I assume—watches this committee religiously, we've effectively, in today's meeting, giving notice to the acting CEO that he should anticipate our desire to have some guidance on these matters.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I was really going to just suggest that we might want to be a bit flexible about it, but maybe the suggestion is to prioritize May 18 as our preferred date, because if we go to May 30, we're running up against the window. We don't have any window after that. That's if the CEO is available. If not, then they know the calendar. As it sits, we have May 16, 18, and 30 probably, in practical terms, for them to be here and to give them some flexibility. Maybe we'll start first with the Chief Electoral Officer, go as long as we need to go, and then call in the Speaker and the head of the PPS. I suspect we won't need as much time to go through their estimates process.

From a scheduling perspective, it would be respectful to give them some certainty as to when to show up. Maybe we'll just go back to you, Mr. Chair, and give them a bit more flexibility and offer them May 16, 18, and 30, with the preference that the Chief Electoral Officer comes as soon as possible, and then we slot in the Speaker and the head of the PPS after that. I don't suggest we do it on May 30, because that puts us up against the window of May 31. That would give you more flexibility in terms of questioning. I'm also very mindful that we also have a deadline on the privilege motion as well. We don't want to take forever on this, but the points you've raised are valid.

Then the other point I wanted to just raise regards the issue of the prioritization from Minister Gould for advancing her particular agenda from her mandate letter. I can undertake to consult with her staff and her about whether there is a revision with respect to certain priority items that they would like us to consider at least before we rise for the summer, if it is at all possible, because clearly there was a referral to us to get something done by May 19, and clearly we're not going to make that deadline. I don't know that we'll have that time, given all the other things that we have jammed in right now.

We have, I think, six sitting weeks left and this to deal with and estimates to deal with. Probably in priority we'll start with this, go back to estimates, and then go back to the Chief Electoral Officer's report in table C, where we were last at.

(1130)

Mr. David Christopherson:

There are so many darn layers to this onion that I lose track.

What was the deadline on the minister's...?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Do you mean Minister Gould?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes. What was Minister Gould's deadline on...?

Mr. Scott Reid:

She said the beginning of June or preferably the end of May. That was what she said to us. Those are almost her exact words.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes. Are we on a bill with that or is that her...?

Mr. Scott Reid:

No, that was in relation to our review of the Chief Electoral Officer's report.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Right. I was just trying to decide. I can't recall, I just have to go back to notes.

Anyway, my point is this. Once the government accepted that the way it did it, through Bill C-33, is a non-starter going forward—don't do that anymore.... I think that message delivered, and I see certain other folks nodding heads that, yes, that's the way it's now understood. We had said that if the government were willing to stop usurping our work, we would do everything we could to try to work within her time frame. I still am, but I have to tell you that time's getting tight, and tighter.

I just leave it with you, Chair. It might also be that we talk this through in a framework and maybe we ask the subcommittee to take a look at some of the more finite deadlines that are involved and actually try to map something through that gets us close to when we still think we're going to be here. When we get to the end of June, it's never clear. There's always this: will there be deal; will we get out? Even at Queen's Park it was the same thing. There's a flurry of deals; everybody wants to get out. It depends on the mood of the House. If you get into agreement, you're out two or three days early. If not, you're there to the very last nanosecond.

There are at least three, maybe four different items that are all serious, at play, with deadlines, and in each of those cases at this stage there's a high degree of co-operation between this committee and the government and its desired agenda. I'm not sure we can do that with all of us here. We should keep talking it through, but it seems to me that at some point we're going to need to lay out all three, four, or five—whatever those pieces are. Again, keeping in mind that the House has now told us what our priorities are, I think we've agreed we can slip away with unanimous consent and do the estimates, but we have to nail that down.

I'm just concerned that, if we don't take the time now to do it in detail, we're just going to run out of runway, and then we're going to find ourselves wherever we are at the end. Then the government's going to say, “You know, we have no choice now; we're going to have to bring legislation in”. That's going to cause at least me to go crazy again, and away we go and nothing's happening. To try to avoid all of that, I think it's in our best interests to get this nailed down as to exactly how we're going to proceed to maximize our ability to achieve what we want to achieve in the time frame that we have accepted.

I'm really good at explaining the problem.

The Chair:

I think today we can set up the privilege and the estimates, but I agree with you that we should have maybe a working group to figure out how we get to that, how close we get at least to that other deadline on the Chief Electoral Officer's report. I'll call that when we see when people are available.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's good. That will let us revert back to the matter at hand.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I will defer to my colleague Mr. Nater on matters relating to the point of privilege.

I did want to say that with regard to the other matters that Mr. Chan raised, I think his work plan and the suggested dates are eminently sensible. I agree with everything he said in its entirety. Everything he suggested, the suggested dates and going back to the minister, everything he said, I think, is eminently reasonable.

I would advocate the following. In your conversation with the minister or her staff, I wonder if you could couch things this way. Her relationship with the Elections Act is unique among all ministers and their responsibilities in that the CEO.... Normally someone who is administering this kind of legislation reports to a minister. The CEO does not report to a minister for obvious reasons; he reports to PROC. We carry on a conversation that she literally can't have with the CEO. Therefore, we are, to some degree, serving as her main information channel. Finding out what things she actually needs to know would be helpful to us. There may be reasons that she'd be.... Well, if you could pose it that way, I think it might prove helpful in coalescing her thoughts as to where the biggest lacunae exist in her own knowledge of what she'd want to do.

(1135)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

That's fine. I wanted to raise only one other point. The other way we can deal with this is by more meetings or longer meetings, or somehow getting to the things that we want to get through. I don't think I'll do my challenge with respect to the motion to adjourn.

The Chair:

We could talk about that at the subcommittee.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

We could have conversations at the subcommittee level. Maybe we should think about calling a quick subcommittee meeting at some point. I don't know when it's convenient for the chair to.... We could do it now with all the members who are here.

Mr. David Christopherson:

We could spend 25 minutes to see how much of the framework around the privilege.... It shouldn't be that difficult.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I don't think it's that difficult.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Unfortunately, we've done it before so we know how to go about it. Then we could slip into a subcommittee meeting on the hour.

The Chair:

Right.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Why don't we talk about the privilege motion, given that Mr. Nater is here?

Let me start, if you don't mind.

The Chair:

Wait, we're not finished yet. We're going to go to Mr. Nater, but I just want to conclude this thing on the estimates.

The last suggestion I heard was to have witnesses on the 16th, 18th, and 30th, hopefully towards the earlier part, with the elections officer first. There was a suggestion that the time be a bit longer than an hour because of the ideas that Mr. Christopherson put forward, the questions we might want to ask.

Is that agreeable to everyone?

Mr. David Christopherson:

[Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. Arnold Chan:

A full day...?

Mr. David Christopherson:

I don't know how else you do it. Two hours is a day.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I agree. Do two hours with the Chief Electoral Officer....

Mr. David Christopherson:

And then two on the—

The Chair:

Two with the Clerk and the protective services...?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Do you think you need two for the Clerk? I don't think you need two for the Clerk. I thought the Clerk and the PPS were pretty straightforward.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It is to you.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

This is the House's budget.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I know.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Unless you have issues on the PPS side. Again, I'm not here to prejudge. You have a right to question the estimates.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It's hard to completely separate that from the privilege motion. There's an overlap there. As I mentioned earlier, I did have an avenue to deal with my concern. I accept that I may be in the minority. That's fine, but I still have my rights. That's why I acknowledge that I have a venue and a vehicle for doing it, but it's buried so far down that, in effect, it's de facto not there. Some of these things I'm going to want to talk about. I want to make it crystal clear, much clearer in terms of how the command works around here. Those two just naturally overlap. I'm not trying to create a problem—

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I understand.

Mr. David Christopherson:

—I just find it impossible to separate the two. I think you get it. I'll go on if you want, but I think you get what I'm saying.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Ironically, it's the same people coming here. Whether it's the privilege motion or the estimates' motion, we're seized of those same parties. The question is, what's the subject matter they're preparing for when they appear before us as witnesses?

Mr. David Christopherson:

You're a smart guy. You can figure it out. You've heard me. You know what my other issues are. You know how they overlap on this point, and I think you can probably map out what my agenda is. I'm not hiding it. Yes, we need the two hours.

The Chair:

David, another option is that we're going to have the Chief Electoral Officer in very soon, when we get back to that, and we could have PPS for the privilege motion, so you might be able to ask all those extra questions on those two occasions, as opposed to during the estimates.

Mr. David Christopherson:

If you want to try to do that, and part of the first meeting dealing with the privilege also has us deal with the estimates, I'm fine with that. It makes it easier for me, quite frankly.

The Chair:

No. I was suggesting that during the privilege motion we have PPS, so you would deal with the types of things you want to that aren't strictly estimates, and then we would just have them for an hour on the estimates.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I see. This is where it is a matter of co-operation and honour. My friend Filomena Tassi is a lawyer and knows me well. She knows exactly what I'm saying.

If you would allow me a little more latitude than we might normally allow on the privilege part, where I'm going to get into some of the structural...just a little, then I'm prepared to look at the estimates as more of a matter of pro forma. What I was seeking to do was to raise the issues that I could raise during estimates, for which, technically, if someone wanted to push and you wanted to be stringent, I might find some difficulty raising when we're dealing with privilege.

What I want is a little bit of latitude there, because to me they are linked. It's impossible to talk about the privilege issue without talking about how security is structured here, how the command process works, and what the reality is, versus the nice flowered-up version of how things work around here vis-à-vis security.

(1140)

Mr. John Nater:

I actually respect Mr. Christopherson's comments on that. I think there is a venue through the privilege motion to discuss some of those structural things. I don't know that we need latitude, because I think they do fit in rather nicely.

Going to Mr. Chan's comments a couple of interventions ago about the framework for moving forward with the privilege motion, I suggest that perhaps as soon as next Tuesday our first witness be the acting Clerk of the House, Mr. Bosc, whom we could invite to attend the committee to outline the importance of privilege and the key issues there. From that, I think, would flow a logical framework of where we go with witnesses, and so on.

If we start with Mr. Bosc on Tuesday, that would provide us with a good starting point to move forward with the other witnesses, including PPS. Also, we may want to begin thinking about inviting the two members whose privileges were violated, Mr. Bernier and Ms. Raitt who, for reasons of political leadership, have a busy next couple of weeks.

The Chair:

Okay, just hold that thought for a second. I want to finish the estimates.

Given that it appears you have that latitude, Mr. Christopherson, we could have the PPS and the Clerk for one hour.

Very soon after these two items we're going to have Elections Canada here anyway. At the first meeting we have, the first part of that meeting would be to answer all of those questions you have that are not estimates-related? That would leave them for—

Mr. David Christopherson:

They are estimates-related, to the extent that it's work they are going to do, and things like that. Anyway, go ahead.

The Chair:

That would leave the estimates just for an hour.

Is that okay with you?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes.

The Chair:

Okay, so we'll try the 16th, 18th, or 30th, with one hour for each, whenever they are available. We'll have one hour for protective services and the Clerk, and one hour for Elections Canada. Then we'll deal with Mr. Christopherson's other issues in the other meetings we just talked about. We'll deal with privilege in the first meeting on—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Does that mean, then, that at the first meeting of the Chief Electoral Officer we'll actually have the Chief Electoral Officer in so that we can pose those questions?

The Chair:

Yes, for that meeting, we'll ask for the Chief Electoral Officer to come.

Mr. David Christopherson:

We've taken the time away from one place. I just need to see it added in the other, or some recognition fo that. If we just went back to what we were doing, there would be staff here but not the Chief Electoral Officer.

The Chair:

We'll invite him.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Would we actually go into public for that portion of it?

The Chair:

Sure.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It's just the last piece of what I need in order to say that I'm okay with an hour rather than what I'm seeking.

If we're going to do it the other way, just make sure that when we do it the other way, I'm actually able to achieve what I would have been able to, had I not given up the right under the other proposal.

The Chair:

Right.

Mr. Schmale, you were on the list.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I think my issue got worked out. It was in regard to the steering committee. If we were going to have one, I just wanted to point out that Blake Richards is not here so it wouldn't work for us.

The Chair:

Right.

Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

With respect to Mr. Christopherson's remarks, I think that we have a lot of the same questions for PPS. Not only do I agree that when we're looking at the question of privilege you would have the latitude to do that, but we would like the same latitude because I think we're on the same page.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's good to hear.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

It's an important issue, so I would like to be able to ask those questions as well, and I support what you're asking.

I speak for myself. If my colleagues feel differently, then of course they will say so, but that's my position.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I would like to go back to Mr. Nater.

Have we dispensed with the estimates?

The Chair:

We're all agreed on the estimates. We'll make those invitations. We'll let you know when they can come as soon as we get a response.

(1145)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I'll go back to questioning Mr. Nater.

I want to get a sense of how many days you think you need to dispense with the privilege motion, while we're having this conversation, because we've seen the previous witnesses....

From our perspective, this is not new. The question is, what are the specific facts that are before us? Obviously, we need the evidence of the members who were affected. Then we'll obviously get the response from the Speaker and/or the Clerk, the head of the PPS, and anyone else we think is appropriate. There may be video evidence, but I don't know if there are many more individuals to call after that, unless I'm missing something.

Mr. John Nater:

No. I think you mentioned the key players in the situation. Some of it will be a scheduling issue, given the two members. We do know that the Speaker has a report.

I've never seen that report. I don't know if anyone in this committee has received those reports from PPS. I'm not aware of that. Those reports are out there. I think that speaking to those who wrote the reports, those who were involved in those reports would be worthwhile.

I don't think we need to spend a lot of meetings on this. I think the matter will be ensuring that we have the right people and availability in a relatively short period of time.

The Chair:

Just before I go to Ms. Tassi, the normal procedure would be to have the people who were disprivileged first, and it may give us more questions for the Clerk.

Ms Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

The only point that I would like to add, Mr. Chair, is that we all agree at this table that this is a very important matter. For me, it's not only about looking at this specific case scenario and getting to the root of that; it's also about looking at the broader picture. I'm already hearing from members of Parliament on different suggestions, concerns, and issues that they have.

I just want to ensure that when we take this on, we take it on in a way that does not limit its scope to this specific issue. We want to do the best that we absolutely can in order to determine that this doesn't happen again.

Having said that, I'm never going on record as saying, “this doesn't happen again”, because we're dealing with human beings, and even though we can do our best—that's what we're here to do, our possible best—that study goes beyond this specific instance. It involves ensuring that we get all the witnesses here that we need. I don't want to rush this, even though we have a huge agenda. The importance is getting everyone here that we need to make our best efforts and to do the best due diligence we possibly can to make the best attempt to ensure that it doesn't happen again. If we all approach it with that attitude....

The Chair:

I'm going to go to Mr. Christopherson, but then I want to go back to Mr. Nater for some feedback.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm on that same issue, and it's music to my ears, Filomena. I think we are on the same page.

With that in mind, again, this hasn't happened in isolation. The reason a few of us have been infuriated—and Ms. Tassi has picked up on this—is that for those of us who've been around for a while, this is Groundhog Day. Some of us predicted...and you're right. As long as humans are doing it, there are going to be mistakes, but there seems to still be a core ingredient of preparation and planning and prioritization of access that just doesn't happen in a way that is as serious as the other plans they're making vis-à-vis providing security for the people on the Hill. That is what causes the disruptions. That's the issue, and that's what's making some of us absolutely livid. We just cannot....

I don't want to go on and on—we'll do that at the time—but what has really done it is that they make all the promises in the world when they come in, and you believe them, and you know they're sincere, but when they get into the business that they do, our access is the same as hydro needing to find their way to a pole. No, this is bigger than that.

The thing we desperately need—and this was my point—is a review from our analysts of incidents in the past, so that we understand the context. We can understand the things that work well consistently—and give credit to that if need be—but recognize that's not the area, and home in on where there is a consistent lack. Then, when we propose solutions, we can also look at these various experiences in the past and say, “Would the solution we're offering not only solve the instant case in front of us, but would it have resolved these issues?”

If that's the case, then maybe we really are getting closer, because we have a systemic problem—not an incidental problem, a systemic problem. Ask me what time it is and I'll tell you how to make a watch. All of that is to say that I think we need a comprehensive report. I know some of that work's already been done by our analysts to give us the historical context for what is happening consistently and what has to stop.

(1150)

The Chair:

Mr. Nater has a comment, on witnesses in particular.

Mr. John Nater:

I take Mr. Christopherson's point as well. I know the analyst has that information and that will feed into the witnesses we choose to call at that point.

The first witnesses we need to coordinate would be the acting Clerk, as well as the two members. Typically, the person who moves the motion of privilege would be called—which would be me—but in this case I would suggest Mr. Bernier and Ms. Raitt.

I would note—and I don't know how we would find this out—that there were other MPs as well, according to the Speaker's ruling, who were on the other buses and who were also denied the opportunity to vote. We don't know who they are. Perhaps the government knows. I was under the impression there were other MPs. That is what was in the Speaker's.... I don't know who those people were, but we should at least provide the opportunity for those other members as well, who had their privileges violated. Whether they come forward or not, I guess that's another point. Certainly the parliamentary protective service would be a witness. I suspect that would come after the acting Clerk and after the two individuals, as well as the RCMP.

Those would be the individuals I think would be appropriate. Beyond that, Mr. Christopherson, you may have an opinion because you were here in previous Parliaments. Other witnesses may come through those discussions or through the review of past breaches of privilege, but I think those are the four key individuals. In terms of the Clerk, I don't know if it would be normal to have the Speaker of the House accompany the Clerk, or if it's simply the Clerk. I don't know. I would look to the guidance of....

The Chair:

Can I suggest that for the first hour on Tuesday, we have Mr. Nater, the two people who didn't get to the vote, and any other MPs we can find through the whips who were hindered and who want to come, and then in the second hour have the Clerk?

Mr. David Christopherson:

The only other thing I wanted to hear was.... I don't just want a document circulated. I'd like an actual presentation on the highlights of previous incidents. I really think that is almost as important as the instant case, given it's the repetitiveness that is the overarching problem.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

When do you want that by?

Mr. David Christopherson:

I am very flexible, but fairly early on, so we have a context.

The Chair:

The report is going to be ready by Tuesday. It's in translation now.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I don't know. I would defer to Mr. Nater, but I think it needs to be near the one, two, three top things that we do. Whichever that is, I'm open.

Certainly, you could never go wrong bringing in the principals who are involved, but again, it also makes sense to make sure you do your historical and contextual work ahead of time. I'm flexible, as long as it's done up near the front.

Mr. John Nater:

Perhaps, at that first meeting, we ought to take the full two hours simply with the individuals who had their rights violated, and at the same time review that historical context. Then on Thursday, if it works for the acting Clerk, have him attend—perhaps for the full two hours—as the subject matter expert.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I think, however, that the Speaker should be with the Clerk, because they both play a key role in security, obviously.

Welcome back.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Thank you. I'm happy to be back. What did I miss?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Let's recap.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That was a little too enthusiastic.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham and then Mr. Nater.

Welcome back, Anita.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

David, we can have our cake and eat it too. I propose that we sit for three hours, from 11 to two on Tuesday, to get through this report and the first two sets of witnesses.

Mr. John Nater:

I think the only indulgence I would ask of the committee is that we recognize some flexibility for Mr. Bernier and Ms. Raitt, who obviously have a schedule that is fairly rigid, given their cross-country tours.

(1155)

Mr. David Christopherson:

We do that for ministers and others.

Mr. John Nater:

That would offer flexibility with that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If they're on the Hill today, we have an hour left in this meeting.

Mr. John Nater:

Your guess is as good as mine as to where they are. That might be a little quick, Mr. Graham, to do that, but if we seek their guidance, I suspect we could find a day, if the committee is willing to do that.

The Chair:

The proposal would be for a three-hour meeting, with the first hour for the researcher's report, the second hour for the three witnesses, and the third hour for the Clerk.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'd put the analyst first.

Mr. David Christopherson:

With the Clerk and the Speaker.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

The Chair:

The clerk is suggesting, and I think this has come up in the past, that because the Speaker made the prima facie ruling and has studied it, it may not be appropriate to have him in again, because he's already involved in the project. I think that was recommended once to a Speaker before, wasn't it, that he had ruled on something?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

We're not asking for the Speaker; we're asking for the Clerk.

The Chair:

Yes, but Mr. Nater and Mr. Christopherson were suggesting the Speaker as well.

Mr. John Nater:

Could I just jump in here very quickly?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. John Nater:

The other element of it is that the Speaker—under the new reporting mechanism for the parliamentary protective service—has oversight over that service as well. He has that alternate role to which he made reference in his ruling, so there is that element as well. Beyond his finding of a prima facie case of privilege, he also has the administrative authority as the head of the House of Commons with the oversight of the parliamentary protective service. There is that double element there, so he might have an appropriate mechanism as well.

To that end perhaps—and I don't know how we would go about requesting the studies that he referenced in his ruling—those studies would be very much pertinent to the case at hand as well.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It's an interesting point, but I do agree with Mr. Nater. There's a duality here, and we're at the stage where we're just trying to inform ourselves of all the information.

He would have no knowledge, first-hand, of what happened on the grounds, but he would be the resource for answers to questions about who makes this decision, who would do this. Just by way of being factual, it seems to me that he's such a key component of the security services that to not have.... We may never ask him a question. He may not be needed, but I could easily see questions coming up where you must have somebody who is in that position, not to talk about the instant case—I get that, and that makes all the sense in the world—but in terms of setting the stage and understanding and having him here as a resource as opposed to a witness per se, as a witness resource, rather than a witness for the ongoing....

I just think that if we don't have him in here we're going to find ourselves with questions that can't be answered. We'll all be looking at each other and going, “You know who can answer this question? The Speaker.” There's certainly no intention on my part, and I would support you in assiduously protecting the Speaker in this regard so that he's not brought into the instant case.... Certainly, I would think, he can answer structural questions, factual questions, and procedural questions that are generic and not specific to the instant case.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Could I just respond to that?

I think the acting Clerk could do all of that without the necessity for the presence of the Speaker. The Clerk ultimately reports to the Speaker, and the Speaker is the—

Mr. David Christopherson:

He doesn't report to us, though. The Speaker is accountable to us. Let's remember—

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I understand the point.

Mr. David Christopherson:

He's first among equals, but he's still among equals.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I understand. I'm trying to address the issue that was raised by the clerk and find a way to get around this. I will just say that the procedural questions you ask can be answered in almost every instance by the acting Clerk.

(1200)

Mr. David Christopherson:

Maybe. He doesn't make decisions. He's not involved in it at all—

Mr. Arnold Chan: I understand.

Mr. David Christopherson: —as opposed to the Speaker, where the buck stops, except for the RCMP commissioner.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

That was the point they were raising, that he is both decision-maker and.... I'm just trying to avoid that conflict.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, me too, but I also want to make sure that we have at our disposal the resources and the answers to questions that we legitimately deserve to have answered.

Mr. John Nater:

Perhaps I could help to square the circle, Chair. In the Speaker's ruling, he made reference to different proposals that he's made to the parliamentary protective service. He said: ...some months ago I asked the director of the Parliamentary Protective Service, as one of his annual objectives, to provide mandatory training on an ongoing basis for all members of the service on the privileges, rights, immunities, and powers of the House of Commons....

He has stated some of the role that he has in this. Perhaps, instead of having him appear as one of the first witnesses, it would be more appropriate to have him at some point after we've heard the primary witnesses, to seek from him an update on how some of the objectives he stated are going, and to perhaps as well to seek his guidance on some of the suggestions he would have going forward on how to make recommendations back to the House, and what changes he would like to see from his authority going forward. That is perhaps not to link him initially with the acting Clerk, so that we don't get him bogged down with the current prima facie finding, but rather that we have him attend at a future date, after we have had the initial witnesses, as we go forward.

Mr. David Christopherson:

With respect, I appreciate what you're trying to do. My difficulty and my concern would be that the further we push him down the process, the more he just by osmosis becomes part of it, whereas if we frame it that we're in fact-finding mode and that's part of it, it seems to me that it might be easier to keep him compartmentalized.

It's our Speaker, and we want the Speaker to succeed, so we want to keep him from that. I just worry that if we push it down too far, it starts to get mooshed together, and it's hard to separate it, whereas if we do it right up front, near the beginning, it's part of the macro, the generic, the background, and a sort of technical briefing, and then we move on to the instant case. That would be my only concern, but I appreciate the suggestions.

The Chair:

At the moment, the proposal is one hour for the history, one hour for any MPs who were impeded, plus Mr. Nater, and one hour for the acting Clerk. On the third hour, we haven't finished the Speaker discussion yet.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Can I just make a suggestion to colleagues that we consider flipping them and doing the historical background first, then the administrative framework, in terms of the Clerk and the Speaker? We've done the macro, and now we're stepping into the instant case—here is the person who was affected; here are other members. Now we're into it and we've kept separate the macro. I might just suggest that one switch. We could have the analyst's historical briefing first for an hour, then an administrative structural review and briefing for an hour with the Clerk and the Speaker, and then in the third hour we would dive off and get into it.

I'm not going to die on that hill. Those are just my thoughts.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

I'm just trying to figure out in which place it would be better. I like Mr. Nater's idea, because the Speaker has already ruled that it's a prima facie case. It's coming here. He has done his upfront ruling at this point, and we need to get into fact-finding initially. I think it would be better, if the Speaker came, to have him do so near the end, to find out how all of this....

I think, Mr. Christopherson, in effect you are saying that you want to see some changes, right? You think the way things have evolved over time is not in the best interests of parliamentary privilege, members' privilege, so that would be something better suited to be at the end of the fact-finding mission.

I don't know. It's obviously being debated. My vote is on that side.

Mr. David Christopherson:

My only worry, again, is that if we leave it too long, by then we'll be into the minutiae. We'll know the details. We'll be seized of it all, and it's going to be harder to keep the Speaker..... I get it; the Speaker shouldn't be involved in this instant case, given his unique role. But, again, if that's what everybody decides, I'll back down. It's just that, in my view, keeping him near the front gives us the information we need about how the system works in general, and he is part of that decision-making. Then once we're done, the beauty is we'll be done, and there shouldn't be any reason to bring him back, and therefore he can't get into....

But I'm open.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I see what you're saying, Mr. Christopherson. In that case, do we have the Speaker at all? We've already had him before this committee on this, and we've asked him questions around this very issue, and you have asked these questions to the Speaker, so are we really gaining anything new by bringing him in again?

(1205)

Mr. David Christopherson:

The problem is that if we have only the Clerk, the Clerk is not part of the security decision-making process, so he can talk framework but he can go only so far. He can't talk, in terms of any practical sense, about how a decision is made, because he's not part of that process. The Sergeant-at-Arms is, but—

The Chair:

We could have the director of PPS.

Mr. David Christopherson:

The director of PPS is, but not the Clerk.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Isn't having the director of PPS more appropriate?

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm surprised we hadn't thought of that.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

That should be the most appropriate—

Mr. David Christopherson:

He should be there too.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

The three of them should be. In fact, by having the three, the Speaker may need to say nothing. He is there to ask a.... He is so integral to the decision.

I'm just looking at it and saying if we're going to talk about the administrative framework, about how this works, and the chain of command, that's controversial. But as for decision-makers, so far we've had just the Clerk, and he is not part of the decision-making process, so it would make sense to have the director and the Speaker there.

Mr. John Nater:

I appreciate where we're going. My concern is that one hour would no longer be enough if we were to have the director of PPS as well as the Speaker and the Clerk.

I would almost think we'd need the full two hours to have that discussion, because when we have the director of PPS, we're getting into fairly substantive issues of how we deal with things. I like the direction that this is going, but I suspect that one hour would be awfully tight to have a meaningful dialogue with the multiple actors in that case, because, in addition to the security apparatus and the administrative framework there, we also have the Clerk's input on privilege itself, which would be an issue as well. I would be somewhat concerned about fitting this into one hour, so perhaps we could move that.

If the committee is flexible, we could designate next Tuesday and Thursday, alternating depending on availability, two hours with the Clerk, the director of PPS, and the Speaker on one day. Then the second day, in whatever order, would be for reviewing the past circumstances, as well as the MPs who were affected. I know that logically we should have the past review first, but if we could have some flexibility to do that...or perhaps if there were a three-hour meeting on Tuesday, then we could do that in the first hour, and then in the second hour, whichever witness would fit in would perhaps be an option for the committee.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Mr. Nater, perhaps in advance of Tuesday you could speak to Ms. Raitt and Mr. Bernier to find out whether they are in fact available on Tuesday, so that we could be advised and we could have a sense.... It's difficult, because we won't have another meeting before then, but at least maybe through the clerk, they could advise us whether they will in fact be attending.

Mr. John Nater:

I think we can undertake that. I don't know about PROC, but I know that in other committees we have in the past had the option of video conferencing as well. That may be an option, if it's available, for the committee if these two individuals—

Mr. Arnold Chan:

We'd have to go to Wellington if we did that, but that's....

Mr. John Nater:

I suspect they would be eager to come before the committee, but they are running for the leadership and given their travel schedules.... I suspect that's very important to them at this point. We could show some flexibility on that if that's an option.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Further to that undertaking, can I just get a sense of when you think you could report back once you've had those conversations with their two respective offices? Can you report it to the clerk so the rest of us can know on a reasonably timely basis? Again, we're willing to be flexible. We just want to have a sense of whether they are in fact available, and then the rest of it will kind of fall into place.

Mr. John Nater:

Absolutely, and I think that's something the individuals themselves would like to have locked down, so we will undertake that as soon as we can and report through the clerk back to the committee.

(1210)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Okay.

Mr. Chair, should we then perhaps consider going to Wellington for the next meeting, if it's available?

That would give you the flexibility, Mr. Nater, if video conferencing is one of your options, to at least know we have that room. I think that's the only room we can actually....

The Chair:

They'll work that out if they—

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Can you possibly work that option out? That way we will know in advance. I'm just trying to figure out how we will do this structurally. If, let's say, they're not available until two weeks from now, then we won't have their evidence for a while.

The Chair:

If they are available, what's the proposal for the meeting?

I'm not sure that the—

Mr. Arnold Chan:

The analyst would go first for sure.

The Chair:

Right.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Then the question is, what comes next?

Let's say they're not available. We haven't given notice to the Clerk and/or Speaker, whichever you want, and the head of PPS. I don't think PPS would come next. I think that would be after, given what you've discussed. We're probably looking at structure first, and then PPS and RCMP.

You could maybe give them some notice that it might be 12 o'clock or it might be one o'clock, and we'll inform them as quickly as we know. We'll probably need a really rapid response. I know it's pushing it, but maybe even by noon tomorrow. They should have a sense of their schedules for next week by now.

Mr. John Nater:

We'll undertake to do it as quickly as we can.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I understand. You don't control where they are.

Mr. John Nater:

I'm neutral on the leadership race. I'm not affiliated with anyone's camp.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

We don't even know where they are.

Mr. John Nater:

We will undertake that as quickly as we can.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I understand.

Mr. John Nater:

I recognize that this is something that our side sees as a priority, and I know your side does as well, so we will do all we can to ensure that we get this—

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Be mindful that we're also dealing with very busy people—the Speaker and/or the Clerk—and we have to give them some clear direction on when we expect them to show up.

Mr. John Nater:

Absolutely, but perhaps as a committee we can make the decision now that for the next two meetings generally we want them.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I agree. I think the next two meetings are the privilege meetings, no matter what. It's just a matter of who goes where. We just don't know right now, because we don't know who's available.

Mr. John Nater:

Perhaps the clerk could undertake that scheduling, once we confirm that, as well, and that way we won't have to come back to the committee to make further changes.

The Chair:

Okay. If they are available, it will be the researcher, the offended MPs, the Clerk and/or the Speaker. If they're not available, then we'll just have the two hours, the report and the Clerk and/or the Speaker.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

And we'll do it at 1 Wellington.

The Chair:

It will be wherever we need to be for the video conference.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

It could be at the Wellington Building, whatever building is available for video conferencing, if we need it.

Mr. David Christopherson:

There's one little technicality. I thought I heard you say, “Clerk or Speaker”. My understanding is that it was Clerk and Speaker, and actually I thought we were doing the PPS director.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

We'll get to that.

The Chair:

I said, “and/or”, but Mr. Chan was suggesting it was too early for the PPS director.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I think the PPS director would come after the Clerk.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We can ask for them for Thursday.

Mr. David Christopherson:

We could have them as part of the background briefing in terms of structure, but I like the idea that we keep it fluid, rather than trying to go any further debating which one of these two things should be first. Leave the flexibility that for now the game plan is that we'll do an hour up front from the analyst to give us the historical context, and then the next two hours will be a fluid blend of—

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Whoever's available.

Mr. David Christopherson:

—individuals. I still think the Speaker should be there with the Clerk, but we don't have to nail down which one has to be in front of the other. If Lisa is not available until sometime in the third hour, surely we can jig that to accommodate everyone. At the end of the three hours, we should have achieved historical background, administrative framework, and begun the details of the incident at hand.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Is there any reason we can't have PPS twice? We could have them in on the background, with the Speaker and the Clerk, and then bring them back when we need more specific details.

Mr. David Christopherson:

We're already benefiting from your return.

The Chair:

How does that sound to people? Good?

If one of those elements is not available, we'll cut the meeting back to two hours and do what we can, and we'll put the next onto the Thursday.

(1215)

Mr. David Christopherson:

It might not be seamless, but it'll work.

The Chair:

Would you rather start at 10 a.m. and finish at 1 p.m., or start at 11 a.m. and finish at 2 p.m.?

Mr. David Christopherson:

I prefer 10 a.m. till 1 p.m.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Sorry, which day?

The Chair:

It's next Tuesday.

Mr. Scott Reid:

If you can give me a second to check my calendar, I'll provide you with a better answer than I can without having checked it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are we going 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. instead of 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Tuesday?

Mr. David Christopherson:

I was just saying that 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. works better for me.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Well, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. is fine with us.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, I like that hour before QP to—

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's fine with me.

The Chair:

Okay. We'll go 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., if we have three hours' worth of work. If we don't, we'll go regular hours, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. We've already decided on the estimates.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Can I also ask my colleagues if they are...? I'm fully seized of Mr. Nater's four or five witnesses, namely, the acting Clerk and Speaker, two members, and the head of the PPS or RCMP. The question is whether there are any other witnesses. I had suggested that tomorrow might be a bit fast for getting additional witnesses, and the evidence might suggest that we need to call other witnesses. We'll leave that to the committee to decide. I suggest that if we have additional ones we want to put on the table, we do so relatively expeditiously. I'd like to deal with this expeditiously and report back to the House.

Mr. John Nater:

I appreciate that, and I think that's the way we would like to see this happen as well. I think by early next week, by Monday perhaps, we could have additional witnesses, if there are any.

The only other thing that flows out of this is that I think it would be worthwhile if we could see a copy of the report the Speaker referenced in his ruling. That might cause us to see another witness from that list, depending on the incident commander. I think that might be something we need to see sooner rather than later to determine what additional witnesses we may need to have—whether we need to call a witness who was at the site, the incident commander, or the supervisor and officer. Whether that would be worthwhile or not, I don't know. Depending on what the report says, it might require an additional witness. I think sooner rather than later we should knock this down so we're not dragging this out ad nauseam.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

The only other question I wanted to ask you, Mr. Chair, maybe through you to the clerk, was whether we know if the Speaker's report, which you mentioned earlier, is available and whether it will be shared with the committee.

The Chair:

The clerk doesn't know.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Okay. That would expedite our review, because then we would at least have a factual report coming back in terms of—

Mr. David Christopherson:

I understand.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I was just saying that if the Speaker has already prepared a report based upon knowing that there was this incident, it would be helpful to have that information, if we have it. Obviously, they don't know when it's going to be available. I'd suggest that you might want to send a transmission to the Speaker's office. If the report is available, it certainly would be helpful to us in expediting our review.

The Chair:

Okay, we'll ask.

The other thing is that I'll leave it up to the whips to see if there are any other MPs who thought something their privileges were adduced on that day, and they can join Ms. Raitt and Mr. Bernier at that round table if there are other people available.

Are we all set? Are we done?

An hon. member: I could probably make a speech on something if you want.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, I put a notice of motion before the committee. I had anticipated it would not be possible to move it, because I actually thought we would be seized entirely with the matter of privilege and did not want to intrude upon that, given its priority.

I did speak to Mr. Chan and indicated I wouldn't be moving it with that presupposition in mind. However, just to repeat what that motion is, it is to invite the government House leader to appear before the committee. I cannot remember if the wording says this, but my hope would be that she would come before this committee prior to her acting upon the intention she indicated in the letter she put out this previous Sunday, in which she said she would act by means of a government motion to essentially draft standing order changes on, I think, five topics. I won't enumerate them here, but the Prime Minister's questions on Wednesday is just one of those items.

I should just explain. I could move the motion, but not if it's going to tie us up unduly. The purpose of the motion is simply this. The minister has stressed her interest in having what she characterizes as a dialogue or a discussion. Discussion is, I think, the term she uses. Of course, a government motion makes that very difficult. In practice, it is not easy to amend a motion of that nature when it's being debated in the House, which is one of the reasons that these things ought to preferably be dealt with in committee.

Should I stop?

(1220)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

No, I just want to make sure that I get an opportunity to respond to you.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay, sorry.

I can't speak to the details of the conversation I had with Mr. Chan, because that was private, but I raised that with him.

The purpose here is that this actually provides some opportunity for discussion. It's not the ideal way of doing it, but I think it allows her to do what she has said she wants to do, and it allows her, as well, to get some feedback from us in advance on those four or five items she says she'll be moving forward. I can't speak for anybody other than myself, but my suspicion is that she would find the kind of input that I know I would like to have to potentially be helpful on those items.

Frankly, the things that I personally found most problematic in the discussion paper are no longer part of what she's putting forward. I would add, as well, that some of those things were specifically enumerated in the Liberal election platform, and hence her point about their having a mandate and no one should have a veto over it is stronger on those. I can see those points, but I do think she might find it helpful. I know we would find it helpful as well, if that could be done.

That was my sales pitch for the motion.

The Chair:

Are you suggesting a positive discussion on those five things?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, where you can actually come along and say, “You went for these five things. Here are some things you might want to think about on this or that.” We get no opportunity to do that, otherwise, until after it's presented and it is harder to make changes. It's a bit like dealing with a bill only at third reading.

The Chair:

Right.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I am happy to share our conversation.

I am sensitive to the point you are raising, Mr. Reid, with respect to hearing from the minister, hopefully before anything is tabled before the House from this committee.

First of all, let me answer the broad principle. The government is happy to have the minister appear. In terms of the motion you tabled, which I know you have not moved yet, clearly we won't be able to meet your initial deadline of May 12, given that we are now dealing with the privilege motion and we also have the estimates issues that we will have to juggle at some point, but in principle I don't have a problem with the appearance of the minister. From the government side, we are happy to do that. Initially, I was going to suggest that if, for some reason—and I knew we couldn't dispense with the privilege motion—I am aware that the minister is not available at certain periods of time.... That is now moot. As a sequencing process, let's first deal with privilege and then with estimates, because we are under very specific time constraints.

Then, if we can get back to it.... You called for an appearance for two hours. The government's position is that we are prepared to have her appear for one hour. If we need additional time, that's fine. We'll consider it after she has made an appearance. You can ask whatever questions you want to ask based upon the letter that she has tendered.

It just depends on how fast we can dispense with the privilege matter and the estimates matters. At that point, if you wish to move a similar motion that calls the minister, we will be supportive of it, but only if it is for one hour, and obviously within her schedule. I can't undertake that this won't be before something is tabled, because we have these other matters that have come in front of this particular committee.

I don't know her timing with respect to when she might submit something to the House, but if we can quickly dispense with the privilege matter and the estimates matters, we might even possibly be able to fit this in before the end of the month, and if not, hopefully in the first week of June. Then we'll see where we go from there.

I know that's tight, but it's the best we can do, given the circumstances. As I said, had we moved forward on the discussion paper, the minister would have been the first person we would have called from the government. We have nothing to hide on that. Our point is that the minister needs to explain what she was trying to advance. Now that obviously the terms have changed with respect to limiting it to the five platform items—that was tabled in the more recent letter to the opposition House leaders—you are welcome to ask questions about that.

Again, we don't have a sense of what the standing order changes.... We have a framework, but we won't know how they will look until they are actually tabled before the House.

(1225)

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson is next, and then Mr. Reid.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks, Chair.

I am just seeking a piece of information, if that's possible.

When I thought this thing through a couple of weeks ago, trying to get a sense of where the government was going to go, one of the options that existed was to bypass what's happening here and go straight to the House. That was before you withdrew some of the most controversial parts. There still may be the possibility that once that motion is in the House, you're likely going to use closure, because you can't use time allocation on a motion. We are getting close to the end of the session, or at least we'll be into June, probably. When I thought that through, the only thing that made any sense.... Given the nature of it and the closure, it seemed to me that the government would want to do this as close as possible to the rising of the House because of the chaos and the mood that could be created.

Had they done all of them originally, the place would have been unmanageable. I don't know if it will be that bad, but it could be. I am only raising this because if we know that it's likely to come later in the sitting rather than earlier, that gives us a lot more opportunity to incorporate the kind of flexibility that you were looking for, Arnold.

In terms of recognizing that the government has an agenda, Mr. Reid is suggesting that, notwithstanding the politics that would have the government eventually bring it to the House, it's still a good idea to get the benefit of committee. Mr. Reid, I don't know if people are picking up on that point, but if you've been around for any time at all, you begin to appreciate making these kinds of small changes, a little here and there, to try to do that. It's hard enough for us to do it. If you try to do that in the House, with 338 people and the rules that we have, it's very difficult. What you end up with is a government that finally just gets kind of bloody-minded and says, “We can't be dealing with all these little pieces”, and they just ram it through.

Any time that can be spent here at committee, where we are actually talking about those issues, can only be helpful. It's easier for us to do that if we have a sense that this motion is coming later in the sitting rather than earlier.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Christopherson's points are good and raise some thoughts that had not occurred to me.

But in response to Mr. Chan, first of all, I think the constraints you suggest, particularly with regard to the priority given to other items, are very sensible. I would prefer two hours to one hour, but I recognize that you guys have the majority. We can't push through a motion that you're not going to agree with.

I'll just make this observation with regard to a one-hour appearance. I really don't think it would be helpful to us, or to the minister for that matter, to discuss her discussion paper. Most of those items have been taken off the agenda. She has five items she wants to move forward on, and I would suggest we stick to those five. We should actually suggest another venue, one of going back to party caucuses, in relation to the issue of Friday sittings and other things, for example, the programming motion, that she said she doesn't want to move forward on. Why discuss that when we have only 60 minutes? With respect to the five items she has on her agenda now, that's enough meat. I guarantee that we'll be able to discuss those for an hour.

Of course, I'm always interested in asking questions, but to some degree I see this as a chance to put forward suggestions, which she doesn't have to take but I think they're generally helpful suggestions. I suppose others would have to editorialize after the fact and see whether I was mistaken on that. But it's a chance to put some ideas into her head prior to coming up with this. I would be very surprised if she has these things prewritten and worked out right now. I think they're in the process of designing them in her office, and I suspect input would be useful to her in delivering her job conscientiously.

That's all I wanted to say about that.

One further thought, though, is that when we move on to other items, it would also be helpful to get some idea of what process the government would like to use for moving forward with other non-platform standing order changes going into the remaining two years of this Parliament. That would be helpful. It doesn't have to come from her at that time, but she might want to add that to her remarks.

(1230)

Mr. David Christopherson:

Technically, we have a review under way, but that's all—“technically”.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's fair.

Mr. David Christopherson:

We in the opposition respect that the government ran on certain platforms. You get elected. You have the legitimacy, and the moral as well as the legal right to pursue that.

At no point yet has there been any opportunity for the opposition to have some changes that we would like considered to be part of all this, so somewhere in all of this, it's not just the government's total domain of the rules. We have some suggestions too, and there are some serious issues such as some of the ridiculousness of chairs making a really good ruling only to be overruled by the majority of the day, so that what is nonsensical and outside the rules is made legitimate. That should be appealable to the Speaker. You shouldn't be able to use a majority vote to dictate how the chair has to rule, especially when the chair has ruled consistently within the rules, but another rule allows the majority to overrule that. I'd like to talk about that.

Right now you can shorten a bell—and we got nailed on this in minority twice. Under the current rules, if you want to shorten a bell, let's say we have a 30-minute bell but it's one of those times when everybody is around, we're not far away in the House, and everybody is saying we don't need to waste all this time, the way we do that is to march in the two whips. They come in and do their little ceremony and that is the majority agreeing that we're going to shorten the bell.

Shortening the bell is a big deal. You schedule your time. As long as you're there for when you should be to legally vote, you shouldn't have to be fearful that somebody is going to take away the time they just told you you had to get to the House. The mechanism for that is the thing—but here's the thing, at Queen's Park where there are three parties, to shorten the bell, it takes, guess what, all three whips to say all three caucuses agree.

Twice since I've been here in minority Parliaments, a couple back, the Conservatives and Liberals joined together. They were satisfied to shorten the bell. We had no consideration. In one case it was done deliberately because we were seen as the problem child in that case, and the vote was taken before everybody was even in the House because two of the parties had the power to end the bell by doing the little ceremony, but the third, fourth, and if there's a fifth party, just get left out of the loop.

There are very legitimate things that would help improve this place in fairness, which we'd like an opportunity to put forward, but nowhere are we given that chance except on that technical review, which is what the government House leader used as a hook to hang her discussion paper on. The reality is that we did what was minimally necessary to meet the requirements of the law and when that was done we moved on to other issues, and we may or may not get back to those rules.

I want to take a moment to say somewhere in this whole process the elements of fairness suggest that the opposition should at least be given their day in court and have an opportunity to put forward their suggestions to make the House more responsive to the needs of its members.

Thank you, sir.

(1235)

The Chair:

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I don't want to deal with what Mr. Christopherson raised.

Again, I simply want to urge committee members. I think we're going to have a sense of this fairly quickly in terms of the availability of the various witnesses once we put things out, and it is in our collective interest to try to move things along fairly quickly.

I just want us to think about how this would get sequenced. We're looking most likely at two days to deal with privilege. We're probably looking at least at some period of time at a minimum that we need to instruct the analyst in terms of a report back to the House. We might decide we need more time for privilege, but that is my sense of where things are leading right now, unless the facts change. We have set aside three possible dates: May 16, 18, and 30 to deal with the estimates, and hopefully we can dispense with that within two of our meetings.

Once we have a sense of how this thing is going to sequence, might I suggest that we call a subcommittee meeting to figure out the rest of how we move things forward for at least the balance of the session? That is the practical thing to do.

At that point too the minister wants some certainty as to when she might appear because she has some dates when she is available and some dates she is travelling. That's the issue. I'm happy to have her come as expeditiously as possible so that you can ask your questions, and I'm fine with that.

From that, where do we want to carry on? I'd like to get back to the Chief Electoral Officer's report at least for the balance of the session and get as much of that done as possible.

My cards are on the table, so rather than our getting into the substantive debate of the issues you're raising.... You're raising issues that I think we can come back to in the fall, as a committee, if we can get through the Chief Electoral Officer's report and any legislation that might happen to appear before us, and then go back to other standing order changes if we think we want to get back to that particular issue. That should be—

Mr. David Christopherson:

I shan't hold my breath.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

We shall not hold our breath. Let's leave that as a conversation we will have in the future. I think the logical way to approach this is to get a sense fairly quickly of where things are going to go in terms of dealing with privilege, with estimates. Let's then, at that point, maybe communicate through our offices to call a subcommittee meeting to fill everything else in. At that point at least we have something to the end of the session. I don't think we need to waste any more time on this at this point.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I concur with everything Mr. Chan just said. He's trying to lay all his cards on the table. He actually doesn't know, to some degree, which cards he's going to be dealt, with regard to the issues like the minister's availability, so it's unreasonable to try to pursue this further until he is able to find out what some of those cards are—to keep the metaphor going. I think that all makes sense.

I also agree with everything Mr. Christopherson said. I have a few suggestions as well for changes to the Standing Orders. Actually, I don't agree with quite everything, David. I think we may find more goodwill than we anticipate on the part of the government. I don't want to sound like I'm Elizabeth May, and always giving the Liberals the benefit of the doubt, but on this occasion I think there's goodwill from everybody at the table. Certainly I know there are other people in the Liberal Party who have tons of goodwill on this kind of thing.

I want to add one last thing, if I could. This is actually a request to our analyst.

Mr. Christopherson raised an interesting point. Although these events happened when I was there, I did not absorb them. I was probably sitting at my desk in the House Commons and reading a book instead of paying attention. But we are all members of parties that have been the third party in this place. I remember being the senior researcher for the Reform Party caucus when it was the third party, and the Bloc Québécois was the second party. The NDP has had its experience being in third place, so have the Liberals fairly recently. The point he's raising is a valid one. I just wondered if on that particular matter we could ask the analyst. Presumably, the way things go, you have all summer to look at what the practices are in the various legislatures with regard to the particular matter he raised of speeding up votes.

I don't know if that's a matter of a different practice that has become a convention, as opposed to being a matter of a standing order. There's nothing that prevents you from taking a practice and making it into a standing order, but it would be good to know what the details are of the model, particularly the Ontario model, but possibly others that are out there, to allow us, if we choose, to move forward productively on that particular point.

(1240)

The Chair:

That's good. We'll ask the analyst to do that. That's a good idea.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Bienvenue à la 56e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Comme vous le savez, hier, la Chambre a voté à l'unanimité pour renvoyer la question de privilège concernant la libre circulation des députés au sein de la cité parlementaire au Comité. Je crois que vous en avez tous un exemplaire devant vous. L'ordre de renvoi précise que « le Comité accorde à cette question la priorité sur tous les autres travaux, y compris son examen du Règlement et de la procédure de la Chambre et de ses comités, pourvu que le Comité présente son rapport au plus tard le 19 juin 2017. »

La réunion est actuellement publique.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Merci. J'invoque le Règlement, comme je vous avais indiqué que je prévoyais le faire, monsieur le président.

Mon propos est lié au rappel au Règlement que j'avais soulevé juste avant que le coup de marteau sonne le glas de la dernière réunion. J'ai plusieurs choses à dire.

Pour commencer, puisque les caméras tournaient toujours et que le microphone était encore allumé, les gens sauront que j'ai utilisé certains termes qui ne sont pas parlementaires. Je ne sais pas s'il faut retirer les mots non parlementaires proférés après une réunion qui a été tenue à l'extérieur d'une lecture parlementaire d'un point de vue formel, alors j'imagine que je ne suis pas en mesure de les retirer. Cependant, j'ai la possibilité de dire ce qui suit, c'est-à-dire ce que je voulais soulever lorsque j'ai invoqué le Règlement à ce moment-là. Je croyais alors que, si nous l'avions demandé, nous aurions pu en arriver à un consensus unanime qui aurait pu faire en sorte que M. Simms accepte de retirer sa motion. En tant que partie prenante du processus, j'aurais bien sûr été heureux moi aussi de retirer mon amendement à sa motion. Selon moi, si nous tentions de faire un tour de table, aujourd'hui, nous pourrions peut-être réussir à le faire.

Pendant que j'ai la parole, monsieur le président, je tiens à souligner publiquement quelque chose que vous savez déjà, soit le fait que j'ai remis une lettre, à vous et au greffier, dans laquelle je décris ce que j'estime être les quatre situations dans lesquelles, en tant que président, durant cette réunion épique, vous avez enfreint les pratiques de la Chambre, telles qu'établies dans O'Brien et Bosc ou, sinon, dans le Règlement. Ces quatre situations sont énumérées, et j'aimerais qu'on se penche sur la question plus tard à un moment approprié, après avoir traité de la question de privilège qui nous a été renvoyée et peut-être aussi après avoir réglé d'autres dossiers importants pour le Comité. Nous pourrions le faire à un moment jugé adéquat par les membres du Comité.

Cependant, je tiens à dire — et j'ai utilisé une assez grande partie de la lettre que je vous ai remise pour le souligner — que, même si ces problèmes précis sont importants, selon moi, en tant que question de privilège, je n'essaie aucunement par là de dénigrer votre présidence générale de cette réunion extraordinaire et, à n'en pas douter, unique. J'estime que votre présidence dans l'ensemble a été absolument remarquable. Je vous portais déjà une grande estime en tant que parlementaire et, en fait, la 55e réunion étant maintenant derrière nous, mon estime n'en est que plus élevée, en raison de la façon générale dont vous avez géré les choses durant cette longue période. Cependant, je crois tout de même qu'il est important de se pencher sur ces choses, parce qu'il est important de comprendre clairement quelles sont les pratiques acceptables et celles qui ne le sont pas.

Voilà, c'est tout ce que j'avais à dire, monsieur le président. Je vous remercie de m'avoir accordé le temps de le faire.

Le président:

Je vous en suis reconnaissant, monsieur Reid. Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais commencer, si vous me le permettez, en disant simplement que j'abonde dans le même sens que M. Reid en ce qui a trait à votre présidence de la réunion. Je crois que cela s'applique aussi, en fait, à toute notre dynamique de groupe. Le fait que, au beau milieu d'une bataille rangée majeure — la lutte n'aurait pas pu être beaucoup plus féroce que ça —, nous ayons tout de même réussi à trouver une solution à l'amiable et créer ce que nous avons appelé...

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Le modèle Simms.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, le modèle Simms, en vertu duquel nous avons trouvé une façon de permettre à nos collègues de prendre la parole et d'interagir d'une façon qui n'est pas pratique courante, mais on estimait qu'il s'agissait de la façon la plus saine pour nous de composer avec la situation dans laquelle nous nous trouvions.

Je tiens donc à élargir vos remarques, si vous me le permettez, monsieur Reid, et les appliquer non seulement à notre président, mais aussi à nos collègues. On n'aurait pas vraiment pu demander mieux lorsqu'on est dans une situation aussi difficile. Dans cette optique, espérons que des leçons ont été apprises et qu'on en tirera de bonnes choses.

Monsieur le président, la raison pour laquelle j'ai demandé la parole, c'est que le gouvernement a indiqué qu'il reculait; M. Simms a mentionné dans un gazouillis, dans des conversations et dans des commentaires publics qu'il avait l'intention de retirer sa motion. M. Reid a dit que, si M. Simms retire sa motion, l'amendement sera de toute évidence retiré aussi. Par conséquent, ce que j'aimerais, c'est qu'on libère la table. Si nous ne faisons que poursuivre nos travaux, techniquement, la motion est encore en suspens et pourrait être rappelée par M. Simms à tout moment qu'il le désire, et elle serait recevable. Cela est problématique, parce que cette situation ne peut que nous laisser, sur les banquettes de l'opposition, avec l'impression que le gouvernement se réserve le droit de ramener de force cette motion.

Afin de nous permettre un changement d'air et un nouveau départ, et afin que nous puissions vraiment travailler, je ne dirais pas que c'est nécessaire, mais ce serait assurément très important d'entreprendre la procédure officielle pour retirer la motion et l'amendement. Qu'on les fasse disparaître, de façon à ce que nous puissions retourner au travail et que ce dossier retourne devant la Chambre où la lutte se poursuivra, mais dans une autre arène, en fonction d'un ensemble de règles différent, de façon à ce que nous puissions nous remettre au travail.

Je demande donc, par votre intermédiaire, monsieur le président, si M. Simms est prêt à demander un consentement unanime pour retirer sa motion et, par voie de conséquence, il en irait de même pour M. Reid, pour clarifier cette affaire afin que le gouvernement et l'opposition puissent adopter le même point de vue et la même attitude à l'avenir, sans laisser planer de doute sur la possibilité qu'il n'y ait pas anguille sous roche.

(1110)

Le président:

Monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Nous sommes le 4 mai, et je porte une cravate sur laquelle on peut voir le visage de Darth Vader, qui représente l'Empire.

Des voix: Ah, ah!

M. Scott Simms: Je dis cela à la blague, mais je sais que c'est un sujet sérieux, et je m'excuse auprès de mes collègues. S'il vous plaît, ne le prenez pas mal.

Pour commencer, je tiens à vous remercier d'avoir donné mon nom à une mesure que, je l'espère, à l'avenir, nous utiliserons dans le cadre d'un débat adulte, pour ainsi dire. J'ose espérer que, durant une bataille rangée et endiablée, dans la mêlée, je puisse jouer mon rôle, en utilisant non pas un gant de crin, mais plutôt un gant de velours.

Avant de faire ce que je m'apprête à faire, habituellement, les gens diraient « je regrette d'avoir à le faire », mais je n'ai pas beaucoup de regret, et ce, pour plusieurs raisons. J'aime le contenu de la motion. Vraiment. J'aime le contenu du document de travail. Mais, qui plus est, j'ai vraiment aimé le contenu de ce que j'appelle l'obstruction avec un petit « o », parce que nous avons vraiment réussi à mettre de l'avant beaucoup d'idées. Nous avons réussi à tenir de bonnes discussions, des discussions, qui parfois, se rapprochaient du meilleur jeu théâtral que je n'aie jamais vu ici même, et je le dis de façon positive. Par théâtre, j'entends du bon contenu. Par exemple, il y a deux semaines, j'ai acheté une copie de la Magna Carta.

Le président:

Vous n'aviez pas à le faire. C'est dans le procès-verbal.

Des voix: Ah, ah!

M. Scott Simms:

Vous soulevez en fait un point valable. J'ai gaspillé 20 $. Non, ce n'est pas du gaspillage parce que...

M. David Christopherson:

Il vous reste encore 800 ans.

M. Scott Simms:

De toute façon, ça m'a donné l'idée de l'acheter, et lorsque j'ai acheté le document, je me suis rendu compte que c'était un exercice utile, et c'est la raison pour laquelle je parle d'obstruction avec un petit « o ». En fait, j'ai aimé une bonne partie du contenu, et pas seulement ce que disait l'opposition, mais ce que nous avons dit de notre côté aussi. Je tiens à remercier mes collègues des deux côtés, ici.

Cela dit, j'ai invoqué le Règlement pour une très bonne raison. Je demande le consentement unanime à tous mes collègues, et je le fais avec beaucoup de respect, pour retirer la motion que j'ai déposée le... Je ne me souviens pas de la date.

(La motion est retirée.)

Le président:

Monsieur Reid, avons-nous besoin du consentement unanime pour retirer votre amendement?

M. Scott Reid:

Je ne sais pas.

Le président:

Faisons-le.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui.

Le président:

Avons-nous le consentement unanime pour retirer l'amendement?

M. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

Puisque la motion est retirée, il n'y a pas d'amendement à la motion principale.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

On ne peut pas modifier quelque chose qui n'existe pas.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous pourriez probablement en parler pendant plusieurs jours cependant.

Le président:

D'accord. Merci à tous.

M. Arnold Chan:

Puisque ce dossier est réglé, je crois que, techniquement, M. Graham a souligné que nous serions normalement le 25 mars...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le 23 mars.

M. Arnold Chan:

Oui, il faudrait donc que l'horloge indique maintenant, enfin, le 4 mai.

Nous avons beaucoup de travail, et particulièrement le dossier qui nous a été renvoyé par la Chambre. Puis-je obtenir le consentement de mes collègues afin que nous puissions discuter rapidement de la façon dont nous irons de l'avant, puisque nous n'avons maintenant rien devant nous? Tout ce que nous avions prévu au calendrier est évidemment derrière nous, maintenant, et nous devons réfléchir à la façon dont nous procéderons maintenant.

Je suis désolé, monsieur Graham. Je vous cède la parole.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je voulais tout simplement poser rapidement une question à mes collègues. Vu la motion que nous avons adoptée au début de la réunion du Comité, voulez-vous que nous poursuivions cette partie de la discussion à huis clos ou en public? Je m'en remets à vous.

M. Scott Reid:

Essentiellement, nous convenons de nous pencher sur le calendrier, alors c'est une bonne question.

M. David Christopherson:

Vu la nature, cependant, du dossier dont nous nous occupons, soit notre accès, et tout le monde sait ce dont il s'agit, puis-je suggérer que, peut-être, plutôt que de tout simplement passer immédiatement à huis clos, nous pourrions au moins commencer à parler de la structure? Je crois que c'est ce que nous avons fait la dernière fois. En fait, je crois que nous avions tout fait publiquement la dernière fois.

Qu'on me corrige si j'ai tort, monsieur le président, mais il me semble que nous avions tout fait publiquement, et que c'était seulement au moment de la production du rapport ou de nos délibérations que nous sommes passés à huis clos. À tout le moins, je suggère que nous parlions de la structure et de la façon dont nous allons aborder cette question. Je suggère que, sauf si nous abordons certains thèmes qui exigent de passer à huis clos — et c'est à ce moment-là que nous le ferions habituellement — je ne vois aucune bonne raison de passer immédiatement à huis clos, puisque — je me répète — nous avions réalisé tout le processus publiquement la dernière fois. Nous n'avons aucune bonne raison de ne pas, au moins, commencer en public, et si quelqu'un veut, en cours de route, faire valoir qu'il faudrait passer à huis clos, il pourra le faire à ce moment-là.

Actuellement, nous n'avons pas vraiment de bonne raison de passer à huis clos, alors mettons-nous au travail.

(1115)

M. Arnold Chan:

Je suis d'accord. On peut très bien rester en public.

Le président:

Est-ce que tout le monde est d'accord?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je crois que nous sommes tous sur la même longueur d'onde. C'est parfait pour moi.

Le président:

D'accord. Bon.

Pendant que nous sommes tous aussi ouverts d'esprit et heureux, puis-je parler rapidement du calendrier pour une seconde?

Si nous voulons formuler des commentaires sur le budget, il faut le faire avant le 31 mai. Il faut s'entendre sur la journée où nous voulons essayer d'accueillir ces témoins, parce que nous avons besoin du greffier de la Chambre, des services de protection et de représentants du directeur général des élections.

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai une question procédurale, monsieur le président, pour vous et le greffier. Je ne connais pas la réponse.

Puisque c'est un ordre de la Chambre, et que la Chambre nous a en fait demandé de nous occuper de ce dossier, pouvons-nous laisser faire et nous occuper d'autre chose, puisque la Chambre règne sur nous? Même si, techniquement, nous sommes maîtres de notre destin, la Chambre est notre patron. Pouvez-vous me fournir des précisions à ce sujet, s'il vous plaît?

Le président:

C'est une bonne question.

Selon le greffier, puisque c'est un précédent, et puisque le délai pour le budget est extrêmement serré, si nous nous entendons à l'unanimité, ce ne sera probablement pas un problème.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est intéressant, c'est donc dire qu'un consentement unanime peut l'emporter sur la volonté de la Chambre. C'est bon à savoir.

Le président:

La Chambre nous a aussi imposé le délai pour le budget.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, alors, techniquement, il faudrait retourner devant la Chambre pour savoir quelle est la priorité.

Je ne veux pas qu'on s'enfarge dans les fleurs du tapis, mais c'est une question intéressante lorsqu'il est question de l'établissement de notre calendrier.

Le président:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous avons déjà établi un précédent il y a quelques secondes lorsque nous avons retiré à l'unanimité une autre motion. Nous l'avons fait par consentement unanime alors que ce n'est pas ce que nous étions censés faire.

M. Scott Reid:

Si j'ai bien compris, dès qu'on fait quelque chose par consentement unanime, d'une certaine façon, on n'établit pas un précédent, ce qui permet de contourner cette difficulté. Je crois cependant que c'est une fiction, en un sens, parce qu'on établit un précédent dans une certaine mesure.

Voici ce qui se produirait selon moi si nous faisions quelque chose que la Chambre trouve vraiment grave. Une personne pourrait soulever cette question à la Chambre et dire: « Cela représente une violation distincte d'un privilège », s'il y avait un genre de problème de privilège permanent qui était retardé. Puisque, en fait, il s'agissait d'une question de privilège de M. Nater, et que, par conséquent, les droits... Je comprends que ce n'est pas lui qui a été retardé, mais c'est la question de privilège qu'il a soulevée, alors il pourrait probablement en parler. Là où j'essaie d'en venir, c'est qu'il y a un moyen de gérer cette situation, et je soupçonne que nous n'aurons pas de problème à la Chambre parce que quelqu'un soulèverait cette question, relativement à laquelle nous pouvons obtenir une confirmation.

M. David Christopherson:

Je ne crois pas qu'il y aura de problème. C'est simplement intéressant pour ceux qui ont ces choses à coeur. Mais je suis d'accord. Je crois que, par consentement unanime, nous pouvons faire à peu près n'importe quoi. Si nous sommes tous d'accord, qui, là-bas, pourrait avoir un problème? La situation serait assez étrange.

M. Arnold Chan:

Le seul point que je soulève, moi aussi, c'est que c'est théorique. Tout dépend du temps dont nous croyons avoir besoin. Nous pourrions discuter du temps dont nous croyons avoir besoin pour nous débarrasser de la motion de privilège de M. Nater. À mon avis, nous devrions présenter les listes des témoins d'ici, disons, vendredi.

M. Jamie Schmale:

C'est demain?

M. Arnold Chan:

C'est demain. Ce n'est pas la première fois. C'est déjà arrivé, alors nous avons déjà une idée. Même dans le cadre de la législature précédente, il y a eu deux situations précises où il y a eu des incidents similaires, et nous savions ce que les témoins... Nous avons appelé le Président. Nous avons appelé les responsables du SPP.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est seulement 24 heures. C'est très serré.

M. Arnold Chan:

Selon moi, rien ne nous empêche d'ajouter des témoins supplémentaires par la suite.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si les témoignages des témoins exigent que nous fassions venir plus de témoins, je ne crois pas que quiconque refusera qu'on appelle plus de témoins. Par où commence-t-on? Commençons par planifier les deux ou trois premières réunions.

(1120)

M. Arnold Chan:

Nous devons simplement déterminer ce que nous ferons pour mardi prochain.

M. David Christopherson:

Si nous sommes tous d'accord, nous pouvons le planifier.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je crois que nous devons savoir que nous allons définitivement devoir convoquer quelqu'un pour, peut-être, mardi prochain, histoire de faire avancer les choses. Nous pouvons peut-être nous entendre sur l'identité des témoins dont la participation est évidente.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui.

M. Arnold Chan:

Et peut-être qu'au début de la réunion, nous pourrons nous occuper de toutes les autres choses auxquelles nous aurons pensé d'ici là. Selon moi, c'est simplement une façon pratique d'aller de l'avant, parce qu'il n'y a pas eu de réunion du Sous-comité depuis un certain temps.

Le président:

À titre d'information, j'ai oublié de mentionner que des recherchistes ont produit un rapport lorsque la question a été soulevée précédemment, et c'est ce sur quoi porte le rapport. Il est actuellement en traduction, mais vous l'aurez d'ici mardi, alors nous aurons accès à beaucoup de renseignements contextuels et nous n'aurons pas à partir de rien.

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

La question de privilège est uniquement à mon nom, même si, au départ, ce ne sont pas mes privilèges qui ont été bafoués, mais j'ai cependant l'occasion unique que la motion soit à mon nom.

Je suggère, pour revenir à la question initiale du budget, que la motion de la Chambre indique que nous en fassions une priorité, mais cela ne signifie pas que nous ne pouvons pas, parallèlement, examiner d'autres enjeux aussi, tant que ce dossier reste la priorité du Comité. Je crois que nous respecterions la directive de la Chambre de prévoir une réunion pour examiner le budget avant le 31 mai. Je crois que cela comblerait le besoin de continuer d'en faire une priorité du Comité, tout en ayant l'occasion d'examiner le budget avant la date limite fixée au 31 mai. C'est ce que je suggérerais, si c'est la volonté du Comité. En tant qu'auteur de la motion de privilège, je serais favorable à une telle solution.

Le président:

Acceptez-vous que nous communiquions avec d'éventuels témoins pour voir s'ils pourraient comparaître à l'une de nos deux dernières réunions de mai?

M. Scott Reid:

Pour les deux dernières réunions...?

Le président:

Vous avez l'horaire devant vous. Je crois que c'est le 18, puis le 30.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, si vous me le permettez, je soupçonne que les deux témoins dont nous parlons sont nos collègues, Mme Raitt et M. Bernier. Le problème évident, ici...

Le président:

Je suis désolé, je parlais des témoins pour le budget.

M. Scott Reid:

Oh, je suis désolé.

Le président:

Il y a trois témoins. Les services de protection seraient avec le greffier. Ils pourraient parler de deux budgets, celui de la Chambre, et celui des services de protection. Puis, il y aurait le budget du directeur général des élections pour Élections Canada. Ce sont des personnes occupées, alors je proposais au greffier de confirmer s'ils sont disponibles, soit le 18, soit le 30.

M. Scott Reid:

Ça me semble raisonnable.

M. David Christopherson:

Nous voulons discuter avec eux pendant combien de temps?

Le président:

Qu'avons-nous fait, avant? Dans le passé, nous avions prévu une heure avec le greffier, et une heure avec le directeur général des élections.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, et voici le problème. Nous n'avons pas terminé l'étude des services de protection que nous avons commencée il y a un certain temps, peu de temps après la création du Comité. Nous avions commencé à travailler, puis cette question a été mise de côté, quand d'autres dossiers ont pris le dessus. Nous avons là l'occasion de gérer certains de ces mêmes enjeux, et donc, je joue cartes sur table, les gens connaissent certains des enjeux qui me tiennent à coeur, et je ne crois pas qu'une heure sera suffisante pour en parler.

Pour ce qui est de l'autre question, je ne sais pas pour vous, mais je n'ai pas grand-chose à demander au directeur général des élections, à part le fait que j'aimerais bien qu'il fournisse certaines dates limites. Je veux obtenir plus de renseignements de lui que je ne le ferais habituellement dans le cadre du processus budgétaire, vu le travail que nous faisons dans le cadre de cette étude, qui a maintenant été reportée. Je suis très préoccupé. J'ai été d'une grande franchise avec M. Chan et d'autres au sujet du fait que nous sommes unis — du moins, c'est mon cas — avec le gouvernement, dans la mesure où nous voulons apporter d'importants changements aux lois électorales.

Une bonne partie de l'information figure dans le rapport du directeur général des élections. C'est en bonne partie une question d'éliminer tout le mauvais, selon moi, prévu dans le projet de loi C-23. Ce travail doit être fait. Ça me briserait le coeur si on arrivait à la fin de la présente législature, avec un gouvernement majoritaire et au moins un des deux partis de l'opposition qui veulent vraiment apporter des réformes dans ces domaines — des réformes progressistes et positives —, sans qu'on ait réussi à faire disparaître les horreurs qui nous ont été imposées durant la dernière législature.

Tout ça pour dire que, pour ma part, j'aurai peut-être besoin d'un peu plus de temps qu'à l'habitude durant l'étude du budget, mais je ne dis pas qu'il faut que la queue commande à la tête. Je dis simplement que, de mon point de vue, on aura peut-être besoin d'un peu plus de temps, vu la situation actuelle dans ces deux dossiers.

(1125)

Le président:

Nous allons passer à M. Reid, puis à M. Chan.

M. Scott Reid:

Exception faite des éditoriaux au sujet de la loi précédente, je tiens à dire que je crois que M. Christopherson a soulevé un très bon point au sujet du DGE... Bien sûr, ce n'est pas le DGE, il occupe le poste de façon provisoire. Le DGE par intérim et son éventuel remplaçant vont en avoir plein les bras et vont devoir composer avec un changement de garde en cours qui doit se faire en très peu de temps, en plus des préoccupations soulevées par M. Christopherson, qui, si j'ai bien compris, sont liées principalement au projet de loi C-33. De son point de vue, je crois que cela concernerait les éléments qui lui déplaisent le plus au sujet de la loi actuelle qui a été imposée durant la dernière législature.

Est-ce que je me trompe?

M. David Christopherson:

C'est un bon début.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. Là où je veux en venir, c'est qu'il faut s'occuper du projet de loi C-33, et tenir compte des genres de délais qu'il y aura dans ce dossier. De plus, il y a le problème de la ministre Gould, qui nous demande de terminer notre étude du 42e rapport parlementaire du DGE à notre président, afin qu'elle puisse ensuite prendre notre rapport, travailler sur la législation à l'automne, produire un texte législatif et le transmettre au DGE afin que ce dernier puisse tout mettre en oeuvre avant les prochaines élections. Le DGE pourrait nous en parler.

En fait, il y a le dossier de la loi sur la réforme financière, la réforme du financement des élections ou le projet de loi sur le financement des partis que la ministre Gould a promis de présenter à la Chambre. J'ai l'impression... en fait, j'ai eu l'occasion de lui poser la question et, même si sa réponse n'était pas claire... en fait, je ne me rappelle pas ce qu'elle a dit, mais la question était essentiellement: « Est-ce que ce doit être en place d'ici la fin de 2017 afin qu'on passe à l'action durant l'année civile 2018, parce que la gestion du financement des partis se fait en fonction du régime de l'année civile? »

Toutes ces choses sont en suspens. Elles sont toutes liées au DGE, et je me dis que, pour cette raison, ce serait utile de rencontrer le directeur général par intérim pendant plus d'une heure. Je crois que nous devrions probablement tous nous entendre sur le fait que, en plus de l'étude précise sur le budget, nous devrions nous donner la possibilité de traiter de ces enjeux plus généraux. Sachant que le DGE — j'imagine — regarde religieusement les réunions du Comité, nous avons effectivement, durant la réunion d'aujourd'hui, avisé le DGE par intérim qu'il doit s'attendre à ce qu'on lui demande certains renseignements sur ces dossiers.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je voulais tout simplement dire que ce serait peut-être préférable d'avoir une petite marge de manoeuvre; nous devrions peut-être choisir le 18 mai comme date préférentielle, parce que nous n'aurons plus beaucoup de jeu si nous décidons de continuer jusqu'au 30 mai. Rendus à cette date, nous serons au pied du mur. Ça, c'est si le directeur général des élections est disponible. Dans le cas contraire, il connaît notre horaire. Présentement, nous avons le 16, le 18 et, probablement, le 30 mai, concrètement, de façon à lui donner une certaine marge de manoeuvre pour qu'il puisse venir ici témoigner. Peut-être que nous devrions commencer par le directeur général des élections — et prendre autant de temps que nous en avons besoin —, puis inviter le Président de la Chambre et le directeur du Service de protection parlementaire. J'imagine que nous n'aurons pas besoin d'autant de temps pour examiner leur processus budgétaire.

À propos de notre calendrier, on devrait faire preuve de respect et leur donner une date fixe pour leur témoignage. Peut-être aussi que nous allons simplement nous en remettre à vous, monsieur le président, et, pour leur donner un peu de flexibilité, leur offrir de venir le 16, le 18 ou le 30 mai, en accordant la priorité au directeur général des élections pour qu'il se présente le plus tôt possible. Ensuite, nous pourrons fixer une date pour le président et le directeur du SPP. Selon moi, on devrait éviter le 30 mai, parce que la date limite est le 31 mai. Nous avons besoin d'un peu plus de flexibilité pour pouvoir trouver des réponses à nos questions. Je suis aussi conscient du fait que nous avons aussi une date butoir pour l'étude de la motion de privilège. Vous avez soulevé de bons points, mais nous ne voulons pas nous éterniser là-dessus.

L'autre chose que je veux dire, brièvement, concerne la ministre Gould et la priorisation de son programme dictée par sa lettre de mandat. Je pourrais demander, à son personnel et à elle, s'ils ont réexaminé les points prioritaires essentiels qu'ils veulent que nous étudiions avant d'ajourner pour l'été, dans la mesure du possible. Je dis cela parce qu'on nous a clairement indiqué que quelque chose devait être fait d'ici le 19 mai, et, de toute évidence, nous n'allons pas y arriver. Je ne crois pas que nous avons assez de temps, vu toutes les autres choses dont nous devons nous occuper également.

Je crois qu'il nous reste six semaines de séance pour régler cette question et nous occuper du budget. Nous allons probablement vouloir accorder la priorité à cette question, puis revenir au budget, et ensuite reprendre les recommandations du tableau C du rapport du directeur général des élections, là où nous nous sommes arrêtés.

(1130)

M. David Christopherson:

Une chose n'attend pas l'autre, et je ne sais plus où j'en suis.

Quelle était la date limite pour la ministre...?

M. Scott Reid:

Vous voulez dire la ministre Gould?

M. David Christopherson:

Oui. Quelle était la date limite pour la ministre Gould...?

M. Scott Reid:

Elle a dit au début du mois de juin, ou préférablement vers la fin du mois de mai. C'est ce qu'elle nous a dit. Je vous rapporte ces paroles exactes, ou presque.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui. Est-ce qu'il y a un projet de loi ou est-ce qu'elle...?

M. Scott Reid:

Non, ça concerne notre examen du rapport du directeur général des élections.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord, j'essayais de décider. La mémoire me fait défaut, je vais devoir m'en remettre à mes notes.

Qu'importe, ce que je voulais dire, c'est que dès que le gouvernement a reconnu que la façon dont il s'y était pris avec le projet de loi C-33 était vouée à l'échec dès le début — ne recommencez plus... Je crois que le message a été reçu, et je vois que certaines personnes hochent la tête. Oui, on dirait que le message a été reçu. Nous avons dit que nous allions essayer de tout terminer dans les délais impartis pourvu que le gouvernement était prêt à cesser d'usurper nos travaux. Je suis prêt à tenir parole, mais je dois vous dire qu'il reste de moins en moins de temps.

Je vais m'en remettre à vous, monsieur le président. Peut-être que nous allons devoir en parler dans un cadre, ou peut-être demander au Sous-comité de se pencher sur quelques-unes des échéances imminentes qui nous concernent afin de pouvoir organiser, d'une façon ou d'une autre, notre temps pour que nous puissions atteindre, dans la mesure du possible, nos objectifs pendant que nous sommes encore ici. À mesure que la fin du mois de juin approche, les choses sont toujours moins claires. C'est toujours la même histoire: est-ce qu'on doit conclure un accord, est-ce qu'on va s'en sortir? La même chose s'est passée à Queen's Park. On patauge dans les ententes, et tout le monde veut sortir. Ça dépend de l'atmosphère qui règne à la Chambre. Si on parvient à un accord, nous pourrons quitter deux ou trois jours plus tôt. Dans le cas contraire, on reste jusqu'à la dernière nanoseconde.

Ces échéances font qu'il y a trois ou peut-être quatre points différents — tous très importants — en jeu. Dans chaque cas, à l'étape où nous en sommes, il faut qu'il y ait un haut niveau de coopération entre le Comité et le gouvernement pour atteindre les objectifs fixés. Je doute que nous tous ici présents y arriverons. Nous ne devrions pas interrompre nos discussions, mais il me semble qu'à un moment ou à un autre, nous allons devoir décider de ce que nous allons faire avec ces trois, quatre ou cinq éléments... peu importe le nombre de points qu'il y a. Nous devons aussi garder à l'esprit les priorités qui nous sont dictées par la Chambre. Je crois que nous avons tous accepté — il y a eu un consentement unanime — de nous éclipser pour voter sur le budget, mais il nous reste des dossiers à clore.

Je ne veux simplement pas que nous nous retrouvions au pied du mur si nous ne prenons pas le temps maintenant de nous attaquer aux détails. Il va encore nous rester des choses à faire, et nous n'aurons plus de temps. C'est là que le gouvernement va nous dire: « Eh bien, nous n'avons plus le choix maintenant. Il va falloir prendre des mesures législatives. » Ça va me rendre fou à nouveau, et encore une fois, nous allons perdre notre temps. Si on veut éviter que cela se produise, je crois qu'il est dans l'intérêt du Comité de décider du déroulement exact de la suite des choses afin que nous ayons tous les moyens possibles pour atteindre nos objectifs, et ce, dans les délais qui ont été fixés.

Je n'ai pas mon pareil pour expliquer un problème.

Le président:

Je pense que nous pouvons décider aujourd'hui de la façon dont nous allons aborder la question de privilège et le budget, mais je suis d'accord avec vous sur le fait que nous devrions peut-être demander à un groupe de travail de déterminer comment nous y prendre pour la suite, comment nous allons arranger les choses jusqu'à l'autre date limite, celle concernant le rapport du directeur général des élections. Je prendrai la décision lorsque nous saurons quand les gens sont disponibles.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord. Peut-on revenir à la question qui nous occupe?

Le président:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Je m'en remets à mon collègue, M. Nater, pour la question de privilège.

Je veux d'abord dire, à propos des autres points soulevés par M. Chan, que, selon moi, son plan de travail et les dates qu'il a proposées sont parfaitement logiques. Je suis d'accord avec tout ce qu'il a dit, sur toute la ligne. Tout ce qu'il a proposé, les dates et ce qui concerne la ministre, tout ce qu'il a dit me semble complètement raisonnable.

J'ai toutefois une recommandation. Pendant la discussion avec la ministre ou avec son équipe, je voulais savoir si on pouvait exposer les choses de cette façon: elle a une relation particulière avec la Loi électorale. Aucun autre ministre n'a ce genre de responsabilité envers le directeur général des élections... Habituellement, la personne qui régit ce genre de loi doit rendre des comptes à un ministre. Le directeur général des élections n'a pas de comptes à rendre à un ministre, pour des raisons évidentes. Il rend des comptes au Comité. Donc, lorsque nous discutons avec le directeur général des élections, c'est une discussion qu'elle ne peut littéralement pas avoir. En quelque sorte, nous sommes sa principale source d'information. Ce serait utile si nous pouvions connaître à l'avance l'information dont elle a vraiment besoin. Il y a peut-être des raisons pour lesquelles... Eh bien, si je peux dire les choses de cette façon, je crois que ce serait utile qu'elle réfléchisse aux lacunes les plus importantes dans ses connaissances qui l'empêchent d'atteindre ses objectifs.

(1135)

M. Arnold Chan:

Bien. Il y a un autre point que je voulais soulever. Nous avons une autre façon de régler le problème: des séances supplémentaires, des séances plus longues ou n'importe quel autre moyen d'arriver à ce que nous voulons faire. Je ne crois pas que je vais contester la motion d'ajournement.

Le président:

Nous pourrons en discuter au Sous-comité.

M. Arnold Chan:

Le Sous-comité pourrait en discuter. On devrait peut-être songer à convoquer une brève réunion du Sous-comité à un moment ou à un autre. Je ne sais pas quand le président est disponible... On pourrait faire cela maintenant, avec tous les membres présents.

M. David Christopherson:

On pourrait prendre 25 minutes pour étudier le cadre entourant la question de privilège... Ça ne devrait pas être trop compliqué.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je doute que ce soit si compliqué.

M. David Christopherson:

Malheureusement, c'est le genre de chose qu'on a déjà faite. Nous savons comment ça fonctionne. On pourrait dès maintenant convoquer une réunion du Sous-comité.

Le président:

C'est vrai.

M. Arnold Chan:

Pourquoi ne pas discuter maintenant de la motion de privilège, puisque M. Nater est ici?

Si vous n'y voyez pas d'inconvénient, je vais commencer.

Le président:

Attendez, nous n'avons pas encore fini. La parole va d'abord aller à M. Nater, mais avant, je veux qu'on règle l'affaire du budget.

La dernière proposition que j'ai entendue était de faire venir les témoins le 16, le 18 et le 30, en essayant que ce soit le plus tôt possible, et en accordant la priorité au directeur général des élections. On a aussi proposé d'allonger un peu la séance et de ne pas se limiter à une heure à cause des idées présentées par M. Christopherson et des questions que nous allons peut-être vouloir poser.

Cela convient-il à tous?

M. David Christopherson:

[Inaudible]

M. Arnold Chan:

Une journée complète...?

M. David Christopherson:

Je ne vois pas d'autre façon. Deux heures, c'est une journée.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je suis d'accord. Est-ce que deux heures avec le directeur général des élections...

M. David Christopherson:

Puis, deux autres avec...

Le président:

Deux heures avec le greffier et le Service de protection...

M. Arnold Chan:

Croyez-vous que nous allons avoir besoin de deux heures avec le greffier? Je ne crois pas que nous allons avoir besoin de deux heures avec lui. À mon avis, le greffier et le SPP sont assez directs.

M. David Christopherson:

Comme vous voulez.

M. Arnold Chan:

On parle ici du budget de la Chambre.

M. David Christopherson:

Je sais.

M. Arnold Chan:

Vous avez peut-être des questions à régler avec le SPP. Encore une fois, j'évite les présomptions ici. Vous avez le droit de poser des questions à propos du budget.

M. David Christopherson:

On peut difficilement séparer cela de la motion de privilège. Il y a un chevauchement. Comme je l'ai mentionné plus tôt, il y avait un moyen d'atténuer mes préoccupations. Je suis conscient du fait que je suis peut-être en position minoritaire. Je l'admets, mais j'ai tout de même des droits. C'est pourquoi j'ai mis en relief le fait qu'il y a des mesures que je peux prendre, mais cela suppose de passer par un tel dédale que, dans les faits, je serais aussi bien d'y renoncer. C'est le genre de choses dont je vais vouloir parler. Je veux que les choses soient parfaitement claires, que la chaîne de commandement ici soit beaucoup plus limpide qu'elle ne l'est présentement. Donc, il y a un chevauchement naturel entre ces deux choses. Je ne veux pas causer de problème...

M. Arnold Chan:

Je comprends.

M. David Christopherson:

... mais je ne vois pas du tout comment on pourrait traiter les deux séparément. Je crois que vous comprenez. Je peux continuer si vous voulez, mais je crois que vous avez compris le fond de ma pensée.

M. Arnold Chan:

C'est ironique, mais ça concerne les mêmes personnes. Qu'on parle de la motion de privilège ou de la motion sur le budget, cela concerne les mêmes parties. La question est donc de savoir pour lequel des deux sujets ils se sont préparés en vue de témoigner devant le Comité.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous êtes un homme intelligent. Vous trouverez bien la réponse. Vous m'avez entendu. Vous savez quels sont mes autres problèmes. Vous savez qu'ils se chevauchent dans ce dossier, et je crois que vous êtes probablement en mesure de comprendre quel est mon objectif. Je ne cache rien. Oui, nous avons besoin des deux heures.

Le président:

David, il y a une autre option; nous allons en effet recevoir très bientôt le directeur général des élections quand nous allons y revenir, et nous pourrions recevoir des représentants du SPP quand il sera question de la motion de privilège. Vous aurez donc deux fois l'occasion de poser toutes ces questions supplémentaires plutôt que le faire pendant qu'il sera question du budget.

M. David Christopherson:

Si c'est ce que vous voulez essayer de faire; puisque la première séance portant sur la question de privilège nous amènera entre autres à parler du budget, cela me convient parfaitement. Ce sera en fait plus facile pour moi, honnêtement.

Le président:

Non. Je proposais que, pendant la séance portant sur la motion de privilège, nous recevions des représentants du SPP, ce qui vous permettra de parler de tout ce que vous voulez, si cela ne concerne pas strictement le budget, puis que nous leur laissions une heure seulement pour le budget.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vois. C'est ici que la collaboration et l'honneur entrent en jeu. Mon amie, Filomena Tassi, est avocate. Elle me connaît bien et elle sait de quoi je parle, exactement.

Si vous pouviez m'accorder un peu plus de latitude que d'ordinaire lorsqu'il est question du privilège, de façon que je puisse aborder la question de la structure... un peu seulement, alors je serais prêt à étudier le budget de manière un peu plus formelle. Ce que je cherchais à faire, c'était de soulever le plus de préoccupations possible pendant qu'il était question du budget, puisque, techniquement, si quelqu'un voulait insister et que vous vouliez faire preuve de sévérité, j'aurais peut-être eu de la difficulté à les soulever pendant que nous parlons du privilège.

Ce que je demande, c'est qu'on m'accorde un petit peu de latitude, parce que, à mon avis, les deux questions sont liées. Il n'est pas possible de parler de la question de privilège sans parler également de la façon dont le service de sécurité est structuré, du mode de fonctionnement du commandement et de notre réalité, puisque, quand il est question de la sécurité, tout n'est pas rose, ici.

(1140)

M. John Nater:

En fait, je suis tout à fait d'accord avec ce que dit M. Christopherson à ce sujet. Je crois que la motion de privilège nous permet tout à fait de discuter de quelques aspects structuraux. Je ne crois pas qu'il faut plus de latitude, je crois que c'est au contraire très pertinent.

Pour en revenir aux commentaires formulés par M. Chan — deux ou trois personnes sont intervenues depuis — sur la façon de procéder pour discuter de la motion de privilège, je propose que, dès mardi prochain, peut-être, nous recevions notre premier témoin, à savoir le greffier de la Chambre, M. Bosc, que nous pourrions inviter afin qu'il nous explique l'importance du privilège et nous parle des principaux enjeux qui y sont liés. À partir de là, je crois que nous pourrions arriver à dégager la logique de notre liste de témoins, entre autres.

Si nous recevons M. Bosc pour commencer, mardi, nous aurions un bon point de départ et nous pourrions passer aux témoins suivants, y compris les représentants du SPP. Nous pourrions en outre nous demander s'il ne faudrait pas inviter M. Bernier et Mme Raitt, les deux députés qui soutiennent qu'il a été porté atteinte à leurs privilèges; ils sont tous deux très occupés au cours des prochaines semaines, parce qu'ils briguent la direction de leur parti politique.

Le président:

D'accord, mais veuillez attendre une seconde. J'aimerais terminer le budget.

Comme il semble que vous disposiez de cette latitude, monsieur Christopherson, nous pourrions recevoir les représentants du SPP et la greffière pendant une heure.

Tout de suite après ces deux-là, nous allons de toute façon recevoir les représentants d'Élections Canada. Nous pourrions consacrer la première partie de notre première séance à toutes vos questions qui n'ont pas trait au budget, c'est ça? Cela nous laisserait...

M. David Christopherson:

Elles sont liées au budget, dans la mesure où elles portent sur les tâches qu'ils devront accomplir, des choses du genre. Quoi qu'il en soit, poursuivez.

Le président:

Cela nous laisserait une heure seulement pour le budget.

Est-ce que cela vous convient?

M. David Christopherson:

Oui.

Le président:

D'accord; nous allons donc proposer le 16, le 18 ou le 30, à raison d'une heure par témoin, selon leurs disponibilités. Nous allons consacrer une heure au service de protection et au greffier, et une heure à Élections Canada. Nous aborderons ensuite les autres questions soulevées par M. Christopherson, pendant les autres séances dont nous venons de parler. Nous allons discuter du privilège pendant la première séance sur...

M. David Christopherson:

Est-ce que cela veut dire, alors, que, pour la première séance concernant le directeur général des élections, ce dernier sera devant nous en chair et en os et que nous pourrons lui poser ces questions?

Le président:

Oui, pour cette séance, nous allons inviter le directeur général des élections.

M. David Christopherson:

Nous venons de couper du temps d'un côté. Je veux tout simplement m'assurer qu'il sera ajouté de l'autre côté; j'aimerais que cela soit clair. Si nous revenions à ce que nous étions en train de faire, nous aurions ici des employés, mais pas de directeur général des élections.

Le président:

Nous allons l'inviter.

M. David Christopherson:

Est-ce que cette partie de la séance sera publique?

Le président:

Bien sûr.

M. David Christopherson:

C'était ce qu'il me restait à préciser avant de pouvoir dire que cela me convient, une heure plutôt que ce que je demandais.

Si nous allons procéder de l'autre manière, assurez-vous tout simplement, que lorsque nous le ferons, je serai en mesure de faire ce que j'aurais pu faire si je n'avais pas renoncé à mon droit, en vertu de l'autre proposition.

Le président:

Bien.

Monsieur Schmale, vous étiez inscrit sur la liste.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je crois que l'on a répondu à ma question. Il s'agissait du comité directeur. Si nous décidons de prévoir une réunion, je voulais seulement souligner que Blake Richards n'est pas présent, alors ça ne fonctionnera pas pour nous.

Le président:

C'est bien.

Madame Tassi.

Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

C'est au sujet des commentaires de M. Christopherson; je crois que nous aimerions poser à peu près les mêmes questions aux représentants du SPP. Non seulement je suis d'accord pour dire que, quand il s'agit de la question de privilège, vous devriez disposer de toute la latitude nécessaire, mais, de plus, nous aimerions la même latitude, car je crois que nous sommes d'accord.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est agréable d'entendre cela.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

C'est une question importante, et c'est pourquoi j'aimerais moi aussi pouvoir poser ces questions; j'appuie votre demande.

Je parle en mon nom. Si mes collègues ont un autre point de vue, ils vont évidemment le dire, mais c'est mon opinion.

M. Arnold Chan:

J'aimerais revenir à M. Nater.

En avons-nous terminé avec le budget?

Le président:

Nous sommes tous d'accord, en ce qui concerne le budget. Nous allons transmettre les invitations. Nous vous dirons dès que nous aurons leur réponse à quel moment les témoins pourront se présenter.

(1145)

M. Arnold Chan:

Je vais donc recommencer à poser des questions à M. Nater.

J'aimerais savoir combien de jours il nous faudra, à votre avis, pour régler cette motion de privilège, pendant que nous en discutons, étant donné que les témoins précédents, nous l'avons vu...

Ce n'est pas nouveau pour nous. La question est la suivante: quels sont les faits que nous connaissons? Bien sûr, nous devons attendre le témoignage des députés concernés. Ensuite, nous allons évidemment obtenir la réponse du Président ou du greffier, celle des représentants du SPP et celle de tout autre témoin que nous jugerons pertinent d'inviter. Les témoignages pourraient aussi être faits par vidéoconférence, mais j'ignore combien d'autres personnes il nous faudrait convoquer, sauf si j'oublie quelque chose.

M. John Nater:

Non. Je crois que vous avez nommé les principales personnes concernées dans le cas qui nous occupe. Il y aura peut-être des problèmes quant aux dates de comparution, dans le cas des deux députés. Nous savons que le Président a reçu un rapport.

Je n'ai jamais vu ce rapport. Je ne sais pas si quelqu'un, au sein de notre comité, a reçu les rapports du SPP. Je n'en ai aucune idée. Mais ces rapports existent. Je crois que, après avoir discuté avec les auteurs de ces rapports, il vaudrait la peine d'inviter les personnes liées à ces rapports.

Je ne crois pas qu'il soit nécessaire de consacrer un grand nombre de séances à cette question. Je crois que le problème sera de nous assurer d'inviter les bonnes personnes et que ces personnes soient disponibles assez rapidement.

Le président:

Avant de céder la parole à Mme Tassi, j'aimerais préciser que, selon la procédure normale, il faudrait que les deux personnes qui prétendent qu'il a été porté atteinte au privilège passent en premier. Cela pourrait nous donner davantage de questions à poser au greffier.

Madame Tassi.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

La seule chose que je voulais ajouter, monsieur le président, c'est que toutes les personnes ici présentes sont d'accord pour dire qu'il s'agit là d'une question très importante. À mon avis, il ne s'agit pas seulement d'examiner ce cas particulier pour vider la question; il faut aussi voir les choses dans leur ensemble. Les députés ont déjà commencé à formuler des suggestions et à exprimer leurs préoccupations.

Je veux tout simplement m'assurer que, lorsque nous nous attaquerons à ce dossier, nous allons le faire sans limiter la discussion à cette question précise. Nous voulons faire de notre mieux de façon que cela n'arrive plus jamais.

Cela dit, on ne m'entendra jamais dire pour le compte rendu que « cela n'arrive plus jamais », puisque nous avons affaire à des êtres humains et que, même si nous cherchons à faire de notre mieux — c'est la raison de notre présence ici, faire de notre mieux —, cette étude va bien au-delà d'un cas précis. Cela suppose que nous nous assurions de convoquer tous les témoins dont nous avons besoin. Je ne veux pas accélérer indûment les choses, même si nous sommes vraiment débordés de travail. L'important, c'est de pouvoir convoquer ici tous les témoins que nous avons besoin de voir, de faire de notre mieux, d'agir avec toute la diligence nécessaire, de faire tout ce qu'il nous est possible de faire pour que cela n'arrive plus jamais. Si nous avions toute la même attitude...

Le président:

Je vais donner la parole à M. Christopherson, mais je vais ensuite demander à M. Nater de réagir.

M. David Christopherson:

Je voulais parler de la même chose, et je suis ravi de ce que je vous entends dire, Filomena. Je crois que nous sommes du même avis.

Dans ce contexte, encore une fois, cela ne s'est pas fait en vase clos. S'il y en a parmi nous qui se sont indignés — et Mme Tassi en a bien parlé —, c'est que, pour ceux d'entre nous qui ont d'assez longues années de service, nous sommes en plein Jour de la marmotte. Certains l'avaient prédit — et ils ont eu raison. Nous sommes toujours des êtres humains, et, à ce titre, nous allons toujours faire des erreurs, mais il me semble qu'il y aura toujours un ingrédient fondamental, la préparation, la planification, les priorités d'accès; mais cela ne se fait pas avec autant de sérieux que les autres plans qui sont dressés pour assurer la sécurité des gens se trouvant sur la Colline du Parlement. Et c'est ce qui cause le désordre. Voilà le problème, voilà pourquoi certains d'entre nous sont en furie. Nous ne pouvons tout simplement pas...

Je ne veux pas m'étendre sur le sujet — je le ferai en temps et lieu —, mais la goutte qui a fait déborder le vase, c'est de voir que, après qu'ils ont fait toutes les promesses du monde, au début — et nous les avons crus, ils nous ont semblé sincères —, mais lorsqu'ils se mettent à agir comme ils le font, notre accès est quelque chose d'absolument essentiel. Non, en fait, il est encore plus essentiel que ça.

Ce dont nous avons désespérément besoin — c'est à cela que je voulais en arriver —, c'est que nos analystes passent en revue tous les incidents qui se sont déjà produits, de façon que nous comprenions bien le contexte. Nous pourrions ainsi comprendre ce qui fonctionne toujours bien — et en attribuer le mérite à qui de droit, s'il y a lieu —, mais il faut reconnaître que ce n'est pas le cas ici et nous intéresser plutôt à ce qui ne fonctionne jamais. Quand nous proposerons des solutions, nous pourrons aussi revenir sur les expériences passées et nous poser la question suivante: « Est-ce que notre solution nous permet non seulement de régler le cas qui nous occupe ou est-ce qu'elle aurait aussi permis de régler les cas passés? »

Le cas échéant, nous nous approchons peut-être vraiment de la solution, étant donné que le problème est systémique: ce n'est pas un problème ponctuel, c'est un problème systémique. Plutôt que de donner l'heure à quelqu'un, dites-lui plutôt comment se fabriquer une montre. Tout cela pour dire que, à mon avis, il nous faut un rapport exhaustif. Je sais que les analystes ont déjà fait une partie de ce travail et qu'ils pourraient nous faire la chronologie de tout ce qui se passe toujours de la même façon et de tout ce qu'il faudrait voir cesser.

(1150)

Le président:

M. Nater voudrait faire un commentaire qui concerne en particulier les témoins.

M. John Nater:

Je vois bien ce que M. Christopherson veut dire. Je sais que l'analyste possède ces informations et que nous pourrons nous appuyer sur elles lorsque nous recevrons les témoins que nous allons à ce moment-là choisir de convoquer.

Les premiers témoins que nous devons convoquer sont le greffier par intérim et les deux députés. En général, il convient de convoquer la personne qui a déposé la motion de privilège — c'est-à-dire moi —, mais, en l'occurrence, je proposerais de convoquerM. Bernier et Mme Raitt.

J'aimerais souligner —, mais je ne sais pas comment on tirera cette question au clair — que, si l'on se fie à la décision du président, d'autres députés, qui se trouvaient dans d'autres autobus, se sont également vu priver de leur droit de vote. Nous ne savons pas de qui il s'agit. Les députés du parti au pouvoir le savent peut-être. J'avais l'impression qu'il y avait d'autres députés. C'est ce que le Président de la Chambre disait dans la... Je ne sais pas de qui il s'agit exactement, mais nous pourrions à tout le moins donner la même possibilité aux autres députés, puisque leur privilège aussi leur a été refusé. Je ne sais pas s'ils se feront connaître, mais j'imagine que c'est là un autre problème. Il est certain que le Service de protection parlementaire devra comparaître. J'imagine que cela se fera après le greffier intérimaire, après les deux députés et après la GRC.

Je crois que ce sont là les personnes qu'il convient de convoquer. À part eux, monsieur Christopherson, avez-vous une opinion, vu que vous avez déjà fait partie d'autres parlements? Nous pourrions peut-être penser à d'autres témoins, au fil des discussions ou après avoir examiné les précédents cas de violation du privilège, mais je crois que ce sont les quatre principaux témoins. En ce qui concerne le greffier, je ne sais pas si, normalement, le président de la Chambre doit l'accompagner ou s'il vient seul. Je l'ignore. Je vais demander l'avis de...

Le président:

Puis-je proposer que, mardi, nous recevions à la première heure M. Nater, les deux personnes qui n'ont pas pu voter et tous les autres députés qui, selon leur whip respectif, en ont eux aussi été empêchés et qui voudraient se présenter et que, à la seconde heure, nous recevrions le greffier?

M. David Christopherson:

J'aimerais seulement qu'une chose soit dite — je ne veux pas que l'on se contente de faire circuler un document. J'aimerais qu'il y ait un exposé en bonne et due forme sur les grandes lignes des incidents précédents. Je crois sincèrement que ce serait presque aussi important que l'incident dont il est maintenant question, en raison de son caractère répétitif qui constitue le problème fondamental.

M. Arnold Chan:

Et quand voudriez-vous avoir ça?

M. David Christopherson:

Je suis très flexible, mais assez rapidement, pour que nous ayons un contexte.

Le président:

Le rapport sera prêt d'ici mardi. Il est présentement en cours de traduction.

M. David Christopherson:

Je ne sais pas. Je m'en remets à M. Nater, mais je crois que cela doit figurer au premier, deuxième ou troisième rangs de nos priorités. Peu importe, je suis ouvert.

Bien sûr, on ne se trompe pas quand on convoque les principaux intéressés, mais, encore une fois, il est logique de vouloir d'abord se renseigner sur l'historique et le contexte. Je suis souple, mais j'aimerais que cela se fasse au début.

M. John Nater:

Peut-être que, pendant la première séance, nous devrions réserver les deux heures aux personnes qui se sont vu priver de leurs droits et, en même temps, revoir le contexte historique. Jeudi, si cela convient au greffier intérimaire, il pourrait comparaître — les deux heures au complet, peut-être — en tant qu'expert en la matière.

M. David Christopherson:

Je crois cependant que le Président de la Chambre devrait accompagner le greffier, puisqu'ils ont tous les deux un rôle clé à jouer au chapitre de la sécurité, c'est évident.

Vous êtes de retour? Bonjour.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Merci. Je suis ravie d'être de retour. Qu'est-ce que j'ai raté?

M. David Christopherson:

Je vais faire une petite récapitulation.

M. Scott Simms:

Vous faites peut-être preuve d'un peu trop d'enthousiasme.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham et ensuite, monsieur Nater.

Bon retour, Anita.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

David, il est toujours possible d'avoir le beurre et l'argent du beurre. Je propose que nous siégions pendant trois heures, de 11 heures à 14 heures, mardi, de façon à régler cette question du rapport et à recevoir les deux premiers groupes de témoins.

M. John Nater:

Je crois que je demanderais au Comité de faire preuve d'indulgence pour un cas bien précis et de faire preuve de souplesse quant à la disponibilité de M. Bernier et de Mme Raitt, qui, de toute évidence, ont un emploi du temps très rempli, puisqu'ils font le tour du pays.

(1155)

M. David Christopherson:

Nous sommes prêts à le faire dans le cas des ministres, notamment.

M. John Nater:

Il faudrait faire preuve de la même souplesse.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

S'ils se trouvent sur la Colline du Parlement, aujourd'hui, il reste une heure à notre séance.

M. John Nater:

Je ne sais pas plus que vous où ils se trouvent. Il serait peut-être un peu précipité, monsieur Graham, d'agir ainsi, mais, si nous leur demandions leur avis, j'imagine que nous pourrions fixer une date, si le Comité est prêt à procéder ainsi.

Le président:

Il est donc proposé de tenir une séance de trois heures, la première qui serait consacrée au rapport du recherchiste, la seconde, aux trois témoins et la troisième, au greffier.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je mettrais l'analyste en premier.

M. David Christopherson:

Avec le greffier et le Président de la Chambre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Le président:

Selon le greffier, et je crois que le cas s'est déjà présenté, étant donné que c'est le Président qui avait pris de prime abord la décision et qu'il l'avait étudiée, il ne serait pas approprié qu'il comparaisse de nouveau, puisqu'il est déjà concerné. Je crois que cette recommandation avait déjà été faite à un précédent Président, non, qui avait rendu une décision sur un sujet quelconque?

M. Arnold Chan:

Nous ne demandons pas au Président de la Chambre de comparaître; nous demandons au greffier de le faire.

Le président:

Oui, mais M. Nater et M. Christopherson proposaient de convoquer également le Président de la Chambre.

M. John Nater:

Puis-je intervenir très rapidement?

Le président:

Oui.

M. John Nater:

L'autre aspect de la question, c'est que le Président de la Chambre — conformément au nouveau mécanisme redditionnel du Service de protection parlementaire — supervise également ce service-là. Il assume cet autre rôle, dont il a parlé dans sa décision, et il faut donc tenir compte de cet autre aspect. Outre sa décision, à savoir s'il y avait à première vue matière à question de privilège, il exerce un pouvoir administratif, en tant que dirigeant de la Chambre des communes ainsi qu'un pouvoir de surveillance sur le Service de protection parlementaire. Il faut donc tenir compte de ces deux aspects, et il pourrait aussi disposer d'un mécanisme approprié.

À cette fin, peut-être — et je ne sais pas par quel moyen nous pourrions demander les études qu'il mentionne dans sa décision —, ces études pourraient également avoir une très grande pertinence dans le cas qui nous occupe.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est un point intéressant, mais je suis d'accord avec M. Nater. Il y a deux choses, ici, et nous en sommes à une étape où nous essayons tout simplement d'obtenir tous les renseignements.

Il ne pourrait pas dire, de but en blanc, ce qui s'est passé sur le terrain, mais il serait une ressource pour qui veut avoir des réponses à des questions, par exemple qui prend la décision, qui peut faire ça. J'essaie de m'en tenir aux faits, et il me semble qu'il est un élément si important des services de sécurité que, si nous n'avons pas... Il se peut que nous ne lui posions aucune question. Il pourrait ne pas nous être utile, mais j'imagine très bien que certaines personnes pourraient poser des questions auxquelles seule une personne qui occupe ce poste peut répondre, et je ne parle pas du cas qui nous occupe — je l'ai compris, c'est on ne peut plus logique —, mais, si l'on veut préparer le terrain pour bien comprendre, si nous l'invitons ici en tant que ressource plutôt qu'en tant que témoin proprement dit, en tant que ressource des témoins, plutôt que témoin pour...

Je crois tout simplement que, si nous ne nous assurons pas de sa présence ici, il nous restera beaucoup de questions sans réponse. Nous allons nous regarder les uns les autres et nous dire: « Savez-vous qui peut répondre à cette question? Le Président de la Chambre. » Je n'ai bien sûr aucune autre intention, et je vous soutiendrais sans réserve de vouloir protéger le Président, pour qu'il ne soit pas mêlé à l'affaire qui nous occupe... Il est certain, à mon avis, qu'il peut répondre à des questions au sujet de la structure, des faits et de la procédure, des questions générales qui ne concernent pas uniquement notre affaire.

M. Arnold Chan:

Me permettez-vous de répondre?

Je crois que le greffier intérimaire peut faire tout cela, il n'est pas nécessaire que le Président de la Chambre soit présent. Au bout du compte, le greffier relève du Président, et le Président est...

M. David Christopherson:

Ce n'est pas à nous qu'il rend des comptes, toutefois. Le Président de la Chambre nous rend des comptes à nous. N'oublions pas...

M. Arnold Chan:

Je vois ce que vous voulez dire.

M. David Christopherson:

Il est le premier parmi ses pairs, mais il reste parmi ses pairs.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je comprends. J'essaie tout simplement de régler le problème que le greffier a soulevé, de trouver une façon de le contourner. Je dis tout simplement que, dans presque tous les cas, le greffier intérimaire peut répondre aux questions de procédure que vous pourriez poser.

(1200)

M. David Christopherson:

Peut-être. Il ne prend aucune décision. Il n'est pas du tout concerné...

M. Chan: Je comprends.

M. Christopherson: ... contrairement au Président de la Chambre, qui est l'ultime responsable, mis à part le commissaire de la GRC.

M. Arnold Chan:

C'est justement le point qu'ils soulevaient, le fait qu'il soit à la fois un décideur et... J'essaie d'éviter ce genre de conflit.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, moi aussi, mais j'essaie également de m'assurer que nous avons à notre disposition les ressources nécessaires et les réponses aux questions, car il est légitime que nous ayons ces réponses.

M. John Nater:

Je pourrais peut-être vous aider à solutionner le problème, monsieur le président. Dans sa décision, le Président de la Chambre a mentionné les différentes propositions qu'il avait présentées au Service de protection parlementaire. Il disait ceci: ... il y a quelques mois, j'ai demandé au directeur du Service de protection parlementaire, dans le cadre de ses objectifs annuels, qu'il offre de la formation continue obligatoire pour tous les membres du Service sur les privilèges, droits, immunités et pouvoirs de la Chambre des communes.

Il a parlé du rôle qu'il jouait dans tout cela. Peut-être que, plutôt que de l'inviter à comparaître avec les premiers témoins, nous serions plus avisés de l'inviter plus tard, après avoir entendu les premiers témoins, pour lui demander de faire le point sur l'évolution de certains des objectifs qu'il a présentés comme étant permanents, et aussi, peut-être, pour lui demander des conseils ou des suggestions sur les recommandations que nous devons présenter à la Chambre et sur les changements qu'il voudrait voir apportés à ses pouvoirs. C'est en quelque sorte pour qu'il ne soit pas lié dès le départ au greffier intérimaire, pour qu'il ne s'embourbe pas par notre faute dans sa décision de prime abord; il nous faudrait plutôt l'inviter à une date ultérieure, après que nous aurons entendu les premiers témoins.

M. David Christopherson:

Si vous me le permettez; je comprends ce que vous essayez de faire. Ce qui me préoccupe, ce qui me pose problème, c'est que je crains que plus nous le forçons à participer à ce processus, plus il se sentira concerné; par contre, si nous lui déclarons que nous sommes à la recherche de faits et qu'il peut nous aider à ce chapitre, plus il sera facile de respecter son indépendance.

C'est le Président de notre Chambre, et nous ne voulons pas lui mettre des bâtons dans les roues; c'est pourquoi nous voulons respecter son indépendance. Je crains tout simplement que, si nous sommes trop exigeants, nous finirons par mêler les cartes et il sera difficile d'y remettre bon ordre, tandis que, si nous faisons ainsi dès le début, le plus tôt possible, cela devient quelque chose de général, cela devient un contexte, des informations techniques, en quelque sorte, et nous pouvons ensuite passer au cas qui nous occupe actuellement. Ce serait ma seule préoccupation, mais je vous remercie de vos suggestions.

Le président:

En ce moment, la proposition est une heure pour le contexte historique, une heure pour les députés touchés plus M. Nater, et une heure pour le greffier suppléant. Pour la troisième heure, nous n'avions pas encore terminé la discussion sur le Président.

M. David Christopherson:

Puis-je suggérer à mes collègues d'envisager un changement et d'abord se pencher sur le contexte historique, ensuite le cadre administratif, pour ce qui est du greffier et du Président? Nous avons survolé la question et entrons maintenant dans le vif du sujet... voici la personne qui est touchée; voici les autres députés. Nous y sommes et avons laissé de côté l'aspect général. Je suggérerais ce changement. Nous pourrions entendre d'abord l'exposé historique de l'analyste pendant une heure, effectuer ensuite l'examen structurel administratif et procéder à la séance d'information d'une heure avec le greffier et le Président. Par la suite, au cours de la troisième heure, nous passerions au débat.

Je ne vais pas en faire une guerre sainte. C'était seulement ce que je pensais.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

J'essaie seulement de comprendre quel ordre serait le mieux. J'aime l'idée de M. Nater parce que le Président a déjà conclu qu'il s'agit d'un cas à première vue. Nous devrons nous pencher sur cette question. Il a déjà rendu sa décision à ce stade, et nous devons passer initialement à la recherche des faits. Je crois qu'il serait mieux que, si le Président témoigne devant le Comité, il vienne témoigner vers la fin afin qu'il sache comment tout ceci...

Je pense, monsieur Christopherson, que vous voulez apporter certains changements, n'est-ce pas? Vous croyez que la façon dont les choses évoluent au fil du temps va à l'encontre des intérêts du privilège parlementaire, du privilège des députés, alors ce serait quelque chose qu'on pourrait mieux aborder à la fin de la recherche des faits.

Je ne sais pas. Cela fait évidemment l'objet d'un débat. Je vote pour cette option.

M. David Christopherson:

Ma seule inquiétude, encore une fois, c'est que nous passions trop de temps sur un sujet et entrions trop dans les détails. Nous allons les connaître. Nous en serons saisis, et il sera difficile de garder le Président... je comprends; le Président ne devrait pas participer dans le cas présent, compte tenu de son rôle unique. Mais, encore une fois, si c'est ce que tout le monde veut, je vais reculer. C'est que, à mon avis, le faire témoigner au début nous donne l'information dont nous avons besoin sur le fonctionnement général du système, et il fait partie du processus décisionnel. Alors, lorsque nous aurons terminé, la beauté de la chose sera que nous aurons terminé, et nous ne devrions avoir aucune raison de recevoir à nouveau le Président, et, par conséquent, il ne peut pas...

Mais je suis ouvert à l'idée.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je comprends ce que vous dites, monsieur Christopherson. Dans ce cas, entendrons-nous ou non le Président? Nous l'avons déjà entendu devant notre Comité à ce sujet et lui avons posé des questions sur cet enjeu précis, et vous avez également posé ces questions au Président, alors allons-nous en apprendre davantage en le ramenant ici?

(1205)

M. David Christopherson:

Le problème, c'est que nous avons seulement le greffier; le greffier ne fait pas partie du processus décisionnel de sécurité, alors il ne peut parler que du cadre, mais c'est à peu près tout. Il ne connaît pas, du point de vue pratique, la façon dont une décision est prise parce qu'il ne fait pas partie du processus. Le sergent d'armes en fait partie, mais...

Le président:

Nous pourrions recevoir le directeur du SPP.

M. David Christopherson:

Le directeur du SPP fait partie du processus, mais pas le greffier.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

N'est-il pas plus approprié de recevoir le directeur du SPP?

M. David Christopherson:

Je suis surpris que nous n'y ayons pas pensé.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Cela devrait être ce qui est le plus approprié...

M. David Christopherson:

Il devrait également être ici.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui.

M. David Christopherson:

Ces trois personnes devraient témoigner devant notre comité. En fait, si nous recevons ces trois personnes, le Président n'aura peut-être pas besoin de témoigner. Il est ici pour demander... Il fait vraiment partie intégrante du processus décisionnel.

Je regarde la situation et me dis que, si nous nous penchons sur le cadre administratif, la façon dont il fonctionne et la voie hiérarchique, ce sera une discussion controversée. Mais, en tant que décideurs, nous n'avons reçu jusqu'à maintenant que le greffier, et il ne fait pas partie du processus décisionnel, alors il serait logique de recevoir le directeur et le Président.

M. John Nater:

Je comprends où nous allons. Ma préoccupation est qu'une heure ne serait plus suffisante si nous recevons le directeur du SPP, de même que le Président et le greffier.

Je croirais presque que nous avons besoin de deux heures entières pour tenir cette discussion parce que lorsque nous recevrons le directeur du SPP, nous allons aborder des questions assez importantes sur la façon dont nous traitons les choses. J'aime voir où s'en va notre discussion, mais je soupçonne qu'une heure serait vraiment insuffisante si l'on veut établir un véritable dialogue avec les multiples intervenants dans le cas présent, parce que, en plus de l'appareil de sécurité et du cadre administratif, nous avons également les commentaires du greffier sur la question de privilège elle-même, ce qui pourrait également représenter un enjeu. Je serais assez préoccupé si nous disposions que d'une heure, alors nous pourrions peut-être déplacer ce sujet.

Si le Comité fait preuve de souplesse, nous pourrions prévoir mardi et jeudi, en alternance selon les disponibilités, deux heures avec le greffier, le directeur du SPP et le Président au cours d'une journée. La deuxième journée, peu importe l'ordre, serait réservée à l'examen de situations passées, de même qu'aux députés qui ont été touchés. Je sais que, logiquement, nous devrions d'abord effectuer l'examen, mais si nous pouvions faire preuve d'un peu de souplesse à cette fin... ou peut-être si nous tenions une séance de trois heures le mardi, alors nous pourrions réaliser l'examen au cours de la première heure et, au cours de la deuxième, entendre n'importe quel témoin; cela pourrait être une option pour le Comité.

M. Arnold Chan:

Monsieur Nater, vous pourriez peut-être parler à Mme Raitt et à M. Bernier avant mardi afin de savoir s'ils sont en fait disponibles cette journée, pour au moins en avoir une idée... C'est difficile parce que nous ne tiendrons pas une autre séance avant de rencontrer les témoins, mais du moins, par l'intermédiaire du greffier, on pourrait nous aviser de leur présence.

M. John Nater:

Je crois que nous pouvons faire cela. Je ne sais pas à propos du PROC, mais je sais que dans d'autres comités, nous avions également, par le passé, l'option de la vidéoconférence. Il peut s'agir d'une option pour le Comité si on peut utiliser la vidéoconférence et si ces deux personnes...

M. Arnold Chan:

Nous devrions aller à l'édifice Wellington si c'est notre choix, mais c'est...

M. John Nater:

Je soupçonne que ces personnes seraient empressées de venir témoigner devant le Comité, mais elles sont en pleine course à la direction et compte tenu de leurs horaires de déplacement... Je suppose que c'est très important pour elles à ce stade. Nous pourrions faire preuve de souplesse à cet égard s'il s'agit d'une option.

M. Arnold Chan:

À cet égard, puis-je avoir une idée du moment où vous pensez nous revenir après avoir parlé aux responsables de leur bureau respectif? Pouvez-vous en rendre compte au greffier afin que le reste d'entre nous l'apprenne dans un délai raisonnablement court? Encore une fois, nous sommes prêts à faire preuve de souplesse. Nous voulons seulement savoir si ces personnes sont en fait disponibles, et le reste tombera en place en quelque sorte.

M. John Nater:

Absolument, et je crois que c'est quelque chose que les personnes elles-mêmes aimeraient prévoir, alors nous nous engagerons dès que nous le pourrons et nous ferons rapport au greffier du Comité.

(1210)

M. Arnold Chan:

D'accord.

Monsieur le président, devrions-nous alors peut-être envisager aller à l'édifice Wellington pour la prochaine séance, si la pièce est libre?

Cela vous permettrait d'avoir une certaine flexibilité, monsieur Nater, si la vidéoconférence est une de vos options, de savoir à tout le moins que nous disposons de cette pièce. Je crois que c'est le seul endroit où nous pouvons en réalité...

Le président:

Les dispositions seront prises si elles...

M. Arnold Chan:

Pouvez-vous envisager cette option? De cette façon, nous le saurons à l'avance. J'essaie seulement de comprendre comment nous pouvons procéder de manière structurelle. Si, disons, les personnes ne sont pas disponibles avant deux semaines, alors nous n'entendrons pas leurs témoignages avant un certain temps.

Le président:

Si elles sont disponibles, quelle est la proposition pour la séance?

Je ne suis pas certain que...

M. Arnold Chan:

L'analyste devrait certainement témoigner d'abord.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. Arnold Chan:

La question ensuite est: quelle est la suite des choses?

Disons qu'elles ne sont pas disponibles. Nous n'avons pas avisé le greffier et/ou le Président, peu importe celui que vous voulez entendre, et le directeur du SPP. Je ne crois pas que le directeur du SPP témoignerait ensuite. Je crois que ce serait après, compte tenu de ce dont nous avons discuté. Nous examinerons probablement d'abord la structure et ensuite nous nous pencherons sur le SPP et la GRC.

Vous pourriez peut-être leur donner un préavis selon lequel ce serait peut-être à midi ou 13 heures, et nous les informerons rapidement dès que nous le savons. Nous aurons probablement besoin d'une réponse rapide. Je sais que nous les pressons, mais nous aimerions peut-être avoir une réponse d'ici demain midi. Ces témoins devraient avoir une idée de leur horaire de la semaine prochaine à l'heure actuelle.

M. John Nater:

Nous allons nous engager à agir le plus rapidement possible.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je comprends. Vous ne maîtrisez pas l'endroit où ces personnes se trouvent.

M. John Nater:

Je suis neutre dans la course à la direction. Je ne suis pas affilié à un camp en particulier.

M. Arnold Chan:

Nous ne savons même pas où elles se trouvent.

M. John Nater:

Nous nous engageons à faire cela dès que nous le pouvons.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je comprends.

M. John Nater:

Je reconnais que c'est quelque chose que notre côté voit comme une priorité et je sais que c'est la même chose pour vous, alors nous ferons tout ce que nous pouvons pour organiser...

M. Arnold Chan:

N'oubliez pas que nous avons affaire à des personnes très occupées — le Président et/ou le greffier — et nous devons leur donner une indication claire quant au moment où nous les attendons.

M. John Nater:

Absolument, mais peut-être, en tant que Comité, nous pouvons décider maintenant si nous voulons que ces témoins témoignent au cours des deux prochaines séances.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je suis d'accord. Je crois que les deux prochaines séances sont celles où nous nous pencherons sur la question de privilège, peu importe ce qui arrive. C'est juste une question de personnes et d'endroits. Nous ne le savons pas à l'heure actuelle parce que nous ne sommes pas au fait de qui est disponible.

M. John Nater:

Peut-être que le greffier pourrait s'occuper de l'horaire, une fois que nous aurons confirmé le tout, également, et de cette façon, nous n'aurons pas à revenir au Comité et à effectuer d'autres changements.

Le président:

D'accord. Si les personnes sont disponibles, ce sera le recherchiste, les députés qui ont été touchés, le greffier et/ou le Président. Si ces personnes ne sont pas disponibles, alors nous tiendrons une séance de deux heures et examinerons le rapport et entendrons les témoignages du greffier et/ou du Président.

M. Arnold Chan:

Et nous tiendrons la séance à l'édifice Wellington.

Le président:

Nous la tiendrons où nous le devrons afin d'utiliser la vidéoconférence.

M. Arnold Chan:

Ce pourrait être à l'édifice Wellington ou peu importe l'édifice où on peut utiliser la vidéoconférence, si nous en avons besoin.

M. David Christopherson:

Il y a un petit détail technique. Je crois que je vous ai entendu dire: « greffier ou Président ». Ce que je comprends, c'est qu'il s'agissait du greffier et du Président et je croyais en réalité que nous recevions le directeur du SPP.

M. Arnold Chan:

Nous verrons cela plus tard.

Le président:

J'ai dit « et/ou », mais M. Chan a suggéré que c'était trop tôt pour le directeur du SPP.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je pense que le directeur du SPP viendrait après le greffier.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous pouvons leur demander de venir jeudi.

M. David Christopherson:

Pour ce qui est de la structure, ils pourraient faire partie de la séance d'information, mais j'aime l'idée que l'on garde ça fluide au lieu de continuer à débattre de laquelle des deux choses devrait passer en premier. Gardons une certaine souplesse: pour l'instant, le plan de match est que nous passerons la première heure avec l'analyste afin qu'il nous donne le contexte historique, puis les deux heures suivantes avec un mélange de...

M. Arnold Chan:

Quiconque sera disponible.

M. David Christopherson:

... personnes. Je crois tout de même que le Président devrait être là avec le greffier, mais nous n'avons pas besoin de décider qui passera en premier. Si Lisa n'est pas disponible avant la troisième heure, nous pouvons certainement déplacer quelque chose pour arranger tout le monde. À la fin des trois heures, nous devrions avoir terminé le contexte historique et le cadre administratif, et avoir commencé à aborder les détails de l'incident en question.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Y a-t-il une raison pour laquelle nous ne pouvons pas rencontrer deux fois les représentants du PPS? Ils pourraient venir pour le contexte, en même temps que le Président et le greffier, et revenir lorsque nous aurons besoin de détails plus précis.

M. David Christopherson:

Nous tirons déjà parti de votre retour.

Le président:

Qu'en pensez-vous? Ça vous va?

Si l'un d'entre eux n'est pas disponible, nous écourterons la réunion à deux heures et ferons de notre mieux, et nous remettrons la prochaine à jeudi.

(1215)

M. David Christopherson:

Ça peut paraître décousu, mais ça fonctionnera.

Le président:

Préférez-vous commencer à 10 heures et terminer à 13 heures ou commencer à 11 heures et terminer à 14 heures?

M. David Christopherson:

Je préfère de 10 heures à 13 heures.

M. Scott Reid:

Excusez-moi, c'est quel jour?

Le président:

C'est mardi prochain.

M. Scott Reid:

Donnez-moi un instant pour vérifier mon agenda, je serai mieux en mesure de répondre par la suite.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Allons-nous nous réunir de 10 heures à 13 heures au lieu de 11 heures à 14 heures mardi?

M. David Christopherson:

J'étais en train de dire que ça fonctionne mieux pour moi de 10 heures à 13 heures.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Bien, de 10 heures à 13 heures, ça nous va.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, j'aime cette heure avant la PQ pour...

M. Scott Reid:

C'est bon pour moi.

Le président:

D'accord. Nous ferons de 10 heures à 13 heures, si nous avons suffisamment de travail pour les trois heures. Sinon, nous ferons les heures habituelles, de 11 heures à 13 heures. Tout est déjà décidé en ce qui concerne le budget.

M. Arnold Chan:

Est-ce que je peux aussi demander à mes collègues s'ils...? Je suis parfaitement conscient des quatre ou cinq témoins de M. Nater, c'est-à-dire le greffier par intérim et le Président, deux députés et le chef du PPS ou de la GRC. Je me demande s'il y aura des témoins supplémentaires. J'avais mentionné que demain était peut-être un peu trop tôt pour en faire comparaître d'autres, et tout indique qu'il faudra peut-être en convoquer. Nous laisserons le Comité décider. Si on veut que d'autres témoins se présentent, je propose qu'on le fasse assez rapidement. Je préférerais régler cela au plus vite et faire rapport à la Chambre.

M. John Nater:

C'est apprécié, et je crois qu'on souhaite aussi que cela se passe ainsi. Je crois que l'on pourrait entendre d'autres témoins au début de la semaine prochaine, peut-être lundi, s'il y en a.

Selon moi, l'autre chose qui en ressort est qu'il pourrait valoir la peine de voir une copie du rapport dont le Président a fait mention dans sa décision. Cela pourrait faire en sorte que nous voulions ajouter un témoin de cette liste, en fonction du commandant du lieu de l'incident. Je crois que c'est quelque chose que nous devons examiner le plus rapidement possible afin de déterminer quels autres témoins nous pourrions devoir entendre — une personne qui était sur place, le commandant du lieu de l'incident ou le superviseur et l'agent. Je ne sais pas si cela vaudrait la peine. En fonction du rapport, cela pourrait être nécessaire. Je crois que nous devons régler cela au plus tôt pour que ça ne traîne à n'en plus finir.

M. Arnold Chan:

La dernière question que je voulais vous poser, monsieur le président, que je veux adresser par votre entremise au greffier, c'est si le rapport du Président, que vous avez mentionné tout à l'heure, est disponible et s'il sera communiqué au Comité.

Le président:

Il ne le sait pas.

M. Arnold Chan:

D'accord. Cela accélérerait notre examen, parce qu'on aurait ainsi au moins un rapport factuel sur lequel...

M. David Christopherson:

Je comprends.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je disais seulement que, si le Président a déjà préparé un rapport en sachant que cet incident avait eu lieu, il serait utile d'en prendre connaissance, si possible. Bien sûr, on ne sait pas quand il sera disponible. Je propose que l'on envoie un message au bureau du Président. Si le rapport est disponible, il nous aiderait certainement à accélérer notre examen.

Le président:

D'accord, on posera la question.

L'autre chose, c'est que je laisserai aux whips le soin de vérifier s'il y a d'autres députés qui croient que leurs privilèges ont été bafoués ce jour-là, et ils pourraient se joindre à Mme Raitt et à M. Bernier à la table ronde, s'il y a d'autres personnes disponibles.

Avons-nous tout réglé? C'est terminé?

Un député: Je pourrais probablement faire un discours sur quelque chose, si vous le souhaitez.

Des députés: Ah, ah!

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, je dépose un avis de motion auprès du Comité. J'avais pensé qu'il ne serait pas possible de le proposer, parce que je croyais en fait que nous serions complètement saisis de la question du privilège et que je ne voulais pas empiéter sur celle-ci, étant donné sa priorité.

J'ai parlé à M. Chan et lui ai dit, avec cette hypothèse en tête, que je ne le proposerais pas. Toutefois, je souhaite seulement répéter que la motion vise à inviter la leader du gouvernement à la Chambre à comparaître devant le Comité. Je ne me souviens pas si c'est formulé de la sorte, mais j'aimerais qu'elle puisse témoigner devant le Comité avant qu'elle prenne des mesures à l'égard de l'intention qu'elle a mentionnée dans la lettre qu'elle a présentée dimanche dernier, dans laquelle elle mentionnait qu'elle se servirait d'une motion du gouvernement essentiellement pour rédiger des modifications du Règlement sur cinq sujets, je crois. Je ne les énumérerai pas, mais les questions posées au premier ministre le mercredi en font partie.

Je m'explique: je pourrais proposer la motion, mais pas si cela risque de nous bloquer indûment. Le but de la motion ne concerne que cela: la ministre a insisté sur son désir d'avoir ce qu'elle décrit comme étant un dialogue ou une discussion. Je crois qu'elle a employé le mot discussion. Bien sûr, une motion du gouvernement rend cela très difficile. En pratique, il n'est pas facile de modifier une motion de cette nature au moment où elle est débattue à la Chambre; c'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles cela devrait préférablement être fait dans le cadre des comités.

Est-ce que je dois m'interrompre?

(1220)

M. Arnold Chan:

Non, je veux seulement m'assurer que j'aurai la possibilité de vous répondre.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord, désolé.

Je ne peux pas donner de détails sur la conversation que j'ai eue avec M. Chan, parce que c'était privé, mais je lui ai soulevé ce point.

En fait, le but consiste à avoir vraiment l'occasion de discuter. Ce n'est pas la meilleure façon de le faire, mais je crois que ça lui permet de faire ce qu'elle dit vouloir faire ainsi que d'entendre nos commentaires à l'avance sur les quatre ou cinq thèmes qu'elle souhaite faire avancer. Je ne peux pas parler pour les autres, mais je suppose que c'est le type de rétroaction que j'aimerais avoir à sa place et qui pourrait être utile.

Honnêtement, ce qui me causait le plus de problèmes dans le document de travail ne fait plus partie de ce qu'elle souhaite mettre de l'avant. J'ajouterai aussi que certaines de ces choses ont été énumérées explicitement dans le cadre de la plateforme électorale libérale; par conséquent, son argument concernant la nécessité d'avoir un mandat et le fait que personne ne devrait avoir un droit de veto est davantage justifié dans le cas de ces questions. Je peux comprendre, mais je crois que ça pourrait lui être utile. Je sais que cela pourrait l'être aussi pour nous, si c'était possible.

C'était mon argument de vente en faveur de la motion.

Le président:

Proposez-vous une discussion positive sur ces cinq points?

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, dans laquelle on pourrait se présenter et dire: « Vous avez choisi ces cinq choses. Voici certains éléments dont vous pourriez vouloir tenir compte à propos de ceci ou de cela. » Nous n'en avons pas l'occasion, du moins pas avant que ce soit présenté, et il est plus difficile d'apporter des changements. C'est un peu comme travailler sur un projet seulement à la troisième lecture.

Le président:

Exactement.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je suis heureux de partager notre conversation.

Je suis sensible au point que vous soulevez, monsieur Reid, concernant le fait d'entendre la ministre... espérons que ce soit avant que ce Comité présente quelque chose à la Chambre.

Tout d'abord, laissez-moi répondre sur le principe général. Le gouvernement peut faire comparaître la ministre avec plaisir. En ce qui concerne la motion que vous avez présentée, et je sais que vous ne l'avez pas encore proposée, il est évident que nous ne serons pas en mesure de respecter la date limite initiale du 12 mai, étant donné que nous travaillons actuellement sur la motion concernant le privilège et que nous devrons aussi nous pencher sur les questions relatives au budget à un moment donné, mais en principe, je ne vois aucun problème à ce que la ministre comparaisse. Du côté du gouvernement, nous le ferons volontiers. Au début, j'allais proposer que si, pour une raison ou une autre — et je savais que nous ne pourrions pas reporter la motion sur le privilège — je suis conscient que la ministre n'est pas disponible durant certaines périodes... C'est alors sans portée pratique. Pour ce qui est du déroulement, occupons-nous d'abord du privilège et ensuite du budget, car nous avons des contraintes de temps très précises.

Par la suite, si nous pouvons revenir sur... Vous avez demandé une comparution de deux heures. La position du gouvernement est que nous sommes prêts à la recevoir pendant une heure. S'il faut plus de temps, d'accord. Nous étudierons la question après sa comparution. Vous pouvez poser toutes les questions que vous souhaitez à propos de la lettre qu'elle a présentée.

Cela dépend seulement de la vitesse à laquelle nous pouvons régler la question du privilège et du budget. À ce moment-là, si vous souhaitez proposer une motion semblable et que vous devez convoquer la ministre, nous l'appuierons, mais seulement si c'est pendant une heure et, bien sûr, que cela fonctionne avec son horaire. Je ne peux pas promettre que cela se fera avant que quelque chose soit présenté, étant donné ces autres questions qui ont été soumises à notre Comité.

Je ne sais pas à quel moment elle prévoit présenter quelque chose à la Chambre, mais si nous pouvions nous débarrasser rapidement de la question du privilège et du budget, nous pourrions peut-être même inclure cela avant la fin du mois, et sinon, avec un peu de chance, durant la première semaine de juin. Nous verrons à partir de là.

Je sais que c'est serré, mais, étant donné les circonstances, c'est le mieux que l'on puisse faire. Comme je l'ai mentionné, si on était allé de l'avant avec le document de travail, la ministre aurait été la première personne à être convoquée par le gouvernement. Nous n'avons rien à cacher à ce sujet. Ce que nous voulons dire, c'est que la ministre doit expliquer ce qu'elle essayait de mettre de l'avant. Évidemment, puisque les conditions ont changé et qu'on s'en tient aux cinq éléments de la plateforme — qui ont été présentés dans la plus récente lettre adressée aux leaders parlementaires de l'opposition —, nous vous invitons à poser des questions à ce sujet.

Encore une fois, nous ne savons pas ce que les changements au Règlement... Nous connaissons les grandes lignes, mais nous n'en saurons pas plus avant la présentation à la Chambre.

(1225)

Le président:

M. Christopherson est le prochain, suivi de M. Reid.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais seulement avoir une information, si c'est possible.

Lorsque je pensais à cela, il y a quelques semaines, et que j'essayais de comprendre où le gouvernement s'en allait, l'une des options possibles consistait à contourner ce qui se passe ici et à aller directement à la Chambre. C'était avant que vous retiriez certaines des parties les plus controversées. Il est encore possible que, une fois que la motion sera rendue à la Chambre, vous imposiez un bâillon, étant donné que vous ne pouvez pas vous servir de l'attribution de temps à l'égard d'une motion. Nous approchons de la fin de la session, ou, du moins, nous serons probablement rendus en juin. Quand j'y réfléchissais, la seule chose qui me paraissait logique... Étant donné sa nature et le bâillon, j'avais l'impression que le gouvernement voudrait le faire le plus près possible de la clôture de la session à la Chambre, en raison du chaos et de l'ambiance que cela pourrait créer.

S'ils avaient fait cela au départ, la situation aurait été ingérable. Je ne sais pas si cela va se passer aussi mal, mais ça pourrait être le cas. Je soulève seulement cela parce que, si nous savons que cela se produira probablement vers la fin de la séance plutôt qu'au début, cela nous donne beaucoup plus la possibilité d'intégrer le type de souplesse que vous souhaitiez, Arnold.

En ce qui concerne le fait de reconnaître que le gouvernement a un objectif, M. Reid pense que, peu importe que, par jeu politique, le gouvernement puisse en venir à présenter cela à la Chambre, c'est toujours une bonne idée de s'en remettre à un comité. Monsieur Reid, je ne sais pas si les gens en reparlent, mais quiconque a une certaine expérience a appris à apprécier les petits changements, que l'on fait ici et là pour tenter d'y parvenir. C'est assez difficile pour nous de le faire. Si vous essayez de faire cela à la Chambre, c'est très difficile, compte tenu des 338 personnes et des règles que nous devons suivre. On finit avec un gouvernement qui devient têtu et se dit qu'il ne peut pas gérer tous ces petits détails, et il finit par tout adopter à toute vitesse.

Le temps que l'on passe à un comité, où l'on discute réellement de ces questions, ne peut qu'être utile. C'est plus facile pour nous si nous savons que la motion sera présentée vers la fin de la séance plutôt qu'au début.

M. Scott Reid:

M. Christopherson a soulevé de bons points et il me fait réfléchir à des choses auxquelles je n'avais pas pensé.

Mais, pour répondre à M. Chan, tout d'abord, je suis d'avis que les contraintes que vous proposez, en particulier en ce qui concerne la priorité accordée aux autres points, sont très sensées. Je préférerais accorder deux heures au lieu d'une, mais je reconnais que vous détenez la majorité. Il nous est impossible de faire adopter une motion avec laquelle vous êtes en désaccord.

Je ne dirai qu'une chose en ce qui a trait au témoignage d'une heure. À mon avis, cela ne sera vraiment pas utile, ni pour nous, ni pour la ministre, pour discuter de son document de travail. La plupart de ces points ont été retirés de l'ordre du jour. Elle a cinq points dont elle souhaite discuter, et je propose que l'on s'en tienne à cela. De fait, nous devrions proposer une autre tribune, retourner en caucus, en ce qui concerne la question des séances du vendredi et d'autres points, par exemple la motion au sujet de notre programme, qu'elle a dit ne pas vouloir faire avancer. Pourquoi discuter de cela quand nous n'avons que 60 minutes? Les cinq points qui figurent sur son ordre du jour actuellement sont suffisants. Je suis convaincu que nous arriverons à en discuter pendant une heure.

Bien entendu, je souhaite toujours poser des questions, mais, d'une certaine façon, je vois cela comme une occasion de présenter des propositions, qu'elle n'est pas tenue de suivre, mais je suis d'avis que ce sont des propositions utiles, de façon générale. J'imagine que d'autres personnes auraient à commenter après coup et à vérifier si j'avais raison sur ce point. Toutefois, c'est une occasion de présenter des idées à la ministre avant de passer à cette question. Je serais très surpris qu'il y ait quoi que ce soit d'écrit et que les questions soient déjà arrêtées en ce moment. Je crois qu'on est en train de le faire à son cabinet, et je pense qu'il lui serait utile de recevoir des commentaires pour qu'elle puisse remplir son mandat de façon consciencieuse.

C'est tout ce que j'avais à dire à ce sujet.

Je souhaite ajouter, toutefois, que, quand nous passerons à d'autres travaux, il serait utile de connaître le processus que le gouvernement compte utiliser pour présenter d'autres modifications du Règlement, qui ne figuraient pas dans son programme, au cours des deux années restantes de la législature. Cela serait utile. La ministre n'a pas à le préciser au moment de son témoignage, mais elle pourrait l'ajouter dans ses commentaires écrits.

(1230)

M. David Christopherson:

En théorie, le Comité mène actuellement un examen, mais c'est tout « en théorie ».

M. Scott Reid:

C'est juste.

M. David Christopherson:

Les membres de l'opposition respectent le fait que le gouvernement a fait certaines promesses électorales. Votre parti a remporté les élections. Vous avez la légitimité voulue, de même que le droit moral et juridique de les réaliser.

L'opposition n'a pas encore eu l'occasion au cours de ce processus de présenter des modifications qu'elle aimerait voir ajoutées, donc, quelque part, les règles n'appartiennent pas qu'au gouvernement. Nous aussi nous avons des choses à proposer. Il existe des problèmes sérieux, comme le fait qu'il est ridicule que des présidents prennent de très bonnes décisions et les voient renversées par la majorité du moment; cela rend légitime une chose qui n'a pas de sens et qui ne respecte pas les règles. Il devrait être possible d'en faire appel au Président. On ne devrait pas pouvoir se servir d'un vote majoritaire pour dicter au président la décision à prendre, en particulier quand la décision de ce dernier respecte les règles, mais qu'une autre règle permet à la majorité de la renverser. J'aimerais discuter de ce sujet.

Actuellement, il est possible de raccourcir la durée de la sonnerie... et nous nous sommes fait prendre deux fois en période de gouvernement minoritaire. Selon les règles actuelles, si vous souhaitez raccourcir la durée de la sonnerie, disons qu'il s'agit d'une sonnerie de 30 minutes, mais que, comme il arrive parfois, tous les députés sont aux alentours, que nous ne sommes pas loin dans la Chambre et que tout le monde s'entend pour dire que nous n'avons pas besoin de perdre de temps, il est possible de le faire en faisant entrer ensemble les deux whips. Ils entrent dans la Chambre et exécutent leur cérémonial. Et voilà! La majorité s'entend pour raccourcir la durée de la sonnerie.

Écourter la sonnerie, ce n'est pas rien. Comme député, vous prévoyez votre emploi du temps. Pourvu que vous soyez présent au moment où vous devez l'être pour voter en tout respect des règles, vous ne devriez pas craindre que quelqu'un vous prive du temps qui vient de vous être accordé pour vous rendre à la Chambre. Le problème réside dans la procédure... mais voilà, à Queen's Park, où il y a trois partis, devinez quoi: les trois whips doivent être présents pour déclarer que les trois caucus sont d'accord pour raccourcir la durée de la sonnerie.

Depuis que je suis à la Chambre, il est arrivé deux fois en période de gouvernement minoritaire, il y a quelques années, que les conservateurs et les libéraux se soient mis d'accord à ce sujet. Il leur convenait de raccourcir la durée de la sonnerie. Aucune considération ne nous a été accordée. Dans un cas, la décision était délibérée, parce que nous étions vus comme l'enfant terrible, et le vote a été tenu avant même que nous soyons tous dans la Chambre, parce que deux des partis avaient le pouvoir de faire cesser la sonnerie en exécutant leur petit cérémonial. Mais le troisième, le quatrième, le cinquième parti, s'il y en a un, sont tout simplement écartés du processus.

Il y a des modifications très légitimes qui aideraient à améliorer l'équité à la Chambre, et c'est pourquoi nous aimerions avoir l'occasion d'en présenter. Mais cette occasion ne nous est jamais donnée, sauf pendant l'examen du Règlement, ce dont s'est servie la leader du gouvernement à la Chambre pour présenter son document de travail. Dans les faits, nous avons effectué les travaux minimalement requis par les règles, et, une fois ceux-ci terminés, nous sommes passés à d'autres questions, et nous ne reviendrons peut-être pas sur ces règles.

Je souhaite prendre un instant pour dire que, dans ce processus global, les éléments d'équité donnent à penser que l'opposition devrait au moins se voir offrir l'occasion de présenter ses propositions pour rendre la Chambre sensible aux besoins de ses membres.

Merci, monsieur.

(1235)

Le président:

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je ne veux pas traiter du sujet soulevé par M. Christopherson.

Encore une fois, je souhaite simplement exhorter les membres du Comité. Je crois que nous connaîtrons assez rapidement la disponibilité des différents témoins une fois les convocations envoyées, et c'est dans notre intérêt à tous d'essayer de faire progresser les choses assez rapidement.

Je veux seulement que nous réfléchissions à l'ordre des travaux. Vraisemblablement, il nous faudra environ deux jours pour traiter la question de privilège. Il faut probablement prévoir au moins une période de temps minimale pour donner des instructions à l'analyste quant au rapport à remettre à la Chambre. Nous pourrions décider qu'il nous faut plus de temps pour traiter la question de privilège, mais voilà la direction dans laquelle nous allons en ce moment, à moins que des faits changent. Nous avons réservé trois dates possibles, soit le 16, le 18 et le 30 mai, pour l'étude du budget des dépenses, et j'espère que nous n'aurons pas besoin de plus de deux séances pour nous acquitter de cette tâche.

Une fois que nous connaîtrons de façon plus précise l'ordre des travaux, je propose que nous tenions une réunion du sous-comité pour établir le calendrier des travaux pour au moins le reste de la session parlementaire. C'est la solution pratique à adopter.

Aussi, la ministre souhaite savoir quand elle peut s'attendre à témoigner, parce qu'elle est disponible à certaines dates, et elle est en déplacement à d'autres. C'est le problème. Je suis heureux qu'on lui demande de venir témoigner le plus rapidement possible, pour que vous puissiez lui poser vos questions. Cela me convient.

Ensuite, quels travaux souhaitons-nous poursuivre? J'aimerais revenir à l'étude du rapport du directeur général des élections, au moins pour le reste de la session, et avancer le plus possible ce travail.

J'ai mis cartes sur table, donc, au lieu de nous engager dans un débat de fond sur les questions que vous soulevez... Je crois que nous pourrons revenir à ces questions à notre retour à l'automne, en tant que Comité, si nous réussissons à terminer l'étude du rapport du directeur général des élections et de toute autre mesure législative qui pourrait nous être soumise. Ensuite, nous pourrions revenir à l'examen d'autres modifications du Règlement, si nous souhaitons revenir à cette question en particulier. Cela devrait...

M. David Christopherson:

Je ne retiendrai pas mon souffle.

M. Arnold Chan:

Nous ne retiendrons pas notre souffle. Laissons cela parmi les sujets que nous discuterons à l'avenir. À mon avis, l'approche logique à appliquer est d'avoir assez rapidement une idée du déroulement des travaux en ce qui concerne la question de privilège et le budget des dépenses. Ensuite, il faudrait peut-être communiquer par l'intermédiaire de notre personnel respectif pour tenir une réunion du sous-comité afin d'établir le reste du calendrier. À ce moment-là, nous aurons au moins un horaire jusqu'à la fin de la session. Je crois que nous ne devons pas gaspiller plus de temps sur ce sujet.

M. Scott Reid:

Je suis d'accord avec tout ce que M. Chan vient de dire. Il tente de mettre toutes ses cartes sur la table. Il reste qu'il ne connaît pas la donne, dans une certaine mesure, quant à la disponibilité de la ministre, par exemple, donc il est déraisonnable d'essayer de poursuivre sur ce sujet avant qu'il sache quelles cartes lui seront distribuées... pour filer la métaphore. Je crois que tout cela est sensé.

Je souscris également à tout ce que M. Christopherson a dit. J'ai aussi quelques modifications du Règlement à proposer. En fait, je n'adhère pas tout à fait à tout ce que vous avez dit, David. Je suis d'avis que le gouvernement fera preuve de plus de bonne volonté que ce que nous croyons. Je ne veux pas passer pour Elizabeth May, et que l'on croit que je donne toujours le bénéfice du doute aux libéraux, mais cette fois-ci, je crois que tous ceux autour de la table font preuve de bonne volonté. Je sais qu'il y a d'autres personnes dans le parti libéral qui font preuve de beaucoup de bonne volonté à l'égard de ce genre de questions.

Je souhaite ajouter une dernière chose, si je puis. Il s'agit en fait d'une demande à l'intention de notre analyste.

M. Christopherson a soulevé un point intéressant. Même si j'étais présent quand ces événements sont survenus, ma mémoire ne les a pas enregistrés. J'étais probablement à mon bureau à la Chambre des communes, en train de lire un livre au lieu de prêter attention. Nous sommes tous des membres de partis qui ont occupé le rôle de troisième parti à la Chambre. Je me souviens de la période où j'occupais le poste de chercheur principal pour le Parti réformiste quand il était le troisième parti et que le Bloc québécois était le deuxième parti. Le NPD a aussi occupé le rang de troisième parti, de même que le Parti libéral assez récemment. Le point qu'il soulève est valide. Je me demandais seulement si nous pouvions soumettre ce sujet à l'analyste. Si tout va comme prévu, vous aurez sans doute tout l'été pour effectuer des recherches sur les pratiques en vigueur dans les différentes législatures concernant les moyens d'accélérer la tenue de votes, sujet qu'il a abordé.

Je ne sais pas s'il s'agit d'une pratique différente qui est devenue une convention, plutôt qu'une règle. Rien n'empêche d'officialiser une pratique en l'ajoutant au Règlement, mais ce serait une bonne chose de connaître les détails du modèle, en particulier celui de l'Ontario, mais peut-être aussi d'autres modèles qui existent, pour que nous puissions, si nous le souhaitons, faire progresser ce point de façon productive.

(1240)

Le président:

Très bien. Nous demanderons à l'analyste d'effectuer cette recherche. C'est une bonne idée.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on May 04, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.