header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-01-30 PROC 86

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

We'll start the new year on time for once and see how that goes.

Good morning and welcome to the 86th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, the first meeting of 2018.

Today, as we continue our study on the creation of an independent commissioner responsible for leaders’ debates, we're going to hear from the Trinidad and Tobago Debates Commission in the first hour and the Jamaica Debates Commission in the second hour.

By video conference from Trinidad and Tobago, we are pleased to be joined by Catherine Kumar, interim chief executive officer; and then Angella Persad, immediate past chair.

Thank you both for appearing today.

I'll now turn the floor over to Ms. Kumar for her opening statement.

Ms. Catherine Kumar (Interim Chief Executive Officer, Trinidad and Tobago Debates Commission):

Thank you very much, Chair, honourable Member Bagnell. It is indeed our pleasure to be here this morning to be able to present our lived experiences from the centre for the debates commission. You have already introduced Angella Persad, who will also be appearing with me during the Q and A questions, and I will just let you know that our current chair is Mr. Nicholas Galt, but he only recently took up the position, and we thought it would be better if Angella handled it.

I would also like to say thank you very much to Andrew. Andrew has been very efficient in handling the million and one questions that we asked. When Andrew first contacted me, I wondered why you would want to hear from a small, developing country like Trinidad and Tobago. That was a question I actually asked him, and then it made sense. We are a Commonwealth country. Our debates commission was already formed, and we realized that you can learn from anyone, small or large, as we all have our lessons we could learn, and we could move forward with that.

I'm really hoping that what we share with you will be good and will help you in some way. During the Q and A, I think, is where we will probably get out most of the questions and answers for you.

I think it's important for us to say a little bit about the political context within which the debates commission operates and how we were born. We are a democratic society. We have elections every five years as mandated. We have election campaigns as do most other countries, and during the election campaigns, there is a lot of mudslinging and personalities bringing down each other, the kind of thing that does not in any way inform the electorate to help them make better decisions when casting their votes.

In Trinidad and Tobago in particular, it's quite a “rum and roti“ environment. There's a lot of entertainment and music and so on going on during the campaigns. Wild promises are made, and there is no accountability afterwards. You can say anything you want in the campaign and there's no one afterwards to hold you accountable for that.

Trinidad and Tobago did not have leaders' debates before the debates commission was formed. As a matter of fact, they had no sort of debates. What you may have seen in the past would probably be media interviews with one of the leaders, but we never had anything where opposing leaders, prospective leaders, would get together and answer questions asked by an independent person. The whole issue of having any formal debating was definitely new to Trinidad and Tobago.

Another important thing is that in Trinidad and Tobago, we have no fixed dates for elections, and as in many other countries, including yours, where you don't have a fixed date now, it makes life very difficult for any debates' sponsor, because you really don't know when an election will be called. While from the legal point of view, the Parliament cannot sit for more than five years after the date of the first sitting, the PM could call elections any time before that and that, as I said, makes it very difficult for us.

The Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce is really the one that started the debates commission. They felt, and so did others in Trinidad and Tobago, that we were not discussing the issues that were really important, the things that we should be considering when we cast our vote. We recognize that there will always be party loyalists, but the marginals are about 30%, so those are the ones that we need to work at and let them hear from the prospective leaders what they have to offer their country. Under the strategic pillar of governance, the Trinidad and Tobago chamber set up the debates commission.

We did something like you did, although not mandated by government in any way, so it was a totally independent initiative. We set up an interim committee and we started going about researching what other countries had done and what was the best way to achieve all mandates. Through that we interacted with the U.S. debates commission, AGG, the National Democratic Institute, and the Jamaican-based commission, because Jamaica was the only country in the Caribbean that had set up a debates commission already, and we got help from them about how they did theirs.

We did not consult the politicians in any way. Quite frankly we did not go to the people either, and I think that's a very good initiative, which I see your Minister of Democratic Institutions is doing. By going to the people, you can get better support afterwards, because you will have heard from them.

(1105)



Those are things we could have probably done a little better, but certainly we recognized that we needed to do something.

This interim committee was set up in 2009, and then in 2010—even though five years had not passed—the Prime Minister pulled the dates out of his back pocket, as we say in Trinidad, and called the election. We were not ready at that time, so we hurriedly set up and registered ourselves as an NGO, an independent, autonomous organization not in any way legally connected to the chamber, even though the chamber gave us full support throughout the entire process. Independence was important for us, as was autonomy.

We did not have funding at that point in time from anyone, so again the chamber helped us there. That brought up a whole issue as to how independent we were, because if we had taken funding from the chamber.... I was then CEO of the chamber, and I also led the debates commission. That's an issue we needed to look at, and we probably made a mistake there. When you say “independent”, you have to really ensure that the commission and the commissioners who are on it are truly independent.

We set the criteria for our commissioners. It was very important that they not be politically aligned in any way, and that they appear to be independent—not only say that they are, but appear to the public to be independent. We went about and quickly founded the debates commission. We had our values—democracy, transparency, objectivity, and independence—and we ensured that all our commissioners subscribed to them and signed on to that code.

In Trinidad and Tobago, our debates commission has no legal standing. It is not established in law. It is not established by any electoral mandate, or anything at all. It really relies totally on the support of the public and the people to demand a debate. This is something that is really very important. We are in the process of doing a strategic plan for the next three to four years, and one of the questions that we have on the table is whether we should also pursue putting some legislation in place whereby the leaders will have to debate. As I go on, you will see the difficulty we have had in having the leaders debate. Also, because we did not go to the people initially, I don't think we got the groundswell from the population to ensure that a debate would be held.

What we have is a group of independent organizations—religious, civic, and others—that got together and formed what is called a “Code of Ethical Political Conduct”, and the political parties all signed on to that. In it, there is a clause that says the leaders must take part in the leaders' debate. However, at the time this was set up, which was really just in 2014, it only said a leaders' debate organized by a debates commission. Subsequent to the last elections in 2015, when we had difficulty in getting the leaders' debate off, we were able to convince them that we must have consistency in who organizes the debates. You cannot really have various bodies—one term it's this body and next term another body. We need a consistent approach and one organization that has rules. We got them to agree that it should be the Trinidad and Tobago Debates Commission that will organize debates, and that was insisted. That has not been tested as yet, because we have not had elections since then, so we will see afterwards.

The consistency was important because during different periods in the last five years there have been other organizations that have been saying they would like to do leaders' debates. From the University of the West Indies, a group of youth wanted to do a debate. Again, it would start off and nothing would happen, so we really were convinced that a debates commission was the organization to do it.

We have set rules that have been laid down and agreed upon by all the commissioners. We also have rules for the commissioners themselves that they have to abide by.

(1110)



For instance, the commissioners cannot attend political campaigns. Trinidad is a very small island of 1.3 million people, and if you go to a party's campaign someone is going to see you and come back and say afterwards that you are not really independent.

We also set rules and criteria for the leaders who will be participating in the debates. We felt that you must be contesting at least 50% of the seats that are up for voting, or you would have achieved at least a 12.5% positive polling in the last two polls. That latter proved to be a challenge for us because polling is not done on an everyday basis in Trinidad and Tobago, and we did not have polls done immediately before.

The 50% of the seats also posed a challenge because it has to be that these are parties that have said they will contest, and you will not know that for sure until nomination date. Nomination date is very close to the election, so you really negotiate with parties, not being 100% sure how many parties will be debating. You may be pretty sure about two parties because we are mainly a two-party system, but the others you would not know about.

We formulated an MOU for the parties to sign, again because we did not have any legislation. We did have the MOU signed by one party, not by all.

The debates commissioners are the ones who will choose the moderator and the questioners. We have had different types of debates. In one case we had one moderator who would moderate and ask the questions, and in other cases we've had a moderator who did strictly the presentation, and questioners who would ask the questions.

The debates commissioners are not involved in any way in coming up with the questions. That's strictly up to the moderator and the questioners. Through social media, we invite the public to send in their questions. We also get together with students to look at possible questions.

Financing is done strictly by corporate T and T—no government financing at all—because we have to maintain our independence. Corporate T and T has been very good so far in helping us with our debates.

We have held three debates so far, one in 2010 immediately as we formed in 2010. We did not get the leaders' debate after the general election but soon thereafter there were local government elections and we got a debate for that. Then in 2013 we had two debates and these were more or less national or provincial debates for Tobago, our sister island. We held a leaders' debate in Tobago and then we had another local government election debate.

We have not been successful in having any leaders' debates to date and that took us right back to the drawing board to ask why our lack of success. Besides the fact that it is not mandated, we really did not bring the media in early enough and the media is an integral party in having these debates. They're the ones we depend on to have their morning shows, all the talk shows, and the advertisements to get the public aware and talking about why we should have debates, and by political analysts to do the front sessions with them.

We did not have the voice of the people. That was not strong enough. I shouldn't say we did not have it because we did have a certain amount but the voice was not strong enough to demand a debate from the potential leaders.

In our strategic plan we are addressing them within a very strong relationship with the media, and directly with publishers and broadcasters. We are also getting the youth involved, getting more social media, and getting the people involved so we can have a stronger relationship with them through civic organizations and the like.

The debates are important to this country. We want to get involved in pre-elections, during elections, and post-elections, so we really want to be part of the entire governance process and these debates will not only be with the leaders. Some of them would probably be with other persons within the parties or political analysts or whoever we deem to be proper to handle that particular type of debate.

(1115)



We are getting ready for 2020, our next general election, but prior to that we hope to have at least two debates so we can get the public involved, and when 2020 comes around they will be ready for us.

On behalf of the Trinidad and Tobago Debates Commission, I again thank you for wanting to hear our views.

I will now turn it back to you, Chair, for the important Q and A part.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. As I said at the beginning, we really appreciate your taking this time for us.

In our Qs and As each party gets seven minutes to start out and that includes questions and answers.

We are starting with Mr. Graham, please.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

This is my first question. I'm a little unclear. You said that the parties have to sign a code of conduct that says they will participate in the debates. Then at the end of your comments you said you haven't actually had any debates yet. Can you bridge that gap for us?

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

The code was developed in 2014 and at that time it just said they had to attend a leaders' debate organized by a debates commission, in other words, anyone. They had no success there actually, so subsequent to 2015 we got them to amend it to say that they must participate in debates organized by the Trinidad and Tobago Debates Commission. Our name has been put into the code, but we have not been able to test that because that was only done subsequent to the last election.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Were there any competing debates commissions that people tried to set up?

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

No, there are no competing debates commissions. We've had ventures. There was a group at the University of the West Indies who tried to do a debate. They did not get very far toward even organizing it. They certainly never got to the point of calling the politicians. Then there was another youth group who tried also but again did not get very far.

Really since the entire talk about having debates, the Trinidad and Tobago Debates Commission is the only one that has been consistently calling for the debates.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You also said there is a criteria of 12.5%, but a quick look at the country says it's effectively a two-party country. In the last election the third party had less than 1% of the vote. Is that 12.5% threshold a barrier to entry for a third party? Does that demotivate or motivate participation, or how do you see that?

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

That's a whole question, and some of the smaller parties really talk about that, given that they do not have 12.5% today, but then we really have a lot of small parties. We think that 90 minutes is about the most we want to go for a debate, so we do not want to have, as we have seen in some other countries, 10 or 12 people debating at the same time. We have chosen to keep it at that level so that we ensure the people who are debating are really from parties that have the potential to lead the next government.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I'm going to give my time to Ms. Tassi, who has some more questions for you.

Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Thank you for your testimony and for being here with us today through video conference.

On the ethical code of conduct that you've prepared and had parties sign, how difficult was it to get them to commit to that?

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

It's very strange but it was not very difficult. This group was formed first by the archbishop. He looked around and didn't like what he saw around election time, and he called a wide group of people together, a lot of religious bodies, a lot of civic organizations. The chamber was involved because we represented business. We sat for a few months and formulated a code, which covers a wide variety of things because it's about ethical behaviour during the election period.

One thing that I would put forward there was that debates would be a very important aspect to have in this code, so we did have success in getting debates included in the code but, as I explained before, not cited by the debates commission, because initially the group felt they did not want to choose one party, given that I was there at the committee, and we didn't want to appear as though we were being biased in any way. Subsequently I think they realized they had to name a party.

As I said, it was not difficult. Once we called the parties together and we explained what we were doing, they willingly signed on, so we have a code with the signatures of all the major parties. We have about 10 or 11 parties that have signed onto that code.

(1120)

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

What is the motivation of the parties to sign onto that code? Is it that they know the public wants them to commit?

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

I would say it was all PR, so they could say, “we have signed on and we want a debate”. In every single election we've had so far, all the leaders have said they want to debate, they will debate. They see the merit in debating, but the incumbent party always then finds an excuse or reason why they should not debate.

In the last election the then prime minister had said publicly in so many places, including in her campaign, that she wanted to debate, that she would debate with the debates commission. Then when we finally had the meeting with her, we got a very long list of conditions under which she would debate, and they violated some of ours.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Is there a penalty? In the code is there a penalty if they do not participate, if they breach that?

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

The only penalty is the public outcry. The code committee will issue a report, and out of that report we would see they did not comply with that particular clause.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

What's been the response of the public with respect to this initiative? How do you do outreach with the public in order to get their input?

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

The initiative, meaning the code?

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Yes, and this whole thing of initiating, not so much the code with respect to the moral aspect but with respect to the leaders' debates.

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

All right. I'll allow Angella to take that.

Ms. Angella Persad (Immediate Past Chair, Trinidad and Tobago Debates Commission):

Good morning.

You hit the nail on the head there, because I think the public outcry has not been loud enough to get the leaders to debate. That is where we realized we did not get the media involved early enough, probably, or give them enough of a seat on the commission. The only way to get the leaders to debate is from a public outcry.

As Catherine explained, we started from the other end. We felt, as the chamber, as leaders, as business leaders in the country, that we needed to have democracy, so we needed to have a debates commission. We started from that end. We did not engage and get the engagement of the public adequately, so they did not call for the debate. We have half the country wanting it, and the other half saying, what good is a debate? There was not enough of a public outcry to get the leaders to debate. We have learned the hard way that it is one of lessons and one of the things we have to fix going forward.

Now the Trinidad & Tobago Publishers & Broadcasters Association is actually part of the commission. We realize that we need to engage them in a different way because they are the only mouthpiece to get to the public. That's a big lesson we learned.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you.

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

The modus operandi so far has really been the debates commissioners going to the politicians, having meetings with them, and trying to convince them as to why they should debate. That really has been the approach, and that is definitely not the best approach.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we'll go to Mr. Richards for seven minutes.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thank you for joining us. I'm surprised you didn't want to make the trip here rather than appear by video conference. You could experience our wonderful weather here. We're -12° Celsius. I'm sure you would enjoy it.

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

No. We will send you some sun instead.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. That would be great.

I have a couple of questions for you. You had mentioned in your opening remarks that, in the process of forming the commission, you hadn't consulted with politicians or with the public. You obviously acknowledged you felt that was probably something you would do differently if you could do it again, particularly with regard to the public.

I was just curious as to whether that was a conscious decision at the time to not do that consultation with politicians and/or with the public, or was that just an oversight at the time?

(1125)

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

It was really a timing issue because we started the interim committee in 2009, and then when the snap election was called in 2010 we were still at the interim committee stage. We had not at that time formulated fully how we would go forward and what we would do.

Literally in five weeks or so we had to register the commission, do everything, start organizing the debate. I certainly believe that if we had gone about it in a normal way, we would have gotten other people involved. Again, as I said, it was the chamber's initiative. In one of the chambers we have operating, it's always to get views from other stakeholders and get their input. The timing really hurt us there. It did impact us going forward.

Mr. Blake Richards:

In terms of lessons for us, advice for us, when this committee makes a decision about what it's going to recommend as to what this would look like going forward, would you suggest that, rather than just moving immediately to try to legislate or put that decision in place, it should be put before the people? In other words, should they be asked their opinion about that particular decision and consulted on it at that point in time? Would those be your thoughts as to good advice for us?

Ms. Angella Persad:

I think that would definitely be something that should be done, to poll the views of different segments of the public. Obviously at the end of the day a decision needs to be made because you will get some people thinking debates are very important and others thinking they are not. I think getting the views of the public, what they want to hear in a debate and why they think a debate is important, will be a very useful exercise.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You had mentioned the independence of the commission and how it's very important that it not only be independent but that it be perceived to be independent, that it appear to have independence. Often in Canada these types of appointments are made by the prime minister, who's obviously the representative of one political party. That might therefore give the appearance that it's not necessarily independent from one political party because of the fact that the commissioner would be appointed by that prime minister.

I 'm curious about your thoughts on whether we need to be looking at that and finding a way to ensure that either all parties have a say in who that commissioner is or this committee maybe or some body other than just the prime minister is making that appointment. Would your thoughts be that, to give us the proper appearance of independence, that would be important?

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

In Trinidad and Tobago, our debates commission does not have the involvement of the government at all, because we have been set up independent of the government. Certainly the Jamaica experience would have been the same thing.

We find in Trinidad that where we have commissions—we have lots of different commissions, like the police service commission—they are always viewed as being political because, as you said, the prime minister makes a recommendation to the president and then the president sets up the commission or commissioner. Therefore our suggestion would be really and truly that the appointment not be part of the government but the committee having come up with what is the best.... I know I said you ought to engage the public also so that the set-up is truly independent, not being named by the prime minister or recommended by the prime minister. I'm not too familiar with your context as to whether there are any other independent bodies that could help in setting up such a commission.

I would also say that in the Commonwealth the word “commission” connotes something, the deals of government. There is also something that has been put to us. Would we like to consider changing our name to “Trinidad and Tobago Debates something else”, not commission, because once they hear “commission” people think it is a government set-up?

(1130)

Ms. Angella Persad:

To add to that, in forming our commission we looked at different representative interests. For instance we looked at legal, communication, civic society, business, and citizen representation for Tobago. We looked at the different representative interests to make sure that we had independent people representing each one of those interests.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. Obviously you're strongly of the opinion that it needs to be independent and not be appointed by the government directly.

So that I completely understand, you said that the chamber at least began discussions about this, but you mentioned that you made the decision not to have it fund the commission. Who does fund the commission?

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

Corporate T & T funds it totally. From the very first debate in 2010, even the debate that did not come off, corporate T & T funded us. The chamber would have been involved with in-kind funding—human resources and those sorts of things, facilities—but the actual cost of the debates is funded totally by corporate T & T, and it has been for all our debates so far.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, great. Thank you very much. I appreciate it.

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

Going forward, that is also a difficulty. We need to have funding that we can rely on, so not every debate you have to go to corporate T & T and literally put your hands out and beg. We are in the process of looking for international funding from some of these other institutions that support democracy and so on. Perhaps if anyone around the committee is aware of institutions that we can approach, I'd be happy to hear about it through Andrew.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Always looking for ways, eh? Thank you.

Maybe if you send some of your sunshine our way, who knows what could happen.

Ms. Angella Persad:

I just wanted to add one point on the funding. There is no branding for corporate T & T when they fund the debate, so they get no acknowledgement, no branding at all. This was their return to building democracy in the country.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, great. Thank you all very much.

The Chair:

Thank you all very much.

Now we'll move on to Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you very much, Chair.

Thank you very much for taking the time. We really appreciate this.

I'll just do a little bit of shifting gears. One of the issues that a lot of presenters have taken time to focus on is the role of social media in these debates and how different the world is in terms of communicating with the public.

How did you approach the issue of social media when you were considering your outreach capacity?

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

We did include social media, but we did not include it sufficiently, recognizing that it is in fact a very important media, particularly if you want to get to youth.

We have a website. Right now it's under reconstruction, because we are doing the strategic plan, and there are quite a few changes that we are going to have. We have a Facebook page. We did visit, for instance, the secondary schools, and we had a competition going for involvement, having people put their post and write their comments, etc. on Facebook, and through that get some feedback. We had a competition. Whoever had the most questions put forward would win a prize. That helped us a bit because we got quite a few comments coming in through there, and I think we got a certain amount of youth involvement, too, but certainly not enough.

Going forward in our new strategic plan, we have recognized that we cannot only rely on the mainstream media that we are familiar with, but we have to get this new media involved. We are even thinking, as of yesterday—we had a meeting—that it would be good to bring on a commissioner who was very much inclined to understand the use of social media, how it can help us, how we measure what value we get out of it, and what sorts of programs we can set up.

Definitely anybody going forward must consider social media.

I say Facebook, but of course, you're not only talking Facebook, you're talking about all the other new social media programs outside.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's certainly what we're finding.

You also mentioned that, going forward, you want to not only be involved during the election in terms of the debate, but you also want some involvement post-election, and you also mentioned pre-election. I'm interested in what kinds of thoughts you have about the commission and its role in any pre-election activities.

(1135)

Ms. Angella Persad:

What we are thinking is that, through the moderators and researchers, through the university and our alignment with the university, we can actually.... The right issues will be researched. So you could influence politics, you could influence democracy by having the right issues being discussed at the debate.

The pre-election involvement would really be to identify the right issues to be discussed and to have debates on those issues even before the actual general election. For instance, right now we don't have a fixed term.

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

That's one of the things we think that we could easily have debated prior to the elections, whether we should have a fixed term for governance and things like that, campaign financing. All things that are relevant to what the party would bring, but bring it all from before. It's a way for us of getting the debates commission accepted as a household name, knowing that we can do debates, and we will have a debate.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you for your comprehensive answers.

There's another area. This may be as much a political/cultural difference. I found it interesting when you talked about ensuring the independence of the commission, and therefore, under the old adage of he who pays the piper calls the tune, you go out of your way to ensure there's no government money. You are looking to the corporate side to ensure that independence.

I have to tell you that many of us here in Canada would see it the other way around. We look at public funding as the neutral dollars, and at the private sector—whether they're NGOs on the progressive left or, on the right, corporations making billions of dollars—as having a political agenda, so we go out of our way to make sure they don't have any money.... Public funding is the way we look at it to ensure there is fairness.

Obviously the government of the day holds the purse strings; for instance, our Elections Canada is funded by the public purse. No one believes that just because it's the government that sets the budget they get to decide how that commission runs. That is dictated by other legislation and other regulations.

Just as a matter of curiosity, could you tease out for me how your view is so completely different from ours and why there's this fear, almost—those are my words—at having public money in any way because that begins the tainting process?

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

Yes, I think you've probably hit the nail on the head: it's a little different with the culture and the Trinidadian people. Again, because the debates commission is not legislated in any way, you will have a particular politician say, “Yes, I support your debates commission and I'm willing to fund the debates commission.” Unless we get something legislated, where from government to government it doesn't matter who is ruling at that time, and it specifies some parameters around the funding so that we would know it would always be there—and again, that it's not partisan—then it becomes very difficult.

In a previous debate, the party in power actually said that they were willing to fund, but they would have said they were willing to fund out of a budget that was probably already allocated to something else. We felt that would certainly lead to bias.

On corporate entities, there is a discussion going on right now about that: how independent are you if corporate entities are funding? You are right, one corporation is aligned to one party and another one to another party. To get around that, because you kind of know which corporations are loyal to which parties, we ensured the widest possible participation by the corporates, so that on both sides of these two major political parties, contributions were made by corporates. It's just getting that breadth that allows us to feel independent, but again, because that is not the best way, it's the other reason why we continue to say that we have to find funding elsewhere. We are looking at international funding.

In the longer term—because it takes a long while to get legislation in Trinidad—there is the hope that eventually we could get the entire master legislation that says they have to debate and they have to provide the funding. In our legislation, we don't even have any substantial funding for political parties' campaigns. It is so small that you probably couldn't even buy a jersey, so really and truly, they also rely on corporations for their funding, which comes right back to the question again: obviously, certain corporations are loyal to certain parties.

(1140)

Mr. David Christopherson:

Very good. Thank you so much for your time and your answers.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC)):

Ms. Tassi, please.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you, Chair.

If you wouldn't mind, please signal me at around a minute, because I'll be sharing my time with Ms. Sahota.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Scott Reid):

I'll signal you at three and a half minutes, all right? Duly noted.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

With respect to the debates, I was taking notes as you were speaking. There were three debates in 2010 and two debates in 2013. Is that accurate?

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

No: one in 2010 and two in 2013.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Were there any others in addition to those from that time?

Ms. Catherine Kumar: No.

Ms. Filomena Tassi: At the beginning when I asked about the public opinion, with respect to the uptake, you said that maybe 50% were in and 50% not so much. Since you've had those debates, has the uptake improved?

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

Perhaps not, because something happened in the last debate that we planned in 2015, which did not go well for the commission. We have learned a lot of lessons along the way. Literally, as we go along, we are learning and improving. One of the things that is very important with the debates commission and liaising with the parties is that you must have the identical letter going to all the parties about any matter relative to the debate. We erred in one area where the letters that went to the parties cited a different date about something. The incumbent party did not want a debate, even though they said they would debate, took that and literally stripped us. It impacted our brand so badly, and the political analysts did not come on our side because the particular ones were party-aligned.

We have to do a lot of rebuilding of our brand and our reputation and that's why we need to have a couple of debates before the next general election.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

We've heard testimony on the importance of the role of media in organizing these debates. You mentioned previously that you could have done the reverse and gotten the media on side to convince people. Right now, what do you see as the role of the media?

Ms. Angella Persad:

We see that role as critical. We see them helping us with the entire production of the debate; but more than that, we see them from now until the general election in 2020. We see them as building awareness of debates, of the issues, and of the need to have your leaders out there debating the issues so that the undecided electorate have something to refer to, to make up their minds. We see that as the media's responsibility, and we see that even more now because we can't go to the politicians, the leaders, to ask them to debate and be confident that they will. If the public calls for it, they have to debate because then they pay the ultimate price.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

With respect to the structure of the commission, does the media have any say or input into decision-making?

Ms. Angella Persad:

They do because two members of the media association are on the commission itself.

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

We are developing a detailed MOU, which would spell out the rights and responsibilities of both parties, the debates commission and the media, so we know going forward there's a really strict way, a modus operandi, between the two.

(1145)

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you.

I'm going to pass my remaining time to my colleague, Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Good morning.

Do you scale down as a debates commission after election years? We heard from the U.S., and they said they were most active during campaigns but then they would scale down to only a few people, therefore reducing costs. I don't know how your commission operates.

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

We operate very much like that. During an election period we bring on extra staff and we would have a full office of all the different skills required and then after elections, we would go back to doing almost nothing. Again, one of the shortfalls for us is that we still relied on the chamber staff during that period so after the elections we went back to our normal work. We recognize that's not the best way to go forward.

I am very familiar that this is the way the U.S. debates operate. That's also the way the Jamaican debates operate. With our new mandate of wanting to be involved in all processes and all stages of the governance cycle, we are in the process right now of looking for a permanent CEO and also a permanent admin assistant and in the activities we have drilled down from the strategic plan. A lot of things need to be done during this interim period so by the time the elections come around, a lot of work has been done.

As I said, I know that's the way some of the others are done, but I really think it's a good exercise to keep the momentum going even outside the election period.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

During the interim, it's just a couple of positions. How many bodies would you have during an election year, how many different positions? You said relevant skills are needed. What would they be?

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

During the election period, the production people are always outsourced. That would be a group made up of probably 10 persons or so. We always bring in our marketing and communication people—again outsourced. That could be probably just two persons. Then we have the office staff who will be there. We normally have about four or five persons working with us, doing all of the front communication—writing of letters, making the calls, and organizing with the different venues where we're going to have the debates. Pretty much that's it.

On the night of the debate, we call on other people. We have to have security on call, and they're on the site. For the week of the debate itself, we beef up even more with additional resources.

The difficulty in having a full office throughout the period when you're not having debates is the cost of carrying that office.

Ms. Angella Persad:

Just to add, the commissioners all understand that they have to pitch in and do work as well. During the election, nearing the election, the commissioners also have rules and responsibilities.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Scott Reid):

Thank you.

I'll have time for a Conservative round, five minutes; and a Liberal round, five minutes.

Let's go to Mr. Nater, please.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, again, to our friends from Trinidad and Tobago for their excellent commentary today. I like the opportunity to speak to our Commonwealth cousins and the opportunity to speak on similar electoral systems and structures of government, and as Mr. Christopherson pointed out, from slightly different cultures as well. It's good to have the dynamics of that conversation.

I have a quick question of clarification. In terms of the actual elections themselves, how are they administered in Trinidad and Tobago? Is there a government entity that administers the elections?

Ms. Angella Persad:

There's the Elections and Boundaries Commission, which is a government entity. They administer all the elections. They would ensure that there are polling booths all through the country. They would ensure free and fair election voting right throughout the country. The responsibility lies with them. They do a pretty good job every year, every election time.

Mr. John Nater:

I would assume it would be structured as an independent type. It's not a government-appointed body, or it's not affiliated, I should say, with a political organization, then.

Ms. Angella Persad:

I think it's appointed by the president of the country but in consultation with the prime minister.

Mr. John Nater:

I'd like to touch a little on some of the dynamics of elections in Trinidad and Tobago. In Canada we have a very strong leader-centred system, where local candidates are very much, for better or worse, tied to the national leader. The success of candidates in local ridings is tied to the national party and the national leader. Is that a similar dynamic in Trinidad and Tobago, where an individual representative in a district is very much tied to the success of the national campaign and the national leader?

(1150)

Ms. Angella Persad:

Yes, it's very much so. The national leaders really are the ones who are the dominant leaders. We have typically mainly two entities here that are the leading parties in Trinidad and Tobago. Just as a bit of background, we have two major ethnic groups in Trinidad and Tobago. We have the Indians and we have the Africans. The two dominant parties are made up of both of these. Then we have maybe one or two other parties that are made up of people who are undecided, who are not blindly loyal, I would say, to one or the other. That is how the makeup goes.

When this commission started in 2010, one thing that made the chamber decide it must take a responsibility was because of the campaigning that was going on, the dirty politics and the ridiculous, for want of a better word, campaigns that were going on. There was no debate. There was no question of issues, discussing issues, giving people an opportunity to understand how leaders were going to treat and deal with these issues. There was nothing like that at all. There was just a lot of campaign rhetoric. It was speaking of the parties and speaking of individuals as well. The chamber, at that point, decided, “We have to take a responsibility here to improve on this and give our country a chance to really improve the democracy and vote not on tribal lines but on issues.” That's the background, I would say.

Mr. John Nater:

Excellent.

Prior to the establishment of the debates commission, were there any debates at the local level in individual districts? I know here in Canada we often have chambers of commerce debates, agricultural society debates. Was there anything like that at the local level in terms of individual districts at all?

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

No, we didn't have anything like that. What you would find is that the chamber of commerce would invite the prospective leaders to come and address their members, and the members would ask them questions. In the context of a debate, no, we have not had that. We've had interviews on television, but not a debate.

Also, the candidates are strongly tied to the leader, even though they go through an interview process before deciding who would be the candidate. The PM has a veto there. Well, the leader has a veto there, and he or she can decide which candidate will go up. It's very strongly tied.

Mr. John Nater:

I think that would be, for better or for worse, similar to our system in terms of the centrality of our leader.

You mentioned earlier that the chamber provides a bit of in-kind service to the debate commission. Is that a structure that you would recommend to Canada, having an existing entity provide the administrative support, or would you recommend a completely independent structure?

The example that has been raised is that our Elections Canada could perhaps provide the administrative function, but have a separate commission. Is that something you would recommend?

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

I think as far as possible, you should remain independent from any organization, because as I said, even though the chamber was extremely supportive, there were times when that worked against us, because people said the chamber is big business and big business is supporting this, so you're not really for the people.

So as far as possible, and especially if you get it legislated and you get funding for it, I think you should try your best to have your own supports so that you're really independent.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you very much.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Scott Reid):

Ms. Sahota, please.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

My follow-up question is about how you disseminate the debates, how you get them out to people. We had a consortium of networks here in the past that used to organize some of the main debates. There's a lot of competition over who gets to carry the debate, what network is going to be the official provider, who's going to craft the questions, which journalists are going to get involved.

How do you deal with that? You said you had in-house production. Do you produce the whole thing and then give it out to all the networks?

(1155)

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

This is one area that we still have to look at, in terms of what is the best way for us to go forward.

So far we have contracted an outside production team to produce the debate. Then we go to the media house, the television stations—because it's a televised event—and ask them to bid on what it will cost to actually carry the debate. One of the conditions is always that they will allow all the other media. In other words, they would have a feed to all the other media houses.

That's the way we've operated in the past. For two of our debates, the government, which owns a television station, carried it for us at no cost, so we did not have to pay. We do not have the strong competition that you have or what you see in the U.S., where the different media houses are bidding for it.

The arrangement we're trying to have, going forward with the broadcasters' association, is that they would come together, this consortium kind of thing, and they would decide which one would carry it. They would have the feed go out to all and they'd take up the entire production cost, because the production costs during the debate itself are easily about 70% of our total cost.

If we can get the media houses to take up that production cost, produce the debate and carry it, it would certainly save us a lot in terms of financial resources.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

For us, accessibility is really important, making sure that all types of people with different income ranges have access to this debate, including hearing-impaired people, vision-impaired people. We're thinking about that quite a bit. The problem we run into is in making sure that some of the big networks carry it, because it's the ones that are on basic cable that more people have access to. However, they may not be satisfied with the production quality if we do it with a different production company and don't use their medium to produce; they all feel they carry a certain quality.

That's an issue, but we've been looking at Internet streaming over different types of social media. Have you considered any of that? Is your population connected more via Internet or do you find that more of the population has access to cable?

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

More of the population has access to cable. The Internet as a means of viewing television is really something quite new in Trinidad and Tobago. Most people would be viewing our main cable stations. We don't have the vast number of stations that you have. We probably have only four large television stations, and all four will carry it.

We allow our radio stations to carry it too because, depending on what part of the country you're from, you will find it is only radio that you can tune in to.

What we have lacked in the past is coverage through social media. That's one of the things we're looking at for the 2020 elections, so that other people can.... During a debate people send in comments through social media, and we hear what their interests are and what they think about the debate. So far, that has been the limit of what we have used social media for during a debate.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

That's very interesting.

One of the other things we're looking at is whether people using social media can ask live questions to the debaters. How can we reach the greatest number of people?

The Chair:

We all really appreciate your attendance here today. It has been very helpful for us to see another Commonwealth situation that is ahead of us in having a debates commission.

Thank you and good luck. We look forward to your sunshine being sent north.

Ms. Catherine Kumar:

Thank you very much. We wish you all the best in forming a debates commission that is best suited to your country.

Ms. Angella Persad:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

We're going to suspend for two minutes while we make a technological change for the other witnesses.

(1155)

(1200)

The Chair:

Good afternoon, welcome back to the 86th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

Our witnesses on this panel, by video conference from Jamaica, are Noel daCosta, chairman, and Trevor Fearon, resource consultant. Thank you both for making yourselves available today. I'm sure you're very busy, but this is going to be very helpful for us.

Mr. daCosta, if you would like to make some opening remarks, we'll then have the committee members ask each of you questions.

Mr. Noel daCosta (Chairman, Jamaica Debates Commission):

Thank you very much.

The Jamaica Debates Commission was formed in 2002. Our main purpose was to promote pre-election debate between the political parties so as to promote civil discourse, to defuse political tension, and to inform the public of the protagonists so that they could make informed decisions. The debates commission is a partnership between the Jamaica Chamber of Commerce—and Mr. Trevor Fearon here is the CEO of the Jamaica Chamber of Commerce—and the Media Association Jamaica, which is a body composed of media house owners.

We established a “partnership at will” and we have now converted that into a registered legal entity. We are going to be applying for charitable status shortly. The Jamaica Debates Commission is run by six directors who are nominated, three from the chamber of commerce and three from the Media Association Jamaica.

How do we work? We operate under a strict code of conduct. We have developed ground rules and guidelines for debates conduct. We call on our media partners to provide the resources to stage the debates.

What have we done to date? We have organized political debates ahead of general elections in 2002, 2007, and 2011 and staged political debates ahead of local government elections in 2012 and 2016.

Typically, our debates are organized. We have three debates: one on social issues, one on economic issues, and one where the leadership of both parties debate each other. We also have team debates on local government elections.

Our debates are staged live events in studio settings with invited guests. We use moderators, who act as traffic cops, and a panel of journalists who pose questions to the protagonists. All telecasts are free to air, on TV and radio, and since 2007 we have been streaming via the Internet. Those who use our signals are obliged to broadcast exactly as received. We do that because we're supported and funded by sponsors from the private sector. In breaks in the debate we insert their advertisements, their promotional material, so we want those who rebroadcast the signal to use it exactly in that form.

During a debate, we set up a debate watch in various communities where we encourage the people in the community to look at the debate, to record their impression, and to discuss it after the debate has been completed. We also have done polls after the debates to see how effective they are, with some interesting results to date. We also have post-debate debriefings and we report back to our sponsors as to how we have spent the money that they entrusted with us to provide these debates.

Those are my key points.

(1205)

Mr. Trevor Fearon (Resource Consultant, Jamaica Debates Commission):

I think that's pretty comprehensive.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

That's great. It's another different model.

The way the questions work, each member from each party gets seven minutes total. It includes their questions to you and your answers to them.

We'll start out with Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you for the presentation.

I note that Jamaica seems to have a fairly two-party system. I saw that in the last election it was 50.01% to 49.99% or something like that. It was a very tight election.

What are the thresholds for participation in the debate, and how do you handle third parties, the other parties that don't have significant support right now?

(1210)

Mr. Noel daCosta:

We have criteria to be accepted, because we've had requests in the past from third and fourth parties to be included in the debates. We have some criteria they must satisfy.

The first is that they should have a written constitution, which requires the holding of periodic elections for the selection of officers. In addition, they must be recognized by the chief electoral officer as an entity that is found appropriate to participate in the debates and to contest political elections.

The second is that they should, in the last general elections, have had an aggregate of not less than 10% of the valid votes cast.

The third condition is that in a national public opinion poll recognized by the commission as having been scientifically conducted, they should have obtained not less than 15% support as a party for whom electors intend to vote.

They must satisfy condition one, which is the first one, as well as either of the other two conditions.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The board of the commission is three members from the chamber of commerce and three from the media association. How do you assess the independence of the organization in terms of the ability for it to make decisions completely independent from the business community or from media's own interests?

Mr. Noel daCosta:

We have a strict code of conduct that all the commissioners must follow. They sign a document saying that they have satisfied all the conditions.

We have learned that the integrity of the commissioners is critical to people putting trust in the work that we do. For example, our code of conduct proscribes making personal contributions or funding to any of the parties or candidates, attending the fundraising events of any of the candidates, participating in their campaign in any form, writing or authoring any documents that the protagonists might wish to put out, being a candidate in any of the elections, disclosing their own voting intentions, and several other criteria that we have developed to ensure that their political credentials are above reproach.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is it possible for us to get a copy of that declaration?

Mr. Noel daCosta:

We can arrange that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Excellent. Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Good day, gentlemen. Thanks for joining us.

Very quickly, you said that it's privately supported. You seek out advertisers and they buy the ads or they get exclusive rights to put on their ads during the breaks of the debate. Is that correct? The broadcast of this debate is fully funded by the private sector.

Mr. Noel daCosta:

Yes. We approach large corporations and we appeal to their public spirit, their national spirit, their civic pride, and their desire for free and fair elections. We also allow them to advertise during the breaks.

We sell packages. We have three packages—gold, silver, and bronze—which determine the extent of the advertising exposure at the beginning, at the break, and at the end of the debate.

Mr. Scott Simms:

There is no government money being put forward to help support this endeavour in any of the debates.

Mr. Noel daCosta:

None whatsoever.

Mr. Scott Simms:

What about compulsory participation? I don't know if this has ever happened. You have a two-party system. I'm assuming everybody plays along, but do you have a rule in place if one of the major parties does not want to take part?

Mr. Noel daCosta:

Yes. In our last general election one of the two major parties decided not to debate.

Mr. Scott Simms:

And what did you do?

Mr. Noel daCosta:

Well, our partners, you recall, are the media association, so we brought the full force of the media to let the whole country know that they are big clients of the debate and we negotiated with them up to, I think, the day before the debates were scheduled. At every step of the way, we kept the public informed as to how the discussions and the negotiations were going, and the reasons that were being put forward not to debate. In the end, they decided not to debate, so we had to cancel the debate.

An anecdote related to that is that, subsequently, the party that refused to debate lost the election. They did a poll, and one of the main findings of the poll was that their decision not to debate weighed heavily against them in the election. They have admitted that they have sort of learned their lesson, so they will participate in the future.

(1215)

Mr. Trevor Fearon:

We should say, though, if I could just interject, we had been in negotiations with both parties before, for weeks and months, and there was an agreement in principle that the debates would take place. The backing out came pretty much as a surprise to the organizers and to the Jamaican public.

Mr. Noel daCosta:

They expressed their disapproval in the actual voting.

The Chair:

Okay, thank you very much.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Again, thank you to our participants today. It's always nice to hear different viewpoints and different examples of debate commissions around the world, so it's great to have both of you joining us today by video conference.

In your opening comments, you mentioned that there are typically three debates: one on social issues, one on economic issues, and one a leadership debate. Am I right to understand that it's only the third debate, the leadership debate, where the party leaders participate? Who participates in the first two debates? Is it the minister responsible for social issues or economic issues, or is it simply a representative that the parties choose to participate in those debates?

Mr. Noel daCosta:

It's the representative that the parties choose, but typically it is the minister responsible for the area on one side and the shadow minister on the other side.

Mr. John Nater:

In the past typically has it only been a two-person debate, then, for those social and economic issues as well, or have there been examples where there has been a third?

Mr. Noel daCosta:

No, in one of the social issues debates we agreed with the parties that they would put up three debaters, so we had three on each side, including those responsible for the particular area. This was a social issues debate. We had three on each side. For the finance debate, we would typically have the finance minister and the shadow finance minister.

Mr. John Nater:

Very good.

Now, in terms of public reaction or public interest, am I right to assume that typically the third debate, the leadership debate, is the most widely viewed? I'd be interested in how much public attention the first two debates, on the social issues and the economic issues, get compared to the leadership debate.

Mr. Noel daCosta:

Those two debates are quite well supported and quite well viewed, not as much as the leadership debates, but the Jamaican society is very politically aware. Both debates engender a fair level of interest, but the leadership debate is the one that usually attracts the highest viewership, and the other two usually get more than average attention from the public.

Mr. Trevor Fearon:

As you will have seen in our documentation, since 2007 we have done polls after the election itself, and from those polls we see the degree of viewership. It's still a substantial viewership. The persons who are watching will attest to whether or not watching this particular debate or that particular debate contributed to their voting decisions later. A leadership debate will probably be the most important, but the others also factor into the voting decision.

Mr. John Nater:

Very good. In terms of the commission's role in choosing the moderators of the debate, what role does the commission play after the moderators have been chosen? Does the moderator then take complete control over the debate in terms of the types of questions asked, or does the commission still have a role to play once the moderator has been chosen?

(1220)

Mr. Noel daCosta:

The moderator is primarily a traffic policeman. Persons at the debate are panels of journalists. The commission selects the journalists, but they also have to be agreed to by both parties that are debating. We have three journalists who ask the questions during the debate. The commission does not know what these questions are going to be. We sequester the journalists, so that amongst themselves we don't have two journalists asking the same question. Neither the commission nor anybody else has any idea what these questions are going to be.

Mr. John Nater:

You said the journalists have to be agreed to by the political parties. Is it common for one or both of the political parties to veto one of the choices for journalists, or veto multiple choices, or is it generally accepted that the journalists who are proposed are typically accepted by the political parties?

Mr. Noel daCosta:

We have had instances. Generally they are accepted because we have learned how to choose the less politically biased journalists. In the past we have had journalists who have been questioned by the political parties, but I don't think we have ever removed any.

Mr. Trevor Fearon:

No. In the end we haven't, but as you had said there is a certain degree of.... We will know, or a political party will advise us, whether a certain journalist has been writing speeches for the opposing party, or has been doing a, b, or c, and therefore they don't think it is a good idea for that person to be selected. When cases like that arise we can certainly adjust our list.

We work with a list. The journalists are invited. They have to agree to sit on the panel in the first place. Sometimes it's a process of attrition, but we end up with a panel that both parties are either comfortable with or not opposed to.

Mr. Noel daCosta:

I should just add that all the work of the journalists, the commission, and the resource persons is voluntary: nobody gets paid.

Mr. John Nater:

Very good. Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now I'm looking forward to Mr. Christopherson's questions, maybe on the ads. Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you very much for your presentation. I have a close affinity with Jamaica. A few years ago I was there under the auspices of GOPAC, the Global Organization of Politicians Against Corruption, the Canadian chapter, and we were doing some work with your public accounts department and your auditor general. Far more importantly, I just came back a couple of weeks ago from being on your beaches and I wish I was still there.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson: Thank you so very much for taking the time. This has been very helpful. I have a couple of areas I would like to explore.

I was very intrigued by the fact that the party that chose to pull out of the debates lost the election. We had the same situation, except we have no evidence yet that I've seen that the refusal to participate in the national debates had any role in it. I found it fascinating that you were able to discern through polling, I think you said, that indeed it was a major factor.

One of the issues we're looking at is if there is a refusal to participate, what, if any, are the repercussions. Is there any disciplinary action? I, for one, have been very reluctant to go down that road of imposing some kind of a sanction on a party refusing to participate in a debate. It's the whole idea of trying to legislate what happens in the dynamics of an election. However, I'm open to it if that's the only tool to ensure that we don't have a repeat of the disgrace that we saw last time, where we did not have the kind of national leaders' debate that Canadians expect.

Sorry for the long preamble, but all of that is to ask you: what do you think that was about, the public outcry and the role of the media? Were there editorials, protests, online protests? Can you give me an idea of the manifestation of the anger or the upset that took place that led to it being a factor in people's decision-making?

(1225)

Mr. Noel daCosta:

It was all available. Editorials spoke to it. Social media went berserk when they found out there would be no debates. There were letters to the editor. The business community was quite upset. Business organizations wrote to the newspaper decrying the fact there was not going to be a debate so that people could see the platform of both parties in an unbiased and non-hyped environment. There was a public outcry.

Mr. David Christopherson: That's beautiful.

Mr. Noel daCosta: The poll that was done afterwards was done by the party that lost—we didn't do the poll; we did our own private poll. Their finding, which they also published, was that their decision not to debate was fatal. Those are their words.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's great. That's where we want to get. That's where we want to be. We want to make it such that whatever the regime necessary, no one would dare say no again to a national debate. Certainly that's what's motivating me. I just love that you had that outcry because that's the best kind of regime to have: where you don't have the rules, it's the public that says that this is unacceptable, that if you go down this road, you're going to pay a price. I'm just thrilled to hear that.

What do you see right now as your major challenge? We're always looking for improvements, ways to do things better. What's on your horizon to continue to push to be as effective as you can?

Mr. Noel daCosta:

I think our challenge right now is to get secure funding for our work. As I mentioned, we're all volunteers. There has been talk within the private sector of some institutionalizing of the work that we do. To that end, we have registered ourselves as a legal entity. Before that we were just a partnership of a media association and chamber of commerce.

That would be what we are putting forward, looking at a secure source of funding rather than the whims of someone, and to ensure some structured continuity for what we do.

Mr. Trevor Fearon:

I would add one point there. Up to the 2016 general election, we were pretty much thinking that the debates were institutionalized, that because of the previous election cycles we would probably get some push-back and some rough treatment at the hands of a political party. It was sufficiently institutionalized that no party would decide not to. It was a rude awakening to us. We realized that the process of institutionalization of the debates process is a constant work in progress. The fact that we were able to get so much support from all parts of society—calling upon the parties to debate, insisting that it take place—was because we managed to build coalitions with our great variety of entities in civil society, etc.

That process is one that has to go on and it's something that we are devoted to carrying on.

(1230)

Mr. Noel daCosta:

Perhaps I could add one point. I suppose you will have a similar issue. We don't have fixed election dates, so the parties can call an election tomorrow. We have to be in a constant state of readiness to put on a debate within a short period of time. That has some challenges, particularly when you have to go out and source funding before putting on the debate.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you so very much for your answers. I appreciate it.

The Chair:

We'll go on to Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thank you so much for coming and helping us out on this project.

One issue we heard about from traditional media outlets in Canada is that they looked to the timing of the debate and they wanted to put it on at a time when it wasn't up against a popular sporting event or a popular television show because they wanted to get as many eyeballs on the debates as possible. Can you tell us how you determine the timing of a debate in Jamaica?

Mr. Noel daCosta:

We also have that issue. Fortunately for us, our partners in this are the media association. They're quite willing to cut us a lot of slack. Our debates typically start at nine o'clock, which is after all the major news shows have taken place. Even though they are partners, we have to pay them for airtime. We like to think we get some concessions on those rates. They have been publicly displaying things like a willingness to accommodate us in the timing of the debates. We have been having it at nine o'clock since we started. We have had no issues other than the background noises that we're missing this program or that program. We've been able to do it through the good relationship we have with our partners.

Mr. Trevor Fearon:

The fact is that we have a short window. Usually we know it has to take place within a period of, say, a week and a half—all three debates. It's a matter of negotiating with the parties. If one party is having its major and final mass gathering, we know it's not going to be that night. Similarly for the other party. We generally try to include a weekend, usually a Saturday, for the final debate, or a Friday. These are all high viewership nights, and we also try to slot the other two in the week before. That has worked out with the parties. The agreement is that both are going to claim they are suffering because of particular issues, but since both are suffering, they're willing to live with it.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Just in terms of comparing the two election cycles—because we do have fixed elections in Canada, but minority governments can happen, and then in that time an election can happen at any moment—how long are your elections typically?

Mr. Noel daCosta:

Between nomination day and election day, there are 21 days. We don't have the debates before nomination day because we're not sure who the parties are going to put up for election, theoretically. Between nomination day and election day, within that 21-day period, we have to plan and execute those three debates, culminating with the leadership debate.

(1235)

Mr. Chris Bittle:

What work does the organization do to take into account persons with disabilities who may not have the ability to access a broadcast in the same way that you or I may be able to do?

Mr. Noel daCosta:

We have signers for the hearing impaired. I think that's the only concession we make.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Excellent.

In terms of the dissemination of the broadcast—and I think you touched on it—you have to pay for the airtime.

Mr. Noel daCosta:

Yes.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

What about the online feed? Is that available for anyone to use and broadcast in any way? How does that work?

Mr. Noel daCosta:

The online features are available, but they have to broadcast it as it appears. They can't edit it. They can't insert advertisements or anything into the period of the debate.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

One of the issues that we're discussing is whether or not such an organization in Canada should be legislated. I know it's a different set-up. Would you see the benefit of having legislation passed requiring a debates commission? Could you discuss that?

Mr. Noel daCosta:

If you legislate it, then the funding would have to be secure.

Mr. Trevor Fearon:

Some of our colleagues have gone that route of a debate commission or debate-organizing bodies in other countries. We have never really come to a policy position on that. I think what we would find most useful would be movement towards fixed election dates.

I think there is a sense that public pressure, public opinion, can drive the parties to feel compelled to debate.

At this point I'm not sure that there are many advantages to having it put in legislation.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We will now go on to Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you to both of you for being with us today to help us out with this study. I appreciate your making some of your time available to us.

You mentioned that the commission had been created by the chamber of commerce and the media association jointly. Is that correct?

Mr. Noel daCosta:

Yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Were they the bodies that then appointed you as chairman and appointed the commission as well? Who appoints that? Is that them, or how are you chosen?

Mr. Trevor Fearon:

The two partners chose the individuals in either entity, the chamber and the Media Association Jamaica. It was those entities that endorsed the participation of, say, Mr. daCosta, and two other commissioners from the chamber because of their whole interest in this area.

The media association did the same thing; it nominated its own three persons from its side. As Noel said, it's a voluntary thing, so they have to be certain that these persons are going to put in the time. It is a lot of time during that lead-up to an election, and so on, and they chose a coalition of the willing, in terms of volunteers, and those would be the commissioners.

(1240)

Mr. Noel daCosta:

These commissioners would have to be persons who have no obvious political leanings and persons whom both parties and the general public would find trustworthy. In choosing the commissioners, both partners keep these criteria in mind.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Is that codified somehow, or is it just informally the process that was put in place?

Mr. Noel daCosta:

It's not really codified anywhere.

Mr. Trevor Fearon:

There are no regulations per se. It's just that the debates commission is a creation of these two entities.

Mr. Noel daCosta:

As far as the chairman is concerned, the chairman alternates between both partners and is changed after every election cycle.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, so it's kind of an agreement that everyone has and understands.

Would you then say that has served you well and worked well? As a sort of addition to that, for our benefit, have you found that having it be independent from the government—it's not chosen by the government or the political parties—has been something that's important and valuable?

Mr. Noel daCosta:

Yes, I think it has served us well since 2002. I think the fact that there is no government intervention in choosing any of the...or having any say at all in the whole Jamaica Debates Commission has worked to our advantage.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Do you feel that has been an important aspect of it?

Mr. Noel daCosta:

Yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I was curious about the polling you mentioned, which is done following each debate to determine whether it was effective. What kinds of questions are asked to determine that? Is it to get a sense as to whether it was effective in terms of giving people the ability to make a judgment about...like whether the format itself was effective? What type of polling and what types of questions are asked to determine that?

Mr. Noel daCosta:

The questions would be to those who watched the debates. We would get some demographic description of those who are responding. Pollsters would ask questions as to whether the debates influenced their decisions in voting.

Some of the questions would be, “Did the debate help you to understand the issues any better? Did it bring clarity to some of the burning questions that the society would ask around the time of the debate? As a result of looking at the debate, would you change your voting intentions?”

Mr. Trevor Fearon:

Or, “Did you change your voting intentions?”

Mr. Noel daCosta:

Yes. We did these polls, not after the debates but after the elections.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I guess a metric of success, then, is whether it actually influenced people's decisions on who they voted for. Is that what you're saying? Is that what you're considering as one of the metrics of success, then?

Mr. Noel daCosta:

Yes. One of the metrics is whether it influenced your voting decision, either positively or negatively.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Quickly, what other metrics would be part of that determination as to whether it was successful?

Mr. Trevor Fearon:

We would ask them for their thoughts about the formats we used. Was it a format that they thought should be improved? Did it work? What would they have preferred?

Part of it is also qualitative in order to get constant feedback, because of this constant process of improvement that we are engaged in. There are the standard formats versus, for instance, a town hall format. We try to relate that to the age of the respondents and whether people would have liked questions coming in from social media, because that's pretty new for us. Those types of assessments help us understand the impacts and how to improve the next time.

(1245)

Mr. Noel daCosta:

As a result of these poll findings, we have changed our format somewhat. For example, in the last set of debates we had a facility where the public could ask questions of the debaters via social media. They responded in real time while the debate was on.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That's great. Thank you very much for your input today.

The Chair:

Before we go to Mr. Simms, who I know is itching to go, I have one question. You had the two people who you were expecting to show up, and at the last minute one of the parties cancelled. Did you give any thought to allowing the person who was willing to show up to have some free airtime and just talk to the public in the meeting?

Mr. Trevor Fearon:

Whether we would have done that and then chair a debate, no.

Mr. Noel daCosta:

We thought about it and decided against it.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Simms, you're on.

Mr. Scott Simms:

First of all, thanks for all the information. I think I'm getting the general gist of how you perform, of how you do it.

The shaming aspect of it for someone who doesn't show up is very interesting, and I agree with Mr. Christopherson. I think that's a fantastic way by which you could police this and also make sure that it's effective by letting them know how the public feels about their absence.

What are some of the changes you're planning to make for the next debate, given what you have been through thus far?

Mr. Noel daCosta:

I think we'll try to find a way to include more questions rather than limiting questions to the selected journalists. We're looking to find a way to include more questions from the general public, but we want to do it in such a way that we could filter out the partisan party supporters who send specific types of questions and also filter it in such a way that it doesn't come across as sterile or boring in the end.

The objective would be to get more participation from the public, because in the final analysis the debates are for them. We want to represent that as best as we can through debate on issues that the public finds interesting.

Mr. Trevor Fearon:

If I could just add to that, we would also want some greater engagement with young people, because what we're finding here is that the size of the voter turnout has been declining. It's particularly noticeable among young voters, newer voters, or people who are newly joining the electorate. One of the things we have been considering is what some of our counterparts do. Should we be having debates in educational institutions, framing and locating them in various educational institutions, or in some way bringing the young people more into the process?

Mr. Scott Simms:

Do you have the ability to sanction these types of debates in those institutions?

Mr. Trevor Fearon:

Given the time we have to prepare—it'll be in the middle of a school year, so to find a facility that we can set up—it's tricky.

Mr. Scott Simms:

...but it would be sanctioned by you. Okay.

The rest of my time I give to Mr. Fillmore.

The Chair:

You'll probably be the last intervenor, unless anyone else is anxious to go.

Mr. Andy Fillmore (Halifax, Lib.):

Thank you, both, for your time and sharing your experiences today.

I'll start by saying there are many of us—and I expect it might be true of you as well—who feel that debates play a fundamental role in providing voters with the information they need to make an informed decision come voting time at the ballot box. We want to provide voters with the information they need, and this is why we're so focused on creating a credible and durable debates commission.

I'm wondering whether your debates commission has, as part of its mandate, any kind of public education role beyond just the production and broadcasting dissemination of a debate. Is there anything else you're doing to encourage viewership, for example, or to otherwise engage voters and citizens outside of the actual debate in election period?

(1250)

Mr. Noel daCosta:

Yes, we do. Well, not outside of the election period, no. We are set up primarily to stage debates. During the debates themselves, we have set up what we call debate watches in various communities, as I mentioned earlier. We encourage the community to look at the debates as a community, not individually in their homes but in a communal setting. We usually have a facilitator there who moderates discussion—because the community is made up of supporters of both parties—around what they saw in the debate. It's not about what happened 20 years in the past, but what they learned from the debate and how it would help them to come to a decision about their voting choices.

Mr. Andy Fillmore:

That's fascinating. We had some ideas from participants in some round tables that we held, who suggested coffee houses or community events surrounding the debate. These would facilitate discussion and perhaps, in some cases, even join it with a performance of this kind or that kind, making it a community event that draws people together so the conversation is shared.

Thank you for sharing your experience.

The Chair:

Thank you both for being with us. We really appreciate it. It sheds a whole other dimension on our study. We wish we were down there in the warmth with you, but thanks for giving us your time.

Mr. Noel daCosta:

Thank you very much. We're glad to be here.

The Chair:

Committee members, on Thursday we'll be looking at the draft report. You've received it already; I read it last night. Any additions from today will be added. Remember, it's in confidence; we do committee reports in confidence.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Being the new year, I'm just getting caught up on everything. It's my understanding that the parliamentary secretary held—and there was just a reference to it now—some public sessions of some kind on this whole thing. Can I just get a clarification? Is that correct?

Mr. Andy Fillmore:

Yes, the minister and I held a series of five round tables across the country, from east to west: Halifax, Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg, and Vancouver. Each was about two hours in length, and we invited members of civil society organizations, academia, traditional and new media, and other interested folks. The idea is to create a third method of gaining information from Canadians, the first being this study, the second being the open portal for all Canadians to share their ideas, and the third being the round tables where perhaps more candid conversations could occur.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm not going to make a mountain out of this, but it still troubles me. The way that the government has viewed this, in my opinion, has been somewhat different from my concept of what it meant to let committees be more independent and respect the work of committees.

This is the first time I've heard that there are three streams of influence on this report. The only one I know about is this committee. I understand the portal may have been there and whatever. I'm not saying it's a bad thing to do. The government has every right to do that, and I'm glad they're talking to Canadians.

What I'm having some trouble with is, we were asked.... I mean, the whole thing has been kind of weird. When I sat down with the minister, she was the one who asked if we were interested in doing this. I said yes for the reasons I've already outlined with our guests. It makes me nuts that one of the leaders said no and got away with it. They should be there, and they should have to debate.

Then when the letter came here, it was, “Oh, I'm so glad the committee has decided to undertake this”. I'm thinking, all right. I let it go, it's no big deal. Then, at another point, you came forward as a parliamentary secretary with a whole list of recommendations that you had. I can't go into it in detail because it was in camera, but you did have a list of things that you wanted from the minister. Now there's this other stream with the minister. I just have some trouble understanding.

Let me have my rant, and then I'll let it go, Chair.

My understanding was that we were tasked with this issue, especially this committee. It's arguably, along with public accounts, the most non-partisan committee that we have. In fact, it only works when we get past our partisanship. It made all the sense in the world to me that we were tasked with this, we agreed to do it, we set out, and we've been doing it.

Then there are these other activities by the minister, and it's almost as if this committee was sort of just one of the pawns in their overall political strategy of how they're going to get themselves out of the hole that they've dug for themselves on the issue of democratic reform.

I just want to leave it with you that this government consistently, notwithstanding the individuals, in fact, the opposite of the members of the committee that I'm looking at.... The government itself consistently does not, in my mind, live up to its promise about the way it was going to view and utilize committees.

This is just one more example. It's not a big, egregious one. It's not like this is all I'm going to do about it, and there are no cameras here, so nobody's even going to know I did this except you. I just want to say that it's still not consistent with the kind of respect that I expected from this government based on the promises they made about how committees will operate.

I've been doing committees for an awfully long time here, and in the provincial legislature, and my idea of an independent committee doing work is different from the way the government has handled this file. I've just been kind of disappointed.

It seems to be more cross-purposes or silly decisions rather than a real deliberative effort to thwart our work. It just leaves a bad taste that it didn't go exactly the way it could have, the way of a fully independent committee, and it certainly doesn't match the promise.

However, having said that, it gets it off my chest, Chair, and I'm good. Thanks.

(1255)

The Chair:

Thank you for airing those thoughts.

Thursday we'll look at the report. Is that good with everyone?

This meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

En ce début d'année, nous allons pour une fois commencer la séance à l'heure. Nous verrons comment les choses vont se passer.

Bonjour et bienvenue à la 86e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, qui est notre première réunion de 2018.

Nous poursuivons aujourd'hui notre étude sur la création d'un commissaire indépendant chargé des débats des chefs. Pour la première heure, nous allons entendre le témoignage de la Trinidad and Tobago Debates Commission, alors que la deuxième heure sera réservée à la Jamaica Debates Commission.

Nous sommes ravis d'être en présence des représentantes de la Trinidad and Tobago Debates Commission: la chef de la direction par intérim Catherine Kumar, qui est accompagnée d'Angella Persad, la présidente sortante.

Je vous remercie toutes les deux de comparaître aujourd'hui.

Je vais maintenant laisser Mme Kumar prononcer sa déclaration liminaire.

Mme Catherine Kumar (chef de la direction par intérim, Trinidad and Tobago Debates Commission):

Monsieur le président et le député Bagnell, merci beaucoup. C'est vraiment un plaisir de pouvoir vous présenter ce matin notre expérience au sein de la commission responsable des débats. Vous avez déjà présenté Angella Persad, qui m'aidera à répondre aux questions. J'aimerais simplement préciser que notre président actuel est M. Nicholas Galt, mais, étant donné qu'il occupe le poste depuis peu de temps, nous avons jugé bon de demander à Angella de comparaître.

J'aimerais aussi remercier infiniment Andrew, qui a répondu très efficacement à nos mille et une questions. La première fois qu'il m'a contactée, je me demandais pourquoi vous voudriez connaître le point de vue d'un petit pays en développement comme Trinité-et-Tobago. Je lui ai d'ailleurs demandé, après quoi j'ai compris. Nous sommes un pays du Commonwealth. Notre commission chargée des débats est déjà formée, et nous avons compris que vous pouviez apprendre de n'importe quel État, petit ou grand, puisque nous pouvons tous tirer des enseignements pour aller de l'avant.

J'espère vraiment que les renseignements communiqués vous seront profitables et vous aideront d'une manière ou d'une autre. Je crois que c'est probablement lors des questions et des réponses que nous retirerons le meilleur des échanges.

Je trouve important de vous raconter brièvement le contexte politique dans lequel évolue la commission responsable des débats, de même que la façon dont nous avons vu le jour. Notre société est démocratique. Nous tenons des élections tous les cinq ans, conformément à la loi. Comme la plupart des pays, nous organisons des campagnes électorales au cours desquelles il y a beaucoup de salissage et d'attaques entre les personnalités, le genre de chose qui n'aide en rien les électeurs à prendre des décisions éclairées au moment de voter.

Trinité-et-Tobago en particulier suit le rythme du rhum et du rôti. Il y a beaucoup de spectacles, de musique et de choses semblables pendant les campagnes. Des promesses mirobolantes sont faites, sans aucune obligation de rendre des comptes par la suite. Un candidat peut dire ce qu'il veut pendant la campagne, et personne ne peut l'en tenir responsable plus tard.

Trinité-et-Tobago n'avait aucun débat des chefs avant la création de la commission responsable des débats. À vrai dire, il n'y avait aucune forme de débat. Par le passé, vous auriez probablement vu des entrevues médiatiques avec un des chefs, mais nous n'avions jamais rien organisé qui réunisse des chefs adverses ou potentiels pour qu'ils répondent aux questions d'un tiers indépendant. Le concept même d'un débat officiel était assurément nouveau pour Trinité-et-Tobago.

Il est aussi important de préciser que Trinité-et-Tobago ne tient pas d'élections à date fixe, comme c'est le cas de nombreux autres pays, y compris le vôtre, où il n'y a aucune date fixe pour l'instant. Voilà qui complique énormément la vie de tout organisateur de débat puisqu'on ne sait jamais vraiment à quel moment des élections seront déclenchées. D'un point de vue légal, le Parlement ne peut pas siéger plus de cinq années après sa formation, mais le premier ministre peut convoquer des élections à tout moment avant cette échéance, ce qui nous complique énormément la tâche, comme je l'ai dit.

C'est vraiment la chambre de l'industrie et du commerce de Trinité-et-Tobago qui a formé la commission responsable des débats. Ses membres, tout comme d'autres habitants de la région, trouvaient que nous ne discutions pas des enjeux vraiment importants et des éléments à tenir en compte au moment de voter. Nous sommes conscients qu'il y aura toujours des fidèles du parti, mais le vote est très serré dans environ 30 % des cas. Ce sont les gens que nous devons cibler et qui doivent entendre le point des chefs potentiels pour savoir ce qu'ils ont à offrir au pays. C'est donc conformément au pilier stratégique de la gouvernance que la chambre de commerce de Trinité-et-Tobago a décidé de créer la commission responsable des débats.

Nous avons fait une chose similaire à ce que vous faites, mais qui n'était aucunement exigée par le gouvernement; l'initiative était totalement indépendante. Nous avons mis en place un comité provisoire, puis nous avons commencé à faire des recherches sur ce que les autres pays avaient fait et sur la meilleure façon d'atteindre tous les objectifs. Grâce à cette formation, nous avons pu échanger avec la commission responsable des débats aux États-Unis, AGG, l'Institut national démocratique et la Jamaican-based commission, puisque la Jamaïque était le seul pays des Caraïbes qui avait déjà créé une commission chargée des débats; le pays nous a d'ailleurs aidés en nous montrant comment il s'y est pris.

Nous n'avons nullement consulté les politiciens. Bien franchement, nous n'avons pas consulté la population non plus. Je pense d'ailleurs que c'est une excellente initiative, comme ce que fait votre ministre des Institutions démocratiques. Si vous allez à la rencontre des gens, vous pourrez obtenir un meilleur appui par la suite puisque vous les aurez écoutés.

(1105)



Ce sont des choses que nous aurions probablement pu faire un peu mieux, mais, chose certaine, nous avons admis que nous devions agir.

Le comité provisoire a été créé en 2009, puis en 2010 — même s'il ne s'était pas passé cinq années —, le premier ministre a sorti les dates de sa poche arrière, comme on le dit à Trinité, puis a déclenché des élections. Nous n'étions pas encore prêts, de sorte que nous nous sommes précipitamment enregistrés en tant qu'organisation non gouvernementale, ou ONG. Nous devenions une entité indépendante et autonome qui n'est absolument pas liée juridiquement à la chambre, même si celle-ci nous a pleinement appuyés tout au long du processus. L'indépendance était importante à nos yeux, de même que l'autonomie.

À ce moment-là, nous n'avions aucune aide financière de qui que ce soit, et la chambre nous a aidés à ce chapitre aussi. Voilà qui a soulevé toute la question de notre niveau d'indépendance, car si nous avions accepté l'argent de la chambre… J'étais à ce moment PDG de la chambre, et je dirigeais également la commission responsable des débats. C'est un enjeu que nous devions examiner, et nous avons probablement fait une erreur à ce chapitre. Lorsque vous parlez d'indépendance, vous devez vraiment veiller à ce que la commission et les commissaires qui y siègent soient véritablement indépendants.

Nous établissons les critères que nos commissaires doivent respecter. Il était très important qu'ils n'aient aucune allégeance politique et qu'ils semblent être indépendants — non seulement qu'ils l'affirment, mais qu'ils semblent aussi l'être aux yeux du public. Nous sommes allés de l'avant et avons rapidement créé la commission responsable des débats. Nous préconisions des valeurs — la démocratie, la transparence, l'objectivité et l'indépendance —, et nous avons fait en sorte que tous nos commissaires y adhèrent et respectent ce code.

À Trinité-et-Tobago, notre commission responsable des débats n'a aucune valeur juridique. Elle n'est pas prévue par la loi. Elle n'est créée ni par mandat électoral ni par quoi que ce soit d'autre. Elle dépend entièrement du soutien de la population et des gens qui demandent la tenue d'un débat. C'est vraiment très important. Nous sommes en train de concevoir un plan stratégique pour les trois ou quatre prochaines années, et une des questions auxquelles nous devons répondre consiste à savoir si nous devrions aussi chercher à faire adopter des lois qui obligent les chefs à tenir un débat. Au cours de mon témoignage, vous constaterez les difficultés que nous avons eues à convaincre les chefs à débattre. Aussi, puisque nous n'avons pas consulté la population d'emblée, je doute que nous ayons obtenu le mouvement de population nécessaire pour assurer la tenue d'un débat.

En fait, nous avons un groupe d'organisations indépendantes — religieuses, civiles et autres — qui se sont réunies pour former ce que nous appelons un code de conduite politique et éthique, auquel tous les partis politiques ont adhéré. Le code contient une disposition qui oblige les chefs à participer au débat des chefs. Par contre, au moment où tout a été créé, soit en 2014 seulement, le document parlait uniquement d'un débat des chefs organisé par une commission responsable des débats. À la suite des dernières élections de 2015, après avoir eu du mal à tenir le débat des chefs, nous avons réussi à convaincre les partis du besoin d'uniformiser l'organisation des débats. Le travail ne peut pas vraiment être fait par différents organismes — une entité qui s'en occupe lors d'une élection, et une autre à l'élection suivante. Il faut une uniformité et une organisation qui suit les règles. Nous avons convaincu les partis que la Trinidad and Tobago Debates Commission devra organiser les débats, ce sur quoi nous avons insisté. La procédure n'a pas encore été mise à l'essai, puisque nous n'avons pas eu d'élections depuis, de sorte que nous verrons ce qui se passera par la suite.

L'uniformité était importante, car, à différentes périodes au cours des cinq dernières années, d'autres organisations ont dit vouloir organiser des débats des chefs. Un groupe de jeunes de l'Université des Indes occidentales souhaitait s'en occuper. Encore ici, le processus était lancé, mais rien ne se produisait, de sorte que nous étions vraiment convaincus qu'une commission responsable des débats serait mieux placée pour le faire.

Nous avons établi des règles qui ont été acceptées par tous les commissaires. Nous avons également des règles que les commissaires eux-mêmes doivent respecter.

(1110)



Par exemple, les commissaires ne peuvent pas participer aux campagnes politiques. Trinité est une très petite île de 1,3 million d'habitants. Si vous participez à la campagne d'un parti, quelqu'un va vous voir et dira par la suite que vous n'êtes pas vraiment indépendant.

Nous établissons également des règles et des critères pour les chefs qui participeront aux débats. Nous estimons qu'il faut briguer au moins 50 % des sièges lors du vote, ou avoir obtenu au moins 12,5 % d'appui lors des deux sondages précédents. Ce dernier critère s'est avéré être un défi pour nous puisque nous ne faisons pas de sondages au quotidien à Trinité-et-Tobago, et qu'il n'y en a pas eu immédiatement avant les élections.

Les 50 % des sièges représentaient également un défi, car il doit s'agir de partis ayant indiqué leur désir de se présenter, ce que vous ne savez pas avec certitude avant la date de mise en candidature. Or, cette date est très près des élections, de sorte qu'il faut vraiment négocier avec les partis, sans être totalement certain du nombre de partis qui prendront part au débat. On peut être à peu près sûr de deux partis puisque nous avons principalement un système bipartite, mais les autres ne seraient pas connus.

Nous avions créé un protocole d'entente que les parties devaient signer, encore une fois parce que nous n'avions aucune loi. Il y a un parti qui l'a fait, mais pas tous.

Ce sont les commissaires aux débats qui choisiront l'animateur et les interlocuteurs. Nous avons tenu différents types de débats. Dans un des cas, nous avions un animateur qui présidait le débat et posait les questions, alors que dans d'autres cas, l'animateur s'occupait strictement de la présentation pendant que d'autres personnes posaient les questions.

Les commissaires aux débats ne participent aucunement à la formulation des questions. Ce volet est laissé entièrement à la discrétion de l'animateur et des intervenants. Au moyen des médias sociaux, nous invitons la population à envoyer ses questions. Nous rencontrons également des étudiants pour examiner d'éventuelles questions.

Le financement provient strictement de la société T&T — il n'y a aucun financement gouvernemental — puisque nous devons préserver notre indépendance. Jusqu'à présent, la société nous a très bien aidés avec nos débats.

Nous avons tenu trois débats jusqu'à maintenant, dont un en 2010, immédiatement après notre création cette année-là. Nous n'avons pas eu de débat des chefs après les élections générales, mais, peu de temps après, il y a eu des élections locales pour lesquelles nous avons organisé un débat. Puis en 2013, nous avons tenu deux débats, qui étaient plus ou moins des débats nationaux ou provinciaux pour Tobago, notre île soeur. Nous avons tenu un débat des chefs à Tobago, puis un autre débat à l'occasion d'élections locales.

Nous n'avons réussi à avoir aucun débat des chefs à ce jour, de sorte que nous sommes retournés à la planche à dessin pour connaître la raison de cet échec. Outre le fait que ce n'est pas obligatoire, nous n'avons vraiment pas attiré l'attention des médias assez tôt, alors que les médias font partie intégrante de la tenue des débats. Nous dépendons d'eux pour avoir accès aux émissions du matin, à toutes les émissions-débats et aux publicités, dans le but de sensibiliser la population et d'expliquer pourquoi nous devrions organiser des débats. Les analystes politiques doivent faire les séances préalables avec les médias.

Nous n'avions pas la voix du peuple. Elle n'était pas assez forte. Je ne devrais pas dire que nous ne l'avions pas, parce que nous bénéficiions d'un certain appui, mais la voix n'était pas assez forte pour exiger un débat de la part de chefs potentiels.

Dans notre plan stratégique, nous rectifions le tir au moyen d'une relation très forte avec les médias, et directement avec les éditeurs et les radiodiffuseurs. Nous encourageons également les jeunes à participer, avons davantage recours aux médias sociaux, et faisons participer les gens afin d'avoir une relation plus forte avec eux par l'intermédiaire d'organisations civiques et ainsi de suite.

Les débats sont importants pour notre pays. Nous voulons intervenir dans la période préélectorale, pendant les élections et après celles-ci. Nous voulons vraiment faire partie de l'ensemble du processus de gouvernance. Ces débats ne se limiteront pas aux dirigeants. Certains d'entre eux cibleront probablement d'autres membres des partis, des analystes politiques ou toute autre personne que nous jugeons apte à affronter ce type de débat en particulier.

(1115)



Nous nous préparons à notre prochaine élection générale, en 2020, mais nous voulons au préalable tenir au moins deux débats pour mobiliser le public. De cette façon, les gens seront prêts pour l'élection de 2020.

Au nom de la Trinidad and Tobago Debates Commission, je vous remercie encore une fois pour cette invitation.

Je vous cède la parole, monsieur le président, pour l'importante période de questions et réponses.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Comme je l'ai indiqué en début de séance, nous vous sommes très reconnaissants d'avoir pris le temps de discuter avec nous.

Pour cette portion de la séance, les partis disposent de sept minutes chacun, et cela inclut les questions et les réponses.

M. Graham est notre premier intervenant. Je vous en prie.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Voici ma première question. Je suis un peu confus. Vous avez dit que les partis doivent signer un code de conduite qui les engage à participer aux débats. Puis, à la fin de votre exposé, vous avez dit que vous n'aviez pas encore tenu de débat. Pourriez-vous clarifier tout cela pour nous?

Mme Catherine Kumar:

Le code a été produit en 2014, et à ce moment-là, il engageait seulement les partis à prendre part à un débat des chefs organisé par une commission des débats; autrement dit, par n'importe qui. Cette formule n'a pas vraiment fonctionné, alors après 2015, nous l'avons fait modifier pour qu'il y soit stipulé que les partis doivent prendre part aux débats organisés par la Trinidad and Tobago Debates Commission. Le nom de notre commission y figure, mais nous n'avons pas encore eu l'occasion de mettre la chose à l'essai, puisque le changement a été fait après la dernière élection.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que d'autres groupes ont tenté de former des commissions responsables des débats?

Mme Catherine Kumar:

Non, il n'y a pas d'autre commission. Il y a eu des tentatives. Un groupe de l'University of the West Indies a essayé d'organiser un débat. Le projet est resté au stade embryonnaire. Les politiciens n'ont jamais été convoqués. Un autre groupe de jeunes a tenté d'organiser un débat, mais encore là, cela n'a pas été bien loin.

Depuis que l'idée des débats a été lancée, la Trinidad and Tobago Debates Commission a été la seule à tenir le fort.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez également fait mention d'un seuil de 12,5 %, mais un survol rapide du pays nous révèle qu'il n'y a véritablement que deux partis. À la dernière élection, le troisième parti a récolté moins de 1 % des voix. Est-ce que le seuil de 12,5 % fait obstacle à la participation d'un troisième parti? Pensez-vous que cela a un effet incitatif ou dissuasif?

Mme Catherine Kumar:

C'est une bonne question, et les petits partis le mentionnent souvent, car ils n'atteignent pas ce seuil de 12,5 %. Par contre, il y a beaucoup de petits partis. Parce que nous ne voulons pas que le débat s'étire vraiment au-delà de 90 minutes, nous voulons éviter que 10 ou 12 personnes débattent des enjeux en même temps, comme c'est le cas dans certains pays. Nous avons choisi de procéder ainsi pour que les participants au débat représentent des partis qui ont véritablement le potentiel de diriger le prochain gouvernement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Je vais laisser le temps qu'il me reste à Mme Tassi, qui a quelques questions à vous poser.

Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Merci d'avoir accepté de témoigner devant le Comité et d'être avec nous par vidéoconférence aujourd'hui.

Concernant le code de conduite que vous avez préparé, a-t-il été difficile de recueillir les signatures des partis?

Mme Catherine Kumar:

Aussi étrange que cela puisse paraître, cela n'a pas vraiment été difficile. Le groupe a été formé à l'origine par l'archevêque. Il n'a pas aimé ce qu'il a vu entourant les élections, alors il a réuni toute une gamme d'intervenants; des organismes religieux, mais aussi beaucoup d'organismes communautaires. La chambre de commerce a été appelée à participer parce qu'elle représente des entreprises. Nous nous sommes réunis sur une période de quelques mois et nous avons rédigé un code, qui aborde un large éventail de sujets, car il est question de comportement éthique en période d'élection.

Je tiens à préciser que les débats étaient un point essentiel à inclure à ce code de conduite, et nous avons réussi à le faire. Par contre, comme je le disais tout à l'heure, la commission n'était pas nommée en tant que telle, car j'en faisais partie et le groupe estimait qu'il ne fallait absolument pas donner l'impression de favoriser une organisation en particulier. Il a par la suite reconnu qu'il était nécessaire de désigner une organisation.

Cela n'a donc pas été difficile d'obtenir les signatures. Nous avons réuni tous les partis et leur avons expliqué quelle était notre intention, et ils ont accepté sans problème. Le code de conduite a ainsi été signé par tous les grands partis, soit 10 ou 11.

(1120)

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Dans quel but les partis acceptent-ils d'adhérer au code? Est-ce parce qu'ils savent que le public veut un engagement de leur part?

Mme Catherine Kumar:

Je crois que c'est pour leur image publique, pour pouvoir dire qu'ils veulent participer aux débats. En temps d'élection, tous les chefs ont chaque fois affirmé qu'ils voulaient débattre des différents enjeux. Ils reconnaissent la valeur d'un tel exercice, mais le parti au pouvoir trouve toujours une excuse pour se défiler.

À la dernière élection, la première ministre du temps avait déclaré publiquement dans le cadre de sa campagne, et à maintes reprises, qu'elle voulait participer aux débats organisés par la commission. Quand nous avons finalement réussi à la rencontrer, elle nous a remis une très longue liste de conditions à respecter si nous voulions compter sur sa participation, et certaines de ces conditions entraient en conflit avec les nôtres.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Est-ce que le code prévoit une sanction en cas de non-respect?

Mme Catherine Kumar:

La seule sanction est l'indignation du public. Le comité responsable du code produit un rapport, dans lequel il sera indiqué quel parti a contrevenu à quelle disposition.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Quelle a été la réaction du public par rapport à cette initiative? Est-ce que vous sollicitez l'avis de la population?

Mme Catherine Kumar:

Quand vous parlez d'initiative, vous voulez parler du code?

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Oui, mais surtout de l'exercice qui entoure les débats des chefs, et plus ou moins de l'aspect moral du code.

Mme Catherine Kumar:

D'accord. Je vais renvoyer la question à Angella.

Mme Angella Persad (présidente sortante, Trinidad and Tobago Debates Commission):

Bonjour.

Vous touchez à un point important, car la population n'a pas crié son indignation assez fort pour que les chefs l'entendent et acceptent de prendre part à un débat. Nous avons alors compris que nous avions trop tardé à inclure les médias dans le processus et que nous ne leur avions pas donné assez de place au sein de la commission. La seule façon de pousser les chefs à débattre des enjeux, c'est d'ameuter le public.

Comme Catherine l'expliquait, nous avons procédé à l'inverse. À la chambre de commerce, en tant que dirigeants et entrepreneurs du pays, nous tenions à favoriser la démocratie, alors nous avons fondé une commission responsable de la tenue de débats. Cela a été notre point de départ. Nous n'avons pas réussi à mobiliser la population à temps, alors celle-ci n'a pas réclamé de débats. La moitié de la population du pays veut des débats, et l'autre se demande s'ils servent vraiment à quelque chose. Les chefs n'ont pas subi suffisamment de pression du public pour plier. Nous avons appris à la dure qu'il fallait remédier à la situation pour les prochaines élections.

Aujourd'hui, la Trinidad & Tobago Publishers & Broadcasters Association siège à la commission. Nous avons compris qu'il faut miser sur la participation des médias, car il n'y a qu'eux qui peuvent joindre le public de cette façon. C'est une importante leçon que nous avons apprise.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci.

Mme Catherine Kumar:

Jusqu'à maintenant, selon le modus operandi, les commissaires chargés des débats s'adressent aux politiciens, les rencontrent et essaient de leur expliquer pourquoi ils devraient participer aux débats. C'est vraiment l'approche adoptée, mais ce n'est certainement pas la meilleure.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Bien. Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Richards, pour sept minutes.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci de vous être joints à nous. Je suis surpris que vous n'ayez pas voulu vous déplacer jusqu'ici plutôt que de comparaître par vidéoconférence. Vous auriez pu voir le temps formidable qu'il fait ici, c'est-à-dire -12°C. Je suis certain que vous auriez aimé.

Mme Catherine Kumar:

Non. Nous allons plutôt vous envoyer du soleil.

M. Blake Richards:

Bien. Cela serait formidable.

J'ai quelques questions pour vous. Vous avez mentionné dans votre déclaration liminaire que, pendant le processus de formation de la commission, vous n'avez pas consulté les politiciens ou les membres du public. De toute évidence, vous avez admis que c'est probablement une chose que vous feriez différemment si c'était à refaire, surtout pour ce qui est du public.

Je suis juste curieux de savoir si, à ce moment-là, la décision de ne pas consulter les politiciens ou le public était délibérée ou si ce n'était qu'une omission?

(1125)

Mme Catherine Kumar:

À vrai dire, c'était une question de temps, car nous avons formé le comité intérimaire en 2009, et lorsque les élections surprises ont été déclenchées en 2010, nous étions encore à l'étape du comité intérimaire. Nous n'avions pas eu le temps de déterminer entièrement comment nous allions procéder.

En l'espace d'environ cinq semaines, nous avons enregistré la commission, tout préparé et commencé à organiser le débat. Je suis convaincu que si nous avions procédé de façon normale, nous aurions fait participer d'autres personnes. Je répète que c'était l'initiative de la chambre. Dans l'une de nos chambres, nous cherchons toujours à obtenir l'avis d'autres intervenants. Le manque de temps nous a beaucoup nui pour la suite des choses.

M. Blake Richards:

Sur le plan des leçons apprises et des conseils que vous pourriez avoir pour nous à propos de ce que notre comité recommandera dans ce dossier pour l'avenir, diriez-vous que nous devrions nous adresser aux gens, plutôt que de juste essayer de légiférer dans l'immédiat ou de mettre en oeuvre la décision? Autrement dit, devrait-on leur demander leur avis sur cette décision et les consulter à ce stade-ci? Pensez-vous que c'est le conseil que vous nous donneriez?

Mme Angella Persad:

Je pense que c'est sans aucun doute quelque chose qui devrait être fait, c'est-à-dire recueillir les points de vue des différents segments de la population. De toute évidence, vous devrez trancher, car certains croient que les débats sont très importants, tandis que d'autres pensent le contraire. À mon avis, sonder les membres du public pour savoir ce qu'ils veulent entendre dans un débat et pourquoi ils pensent que c'est important sera un exercice très utile.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous avez mentionné l'indépendance de la Commission et à quel point il est très important non seulement qu'elle soit indépendante, mais aussi qu'elle soit perçue ainsi. Au Canada, il arrive souvent que ce genre de nominations soit fait par le premier ministre, qui représente évidemment un parti politique. Cela peut donc donner l'impression que ce n'est pas nécessairement détaché d'un parti politique, car le commissaire serait nommé par le premier ministre.

Je suis curieux de savoir si vous pensez que nous devrions nous pencher là-dessus et trouver un moyen de nous assurer que tous les partis, ou peut-être le comité ou une autre entité, ont leur mot à dire dans la nomination du commissaire, plutôt que de s'en remettre uniquement au premier ministre. Pensez-vous que ce serait important pour donner une impression d'indépendance?

Mme Catherine Kumar:

À Trinité-et-Tobago, le gouvernement n'intervient aucunement dans la commission chargée des débats, car elle a été mise sur pied de manière à assurer son indépendance. C'est certainement la même chose en Jamaïque.

Nous constatons qu'à Trinité, les commissions — nous avons beaucoup de commissions, comme la commission des services de police — sont toujours considérées comme étant politisées, car, comme vous l'avez dit, le premier ministre présente une recommandation au président qui met ensuite sur pied la commission ou qui nomme un commissaire. Nous recommanderions donc vraiment que la nomination ne provienne pas du gouvernement, mais que le comité détermine plutôt ce qu'il y a de mieux... Je sais que j'ai dit qu'il faut aussi consulter le public afin que la structure soit vraiment indépendante, que la nomination ne vienne pas du premier ministre ou ne soit pas recommandée par lui. Je ne connais pas assez bien votre contexte pour savoir s'il y a d'autres organismes indépendants qui pourraient vous aider à mettre sur pied une commission de ce genre.

Je dirais aussi que dans le Commonwealth, le mot « commission » a une connotation, à savoir que c'est rattaché aux affaires gouvernementales. C'est une autre chose qui nous a été dite. Nous aimerions envisager de changer le mot « Commission » dans « Trinidad and Tobago Debates Commission », car les gens pensent que c'est une organisation gouvernementale dès qu'ils entendent le mot « commission ».

(1130)

Mme Angella Persad:

De plus, au moment de mettre sur pied notre commission, nous avons examiné différents groupes représentatifs pour Tobago, par exemple des groupes juridiques, du domaine des communications et de la société civile. Nous nous sommes assurés d'avoir des gens indépendants qui représentent chacun de ces groupes.

M. Blake Richards:

Je vois. De toute évidence, vous estimez que la commission doit être indépendante, que le commissaire ne doit pas être nommé directement par le gouvernement.

Je comprends parfaitement. Vous avez dit qu'il y a au moins la chambre qui a entamé des discussions à ce sujet, mais vous avez dit que vous avez décidé de ne pas la laisser financer la Commission. Qui alors finance la Commission?

Mme Catherine Kumar:

Elle est entièrement financée par des entreprises de Trinité-et-Tobago. Depuis le tout premier débat en 2010, même celui qui n'a pas été diffusé, les entreprises de Trinité-et-Tobago nous financent. La chambre a eu de l'aide non financière — des ressources humaines, des installations et ainsi de suite —, mais le coût réel des débats est entièrement assumé par les entreprises, et c'est le cas pour tous nos débats jusqu'à maintenant.

M. Blake Richards:

Bien, parfait. Je vous suis reconnaissant de ces explications.

Mme Catherine Kumar:

Ce sera également une difficulté à l'avenir. Nous avons besoin d'un financement fiable, afin de ne pas devoir compter sur les entreprises de Trinité-et-Tobago pour financer chaque débat en ayant carrément à tendre la main pour quémander. Nous sommes en train de chercher du financement international auprès d'autres institutions qui soutiennent la démocratie, entre autres choses. Si un membre du Comité connaît des institutions à qui nous pouvons nous adresser, je serais heureuse de savoir lesquelles par l'entremise d'Andrew.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous cherchez toujours des moyens, n'est-ce pas? Merci.

Peut-être si vous nous envoyez un peu de votre soleil; qui sait ce qui peut arriver.

Mme Angella Persad:

Je voulais juste ajouter une chose au sujet du financement. Les entreprises de Trinité-et-Tobago ne bénéficient d'aucune visibilité lorsqu'elles financent le débat. On ne souligne pas leur contribution. Le renforcement de la démocratie au pays est leur récompense.

M. Blake Richards:

Bien, excellent. Merci beaucoup à chacun de vous.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup à chacun de vous.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Merci beaucoup de votre temps. Nous vous en sommes très reconnaissants.

Je vais changer un peu de sujet. L'un des problèmes sur lesquels une grande partie des témoins ont pris le temps de mettre l'accent est le rôle des médias sociaux dans ces débats et à quel point les communications avec le public sont différentes.

Comment avez-vous abordé la question des médias sociaux au moment d'examiner votre capacité de rayonnement?

Mme Catherine Kumar:

Nous en avons tenu compte, mais pas assez lorsqu'on reconnaît que c'est à vrai dire des médias très importants, surtout auprès des jeunes.

Nous avons un site Web. Il est actuellement en chantier, car nous exécutons le plan stratégique, et nous allons apporter pas mal de changements. Nous avons aussi une page Facebook. Nous avons visité, par exemple, les écoles secondaires, et nous avons fait un concours de participation, dans lequel les gens affichaient des messages, écrivaient des commentaires et ainsi de suite sur Facebook, ce qui nous a permis de recueillir des points de vue. Nous avons organisé un concours. La personne qui posait le plus grand nombre de questions gagnait un prix. Cela nous a un peu aidés, car nous avons recueilli ainsi pas mal de commentaires, et je pense que les jeunes ont également participé dans une certaine mesure, mais certainement pas assez.

Dans le cadre de la mise en oeuvre de notre plan stratégique, nous avons constaté que nous ne pouvons pas miser uniquement sur les médias traditionnels, que nous connaissons bien, car nous avons besoin de la contribution de ces nouveaux médias. Nous pensons même, depuis hier — nous avons eu une réunion —, qu'il serait bon d'avoir un commissaire à même de comprendre l'utilisation des médias sociaux, comment ils peuvent nous aider, comment mesurer la valeur de leur contribution et quelles sortes de programmes nous pouvons mettre sur pied.

Chose certaine, il faudra dorénavant tenir compte des médias sociaux.

J'ai parlé de Facebook, mais, de toute évidence, il est également question de tous les autres nouveaux médias sociaux.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est sans aucun doute ce que nous constatons.

Vous avez également mentionné qu'à l'avenir, vous voulez apporter une contribution non seulement pendant les élections au moyen du débat, mais aussi après le scrutin, et vous avez également parlé de la période qui précède les élections. Je m'intéresse à ce que vous pensez du rôle de la Commission dans le cadre des activités préélectorales.

(1135)

Mme Angella Persad:

Nous pensons qu'avec l'aide des animateurs et des chercheurs, de l'université et de notre coordination avec celle-ci, nous pouvons en fait... La recherche portera sur les bonnes questions. Il sera donc possible d'influencer la politique et la démocratie en abordant les bonnes questions au débat.

La participation préélectorale viserait vraiment à cerner les bons sujets de discussion et à faire porter les débats sur ces questions avant même la tenue des élections générales. À titre d'exemple, nous n'avons actuellement pas de mandat fixe.

Mme Catherine Kumar:

C'est une des choses qui pourrait être facilement débattue selon nous avant les élections, à savoir la question de déterminer si nous devrions avoir un mandat de gouvernance fixe et ce genre de choses, comme un financement des campagnes. Toutes les questions qui se rattachent à ce que le parti apporterait seraient retenues, et elles seraient toutes abordées avant les élections. C'est une façon pour nous de bien faire connaître la commission chargée des débats parce que nous savons que nous pouvons en organiser, et qu'il y en aura.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci de vos réponses détaillées.

Il y a un autre aspect. C'est peut-être surtout une différence politique et culturelle. J'ai trouvé intéressant ce que vous avez mentionné à propos d'assurer l'indépendance de la commission. Comme le dit le vieil adage, qui paie les violons choisit la musique, et vous vous efforcez donc de veiller à ce qu'il n'y ait pas d'argent du gouvernement. Vous vous tournez vers les entreprises pour assurer cette indépendance.

Je dois vous dire que pour beaucoup d'entre nous au Canada, cela serait plutôt le contraire. Pour nous, c'est le financement public qui est neutre, et c'est le secteur privé qui a un programme politique — qu'il s'agisse d'ONG du côté gauche et progressiste ou d'entreprises du côté droit qui gagnent des milliards de dollars. Nous tâchons donc de faire en sorte que l'argent ne vient pas... Pour nous, le financement public est le moyen d'assurer un processus équitable.

De toute évidence, le parti qui forme le gouvernement tient les cordons de la bourse. À titre d'exemple, Élections Canada est financé au moyen de fonds publics. Pourtant, personne ne croit que le gouvernement peut décider du fonctionnement de la commission parce qu'il établit le budget. C'est dicté par d'autres lois et règlements.

Je suis curieux. Pourriez-vous m'expliquer pourquoi votre point de vue est complètement différent du nôtre et pourquoi l'on craint — ce sont mes mots — d'utiliser des fonds publics, peu importe comment, ce qui pourrait entacher le processus?

Mme Catherine Kumar:

Oui, je pense que vous avez probablement frappé en plein dans le mille: les Trinitéens sont un peu différents sur le plan culturel. Encore une fois, puisqu'aucune loi ne régit la commission chargée des débats, un politicien pourrait accepter de soutenir la commission et d'en financer les débats. À défaut d'avoir une mesure législative qui énonce des paramètres pour assurer le maintien du financement d'un gouvernement à l'autre — et, encore une fois, pour éviter la partisanerie —, cela devient très difficile.

Dans un débat précédent, le parti au pouvoir a dit être prêt à fournir les fonds, mais en puisant dans un budget qui était probablement déjà prévu pour autre chose. Nous avons estimé qu'il en découlerait sans aucun doute un parti pris.

À propos des entreprises, il y a actuellement une discussion à ce sujet: à quel point la commission peut-elle être indépendante si des entreprises la financent? Vous avez raison: les entreprises adhèrent à différents partis. Pour contourner le problème, car on connaît plutôt bien leurs allégeances, nous nous assurons d'avoir la plus grande participation possible de leur part, de sorte que des entreprises associées aux deux principaux partis politiques apportent une contribution. C'est la portée du financement qui nous permet d'être indépendants, mais, encore une fois, étant donné que ce n'est pas la meilleure façon de procéder, c'est l'autre raison pour laquelle nous continuons de dire que nous devons en trouver ailleurs. Nous envisageons un financement international.

À long terme — car il faut beaucoup de temps pour faire adopter une loi à Trinité —, nous espérons avoir une loi-cadre qui dit que les partis doivent débattre et fournir le financement. Nos lois ne prévoient même pas de fonds importants pour les campagnes des partis politiques. Les sommes sont si petites que, bien franchement, vous ne pourriez probablement pas acheter un chandail. Les partis comptent donc aussi sur les entreprises pour se financer, ce qui nous ramène directement à la question, à savoir que, de toute évidence, certaines entreprises sont loyales envers certains partis.

(1140)

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien. Merci beaucoup de votre temps et de vos réponses.

Le vice-président (M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC)):

Madame Tassi, s'il vous plaît.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Si vous voulez bien, je vous prie de me faire signe quand il me restera environ une minute, car je vais partager mon temps avec Mme Sahota.

Le vice-président (M. Scott Reid):

Je vous ferai signe dans trois minutes et demie, si cela vous convient. J'en prends bonne note.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

À propos des débats, j'ai pris des notes pendant que vous parliez. Il y en a eu trois en 2010 et deux en 2013, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Catherine Kumar:

Non. Un en 2010 et deux en 2013.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Est-ce qu'il y en a eu d'autres, en plus de ceux-là?

Mme Catherine Kumar: Non

Mme Filomena Tassi: Au début, quand j'ai posé la question à propos de l'opinion publique, concernant l'adoption, vous avez dit que c'était positif peut-être à 50 %, et que ce n'était pas si positif à 50 %. Depuis la tenue des débats, est-ce que l'adoption s'est améliorée?

Mme Catherine Kumar:

Peut-être pas, car il s'est produit quelque chose au dernier débat que nous avions prévu en 2015, et cela n'a pas bien fonctionné pour la Commission. Nous avons beaucoup appris au fil du temps. Vraiment, avec le temps, nous apprenons et nous nous améliorons. L'une des choses très importantes, concernant la commission chargée des débats et les liens avec les partis, c'est qu'il faut que tous les partis reçoivent une lettre identique sur toute question relative au débat. Nous avons fait une erreur, dans un cas: les lettres adressées aux différents partis ne portaient pas toutes la même date pour un événement. Le parti sortant ne voulait pas la tenue d'un débat, même s'il avait indiqué son intention de participer. Il a profité de cela pour littéralement nous démolir. Cela a eu un très mauvais effet sur notre image de marque, et les analystes politiques ne nous ont pas soutenus à cause de leur proximité au parti.

Nous devons travailler fort à refaire notre image et notre réputation, et c'est la raison pour laquelle nous devons tenir quelques débats avant les prochaines élections générales.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Nous avons entendu des témoignages sur l'importance du rôle des médias dans l'organisation de tels débats. Vous avez mentionné précédemment que vous auriez pu faire l'inverse et obtenir la contribution des médias pour convaincre les gens. En ce moment, comment voyez-vous le rôle des médias?

Mme Angella Persad:

Leur rôle est crucial, et ils peuvent nous aider avec l'ensemble de la production du débat, mais surtout, d'ici les élections générales de 2020, nous voulons qu'ils sensibilisent les gens aux débats, aux enjeux et à la nécessité d'amener nos dirigeants à débattre des enjeux pour que les indécis puissent s'appuyer sur quelque chose afin de se faire une idée. Nous estimons que c'est la responsabilité des médias, et c'est encore plus le cas maintenant, car nous ne pouvons pas nous adresser aux politiciens et aux dirigeants pour leur demander de débattre des enjeux avec la certitude qu'ils le feront. Si le public le demande, ils seront obligés de le faire, sans quoi ils vont en payer le prix au bout du compte.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

En ce qui concerne la structure de la Commission, les médias ont-ils leur mot à dire? Participent-ils au processus décisionnel?

Mme Angella Persad:

Oui, car deux membres de l'Association des médias siègent à la Commission.

Mme Catherine Kumar:

Nous rédigeons en ce moment un protocole d'entente détaillé qui énoncerait les droits et les responsabilités des deux partis, de la Commission et des médias, de sorte que nous sachions qu'il y a une façon très stricte de procéder, un modus operandi, entre les deux.

(1145)

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci.

Je vais céder le reste de mon temps à ma collègue, Mme Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Bonjour.

Réduisez-vous vos activités après les années électorales? Les gens des États-Unis nous ont dit qu'ils sont surtout actifs pendant les campagnes, mais qu'ils réduisent ensuite leurs activités pour ne plus être qu'une poignée de personnes à travailler, ce qui réduit les coûts. Je ne sais pas comment votre commission fonctionne.

Mme Catherine Kumar:

Cela correspond assez bien à notre façon de fonctionner. En période électorale, nous augmentons le personnel et nous avons un bureau complet où se trouvent toutes les compétences requises. Après les élections, nous réduisons nos activités à presque rien. Encore là, un des désavantages est que nous comptions toujours sur le personnel de la chambre de commerce pendant cette période, alors à la suite des élections, nous revenions à notre travail normal. Nous reconnaissons que ce n'est pas la meilleure façon d'aller de l'avant.

Je sais très bien que c'est ainsi qu'ils fonctionnent, aux États-Unis. C'est pareil en Jamaïque. Avec notre nouveau mandat, selon lequel nous voulons intervenir dans tous les processus et à toutes les étapes du cycle de gouvernance, nous cherchons en ce moment une ou un PDG permanent ainsi qu'une ou un adjoint administratif permanent, et nous voulons nous adonner aux activités que nous avons précisées à partir du plan stratégique. Il y a beaucoup à faire, entre les périodes électorales. Nous pouvons en faire beaucoup avant les prochaines élections.

Comme je l'ai dit, je sais que c'est ainsi que d'autres font les choses, mais je crois vraiment qu'il est bon de maintenir la dynamique, même en dehors des périodes électorales.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

En dehors des périodes électorales, il n'y a que quelques postes qui restent. Combien de personnes auriez-vous pendant une année électorale? Combien de postes différents? Vous dites qu'il faut les compétences pertinentes. Quelles sont-elles?

Mme Catherine Kumar:

En période électorale, nous allons toujours chercher à l'extérieur les personnes qui s'occupent de la production. C'est un groupe d'environ 10 personnes. Nous allons toujours aussi chercher nos gens de marketing et de communication, là aussi, à l'extérieur. On aurait probablement deux personnes seulement pour cela. Puis il y a le personnel de bureau. Nous avons normalement quatre ou cinq personnes qui travaillent avec nous. Ces personnes s'occupent des communications directes — rédiger des lettres, faire des appels et prendre les dispositions relatives aux endroits où se tiendront les débats. C'est à peu près cela.

Le soir du débat, nous faisons appel à d'autres gens. Nous avons du personnel de sécurité sur appel, ainsi que sur les lieux. Pendant la semaine du débat, nous allons chercher encore plus de ressources.

Le problème d'un bureau complet en dehors des périodes où se tiennent des débats, c'est le coût d'un tel bureau.

Mme Angella Persad:

J'aimerais ajouter que les commissaires comprennent tous qu'ils doivent apporter leur contribution et accomplir aussi du travail. Pendant les périodes électorales, à l'approche des élections, les commissaires doivent également se soumettre à des règles et assumer des responsabilités.

Le vice-président (M. Scott Reid):

Merci.

Nous avons le temps de faire un tour de cinq minutes pour les conservateurs, puis un tour de cinq minutes pour les libéraux.

Monsieur Nater, c'est à vous.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci encore à nos amies de Trinité-et-Tobago pour leurs excellentes observations d'aujourd'hui. J'aime pouvoir discuter avec nos cousins du Commonwealth et traiter avec eux de nos systèmes électoraux et structures gouvernementales semblables, ainsi que de nos cultures légèrement différentes, comme M. Christopherson l'a souligné. C'est une dynamique intéressante.

J'aimerais rapidement obtenir des éclaircissements. En ce qui concerne les élections elles-mêmes, comment sont-elles administrées à Trinité-et-Tobago? Est-ce qu'une entité gouvernementale s'occupe de les organiser?

Mme Angella Persad:

Nous avons l'Elections and Boundaries Commission, la Commission des élections et des frontières, qui est une entité gouvernementale. La Commission garantit la présence de bureaux de scrutin partout au pays. Elle veille au respect du droit à des élections libres et justes à l'échelle du pays. Cette responsabilité lui incombe. Elle fait de l'excellent travail pendant chaque année électorale.

M. John Nater:

Je présume qu'elle serait structurée de manière à être indépendante. Ce n'est pas un organisme nommé par le gouvernement, ou affilié, devrais-je dire, à une organisation politique, alors.

Mme Angella Persad:

Je crois qu'elle est nommée par le président du pays, mais en consultation avec le premier ministre.

M. John Nater:

J'aimerais que nous parlions un peu de la dynamique des élections à Trinité-et-Tobago. Au Canada, nous avons un système très fermement axé sur les chefs. Les candidats locaux sont liés dans une très grande mesure — pour le meilleur et pour le pire — au chef national. Le succès des candidats dans les circonscriptions locales est lié au parti national et au chef national. La dynamique est-elle semblable à Trinité-et-Tobago? Le succès d'un représentant dans un district est-il très étroitement lié au succès de la campagne nationale et du chef national?

(1150)

Mme Angella Persad:

Oui, tout à fait. Les chefs nationaux sont réellement ceux qui dominent. Nous avons à Trinité-et-Tobago deux grands partis qui mènent. Pour vous donner une idée, nous avons deux grands groupes ethniques. Nous avons les Autochtones et les Africains. Les deux partis dominants sont composés de ces deux groupes ethniques. Puis nous avons un ou deux autres partis qui sont composés d'indécis, et qui ne font pas preuve d'une loyauté aveugle envers l'un ou l'autre des deux grands partis. C'est la situation.

Quand la Commission a vu le jour en 2010, la chambre a conclu qu'elle devait prendre la responsabilité en raison de la campagne qui se déroulait, la politique tordue et les campagnes ridicules — je n'arrive pas à trouver d'autres mots. Il n'y avait pas de débats. Il n'était pas question d'enjeux et de discussion des enjeux. On ne donnait pas aux gens la chance de comprendre comment les leaders allaient s'occuper des enjeux. Il n'y avait rien de cela. Ce n'était que discours de campagnes électorales. On parlait des partis et des personnes. C'est alors que la chambre a conclu qu'elle devait prendre la responsabilité d'améliorer la situation, de donner à notre pays la chance de vraiment améliorer la démocratie et d'amener les gens à voter sur des enjeux, au lieu de voter selon des lignes tribales. C'est le contexte.

M. John Nater:

Excellent.

Avant la création de la commission chargée des débats, est-ce qu'il y avait des débats localement, dans les circonscriptions individuelles? Je sais qu'ici, au Canada, nous avons des débats organisés par les chambres de commerce et des débats organisés par des sociétés agricoles. Est-ce qu'il y avait quelque chose de ce genre à l'échelon local, pour les districts particuliers?

Mme Catherine Kumar:

Non. Pas du tout. Ce qui arrivait, c'était que la chambre de commerce invitait les gens qui voulaient devenir des leaders à venir prendre la parole devant ses membres, après quoi les membres posaient des questions. Cependant, non, il n'y avait pas de débats. Nous avons eu des entrevues à la télé, mais pas de débats.

De plus, les candidats sont étroitement liés à leur leader, même s'ils sont soumis à un processus d'entrevue avant qu'on décide des candidats. Le PM a son mot à dire. En fait, le chef a son mot à dire, et il peut décider des candidats qui iront. C'est très étroitement lié.

M. John Nater:

Je crois que c'est, pour le meilleur ou pour le pire, semblable à notre système, sur le plan de la centralité du chef.

Vous avez dit précédemment que la chambre offre des services en nature à la Commission. Est-ce une structure que vous recommanderiez au Canada, soit d'avoir une entité existante qui offre du soutien administratif? Recommanderiez-vous plutôt une structure complètement indépendante?

L'exemple qui a été donné, c'est qu'Élections Canada pourrait assumer la fonction administrative, mais qu'il y aurait une commission distincte. Est-ce une chose que vous recommanderiez?

Mme Catherine Kumar:

Je crois que dans la plus grande mesure possible, vous devriez demeurer indépendants de toute organisation, car comme je l'ai dit, même si la chambre de commerce nous a beaucoup appuyés, il y a des moments où cela nous a désavantagés, parce que les gens disent que la chambre représente les grosses entreprises et que les grosses entreprises appuient cela, ce qui fait que nous ne sommes pas vraiment là pour le peuple.

Dans toute la mesure possible, et surtout si c'est inscrit dans les lois et que vous obtenez du financement pour cela, je crois que vous devriez essayer autant que possible d'avoir votre propre soutien de manière à être véritablement indépendants.

M. John Nater:

Merci beaucoup.

Le vice-président (M. Scott Reid):

Madame Sahota, c'est à vous.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Ma question de suivi porte sur votre façon de diffuser les débats, de joindre les gens. Nous avons eu, ici, un consortium de réseaux qui organisaient certains des principaux débats. Il y a beaucoup de concurrence quand il s'agit de savoir qui va diffuser le débat — le réseau qui va être le présentateur officiel du débat —, qui va établir les questions et quels journalistes vont participer.

Comment organisez-vous cela? Vous avez dit que la production se faisait à l'interne. Produisez-vous tout pour ensuite donner cela à tous les réseaux?

(1155)

Mme Catherine Kumar:

C'est un aspect qu'il nous reste à regarder, du point de vue de la meilleure marche à suivre.

Jusqu'à maintenant, nous avons contacté une équipe de production externe pour la production du débat. Nous demandons ensuite aux médias, aux stations de télé — parce que c'est un événement télévisé — de faire des soumissions à savoir ce qu'il en coûtera précisément pour diffuser le débat. L'une des conditions est toujours qu'ils vont inclure tous les autres médias. Autrement dit, ils doivent transmettre à toutes les autres sociétés de médias.

C'est ainsi que nous avons fonctionné dans le passé. Le gouvernement, qui possède une station de télé, a diffusé sans frais deux des débats. Nous n'avons pas eu à payer. Nous n'avons pas la forte concurrence que vous avez et qu'il y a aux États-Unis, où les diverses sociétés de médias soumissionnent.

Ce que nous cherchons à avoir, comme arrangement, à l'avenir, avec l'association des diffuseurs, c'est qu'ils se rassemblent en un genre de consortium et qu'ils décident du réseau qui va le diffuser. Le débat serait transmis à tous, et ils assumeraient la totalité des coûts de production, car les coûts de production, pendant le débat, représentent facilement 70 % de nos coûts totaux.

Si nous pouvons convaincre les sociétés de médias d'assumer les coûts de production, de produire le débat et de le diffuser, cela nous permettait certainement d'économiser beaucoup de ressources financières.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pour nous, l'accessibilité est vraiment importante — veiller à ce que tous les types de personnes, de toutes les fourchettes de revenus, aient accès à ce débat, y compris les personnes malentendantes, les personnes aveugles. Nous pensons beaucoup à cela. Le problème auquel nous faisons face, c'est que nous devons veiller à ce que certains des grands réseaux le diffusent, car ce sont ces réseaux qui se trouvent sur le câble de base et auxquels le plus de gens ont accès. Cependant, ils pourraient ne pas être satisfaits de la qualité de la production, si nous faisons appel à une société de production différente et qu'ils n'utilisent pas leurs moyens pour la production; ils estiment tous avoir une certaine qualité.

C'est un problème, mais nous regardons aussi du côté de la diffusion en continu sur Internet, au moyen de divers types de médias sociaux. Avez-vous envisagé cela? Votre population est-elle plus connectée sur Internet? Est-elle plutôt axée sur l'accès par câble?

Mme Catherine Kumar:

La population est surtout axée sur l'accès par câble. L'Internet comme moyen de regarder la télé est vraiment un concept assez nouveau à Trinité-et-Tobago. La plupart des gens opteraient pour nos grandes chaînes de câblodistribution. Nous n'avons pas les nombreuses stations que vous avez. Nous n'avons probablement que quatre grandes chaînes, et le débat sera présenté sur les quatre chaînes.

Nous permettons à nos stations de radio de le diffuser aussi, car dans certaines parties du pays, il n'y a que la radio.

Ce qui nous a manqué dans le passé, c'est le recours aux médias sociaux. C'est une des choses que nous envisageons pour les élections de 2020, pour que les gens puissent... Pendant un débat, les gens font des commentaires sur les médias sociaux, et nous apprenons ainsi ce qui les intéresse et ce qu'ils pensent du débat. À ce jour, c'est à cela que s'est limitée notre utilisation des médias sociaux pendant le débat.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'est très intéressant.

L'une des autres choses que nous examinons, c'est la question de savoir si les personnes qui utilisent les médias sociaux peuvent poser des questions en direct aux personnes qui participent au débat. Comment pouvons-nous joindre le plus grand nombre possible de personnes?

Le président:

Nous vous savons gré de votre participation aujourd'hui. Il nous est très utile de connaître la situation dans un autre pays du Commonwealth qui a de l'avance sur nous concernant l'existence d'une commission chargée des débats.

Je vous remercie et je vous souhaite bonne chance. Nous espérons pouvoir profiter de votre soleil, ici dans le nord.

Mme Catherine Kumar:

Merci beaucoup. Nous vous souhaitons tous la meilleure des chances lors de la formation de la commission chargée des débats qui conviendra le mieux à votre pays.

Mme Angella Persad:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Nous allons suspendre la séance deux minutes pendant que nous apportons un changement technologique pour les autres témoins.

(1155)

(1200)

Le président:

Bonjour et bienvenue à la 86e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Notre groupe de témoins est composé de Noel daCosta, président, et de Trevor Fearon, conseiller en ressources, qui comparaissent par vidéoconférence depuis la Jamaïque. Nous vous remercions tous les deux de témoigner aujourd'hui. Je suis certain que vous êtes fort occupés, mais vos témoignages nous seront très utiles.

Monsieur daCosta, nous vous demanderions de faire un exposé, après quoi les membres du Comité vous interrogeront tous les deux.

M. Noel daCosta (président, Jamaica Debates Commission):

Merci beaucoup.

La Jamaica Debates Commission, formée en 2002, a pour principal mandat de favoriser le débat entre les partis politiques avant les élections afin d'encourager le discours civil, d'atténuer la tension politique et d'informer le public au sujet des protagonistes pour qu'il puisse prendre des décisions éclairées. La Commission est le fruit d'un partenariat entre la Jamaica Chamber of Commerce — dont M. Trevor Fearon ici présent est le président-directeur général — et la Media Association Jamaica, un organe composé de propriétaires de boîtes médiatiques.

Nous avons établi un « partenariat volontaire », que nous avons maintenant converti en entité juridique enregistrée. Nous présenterons bientôt une demande pour obtenir le statut d'organisme caritatif. La Jamaica Debates Commission est dirigée par six administrateurs nommés, trois venant de la chambre de commerce et trois, de la Media Association Jamaica.

Comment fonctionnons-nous? Nous agissons en vertu d'un code de déontologie strict. Nous avons établi des règles et des lignes directrices de base afin de tenir des débats. Nous faisons appel à nos partenaires du secteur des médias pour qu'ils nous fournissent les ressources nécessaires à la tenue des débats.

Qu'avons-nous accompli jusqu'à maintenant? Nous avons organisé des débats politiques avant les élections générales de 2002, 2007 et 2011, et tenu des débats politiques avant les élections du gouvernement local en 2012 et 2016.

Nos débats sont habituellement organisés. Nous tenons trois débats: un sur les questions sociales, un sur les sujets économiques, et un au cours duquel les chefs des deux partis s'affrontent. Nous organisons également des débats d'équipe lors des élections de gouvernements locaux.

Nos débats sont diffusés en direct à partir de studios en présence d'invités. Des animateurs jouent le rôle d'agents de la circulation, alors qu'un groupe de journalistes interroge les protagonistes. Toutes les télédiffusions peuvent être librement diffusées à la télévision et à la radio, et depuis 2007, nous les diffusons par Internet. Ceux qui utilisent nos signaux sont obligés de les diffuser exactement comme ils les reçoivent, et ce, parce que nous sommes soutenus et financés par des parrains du secteur privé, dont nous diffusons les publicités et le matériel promotionnel au cours des pauses pendant le débat. Nous voulons donc que ceux qui rediffusent le signal l'envoient exactement sous cette forme.

Au cours d'un débat, nous surveillons le débat dans diverses communautés, où nous encourageons les gens à suivre le débat, à noter leur impression et à discuter une fois le débat terminé. Nous avons également réalisé des sondages après les débats pour en vérifier l'efficacité, et nous avons obtenu d'intéressants résultats jusqu'à présent. Nous tenons aussi des séances de bilan après les débats et faisons rapport à nos parrains de l'utilisation que nous avons faite des fonds qu'ils nous ont confiés pour organiser les débats.

C'était là les principaux points que je voulais vous communiquer.

(1205)

M. Trevor Fearon (conseiller en ressources, Jamaica Debates Commission):

Je pense que cet exposé est assez complet.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

C'est formidable. C'est un autre modèle différent.

Voici comment nous procédons pour les questions: chaque député de chaque parti dispose de sept minutes en tout, pour poser ses questions et recevoir vos réponses.

Nous commencerons par M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci de cet exposé.

Je remarque que la Jamaïque semble dotée d'un régime bipartite. J'ai vu, lors des dernières élections, que le résultat était de 50,01 à 49,99 % ou quelque chose comme cela. C'était très serré.

Quels sont les seuils pour participer au débat, et comment composez-vous avec les tiers partis, ceux qui ne recueillent pas de soutien substantiel à l'heure actuelle?

(1210)

M. Noel daCosta:

Il y a des critères à satisfaire pour être accepté, car des troisième et quatrième partis nous ont déjà demandé d'être inclus dans les débats. Ils doivent toutefois satisfaire à certains critères.

Ils doivent tout d'abord disposer d'une constitution écrite exigeant la tenue d'élections périodiques pour la sélection des hauts dirigeants. De plus, le directeur général des élections doit les considérer comme des entités jugées aptes à participer aux débats et aux élections politiques.

En outre, ils doivent obtenir au moins 10 % du suffrage global valide aux élections générales.

Ils doivent aussi obtenir un soutien d'au moins 15 % lors d'un sondage de l'opinion publique sur les intentions de vote, sondage que la Commission doit juger comme ayant été mené de manière scientifique.

Les partis doivent satisfaire à la première condition et à l'une ou l'autre des deux autres conditions.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le conseil d'administration de la Commission comprend trois membres de la chambre de commerce et trois membres de l'association des médias. Comment évaluez-vous l'indépendance de l'organisation et sa capacité à prendre des décisions entièrement indépendante du milieu des affaires ou des intérêts des médias?

M. Noel daCosta:

Nous sommes dotés d'un code de déontologie strict que tous les commissaires doivent respecter. Ils signent un document indiquant qu'ils satisfont à toutes les conditions.

Nous avons appris que l'intégrité des commissaires est essentielle pour que les gens aient confiance au travail que nous accomplissons. Par exemple, notre code de déontologie interdit d'offrir des contributions ou des fonds personnels aux partis ou aux candidats, de prendre part à des activités de financement de quelque forme que ce soit, de participer à des campagnes de quelque manière que ce soit, de composer des documents que les protagonistes pourraient vouloir publier, de se porter candidat lors d'une élection et de dévoiler ses propres intentions de vote. Les commissaires doivent également respecter plusieurs autres critères que nous avons établis pour nous assurer que leur crédibilité politique soit irréprochable.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pourrions-nous obtenir un exemplaire de cette déclaration?

M. Noel daCosta:

Nous pouvons vous en faire parvenir une copie.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Excellent. Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Bonjour, messieurs, et merci de vous joindre à nous.

Très brièvement, vous avez indiqué que la Commission reçoit du soutien du secteur privé. Vous cherchez des annonceurs, qui achètent des publicités ou obtiennent le droit exclusif de diffuser leurs publicités au cours des pauses ménagées pendant le débat. Est-ce bien le cas? La diffusion du débat est entièrement financée par le secteur privé.

M. Noel daCosta:

Oui. Nous nous adressons à de grandes sociétés, faisant appel à leur civisme, à leur esprit national, à leur fierté civique et à leur désir d'élections libres et équitables. Nous leur permettons aussi de diffuser des publicités au cours des pauses.

Nous vendons des forfaits. Nous en proposons trois, or, argent et bronze, qui déterminent la portée de la publicité au début et à la fin du débat et au cours des pauses.

M. Scott Simms:

Vous ne recevez aucun fonds du gouvernement à l'appui de vos activités lors des débats.

M. Noel daCosta:

Absolument aucun.

M. Scott Simms:

Qu'en est-il de la participation obligatoire? J'ignore si cela s'est déjà produit. Vous avez un régime bipartite. Je présume que tout le monde joue le jeu, mais disposez-vous d'une règle si un des grands partis refuse de participer au débat?

M. Noel daCosta:

Oui. Lors des dernières élections générales, un des deux grands partis a décidé de ne pas participer au débat.

M. Scott Simms:

Et qu'avez-vous fait?

M. Noel daCosta:

Eh bien, souvenez-vous que l'association des médias est notre partenaire; nous avons donc tiré pleinement parti de la force des médias pour informer le pays que ce parti était un client important du débat avec lequel nous avons négocié, jusqu'à la veille des débats, il me semble. À chaque étape, nous avons tenu la population informée de l'état des discussions et des négociations, et des motifs avancés par le parti pour ne pas participer au débat. À la fin, il a décidé de ne pas participer; nous avons donc annulé le débat.

Sachez que le parti qui a refusé de participer au débat a subséquemment perdu les élections. Il a réalisé un sondage, qui a révélé que sa décision de ne pas prendre part au débat lui avait fortement nui lors des élections. Il a admis qu'il avait en quelque sorte appris sa leçon et qu'il participera aux débats dans l'avenir.

(1215)

M. Trevor Fearon:

Si vous me permettez d'intervenir, nous devions préciser que nous avons négocié avec les deux partis pendant des semaines et des mois avant le débat, et que nous en étions arrivés à une entente de principes selon laquelle les débats auraient lieu. Ce désistement a pris les organisateurs et la population de la Jamaïque par surprise.

M. Noel daCosta:

La population a exprimé sa désapprobation lors du scrutin.

Le président:

D'accord. Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Une fois encore, merci à nos participants d'aujourd'hui. C'est toujours agréable d'entendre des points de vue différents et de connaître d'autres exemples de commissions chargées des débats de diverses régions du monde. Nous sommes donc enchantés de vous entendre aujourd'hui par l'entremise d'une vidéoconférence.

Dans votre exposé, vous avez indiqué que vous tenez habituellement trois débats: un sur les questions sociales, un sur les sujets économiques et un débat des chefs. Ai-je raison de comprendre que ce n'est qu'au cours du troisième débat que les chefs de parti croisent le fer? Qui participe aux deux premiers débats? Est-ce le ministre responsable des questions sociales ou économiques, ou simplement un représentant choisi par les partis?

M. Noel daCosta:

C'est le représentant choisi par les partis, mais il s'agit habituellement du ministre responsable de la question d'un côté et du porte-parole de l'opposition de l'autre.

M. John Nater:

Il s'agit donc habituellement de débats entre deux personnes, pour les questions sociales et économiques également. Est-il arrivé qu'une troisième personne participe?

M. Noel daCosta:

Non. Lors d'un des débats sur les questions sociales, nous avons convenu avec les partis d'avoir trois participants; il y avait donc trois représentants par parti, dont le responsable du dossier. Il s'agissait d'un débat sur les questions sociales, au cours duquel trois participants ont représenté chaque côté. Pour le débat sur les finances, ce serait habituellement le ministre des Finances et le porte-parole de l'opposition en matière de finances qui participeraient.

M. John Nater:

Très bien.

Maintenant, pour ce qui est de la réaction ou de l'intérêt de la population, ai-je raison de présumer que c'est habituellement le troisième débat, soit le débat des chefs, qui est le plus regardé? J'aimerais savoir quelle attention la population accorde aux deux premiers débats, soit ceux sur les questions sociales et économiques, par rapport au débat des chefs.

M. Noel daCosta:

Ces deux débats recueillent un bon appui et sont très regardés; ils ne le sont pas autant que les débats des chefs, mais la société jamaïcaine s'intéresse de près à la politique. Les deux débats suscitent un degré substantiel d'intérêt, mais c'est le débat des chefs qui attire habituellement le plus grand nombre de téléspectateurs, les deux autres obtenant une attention supérieure à la moyenne au sein de la population.

M. Trevor Fearon:

Comme vous l'aurez vu dans notre documentation, depuis 2007, nous avons mené, après les élections, des sondages qui nous ont permis d'évaluer le nombre de téléspectateurs. Ce nombre est encore substantiel. Les personnes qui ont regardé un débat indiqueront si ce dernier a ultérieurement influencé ou non leur vote. Le débat des chefs sera probablement celui qui aura le plus d'incidence, mais les autres débats influent également sur le vote.

M. John Nater:

Très bien. Pour ce qui est du rôle de la Commission dans le choix des animateurs du débat, quel rôle tient-elle une fois ces animateurs choisis? L'animateur a-t-il ensuite le contrôle absolu quant au genre de questions posées ou est-ce que la Commission a encore un rôle à jouer une fois qu'il a été choisi?

(1220)

M. Noel daCosta:

L'animateur agit principalement à titre d'agent de la circulation. Ce sont des groupes de journalistes qui assistent au débat. La Commission choisit les journalistes, mais ce choix doit être avalisé par les deux partis prenant part au débat. Trois journalistes posent les questions au cours du débat. La Commission ignore quelles seront ces questions. Nous isolons les journalistes pour que deux d'entre eux ne posent pas la même question. Ni la Commission ni qui que ce soit d'autre n'a la moindre idée de ce que seront ces questions.

M. John Nater:

Vous avez indiqué que les journalistes sont acceptés par les deux partis. Est-il fréquent qu'un ou deux des partis politiques opposent leur veto quant au choix d'un ou de plusieurs journalistes, ou acceptent-ils généralement ceux qui sont proposés?

M. Noel daCosta:

Cela est déjà arrivé. De façon générale, ils sont acceptés, car nous avons appris à choisir des journalistes ayant le moins de parti pris politique. Par le passé, certains choix ont été remis en question par des partis politiques, mais je ne pense pas que nous ayons exclus de journalistes.

M. Trevor Fearon:

Non. Au bout du compte, nous n'en avons pas exclus, mais, comme vous l'avez fait remarquer, il existe un certain degré de... Nous saurons, ou un parti politique nous indiquera, si un journaliste donné a écrit des discours pour le parti adverse ou a fait ceci ou cela, et on considérera que ce n'est pas une bonne idée de choisir cette personne. En pareil cas, nous pouvons certainement modifier notre liste.

Nous travaillons avec une liste. Les journalistes sont invités et doivent d'emblée accepter de faire partie du groupe. Parfois, nous procédons par attrition, mais nous finissons par avoir une liste que les deux partis acceptent ou à laquelle ils ne s'opposent pas.

M. Noel daCosta:

Je devrais ajouter que les journalistes, la Commission et les ressources travaillent à titre bénévole; personne n'est payé.

M. John Nater:

Très bien. Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci.

Je suis maintenant impatient d'entendre les questions de M. Christopherson, qui porteront peut-être sur les publicités. Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci beaucoup de votre exposé. J'ai une grande affinité avec la Jamaïque. Il y a quelques années, j'y étais à titre de membre de la section canadienne de l'Organisation mondiale des politiciens contre la corruption, ou GOPAC, sous les auspices de laquelle nous avons travaillé avec votre ministère des Comptes publics et votre vérificateur général. Mais, fait bien plus important, je reviens à peine d'un séjour sur vos plages, où je voudrais bien être encore.

Des voix: Ah, ah!

M. David Christopherson: Merci beaucoup de nous accorder du temps. Vous nous êtes d'une aide considérable. J'aimerais explorer quelques sujets.

J'ai été très intrigué par le fait que le parti qui a choisi de ne pas participer aux débats a perdu les élections. Nous avons été confrontés à la même situation, sauf que je n'ai rien vu jusqu'à présent qui montre que le refus de participer aux débats nationaux a joué un rôle quelconque dans cette défaite. Je trouve fascinant que vous ayez pu déterminer, grâce à des sondages, que ce refus a effectivement constitué un facteur de premier plan.

Nous nous intéressons notamment aux répercussions, si répercussions il y a, d'un refus de participer aux débats. Y a-t-il des mesures disciplinaires? Je suis personnellement fort réticent à l'idée d'imposer une sanction quelconque à un parti qui refuse de participer à un débat afin de tenter de régir ce qui se passe dans la dynamique d'une élection. Je comprends toutefois qu'il s'agit du seul outil qui permet d'éviter la disgrâce à laquelle nous avons assisté la dernière fois, lorsque les Canadiens n'ont pas eu le débat des chefs national auquel ils s'attendent.

Pardonnez-moi ce long préambule, mais j'ai dit tout cela pour vous demander ce qu'il en est du tollé public et du rôle des médias? Y a-t-il eu des éditoriaux, des manifestations ou des protestations en ligne? Pouvez-vous me donner une idée de la manifestation de colère ou de mécontentement qui a fini par avoir une influence sur la prise de décision des gens?

(1225)

M. Noel daCosta:

C'était partout. Dans les éditoriaux. Dans les médias sociaux, qui se sont déchaînés à l'annonce de l'annulation des débats. Dans les courriers des lecteurs. Les gens d'affaires, très offusqués, ont critiqué dans les journaux, par la voix des organismes qui les représentaient, l'absence d'un débat qui aurait fait connaître sans parti pris, posément, la plateforme des partis. Ç'a été un tollé.

M. David Christopherson: Formidable!

M. Noel daCosta: Le sondage réalisé et publié ensuite par le parti perdant — pas le nôtre, qui était privé — a révélé que sa décision de ne pas participer aux débats a été funeste. Ce sont les mots qu'il a employés.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est génial. C'est ce à quoi nous voulons en venir. Nous voulons mettre en place les conditions qui feront que, quelles que soient les mesures nécessaires, personne n'osera plus refuser de participer à un débat national. Voilà ma motivation. Je me réjouis de ce tollé, parce que c'est le meilleur remède possible: faute de règles, c'est le public qui juge la situation inacceptable, qui promet que cette décision aura un prix. Je jubile tout simplement de l'entendre.

Quel est, d'après vous, votre principal défi? Nous cherchons toujours des améliorations, des méthodes pour mieux faire. Qu'entrevoyez-vous maintenant pour continuer à vous efforcer d'être aussi efficaces que possible?

M. Noel daCosta:

Notre défi, c'est désormais d'assurer le financement de notre travail. Comme je l'ai dit, nous sommes tous des bénévoles. Il a été question, dans le secteur privé, d'une institutionnalisation de notre travail. Voilà pourquoi nous avons acquis la personnalité morale, nous qui n'étions qu'un partenariat entre une association de médias et une chambre de commerce.

Voilà l'objectif, notre financement assuré, à l'abri des caprices particuliers, et une suite structurée pour ce que nous faisons.

M. Trevor Fearon:

J'ajouterais que, jusqu'aux élections générales de 2016, nous avions l'impression que les débats étaient une institution, que, du fait des élections antérieures, nous recevrions peut-être des plaies et bosses d'un parti politique. C'était assez institutionnalisé pour qu'aucun parti ne décide de s'en abstenir. Pour nous, le réveil aura été brutal. Nous avons compris que l'institutionnalisation des débats est un processus jamais achevé. Tous ces appuis que nous avons reçus de tous les secteurs de la société, en insistant pour que le débat ait lieu, en invitant les partis à y participer, nous les devons au fait d'avoir réussi à nouer des coalitions avec les très nombreux joueurs de la société civile, etc.

Ce processus ne doit jamais s'arrêter, et nous sommes attachés à l'accomplir.

(1230)

M. Noel daCosta:

Si vous permettez, je voudrais ajouter quelque chose. Je suppose que vous aurez un enjeu semblable. Nous n'avons pas d'élections à date fixe, ce qui permet aux partis de décréter des élections du jour au lendemain. Nous devons être constamment préparés à organiser très rapidement un débat. Ça présente des difficultés, particulièrement quand il faut d'abord trouver du financement.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci beaucoup pour vos réponses. Je vous en suis reconnaissant.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Je vous remercie de votre aide pour ce projet.

L'un des problèmes dont nous ont informés les médias traditionnels canadiens est de trouver pour le débat un moment où il ne subirait pas la concurrence d'une rencontre sportive ou d'une émission télévisée populaires, pour en augmenter le plus possible la cote d'écoute. Pouvez-vous nous dire comment vous déterminez ce moment en Jamaïque?

M. Noel daCosta:

C'est un problème ici aussi. Heureusement pour nous, notre partenaire est l'association des médias, qui nous laisse volontiers beaucoup de latitude. Ordinairement, nos débats commencent à 21 heures, après la fin de toutes les principales émissions de nouvelles. Malgré notre partenariat, notre temps d'antenne n'est pas gratuit. Nous aimons croire que le prix qu'on nous facture nous vaut des concessions. Publiquement, les médias se montrent désireux de nous accorder le temps que nous choisissons pour les débats. Ils ont toujours eu lieu à 21 heures. Des voix peu nombreuses, un simple bruit de fond, se plaignent d'avoir raté telle ou telle émission. C'est la seule réaction qui nous est parvenue. Grâce aux bons rapports entre nous et nos partenaires.

M. Trevor Fearon:

En fait, nous avons peu de temps à notre disposition. Nous savons que, habituellement, les trois débats doivent avoir lieu en, disons, une semaine et demie. Il faut négocier avec les partis. Si l'un d'eux organise une dernière grande assemblée de masse, nous savons que le débat n'aura pas lieu ce soir-là. Il en va de même pour l'autre parti. En général, nous essayons de faire coïncider le débat final avec la fin de semaine, habituellement le samedi ou le vendredi. Ce sont des périodes de grande écoute, et nous essayons aussi de placer les deux autres débats dans la semaine précédente. Les partis y ont acquiescé. Les deux s'accordent à dire qu'ils souffriront à cause d'enjeux particuliers, mais comme c'est les deux, ils sont disposés à s'en accommoder.

M. Chris Bittle:

Seulement pour comparer la durée de vos élections et des nôtres, qui, au Canada, sont à date fixe, mais nous pouvons élire des gouvernements minoritaires, qui peuvent déclencher des élections en tout temps, quelle est leur durée ordinaire, chez vous?

M. Noel daCosta:

Entre la clôture des candidatures et les élections, on compte 21 jours. Les débats ne précèdent pas la clôture des candidatures, parce que nous ne savons pas qui seront les candidats des partis. Pendant ces 21 jours, nous devons organiser et conduire ces trois débats, que couronne le débat des chefs.

(1235)

M. Chris Bittle:

Quel travail votre organisation accomplit-elle pour tenir compte des personnes handicapées qui risquent de ne pas visionner une émission comme vous ou moi?

M. Noel daCosta:

Nous avons des interprètes en langue des signes pour les malentendants. Je pense que c'est notre seule concession.

M. Chris Bittle:

Excellent.

En ce qui concerne la diffusion — et je pense que vous y avez fait allusion —, vous devez payer le temps d'antenne.

M. Noel daCosta:

Oui.

M. Chris Bittle:

Qu'en est-il du service en ligne? Est-il offert à quiconque veut s'en servir et diffuser l'émission? Ça se passe comment?

M. Noel daCosta:

Le service en ligne est accessible, mais la diffusion doit se faire telle quelle, sans montage, sans insertion de publicités ni rien d'autre pendant le temps du débat.

M. Chris Bittle:

L'un de nos sujets de discussion est l'éventuelle création d'une organisation semblable au Canada par une loi. Je sais que le contexte est différent. D'après vous, serait-il avantageux d'adopter une loi exigeant une commission des débats? Qu'en pensez-vous?

M. Noel daCosta:

Cette loi devrait en assurer le financement.

M. Trevor Fearon:

Certains de nos homologues, à l'étranger, ont suivi cette voie, la création d'une commission ou d'organismes chargés de l'organisation de débats. Nous n'avons jamais vraiment produit d'énoncé de principe sur la question. Je pense que le plus utile serait d'obtenir des élections à date fixe.

Je pense que l'impression générale est que la pression du public, l'opinion publique peuvent faire que les partis se sentent obligés de participer aux débats.

Actuellement, je ne suis pas sûr que l'adoption d'une loi procure beaucoup d'avantages.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Je vous remercie tous les deux de votre aide dans notre étude. Je vous suis reconnaissant du temps que vous nous accordez.

Vous avez dit que la commission a été créée par la chambre de commerce et l'association des médias. Est-ce exact?

M. Noel daCosta:

Oui.

M. Blake Richards:

Ces organismes vous ont-ils ensuite nommé président et ont-ils aussi nommé les membres de la commission? Qui nomme qui? Est-ce eux ou comment êtes-vous choisi?

M. Trevor Fearon:

Les deux partenaires ont choisi les membres dans chaque organisation, la chambre et l'association des médias de la Jamaïque. Ces organisations ont avalisé la participation de, disons, M. daCosta et des deux autres commissaires de la chambre, en raison de tout leur intérêt pour cette question.

L'association des médias a fait de même; elle a nommé ses trois propres représentants, de son côté. Comme Noel l'a dit, c'est du bénévolat, il faut donc avoir la certitude que ces personnes y consacreront leur temps. Il en faut beaucoup pendant la période qui précède les élections et ainsi de suite, et on a choisi chez les bénévoles une coalition des âmes de bonne volonté pour en faire les commissaires.

(1240)

M. Noel daCosta:

Ces commissaires devaient être des personnes sans penchant politique manifeste, que les deux partis et le grand public considéraient comme dignes de confiance. Dans le choix des commissaires, les deux partenaires retiennent ces critères.

M. Blake Richards:

Le processus est-il codifié ou seulement officieux?

M. Noel daCosta:

Il n'y a pas vraiment de codification.

M. Trevor Fearon:

Il n'existe pas de règlement en soi. La commission des débats est seulement une créature de ces deux organisations.

M. Noel daCosta:

En ce qui concerne la présidence, elle est occupée en alternance par les deux partenaires, et le titulaire est remplacé après chaque élection.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. C'est donc une sorte d'entente générale, comprise de tous.

Diriez-vous alors que cette entente vous a rendu service et a donné de bons résultats? De plus, dans notre intérêt, en quelque sorte, avez-vous constaté que son indépendance par rapport au gouvernement — ce n'est pas le choix du gouvernement ou des partis politiques — est importante et précieuse?

M. Noel daCosta:

Oui, je pense qu'elle nous a rendu de grands services depuis 2002, que le gouvernement ne choisissant pas les... ou n'exerçant aucune influence sur la commission des débats de Jamaïque, elle nous a favorisés.

M. Blake Richards:

Avez-vous l'impression que c'est un aspect important de la question?

M. Noel daCosta:

Oui.

M. Blake Richards:

Je suis curieux d'en savoir un peu plus sur le sondage dont vous avez parlé, qui suit chaque débat, pour en déterminer l'efficacité. Quel genre de questions a-t-on posé? Voulait-on savoir si le débat avait aidé les électeurs à juger de... l'efficacité, par exemple, de la formule? Quel genre de sondage et de questions posez-vous pour en juger?

M. Noel daCosta:

Les questions s'adressaient aux membres des auditoires des débats. Les réponses permettaient de décrire les répondants sur le plan démographique. Les sondeurs les interrogeaient sur l'influence des débats sur le choix des électeurs.

Par exemple: « Le débat vous a-t-il aidé à mieux comprendre les enjeux? A-t-il mieux éclairé certaines des questions sociales brûlantes du moment? Le débat a-t-il changé vos intentions de vote? »

M. Trevor Fearon:

Ou: « Avez-vous changé vos intentions de vote? »

M. Noel daCosta:

Oui. Nous faisons ces sondages, pas après les débats, mais après les élections.

M. Blake Richards:

Je pense qu'un étalon de mesure du succès est l'influence exercée sur les électeurs. Est-ce ce que vous êtes en train de dire? Est-ce l'un de vos étalons de mesure de la réussite de l'opération?

M. Noel daCosta:

Oui. L'un d'eux est l'influence, positive ou négative, sur les électeurs.

M. Blake Richards:

Rapidement, quels seraient d'autres paramètres de réussite?

M. Trevor Fearon:

Nous questionnons les sondés sur leur opinion sur la formule que nous avons employée. Devrions-nous l'améliorer? A-t-elle eu des résultats? Qu'auraient-ils préféré?

Il y a aussi un volet qualitatif, pour obtenir des réactions constantes, en raison du processus continuel d'amélioration dans lequel nous sommes engagés. À côté des formules standard on trouve, par exemple, la formule assemblée publique. Nous essayons de corréler les réponses à l'âge des sondés et à savoir si les électeurs auraient aimé des questions provenant des médias sociaux, un médium assez nouveau chez nous. Ces évaluations nous aident à comprendre les répercussions et à discerner d'éventuelles améliorations pour la prochaine fois.

(1245)

M. Noel daCosta:

Ces sondages nous ont permis de modifier un peu notre formule. Par exemple, dans le dernier ensemble de débats, nous avons mis à la disposition du public un moyen lui permettant, grâce aux médias sociaux, de questionner les participants, qui lui ont répondu en temps réel, pendant le débat.

M. Blake Richards:

Excellent. Merci beaucoup de votre témoignage.

Le président:

Avant de passer à M. Simms, qui, je le sais, brûle de commencer, j'ai une question. À la dernière minute, l'un des partis s'est désisté. Avez-vous songé un instant à permettre à la personne qui était disposée à participer aux débats d'avoir gratuitement tout le temps à sa disposition pour simplement parler au public pendant la réunion?

M. Trevor Fearon:

Soit c'est ce que nous aurions fait, puis nous aurions présidé un débat. Ç'a été non.

M. Noel daCosta:

Nous y avons songé, mais nous avons décidé de ne pas le faire.

Le président:

D'accord.

Monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

Tout d'abord, je vous remercie pour tous vos renseignements. Je pense que je saisis l'essentiel de votre façon de procéder.

La honte qui rejaillit sur quelqu'un qui ne se présente pas aux débats est un aspect très intéressant, et je suis d'accord avec M. Christopherson. Je pense que c'est une façon incroyable d'assurer le bon déroulement du processus et aussi de vous assurer que c'est efficace en faisant savoir aux absents ce que le public en pense.

Quelles sont certaines modifications que vous prévoyez pour le prochain débat, compte tenu de vos réflexions jusqu'ici?

M. Noel daCosta:

Je pense que nous essaierons de trouver une façon d'augmenter le nombre de questions plutôt que de les limiter aux journalistes choisis. Nous cherchons une façon de faire poser plus de questions par le public, mais en filtrant les questions particulières que posent les militants des divers partis, mais aussi sans finalement rendre le débat stérile ou ennuyeux.

L'objectif serait d'augmenter la participation du public, parce que, en dernière analyse, les débats s'adressent à lui. Nous voulons y parvenir du mieux que nous le pouvons, grâce à un débat sur les questions que le public trouve intéressantes.

M. Trevor Fearon:

Si vous me permettez seulement cette petite précision, nous visons une plus grande mobilisation des jeunes, parce que nous constatons une baisse de la participation au scrutin, particulièrement visible chez les jeunes électeurs, les nouveaux électeurs ou ceux qui viennent de joindre les rangs de l'électorat. Nous avons notamment examiné les mesures prises par nos homologues. Devrions-nous tenir et encadrer les débats dans des établissements d'instruction, ou, d'une manière ou d'une autre, attirer plus les jeunes dans le processus?

M. Scott Simms:

Est-ce que vous pouvez sanctionner la tenue de débats dans ces établissements?

M. Trevor Fearon:

Compte tenu du moment où nous devons préparer le tout, soit en plein coeur de l'année scolaire, il est un peu difficile de trouver un établissement où nous pourrons organiser un débat.

M. Scott Simms:

Mais vous pourriez sanctionner le débat. D'accord.

Je laisse le reste de mon temps à M. Fillmore.

Le président:

Vous serez sans doute le dernier à prendre la parole, à moins que quelqu'un d'autre n'y tienne absolument.

M. Andy Fillmore (Halifax, Lib.):

Merci à vous deux pour le temps que vous nous consacrez et les expériences dont vous nous faites bénéficier aujourd'hui.

Je tiens à préciser d'entrée de jeu que nous sommes nombreux ici à penser — et je suppose que c'est la même chose de votre côté — que les débats jouent un rôle fondamental en permettant aux électeurs d'avoir accès à l'information dont ils ont besoin pour prendre une décision éclairée au moment de se présenter dans l'isoloir. Nous voulons que les électeurs disposent de toute l'information nécessaire, et c'est pourquoi nous tenons tant à nous donner une commission des débats qui soit à la fois crédible et efficace à long terme.

J'aimerais bien savoir si le mandat de votre commission prévoit un rôle quelconque en matière de sensibilisation du public qui ne se limiterait pas à la production et à la diffusion des débats à proprement parler. Est-ce que vous prenez d'autres mesures pour accroître l'audience par exemple, ou pour mobiliser par ailleurs les électeurs et les citoyens en dehors des débats tenus pendant la campagne électorale?

(1250)

M. Noel daCosta:

Nous prenons effectivement certaines mesures, mais pas à l'extérieur de la campagne électorale. Notre rôle consiste principalement à permettre la diffusion de débats. Lorsqu'un débat est diffusé, nous organisons des séances de visionnement dans différentes collectivités, comme je l'indiquais tout à l'heure. Nous encourageons ainsi les gens à regarder le débat avec leurs concitoyens dans un cadre communautaire, plutôt que chacun chez soi. Nous déléguons généralement sur place une personne pour animer les discussions, car on y trouve des sympathisants des deux partis. Les échanges ne portent pas sur ce qui a pu se produire 20 ans auparavant, mais bien sur les informations qui peuvent être tirées du débat et sur la façon dont elles peuvent éclairer les choix électoraux.

M. Andy Fillmore:

C'est plutôt fascinant, car certains participants à des tables rondes que nous avons tenues ont suggéré de tels rassemblements dans des cafés ou des espaces communautaires à l'occasion des débats. On faciliterait ainsi les échanges en y adjoignant parfois un spectacle pour en faire un véritable événement communautaire de telle sorte qu'un maximum de citoyens puissent discuter entre eux.

Merci de nous avoir fait bénéficier de votre expérience.

Le président:

Merci à vous deux d'avoir été des nôtres aujourd'hui. Nous vous en sommes vraiment reconnaissants. Vous avez jeté un tout nouvel éclairage sur notre étude. Nous aimerions bien être auprès de vous pour profiter de la chaleur, mais nous tenons surtout à vous remercier du temps que vous nous avez consacré.

M. Noel daCosta:

Merci beaucoup. Nous sommes heureux d'avoir pu le faire.

Le président:

Je m'adresse maintenant aux membres du Comité. Nous allons examiner jeudi l'ébauche de rapport. Vous l'avez tous déjà reçue; je l'ai moi-même lue hier soir. Les ajouts nécessaires seront faits en fonction de ce que nous avons pu entendre aujourd'hui. Je vous rappelle que le processus d'examen des rapports de comité est confidentiel.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Comme c'est une nouvelle année qui commence, j'ai un peu de rattrapage à faire sur bien des dossiers. J'ai cru comprendre que le secrétaire parlementaire a tenu — et il vient tout juste d'y faire référence — des séances publiques sur cette question. Pourrais-je avoir des précisions à ce sujet? Est-ce bien le cas?

M. Andy Fillmore:

Oui, la ministre et moi-même avons tenu cinq tables rondes dans les différentes régions du pays, soit d'est en ouest: Halifax, Montréal, Toronto, Winnipeg et Vancouver. Chacune était d'une durée d'environ deux heures. Nous y avons convié des représentants d'organisations de la société civile, du milieu universitaire, des médias traditionnels et des nouveaux médias, et d'autres groupes intéressés. Il s'agissait d'ouvrir un troisième canal pour obtenir de l'information auprès des Canadiens, les deux premiers étant l'étude du comité et le portail où tous les Canadiens peuvent nous faire part de leurs idées. Nous avons pensé que les tables rondes pourraient permettre des échanges plus spontanés.

M. David Christopherson:

Je ne vais pas en faire tout un plat, mais la situation me dérange tout de même. À mon sens, la façon de voir les choses du gouvernement en la matière s'éloigne totalement de sa volonté exprimée d'accorder une plus grande indépendance aux comités et de respecter leur travail.

Ce rapport est maintenant soumis à trois niveaux d'influence, et c'est la première nouvelle que j'en aie. Je croyais que le travail de notre comité allait faire foi de tout. J'apprends maintenant qu'il y a un portail qui a été rendu accessible. Je ne suis pas en train de dire que c'est une mauvaise chose. Le gouvernement a tout à fait le droit d'agir de la sorte, et je me réjouis de le voir consulter les Canadiens.

Je trouve surtout déconcertant de penser que l'on nous a confié ce mandat... Les choses se sont passées de façon plutôt étrange. Lorsque j'ai rencontré la ministre, c'est elle qui a demandé si nous étions intéressés à mener une telle étude. Je lui ai répondu par l'affirmative pour les raisons que j'ai déjà soumises à nos invités. Je n'arrive pas à comprendre qu'un des chefs puisse refuser de participer à un débat sans en subir les conséquences. Les chefs devraient être tenus de participer aux débats qui sont organisés.

Nous avons ensuite reçu une lettre nous indiquant que l'on se réjouissait de la décision du Comité d'aller de l'avant. Je me suis alors dit qu'il ne fallait pas en faire trop de cas. Par la suite, le secrétaire parlementaire nous est arrivé avec toute une liste de recommandations. Je ne veux pas entrer dans les détails, car cela se déroulait à huis clos, mais il s'agissait effectivement d'une liste de souhaits de la ministre. Et voilà que vous nous parlez de cet autre volet d'intervention, toujours avec la ministre. J'arrive difficilement à comprendre.

Laissez-moi me vider le coeur, monsieur le président, et tout ira mieux par la suite.

J'avais cru comprendre que le mandat d'étudier cette question avait été confié à notre comité. Nous sommes d'ailleurs l'un des comités, avec celui des comptes publics, où la partisanerie politique est la moins présente. De fait, nous pouvons fonctionner uniquement si nous outrepassons les limites partisanes. À mon sens, il était tout à fait logique que l'on nous confie ce mandat. Nous l'avons donc accepté; nous avons pris les mesures nécessaires; et nous procédons maintenant à cette étude.

Voilà qu'il y a maintenant ces autres activités menées par la ministre, et on a presque l'impression que notre comité n'est qu'un pion sur l'échiquier stratégique d'un gouvernement qui veut se sortir du trou dans lequel il s'est lui-même enfoncé en matière de réforme démocratique.

Je veux seulement faire un constat quant à la façon dont ce gouvernement se comporte systématiquement, et ce, sans viser les individus qui le composent, et surtout pas, bien au contraire, les membres du Comité assis en face de moi. À mon avis, le gouvernement n'a jamais respecté ses engagements quant à la façon dont il allait considérer les comités et recourir à leurs services.

C'est juste un exemple de plus. Cela n'a rien de flagrant et d'épouvantable. Je ne vais pas chercher à pousser les choses plus loin. Il n'y a même pas de caméra ici, si bien que vous serez les seuls à être au courant de ma tirade. Je veux simplement dire que ce n'est pas à la hauteur du respect auquel je m'attendais de ce gouvernement à la suite de ses promesses quant au mode de fonctionnement des comités.

Ce n'est pas d'hier que je fais partie de comités, tant ici même qu'au sein de la législature provinciale, et ma perception du travail d'un comité indépendant est différente de celle que traduit la manière dont le gouvernement gère ce dossier. Je suis plutôt déçu de la situation.

Il semble que ce soit davantage une question de malentendus ou de mauvaises décisions, plutôt qu'un effort vraiment délibéré pour nuire à notre travail. Tout cela me laisse un goût amer, car ce n'est pas exactement la façon d'agir pour que le Comité soit pleinement indépendant en plus de n'être assurément pas conforme aux engagements pris.

Merci de m'avoir permis de déballer mon sac, monsieur le président.

(1255)

Le président:

Merci d'avoir exprimé ces pensées.

Est-ce que tout le monde est d'accord pour que nous examinions l'ébauche de rapport jeudi?

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on January 30, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.