header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-04-14 PROC 15

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

In an effort to keep on time and get the maximum time possible for the committee to question the witnesses, we will start.

Good morning. This is meeting number 15 of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs of the first session of the 42nd Parliament. Today we continue our study of initiatives towards a family-friendly House of Commons.

The witnesses from the House of Commons administration are Marc Bosc, the acting clerk; and Pierre Parent, chief of human resources.

I'll just remind committee members that the witnesses are here to answer all questions about the House of Commons, day care, or the buses. Anything that comes up related to the House of Commons administration should be answered by these two, which is why they are here for two hours. We'll have a lengthy time to cover all of these topics.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

On a point of order, I didn't want to bring this up at Tuesday's meeting because we had a lot of witnesses, and I know we have a bit more time today.

I'll be brief, but I wanted to ask about a series of questions that have gone around. I think most members of the committee have probably seen them by now, but they went around to all sorts of people whom we're inviting here as witnesses. I was curious how the questions were determined, because there has been a lot of discussion in committee about them. Maybe my memory's faulty, but there are some questions here I don't recall our discussing at committee. Certainly, if we did discuss some of them, it may have only been very quickly or tangentially.

I'm not suggesting that the committee needs to approve everything that goes out when we invite witnesses and things like that, but I am a little curious how the questions were derived. I'd like to get some indication of that.

The Chair:

That's a very good question. I didn't know they'd gone to the witnesses, actually.

I'll get the clerk to respond to that.

The Clerk of the Committee (Ms. Joann Garbig):

Thank you, Chair.

The committee members had had a discussion about how they wanted to approach the study and said that they would like the witnesses to be informed of these items when they were invited to appear, so I consulted with the analyst who developed a list, and we passed it by the chair before any witnesses were invited.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That's fine. I don't mean to sound like I'm questioning you or our analyst. I know you both do a great job. I just was curious as to how these specific questions were chosen, because I know that on some of them we had quite a bit more discussion, but on others I don't recall. Maybe that's just my memory being faulty, but I was just curious how they were developed.

The Chair:

I apologize. I don't remember seeing it actually.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You don't need to give details.

I ask because, to some degree, these obviously frame the discussion from the witnesses. I'm not suggesting that we need to know every piece of correspondence that goes out to a potential witness, but when we're talking about the broad set of questions, it might be something the committee might want to make sure we have proper direction on.

The Chair:

That makes a lot of sense.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

I have another point of order on a different topic.

This just relates to having these witnesses for two hours, just two witnesses as opposed to the half dozen we had at the last meeting.

Are we reserving time to discuss motions at the end of this committee meeting today? If so, I'll be wanting to introduce the motion that I've already circulated related to inviting the Senate advisory board back during the month of May.

The Chair:

Yes, certainly, if we have time at the end and people are finished questions.

We have the five things I mentioned at the beginning of the last meeting: your motion, Mr. Christopherson's motions, the conflict of interest guidelines on gifts, the Speaker's emergency motion, and approval of the budget for this study. We'll definitely do any of that we can, depending on the time.

Keep in mind that you have to get in all the topics related to the House of Commons. Make sure you've asked all your questions of these two witnesses.

Thank you for coming. I know you two are very busy with huge responsibilities, and we look forward to short opening comments and then lots of questions.

Mr. Marc Bosc (Acting Clerk, House of Commons):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'm obviously pleased to be before the committee this morning to speak to your study on initiatives toward a family-friendly Parliament.[Translation]

I am accompanied by Mr. Pierre Parent, who is the Chief Human Resources Officer. One of our colleagues is also in the audience, the Director General of Parliamentary Precinct Operations, Mr. Benoit Giroux.[English]

We've done our best to follow the work of the committee over the last little while, so we are somewhat familiar with some of the issues that have come up. I must say at the outset that I am pleased to share with you that the House administration under the Speaker's leadership has recently made a number of improvements to facilities and services available to members with young children. There is the creation of a family room, among other things, including parking spaces, and other facilities that have been improved or upgraded. We have made some progress.

As you move forward with your consideration of this study, we remain available to you and poised to act on the recommendations that the House may make. Obviously informally as well, with members who express special needs, we work with them and try our best to accommodate their requirements.

(1110)

[Translation]

We are of course at your disposal to answer all of your questions this morning. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Parent, did you have anything to open with?

Mr. Pierre Parent (Chief Human Resources Officer, House of Commons):

No, thank you.

The Chair:

Okay, we'll start the first round of seven minutes.

Mr. Graham will be followed by Mr. Richards.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Good morning, and thank you.

I have a number of questions. I was expecting to speak to the departments individually and get a little bit more technical, but we'll go with what we've got.

My first question is on—

The Chair:

I don't think you should be worried about asking technical questions. You have to ask all your questions here, so ask the very technical ones.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We'll get the answers later, if need be. That sounds good. Okay.

First of all, day care is a big issue for us. We understand there is a fairly lengthy waiting list to get in the day care and that there are a lot more kids than slots. I'd like you to address the possibility of having the day care much more open and freestyle so that people could drop off their kids for the day and not be tied into it for the month, or that they could sit for longer hours, until midnight if we sit until midnight, so that there's an opportunity for somebody who has a kid here in Ottawa to actually use the day care.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

I'll perhaps start, and Pierre can fill in some blanks on the parameters around which this day care, Children on the Hill, operates on the Hill.

I am a former president of the board of directors of the day care service, having had our two daughters attend. It was started by Madam Sauvé. Really, the issue becomes one of the day care programming and the costs associated with having a service that is more flexible and has longer hours, but with a complete absence of information on the levels of usage. That is the issue.

Pierre can fill in on the parameters that we must govern ourselves by and that the day care must govern itself by. Maybe Pierre can talk about that, and then I'll come back to it, because we think we've found another solution to this situation that is very positive.

Mr. Pierre Parent:

Thank you, Marc.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I think it's important to add that the day care doesn't operate under the management of the House of Commons. It operates by its own board of directors and own management. We've had in the past, I would say, 18 months several discussions on how we could arrange the day care for members with the help of Children on the Hill. We've looked at these options. For instance, we've looked at the option of having a drop-in at any time, and having the day care hours extended from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. when the House sits.

The issue has always turned on the business model of the day care. Of course, they're not there to lose money, so they would staff the day care accordingly. Then the question would be, if there's less usage than the staffing required, who would actually pay for the difference? That's the kind of balance between the offer of service from the day care, being an independent body, and the level of service especially from a drop-in perspective where the facility should be there and people should be there to accommodate drop-ins, and without knowing exactly the level of usage. That was one of the difficulties.

Also, from their perspective, and I can't necessarily talk on their behalf, but mixing their full-time program and the drop-in program is problematic. I won't necessarily go into the details, but that was problematic from their perspective, so they would see two different operations and two different facilities.

That's why we looked into a third option, which is maybe a nanny service, which would require probably a booking fee. We spoke with different providers and usually what they require is a contract with the employer. In this case there's no employer. Depending on the provider, there would be a booking fee on a specific booking, or a booking fee that would be paid on an annual basis, and then paid by usage.

We're looking at different providers, and in that context the services could be provided here in Centre Block, or be provided in the family room, in the member's office, their home, or even a hotel room. That's much more flexible, and that's where we're looking.

(1115)

Mr. Marc Bosc:

I should add that this avenue is very promising because it speaks to the main issue that members face, and that is flexibility. It's sometimes unpredictable for members what's going to happen in the House and committees. They may not know from day to day, and this service is aimed at in fact allowing members to make those arrangements themselves on very short notice and have that service available for the number of hours or days required. They pay the supplier directly. Once this contract is entered into by the House, with a nominal fee for the service, the members who are availing themselves of it would pay for it directly, and it's a market fee, $14 or $15 an hour. It's very reasonable.

I think that's what we're looking at. Of course, this kind of decision is one that's made by the board. There's a board meeting next week.

I'll leave it at that.

The Chair:

A minute and a half, David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. I was going to ask briefly, could we have some kind of a written explanation of how it would work and what it would cost? When would that be available? What kinds of timelines are we looking at?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Just for clarity, what exactly do you mean by “what it would cost”?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If you're talking about having an off-site nanny program, where's the development of that program at? You're saying it's coming, but how far is it? When are we going to know about it?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

I would say it's very close. I have to be careful because the board deliberations are confidential. I'll leave it at that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have another quick question that I was going to ask the IT department, but I guess it goes for you. One of the issues that we have as MPs is sharing our calendars with our families. It's a very simple thing. Some of us use Google Calendar. We go off the “reservation” to share our calendars with our families. Can we explore options to fix that problem? Can we explore options of providing spouses with email accounts so they can use a phone giving them access to our calendar, or something like that to permit us to share our calendars?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

I was aware this question was likely to come up. I'd already spoken to the chief information officer about this, and he is currently studying the matter. As you know, there are security issues around access to the Parliamentary network. That's the big stumbling block. He has assured me that he will look into it actively to see if a solution can be found.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

As you heard me reference in my point of order at the beginning of the meeting, there was a series of seven question that were sent around to all the potential witnesses. You're unique among our witnesses as you're part of our administration here at the House of Commons. Were you sent those questions?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

I did receive them.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That's obviously because they've been sent to other witnesses and will frame a lot of our discussions with the witnesses we do have here. I wanted to focus on those to some degree.

There is a series of six of them I wanted to ask you about. I have three questions about each of them, and we'll go through them one by one. I'll give you an idea ahead of time as to what I'm looking to get your feedback on.

In each of these areas I want to get a sense of what you think might be the potential unintended consequences of any changes we make in each area. I want to get a sense as to what you think some of the costs might be in the area. Most importantly, I want to get your sense as to what kind of impact changes in each of these areas might have on our constituents.

I'll go through them one by one. Hopefully, we'll have enough time. If not, maybe I can get another round and continue to ask about the the other parts.

The first one is in relation to the House considering shortening or compressing its sitting week, or otherwise altering its sitting calendar. For each of those three themes, could you give us some sense as to what you think the unintended consequences might be, and the costs, and what impact there might be on our constituents?

(1120)

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Unintended consequences are difficult to predict, because that's the nature of them: they're unintended. With regard to reducing the sitting week by one day, there are in the standing orders right now several provisions that provide for fixed numbers of days on certain types of business. For things like private members' business, there's an hour a day. For things like supply proceedings, there are seven days from September to December, seven days from January to March, and eight days from April to June. The proportions of these as a part of the whole calendar year would obviously change. The number of days allotted to a budget debate is a fixed number of days. The number of days allotted to a throne speech debate is a fixed number of days, and so on.

Those are the kinds of things the committee ought to look at as unintended consequences with the compression of the time available to conduct business.

In terms of costs, I see very little impact. The salaries of House employees are payed on a full-time basis yearly. There might be a few savings, but they're negligible. I'd have to do a proper analysis. I wouldn't see a huge impact there one way or the other.

As for an impact on constituents, obviously if members are in the constituency more, there's a positive impact on constituents because they see their member more.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'll jump around a bit with my questions and not necessarily follow the order of the questions listed here. The next one I wanted to ask about in the same regard, that is, in terms of potential unintended consequences or pitfalls, is parental leave for MPs. One of the questions was whether that would be feasible. For each of those same questions....

Mr. Marc Bosc:

I'll turn this one over to Pierre.

Mr. Pierre Parent:

Parental leave would probably require—and I don't want to speak on behalf of the Law Clerk—modifications to the Parliament of Canada Act where attendance is regulated by section 57. The attendance regulations include illness as a reason for being absent during a sitting day, but they don't necessarily include the reason of giving birth to a child, parental leave, or even taking care of a sick child. These provisions are included in the Parliament of Canada Act, and my pay service is administering these provisions for you as members. These, of course, would require higher change to the legislation.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, have you any sense as to the cost or the impact that would have on constituents if parental leave were to be granted to a member of Parliament?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Again, on that aspect of the question, it would really depend on what the member availing himself or herself of such parental leave chose to do. If the member chose to still carry out duties to a degree, then the impact on constituents would be negligible, because the member's staff would continue to function, and so on.

With regard to costs, members receive an annual salary. There would be no change to that.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, then we'll go to electronic voting or proxy voting, the idea of those two things. What would be the impacts in those areas?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

On electronic voting, the House has looked at this in the past. This committee, in a previous incarnation, looked at this on more than one occasion. It really comes down to a decision by the House on how it wants to conduct votes. The House is equipped electronically for that to happen, but in my experience, the whips tend to like to have members present and voting. And I've heard it expressed that members themselves kind of like the atmosphere leading up to a vote. The bells are ringing. There is a more informal atmosphere. They are able to talk to colleagues. It's kind of a place where business can be transacted fairly efficiently on an occasional basis while the House waits to have the formal stand-up vote.

In terms of proxy voting, right away you're into a completely different debate and discussion, and that is the nature of a deliberative assembly. Is it necessary for members to be present here? You will hear from some people—not from me, necessarily—who would say that allowing this kind of thing is the thin edge of the wedge; so if you'd allow proxy voting, what's next? Are you going to allow the next step? That's the kind of debate you get into.

That said, it does happen elsewhere.

(1125)

Mr. Blake Richards:

Do I still have some time, Mr. Chair?

Thank you, then.

The Chair:

We'll go on to Mr. Christopherson.

Just before we do, though, in Sweden they all push their button, but they have to be there, so it takes five minutes for what it takes us two hours; but they have to be there so they can do all their talking with everyone.

Go ahead, Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you, Chair.

Thanks very much for being present. I indicated earlier that I was going to focus on one area. I will acknowledge right up front that part of it is a pet peeve in terms of my experience here on the Hill, but it does lead to what I think are matters that are far more substantive than my feet getting cold.

It's about what we call the “green bus service”. Now even that's changing. It's no longer going to be the green bus, I guess; it's going to be the white bus. Anyway, there have been cutbacks. I've been around here going on 12 years now, and it has been cutback, cutback, and cutback. That's not to say that there aren't times when you can make changes and improvements and when cuts are even warranted, but my experience is that with the expansion of Parliament Hill now spilling over more onto Queen Street and Wellington Street, and with the opening in the last few years of what is now the Valour Building, we're actually going off the Hill.

There was a time—and you can tell I'm getting old—back in the good old days.... But there was a time not that long ago when you got on the green bus and it came very quickly and very efficiently. One bus took you everywhere, because there were only a handful of locations. It's very different now. It's far more widespread. At a time when we have more destinations, the vehicles now have to leave the Parliament Hill precinct and go onto the public streets of Ottawa, particularly along Wellington and Queen, and get all the way around the national monument to get over to One Wellington. At a time when we have an expanded need for the service, there have been more and more cutbacks. Now, I'm not saying that there hasn't been some expansion, but relatively speaking, in my view, there's been a diminishment of the service.

I'll just get this off my chest and then I'll move to what is the more substantive matter. From my perspective, the amount of efficiency and productivity lost by the number of times people have to wait for a bus, and by how many times committee meetings have been delayed, or by staff people having to use them to get around when they're bringing things for the members because something has changed, or the agenda has changed, or you need information.... On the efficiency waste, if you had experts look at it, I have to believe—and I'm no expert—that they would tell you that this is a false economy and that you may be saving on the one budgetary line item that says “transportation on the Hill”, but if you look at the effect on the efficiency and productivity, not to mention just the frustration level....

I'll get to the point: it's cold in Ottawa. I'll say parenthetically to my new colleagues that I'm from Hamilton, and I knew it was cold when I got here and the people from Winnipeg said, “Aw, Dave, it's really cold here.”

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson: It is cold in Ottawa. It has bugged me that the ones who are driving around in the limos and staying nice and warm are the ones directing the rest of us poor schmucks who have to stand outside and wait.

Now, all of that is a bit light-hearted, but it has some meaning, as you can tell. However, far more important and germane to those points is this: staff and members who have physical impairments. The buses used to go longer and further. Now, on the parking lot.... It's lucky for us MPs, of course, as we're treated very well here on the Hill. Everything exists to support the members and the work of the House, so my parking spot is fine. I don't need a bus to get to my parking spot unless I'm leaving from here, but some people have a long way to go. If it's not that late at night but into evening, it's dark and cold. If they have a bad knee, a bad leg, a broken leg, arthritis, or whatever impairment, or if they're just getting older and slower when moving around, I don't know how those folks are getting around. Are we paying for cabs? Do they have to arrange for rides? Do they have to change their personal life to have somebody come and get them?

Then there's the fact of.... For instance, last night I attended a meeting here in the Centre Block that started at 7:30 and went until 9. I had to leave a little early. I got lucky and got on the last bus as it was leaving at five or ten minutes after eight, but for everybody else who was at that meeting, staff included, there was no bus.

I know there's more security around. Sometimes it's like an armed camp from what we see. But I have to tell you: walk around the Hill at night and you'll easily see opportunities where members are alone and walking. I'm not even talking about those who are maybe more vulnerable than others, but just about MPs who are walking around in the dark, late at night, and relatively alone. There may be help, but it's a little further away. Wellington's not that far; you can get access. As a safety concern, I'm worried. So for all those reasons....

(1130)



I accept that most of what I just said, Chair, was a rant, fair enough. But I've been waiting a long time to get somebody in that seat so I can have this rant.

I realize you can't comment on the cuts, and I don't expect you to. You're the embodiment of appropriateness, fair enough. But from a management point of view, you also have a responsibility. It's your staff in many ways as much as it's our staff, and I'd like your thoughts on this.

I'll make it easy for you, Marc. I would like your thoughts on any part of what I've had to say, including being dismissive. I'm prepared to accept that, but these are my feelings about this and I'd like to know what you think.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Well, first I need to know from the chair how much time I have.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

You have about a minute.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Okay, I'll do my best.

I'm a Winnipegger. I know how cold it gets. My way of dealing with that is just to walk. I find walking is way more efficient. I'm not suggesting other people want to do that or should do that. That's just how I deal with it.

Mr. David Christopherson:

If you're able-bodied.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

That said, there's no doubt that the bus operation is a very complex proposition, for the reasons you've outlined. The precinct has gotten bigger. Committees are meeting in different places. Trust me when I say that, Benoit. I have had numerous conversations about this. It's not an easy puzzle to resolve, particularly given that the decisions around levels of service were made in the context of a general restraint era. All parts of the broader federal government were affected, the House included. We reduced our expenditures by 7%. That was one of the services affected.

That said, we must remember that the buses are there not for the staff, not for the employees, but for members. The reason they're there for members is so that members can get to the committee meetings they're supposed to get to, and to the chamber that they need to get to for votes and whatever other reason. That is the reality.

From a safety angle, I have had a very good conversation with the Director of the Parliamentary Protective Service on that subject. Sometimes trying to plan exceptions for a service like the bus service is not the most efficient way to go. Making individual arrangements, such as having a hotline you can call for an escort or whatever, if you really feel your safety is at risk, may be something to explore.

I know I haven't addressed all the points you've raised, but I've tried to cover as many as I could.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I appreciate what you said, fair enough, on the walking thing. Okay, that was part of my rant.

The serious part was about those who aren't able to walk as easily or are temporarily disabled. It makes a difference. Sorry, I find it a little cavalier to say, ”Oh, well, just walk. Don't be such a wimp.” There are some people who have problems doing that, and they're left in the same jam we are. I haven't heard any explanation there, let alone any kind of sympathy for that.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Well, it's not that I'm not sympathetic; it's just that I don't think we can start giving taxi chits to everybody who needs a ride up to the Hill. There's an economic reality to that. That said, as an employer—I can't speak for members' employees, since I don't know what arrangements are made there—we still have the service around the Hill for our staff to take the bus. For our staff, we do our best to accommodate them as per their requirements.

I didn't want to sound cavalier, trust me, Mr. Christopherson.

(1135)

Mr. David Christopherson:

I know, but it came across that way.

The Chair:

Okay, before we go on to the next witness, just so that committee members know, Benoit Giroux, the director general of Parliamentary precinct operations, is in the back here if you have some questions.

I will say, Mr. Clerk, that I left here at one o'clock in the morning on Wednesday and there were three white buses waiting for me, so I appreciated that. Thank you.

Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Before I get into my line of questioning, I do have one question on this subject as well. I know that when there are committees or the House is sitting, the buses will be running, but what about special committees?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

I'll have to turn to Benoit on that one.

Mr. Benoit Giroux (Director General, Parliamentary Precinct Operations, House of Commons):

Thank you, Mr. Bosc.

We would offer services to committees. When there's a committee that is planned, we do have a route for 1 Wellington and we have a route for 131 Queen, and we follow the schedules of the committees.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I do agree with Mr. Christopherson, and I would just echo the concern. Especially as a woman who is often walking on the Hill alone at night, it is of concern. I don't think you'll find that most women MPs will call somebody to have a security guard walk with them all the way to their car. I don't think you'll find us availing ourselves of that very often, but when the buses are there, we'll certainly use them. I'll just put that out there.

The last time you were at the committee, Mr. Bosc, you brought up the idea of the parallel chamber. I'd like to delve into that just a little bit more, from a practical perspective, in terms having a parallel chamber similar to what Westminster Hall does, but also looking at it as a potential option for the Friday sittings. Instead of having a physical parallel chamber, we would have a parallel chamber in name that would happen on Fridays instead of the regular House sitting, which would have different orders of business.

What do you think the practicalities of that might be?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

The idea of a parallel chamber is actually not at all complicated from a procedural standpoint, from our perspective. The way the parallel chambers are structured in Australia and Great Britain is that they have a very small quorum. The chambers and houses there have delimited the kinds of business that can be transacted in such a forum. As well, they have gone so far as to say how proceedings flow from that. If a decision must be arrived at, who makes it? Does the parallel chamber make it or does the full chamber make it? Those kinds of issues are all covered in the way those two chambers function.

From our perspective, from a purely logistical standpoint, a parallel chamber could be very simply like a committee. We could have it in the reading room, we could have it in this room, we could have it anywhere. It would be up to the committee, if it wants to go down that road, to delimit the kinds of arrangements that would be required for such a chamber.

We're completely flexible on it. In terms of impacts, we wouldn't need any additional staff, I don't believe. We run 55-plus committee meetings a week. This would be like another committee meeting.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

If it were to occur on Friday, for instance, physically in the House, then would the rules of quorum in the BNA Act, that we have to have a quorum of 20, not apply if we named that a parallel chamber?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Again, the House is sometimes used for various purposes. If it weren't the House sitting that day, it wouldn't be the House sitting, so those concerns wouldn't occur.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Right now we sit for four and a half hours on Fridays. We don't have committees on Fridays. We rarely have votes on Fridays.

If, for instance, we were to have a parallel chamber on Fridays, but let's say it would sit for eight hours, we could get more members on the record. It would also be much more efficient for members who are travelling far, who don't have something to say, and who have to sit in the lobby—they have to be there just in case something happens—instead of being in their constituencies. But more members who do have something to say, who don't have the opportunity during the week, would actually have an extra three and a half hours of time to be able to get on the record.

Is that correct?

(1140)

Mr. Marc Bosc:

That's certainly one way of looking at it, yes.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

What impact would that have on the staff, the table officers? Would that have any impact?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

We staff the chamber on the basis of shifts. We take turns. Whether the House sits three hours, five hours, or eight hours, it's all of a piece. We supply the necessary personnel to run the chamber.

I don't see a huge impact. There might be if it sat for eight hours on a Friday. That might have an impact on maybe overtime a little bit, but we're used to going with what the chamber decides to do. This week we sat until midnight one night. The staff adapted, and proceedings ran smoothly.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

For instance, for take-note debates, emergency debates, even private members' business, we could have a longer period, for instance, for S. O. 31s. And because we wouldn't have a question period on Friday, we could even take the S. O. 31s off the Monday to Thursday period, put them on Friday, and then add more time for question period.

Those are all options.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

If the committee wanted to recommend a complete change to the House's weekly schedule, it could do so. It could move the statements by members to a parallel chamber. It could recommend that, certainly.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

What about notice? You mentioned that there are a number of things that require certain numbers of sitting days. Giving notice usually requires a particular period of sitting days. Would it be very complicated to make adjustments for that in case it's on a Friday?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

If, let's say, the House didn't sit on a Friday, what could be done is to have the day count just the same for notice purposes. I know our colleagues in Britain do that.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

On the business of supply, where you have an x number of days per period, would you count Friday as a sitting day for those purposes as well—not have a supply day on a Friday but be able to count it?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Well, no. If the House doesn't sit on Fridays, it doesn't sit on Fridays. It is not a sitting day.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

If there is a parallel chamber....

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Again, that would be something for the committee to consider, what counts and what doesn't. Remember, a parallel chamber is not the chamber. It's a different beast, so you have to be careful how you quantify things after that.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Reid and Mr. Schmale, go for five minutes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I just want to make a little statement, which is directed more at our analysts than anybody else. It comes from the exchange between Mr. Christopherson and Mr. Bosc. It's just this: Mr. Christopherson was pointing to the exceptional cases that require the green buses, for people who are not capable of walking around or have some form of a mobility issue.

I just want to suggest that the best way of dealing with that, when it arises, is that we not try to change the rules, not try to change the green bus system, but try to change our intra-party cultures. Each party ought to try to move those individuals to Centre Block so they don't have to travel around very much. Then we ought to work on making the committees they are members of meet in this building, as opposed to a different building. That would actually resolve the matter for the period between now and when we move to West Block. It will be a different story then, but I suspect it could be accommodated there.

That's what we did with Steven Fletcher, who was, of course, a quadriplegic. He had an office on the first floor of Centre Block. I suggest that this would be our first line of attack, and it could be dealt with immediately, whereas changes to the green bus service would be several years in the making.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I think I was next, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Oh, it's you. Okay.

Mr. Blake Richards:

What do I have for time?

The Chair:

Three minutes and 30 seconds.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Hopefully, that will be enough time.

I'll return to where we were in the conversation previously. First of all, I want to go back to the idea of the sitting weeks and changes that might be entailed there. If we were to go to having longer hours on specific days to accommodate the idea that the Liberals want, which is not to be here on Fridays, would overtime costs incurred by staff on the administrative level? What kind of costs would we see in that? If we are talking about longer sitting days, those should incur extra costs for administration staff and these kinds of things. What is your sense of that?

(1145)

Mr. Marc Bosc:

It's hard to know precisely without knowing what those longer hours might look like.

I'll give you an example. Right now we begin the sittings on Mondays at 11 o'clock. If we started at 10 o'clock or 9 o'clock, that would have no impact, because people are here anyway to work a full day. Sitting an extra half-hour or an hour later in the day—minimal impact again. People are here, largely, for shifts that end near the adjournment time anyway, and that can be adjusted. People could be asked to come in a little later and stay a little later. We already do that in the journals branch, for example.

My initial instinctive feeling is that it wouldn't have a huge impact.

Mr. Blake Richards:

In terms of the idea of the secondary chamber or the parallel debating chamber, I know you were having a bit of a conversation with one of my colleagues here briefly on that in the previous round. What's your sense as to what the cost of setting up a parallel debating chamber would look like? Obviously a physical facility would have to be provided of some kind, and the staff costs and stuff like that. In that regard what kind of costs would we be looking at there?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Again, I don't believe there's a huge impact financially there. Obviously, we haven't done a full analysis, so there's always that caveat, but if you picture it more as an additional committee, then you immediately get the picture that we can do this very quickly.

As I said earlier, we do 50 to 60 committees a week. This week we have 55, I believe. We're able to do those, and a parallel chamber could resemble a large committee quite easily.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Give me kind of a sense as to how you would see that being set up, then. Would we be utilizing one of these committee rooms and we'd have it set up similar to what we have here, where people would speak from their place at the committee table? I'm not certain as to how that looks.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

It's hard for me to speculate on that. It would really depend on how the committee would want to structure that. Members might want the set-up a bit like the House is set up, with chairs on either side, with maybe a central podium, or members could rise and speak from their assigned seat.

There are a lot of different possible ways it could be done, from rather informal to rather formal.

The place I referred to is the parallel chamber in Australia, which is in a room not unlike this one, set up for that purpose in a committee style.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Maybe we'll thank you there, and hopefully we'll have another chance.

The Chair:

In regard to the point on disability that Mr. Reid and Mr. Christopherson made, as I said, you can have the people—and we have, in the past—who have been in their office here and in their committee meetings here. That was allowed under the very first standing order:

The Speaker may alter the application of any Standing or special Order or practice of the House in order to permit the full participation in the proceedings of the House of any Member with a disability.

We'll go on to Ms. Sahota for five minutes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Clerk, and everyone, for being here today.

I'd like to start by saying that we're here in this committee trying to figure out how to make Parliament more efficient, more modern, and more family friendly, and this is not a position that all Liberals have taken. It's a position that for years and years has been talked about, has been discussed, and we're trying to figure out how to come to a solution now.

There are many Conservatives and many NDP members who are also in favour of having constituency days on Friday, and many, many spouses.

I appreciate and agree that the impact we were talking about on the constituents might be quite good, because my constituents whom I oftentimes hear from think that I'm not working when I'm not there. I hear that concern quite often. They have to wait weeks to get a meeting with me because they want face time with me, not with my staff, because they have a very serious concern in the riding. Because of that, I end up having to meet them. I take time to try to get back on Fridays mostly, just so that I can meet them and keep my constituents happy, or meet them over the weekend along with attending various events. It leaves very little time for family and children, but that's something that each individual MP takes on.

So, having days in the constituency would make them quite happy, so they wouldn't have to wait weeks to meet with me, but every week they'd know there was a day when they could come and have face time.

I would like to know what your opinion is on the easiest way of doing that, if we were to choose to do that in the end, in your expert opinion. Would it be the parallel chamber? Would it be moving hours around? What is your opinion on that?

(1150)

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Here again, bearing in mind the theme of family friendliness, it should be remembered that all parties run a roster system in the chamber for House duty. The lost hours on a day that the House would choose to not sit could be made up on those other days. This has been the pattern in the past when the hours of sitting of the House have been modified. The parties have chosen to make sure that those hours aren't lost. In fact, in some cases they've been increased.

Sitting later doesn't necessarily mean that all members are affected. It really only means that certain members are affected, and not all the time, because House duty shifts change. Sometimes you might have to work a Thursday afternoon once a month or whatever. That's the kind of arrangement that the whips try to make to accommodate members. So the impact of eliminating a day and reapportioning those hours should be manageable, in my opinion, from an individual member standpoint.

The real key, though, is the issue of predictability, and I spoke about this the last time I was here. What really helps members plan their activities and their lives is knowing when things are going to take place. Having votes at three o'clock, as the House has started doing, is a great amelioration of the uncertainty that members used to face: “There's a vote tonight. Well, no, there's an extension because of a ministerial statement, so it's not going to be at 5:30, but 6:00. Oh, no, it's 6:18 that the bells will start.” It was a moveable feast. Members never knew when, plus they had to wait for the time of the bells.

With having the vote right at 3 o'clock, everyone is there. Boom, you do it and it's done. It's eight minutes, nine minutes, and you can get on with the rest of your day.

Now, we haven't been faced with multiple votes yet, and that will challenge that model somewhat. With a parallel chamber, again, it's the same argument there. If you have a parallel chamber, it only affects certain members: the ones who choose to be there. If the quorum is low, like it is in Australia and Great Britain, it's not an issue from the whips' standpoint and the other rules that are put around that.

If you look at it from that prism, thinking of the individual members taking turns where it's required, it becomes manageable.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

I asked to be included in the speaking order because I wanted to make some of the same points Mr. Bosc just made. The parallel chamber idea originated, as I understand it, in Australia. It may exist elsewhere. I love Australia. I admire Australia. I used to live in Australia. I was once a permanent resident of Australia.

However, the purpose of the parallel chamber, we should be clear, is to allow people to pretend dishonestly that they spoke before the whole House of Commons when they did nothing of the sort. They speak to an empty room that has a special quorum requirement so that virtually nobody has to be present, and which is running at the same time as the House is running. That means that in fact they are talking to nobody, but they could make a claim. I think that's dishonest. I would oppose having a parallel chamber.

We do have a system of S. O. 31s, where you can bring up any issue that is of importance to you. It happens right before QP, when everybody is present, so you are actually saying it when people are paying attention. That is the beauty of our system. If we have a problem that members aren't getting enough chances to appear before their colleagues, then I would suggest expanding the S. O. 31s from 15 minutes to some longer period of time, maybe starting them at 1:45 p.m. instead of 2 p.m., to double the time, or something like that.

On the subject of taking a parallel chamber and having it set up on Friday, you wouldn't need a parallel chamber because the House of Commons would be available. But I can't think of anything more antithetical to being family-friendly: “Now I must stay in the House of Commons on Fridays if I want to address these matters that are of issue to my constituents.” I would strongly oppose that too.

There are a whole bunch of ways of doing better than this, but I suggest that we start expanding the number of S. O. 31s if you really believe this is an issue. I didn't have a question; I just wanted to make that statement.

(1155)

The Chair:

Does anyone else from the Conservatives want to speak?

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you very much for all your feedback.

I also wanted to comment on having Fridays off. I think the flexibility we have as members of Parliament is to arrange our schedules so they best serves us, our constituents, our staff, etc. I have a very large riding, about 10,000 square kilometres. It's large compared to some, but if you compare it to the chair's, or Larry's, it's a bit different. But you work your schedule around it. I find that I'm meeting constituents on Saturdays, if I have to, in-between events and those sorts of things. So I think there is a lot of flexibility.

I still question whether you look at what's happening in Alberta. People are losing their jobs in Alberta and our salaries were raised, and now we're looking at taking a day off. I think that's the wrong message to send. We heard comments from the parliamentary spouses and some of them said in their survey responses that having Fridays off would be a bad thing, The member from the NDP who was speaking also said it was a bad idea.

I agree with Mr. Reid. I think if there are ways to rearrange the schedule and that those are smaller changes that we can make, rather than just overhauling the entire system. We may be working in our ridings Friday, but I think it gives the wrong impression.

Again, that was more of a comment than a question. We went through a lot already.

How much time do I have? I just want to make a few more comments.

The Chair:

You have one minute.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I want to comment about the calendar, which I know you addressed at the beginning. I know your IT people are looking at it, but that is a huge issue. I know there are the secure ID cards whereby people can log in and get access to it, but it's $100 each, I believe, and we don't want six or seven of them out there, so if there is any way.... We use Google Calendar. I know it's not the best option, but it's the best option for getting people to see my calendar.

I think most of what I wanted to ask has been asked already. I do have concerns about cost of some of the changes, but I don't know if you have any additional comments on that.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Yes, just to say that I don't want to leave the committee with the impression that I am in favour or against any of the options being discussed. I'm neutral on all of this. As the House administration and as a procedural team, we will do whatever the House decides it wants to do. That's what we're here for. We have no views one way or another. We're just trying to explain that our flexibility allows us to go wherever the House decides to go.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll go on to Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Before I hand over the floor to my colleague, I want to make sure that we're not caught up on the S. O. 31s and what Mr. Reid said about having more S. O. 31s during the week. If we had a parallel chamber on Fridays, it would give us more flexibility to add things like that. We could do other things on Fridays: private members' business, government business, whatever. I think it would give us a lot of flexibility as a Parliament to be able to look at what that schedule would look like, and that would include, if you have the parallel team on Fridays, adding more members' statements, if that's the wish of the committee. So I don't want to get caught up on that one thing, but I do want to pass it on to....

(1200)

The Chair:

Ginette.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Thank you.

Just to piggyback on the comments of my colleague, Mr. Schmale, we had the pleasure of having the Parliamentary Spouses Association here this week, and they indicated that they had sent out some surveys. However, we also have to remember that only 12 people responded to those surveys, so perhaps they weren't a great snapshot of everyone's wishes and opinions.

That said, there was one comment that I felt was quite interesting. When the spouses spoke about the travel point system, they indicated that some spouses sometimes don't want to use the privilege of coming to Ottawa to visit their spouse because the expenses are posted. Of course, we want all of our expenses to be transparent; we feel it's very important. But some individuals whose travel costs are much higher feel that perhaps their partner's will be penalized during election time or whatever about spending an awful lot of money. Could you expand on that and see if any other option is available that could avoid that type of situation?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

None come to mind, Madam Petitpas Taylor. The reality is that there was a decision by the board to be more transparent on members' expenses. Those are divulged on a quarterly basis, as you know.

I tend to think that even though the numbers get bigger, particularly for members who live far away and whose travel expenses are greater, there is a discernment out in the public that there is an allowance made for members, let's say like Mr. Bagnell, who lives in Yukon. It's going to cost more to get to and from Whitehorse, just as it will cost less for someone who lives in Toronto. I think the public are discerning enough to see that difference.

The trouble with transparency and disclosure is that you either do it or you don't. You can't suddenly say, “Well, for this category we're not going to disclose it” for this or that reason. That's the reality of disclosure, and that it's out there and it's up to the members to explain it if required.

The Chair:

Sorry, could I ask a question on that point? I got the sense that the spouse thought that if those travel points were disclosed, but the expenses of the family and the member were all mixed into one batch and not individually identified, it would help that spouse.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Okay. I didn't read that part of the transcript, Mr. Chairman.

The Chair:

Is that possible?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

I'll have to look at it. I don't really know the answer to the question.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

That's it.

The Chair:

We're going to the three-minute round, for which we have one person. After that, if we can be civil, I'll be more informal and allow anyone who wants to ask questions to have three minutes. We'll be starting that with Mr. Reid.

We'll start with Mr. Christopherson. It's the last round.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I thought I heard a qualifier there, that as long as I am civil I get a second crack. You're automatically, by definition, denying me a second round.

The Chair:

Yes, that was the intention.

No, just kidding.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Chair.

I know I'm not going to be able to say much in three minutes. I assume we're going to go around again, so I won't worry about rushing things.

In no particular order, but on Ginette's last comment, I thought that was a valid point, too. I underscore that. If you recall, I was the House leader of the third party at Queen's Park when we didn't have the point system, but it was pure dollars. The unfairness of it speaks to Mr. Bosc's point. It was there, it was open, and it was transparent, but the politics of it were horrible. That's why we adopted the federal system.

Now we're hearing that there is still an issue, and I think there is merit in that. I gave the example of the difference between Mr. Bagnell and me, or the difference in the distance to Hamilton versus his distance. There is also the question of the number of family members, how old you are, and how many dependants you would have. I think in the element of fairness—I like the idea, and I hope we pursue it—we need to find some way of coupling the total dollars so there is total transparency. The points used are still there, but it's just not that stark differential, like, “Hey, Christopherson, you only spent...and MP Smith over here spent five times as much”. As a stand-alone political statement, that's not helpful. That's not the kind of headline you want to see in your local paper. You've done nothing wrong or different from any other colleague, and yet because of our reporting mechanism, you're left in a negative political spot. It seems to me that in terms of fairness, those of us who don't face that should be the ones who are pushing the most. Otherwise it looks rather self-serving.

As one of those who benefits from this, I'm willing to keep on pushing for the same reasons I did 20 years ago at Queen's Park—fair's fair, and there seems to be an element of unfairness. It's going to take some work and imagination. We have to maintain the transparency. Nobody should interpret this as a desire to hide anything, but we're trying to find a way.... Just like the move from raw dollars to the point system was meant to introduce an element of fairness, there is another element here that's not quite fair.

We may be limited by the transparency and disclosure, but surely creative people can find a way where we don't lose that, but enhance the fairness just as we did at Queen's Park when we looked around, saw the federal system, and said, “Hey, there's a way to go. Let's do it by five times in one month you went back and forth to your riding, stacked up against somebody else and how many times they went”, and not by how much money they spent.

I hope we continue to pursue that.

Before I lose the floor, I'm going to jump out of my order. I want to apologize, Mr. Bosc. I shouldn't have said what I said to you, and I regretted it as soon as it was out of my lips. I think it comes from the Attawapiskat issue where there was a thought that, “Well, why don't you just move?“ When you said, “Why don't you just walk”, I took it the same way, and I know you don't mean that.

By the way, I want to say to all your staff that my issues are not with the way you've managed it. My issues are political ones in terms of the money that's allocated. I know you can't address that, so I was asking my question in a way where I was hoping you could make my case from a practical operational point of view, and then I would go back and do the political stuff and do all that kind of stuff.

I do apologize, sir. I know that you and all of you care greatly about the staff, and I retract what I said and apologize. I feel bad.

(1205)

Mr. Marc Bosc:

No offence taken. In fact, just to be clear, I wasn't suggesting that anyone other than me should walk. That's how I get my exercise. I deliberately park far away and get my walk every morning, because otherwise—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Fair enough.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

—I'm a prisoner here all day and get no exercise.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'll probably end here. It's probably close to my three minutes. We're going to have more rounds, Chair, so I'll await the opportunity to get into my other issues. Thanks.

The Chair:

The changes that you've already made, you mentioned right at the very beginning, I hope you've sent that to every MP, because I don't remember actually receiving it.

Mr. Christopherson, you and the clerk—who is not here—might want to follow up to get more specific about suggested models, to deal with that good point you raised. But I'll leave that with you, and we'll go to Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

My purpose in asking for the microphone again was to continue the debate with Ms. Vandenbeld.

Regarding the idea of having a parallel chamber sitting on Friday, I repeat the thought that if the House isn't sitting, if we change to a four-day week, which the Liberals really seem to want to do, then you'd effectively have the House free, and you could just have the House deal with all of this business. I'm not recommending this. I'm just observing that you wouldn't need the parallel chamber. The parallel chamber is to allow something else to be happening at the same time the House is sitting, in the same way that we can be in this committee right now while the House is just around the corner sitting and dealing with some other items of business. So there would simply be no need for that.

Again, the purpose of the parallel chamber, as I said, is to engage in a dishonest exercise of pretending you spoke to an actual audience when you did not actually speak to your colleagues, which I just disapprove of on principle.

Finally, on dealing with issues like private members' business in a parallel chamber, well, you can't deal with anything that involves actual debate or votes in a parallel chamber. You can only do it in the House, because only in the House are we not going to find ourselves engaged in House business somewhere else while that item is coming up. Only statements can be made in a parallel chamber, in the empty room to a non-audience. Nothing else can happen there.

Finally, if you did put all private members' business on Fridays, whether in the House itself by changing the Standing Orders, or in a parallel chamber, you'd wind up creating a situation in which members who wanted to deal with that would have to stay on Fridays, including any members who wanted to address those items. Private members' business is the most subject, thanks to trades, to change from one day to the next, meaning that we'd have fewer predictable schedules, and it would be that much more difficult for anyone to get out of the House on Fridays. That is true whether or not we go to the four-day week that the Liberals want so much, or whether we stick with the five-day week.

That's all I wanted to say on that.

(1210)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Just very briefly, Chair, I want to come back to the points.

I have a very large riding. It's almost the size of the state of Vermont, which gives you a sense. My constituency offices are 135 kilometres apart. I run out of points well before the year is up. For bringing family back and forth, we're lucky we can go by car; my riding is not very far from here. But I just put the idea on the table of having a point attached to the member and the spouse and dependants. The cost is declared, but one point gets you and your family to Ottawa.

I'd like to have the elimination of the distinction between special and regular points explored as an option. In my riding, I run out of one category and still have lots left in the other category, because every day of my life is a point. That's the reality of a 20,000-kilometre riding.

I have just one more quick note on the parallel chamber, which I think is a fascinating idea. To the analyst, perhaps we could consider recommending further study of this in the eventual report, as opposed to it being something we can resolve here. I think it's a big enough issue that it could require its own study to really deal with it.

The Chair:

Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

On the comments of Mr. Reid on Fridays, I think that what happens right now is that on those days you could have dilatory motions. The quorum of 20 applies anytime the House is sitting, because that's in the BNA Act. Just a few weeks ago, at 2:10 there was an adjournment motion and everybody had to run into the House and have a vote. What happens as a result is, for instance, that I'll have to spent four and a half hours sitting in the lobby or at my seat even though it may not be a debate that I'm planning on weighing in on, and I could spend those four and a half hours in my constituency meeting with constituents.

I think what we're talking about is efficiency. If we were to talk about adding those hours for government business, and everything Mr. Reid talked about, to the other days of the week, you add those four and a half hours, but then in addition, so that we can be more efficient, we could have a parallel chamber on those Fridays—if the chamber is empty, why not have a parallel chamber?. Then people who do want to get on the record can get on the record.

I can just say that there may be a debate happening that I'm interested in when I'm in committee, but when I'm in the chamber, it might be something that's less relevant to my constituents. We have technology. It's not the old days when you had to be physically present or read Hansard afterwards. On one topic I was very interested in, I went to my office and looked at ParlVu, the video, of other statements that members made when I wasn't in the chamber. I was then able to go and engage those members about that. Because we have technology, we can watch happens in the chamber even when we're not in the chamber, and I think more opportunities to get on the record and speak to Canadians—not just to each other, but speak to Canadians—would be very useful.

But I do have a question and a clarification for Mr. Bosc.

Mr. Reid indicated that on Fridays, if there were a parallel chamber, we would not be able to do anything other than members' statements, S. O. 31s. Is that the case? Or could it be that we would choose to do government business, but just not have votes, where people could get on the record?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

That isn't what I understood Mr. Reid to say. I thought he was merely referring to the general practice in the other jurisdictions of having the parallel chamber be a place for speeches to be made. I think that's what he was meaning to say. That's my understanding, anyway.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

What kinds of debates occur in Westminster Hall and in Australia in that chamber?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

There are a variety of things that are possible to be debated. The key thing, though, is not the nature of the debate so much as the fact that those two chambers have decided to not give that chamber any decision making power. The decision rests with the main chamber. That's really the key point there. Of course, the low quorum speaks to what Mr. Reid was saying, and that is that attendance, therefore, is not what it is in the House.

(1215)

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

So the difference is really the quorum.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Yes, it's a quorum of three, one per party.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Okay.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Christopherson, you have more....

Mr. David Christopherson:

Oh, don't I always see to? Thank you.

Fridays—I don't know why the government is continuing to natter on about this. The official opposition has made it clear that it's not interested in taking Fridays off, as far as I know. The third party has made it clear that we're not interested in taking Fridays off. I don't know why the government is going on about it. It should be a non-starter.

Regarding the second chamber, I'm like Mr. Graham; I find it a fascinating subject. It tweaked my interest the second I heard it. I didn't know it existed. But I suspect both of us are parliamentary wonks, and we really like the machinery of Parliament and how it works. I have to say that Mr. Reid's comments had some resonance with me too. I'd still be interested in pursuing it more, as an interest.

I'm not sure it's going to end up being anything practical. Therefore, as a precursor to that discussion, I'd want to get an initial report back to see how much time we want to dedicate to it. I'm not sure, based on what Mr. Reid is saying, where the practicality is. But I still continue to find it a fascinating adjustment to the way the Westminster model of parliamentary democracy works. So that's that.

Back to the parking, back to the bus, I want to thank Madame Vandenbeld for commenting. You can only assume you're speaking for someone else so far, and then someone else has to speak. So I'm glad to hear that, because it's an issue.

I want to finish my thought, because I don't think I finished my thought on that meeting last night. My point was that I got out in time to catch one of the last buses. It was here at Centre Block. It was just after 8:00 p.m. and my office is, of course, down in the Justice Building. But it's more to the fact that everybody else who was in the room, regardless of what their next move was, had to get to the parameters of the parliamentary precinct on foot.

Again, if they were able-bodied and bundled up for the weather, fine. But if not, or if there were any other concerns—security, etc., because it was dark—they were just kind of left out in the cold. It seems to me that if there's real....

I grant you, it was not committee business. It wasn't House. It was caucus business. We were doing briefings on a matter. We had staff and members there. Nonetheless, it was legitimate parliamentary business. It was here in Centre Block. In fact, it was just in room 112 downstairs, and it was just last night. It's a perfect example of when people, members and staff who work here, were working until 9 o'clock at night, which is not unusual, as everyone knows, yet there was no availability.

Again, when I was talking about the efficiencies, I didn't mention the fact that it used to be fairly easy to get from one committee meeting to the next—number one, because they weren't so far apart physically, because of the locations that both Mr. Bosc and I have mentioned; but also, because of the regularity of the buses. I could pretty much assume that, if I had to talk to Mr. Chan about something, I had time to run over, have a brief chat with him to finish off something in this meeting, grab my staffer, and head out the door; and I knew I needed to wait only a couple of minutes and I could get on a bus and get to the next meeting, even if it was way over on Wellington Street or on Queen Street. That falls apart when I get to the part where I'm running out the door and waiting for a bus for 10 of the 15 minutes that I have to get from one committee to the next. I still find that unresolved.

I'm just a little out of order. I apologize. I made some very quick notes.

I just wanted to mention this, too. Mr. Reid had mentioned about moving a member to Centre Block, and used one of our former colleagues as an example. That is all fair enough, all to the point, but that doesn't speak to somebody who is temporarily disabled—for example, who breaks a leg. I have a knee from an old judo injury that every now and then flares up, and I have a heck of a time getting around. But it's a minor thing. It's only around for maybe a week or two, and then it clears up. We're not going to move me to Centre Block.

I find that fine when we have a permanent situation, but doesn't work on a temporary basis. With a disability, whether it's permanent or temporary, when it's affecting you, it's real. I wanted to say that.

I wasn't clear, Mr. Bosc, on the staff. I hope I'm not opening a can of worms. Or if I am, I'm going to make sure I stay on top of it, to keep it fixed. Staff are on the buses, as they should be. My staffer, Tyler, gets on the bus all the time. I know that there's House of Commons staff too; I see them early in the morning coming from the parking lots.

(1220)



I think about those very folks in the morning, who have the bus service there; the concept of the employer, Parliament, providing that service is there, but it's not there at the other end of the day, if they happen to have to stay late. That still leaves me with a bit of a question.

May we have your thoughts on that?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

I'll try to address most of the points you've raised. I think Benoit has something you will find interesting.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay, great.

Mr. Benoit Giroux:

You mentioned special events. We would accommodate a request to provide the service, if there were special caucus meetings or something like that. We've done it. We get requests from the whip's office, usually. We would coordinate with the whip's office and we would provide such types of services for official parliamentary business.

Mr. David Christopherson:

May I respond to that, Chair?

Thank you very much. This is what we want. I appreciate it very much, but here's the thing: sometimes it's not a formal meeting of caucus. It's not unusual for me in my capacity and for our caucus to have to meet with our House leader and whip. Many times it's in that same timeframe. After everything is done, we'll all gather in the House leader's office, and we're there until 8:30 or nine o'clock. We have staff—I don't go very far without Tyler—and there are support staff.

I don't know whether you would call that special enough to call up a bus. Even I am asking whether you would call up a bus and a driver for five or six people. Yet those five or six people are doing legitimate parliamentary work, they're here in Centre Block, it's late at night, and they don't have access to the bus. If they're a support staffer whose car is parked far away, they have to walk even further than I do, because I'm an MP and I get a privileged spot.

It's not so much about me in that case. There's this element of unfairness in terms of the infrastructure. I know it costs money, but the service used to be there and the principle of making sure that you could move people, whether they're members or staff. Let's not differentiate; they're people on the Hill moving around.

Now we have a bigger area, committee meetings are further apart, the service is less frequent, and it's cut off earlier than it used to be.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm still left unsatisfied, I have to tell you, with this whole thing. I realize that at the end of the day it's a political question. If Parliament says to you, we want more fulsome service and here are the bucks to pay for it, you'd be glad to design us the most efficient system, I have no doubt. We have to work together here. Give us the good rationale for it, shore up a couple of things, and then we can fight it on the other side.

To be fair, I think this government is open-minded in a whole host of areas in which before, the doors were slammed shut, locked, bolted, and all but welded closed. I want to take advantage of this, so that we're not just hitting some of the bright, shiny things around here, but some of the infrastructure stuff that has been damaged by too much austerity, in my opinion. This would be one of those areas.

The Chair:

Thank you, David.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Again, I don't know whether to give this some life; I haven't heard too much from colleagues as to whether they support me. If there's not too much more—

The Chair:

Thank you. That's it.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Am I at seven minutes, really?

The Chair:

Your three-minute round is at eight minutes and 45 seconds at the moment.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson:

I already did the three-minute round. I thought we were in the seven-minute round.

The Chair:

Does Benoît have anything?

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's okay. We're going to be here for over half an hour. I have lots of time.

The Chair:

Does anyone want to comment before we go to the list?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

I'll just say, very briefly, we've heard you, Mr. Christopherson.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Marc Bosc: The issue of finding the right balance between costs, personnel, and service levels is always a difficult thing. Obviously, in your opinion we're not in the right place. We've understood that, we've heard it, and we'll take it away with us.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you. I appreciate that.

Chair, with your indulgence, I'll make one last statement, then I'll back off this, because it may end it, actually.

What I want to know is whether there's any support around the table for some of this. If there is, then maybe we should ask for a report, something so that it doesn't go away, something to give us a focus. I'm at the point now that I've had my opportunity to have my say and my rant, and I don't feel that I've been shut down. If I'm the only one who really sees this as a cause célèbre, I'm quite prepared to back off, believing I've done my bit, and I'm prepared to leave it at that, Chair.

(1225)

The Chair:

Okay. Thank you.

We're at 10 minutes for your three-minute round now. Most of the members are on the list, so they can comment on your question.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Am I on the list?

The Chair:

Yes, you are. We have Mr. Chan, Mr. Reid, Mr. Graham, Ms. Sahota, and Ms. Taylor. We're at Mr. Chan now.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Forgive me, Mr. Chair, could you just tell me what the list is, the order of the list?

The Chair:

I just read it: Mr. Chan, Mr. Reid, Mr. Graham, Ms. Sahota, and Ms. Taylor—and Ms. Vandenbeld.

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

For the record, let me to simply thank you, Mr. Bosc, and your entire House administration team for your professionalism, and for the fact that you've made it very clear and have demonstrated time and again that you and your entire team work ultimately to serve the members and whatever decisions the House makes. You carry it out with tremendous professionalism. I simply want to put that on the record.

I want to briefly address some of the points by Mr. Reid, and then I want to get back to a very specific question. I might wander past by a couple of minutes, but I haven't spoken yet.

Mr. Reid, I want to get back to first principles. The point the government made in the campaign with respect to making the House more family friendly is more a function of trying to make this place a more attractive place for all Canadians to feel they can fully participate and become members of the House of Commons. What we're trying to do is to find that sweet spot where we remove as much as possible the structural barriers to participation.

I'm going to say on the record—and I know Ms. Vandenbeld shares this particular view—that there is not unanimity in the Liberal caucus on the elimination of Friday sittings. I think some of the members who have been here longer than I have, those who have served as staff, understand that the practical reality is that when we signed up and became members of Parliament and we have the privilege to do the work that we do, it is a 24-7 kind of job. No matter whether you have a four-day House sitting week or five-day House sitting week, we're going to be working a lot, no matter what.

What we're trying to do is to find an opportunity where we can have full participation and recognize the incredible impact this job has, particularly for those of us who have families. You and I share that particular reality. I simply wanted to address that.

That gets me to my substantive question that I wanted to raise with the clerk and his team. I'm ultimately concerned about its impact in terms of its interplay with the Standing Orders. I wanted your thoughts, perhaps—and we haven't raised this yet—on changing the concept of sessional days to perhaps.... I note in some of the papers the analysts had prepared that over time, the time for debate has been reduced in the House through changes to the Standing Orders.

I've observed, frankly, that a lot of members now, in the standard 20-minute allocation of time, split their time to 10 minutes. What's your thought on further reducing time for debate and changing from the concept of sessional days to maybe sessional hours, and how would that have an interplay with respect to the Standing Orders so that we could perhaps get through the business of government and the business of private members perhaps a little more efficiently?

The Chair: Mr. Bosc.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

I recall the exchange we had, Mr. Chan, on debating time. I think I made the point that yes, you could reduce the duration of speeches, but there was a point where you reached a point where it became absurd if you were going to conserve the questions and comments period after speeches. Right now, many, many members split their time and make 10-minute speeches, leaving five minutes for questions and comments. It's a bit hard to imagine a two-minute question and comment period or a one-minute question and comment period. I would just put that out there. I don't think it's an impediment to reducing speaking times. You could have five-minute speeches and five minutes of questions and comments if you wanted. Right now, we have a two-to-one formula for questions and comments. It doesn't have to be that. It could be anything that the committee decides it ought to be.

On days versus hours, there again, that is certainly a possible way of looking at the time of the House. However, I would say that you have to be careful with hours, simply because of the existence of procedural mechanisms that are available and that could come and disrupt that. The perfect example is when something is time-allocated, let's say, and a day is allocated to that final day of debate, say at second reading of a bill. As long as the day starts, it counts, even if it's only two minutes long, whereas if you've allocated four hours to it and a clever opposition decides to do other things leading up to that time, then you won't get it that day. That's the challenge. I'm not saying that it's not insurmountable, but that's the kind of thing you have to consider when looking at that.

(1230)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Are you finished?

Mr. Reid.

Oh, yes.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

One thing I did forget to mention earlier on, on the question of proxy voting, was to bring up something that has fallen into disuse and might be of interest to the committee, and that is the practice of pairing. I think it exists in the Standing Orders. It has been there a very long time—Standing Order 44.1— and it is a way to have members' names appear in the Journals as being paired, if they were absent for legitimate reasons essentially. It's a way of getting around this idea of members' names not appearing anywhere if they can't come and vote.

I just put that out there.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, I just want to determine if the speakers list is going to have the effect, with the number of people still on it, of eating up the remainder of our time. Obviously I want to get to the motion that I distributed on Monday, inviting the members of the independent advisory board for Senate appointments, the so-called independent advisory board for Senate appointments, to appear before our committee before the end of May. I just wanted to find out whether, when you add up the time there, we're going to have a chance to get to this, or we're not.

The Chair:

Well, we have four people who are supposed to take three minutes. It looks like they're not taking as much time as Mr. Christopherson took. It looks like we'll have time at the moment.

Mr. Scott Reid:

All right, maybe you could add me to the bottom of that list in case that doesn't happen. I appreciate that.

I should know this but I don't. I have the parliamentarians' bible sitting in front of me, and seeing as one of the authors of the parliamentary bible is right here with me, is it right that for all dilatory motions, once someone calls for one, there's a bell for 30 minutes, there's no debate, and then you must have at least 20 members present to deal with that in order to cause the division to occur? Is that correct?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

That's correct, if you're having a recorded division, yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You need 20, okay. That confirms what I was going to say in answer to Ms. Vandenbeld's earlier comment about needing the people present. You only need to have 20 people present on a Friday to cause a dilatory motion to go to a recorded vote. That's all you need. If you have something that's coming up, an item of government business on a Friday that you're worried about, and you want to pursue it but you think that dilatory motions could be a problem, you can seek unanimous consent of the House and discuss that in the Tuesday meeting of the House leaders about not allowing dilatory motions on Friday. That would resolve that problem. And then dilatory motions can be legitimate. It's not illegitimate to have these things.

I don't see a situation in which this is going to cause more than one-ninth of a 180-member caucus to have to be here on Fridays. Being here one Friday in nine doesn't seem like a terrible burden to face. It's a little tougher for us in the opposition, but we're willing to do it, and so are the NDP. I don't think that's a good reason not to sit on Fridays.

That's all I wanted to say.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Mr. Chairman, as a point of clarification, the The 20 really refers to the necessary number of voting members for the decision of the House to be valid. All that's required to force a recorded division is five members, and parties want to win votes, so they're going to have members present to win those votes. I think that's what I would add to that answer.

(1235)

Mr. Scott Reid:

In that case, I'm sorry for my incorrect statement. You pointed that we need even fewer people to force a recorded vote. The 20, essentially, is the quorum requirement.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Correct.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You only need 20 people there. If there aren't 20 people there, it's just that the business wasn't that important. One of the dilatory motions is that the House do now adjourn, and if they have nothing important to discuss, let's take that Friday off or end the House at that time. We are always seeing the clock in order to pretend that we left at the normal adjournment time when we actually got up and left several hours earlier, anyway. Everybody's experienced that.

You can see what I'm getting at. The only time we'd ever have the House continue to sit is when, frankly, one of the parties felt strongly enough about it that they were prepared to be there and engage in a dilatory motion. All of our parties got millions of votes. If one of the parties, just one, feels it's important enough to do that, then why on earth shouldn't we be sitting on Friday? It means that at least one of our three recognized parties thinks that the matter before the House is more important than a day off.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I wouldn't call it a day off, so there you go.

Mr. Reid, don't worry. I'll be brief. I am not a big fan of dragging it out, as you saw with my very rushed filibuster one time.

Mr. Scott Reid:

[Inaudible]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I was going to say that from my experience as a staffer sitting next to Tyler, when I learned that he is the more expendable of the pair between him and David, there are a number of things that we used to have that I kind of miss. One thing, Clerk, is the one-stop shop. It would be very useful. It doesn't really fall in the category of this study, but I would really like to see the one-stop shop come back. If I need basic office supplies, why should I wait three days to get them? If I need a pen, why can't I go downstairs and get a pen? That's the way it was.

Tying back to what we were talking about before, here is another idea about after-hours, or members' access members to get back to the parking lot, for example. In particular circumstances at night, members perhaps could have the opportunity to use the Mounties to get down the hill. It would provide the protection that they would request in certain circumstances. The vehicles are already there. There are no major logistical problems with that. It's an idea to put out there, nothing more than that.

There is one other thing, on the Standing Orders. We haven't talked much about them today. Standing Order 14 is about strangers in the House. Perhaps it could get a subsection specifically exempting the care of infants. It's food for thought.

I also wanted to come back to the calendar thing we started the meeting with. Right now calendar-sharing between staff is difficult enough. My staff cannot view and edit my calendar on their phones, which I think is very frustrating.

If you want to take the logical step of enabling families to see our calendars, I would like the whole office to have a properly integrated calendar so we are not stuck, as we are now, using Google calendars. You are talking about security issues as one of the concerns. We are already circumventing the security issues because of the limitations. Yes, you can make it secure, but if nobody uses it, it's pretty useless. I'll put that out there.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota, go ahead.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'd like to start by thanking Mr. Christopherson for his comments about this government coming from a place of being open-minded. I assure you the reasons I keep bringing up the Friday sittings, and making them constituency days, are coming from a place of trying to be open-minded.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It's to your credit.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you.

You are the one who gave us that compliment, and so I'd like to thank you for it.

I'd like to talk about perception versus reality a little bit, because I feel there is a lot of politics being played and some closed-mindedness on the side of the opposition as to the Friday sittings.

I'd like to know how many ministers, not just in this Parliament but in the last Parliament and in the previous Parliament, are actually there on Fridays. What does question period look like? How many members are actually present on Fridays? What are the hours like on a Friday?

I don't want us to be closed-minded to this, and I am not saying I'm completely for one thing or another. We've just heard my colleague Arnold Chan say that even the Liberals.... We are just trying to figure it out. There are people who are for it or against it. They are trying to see what's best to make Parliament more family-friendly.

I have to say, for myself, before knowing that you could probably trade off House duty and all that, it was a very difficult decision for me to make when running for a member of Parliament, for this position, because I have a young family. I used to play a very prominent role in the child care, so we had to switch things around at least for the first year or two of my child's life. I got in the game, in the race, got out of it, and then got back in after a year. It was a struggle.

I don't want there to be a deterrent factor for other people with young families who might want to participate and become members of Parliament. After all, we do need a diverse Parliament. We need to make sure that their voices are heard.

That is why I would really like to focus on this idea of perception versus reality. How much are we actually gaining by these Friday sittings? Would we be losing anything by not having the sittings, by switching the hours around but still having the same number of sitting hours, depending on how we change things? How much would we gain in our ridings, and how much might our constituents gain from our being there?

Could you shed some more light on what the reality of our Fridays looks like right now?

(1240)

Mr. Marc Bosc:

There is a well-established rule that we don't comment on the presence or absence of members. That said, it is no secret that attendance on Fridays is lower, for the same reasons I mentioned earlier. All parties have roster systems. They try to manage the requirements for their members to be present as efficiently as they can and allow as many of their members as possible to go back to the constituency, either on Thursday evening or early on Friday. Then they try to manage it in a similar way on the other end, on Mondays.

I have no views on whether or not it's a good idea not to sit on Fridays. It's neither here, nor there to the House administration. We will adapt to whatever the House decides.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'm sure you would agree that the status quo is always easy to maintain, but it takes some mindfulness and some courage to change things and to modernize Parliament. That's what we are trying to get to.

The Chair:

Ms. Petitpas Taylor.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

I would like to echo something that has been said on a few occasions today. It's not about taking Fridays off and not wanting to serve; it's about being more efficient with our time as members of Parliament, not just here in Ottawa but also in our ridings.

We're starting a 10-week rotation, let's say, and for me to be able to meet a constituent, the next appointment that's available is in early July. To me, that's just not acceptable.

Going in on Saturday mornings is an option, but we try to have that work/life balance.

My question is specifically for the staff. If members of Parliament worked in their constituencies on Fridays as opposed to being on the Hill, would it create efficiencies for the staff of the House of Commons by our not being here?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

As I said earlier, the vast majority of House of Commons personnel are indeterminate employees. They are full-time employees. There are a small number of sessional employees, so there may be an impact there, but I would suggest that it's minimal.

Pierre, would you agree?

Mr. Pierre Parent:

I would agree with Marc, because the bulk of our staff are full-time permanent employees. We do have a very small portion of our staff who are sessional, who are tied to the actual activities of the House.

The same applies to summer. There are some activities that continue in the summer, whether it's in finance, legal services, or information services. This is the bulk of our workforce.

The Fridays would not necessarily create extra savings or significant savings for the administration.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

But for the staff, would it allow them some time to catch up on the work that needs to get done? Sometimes when we're here we can see that we can create an awful lot of extra work.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Perhaps in some offices, but we're used to the parliamentary cycle and we manage with that. I don't think it would have a huge impact.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Far be it from me to agree with Mr. Christopherson twice in one day, but I do want to say that he had called on those members who aren't affected by travel points to talk about this issue. I live 15 minutes from here. The furthest reach of my constituency is, at a maximum, a forty-minute drive from here, and I don't have children or caregiving responsibilities.

I would like to echo that I think it's only fair that those who have to use more points because they have larger families or travel greater distances not be perceived as spending more money—the only caveat being that if we're going to say how many trips they took, we should also indicate if it was economy class or business class, and whether they took the most efficient, direct, and economical route. We don't want people to think that since we're not putting down the amounts, they can just go business class every single time.

Now back to the issue of the parallel chamber on Fridays. I think that if we were to sit half an hour early and half an hour late, Monday through Thursday, we would make up the 4.5 hours we sit on Fridays for all the business we do in the House right now.

Here's what happened to me just this past week. We have four days of debate on the budget. On the very first day, I asked to be put on the list. There were 80 members who had already asked to speak on the budget during those four days, so a lot of members don't get to speak on the things that are really important to them.

I hear what Mr. Reid is saying about Fridays being just for members' statements. I think we should allow it for members' statements—and for any bill that is before the House, perhaps members could give a twenty-minute speech on that subject on Fridays. We could even do it longer. We could have six hours on a Friday.

We'd be adding more time, but being much more efficient in terms of when we're here and when we're away, so that when we are here we are doing the things that we know matter to our constituents, and we don't have to be here just sitting in the lobby if there are other things we could be doing.

Can you comment on whether that would work, for instance on a Friday.

(1245)

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Again as I've said before, the committee has the full flexibility to recommend any kind of structure it wants to recommend. I'm reminded a little bit of something that Dr. Koester, a previous clerk of the House, said to me one time, and it's from an old version of Erskine May, where in the preface there are two quotes. One is from an old clerk from the 1600s who grumbled during a procedural wrangle that “the old way was the best, and when we went out of it, we found rubs and stops as men usually did in unbeaten ways”. And then the alternative view from a different clerk in the 1820s was, “What does that signify about precedence? The House can do what it wants.”

So what the committee needs to remember is that precedents come from somewhere, and new ways of doing things come from somewhere. The committee is entirely free to recommend whatever it wants in that regard. I really have no views on what the best way forward is, but you should know that the House will adapt to whatever the committee recommends.

The Chair:

Go ahead, David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll just very briefly respond to one comment on the shortest and most efficient route: we should be careful of that. In my riding, the shortest route goes through the Papineau-Labelle nature reserve on single-lane unimproved roads.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I meant flights.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, be very specific on that, so I don't get stuck having to go through the reserve. Thank you.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I meant flights.

The Chair:

Okay.

I'd like to thank our witnesses for a very long but very helpful session. You answered a lot of questions that committee members had in a lot of areas and gave us the ramifications of the recommendations that we might make ultimately. I know that you've always been very helpful. Between meetings, if we need clarification, we know you're always there, and we really appreciate your giving us this much time.

You are excused.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

The Chair:

As I said at the beginning of the meeting, we have five items of business that we can deal with. We have Mr. Reid's motion and Mr. Christopherson's motion. We have to approve a budget for these hearings to pay for our witnesses coming, and there's the guideline from the Ethics Commissioner on gifts for members, which I hope you've all read. There's also the emergency motion drafted by the clerk or the Speaker, which seems to make quite common sense and is a very short item. So we have to decide which item of those to do and to start with.

Go ahead, Mr. Reid.

(1250)

Mr. Scott Reid:

If I could, I would like to go with the motion I proposed first. I don't think this is controversial, but I could be proved wrong. So perhaps I'll move it now.

The motion is: That the Chairperson and federal members of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments be invited to appear before the Committee before the end of May 2016, to answer all questions relating to: their mandate and responsibilities, the Report of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments Transitional Process (January - March 2016) that was submitted to the Prime Minister on March 31, 2016, expenses incurred during the period of the report, and anticipated future expenses.

Mr. Chair, I'll be very brief in summarizing the rationale for this. In the past, there was resistence to inviting the members of the advisory board. Yes, it was from the Liberals. The arguments presented against doing so included the fact that they would be submitting a report and that we ought to wait for that and ought not to put them in a position of having to report to us prior to doing their report to the Prime Minister. That's no longer an issue. We now have that report.

We also have some other information. We have information that their costs were a good deal higher that I would have thought would be reasonable, although it may be that they are reasonable and I'm just not seeing what the reasons are. But you can project that, if it costs this much to appoint seven, it's going to cost about three times as much to appoint the remaining 22 vacancies, and obviously that is a concern. Thus there's a desire to find out more.

As well, there is one oddity. The advisory board indicated that it had misplaced the list of organizations it contacted. I'm having some trouble, in the age of endless electronic copies of things, understanding how that could have occurred. The advisory board thought it was important enough that it wanted to present this information, but was unable to get a complete list. So getting that from it as well would be part of what we'd want to hear, or I would certainly want to hear.

Anyway the proposal is to get the advisory board here before the end of May, and I'm reluctant to raise this issue if we wind up having another meeting where we've got six witnesses and I'd be crowding them out through discussion of this motion. So that's why I raised it today, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Does anyone want to speak to the motion?

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'll chime in quickly, to the extent that I'm not going to oppose it. We'll support it.

But you know, for us in the NDP, in the context of our position, this is all just polishing the deck chairs on the Titanic before the darned thing goes down. We're not all that interested in perfecting an overall system that makes appointments in a democracy the reality. However, it is the reality, and if anyone wants to continue poking around in this area, we'll be supportive, but always in the context that none of this should be happening. It's a wart on the body politic of Canada that we have this thing, and all its various permutations of appointing people doesn't change the fact that it's an appointment process.

Also, I remind the government that it's not 2015 now, but 2016, and the idea of an appointed upper House is still the antithesis of anything anyone would remotely call a democracy.

In that context, we'll support it, but we won't be leading the band.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Will there be any further discussion before we have a vote?

The motion has just been read.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'd like a recorded vote, please.

The Chair:

Recorded vote, Madam Clerk.

The Clerk:

On the motion of Mr. Reid.

(Motion negatived: nays 5; yeas 4)

(1255)

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's not a very sunny way to be.

The Chair:

I wonder if we could quickly go to the budget for our hearings, which I think the clerk happens to have.

The budget proposed, which is just being handed around, is a standard amount of $15,500 basically to pay for the travel and electronics for our witnesses.

Is there any discussion before we vote on approving or not approving the budget?

I'll give you a minute to look at it.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'll move that.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: Has everyone read the very brief proposed change to the Standing Orders by the Speaker so that he can handle emergency hours?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes.

I took that to our former speaker Andrew Scheer, who of course is now the opposition House leader. I asked him to look it over, because the events that occurred actually occurred while he was Speaker. I gave my copy to him, and asked him to take a look at it and get back to me so that I could bring back comments to the chair.

It's my fault. I meant to bring them today and I forgot. I'll try to have them for Tuesday, if that's acceptable.

The Chair:

Okay, that's a good idea.

Mr. David Christopherson:

On this?

The Chair:

Yes.

Can we wait until Tuesday now?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Absolutely.

The Chair:

Has everyone read the guidelines that we asked the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner to provide for us, so that it's clear to members of the House when they can accept gifts? She doesn't like it, but it's our prerogative. At the moment, under our authority we have to approve those and report them to the House.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Do you mean the forms?

The Chair:

No, not the forms, but the guideline we emailed to you about 10 days ago. It was further clarification.

We, as a committee, asked for further clarification as to what was an acceptable gift. She did what we asked and wrote out this document, which is a few pages long and which we emailed to you all.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Sorry, Chair, I confess I have not seen it.

The Chair:

We'll also defer on that.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I had a chance to look at it briefly. I haven't had a chance to go through it in detail, but I suggest from my brief look at it that the guidelines are still somewhat less than clear in my mind. I would encourage everyone to spend some time to look through it and see for themselves, but we may have to have some further discussion on it.

The Chair:

I want to remind people, too, about members getting information from the clerk. You are the ones who have given her instructions as to where it should go. I noticed that a recent email from her went to virtually all of our general emails that our staff receive. If you want these to go to your personal email address, make sure that clerk knows this. I have mine go to my personal email address and to my staff, but it's up to you. Make make sure that each of you talks to the clerk to clarify where your emails are going.

We'll defer our discussion on the conflict of interest guidelines on gifts.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I appreciate that. I do have a wrinkle in my email system too, which may lead emails going to an account that doesn't regularly come before me. I did noticed that others had maybe not seen the email either, so I feel a little better, thanks.

I have been on this issue for quite some time and in different iterations. Mr. Richards is absolutely right, it is still not clear. I would suggest that we get out in front of this and invite her back in.

She's always had a suggestion that she didn't much like them, and I hope I'm not putting words in her mouth. Mr. Reid's been around the mulberry bush on this from the inception, I believe, so he knows more about it than probably anybody in Parliament. She had claimed that if we really want to make things simple, then we should just have a dollar amount where any gifts below that amount are considered okay and nobody would question these, and above that amount, there should be a reporting mechanism. I think she had suggested $35.

I would defer to Mr. Reid's expertise in this area, but it seems to me that from a common sense approach—and I guess this speaks to where Mr. Richards was too—we still have conflicting interpretations that leave it unclear. There's still no ability to look at it at a quick blush and understand what it is. For the life of me, I don't know why it evades us. We should be able to find a way that's nice and crystal clear, and yet we don't have it and it's so important.

I'm suggesting that maybe we ought to jump out in front, say yes that we're going to deal with it on the agenda, and invite her to come in and have that discussion and keep chasing this thing until we finally get it clear.

Those are my thoughts.

Thank you.

(1300)

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

On this, I have some sympathy for her because she's struggling with the fact that the rules themselves were not brilliantly drafted. They do create situations where two parts of the rules can be seen to some degree as one being more permissive than the other. This is true with gifts. As long as that's the case, she appears to be adopting the view that she will take the more restrictive of the interpretations, which I suppose I'd probably do if I were her too.

Having said that, it seems to me that the best way of resolving it is ultimately to change the rules to remove those restrictions. My own recommendation would be that we chat with each other—and we can do it offline if we're worried it will take up too much committee time—and see if there's a developing consensus. It would be to see if we can find a way of adjusting the wording of that part of the ethics code so there is greater precision.

I think that's the only solution.

The Chair:

Okay, it's understood that we need a much more detailed time on this.

Our time's up, but there are two things I need to mention. Could people get back to the clerk or me by the end of the week on particular names of witnesses we've recommended. We don't yet have the names. On the question of political staff, we have one from the NDP, but the Liberals and the Conservatives have not provided any. If there's someone on your political staff that you think wants to be a witness, could you get back to the clerk by the end of this week?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Kevin Bosch.

The Chair:

Well, we don't want the names right now.

Also, on House of Commons staff, if there's someone else who need to be consulted, please talk to the clerk or me about that.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I was a little surprised that somebody came up and asked me, “Do you know who the different unions are that represent the various works on the Hill here?” I was thinking that surely somebody has a registry of the unions. I was struck by that. I don't know why it's difficult. I'm missing a piece here: it should be straightforward. Go to HR, give us the names of the unions that represent workers on the Hill here, and we will extend an invitation to their representatives.

On the previous point, if I could offer up assistance to my colleagues among the Liberal and the Conservative caucuses, I would point out that it's a lot easier once your staff are organized and have their own representatives. I'd be glad to provide folks that could come in and help you with that process.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We're adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Afin que l'horaire soit respecté et que le Comité ait le plus de temps possible pour interroger les témoins, nous allons commencer.

Bonjour. Il s'agit de la quinzième séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre de la première session de la 42e législature. Aujourd'hui, nous poursuivons notre étude des mesures visant à adapter le Parlement aux besoins des familles.

Les témoins de l'Administration de la Chambre des communes sont Marc Bosc, greffier par intérim, et Pierre Parent, dirigeant principal des ressources humaines.

Je vais simplement rappeler aux membres du Comité que les témoins sont ici pour répondre à toutes les questions au sujet de la Chambre des communes, du service de garde ou des autobus. Ces deux personnes devraient répondre à toute question soulevée relativement à l'Administration de la Chambre des communes, et c'est pourquoi nous sommes ici pour deux heures. Nous disposons d'une longue période pour aborder tous ces sujets.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

J'invoque le Règlement; je ne voulais pas soulever cette question lors de la séance de mardi parce que nous avions beaucoup de témoins, et je sais que nous avons un peu plus de temps aujourd'hui.

Je serai bref, mais je voulais poser une série de questions qui circulent. Je pense que la plupart des membres du Comité les ont probablement déjà vues, mais elles ont été adressées à toutes sortes de personnes que nous invitons à comparaître en tant que témoin. J'étais curieux de savoir comment les questions avaient été déterminées, car bien des discussions ont été tenues à leur sujet au sein du Comité. Ma mémoire me joue peut-être des tours, mais je ne me rappelle pas que nous ayons discuté de certaines questions au Comité. Certes, si nous avons abordé certaines d'entre elles, nous ne l'avons peut-être fait que très rapidement ou indirectement.

Je ne veux pas laisser entendre que le Comité doit approuver tout ce qui ressort lorsque nous invitons des témoins et des choses du genre, mais je suis un peu curieux de savoir comment les questions ont été obtenues. Je voudrais obtenir une certaine indication à cet égard.

Le président:

Voilà une très bonne question. Je ne savais pas qu'elles avaient été envoyées aux témoins, en fait.

Je vais demander à la greffière de répondre à cette question.

La greffière du comité (Mme Joann Garbig):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Les membres du Comité ont discuté de la façon dont ils voulaient aborder l'étude et ont dit qu'ils voudraient que les témoins soient informés de ces éléments quand ils allaient être invités à comparaître, alors j'ai consulté l'analyste qui a dressé une liste, et nous l'avons transmise par l'intermédiaire du président avant que tout témoin soit invité.

M. Blake Richards:

Ça va. Je ne veux pas donner l'impression que je remets en question votre travail ou celui de notre analyste. Je sais que vous faites tous les deux un excellent travail. J'étais simplement curieux de savoir comment ces questions particulières avaient été choisies, parce que je sais que nous avons beaucoup discuté de certaines d'entre elles, mais je ne me souviens pas d'en avoir abordé certaines autres. C'est peut-être seulement ma mémoire qui me joue des tours, mais j'étais tout simplement curieux de connaître la façon dont elles avaient été élaborées.

Le président:

Je m'excuse. En fait, je ne me souviens pas d'avoir vu cette liste.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous n'avez pas besoin de donner de détails.

Je pose la question parce que, dans une certaine mesure, ces questions établissent manifestement le cadre de la discussion lancée par les témoins. Je ne veux pas dire que nous devons connaître tous les éléments de correspondance qui sont envoyés à un témoin potentiel, mais, lorsqu'il est question de la série de questions dans son ensemble, le Comité devrait peut-être s'assurer que nous recevions des directives appropriées à cet égard.

Le président:

C'est tout à fait logique.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

J'invoque aussi le Règlement, sur un sujet différent.

C'est tout simplement lié au fait d'accueillir ces témoins pour deux heures, seulement deux témoins par rapport à la demi-douzaine que nous avons accueillis lors de la dernière séance.

Réservons-nous une période pour discuter de motions à la fin de la séance du Comité d'aujourd'hui? Si c'est le cas, je vais vouloir proposer la motion que j'ai déjà distribuée relativement à l'invitation du comité consultatif du Sénat durant le mois de mai.

Le président:

Oui, certainement, si nous avons le temps à la fin et que les gens ont fini de poser des questions.

Nous avons les cinq éléments que j'ai mentionnés au début de la dernière séance: votre motion, celles de M. Christopherson, les lignes directrices relatives aux cadeaux de la commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts, la motion d'urgence du Président et l'approbation du budget alloué à la présente étude. Nous allons assurément faire tout cela si nous le pouvons, selon le temps qu'il restera.

Rappelez-vous que vous devez aborder tous les sujets liés à la Chambre des communes. Assurez-vous d'avoir posé toutes vos questions à ces deux témoins.

Merci de votre présence. Je sais que vous avez tous deux d'énormes responsabilités qui vous tiennent occupés et nous avons hâte d'entendre vos courtes déclarations préliminaires, puis de vous poser beaucoup de questions.

M. Marc Bosc (Greffier par intérim, Chambre des communes):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Évidemment, je suis heureux de comparaître devant le Comité ce matin afin de discuter de votre étude des mesures visant à adapter le Parlement aux besoins des familles. [Français]

Je suis accompagné de M. Pierre Parent, qui est le dirigeant principal des ressources humaines. Dans l'auditoire, il y a aussi l'un de nos collègues, soit le directeur général des Opérations de la Cité parlementaire, M. Benoit Giroux.[Traduction]

Nous avons fait de notre mieux pour suivre le travail du Comité depuis un certain temps, alors nous connaissons un peu certaines des questions qui ont été soulevées. Dès le départ, je dois dire que je suis heureux de vous annoncer que l'Administration de la Chambre, sous la direction du Président, a récemment apporté un certain nombre d'améliorations aux installations et aux services offerts aux députés ayant de jeunes enfants. Mentionnons la création d'une salle familiale, entre autres, y compris des places de stationnement et d'autres installations qui ont été améliorées ou mises à niveau. Nous avons fait des progrès.

À mesure que vous poursuivrez votre étude, nous demeurerons à votre disposition et prêts à donner suite aux recommandations que la Chambre pourrait formuler. Bien entendu, nous travaillons également de façon informelle auprès des députés qui nous font part de besoins spéciaux, et nous faisons de notre mieux pour répondre à leurs besoins.

(1110)

[Français]

Nous sommes évidemment prêts à répondre à toutes vos questions ce matin. [Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Parent, aviez-vous une déclaration préliminaire?

M. Pierre Parent (dirigeant principal des ressources humaines, Chambre des communes):

Non, merci.

Le président:

D'accord, nous allons commencer la première série de questions de sept minutes.

M. Graham sera suivi de M. Richards.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Bonjour, et merci.

J'ai un certain nombre de questions à poser. Je m'attendais à discuter avec les représentants de chaque ministère et à aborder des aspects un peu plus techniques, mais nous allons y aller avec ce que nous avons.

Ma première question porte sur...

Le président:

Je ne pense pas que vous devriez craindre de poser des questions techniques. Vous devez poser toutes vos questions ici, alors posez celles qui sont très techniques.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous obtiendrons les réponses plus tard, s'il le faut. Ça me va. D'accord.

Tout d'abord, le service de garde est un enjeu important pour nous. Nous croyons savoir que la liste d'attente est assez longue pour obtenir une place au service de garde et qu'il y a beaucoup plus d'enfants que de places. Je voudrais que vous abordiez la possibilité de rendre le service de garde beaucoup plus ouvert et de lui donner un style libre afin que les gens puissent y déposer leurs enfants pour la journée sans être liés pour le reste du mois, ou bien de faire en sorte qu'ils permettent aux députés de siéger pendant de longues heures — jusqu'à minuit, si nous siégeons jusqu'à minuit — afin qu'une personne qui a un enfant ici, à Ottawa, ait vraiment la possibilité d'utiliser le service de garde.

M. Marc Bosc:

Je vais peut-être commencer, et Pierre pourra compléter ma réponse sur certains des paramètres selon lesquels le service de garde — Les enfants de la Colline — fonctionne sur la Colline.

Je suis un ancien président du conseil d'administration du service de garde, et nos deux filles l'ont fréquenté. Il a été mis sur pied par Mme Sauvé. En réalité, le problème tient à la programmation du service de garde et aux coûts associés au fait d'avoir un service qui est plus flexible et qui est ouvert plus longtemps, mais sans que l'on dispose de renseignements complets sur les taux d'utilisation. Voilà le problème.

Pierre peut compléter ma réponse au sujet des paramètres en fonction desquels nous devons nous gouverner et en fonction desquels le service de garde doit le faire. Pierre pourra peut-être aborder cet aspect, puis je reviendrai sur la question, car nous croyons avoir trouvé une autre solution à cette situation, qui est très favorable.

M. Pierre Parent:

Merci, Marc.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je pense qu'il est important d'ajouter que le service de garde n'exerce pas ses activités sous la direction de la Chambre des communes. Il est exploité par son propre conseil d'administration et sa propre direction. Dans le passé — je dirais, il y a 18 mois —, nous avons tenu plusieurs discussions sur la façon dont nous pourrions organiser le service de garde pour les députés avec l'aide des responsables des Enfants de la Colline. Nous avons étudié ces options. Par exemple, nous avons étudié la possibilité de permettre aux députés de déposer leur enfant en tout temps et de prolonger les heures d'ouverture en faisant passer l'heure de fermeture de 18 heures à 23 heures, lorsque des séances sont tenues en Chambre.

Le problème a toujours été lié au modèle d'affaires du service de garde. Bien entendu, ses responsables ne sont pas là pour perdre de l'argent, alors ils affectent du personnel au service de garde en conséquence. Alors, la question sera la suivante: si le taux d'utilisation est inférieur au taux de dotation exigé, qui va assumer la différence? Il s'agit du genre d'équilibre à établir entre le service offert par le service de garde, qui est un organisme indépendant, et le niveau de service, surtout du point de vue de l'admission sans rendez-vous qui supposerait que l'établissement soit prêt à recevoir les enfants que les gens y déposent sans connaître exactement le taux d'utilisation. Il s'agissait de l'une des difficultés.

En outre, de leur point de vue — et je ne peux pas nécessairement parler en leur nom —, le fait de mélanger leur programme à temps plein au programme d'admission sans rendez-vous pose problème. Je n'entrerai pas nécessairement dans les détails, mais cette option était problématique de leur point de vue, alors ils considéreraient qu'il s'agit de deux exploitations différentes et de deux établissements différents.

Voilà pourquoi nous avons envisagé une troisième option, qui pourrait être un service de nourrice, lequel exigerait probablement des frais de réservation. Nous nous sommes adressés à divers fournisseurs et, habituellement, ils exigent la passation d'un contrat avec l'employeur. Dans ce cas-ci, il n'y a pas d'employeur. Selon le fournisseur, il y aurait des frais de réservation à l'égard d'une réservation particulière, ou bien des frais de réservation qui seraient payés une fois par année, puis payés à l'utilisation.

Nous envisageons divers fournisseurs et, dans ce contexte, les services pourraient être fournis ici, dans l'édifice du Centre, ou bien être fournis dans la salle familiale, dans le bureau du député, à son domicile, ou même dans une chambre d'hôtel. C'est beaucoup plus flexible, et c'est le genre de solution que nous envisageons.

(1115)

M. Marc Bosc:

J'ajouterais que cette voie est très prometteuse parce qu'elle règle le principal problème auquel font face les députés, c'est-à-dire la flexibilité. Il est parfois impossible pour les députés de prévoir ce qui va se passer à la Chambre et au sein des comités. Ils ne le savent peut-être pas d'un jour à l'autre, et ce service vise en fait à permettre aux députés de prendre ces dispositions par eux-mêmes, moyennant un très court préavis, et d'avoir accès à ce service pour le nombre d'heures ou de jours requis. Ils paient le fournisseur directement. Une fois que ce contrat est conclu par la Chambre, moyennant des frais de service minimes, les députés qui s'en prévalent paieraient directement pour le service, et ce, au prix du marché, soit 14 ou 15 $ l'heure. C'est très raisonnable.

Je pense que c'est à cela qu'on peut s'attendre. Bien entendu, ce genre de décision doit être prise par le conseil d'administration. Une réunion du conseil d'administration aura lieu la semaine prochaine.

Je m'arrêterai là.

Le président:

Une minute et demie, David.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. J'allais brièvement poser la question suivante: pourrions-nous obtenir un genre d'explication écrite de la façon dont le service fonctionnerait et de ce qu'il coûterait? Quand cette explication serait-elle disponible? À quels genres de délais devons-nous nous attendre?

M. Marc Bosc:

Pour clarifier la question, que voulez-vous dire exactement par « ce qu'il coûterait »?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si vous parlez d'établir un programme de nourrice à l'extérieur de l'établissement, à quelle étape de l'élaboration de ce programme en êtes-vous? Vous dites qu'il viendra, mais dans combien de temps? Quand allons-nous le savoir?

M. Marc Bosc:

Je dirais que c'est dans un avenir très rapproché. Je dois faire attention parce que les délibérations du conseil d'administration sont confidentielles. Je m'en tiendrai à cela.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une autre question rapide que j'avais l'intention de poser au service des TI, mais je suppose que je vais vous l'adresser. L'un des problèmes que nous avons en tant que députés tient au partage de notre agenda avec les membres de notre famille. C'est une chose très simple. Certains d'entre nous utilisent Google Agenda. Nous sortons de la « réservation » pour partager notre agenda avec les membres de notre famille. Pouvons-nous étudier des options pour régler ce problème? Pouvons-nous étudier des options qui permettraient de donner à notre conjoint l'accès à notre compte de courriel afin qu'il puisse utiliser un téléphone qui lui donnerait accès à notre agenda, ou quelque chose du genre, pour nous permettre de partager notre agenda?

M. Marc Bosc:

Je savais que cette question était susceptible d'être soulevée. J'en avais déjà parlé au dirigeant principal de l'information, et il étudie actuellement la question. Comme vous le savez, des enjeux liés à la sécurité sont associés à l'accès au réseau parlementaire. Voilà l'obstacle majeur. Il m'a assuré qu'il allait se pencher là-dessus activement pour voir s'il pouvait trouver une solution.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Comme vous m'avez entendu le mentionner lorsque j'ai invoqué le Règlement au début de la séance, une série de sept questions a été envoyée à tous les témoins potentiels. Vous êtes uniques parmi nos témoins, car vous faites partie du personnel administratif de la Chambre des communes. Ces questions vous ont-elles été envoyées?

M. Marc Bosc:

Je les ai reçues.

M. Blake Richards:

C'est évidemment parce qu'elles ont été envoyées à d'autres témoins et qu'elles établiront le cadre de bien des discussions que nous tiendrons avec les témoins que nous accueillons ici. Je voulais me concentrer sur ces questions dans une certaine mesure.

Je voulais vous poser des questions au sujet de six d'entre elles. J'ai trois questions à poser à propos de chacune, et nous allons les aborder une à une. Je vais vous donner à l'avance une idée de ce sur quoi j'espère obtenir vos commentaires.

Dans chacun de ces domaines, je veux me faire une idée de ce qui, selon vous, pourrait être les conséquences potentielles imprévues de toute modification que nous apportons dans chaque domaine. Je veux me faire une idée de ce que pourraient être les coûts, selon vous, dans le domaine en question. Fait le plus important: je veux savoir quel genre de conséquences les modifications apportées dans chacun de ces domaines pourraient avoir sur nos électeurs, selon vous.

Je vais aborder les questions une par une. J'espère que nous aurons suffisamment de temps. Sinon, je pourrai peut-être obtenir un autre temps de parole pour continuer de poser des questions au sujet des autres volets.

La première question est liée au fait que la Chambre envisage de raccourcir ou de comprimer ses semaines de séance, ou bien de changer son calendrier de séances. Pour chacun de ces trois thèmes, pourriez-vous nous donner une idée de ce que pourraient être, selon vous, les conséquences imprévues — les coûts et les répercussions sur nos électeurs?

(1120)

M. Marc Bosc:

Les conséquences imprévues sont difficiles à prévoir en raison de leur nature: elles sont imprévues. En ce qui concerne le fait d'amputer la semaine de séance d'une journée, le Règlement contient actuellement plusieurs dispositions qui prévoient des nombres de jours fixes pour certains types d'activités. Pour les choses comme des activités d'initiative parlementaire, c'est une heure par jour. Pour les choses comme des travaux des subsides, c'est sept jours de septembre à décembre, sept jours de janvier à mars et huit jours d'avril à juin. Ces proportions en tant que partie de l'année civile dans son ensemble changeraient, manifestement. Le nombre de jours alloués à un débat budgétaire est fixe. Le nombre de jours alloués à un débat sur le discours du Trône est fixe, et ainsi de suite.

Voilà le genre de choses que le Comité doit étudier en tant que conséquences imprévues liées à la compression des périodes disponibles pour mener des activités.

Pour ce qui est des coûts, je vois très peu de répercussions. Le salaire des employés de la Chambre est versé à temps plein annuellement. On pourrait faire quelques économies, mais elles seraient négligeables. Il faudrait que j'effectue une analyse appropriée. Je ne pense pas qu'il y aurait d'énormes conséquences sur ce plan, de toute façon.

Quant aux répercussions sur les électeurs, évidemment, si les députés sont davantage dans la circonscription, cela aura une incidence positive pour les électeurs, qui verraient davantage leur député.

M. Blake Richards:

Je vais sauter un peu d'une question à une autre sans suivre nécessairement l'ordre de la liste. La prochaine que je voulais poser est du même ordre, c'est-à-dire qu'elle concerne les conséquences ou les obstacles potentiels imprévus liés au congé parental des députés. L'une des questions visait à déterminer si c'était faisable. Pour chacune des mêmes questions...

M. Marc Bosc:

Je vais laisser Pierre répondre à celle-là.

M. Pierre Parent:

Le congé parental exigerait probablement — et je ne vais pas parler au nom de l'assistant judiciaire — qu'on apporte des modifications à la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada, où l'assiduité est régie par l'article 57. Le règlement relatif à l'assiduité comprend la maladie comme raison de s'absenter durant une journée de séance, mais il ne comprend pas nécessairement la raison « donner naissance à un enfant », « congé parental » ou même « prendre soin d'un enfant malade ». Ces dispositions sont incluses dans la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada, et mon service de paie administre ces dispositions pour vous en tant que députés. Bien entendu, l'ajout de ces raisons exigerait une modification de la loi à un échelon supérieur.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord, avez-vous une idée du coût ou des conséquences que cette modification entraînerait sur les électeurs, si un congé parental était accordé à un député?

M. Marc Bosc:

Encore une fois, concernant cet aspect de la question, cela dépendrait en réalité de ce que le député qui se prévaudrait du congé parental choisirait de faire. S'il choisissait d'exercer tout de même ses fonctions dans une certaine mesure, les répercussions sur les électeurs seraient négligeables, car le personnel du député continuerait d'assumer ses fonctions, et ainsi de suite.

En ce qui concerne les coûts, les députés touchent un salaire annuel. Il n'y aurait aucun changement à cet égard.

M. Blake Richards:

Alors, nous allons passer au vote électronique ou au vote par procuration, l'idée de ces deux options. Quelles seraient les conséquences dans ces domaines?

M. Marc Bosc:

En ce qui a trait au vote électronique, la Chambre a étudié cette possibilité dans le passé. Une version antérieure du Comité s'était penchée là-dessus à plus d'une occasion. En réalité, il s'agit essentiellement d'une décision que doit prendre la Chambre à l'égard de la façon dont elle veut procéder aux votes. D'un point de vue électronique, la Chambre est équipée pour que cette possibilité se concrétise, mais, d'après mon expérience, les whips aiment habituellement que les députés soient présents pour voter. Et j'ai entendu dire que les députés eux-mêmes aiment bien l'ambiance de la période qui précède le vote. Les cloches sonnent. L'ambiance est plus informelle. Ils peuvent discuter avec des collègues. C'est un genre d'endroit où des transactions peuvent être conclues de façon assez efficiente, occasionnellement, pendant que la Chambre attend que se tienne le vote officiel par appel nominal.

Pour ce qui est du vote par procuration, vous tombez tout de suite dans une discussion et un débat complètement différents, et c'est la nature d'une assemblée délibérante. Est-il nécessaire que les députés soient présents? Certaines personnes vous diront — pas moi, nécessairement — que le fait de permettre ce genre de choses ouvre la voie à d'autres changements; ainsi, si on permettait le vote par procuration, qu'accepterait-on ensuite? Va-t-on permettre la prochaine étape? Voilà le genre de débats dans lequel on s'embarque.

Cela dit, cette situation se produit ailleurs.

(1125)

M. Blake Richards:

Me reste-t-il un peu de temps, monsieur le président?

Merci, alors.

Le président:

Nous allons passer à M. Christopherson.

Toutefois, avant que nous le fassions, je mentionnerais qu'en Suède, les élus appuient tous sur leur bouton, mais ils doivent être présents, alors ils font en cinq minutes ce que nous faisons en deux heures, mais ils doivent être présents afin de pouvoir tenir toutes leurs discussions avec tout le monde.

Allez-y, monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci beaucoup de votre présence. J'ai affirmé plus tôt que j'allais me concentrer sur un aspect. Je vais reconnaître d'emblée qu'il s'agit en partie d'une bête noire du point de vue de mon expérience sur la Colline, mais il nous amène à ce qui, selon moi, sont des affaires bien plus importantes que ma réticence.

Il s'agit de ce que nous appelons le « service d'autobus vert ». Même ce service est en train de changer. Il ne s'agirait plus de l'autobus vert, je suppose; ça sera l'autobus blanc. Quoi qu'il en soit, il y a eu des compressions budgétaires. Cela fera bientôt 12 ans que je suis dans le coin, et il y a eu compression par-dessus compression, par-dessus compression. Cela ne veut pas dire qu'il n'y a pas des fois où on peut apporter des changements et des améliorations et où les compressions sont même justifiées, mais, selon mon expérience, comme l'expansion de la Colline parlementaire déborde maintenant sur la rue Queen et la rue Wellington, et compte tenu de l'ouverture au cours des dernières années de ce qui est maintenant l'édifice de la Bravoure, nous sommes en fait rendus en bas de la Colline.

Il fut un temps — et on voit que je vieillis —, dans le bon vieux temps... mais cette période ne remonte pas à si loin, où, quand on montait à bord de l'autobus vert, il arrivait très rapidement et était très efficient. Un autobus nous amenait partout, car il n'y avait qu'une poignée d'endroits où aller. C'est très différent maintenant. Le territoire est beaucoup plus étendu. En cette période où nous avons davantage de destinations, les véhicules doivent maintenant quitter la Cité parlementaire pour se rendre dans les rues publiques d'Ottawa, plus particulièrement les rues Wellington et Queen, et faire tout le tour du monument national pour arriver au 1, rue Wellington. Alors que notre besoin de services est élargi, il y a de plus en plus de compressions budgétaires. Je ne dis pas qu'une certaine expansion n'a pas eu lieu, mais, somme toute, à mon avis, il y a eu une régression au chapitre du service.

Je vais simplement me vider le coeur, puis je vais passer à l'affaire qui est plus importante. De mon point de vue, la quantité d'efficience et de productivité perdue par le nombre de fois où les gens doivent attendre l'autobus, de fois où des séances du Comité ont été retardées ou de membres du personnel qui ont dû les utiliser pour se déplacer lorsqu'ils apportaient des choses pour les députés parce que quelque chose avait changé, que l'ordre du jour avait changé ou qu'on avait besoin d'information... Concernant la perte d'efficience, si vous demandiez à des experts d'étudier la situation, j'ose croire — mais je ne suis pas un expert — qu'ils vous diraient qu'il s'agit d'une fausse économie et que vous économisez peut-être à l'égard du poste budgétaire « transport sur la Colline », mais que, si vous regardez les faits en ce qui a trait à l'efficience et à la productivité, sans compter seulement le niveau de frustration...

Je vais aller droit au but: il fait froid à Ottawa. J'ajouterais entre parenthèses pour mes nouveaux collègues que je viens de Hamilton et que j'ai su qu'il faisait froid quand je suis arrivé ici et que des gens de Winnipeg m'ont dit: « Ah, Dave, il fait vraiment froid ici. »

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David Christopherson: Il fait froid à Ottawa. Cela me dérange que les personnes qui se déplacent en limousine et qui restent bien au chaud soient celles qui dirigent le reste d'entre nous, pauvres habitants, qui devons rester à l'extérieur et attendre.

Tout cela n'est pas très sérieux, mais cela a un certain sens, comme vous pouvez le constater. Toutefois, voici ce qui est bien plus important et pertinent par rapport à ces points: les membres du personnel et les députés atteints d'un handicap physique. Autrefois, les autobus se déplaçaient sur de plus longues distances et se rendaient plus loin. Maintenant, dans le stationnement... heureusement pour nous, bien sûr, car nous sommes très bien traités, sur la Colline. Tout est là pour appuyer les députés et le travail de la Chambre, alors ma place de stationnement est très bien. Je n'ai pas besoin d'un autobus pour me rendre à ma place de stationnement, à moins que je parte d'ici, mais, certaines personnes ont un long trajet à parcourir. S'il n'est pas trop tard la nuit, mais dans la soirée, il fait noir et froid. Si la personne a un problème de genou ou de jambe, une jambe cassée, de l'arthrite ou un quelconque handicap, ou bien qu'elle est tout simplement âgée et a une mobilité réduite lorsqu'elle se déplace... Je ne sais pas comment ces gens font pour se rendre d'un endroit à un autre. Payons-nous pour les taxis? Doivent-ils s'organiser pour se faire déposer? Doivent-ils changer leur vie personnelle afin que quelqu'un vienne les chercher?

Puis il y a le fait de... par exemple, hier soir, j'ai assisté ici, dans l'édifice du Centre, à une séance qui a commencé à 19 h 30 et qui s'est poursuivie jusqu'à 21 heures. J'ai dû partir un peu tôt. J'ai eu de la chance et j'ai pu monter à bord du dernier autobus, puisqu'il partait 5 ou 10 minutes après 20 heures, mais, pour toutes les autres personnes qui étaient présentes à cette séance, y compris les membres du personnel, il n'y a pas eu d'autobus.

Je sais qu'il y a davantage d'agents de sécurité dans les environs. Parfois, c'est comme un camp armé, d'après ce que nous voyons. Mais je dois vous dire: promenez-vous sur la Colline le soir, et vous verrez facilement des situations où des députés marchent et sont seuls. Je ne parle même pas de ceux qui pourraient être plus vulnérables que d'autres, mais simplement de députés qui se promènent dans le noir, tard le soir, et relativement seuls. Une aide est peut-être accessible, mais elle se trouve un peu plus loin. La rue Wellington n'est pas si loin; vous pouvez y accéder. Sur le plan de la sécurité, je suis inquiet. Alors, pour toutes ces raisons...

(1130)



Je reconnais que la majeure partie de ce que je viens tout juste de dire, monsieur le président, était une diatribe, soit. Mais j'ai attendu longtemps avant de pouvoir faire venir une personne afin de pouvoir me lancer dans cette diatribe.

Je sais que vous ne pouvez pas formuler de commentaire au sujet des compressions, et je ne m'attends pas à ce que vous le fassiez. Vous êtes l'incarnation de la bienséance, je n'y vois pas d'inconvénient. Toutefois, du point de vue de la gestion, vous avez également une responsabilité. À de nombreux égards, ce personnel est le vôtre tout autant que le nôtre, et j'aimerais connaître vos réflexions à ce sujet.

Je vais vous faciliter les choses, Marc. Je voudrais connaître vos réflexions sur toute partie de ce que j'avais à dire, même si elles sont méprisantes. Je suis prêt à l'accepter, mais il s'agit là de mes sentiments à ce sujet, et je voudrais savoir ce que vous en pensez.

M. Marc Bosc:

Eh bien, tout d'abord, je dois demander au président de combien de temps je dispose.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président:

Vous avez environ une minute.

M. Marc Bosc:

D'accord, je vais faire de mon mieux.

Je suis Winnipégois. Je sais à quel point il peut faire froid. Ma façon de composer avec cette température consiste tout simplement à marcher. Je trouve la marche beaucoup plus efficiente. Je ne veux pas insinuer que d'autres personnes veulent le faire ou devraient le faire. C'est tout simplement ma façon de composer avec le froid.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous n'êtes pas handicapé.

M. Marc Bosc:

Cela dit, il ne fait aucun doute que le service d'autobus est très complexe, pour les raisons que vous avez mentionnées. La cité s'est agrandie. Les comités se réunissent à divers endroits. Croyez-moi quand je le dis, Benoit. J'ai eu de nombreuses conversations à ce sujet. Il ne s'agit pas d'un casse-tête facile à résoudre, surtout compte tenu des décisions à l'égard des niveaux de service qui ont été prises dans le contexte d'une période de compressions budgétaires généralisées. Toutes les parties du gouvernement fédéral dans son ensemble ont été touchées, y compris la Chambre. Nous avons réduit nos dépenses de 7 %. Il s'agit d'un des services qui ont été touchés.

Cela dit, nous devons nous rappeler que les autobus sont là non pas pour le personnel, pour les employés, mais pour les députés. La raison pour laquelle ils sont destinés aux députés est qu'ils ont pour but de leur permettre de se rendre aux séances de comités auxquelles ils sont censés se rendre, et à la Chambre où ils doivent se rendre pour les votes et pour quelque autre raison que ce soit. Voilà la réalité.

Du point de vue de la sécurité, j'ai eu une très bonne discussion avec le directeur du Service de protection parlementaire à ce sujet. Parfois, le fait de tenter de prévoir les exceptions dans le cas d'un service comme celui de l'autobus n'est pas la façon la plus efficiente de procéder. La prise de dispositions au cas par cas, comme l'accès à une ligne téléphonique permettant de téléphoner pour obtenir une escorte ou quoi que ce soit, si on a vraiment l'impression que sa sécurité est à risque, pourrait être une possibilité à étudier.

Je sais que je n'ai pas répondu à tous les points que vous avez soulevés, mais j'ai essayé d'en aborder le plus possible.

M. David Christopherson:

Je comprends ce que vous avez dit, ça va, au sujet de la marche. D'accord, cela faisait partie de ma diatribe.

La partie sérieuse concernait les personnes qui ne peuvent pas marcher aussi facilement ou qui sont handicapées temporairement. Cela change les choses. Désolé, je trouve qu'il est un peu insolent de leur dire: « Oh, eh bien, vous n'avez qu'à marcher. Ne soyez pas aussi moumoune. » Certaines personnes ont de la difficulté à le faire, et elles se retrouvent dans le même bourbier que nous. Je n'ai entendu aucune explication à ce sujet, et encore moins aucune forme de sympathie à cet égard.

M. Marc Bosc:

Eh bien, ce n'est pas que je ne suis pas sympathique; c'est simplement que je ne pense pas que nous puissions commencer à donner des bons de taxi à toutes les personnes qui ont besoin qu'on les dépose à la Colline. Une réalité économique se rattache à cette situation. Cela dit, en tant qu'employeur — je ne peux pas parler pour les employés des députés, puisque je ne sais pas quelles dispositions sont prises dans leur cas —, le service nous est encore offert sur la Colline, et notre personnel peut prendre l'autobus. Dans le cas des membres de notre personnel, nous faisons de notre mieux pour répondre à leurs besoins.

Je ne voulais pas avoir l'air insolent, croyez-moi, monsieur Christopherson.

(1135)

M. David Christopherson:

Je sais, mais c'est l'impression que vous avez donnée.

Le président:

D'accord, avant que nous passions au prochain témoin, seulement pour que les membres du Comité le sachent, Benoit Giroux, le directeur général des opérations de la Cité parlementaire, se trouve à l'arrière de la salle, si vous avez des questions à lui poser.

Je dirai, monsieur le greffier, que je suis parti d'ici à 1 heure du matin mercredi et que trois autobus blancs m'attendaient, alors je l'apprécie. Merci.

Madame Vandenbeld.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Avant que je commence ma série de questions, j'en ai une à poser sur ce sujet également. Je sais que, quand des comités ou la Chambre siègent, les autobus circulent, mais qu'en est-il des comités spéciaux?

M. Marc Bosc:

Je vais devoir demander à Benoit de répondre à cette question.

M. Benoit Giroux (directeur général, Opérations de la Cité parlementaire, Chambre des communes):

Merci, monsieur Bosc.

Nous offririons des services aux comités. Lorsqu'une séance de comité est prévue, nous avons un itinéraire qui mène au 1, rue Wellington, et un autre qui mène au 131, rue Queen, et nous suivons les horaires des comités.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je suis d'accord avec M. Christopherson, et je me ferais simplement l'écho de sa préoccupation. Surtout en tant que femme qui marche souvent seule sur la Colline le soir, c'est inquiétant. Je ne pense pas que vous allez découvrir que la plupart des femmes députées appellent quelqu'un afin que le gardien de sécurité marche à leurs côtés jusqu'à leur voiture. Je ne pense pas que vous allez découvrir que nous nous prévalons de ce service très souvent, mais, quand les autobus sont là, nous les utilisons certainement. Je tiens simplement à le signaler.

La dernière fois que vous avez siégé au Comité, monsieur Bosc, vous avez soulevé l'idée de la chambre parallèle. Je voudrais approfondir un peu plus cette question, d'un point de vue pratique, en ce qui concerne l'établissement d'une chambre parallèle semblable à celle de Westminster Hall, mais aussi l'étudier en tant qu'option potentielle pour les séances du vendredi. Au lieu d'établir une chambre parallèle physique, nous aurions une chambre parallèle de nom qui serait utilisée le vendredi au lieu de la séance normale en Chambre, dont l'ordre des travaux serait différent.

Selon vous, quels pourraient en être les aspects pratiques?

M. Marc Bosc:

L'idée d'une chambre parallèle n'est en fait pas du tout compliquée, d'un point de vue procédural, de notre point de vue. La façon dont les chambres parallèles sont structurées en Australie et en Grande-Bretagne est que leur quorum est très petit. Les chambres de ces pays ont établi les limites des genres d'affaires qui peuvent être conclues sur une telle tribune. En outre, les responsables sont allés jusqu'à préciser comment les procédures découlent de cela. S'il faut en arriver à une décision, qui la prend? Est-ce que c'est la chambre parallèle, ou bien la chambre complète? Ce genre de questions sont toutes prévues dans la façon dont ces deux chambres fonctionnent.

De notre point de vue — d'un point de vue purement logistique —, une chambre parallèle pourrait être très simplement comme un comité. Nous pourrions la tenir dans la salle de lecture; nous pourrions la tenir dans cette salle; nous pourrions la tenir n'importe où. Il reviendrait au Comité — s'il veut emprunter cette voie — d'établir les limites des dispositions qu'il faudrait prendre pour la tenue d'une telle chambre.

Nous sommes complètement flexibles à cet égard. Pour ce qui est des conséquences, je ne crois pas que nous aurions besoin d'aucun personnel supplémentaire. Nous tenons plus de 55 séances de comité par semaine. Ce serait comme une autre séance de comité.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Si elle avait lieu le vendredi, par exemple, physiquement dans la Chambre, les règles du quorum prévues dans l'Acte de l'Amérique du Nord britannique, selon lesquelles nous devons avoir un quorum de 20, ne s'appliqueraient-elles pas si nous appelions cela une chambre parallèle?

M. Marc Bosc:

Encore une fois, la Chambre est parfois utilisée à diverses fins. Si ce n'était pas la Chambre qui siège ce jour-là, il ne s'agirait pas d'une séance de la Chambre, alors nous n'aurions pas ces préoccupations.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Actuellement, nous siégeons pendant quatre heures et demie le vendredi. Nous n'avons pas de comité le vendredi. Nous tenons rarement des votes le vendredi.

Si, par exemple, nous tenions une chambre parallèle le vendredi, mais que — disons — les députés siégeaient pendant huit heures, davantage d'entre eux pourraient se faire entendre. Cela serait également beaucoup plus efficient pour les députés qui viennent de loin, qui n'ont rien à dire et qui doivent s'asseoir dans l'antichambre — ils doivent être présents juste au cas où quelque chose arriverait — au lieu d'être dans leur circonscription. Mais un plus grand nombre de députés qui ont quelque chose à dire et qui n'en ont pas la possibilité durant la semaine disposeraient en fait de trois heures et demie de plus pour pouvoir se faire entendre.

Est-ce exact?

(1140)

M. Marc Bosc:

Il s'agit certes d'une façon de voir les choses, oui.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Quelle incidence la tenue de cette chambre aurait-elle sur le personnel, sur les greffiers? Aurait-elle des conséquences?

M. Marc Bosc:

Nous affectons du personnel à la Chambre par quarts de travail. Nous travaillons à tour de rôle. Que la Chambre siège pendant trois heures, cinq heures ou huit heures, cela ne change rien. Nous fournissons le personnel nécessaire aux travaux de la Chambre.

Je ne vois pas d'incidence énorme. Il pourrait y en avoir une si les députés siégeaient pendant huit heures un vendredi. Cela pourrait avoir des conséquences, peut-être un peu sur le nombre d'heures supplémentaires, mais nous avons l'habitude de nous adapter à ce que la Chambre décide de faire. Cette semaine, nous avons siégé jusqu'à minuit, un soir. Le personnel s'est adapté, et les procédures se sont déroulées en douceur.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Par exemple, dans le cas des débats exploratoires, des débats d'urgence, même des affaires émanant des députés, nous pourrions disposer d'une période plus longue, par exemple, pour les affaires relatives à l'article 31 du Règlement. Et, comme nous n'aurions pas de période de questions le vendredi, nous pourrions même retirer les affaires relatives à l'article 31 du Règlement de la période du lundi au jeudi, les mettre le vendredi, puis ajouter plus de temps pour les périodes de questions.

Ce sont toutes des options.

M. Marc Bosc:

Si le Comité tient à recommander un changement complet du calendrier hebdomadaire de la Chambre, il peut le faire. Il pourrait transférer les déclarations des députés dans une chambre parallèle. En effet, il pourrait très bien le faire.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Qu'en est-il des avis? Vous avez mentionné que plusieurs choses exigent un certain nombre de jours de séance. La communication d'avis exige habituellement un nombre précis de jours de séance. Serait-il très compliqué d'apporter des rajustements à ce sujet si c'est un vendredi?

M. Marc Bosc:

Admettons, par exemple, que la Chambre ne siège pas un vendredi, ce qu'on pourrait faire, c'est de compter la journée comme les autres aux fins du calcul de la période pour les avis. Je sais que nos homologues britanniques le font.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Pour ce qui est des travaux des subsides, où il y a un certain nombre de jours par période, faudrait-il compter le vendredi comme un jour de séance dans ce cas-là aussi? Ne pas prévoir un jour réservé aux travaux des subsides un vendredi, mais le compter tout de même?

M. Marc Bosc:

Eh bien, non. Si la Chambre ne siège pas les vendredis, elle ne siège pas les vendredis. On ne peut pas considérer cette journée comme un jour de séance.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

S'il y a une chambre parallèle...

M. Marc Bosc:

Encore une fois, c'est une question à laquelle le Comité devrait réfléchir, soit ce qui compte et ce qui ne compte pas. N'oubliez pas, une chambre parallèle n'est pas une chambre. C'est une tout autre chose, alors il faut faire attention à la façon dont on quantifie les choses par la suite.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Reid et monsieur Schmale, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais formuler une courte remarque, qui est principalement destinée à nos analystes. Elle découle de l'échange entre M. Christopherson et M. Bosc. La voici: M. Christopherson soulignait les situations exceptionnelles qui exigent des autobus verts, pour les personnes qui ne peuvent pas se déplacer ou qui ont un problème de mobilité quelconque.

J'aimerais faire valoir que la meilleure façon de gérer cette situation, lorsqu'elle se présente, c'est d'essayer de ne pas modifier les règles, d'essayer de ne pas modifier le système des autobus verts, mais d'essayer plutôt de changer la culture au sein des partis. Chaque parti devrait essayer de déplacer ces personnes à l'édifice du Centre, afin qu'elles n'aient pas à trop se déplacer. Puis, il faudrait s'efforcer de faire en sorte que les comités dont ces personnes sont membres se réunissent dans cet édifice, plutôt que dans un autre. Cela, en fait, réglerait le dossier d'ici à ce que nous passions à l'édifice de l'Ouest. Rendu là, ce sera une tout autre histoire, mais je soupçonne qu'on pourrait s'adapter là-bas.

C'est ce que nous avons fait pour Steven Fletcher, qui était, bien sûr, quadriplégique. Il avait un bureau au premier étage de l'édifice du Centre. Selon moi, ce devrait être notre première ligne d'attaque, et on pourrait s'en occuper immédiatement, tandis que la modification du service d'autobus verts pourrait prendre plusieurs années.

M. Blake Richards:

Je crois que j'étais le suivant, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Oh, c'est vous. D'accord.

M. Blake Richards:

De combien de temps est-ce que je dispose?

Le président:

Trois minutes et 30 secondes.

M. Blake Richards:

J'espère que ce sera suffisant.

J'aimerais revenir sur ce dont nous avons parlé précédemment. Pour commencer, je veux revenir sur l'idée des semaines de séance et des changements qu'on pourrait apporter à cet égard. Si nous décidons de siéger plus d'heures certains jours pour concrétiser les souhaits des libéraux, soit de ne pas être ici le vendredi, y aurait-il des coûts engagés en raison des heures supplémentaires faites par les employés administratifs? De quel genre de coûts parle-t-on là? Si nous tenons des jours de séance plus longs, il y aurait des coûts supplémentaires pour le personnel administratif et ce genre de choses. Comment voyez-vous les choses?

(1145)

M. Marc Bosc:

C'est difficile à dire précisément sans savoir exactement en quoi consisteraient ces heures plus longues.

Je vais vous donner un exemple. Actuellement, nous commençons les séances le lundi à 11 heures. Si nous décidons de commencer à 10 heures ou à 9 heures, il n'y aura pas d'impact, parce que, de toute façon, les gens sont ici pour une journée complète. Si la séance dure une demi-heure ou une heure de plus à la fin de la journée, encore une fois, l'impact sera minimal. Les gens seront, en grande partie, déjà ici, et leurs quarts prennent fin près de l'heure où la séance est levée de toute façon, alors tout cela peut être rajusté. On pourrait demander aux personnes d'arriver un peu plus tard et de partir un peu plus tard. Nous le faisons déjà à la Direction des journaux par exemple.

À première vue, je ne crois pas que cela aurait un gros impact.

M. Blake Richards:

En ce qui a trait à l'idée d'une chambre secondaire ou d'une chambre de débat parallèle, je sais que vous en avez parlé avec un de mes collègues ici brièvement durant la série de questions précédente. Selon vous, quels pourraient être les coûts liés à la mise en place d'une chambre de débat parallèle? Évidemment, il faudrait fournir une installation physique d'un genre ou d'un autre, et il y aurait des coûts liés aux employés et ce genre de choses. À cet égard, à quel genre de coûts pourrait-on s'attendre?

M. Marc Bosc:

Encore une fois, je ne crois pas qu'il y a là un grand impact financier. Évidemment, nous n'avons pas réalisé une analyse complète, alors il ne faut pas oublier ce bémol, mais si on voit cette chambre comme un comité de plus, alors on comprend immédiatement que ce peut être fait très rapidement.

Comme je l'ai déjà dit, il y a de 50 à 60 séances de comités par semaine. Cette semaine, nous en avons 55 si je ne m'abuse. Nous arrivons à tout organiser, et une chambre parallèle pourrait très bien ressembler à un grand comité.

M. Blake Richards:

Donnez-moi une idée de la façon dont, selon vous, tout cela pourrait alors être aménagé. Faudrait-il utiliser l'une des salles de réunion des comités de façon similaire à ce que nous avons ici, où les gens pourraient parler de leur place, à la table? Je ne sais pas exactement à quoi il faudrait s'attendre.

M. Marc Bosc:

C'est difficile pour moi de formuler des suppositions à ce sujet. Tout dépendrait en fait de la façon dont le Comité voudrait aménager le tout. Les membres voudraient peut-être un aménagement semblable à celui de la Chambre, avec des chaises de chaque côté et peut-être un podium au centre, ou les membres pourraient simplement se lever pour parler de la place qui leur est attribuée.

On peut le faire de beaucoup de façons différentes, de structures plus informelles à quelque chose de plus officiel.

L'endroit auquel je fais référence, c'est la chambre parallèle en Australie, qui est une salle assez semblable à celle-ci et qui est aménagée à cette fin un peu comme on le ferait pour un comité.

M. Blake Richards:

Nous allons peut-être vous remercier maintenant, et, espérons-le, nous aurons encore l'occasion de vous parler.

Le président:

En ce qui a trait au point sur l'incapacité soulevé par M. Reid et M. Christopherson, comme je l'ai dit, on peut s'assurer que les gens — et c'est ce que nous avons fait dans le passé — ont leur bureau ici et tenir les réunions de leur comité ici aussi. Cela était permis en vertu du tout premier article:

Le Président peut modifier l’application de toute disposition du Règlement ou de tout ordre spécial ou usage de la Chambre pour permettre la pleine participation d’un député handicapé aux délibérations de la Chambre.

Nous allons passer à Mme Sahota, qui a cinq minutes.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le greffier, et merci à tous d'être là aujourd'hui.

Pour commencer, j'aimerais dire que nous sommes ici, au sein du Comité pour essayer de rendre le Parlement plus efficient, plus moderne et plus adapté aux besoins des familles. En outre, ce n'est pas une position adoptée par tous les libéraux. C'est une position dont on parle depuis des années et des années. Il y a eu des discussions, et nous tentons maintenant de trouver une solution.

Il y a de nombreux conservateurs et membres du NPD qui sont aussi en faveur de faire du vendredi une journée où les députés vont dans leur circonscription, et il y a aussi beaucoup, beaucoup d'épouses et d'époux qui aimeraient cela.

Je comprends que l'impact sur les électeurs dont nous avons parlé pourrait être très favorable et je suis d'accord, parce que mes électeurs, qui me parlent de temps en temps, pensent que je ne travaille pas lorsque je ne suis pas là. C'est une préoccupation que j'entends très souvent. Ils doivent attendre des semaines pour pouvoir me rencontrer parce qu'ils veulent me voir en personne, moi, pas mes employés, parce qu'ils sont très préoccupés par quelque chose qui se passe dans ma circonscription. Pour cette raison, au bout du compte, je dois les rencontrer. Je prends le temps et j'essaie de retourner le vendredi, surtout, simplement pour les rencontrer et m'assurer qu'ils sont heureux ou je les rencontre durant la fin de semaine en participant à divers événements. Cette situation nous laisse très peu de temps pour notre famille et nos enfants, mais c'est le lot de chaque député.

Par conséquent, si je passais des journées dans ma circonscription, cela rendrait mes électeurs très heureux. Ils n'auraient plus à attendre des semaines pour me voir, mais sauraient plutôt que, chaque semaine, il y a une journée où ils peuvent venir me voir en personne.

J'aimerais savoir quelle est, en votre qualité d'expert, la façon la plus facile d'y arriver si, au bout du compte, nous choisissons d'aller dans cette direction. La solution est-elle la chambre parallèle? Faudrait-il déplacer les heures? Quelle est votre opinion à ce sujet?

(1150)

M. Marc Bosc:

Encore une fois, en tenant compte du thème de l'adaptation aux besoins des familles, il ne faut pas oublier que tous les partis utilisent un système de roulement pour le service à la Chambre. Les heures perdues durant la journée où la Chambre déciderait de ne pas siéger pourraient être reprises durant ces autres jours. C'est ce qui s'est fait dans le passé lorsque les heures de séance de la Chambre ont été modifiées. Les partis ont décidé de s'assurer que ces heures n'étaient pas perdues. En fait, dans certains cas, il y en a eu plus.

Le fait de siéger plus tard ne signifie pas nécessairement que tous les membres sont touchés. Cela signifie seulement que certains membres sont touchés, et pas tout le temps, parce que les quarts de service à la Chambre changent. Une personne doit parfois travailler le jeudi après-midi une fois par mois ou je ne sais quoi. C'est le genre d'arrangements que les whips tentent de prendre pour accommoder les députés. Par conséquent, l'impact découlant de l'élimination d'une journée et de la réaffectation des heures perdues devrait être gérable, selon moi, du point de vue des différents députés.

Le réel enjeu, cependant, c'est la question de la prévisibilité, et j'en ai parlé la dernière fois que je vous ai rencontrés. Ce qui aide vraiment les députés à planifier leurs activités et leur vie, c'est de savoir quand les choses ont lieu. Le fait de tenir des votes à 15 heures, comme la Chambre a commencé à faire, est une très grande amélioration relativement à l'incertitude à laquelle les députés étaient confrontés avant: « Il y a un vote ce soir. Eh bien, non, il y a eu une prorogation en raison d'une déclaration ministérielle, alors ce ne sera pas à 17 h 30, mais à 18 heures. Oh non, c'est à 18 h 18 que les cloches se feront entendre. » C'était une fête mobile. Les députés ne savaient jamais quand, et en plus ils devaient attendre la période des cloches.

En tenant les votes exactement à 15 heures, on s'assure que tout le monde est là. Boum, on le fait et c'est fini. Le processus dure huit, neuf minutes, et on peut retourner vaquer à nos occupations pour le reste de la journée.

Maintenant, nous n'avons pas encore été confrontés à des votes multiples, et cela mettra un peu le modèle à l'épreuve. Le même argument s'applique encore une fois avec une chambre parallèle. Si on met en place une chambre parallèle, seulement certains députés sont touchés: ceux qui choisissent d'être là. Si le quorum est bas, comme c'est le cas en Australie et en Grande-Bretagne, ce n'est pas problématique du point de vue du whip et des autres règles mises en place à cet égard.

Si on aborde la question de cette perspective, et qu'on pense au fait que ce sont différents députés qui y vont tour à tour, au besoin, la situation devient gérable.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

J'ai demandé d'être inclus dans la liste des intervenants parce que je voulais souligner certains des points que M. Bosc vient de soulever. D'après ce que j'en sais, l'idée d'une chambre parallèle vient d'Australie. Il y en a peut-être ailleurs. J'admire ce pays. J'ai vécu là-bas. En fait, j'ai déjà été résident permanent de l'Australie.

Cependant, l'objectif de la chambre parallèle — et il faut être clair — est de permettre aux gens de prétendre malhonnêtement qu'ils ont parlé devant toute la Chambre des communes alors qu'ils n'ont rien fait de tel. Les gens parlent devant une salle vide assortie d'un quorum spécial qui fait en sorte qu'à peu près personne n'a à être présent, et ce, en même temps que la Chambre siège. Cela signifie que, en fait, ils ne parlent à personne, mais peuvent tout de même affirmer l'avoir fait. Je crois que c'est malhonnête. Je serais opposé à la création d'une chambre parallèle.

Nous avons un système nous permettant d'utiliser l'article 31 du Règlement pour soulever tout enjeu important à nos yeux. Cela se fait tout juste avant la période de questions, lorsque tout le monde est là, alors, en fait, les choses sont dites lorsque les gens portent attention. C'est la beauté de notre système. Si nous avons un problème qui fait que les députés n'ont pas suffisamment l'occasion de comparaître devant leurs collègues, alors je suggère d'élargir la période liée à l'article 31 du Règlement de 15 minutes à une période plus longue, peut-être de commencer le tout à 13 h 45, plutôt que 16 heures, pour doubler le temps alloué à cette fin ou quelque chose du genre.

Pour ce qui est de la question de prévoir la chambre parallèle le vendredi, une chambre parallèle ne serait pas nécessaire parce que la Chambre des communes serait disponible. Mais je ne vois pas ce qui pourrait être plus contraire aux besoins des familles: « Je dois maintenant rester dans la Chambre des communes le vendredi si je veux soulever les enjeux qui sont problématiques pour mes électeurs ». Je m'opposerais aussi fortement à une telle proposition.

Il y a plein de façons de mieux faire les choses, mais, à mon avis, il faudrait commencer par prolonger le nombre d'interventions liées à l'article 31 du Règlement si nous croyons vraiment que la situation est problématique. Je n'ai pas de questions, je voulais simplement faire cette déclaration.

(1155)

Le président:

Un autre conservateur veut-il prendre la parole?

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Merci beaucoup à vous tous de vos commentaires.

Je voulais aussi parler des vendredis de congé. Je crois que la marge de manoeuvre dont nous bénéficions en tant que députés, c'est de pouvoir organiser nos horaires afin qu'ils nous conviennent, qu'ils conviennent à nos électeurs, à nos employés, etc. Ma circonscription est très grande, environ 10 000 kilomètres carrés. Elle est très étendue comparativement à d'autres, mais si vous la comparez à celle du président ou de Larry, c'est un peu différent. Cependant, on organise notre horaire en fonction de cela. Je rencontre des électeurs le samedi si je dois le faire, entre des événements, et ce genre de choses. Alors je crois qu'on a beaucoup de souplesse.

Je me demande encore si vous avez regardé ce qui se passe en Alberta. Les gens perdent leur emploi en Alberta, et nos salaires ont été augmentés, et maintenant nous voulons prendre une journée de congé. Je crois que nous enverrions le mauvais message. Nous avons entendu des commentaires des épouses de parlementaires, et certaines d'entre elles ont dit en réponse à un sondage que les vendredis de congé seraient une mauvaise chose. Le membre du NPD qui a pris la parole a aussi dit que c'était une mauvaise idée.

Je suis d'accord avec M. Reid. Je crois qu'il y a des façons de réorganiser l'horaire et qu'il y a des plus petits changements que nous pouvons faire plutôt que de chambouler tout le système. Nous travaillons peut-être dans nos circonscriptions le vendredi, mais je crois que cette mesure donnerait la mauvaise impression.

Encore une fois, c'est plus un commentaire qu'une question. Nous avons déjà couvert beaucoup de terrain.

Il me reste combien de temps? J'aimerais formuler deux ou trois autres commentaires.

Le président:

Il vous reste une minute.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je veux parler du calendrier. Je sais que vous en avez parlé au début. Je sais aussi que vos responsables des TI se penchent sur la question, mais c'est un enjeu immense. Je sais qu'il y a des SecurID, qui permettent aux gens d'ouvrir une séance et d'y avoir accès, mais ces cartes coûtent 100 $ chacune, si je ne m'abuse, et nous ne voulons pas qu'il y en ait 6 ou 7 en circulation, alors si c'est possible... Nous utilisons le calendrier de Google. Je sais que ce n'est pas la meilleure option, mais c'est la meilleure façon de permettre aux gens de voir mon agenda.

Je crois que la plupart des questions que je voulais poser l'ont déjà été. Je suis préoccupé par le coût de certains des changements, mais je ne sais pas si vous avez d'autres commentaires à formuler à ce sujet.

M. Marc Bosc:

Oui, j'aimerais simplement dire que je ne veux pas que les membres du Comité partent en ayant l'impression que je suis pour ou contre les options dont on a discuté. J'adopte une position neutre relativement à ces questions. En tant que responsables de l'administration de la Chambre et en tant que membres de l'équipe de la procédure, nous ferons ce que la Chambre décide de faire. C'est pour cela que nous sommes là. Nous n'avons pas des points de vue d'un côté comme de l'autre. Nous tentons simplement d'expliquer que notre souplesse nous permet de faire peu importe ce que la Chambre décidera.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons passer à Mme Vandenbeld.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Avant que je ne cède la parole à mon collègue, je veux m'assurer que nous ne nous embourberons pas dans les interventions liées à l'article 31 du Règlement et tout ce que M. Reid a dit sur la prolongation de la période pour ces interventions durant la semaine. Si nous avions une chambre parallèle le vendredi, nous aurions plus de souplesse pour ajouter ce genre de choses. Nous pourrions faire d'autres choses le vendredi: les affaires émanant des députés, les affaires émanant du gouvernement, peu importe. Je crois que cela nous donnerait une bonne marge de manoeuvre en tant que Parlement pour déterminer ce à quoi pourrait ressembler le calendrier et cela pourrait inclure, si on a une équipe parallèle, accroître le nombre de déclarations des députés, si c'est ce que le Comité désire. Alors je ne veux pas trop m'attarder à cette seule chose, mais je veux céder la parole à...

(1200)

Le président:

Ginette.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Merci.

Je veux simplement revenir sur les commentaires de mon collègue, M. Schmale. Nous avons eu l'occasion d'accueillir ici cette semaine des représentants de l'Association des conjoints des parlementaires, qui nous ont indiqué avoir envoyé certains résultats de sondages. Cependant, il ne faut pas oublier que seulement 12 personnes ont répondu à ces sondages, alors les résultats ne donnent peut-être pas un bon aperçu des voeux et des avis de tout le monde.

Cela dit, il y a un commentaire que j'ai trouvé très intéressant. Lorsque les époux ont parlé du système de points de déplacement, ils ont indiqué que, parfois, certains d'entre eux ne veulent pas se servir du privilège de venir à Ottawa visiter leur conjoint parce que les dépenses sont affichées. Bien sûr, nous voulons faire preuve de transparence à l'égard de toutes les dépenses et nous croyons que c'est très important, mais certaines personnes dont les coûts de déplacement sont beaucoup plus élevés croient que, peut-être, leur partenaire sera pénalisé durant les élections ou je ne sais quand parce qu'il dépense beaucoup d'argent. Pouvez-vous nous en dire davantage à ce sujet et déterminer s'il y a d'autres options possibles permettant d'éviter ce type de situation?

M. Marc Bosc:

Rien ne me vient à l'esprit, madame Petitpas Taylor. La réalité, c'est que le conseil a décidé de faire preuve de plus de transparence à l'égard des dépenses des députés. Comme vous le savez, cette information est divulguée chaque trimestre.

J'ai tendance à croire que, même si les chiffres sont plus élevés — surtout pour les députés qui vivent très loin et dont les dépenses de déplacement sont plus élevées —, le public fait preuve de discernement et sait que les députés ont droit à des indemnités, comme, par exemple, M. Bagnell qui vit au Yukon. C'est plus cher pour lui d'aller à Whitehorse et d'en revenir, que pour quelqu'un qui vit à Toronto. Je crois que le public a suffisamment de discernement pour faire la part des choses.

Le problème de la transparence et de la divulgation, c'est qu'on le fait ou on ne le fait pas. On ne peut dire tout simplement: « Eh bien, pour cette catégorie, nous n'allons pas le divulguer » pour telle ou telle raison. C'est la réalité de la divulgation: l'information est communiquée, et c'est aux députés de s'expliquer, au besoin.

Le président:

Pardonnez-moi, puis-je poser une question à ce sujet? J'avais l'impression que si la personne croyait que ces points de voyage pouvaient être divulgués, mais que les dépenses de la famille et du député étaient réunies plutôt qu'être consignées de façon distincte, cela serait bénéfique.

M. Marc Bosc:

D'accord. Je n'ai pas lu cette partie de la transcription, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Est-ce possible?

M. Marc Bosc:

Je vais devoir me pencher sur cette question. Je ne connais pas la réponse.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

C'est tout.

Le président:

Nous allons passer à une série de questions de trois minutes, qui ne compte qu'une seule personne. Par la suite, si nous pouvons rester civilisés, j'adopterai une structure plus informelle, et tous ceux qui veulent poser des questions pourraient avoir trois minutes. Nous allons commencer par M. Reid.

Nous allons commencer par M. Christopherson. C'est la dernière série.

M. David Christopherson:

Je pensais avoir compris que, si je restais civilisé, je pouvais avoir une deuxième chance d'intervenir. Par définition, vous me refusez automatiquement un deuxième tour.

Le président:

Oui, c'était bien l'objectif.

Mais non, je plaisante.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je sais que je ne vais pas pouvoir dire grand-chose en trois minutes. Je ne crois pas que nous aurons une autre chance de parler, alors je vais me permettre de tourner les coins ronds.

J'y vais sans suivre un ordre précis, mais, en ce qui a trait au dernier commentaire de Ginette, je crois moi aussi que son point est valide. Je tiens à le souligner. Si vous vous souvenez bien, j'étais leader à la Chambre du troisième parti à Queen's Park lorsqu'il n'y avait pas de système de points et qu'on parlait en dollars. Le caractère injuste de ce système témoigne de l'argument soulevé par M. Bosc. L'information était là, ouverte et transparente, mais les répercussions politiques étaient horribles. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous avons adopté le système fédéral.

Là, nous apprenons qu'il y a encore un problème, et je crois que c'est fondé. J'ai donné l'exemple de la différence entre M. Bagnell et moi, ou de la différence entre la distance jusqu'à Hamilton et la distance que lui doit parcourir. Il y a aussi la question du nombre de membres de la famille, de l'âge et du nombre de personnes à charge. Je crois que, du point de vue de l'équité — j'aime bien cette idée, et j'espère que nous l'approfondirons —, nous devons trouver une façon de réunir les montants totaux afin d'assurer une transparence totale. Les points utilisés restent, mais c'est moins frappant que, par exemple: « Hé, Christopherson, tu as seulement dépensé... et, de son côté, le député Smith a dépensé cinq fois plus. » En tant que déclaration politique autonome, ce n'est pas utile. Ce n'est pas le genre de manchettes qu'on veut voir dans le journal local. Une personne ne fait rien de mal ou de différent d'un de ses collègues, mais, en raison du mécanisme redditionnel, elle se retrouve dans une mauvaise situation sur le plan politique. J'ai l'impression que, en ce qui a trait à l'équité, ceux d'entre nous qui n'ont pas ce problème devraient être ceux qui mettent le plus de pression. Sinon, notre comportement semble intéressé.

En tant que l'un de ceux qui bénéficient de la situation, je suis prêt à continuer à le dire pour les mêmes raisons qu'il y a 20 ans, à Queen's Park, il faut être juste, et il semble y avoir un élément d'injustice. Il faudra faire des efforts et faire preuve d'un peu d'imagination. Il faut assurer la transparence. Personne ne doit interpréter ce que nous faisons comme un désir de cacher quoi que ce soit, mais nous tentons de trouver une façon... Tout comme lorsqu'on est passé d'un système en dollars à un système de points, nous voulions accroître l'équité, et, maintenant, il y a un autre aspect qui n'est pas tout à fait juste.

Nous sommes peut-être limités par les exigences de transparence et de divulgation, mais je suis sûr que des personnes créatives peuvent trouver des façons de ne rien perdre de cela, mais d'accroître l'équité comme nous l'avons fait à Queen's Park lorsque nous avons regardé autour de nous, avons vu le système fédéral et nous sommes dit: « Hé, voilà une solution. Multiplions par cinq, en raison des cinq allers et retours dans la circonscription durant le mois, comparons le résultat à ce que quelqu'un d'autre a fait et combien d'allers et retours il a accumulés » et pas en calculant l'argent dépensé.

J'espère que nous continuerons à y réfléchir.

Avant que je ne cède la parole, je tiens à faire une mise au point. Je veux m'excuser, monsieur Bosc. Je n'aurais pas dû dire ce que j'ai dit, et je l'ai regretté dès que je l'ai dit. Je crois que c'est lié à la question d'Attawapiskat; quelqu'un avait dit « Eh bien, pourquoi ne déménagez-vous pas tout simplement? » Lorsque vous avez dit « Pourquoi ne marchez-vous pas tout simplement », je l'ai pris de la même façon, et je sais que ce n'est pas ce que vous vouliez dire.

En passant, je veux dire à tout votre personnel que les problèmes que je perçois n'ont rien à voir avec la façon dont vous avez géré la situation. Les problèmes, à mes yeux, sont de nature politique et concernent les fonds alloués. Je sais que ce n'est pas de votre ressort, alors j'ai formulé ma question en espérant que vous puissiez confirmer ma position d'un point de vue opérationnel pratique. J'aurais ensuite pu revenir aux questions politiques et faire ce genre de choses.

Alors je vous prie de m'excuser, monsieur. Je sais que vous et vous tous avez vraiment à coeur les employés, et je retire ce que j'ai dit en vous demandant à nouveau pardon. Je me sens mal.

(1205)

M. Marc Bosc:

Je ne l'ai pas pris mal. En fait, pour être bien clair, je ne suggérais à personne d'autre que moi de marcher. C'est ma façon de faire de l'exercice. Je me stationne délibérément très loin pour pouvoir faire ma marche chaque matin, parce que sinon...

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien.

M. Marc Bosc:

... je suis un prisonnier ici toute la journée et je ne peux pas faire d'exercice.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vais probablement m'arrêter ici. Mes trois minutes sont à coup sûr à peu près écoulées. Il y aura d'autres tours, monsieur le président, alors j'attendrai une autre occasion de soulever les autres enjeux que j'ai en tête. Merci.

Le président:

En ce qui a trait aux changements que vous avez déjà apportés — vous les avez mentionnés dès le départ —, j'espère que vous les avez envoyés à tous les députés, parce que je ne me souviens pas vraiment de les avoir reçus.

Monsieur Christopherson, vous et le greffier — qui n'est pas ici — devriez peut-être faire un suivi afin d'obtenir des renseignements plus précis au sujet des modèles suggérés, pour donner suite au bon point que vous avez soulevé. Mais, c'est à vous de voir, et nous allons passer à M. Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

La raison pour laquelle j'ai demandé à nouveau le microphone, c'est que je veux poursuivre le débat avec Mme Vandenbeld.

En ce qui a trait à l'idée d'une chambre parallèle qui siégerait le vendredi, je souligne à nouveau l'idée que, si la Chambre ne siège pas, si nous adoptons une semaine de quatre jours, ce que les libéraux semblent vraiment vouloir faire, alors, en fait, la Chambre serait libre, et on pourrait tout simplement l'utiliser pour faire tous ces travaux. Ce n'est pas ce que je recommande. Je souligne simplement qu'une chambre parallèle ne serait pas nécessaire. L'objectif de la chambre parallèle est de permettre de faire des choses pendant que la Chambre siège, tout comme le Comité peut se réunir actuellement tandis que, dans la Chambre, qui est juste à côté, des députés siègent et s'occupent d'autres affaires. Ce ne serait tout simplement pas nécessaire.

Encore une fois, l'objectif d'une chambre parallèle, comme je l'ai dit, c'est de permettre de prétendre malhonnêtement avoir parlé à un vrai auditoire alors que, en fait, on parle à des collègues, ce que je désapprouve pour une raison de principe.

Enfin, en ce qui a trait à la gestion d'enjeux comme les affaires émanant des députés dans une chambre parallèle, eh bien, on ne peut pas traiter de quoi que ce soit qui exige un réel débat ou un vote dans une chambre parallèle. On peut seulement le faire en Chambre, parce que c'est seulement là qu'on est sûr de ne pas se trouver en train de faire les travaux de la Chambre ailleurs pendant que ce point est soulevé. On ne peut que faire des déclarations dans une chambre parallèle, dans une chambre vide sans auditoire. Rien d'autre ne peut s'y produire.

Enfin, si on regroupait toutes les affaires émanant des députés le vendredi — soit dans la Chambre en tant que telle en modifiant le Règlement ou dans une chambre parallèle —, on créerait une situation dans laquelle les députés qui veulent traiter de telle ou telle chose doivent rester le vendredi, y compris les députés qui voulaient s'occuper de ces choses. Les affaires émanant des députés sont les affaires qui font le plus l'objet — en raison des échanges — de changements d'un jour à l'autre, ce qui signifie que nous aurions moins d'horaires prévisibles et qu'il serait beaucoup plus difficile pour quiconque de quitter la Chambre le vendredi, et ce, qu'on adopte une semaine de quatre jours comme les libéraux le veulent tant ou qu'on reste avec la semaine de cinq jours.

C'est tout ce que je voulais dire.

(1210)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très rapidement, monsieur le président, je veux revenir aux points.

Ma circonscription est très grande, presque la taille de l'État du Vermont, ce qui vous donne une idée. Mes bureaux de circonscription sont situés à 135 kilomètres l'un de l'autre. J'épuise tous mes points bien avant la fin de l'année. Pour ce qui est de faire l'aller-retour avec ma famille, nous sommes chanceux de pouvoir faire le déplacement en voiture, ma circonscription n'est pas très loin d'ici. J'aimerais cependant proposer d'associer un point au député et à l'épouse et aux personnes à charge. Le coût est déclaré, mais un point permet de faire venir le député et sa famille à Ottawa.

J'aimerais qu'on envisage comme option d'éliminer la distinction entre les points réguliers et les points spéciaux. Dans ma circonscription, j'épuise les uns, et il me reste encore beaucoup de points dans l'autre catégorie, parce que chaque jour de ma vie, c'est un point. C'est la réalité dans une circonscription de 20 000 kilomètres carrés.

J'aimerais ajouter rapidement quelque chose sur la chambre parallèle, qui, selon moi, est une idée fascinante. J'aimerais dire à l'analyste que, peut-être, nous pourrions envisager de recommander une étude plus poussée de cette question dans notre éventuel rapport, plutôt que d'en faire quelque chose que nous pouvons régler ici. Je crois que c'est un enjeu assez important pour qu'il bénéficie de sa propre étude afin qu'on puisse vraiment le régler.

Le président:

Madame Vandenbeld.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

En ce qui a trait au commentaire de M. Reid sur les vendredis, selon moi, ce qui se produit actuellement c'est que, ces jours-là pourraient être réservés à des motions dilatoires. Le quorum de 20 s'applique en tout temps lorsque la Chambre siège, conformément à l'Acte de l'Amérique du Nord britannique. Il y a tout juste quelques semaines, à 14 h 10, il y a eu une motion d'ajournement, et tout le monde a dû se rendre à la course à la Chambre pour voter. Cela fait en sorte que, par exemple, je dois passer quatre heures et demie dans l'antichambre ou à ma place, même s'il ne s'agit pas d'un débat auquel j'envisage de participer, et je pourrais passer ces quatre heures et demie dans ma circonscription pour rencontrer des électeurs.

Je crois que ce dont nous parlons ici, c'est d'efficience. Si nous parlions d'ajouter toutes ces heures consacrées aux affaires émanant du gouvernement et à tout ce dont M. Reid a parlé aux autres jours de la semaine, on ajouterait ces quatre heures et demie, mais, ensuite, de plus, à des fins d'efficience, nous pourrions organiser une chambre parallèle ces vendredis-là; si la Chambre est vide, pourquoi ne pas organiser une chambre parallèle? Les gens pourraient alors dire pour le compte rendu ce qu'ils jugent nécessaire.

Je peux tout simplement dire qu'il y a peut-être un débat en cours qui m'intéresse lorsque je suis en comité, mais lorsque je suis dans la Chambre, il peut s'agir de quelque chose qui est moins pertinent pour mes électeurs. Nous pouvons compter sur les technologies. Il n'y a pas si longtemps, il fallait être présent physiquement ou lire le hansard après coup. Il y a un sujet qui m'intéressait beaucoup, et de mon bureau, j'ai visionné sur ParlVU l'enregistrement vidéo des échanges et des autres déclarations des députés qui ont été faites lorsque je n'étais pas là. J'ai ensuite pu aller parler à ces députés de cette question. En raison de la technologie, nous pouvons regarder ce qui se produit dans la Chambre même lorsque nous ne sommes pas là, et je crois que plus d'occasions de dire des choses pour le compte rendu et de parler aux Canadiens — pas seulement entre nous, mais aux Canadiens — seraient très utiles.

Cependant, j'ai une question pour M. Bosc et j'ai besoin de ses éclaircissements.

M. Reid a indiqué que, le vendredi, s'il y avait une chambre parallèle, nous devrions nous en tenir à des déclarations des députés et des déclarations liées à l'article 31 du Règlement. Est-ce le cas? Ou pourrions-nous choisir de traiter des affaires gouvernementales, mais simplement ne pas tenir de vote, mais en permettant tout de même aux gens de dire des choses pour le compte rendu?

M. Marc Bosc:

Je ne crois pas que c'est ce que M. Reid a dit. Je croyais qu'il parlait simplement de la pratique générale dans d'autres administrations où la chambre parallèle est un endroit pour faire des discours. Je crois que c'est ce qu'il tentait de dire. C'est ce que j'ai compris en tout cas.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Quels genres de débats ont lieu dans le Westminster Hall et dans la chambre en Australie?

M. Marc Bosc:

Il y a une diversité de sujets qui peuvent être débattus. L'élément clé, cependant, ne concerne pas vraiment la nature des débats autant que le fait qu'il a été décidé que ces deux chambres n'avaient pas de pouvoir décisionnel. Les décisions sont prises dans la chambre principale. C'est le point central ici. Bien sûr, le faible quorum imposé illustre bien ce que M. Reid disait, soit que la participation n'est pas ce qu'elle est dans la Chambre.

(1215)

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Alors la différence concerne en fait le quorum.

M. Marc Bosc:

Oui, c'est un quorum de trois, soit une personne par parti.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

D'accord.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Christopherson, vous avez plus...

M. David Christopherson:

Oh, est-ce que ce n'est pas toujours le cas? Merci.

Les vendredis: je ne sais pas pourquoi le gouvernement revient sans cesse sur la question. D'après ce que j'en sais, l'opposition officielle a dit clairement qu'elle ne veut pas prendre les vendredis de congé. Le troisième parti a dit clairement qu'il ne voulait pas non plus. Je ne sais pas pourquoi le gouvernement continue d'en parler. Le sujet devrait être mort dans l'oeuf.

En ce qui a trait à la deuxième chambre, je pense comme M. Graham: je trouve l'idée fascinante. Ça a piqué mon intérêt dès que j'en ai entendu parler. Je ne savais pas que ce genre de chambre existait. Cependant, je soupçonne que nous sommes deux mordus des questions parlementaires et que nous aimons beaucoup analyser le fonctionnement du Parlement. Je dois dire que j'étais assez d'accord avec les commentaires de M. Reid. J'aimerais encore approfondir cette question, que je trouve intéressante.

Je ne sais pas si, au final, on en tirera quelque chose de concret. Par conséquent, en guise de préambule à cette discussion, j'aimerais bien obtenir un rapport initial pour déterminer combien de temps nous voulons consacrer à cette question. Je ne suis pas sûr, à la lumière de ce que M. Reid nous a dit, de la mesure dans laquelle c'est faisable. Mais je continue de croire qu'il s'agit d'une adaptation fascinante de la façon dont fonctionne le modèle de démocratie parlementaire de Westminster. Alors voilà pour cette question.

Revenons au stationnement et aux autobus. Je tiens à remercier Mme Vandenbeld des commentaires qu'elle a formulés. On peut seulement présumer parler pour quelqu'un d'autre jusqu'à un certain point, puis c'est l'autre qui doit prendre la parole. Je suis donc heureux de vous l'avoir entendu dire, parce que c'est un problème.

Je veux aller au bout de ma pensée relativement à la réunion d'hier soir, parce que je ne crois pas avoir eu l'occasion de le faire. Ce que j'essaie de dire, c'est que je suis sorti à temps pour prendre un des derniers autobus. J'étais ici, dans l'édifice du Centre, et il était tout juste passé 20 heures. Et, bien sûr, mon bureau est dans l'édifice de la Justice. Ce que j'essaie de dire, c'est que toutes les autres personnes qui étaient là avec moi — peu importe où elles s'en allaient — devaient se rendre dans le périmètre de la Cité parlementaire à pied.

Comme on l'a déjà dit, ceux qui étaient physiquement aptes et qui portaient des vêtements assez chauds n'avaient pas de problèmes. Cependant, si ce n'était pas le cas ou s'il y avait une autre préoccupation — la sécurité, par exemple, parce qu'il faisait noir —, les gens étaient simplement laissés à eux-mêmes dans le froid. Selon moi, s'il y a vraiment...

Je reconnais qu'il ne s'agissait pas des travaux d'un comité, ni de travaux de la Chambre. On s'occupait d'affaires relevant du caucus. On avait organisé des séances d'information sur une question quelconque. Il y avait des employés et des députés sur place. Cependant, malgré tout, il s'agissait de travaux parlementaires légitimes. Ça se passait ici, dans l'édifice du Centre. En fait, nous étions dans la salle 112, juste en dessous, et ça s'est passé tout juste hier soir. C'est un exemple parfait d'une situation où des gens — des députés et du personnel qui travaillent ici — travaillaient jusqu'à 21 heures — ce qui n'est pas inhabituel, comme nous le savons tous —, sans qu'il y ait de services.

Encore une fois, lorsque j'ai parlé des gains d'efficience, je n'ai pas mentionné le fait que, avant, on pouvait assez facilement se déplacer d'une réunion d'un comité à une autre. En effet, dans un premier temps, les salles de réunions n'étaient pas très loin les unes des autres, en raison des emplacements dont M. Bosc et moi avons parlé, mais, aussi, en raison du passage régulier des autobus. Je savais que, si je devais parler à M. Chan de quelque chose, j'avais le temps d'y aller, de discuter brièvement avec lui pour clore un dossier abordé durant une réunion, de repartir avec mon employé et de sortir dehors tout en sachant que, au bout de deux ou trois minutes, un autobus allait passer et m'amener à la prochaine réunion, même si elle avait lieu à l'autre bout, sur la rue Wellington ou la rue Queen. Je ne peux pas le faire si, lorsque je sors dehors, je dois attendre l'autobus pendant 10 ou 15 minutes pour me rendre à une autre réunion. C'est un problème qui n'est toujours pas résolu.

Ce que je fais est un peu contraire au règlement. Je suis désolé. J'ai préparé de très brèves remarques.

Je voulais le mentionner aussi. M. Reid a parlé de la possibilité d'installer un député dans l'édifice du Centre. Il a utilisé l'exemple de l'un de nos anciens collègues. Tout ça est très bien, ça va droit au but, mais ça ne tient pas compte des personnes qui ont une incapacité temporaire, comme quelqu'un qui se casse la jambe, par exemple. De temps en temps, j'ai des problèmes de genou récurrents en raison d'une ancienne blessure de judo. Lorsque cela se produit, j'ai beaucoup de difficulté à me déplacer. Mais c'est un problème mineur. Ça dure seulement une semaine ou deux, puis les choses s'arrangent. On ne va pas me réinstaller dans l'édifice du Centre pour cela.

Je trouve la solution parfaite lorsqu'une personne a un problème permanent, mais ça ne fonctionne pas pour ceux qui ont des problèmes temporaires. Lorsqu'une personne a une invalidité, qu'elle soit permanente ou temporaire, elle est touchée très concrètement. Je voulais le dire.

Je n'étais pas sûr, monsieur Bosc, pour le personnel. J'espère que je n'ai pas ouvert une boîte de Pandore. Et si c'est le cas, je vais m'assurer de garder la situation bien à l'oeil, pour que tout reste au beau fixe. Les employés prennent les autobus, c'est normal. Mon employé, Tyler, prend constamment l'autobus. Je sais qu'il y a aussi des employés de la Chambre des communes qui les utilisent, je les vois tôt le matin lorsqu'ils arrivent des parcs de stationnement.

(1220)



Je pense à ces personnes le matin, qui bénéficient du service d'autobus. Le matin, le service est offert à ces employés par leur employeur, le Parlement, mais ce n'est pas le cas à la fin de la journée, si ces mêmes employés doivent travailler tard. Cette situation continue à me laisser un peu songeur.

Pouvez-vous nous dire ce que vous en pensez?

M. Marc Bosc:

Je vais essayer d'aborder la plupart des points que vous avez soulevés. Je crois que Benoit a quelque chose à dire que vous trouverez intéressant.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord, parfait.

M. Benoit Giroux:

Vous avez mentionné les événements spéciaux. Nous pourrions mettre en place un processus de demande de service en cas de réunions spéciales de caucus ou quelque chose du genre. Nous l'avons fait dans le passé. Nous recevons habituellement des demandes du bureau du whip. Nous pourrions assurer une coordination avec le bureau de whip, puis fournir de tels services pour les travaux parlementaires officiels.

M. David Christopherson:

Puis-je répondre à ce qui vient d'être dit, monsieur le président?

Merci beaucoup. C'est ce que je veux. Je l'apprécie beaucoup, mais voici ce qui cloche: parfois ce n'est pas une réunion officielle du caucus. Il n'est pas inhabituel que notre caucus ou moi — vu mon rôle — ayons à rencontrer notre leader à la Chambre et notre whip. Très souvent, c'est justement à cette période de la journée. Une fois que tout est fait. Nous nous réunissons dans le bureau du leader à la Chambre et nous sommes là jusqu'à 20 h 30 ou 21 heures. Nous sommes accompagnés de membres du personnel — je ne vais jamais très loin sans Tyler — et il y a aussi du personnel de soutien.

Je ne sais pas si on peut considérer cela comme un événement suffisamment spécial pour faire venir un autobus. Même moi je me demande si on peut vraiment appeler un autobus et un conducteur pour cinq ou six personnes. Cependant, ces cinq ou six personnes font du travail parlementaire légitime, elles sont ici dans l'édifice du Centre tard le soir et elles n'ont pas accès à un autobus. S'il s'agit d'un membre du personnel de soutien dont le véhicule est stationné très loin, il doit marcher encore plus loin que moi, parce que je suis un député et j'ai une place privilégiée.

Cette situation ne me concerne pas tant que ça. Il y a un aspect injuste du point de vue de l'infrastructure. Je sais que tout a un coût, mais, avant, les services étaient offerts, et on respectait le principe selon lequel les gens doivent pouvoir se déplacer, qu'il s'agisse de députés ou d'employés. Il ne faut pas faire de distinction ici: on parle de personnes qui se déplacent sur la Colline.

Maintenant, la zone est encore plus grande, les comités se réunissent encore plus loin les uns des autres, le service est moins fréquent et se termine plus tôt qu'avant.

Le président:

Merci.

M. David Christopherson:

Je dois vous avouer que je reste insatisfait relativement à toute cette question. Je me rends compte que, au bout du compte, c'est une question politique. Si le Parlement vous dit qu'il veut un service plus complet et qu'il vous donne l'argent nécessaire, vous serez heureux de nous fournir le système le plus efficient possible, je n'en doute pas. Nous devons travailler en collaboration sur cette question. Fournissez-nous une bonne justification, soulevez deux ou trois choses, puis nous pourrons nous battre de l'autre côté pour y arriver.

Pour être honnête, je crois que le gouvernement actuel est ouvert d'esprit dans pas mal de domaines où, avant, les portes étaient fermées, verrouillées, cadenassées, pour ne pas dire condamnées. Je tiens à profiter de l'occasion — il ne faut pas seulement se lancer les lauriers — pour dire que, selon moi, certains éléments d'infrastructure ont été endommagés par trop d'austérité. C'est peut-être l'un de ces éléments.

Le président:

Merci, David.

M. David Christopherson:

Encore une fois, je ne sais pas si c'est un enjeu bien réel, peu de collègues ont précisé s'ils me soutenaient ou non. S'il n'y a pas trop...

Le président:

Merci, c'est tout.

M. David Christopherson:

J'en suis déjà à sept minutes?

Le président:

Votre ronde de trois minutes est rendue à 8 minutes 45 secondes en ce moment.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David Christopherson:

J'avais fini ma ronde de trois minutes. Je croyais que nous en étions à une ronde de sept minutes.

Le président:

Est-ce que Benoit a quelque chose à ajouter?

M. David Christopherson:

C'est correct. Nous sommes ici pendant plus d'une demi-heure. J'ai encore beaucoup de temps.

Le président:

Quelqu'un a-t-il un commentaire à formuler avant que nous passions à la liste?

M. Marc Bosc:

J'aimerais simplement dire, très rapidement, que nous vous avons entendu, monsieur Christopherson.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Marc Bosc: Il est toujours difficile de trouver le juste équilibre entre les coûts, le personnel et les niveaux de service. Évidemment, selon vous, la situation actuelle n'est pas appropriée. Nous l'avons compris, nous vous avons entendu, et nous nous en souviendrons.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, je l'apprécie.

Monsieur le président, si vous me le permettez, je vais faire une dernière déclaration, puis je lâcherai le morceau, parce que, en fait, ma déclaration mettra peut-être le point final à la discussion.

Ce que j'aimerais savoir c'est s'il y a des personnes ici présentes qui appuient en partie ce que j'ai dit. Si c'est le cas, alors nous devrions peut-être demander un rapport, quoi que ce soit afin que ça ne tombe pas dans l'oubli, quelque chose sur quoi nous concentrer. Actuellement, j'ai eu l'occasion de dire ce que je pensais et de me vider le coeur, et je ne crois pas qu'on m'ait fait taire. Si je suis seul à vraiment croire qu'il s'agit d'une guerre sainte, je suis prêt à lâcher le morceau, et à admettre que j'ai fait ce que je pouvais. Je serai prêt à laisser tomber, monsieur le président.

(1225)

Le président:

D'accord. Merci.

Vous avez maintenant eu droit à 10 minutes durant votre ronde de 3 minutes. Le nom de la plupart des membres figure sur la liste, alors ils pourront répondre à votre question.

M. Scott Reid:

Est-ce que je suis sur la liste?

Le président:

Oui, vous l'êtes. Il y a M. Chan, M. Reid, M. Graham, Mme Sahota et Mme Taylor. Nous sommes maintenant rendus à M. Chan.

M. Scott Reid:

Pardonnez-moi, monsieur le président, pouvez-vous simplement me donner le contenu de la liste, l'ordre des noms?

Le président:

Je viens de la lire: M. Chan, M. Reid, M. Graham, Mme Sahota et Mme Taylor — et Mme Vandenbeld.

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

Monsieur Bosc, pour le compte rendu, je veux simplement vous remercier — vous et toute l'équipe chargée de l'administration de la Chambre — de votre professionnalisme et du fait que vous avez dit clairement et prouvé à maintes reprises que l'objectif ultime de vous et de toute votre équipe est de servir les députés peu importe les décisions prises par la Chambre. Vous le faites avec énormément de professionnalisme. Je voulais le dire pour le compte rendu.

J'aimerais parler brièvement de certaines des choses soulevées par M. Reid, puis je veux revenir à une question très précise. Je vais peut-être prendre deux ou trois minutes de plus que prévu, mais je n'ai pas encore parlé.

Monsieur Reid, je veux revenir aux principes de base. Lorsque, durant la campagne, le gouvernement a dit qu'il voulait rendre la Chambre plus conviviale pour les familles, c'était davantage pour faire de cet endroit un lieu plus attrayant pour tous les Canadiens, afin que ceux-ci aient l'impression qu'ils peuvent participer pleinement et devenir des députés de la Chambre des communes. Là, nous tentons de trouver le juste équilibre et tentons de retirer le plus d'obstacles structurels possible à la participation.

Je tiens à dire pour le compte rendu — et je sais que Mme Vandenbeld est d'accord avec moi — que l'élimination des séances du vendredi ne fait pas l'unanimité au sein du caucus libéral. Je crois que certains des membres qui sont ici depuis plus longtemps que moi — ceux qui ont déjà été employés — comprennent que, en réalité, lorsque nous nous engageons et devenons des membres du Parlement et que nous avons le privilège de faire le travail que nous faisons, c'est un genre de travail 24 heures sur 24 et 7 jours sur 7. Que la semaine de séance de la Chambre soit de quatre jours ou de cinq, nous allons travailler beaucoup, peu importe.

Ce que nous essayons de faire est de cerner une occasion d'assurer une participation pleine et entière des Canadiens et de reconnaître l'impact incroyable que cet emploi a, surtout pour ceux d'entre nous qui avons des familles. Vous et moi partageons cette réalité. Je tenais à le dire.

Me voilà enfin arrivé à la question principale que je voulais soulever avec le greffier et son équipe. Au bout du compte, je suis préoccupé par l'impact lié à l'interaction avec le Règlement. J'aimerais connaître votre opinion, peut-être — et cette question n'a pas encore été soulevée —, sur le fait de changer le concept de jour de session pour... J'ai remarqué dans certains des documents que l'analyste a préparés au fil du temps que le temps consacré aux débats avait été réduit dans la Chambre en raison de modifications apportées au Règlement.

Franchement, j'ai constaté que beaucoup de députés séparent leur temps et utilisent seulement 10 minutes des 20 minutes habituellement attribuées. Que pensez-vous d'une réduction supplémentaire du temps de débat et de l'abandon de la notion de jours de session au profit, peut-être, de celle d'heures de session et de l'impact que cela pourrait avoir sur le Règlement, si nous voulons nous occuper des affaires émanant du gouvernement et des affaires émanant des députés de façon un peu plus efficiente.

Le président: Monsieur Bosc.

M. Marc Bosc:

Je me souviens de notre échange, monsieur Chan, sur le temps consacré aux débats. Je crois que j'ai fait valoir qu'on pouvait effectivement réduire la durée des discours, mais que, à un moment donné, le processus devient absurde, si on doit conserver la période de questions et de commentaires après les discours. Actuellement, beaucoup, beaucoup de députés séparent leur temps et présentent des discours de 10 minutes, laissant 5 minutes pour les questions et les commentaires. On peut difficilement imaginer une période de questions et de commentaires de deux minutes ou une période de commentaires et de questions d'une minute. Je tiens à le mentionner. Je ne crois pas que cela nuit à la réduction de la durée des discours. On pourrait avoir des discours de cinq minutes puis cinq minutes pour des questions et des commentaires si nous voulions. Actuellement, nous avons un ratio de deux pour un en ce qui a trait aux questions et aux commentaires. Ce n'est pas obligatoire. On peut faire tout ce que le Comité décide de faire.

Pour ce qui est des jours ou des heures, encore une fois, c'est une façon possible d'envisager le temps de la Chambre. Cependant, je dirais qu'il faut faire attention si on utilise les heures, simplement en raison de certains mécanismes procéduraux qui pourraient venir mettre des bâtons dans les roues. Le meilleur exemple, c'est lorsqu'un temps est alloué à quelque chose, disons, une journée pour clore un débat, disons, dans le cadre de la deuxième lecture d'un projet de loi. Dès que la journée commence, elle compte, même si elle dure seulement deux minutes, tandis que, si on attribue quatre heures et qu'une opposition ingénieuse décide de faire d'autres choses durant cette période, alors cette journée ne comptera pas. C'est le défi. Je ne dis pas que c'est insurmontable, mais c'est le genre de choses auxquelles il faut réfléchir lorsqu'on envisage une telle possibilité.

(1230)

M. Arnold Chan:

Merci.

Le président:

Avez-vous terminé?

Monsieur Reid.

Oh, oui.

M. Marc Bosc:

Une des choses que j'ai oublié de mentionner tantôt relativement à la question du vote par procuration, c'est de rappeler une pratique qui n'est plus utilisée, mais qui pourrait intéresser le Comité, et je parle du pairage. Je crois que cette pratique figure dans la Règlement. C'est là depuis très longtemps — à l'article 44.1 du Règlement — et c'est une façon de faire en sorte que les noms des députés apparaissent en paires dans les Publications parlementaires au cas où ils s'absentent pour des raisons essentiellement légitimes. C'est une façon d'éviter que les noms des députés ne figurent nulle part s'ils ne peuvent pas venir voter.

Je voulais le souligner.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, je veux savoir si terminer la liste des intervenants prendra tout le temps qu'il nous reste vu le nombre de personnes qui ne sont pas encore passées. De toute évidence, je veux en venir à la motion que j'ai distribuée lundi, pour inviter les membres du Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat, ce que l'on a appelé le Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat afin qu'ils comparaissent devant le Comité avant la fin de mai. Je voulais simplement savoir si, lorsque vous additionnez les temps de parole, nous aurons l'occasion d'y venir ou non.

Le président:

Eh bien, il y a quatre personnes qui devraient avoir droit à trois minutes. Il semble qu'elles ne prendront pas autant de temps que M. Christopherson. Il semble que nous aurons le temps, à ce moment-là.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien, pourriez-vous inscrire mon nom à la fin de cette liste au cas où cela ne se déroulerait pas ainsi. Merci.

Je devrais le savoir, mais je ne le sais pas. J'ai devant moi la bible des parlementaires, et je vois que l'un des auteurs de cette bible des parlementaires est présent ici même; est-il vrai que, dans le cas d'une motion dilatoire quelconque, dès que quelqu'un propose la motion, une sonnerie se fera entendre et un délai de 30 minutes s'écoule. Il n'y a pas de débats, et il faut qu'il y ait au moins 20 députés présents pour que l'on puisse tenir un vote? Est-ce exact?

M. Marc Bosc:

C'est exact, si vous tenez un vote par appel nominal, oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Il en faut 20, d'accord. Cela confirme ce que j'allais dire en réponse aux commentaires qu'a faits Mme Vandenbeld, plus tôt, sur la nécessité pour les gens d'être présents. Il faut seulement que 20 personnes soient présentes, le vendredi, pour qu'une motion dilatoire soit soumise à un vote par appel nominal. C'est tout ce qu'il faut. Si une question qui vous intéresse approche, si une affaire émanant du gouvernement doit être abordée un vendredi et que cela vous préoccupe, que vous voulez en débattre, mais que vous craignez qu'une motion dilatoire pose problème, vous pouvez demander le consentement unanime de la Chambre et discuter de la question pendant la réunion des leaders parlementaires du mardi pour que les motions dilatoires soient interdites, le vendredi. Cela réglerait le problème. Mais les motions dilatoires peuvent être légitimes. Ces choses-là ne sont pas illégitimes.

Je ne vois pas comment cela pourrait faire en sorte que plus d'un neuvième du caucus, qui compte 180 membres, soit obligé d'être ici un vendredi. Je ne crois pas qu'il soit terriblement exigeant d'avoir à être présent ici un vendredi sur neuf. C'est un peu plus lourd pour les représentants de l'opposition, mais nous sommes prêts à le faire, tout comme les membres du NPD. Je ne crois pas que cela soit une raison suffisante pour ne pas nous réunir les vendredis.

C'est tout ce que j'avais à dire.

M. Marc Bosc:

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais apporter un éclaircissement; quand on parle de 20 personnes, on parle en fait du nombre de membres avec droit de vote nécessaire pour qu'une décision de la Chambre soit valide. Tout ce qu'il faut, pour forcer la tenue d'un vote par appel nominal, c'est cinq membres, et comme les partis veulent remporter le vote, ils s'assureront que leurs membres sont présents et gagnent le vote. C'est ce que je voulais ajouter à la réponse.

(1235)

M. Scott Reid:

Dans ce cas, je m'excuse d'avoir dit une fausseté. Vous avez souligné que, pour forcer la tenue d'un vote par appel nominal, il fallait encore moins de gens. Vingt personnes, essentiellement, c'est le nombre nécessaire pour avoir le quorum.

M. Marc Bosc:

C'est exact.

M. Scott Reid:

Il faut seulement que 20 personnes soient présentes. S'il n'y en a pas 20, c'est que l'affaire à traiter n'était pas importante. L'une des motions dilatoires porte « que la Chambre s'ajourne maintenant »; si les députés n'ont rien d'important à débattre, ils vont proposer de prendre congé le vendredi ou d'ajourner la Chambre, à partir de ce moment-là. Nous regardons toujours l'heure et nous prétendons avoir quitté à l'heure habituelle de levée de la séance, alors qu'en fait, nous avons quitté plusieurs heures plus tôt, d'une manière ou d'une autre. Tout le monde a vécu cela.

Vous voyez où je veux en venir. Le seul moment où nous pouvons convaincre la Chambre de poursuivre la séance, à parler franchement, c'est lorsqu'un des partis tient fermement à débattre d'un sujet en particulier et que les députés sont prêts à être présents et à présenter une motion dilatoire. Nos partis ont tous obtenu des millions de votes. Si un des partis, un seulement, estime qu'une question est suffisamment importante pour faire cela, pourquoi diable ne pourrions-nous pas siéger un vendredi? Cela voudrait dire qu'au moins un des trois partis reconnus estime que la question dont la Chambre doit débattre est plus importante qu'une journée de congé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'appellerais pas cela une journée de congé, je voulais que vous le sachiez.

Monsieur Reid, ne vous en faites pas. Je serai bref. Je n'aime pas beaucoup laisser traîner des choses en longueur, comme vous l'avez constaté une fois déjà lorsque j'ai fait de l'obstruction de façon très précipitée.

M. Scott Reid:

[Note de la rédaction: inaudible]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'allais dire que, selon mon expérience d'employé, j'étais assis aux côtés de Tyler, quand j'ai constaté qu'entre les deux, entre David et lui, c'était lui qu'il était possible de sacrifier, et il y a certaines choses que nous avions autrefois et dont je dirais que je m'ennuie. Entre autres, monsieur le greffier, les guichets uniques. Ce serait une chose très utile. Ils n'entrent peut-être pas vraiment dans la catégorie des choses visées par notre étude, mais j'aimerais beaucoup que les guichets uniques existent de nouveau. Quand j'ai besoin de fournitures de bureau ordinaires, pourquoi devrais-je attendre trois jours pour les obtenir? Si j'ai besoin d'un stylo, pourquoi est-ce que je ne peux pas descendre l'escalier et demander un stylo? Cela fonctionnait ainsi avant.

Pour en revenir à ce que nous disions, j'ai une autre idée pour la période qui dépasse les heures normales de travail ou sur le fait que des députés demandent à d'autres députés d'être présents pour se rendre, par exemple, jusqu'au terrain de stationnement. Dans certaines circonstances, le soir, les députés pourraient peut-être demander qu'un membre de la GRC les escorte jusqu'en bas de la Colline. Ils auraient ainsi une protection qu'ils demanderaient dans d'autres circonstances. Les véhicules sont déjà disponibles. Cela ne représente aucun problème de logistique important. C'est tout simplement une idée que je lance, rien de plus.

Il y a une autre chose, en ce qui concerne le Règlement. Nous n'en avons pas beaucoup parlé aujourd'hui. L'article 14 du Règlement concerne les personnes étrangères à la Chambre. Il faudrait peut-être y ajouter une disposition qui prévoit une exemption particulière pour les nourrissons. Il vaut la peine d'y réfléchir.

Je voulais aussi revenir sur la question de l'agenda, avec laquelle nous avons ouvert la séance. À l'heure actuelle, les employés ont déjà assez de difficultés comme cela à partager leur agenda. Mes employés ne peuvent pas consulter ou modifier le mien à partir de leur téléphone, et je trouve que c'est très frustrant.

Si vous voulez, comme il serait logique de le faire, permettre aux familles de consulter nos agendas, j'aimerais que le bureau au complet ait accès à un agenda bien intégré de façon que nous ne soyons pas obligés d'utiliser, comme aujourd'hui, l'agenda de Google. Vous dites que, entre autres préoccupations, il y a des questions touchant la sécurité. Nous évitons déjà beaucoup de problèmes de sécurité en raison des limites. Oui, il peut être sécurisé, mais si personne ne s'en sert, c'est plutôt inutile. Je voulais le dire.

M. Marc Bosc:

Merci.

Le président:

Madame Sahota, allez-y.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'aimerais commencer par remercier M. Christopherson des commentaires qu'il a formulés sur le fait que le gouvernement actuel veut faire preuve d'ouverture d'esprit. Vous pouvez me croire, les raisons pour lesquelles je reviens toujours sur la question des séances du vendredi en demandant que cette journée-là soit consacrée aux circonscriptions, viennent du fait que je veux faire preuve d'ouverture d'esprit.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est tout à votre honneur.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci.

C'est vous qui nous avez fait le compliment et c'est pourquoi je voulais vous en remercier.

J'aimerais parler un peu de la perception par rapport à la réalité, car j'ai l'impression que l'opposition fait de la petite politique et se montre étroite d'esprit quand il est question des séances du vendredi.

J'aimerais savoir combien de ministres, et je ne parle pas seulement de ceux de la législature actuelle, je parle aussi de la précédente et de celle qui la précédait, sont présents le vendredi. À quoi ressemble la période de questions? Combien de députés sont présents, en fait, le vendredi? Qu'est-ce qui se passe le vendredi?

J'aimerais que nous ne soyons pas fermés, sur cette question, et je ne dis pas que je suis tout à fait d'accord ni tout à fait en désaccord. Nous venons tout juste d'entendre mon collègue, Arnold Chan, dire que même les libéraux... nous essayons tout simplement de tirer cela au clair. Il y a ceux qui sont d'accord et il y a ceux qui sont en désaccord. Tout le monde essaie de savoir quel serait le meilleur moyen de rendre le Parlement propice à la vie de famille.

Je dois dire pour ma part que, avant de savoir qu'il était probablement possible de réaménager ses responsabilités à la Chambre, et tout le reste, la décision de me présenter au poste de député a été très difficile à prendre, car j'ai une jeune famille. J'assumais auparavant la plus grande partie des soins, et nous avons donc dû échanger nos attributions pendant la première ou les deux premières années de vie de mon enfant. Je me suis lancée, j'ai pris part à la course, j'ai arrêté et je suis revenue un an plus tard. Il a fallu que je m'adapte.

Je ne veux pas décourager les gens qui ont de jeunes enfants et qui voudraient peut-être eux aussi participer et devenir député. Après tout, nous avons besoin d'un Parlement diversifié. Nous devons nous assurer que tout le monde peut se faire entendre.

C'est pour cette raison que j'aimerais vraiment que l'on réfléchisse à cette question de la perception par rapport à la réalité. Qu'est-ce que nous gagnons, en fait, à tenir une séance le vendredi? Qu'est-ce que nous y perdrions si nous ne tenions pas ces séances, si nous modifiions notre horaire en nous assurant de siéger quand même le même nombre d'heures, selon notre désir de faire changer les choses? Que gagnerions-nous à être présents dans notre circonscription et qu'est-ce que nos électeurs gagneraient si nous y étions présents?

Pourriez-vous faire la lumière sur ce qui se passe en réalité ici les vendredis?

(1240)

M. Marc Bosc:

Nous avons depuis longtemps pour règle de ne pas commenter la présence ou l'absence des députés. Cela dit, les députés sont moins nombreux le vendredi, cela n'est un secret pour personne, et j'ai donné plus tôt les raisons de cette situation. Tous les partis ont mis en place un système de roulement. Ils essaient de gérer les présences obligatoires de leurs députés de la façon la plus efficiente possible en permettant au plus grand nombre possible de leurs députés de retourner dans leur circonscription le jeudi soir ou tôt le vendredi. Ils essaient de gérer les choses de la même façon de l'autre côté, le lundi.

Je n'ai vraiment aucune opinion sur la question de savoir s'il est utile ou non de tenir une séance le vendredi. Cela ne fait ni chaud ni froid à l'administration de la Chambre. Nous nous adapterons à la décision de la Chambre, peu importe cette décision.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je suis certaine que vous êtes d'accord pour dire qu'il est toujours facile de maintenir le statu quo, mais qu'il faut agir selon sa conscience et avec courage pour changer les choses et moderniser le Parlement. Voilà ce que nous essayons de faire.

Le président:

Madame Petitpas Taylor.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

J'aimerais me faire l'écho de quelque chose qui a été dit à quelques reprises aujourd'hui. Il ne s'agit pas de prendre congé le vendredi et de refuser de faire son travail; il s'agit de travailler de la manière la plus efficiente possible en tant que députés, non pas seulement ici, à Ottawa, mais également dans notre circonscription.

Disons que nous établissons un système de roulement pour une période de 10 semaines; s'il me faut rencontrer un électeur, je ne pourrais pas lui offrir un rendez-vous avant le début du mois de juillet. À mon avis, c'est tout à fait inacceptable.

Je pourrais le rencontrer le samedi matin, mais nous essayons de respecter l'équilibre entre la vie professionnelle et la vie personnelle.

La question s'adresse spécifiquement aux employés. Si les députés travaillaient dans leur circonscription, le vendredi, plutôt que de venir sur la Colline du Parlement, est-ce que le fait que nous ne soyons pas présents ici permettrait au personnel de la Chambre des communes de travailler de façon plus efficiente?

M. Marc Bosc:

Comme je l'ai déjà dit, la grande majorité des employés de la Chambre des communes sont des employés embauchés pour une durée indéterminée. Ce sont des employés à temps plein. Il y a un petit nombre d'employés de session, et il y aurait peut-être des répercussions de ce côté-là, mais à mon avis elles seraient minimes.

Pierre, êtes-vous du même avis?

M. Pierre Parent:

Je serais du même avis que Marc étant donné que la plus grande partie de nos employés sont des employés permanents à temps plein. Nous disposons en effet d'un petit nombre d'employés de session, dont le travail est lié aux activités réelles de la Chambre.

La même observation vaut pour l'été. Il y a certaines activités qui se poursuivent durant l'été, dont s'occupent les services des finances, les services juridiques ou encore les services de l'information. Cela concerne la plus grande partie de nos employés.

Les vendredis ne représentent pas d'économie supplémentaire ou d'économie importante pour l'administration.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Mais, du point de vue du personnel, est-ce que cela lui donnerait le temps de faire le travail qui doit être accompli? Parfois, quand nous sommes ici, nous voyons bien que nous créons beaucoup de travail supplémentaire.

M. Marc Bosc:

Cela est possible, dans certains bureaux, mais nous sommes habitués au cycle parlementaire et nous nous organisons en conséquence. Je ne crois pas que les répercussions seraient énormes.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Loin de moi l'idée d'être d'accord avec M. Christopherson deux fois dans la même journée, mais je tiens à dire qu'il a demandé aux députés qui ne sont pas concernés par les points de déplacement de discuter de cette question. J'habite à 15 minutes d'ici. Pour me rendre dans ma circonscription, je dois faire un trajet d'au plus 40 minutes, et je n'ai pas non plus d'enfant ni de personne de qui je dois prendre soin.

J'aimerais dire moi aussi que je crois qu'il est juste que ceux qui doivent utiliser davantage de points de déplacement parce qu'ils ont de plus grosses familles ou qu'ils doivent se déplacer sur de plus grandes distances ne soient pas perçus comme des gens qui dépensent plus d'argent. Je ferais cependant une mise en garde: si nous devons dire combien de déplacements ils ont effectués, nous devrions également préciser qu'il s'agit de la classe économique ou de la classe affaires et préciser aussi s'ils ont choisi le trajet le plus efficient, le plus direct et le plus économique. Nous ne voulons pas que les gens pensent que, étant donné que nous ne précisons pas les montants, ils pourront toujours voyager en classe affaires.

Revenons maintenant sur le sujet de la chambre parallèle du vendredi. Je crois que si nous décidions d'ouvrir la séance une demi-heure plus tôt et de la lever une demi-heure plus tard, du lundi jusqu'au jeudi, nous récupérerions les quatre heures et demie pendant lesquelles nous siégeons, le vendredi, et qui sont consacrées à toutes les affaires de la Chambre.

Voici ce qui m'est arrivé la semaine dernière, justement. Nous avions quatre jours pour discuter du budget. Le tout premier jour, je demande à ce que mon nom soit inscrit sur la liste. Il y avait déjà 80 députés qui avaient demandé à avoir la parole pour discuter du budget, pendant ces quatre jours, et cela fait en sorte que de nombreux députés n'ont pas l'occasion de parler d'un sujet qui est important pour eux.

Je comprends ce que M. Reid veut dire lorsqu'il dit que le vendredi est réservé aux déclarations des députés. Je crois que nous devrions réserver cette journée aux déclarations des députés... et, peu importe le projet de loi dont la Chambre est saisie, les députés pourraient peut-être avoir la parole pendant 10 minutes, sur ce sujet en particulier, le vendredi. Ils pourraient peut-être même parler plus longtemps. Nous pourrions tenir une séance de six heures, les vendredis.

Nous ajouterions des heures, mais nous augmentons également beaucoup notre efficience, quand nous travaillons ici ou quand nous travaillons à l'extérieur, et, ainsi, quand nous sommes ici nous faisons un travail qui a de l'importance pour nos électeurs, nous le savons, et nous ne sommes pas obligés de rester dans l'antichambre, à attendre, pendant que nous pourrions faire autre chose.

Pourriez-vous dire si cela fonctionnerait, les vendredis, par exemple?

(1245)

M. Marc Bosc:

Comme je l'ai déjà dit, le comité a carte blanche et peut recommander n'importe quel type de structure. Cela me rappelle quelque chose que M. Koester, un ancien greffier de la Chambre, m'a dit un jour en citant une ancienne version de l'ouvrage d'Erskine May, c'est-à-dire deux citations se trouvant dans la préface. La première vient d'un ancien greffier des années 1600 qui, pendant une querelle de procédures, a dit en ronchonnant: [Traduction] « L'ancienne façon de faire était meilleure, et quand nous l'avons remplacée, nous avons connu des frictions et des obstacles, comme il faut s'y attendre quand on s'éloigne des sentiers battus. » Un autre greffier exprimait un point de vue différent dans les années 1820: [Traduction] « Pourquoi est-il question de préséance? La Chambre peut faire ce qu'elle veut. »

Les membres du comité ne doivent donc pas oublier qu'un précédent vient de quelque part, et que les nouvelles façons de faire les choses ne tombent pas du ciel. Le Comité a toute la liberté voulue et peut recommander ce qu'il veut à ce chapitre. Je n'ai vraiment pas d'opinion sur ce qu'il convient de faire, mais sachez que la Chambre s'adaptera aux recommandations du Comité, quelles qu'elles soient.

Le président:

Allez-y, David.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aimerais tout simplement répondre brièvement à un commentaire sur les déplacements les plus courts et les plus efficients. Nous devons faire attention. Dans ma circonscription, la route la plus courte traverse la réserve naturelle de Papineau-Labelle, et il s'agit d'un chemin rudimentaire à une seule voie.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je parlais des déplacements en avion.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord, mais précisez-le, car je ne veux pas être obligé de passer par la réserve. Merci.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je voulais parler des déplacements en avion.

Le président:

D'accord.

J'aimerais remercier les témoins; la séance a été très longue, mais très utile. Vous avez répondu à bon nombre des questions des membres, qui concernaient toute une gamme de sujets, et vous nous avez expliqué les ramifications des recommandations que nous pourrions formuler, au bout du compte. Je sais que vous avez toujours été très utiles. Entre les séances, quand nous avons besoin d'éclaircissements, nous savons que vous êtes toujours présents, et nous apprécions vraiment le fait que vous nous ayez aujourd'hui consacré tout ce temps.

Vous pouvez y aller.

M. Marc Bosc:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Comme je le disais au début de la séance, nous avons cinq autres affaires à traiter. Nous devons discuter de la motion de M. Reid et de celle de M. Christopherson. Nous devons approuver le budget des séances, pour payer les déplacements des témoins, et nous devons discuter de la directive du Commissariat à l'éthique concernant les cadeaux offerts aux députés, que vous avez tous lue, je l'espère. Il y a aussi la motion sur les urgences dont une version provisoire a été rédigée par le greffier ou par le président, et qui semble pleine de bon sens; cela ne prendra vraiment pas beaucoup de temps. Nous avons donc à décider de quelles affaires nous allons discuter et par quelle affaire nous allons commencer.

Allez-y, monsieur Reid.

(1250)

M. Scott Reid:

Si vous me le permettez, j'aimerais passer à la motion que j'ai proposée en premier lieu. Je ne crois pas que cela suscite une controverse, mais je peux avoir tort. C'est pourquoi je vais la présenter maintenant.

Voici la motion en question: Que la présidente et les membres fédéraux du Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat soient invites à comparaître devant le Comité avant la fin de mai 2016 pour répondre à toutes les questions concernant: leur mandat et leurs responsabilités, le rapport du Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat sur le processus de transition (janvier à mars 2016), présenté au premier ministre le 31 mars 2016, les dépenses engagées pendant la période visée par le rapport; les dépenses prévues.

Monsieur le président, je vais très brièvement résumer la justification de cette motion. Dans le passé, il y avait de la réticence à l'idée d'inviter des membres du conseil consultatif. Oui, la réticence venait des libéraux. Selon les arguments présentés pour s'y opposer, mentionnons le fait que les membres du comité devaient présenter un rapport et que nous devions attendre ce rapport et que nous ne pouvions pas les obliger à nous présenter un rapport avant d'avoir fait rapport au premier ministre. Mais cela ne pose plus aucun problème. Aujourd'hui, nous avons ce rapport.

Nous avons également d'autres informations. Nous avons de l'information sur les coûts que ce comité entraîne, et qui sont beaucoup plus élevés que ce que j'aurais cru raisonnable, ou encore les coûts sont peut-être raisonnables, mais je ne comprends pas pour quelle raison. Mais vous pouvez imaginer que, s'il en coûte autant pour les sept personnes nommées, il en coûtera environ trois fois plus pour combler les 22 derniers postes vacants, et cela est de toute évidence une préoccupation. C'est pourquoi j'aimerais en savoir davantage.

De plus, il y a quelque chose d'étrange. Le comité consultatif a dit qu'il avait égaré la liste des organismes avec lesquels il avait communiqué. J'ai un peu de difficulté, à l'ère où d'innombrables copies électroniques sont faites de toutes sortes de choses, à comprendre comment cela a pu se produire. Le comité consultatif a jugé que cela était suffisamment important pour justifier qu'il présente cette information, mais il n'a pas été en mesure de dresser une liste complète. C'est donc aussi de l'information à ce sujet que nous aimerions obtenir, ou que moi, du moins, j'aimerais obtenir.

Quoi qu'il en soit, la proposition vise à inviter le comité consultatif à comparaître devant nous avant la fin du mois de mai, et j'hésite à soulever la question si, au bout du compte, nous tenons une autre séance à laquelle six témoins sont convoqués et où je prendrais toute la place en discutant de cette motion. C'est pourquoi j'ai soulevé la question aujourd'hui, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Est-ce que quelqu'un veut discuter de cette motion?

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vais intervenir rapidement, seulement pour dire que je ne vais pas m'y opposer. Nous allons l'appuyer.

Mais vous savez que, du point de vue du NPD, étant donné notre position, tout se passe comme si nous allions faire briller les fauteuils de pont du Titanic avant que le satané navire ne coule. Nous n'avons absolument aucun intérêt à perfectionner un système général qui rend possible, dans une démocratie, de procéder à des nominations. Quoi qu'il en soit, telle est la réalité, et si vous voulez continuer à creuser tout cela, nous allons vous appuyer, mais nous allons toujours le faire en sachant que rien de tout cela ne devrait arriver. Cette chose est une verrue sur le corps politique du Canada, et les diverses combinaisons utilisées pour nommer des gens ne changent rien au fait qu'il s'agit d'un processus de nominations.

De plus, je rappellerais au gouvernement que nous ne sommes plus en 2015; nous sommes en 2016, et le concept d'une chambre haute dont les membres sont nommés est toujours l'antithèse de tout ce qu'on pourrait appeler de près ou de loin une démocratie.

Dans ce contexte, nous allons appuyer la motion, mais nous ne faisons que vous suivre.

Le président:

Merci.

Quelqu'un veut-il ajouter quelque chose avant que nous ne mettions la question aux voix?

La motion vient d'être lue.

M. Blake Richards:

J'aimerais un vote par appel nominal, s'il vous plaît.

Le président:

Vote par appel nominal, madame la greffière.

La greffière:

Sur la motion de M. Reid.

(La motion est rejetée par 5 voix contre 4.)

(1255)

M. David Christopherson:

Ce n'est rien pour améliorer les choses.

Le président:

J'aimerais que nous puissions rapidement examiner le budget de nos séances, et je crois que la greffière l'a en main.

Le budget proposé, que l'on est en train de vous distribuer, est un montant uniforme de 15 500 $ qui doit couvrir essentiellement les déplacements et les installations électroniques de nos témoins.

Voulez-vous discuter de la question de savoir si nous devons approuver ou non le budget avant de passer aux voix?

Je vous laisse une minute pour l'examiner.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vais présenter la motion.

Le président:

Quelqu'un veut-il en discuter?

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président: Est-ce que tout le monde a lu la très courte proposition de changement du Règlement présentée par le président, qui lui permet de gérer les services qui doivent être offerts après les heures normales de travail?

M. Scott Reid:

Oui.

J'en ai parlé avec notre précédent Président, Andrew Scheer, qui est bien sûr leader de l'opposition à la Chambre. Je lui ai demandé de l'examiner étant donné que les événements en question se sont déroulés, en fait, pendant qu'il était Président. Je lui ai remis ma copie et je lui ai demandé d'y jeter un oeil et de me la remettre de manière que je puisse présenter des commentaires au président.

C'est de ma faute. Je voulais la rapporter aujourd'hui et je l'ai oubliée. Je vais m'efforcer de l'avoir mardi, si cela vous convient.

Le président:

D'accord, c'est une bonne idée.

M. David Christopherson:

À ce sujet?

Le président:

Oui.

Pouvons-nous attendre jusqu'à mardi?

M. David Christopherson:

Tout à fait.

Le président:

Est-ce que tout le monde a lu la directive que la commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique a rédigée à notre demande pour expliquer clairement aux députés dans quelles situations ils peuvent accepter des cadeaux? Elle n'aime pas cela, mais nous en avons la prérogative. À l'heure actuelle, selon les pouvoirs qui nous sont conférés, nous devons l'approuver et en faire rapport à la Chambre.

M. Arnold Chan:

Parlez-vous des formulaires?

Le président:

Non, pas des formulaires, de la directive qui vous a été transmise par courriel il y a une dizaine de jours. Elle fournissait des éclaircissements supplémentaires.

Nous avons demandé en tant que comité d'obtenir davantage d'éclaircissements sur ce que sont les cadeaux acceptables. Elle a répondu à notre demande et a rédigé ce document qui compte quelques pages que vous avez tous reçu par courriel.

M. David Christopherson:

Je suis désolé, monsieur le président, je dois avouer que je ne l'ai pas vu.

Le président:

Nous allons reporter cette question-là également.

M. Blake Richards:

J'ai eu l'occasion d'y jeter un coup d'oeil. Je n'ai pas eu la possibilité de le lire en entier, mais selon ce que j'en ai lu brièvement, la directive est toujours loin d'être claire, à mon avis. Je vous encourage tous à prendre le temps de l'examiner pour vous faire une idée, mais nous allons probablement devoir en discuter davantage.

Le président:

J'aimerais aussi vous rappeler comment la greffière peut vous transmettre de l'information. C'est vous qui lui avez donné des instructions sur la façon de communiquer avec vous. J'ai remarqué qu'un courriel qu'elle a récemment envoyé était adressé dans quasiment tous les cas à l'adresse générale de nos employés. Si vous voulez que les courriels qu'elle vous envoie se rendent à votre adresse personnelle, assurez-vous de la lui donner. Pour ma part, ses courriels arrivent dans ma boîte personnelle et dans celle de mes employés, mais vous avez le choix. J'aimerais que vous vous assuriez tous de clarifier avec la greffière l'adresse de vos courriels.

Nous allons reporter le débat concernant la directive sur les conflits d'intérêts et les cadeaux.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Je comprends cela. J'ai moi-même un problème avec mon système de courriel qui envoie parfois des courriels vers un compte que je ne vois pas régulièrement. J'ai constaté que je ne suis pas le seul à ne pas avoir vu ce courriel, et ça me rassure un peu, merci.

Cela fait un certain temps déjà que je m'intéresse à cette question et que je l'étudie sous tous les angles. M. Richards a tout à fait raison, c'est encore loin d'être clair. J'aimerais proposer que nous prenions les devants et que nous l'invitions de nouveau.

Elle ne s'est jamais cachée pour dire qu'elle n'aimait pas beaucoup la directive, et j'espère ne pas lui faire dire ce qu'elle n'a pas dit. M. Reid s'intéresse à cette question depuis le tout début, je crois, et il en connaît probablement plus à ce sujet que quiconque au Parlement. Elle a dit que si nous voulions vraiment simplifier les choses, il nous suffisait de déterminer un montant d'argent; tout cadeau d'un prix inférieur serait acceptable, et personne ne pourrait le contester, mais, au-delà de ce montant, il faudrait un mécanisme de déclaration. Je crois qu'elle a parlé de 35 $.

Je m'en remettrais à l'expertise de M. Reid à ce chapitre, mais il me semble que, si on envisage la situation de façon raisonnable — et je crois que c'est ce que M. Richards vient de faire —, il y a toujours des interprétations contradictoires qui font que la directive n'est toujours pas claire. Il est toujours impossible de comprendre de quoi il est question en la parcourant rapidement. Je n'arrive pas à comprendre pourquoi cela nous échappe. Nous devrions trouver une façon de l'exposer clairement et simplement, mais nous n'y arrivons pas et pourtant, c'est très important.

Je crois que nous devrions prendre les devants, nous devrions dire que nous sommes prêts à mettre ce point à l'ordre du jour, à la convoquer pour en discuter et régler la question une fois pour toutes, pour avoir une directive claire.

Voilà ce que je pense.

Merci.

(1300)

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

À ce sujet, j'ai de la compassion pour elle, car elle doit composer avec le fait que les règles n'avaient pas au départ été rédigées brillamment. Elles donnent lieu en effet à des cas où deux volets d'une même règle semblent jusqu'à un certain point ne pas être aussi permissifs l'un que l'autre. Cela est vrai des cadeaux. Puisque c'est le cas, elle semble avoir décidé de se fonder sur l'interprétation la plus restrictive, et je crois que c'est ce que je ferais si j'étais à sa place.

Cela dit, il me semble que le meilleur moyen de régler le problème, au bout du compte, serait de changer les règles et de supprimer ces restrictions. Ma recommandation serait que nous en discutions les uns avec les autres — nous pouvons le faire ailleurs si nous craignons que cela prenne trop de temps au comité — pour voir si un consensus ne se dégage pas. Cela nous permettrait de savoir s'il est possible pour nous de trouver une façon de modifier le libellé de cette section du code d'éthique pour qu'il soit plus clair.

Je crois que c'est la seule solution.

Le président:

D'accord, nous comprenons qu'il nous faudra en discuter plus en détail.

Notre temps est épuisé, mais il y a deux choses que je dois mentionner. J'aimerais que vous communiquiez à la greffière ou à moi-même, d'ici la fin de la semaine, le nom des témoins que nous avons recommandés. Nous n'avons toujours pas leurs noms. En ce qui concerne le personnel politique, nous avons un représentant du NPD, mais ni les libéraux ni les conservateurs n'en ont proposé un. Si vous pensez qu'un membre de votre personnel politique voudrait être convoqué en tant que témoin, pourriez-vous le dire à la greffière d'ici la fin de la semaine?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Kevin Bosch.

Le président:

Oui, mais nous ne voulons pas les noms tout de suite.

De plus, en ce qui concerne le personnel de la Chambre des communes, s'il y a quelqu'un d'autre qui devrait être consulté, veuillez en parler à la greffière ou à moi-même.

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai été un peu surpris quand quelqu'un m'a demandé si je connaissais les différents syndicats qui représentent les divers travailleurs de la Colline du Parlement. Je croyais que quelqu'un avait sûrement un registre des syndicats. Ça m'a frappé. Je ne vois pas pourquoi ce serait difficile. Il y a quelque chose qui m'échappe: ce devrait être simple. Il suffit de demander aux Ressources humaines de nous donner le nom des syndicats qui représentent les travailleurs du Parlement, et nous pourrons ainsi transmettre une invitation à leurs représentants.

En ce qui concerne le point précédent, j'aimerais proposer mon aide à mes collègues tant libéraux que conservateurs en soulignant que c'est beaucoup plus facile une fois que le personnel est organisé et qu'il peut désigner ses propres représentants. Je serais heureux de vous proposer le nom de certaines personnes qui pourraient vous aider dans ce processus.

Le président:

Merci.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on April 14, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.