header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-05-31 PROC 24

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Let's try to keep up our tradition of being mostly on time.

Good morning. This is meeting number 24 of the Standing Community on Procedure and House Affairs for the first session of the 42nd Parliament. This meeting is being held in public.

I want to informally welcome three people who know me from elementary and high school from 50 years ago. You can guess which ones they are.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: The other one, as you can probably guess, is a student. A lot of MPs are being shadowed today by students, and Maris is here. Welcome.

We welcome Marc Bosc, Acting Clerk and Philippe Dufresne, the Law Clerk and Parliamentary Counsel, and our visitors.

Just so the committee knows, our long-awaited family-friendly interim draft report will come out on Thursday afternoon. It's in translation.

In terms of our first item of business for this morning, for anyone who wasn't here at the time, we have already had the Clerk and the Law Clerk here to give their opening remarks on the question of privilege on Bill C-14, but they had just got through their opening remarks when we got called to a vote. They're back to do that question and answer round. In the second hour, we'll do the other question of privilege. More than likely, it's committee business. We'll do that in the second hour, as well as any other committee business people want to do.

Without further ado, I think we'll go to the first round. We'll start with Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Again, I want to thank Mr. Bosc and Mr. Dufresne for appearing. Also, I apologize. I wasn't present when you made your opening statements, but I've had a chance to review the transcript of your statements.

Obviously, those of us on the government side take very seriously any matter that's referred to this committee with respect to members' privileges. In terms of my question, I didn't get a sense of this in your opening statement, Mr. Bosc, and I think it would be very helpful to me and to my colleagues on the committee, with respect to the nature of previous findings of premature disclosure of information before it has been tabled in the House, whether this requires there to be an actual proactive disclosure of the actual bill or simply merely the discussion of the contents of what may or may not be in a bill.

Again, I just wanted to understand, from your perspective, based upon historical precedent, any evidence that you can shed on this for us, which would help me understand whether in fact this is actually a breach of privilege or not.

Mr. Marc Bosc (Acting Clerk, House of Commons):

If I could, I will start by referring you, Mr. Chan, and other members, to the document that was circulated some time ago by the committee staff, which highlights four different cases.

What I would say as well, before I get into it, is that each case is always a little different. There's no direct comparison possible easily, because each circumstance is different. The cases that have been found by the House to constitute privilege and were sent to committee include the ones from 2001, which I would say would be the most likely to be akin to the present case.

There are other cases you could consider. Again, they're in the documentation you have. There's one from 2010 involving a private members' business issue, and again in 2009 a government bill, although in that case there was no prima facie finding.

The key element for the committee to consider is whether the committee feels, given the evidence it gathers, whether the right of members to have first access to legislative information was respected. The idea there is for members to be able to perform their duties. The principle is that members ought to have first access to information about bills and that the membership as a whole as well ought to have that first access to that information.

Those are the broad outlines of the issues as I see them. I don't know if that goes where you wanted it to go.

(1105)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I'm just struggling with this a bit, Mr. Bosc. I simply wanted to get a sense of this. If you take the March 2001 case, that was a very specific instance where the government actually engaged in the briefing of the media to the exclusion of other members from the opposition. I don't see that necessarily happening in this case.

What I'm also struggling with is this. When I look at the two specific media reports that we are dealing with, again, I don't have any clear evidence that the reporters in question or that the two media outlets in question were actually in possession of the contents of the bill before it had been disclosed to Parliament. Again, what I'm struggling with is the concept of physical possession of the actual document or a discussion about what may or may not be in a bill in advance of the tabling of the bill. I've seen plenty of instances in the past where various governments have been discussing bills that they're proposing to introduce into the House, where they talk about what may or may not be in a particular bill. I don't see that as necessarily being a breach of members' privileges in that particular instance. I could see it being very directly the case if a copy of the bill was in the possession of someone before it had been tabled in Parliament. That's what I'm struggling with. Within the examples that were provided in the paper I'm trying to get to the heart of that particular issue.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

I understand your difficulty.

At the same time we really need to say at the outset that it is not for us to make that determination for the committee.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

No, I agree.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

It's really up to the committee, based on whatever evidence it gathers, to come to a conclusion one way or another. That's really what it comes down to. You could call witnesses. You could invite various people who might have information about how this information got out and so on.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Sure.

At the end of the day we're also very much governed by the practices of Westminster. Were there any examples in other historical instances of premature disclosure of information that would also be helpful to this committee in terms of giving us some guidance with respect to the situation that we're faced with today?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

It may be. We could look at that, but I'm rather dubious that this would be the case.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Each one is quite unique.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Yes, but it's not only that. Every parliament has its own practices and usages, and they differ considerably on matters like this. Again, a direct comparison would be difficult, I would say. I can look at what we can find but I'm not hopeful, let's say.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Thank you.

I appreciate your comments so far.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll go on to Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thanks for being here today. I have a few questions.

On the first one, I'm getting the sense that there is some attempt here to claim that there were no details of the legislation actually put before the media prior to the bill being introduced. If you look at the articles, I think you can see clearly that a number of items from the bill were put forward. Of course, the articles themselves indicate such things as “according to a source familiar with legislation” or “according to a source who is not authorized to speak publicly about the bill”. Look at the CBC articles: “sources say that the Liberal cabinet” or “sources tell the CBC that...”. No one knows who those sources are, but at the end of the day that's sort of what our task is. It's to try to determine whether there has been a breach and by whom.

Also, when you look at the article itself, you see that it indicates a number of items. I could go through them here. I'll quickly pull a few quotes just to indicate this: ...a bill that will exclude those who only experience mental suffering, such as people with psychiatric conditions.... The bill also won't allow for advanced consent....

I could go on with that one.

It continues: The government's bill is set to take a much narrower approach than recommended by a joint parliamentary committee....

It also says that the government's plan will put off the issue of those who suffer from psychological but not physical illness.

A number of items that certainly are contained in the bill were disclosed.

Then we see an article this morning, an iPolitics article, where the government House leader is asked about another piece of legislation that may be coming forward, and he says: If I talk about potential legislation before it is introduced then we'll have a very irate question of privilege from the opposition that I'm talking about a bill before it's introduced.

Now, it's great that he recognizes this, but also, I think the tone of it is almost one that the government isn't really taking this very seriously, and that is a concern. I think it's something that the committee needs to deal with. I know it's not your place to give us advice on what we should or shouldn't do, necessarily, but it certainly is something that I think the committee here should deal with.

Therefore, a point needs to be made so the government understands that these are serious matters, that this has to be taken seriously, and that we won't see this kind of thing happen in the future. If the committee is looking to try to make that point, what are some of the options available to us in order to make that point so that it's clear and an example is made, if that's what the committee chooses to do?

(1110)

Mr. Philippe Dufresne (Law Clerk and Parliamentary Counsel):

Maybe what I can say is that in looking at the precedents, the previous decisions of the House, and the previous reports of this committee, as Mr. Bosc said, they looked at the extent of the information that was shared and the amount of detail, whether it was the content of the bill or information that was already publicly available, so that's part of your fact-finding.

But it also looked at and was influenced by the apologies that were given and any corrective measures that were put in place. In those previous decisions, those were commented on in the report of the committee or in decisions by the Speaker on prima facie. That's what I would say in terms of previous decisions.

Mr. Blake Richards:

The committee currently has another question of privilege that has been sent our way. For me, at least, this is a new situation. I'm not sure if it's one that the committee has experienced before. I'm wondering if you can give us some advice on how we should best handle this.

Obviously we have this one, and we have the physical molestation one that we are all aware of, where the Prime Minister made physical contact with another member of Parliament, and that apparently prevented her from voting. How should the committee best handle having those two questions of privilege? Should those be dealt with chronologically? Should they be dealt with concurrently? What would be your advice on what would be appropriate for the committee to do in order to handle those two appropriately?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

The committee has before it a number of items, I presume, on its agenda. It's dealing with a number of priorities, and it's entirely up to the committee how it wants to proceed. It's not for us to say what the committee should or shouldn't do.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. Is there any advice you have or any other examples that you're aware of in terms of points of order—whether they be in provinces or other Westminster parliaments—in regard to physical molestation of a member by another member, so that we can have some sense as to what that might be and that would guide us in terms of how we would deal with that question of privilege?

(1115)

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Again, Mr. Chairman, are we covering both cases here today or just the one? Are we going to be invited again?

The Chair:

You've been invited to address Bill C-14 today if you want to address the.... I'll leave it up to you. I know you weren't prepared.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Essentially Mr. Chairman and Mr. Richards, the process the committee will follow in both cases is the same or likely to be the same. In other words, you gather information, you assess that information, and you make a recommendation based on what you find. It's not very different in one case or another.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I noticed in some of the other examples that we had before us of previous cases like this, the premature disclosure of the contents of the bill, there seemed to be some differing opinions on whether the contents of the bill had been released. Sometimes it can be difficult to determine whether someone just had a lucky guess or whether contents of the bill were released.

In the absence of being able to determine that, is there any advice on how the committee would proceed? Obviously it would be important for the committee to try to make sure it's taken as a cautionary tale for any future government bills.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Again, as part of the documentation that the committee received earlier in its study, a number of avenues are outlined that are available to the committee, ranging from deciding not to proceed, finding that there has not been a contempt or a breach of privilege, all the way to the other end of finding that there is and recommending some form of discipline. All those options are available to the committee. But as Philippe indicated, in some cases the apologies or actions already taken in the House are deemed sufficient by the committee. That can happen as well. That's part of the range of things the committee can look at.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll go on to Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you, Chair, and thank you both for your attendance today.

Having been around the mulberry bush on this one quite a number of times, I don't have a lot of questions. Most of my questions would come up as a matter of detail when circumstances arise. I may not even need all my seven minutes in this particular round. I know. It will be the second time by the way.

Chair, as much as you'll allow it, and I look to your discretion to guide me, given the fact that on April 14, Bill C-14 was introduced, that was the day of the leak. The chief government whip acknowledged there was a leak and apologized. At least it was reported. The notes say unreservedly, and I take them at face value. When you ask the question, who benefits, it's pretty clear it's the government. Nobody else benefited from this leak. Quite frankly it would be difficult for anybody other than the government to have the information to leak in the first place.

Has the government initiated any kind of a review themselves? It's clear one of their own has leaked this. Can somebody over there give me some kind of an answer, Chair?

The Chair:

It's up to you, if anyone wants to respond.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It's a factual request. Did the government, given the importance of this and the fact that the chief government whip got up right away and acknowledged this is a problem...? I could read Hansard but knowing the individual, I'm sure it was very heartfelt and complete. But it begs the question, if the government is that serious about it, did the government begin an internal investigation to find out who did it, given that the odds are it was a government staffer or member, somebody attached to the government. I think it's a fair question.

Looks as if it's a screaming no.

The chief government whip is right here. I'm sure he'd be glad to help.

Crickets, crickets.

It begs the question. If it's all that important, it's hard to match the words with the action. If the government is that sincere that this really upsets them—I took them at face value that it does—you'd think they would have announced an internal investigation because the likely culprit is someone within their organization. If they're not doing that, I don't know where the heck that leaves us. That's all I have to say.

(1120)

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Mr. Chair, thank you.

We've talked quite a bit about precedent and we've addressed four cases or so from the last couple of decades. I think there is quite a bit of precedent that says that it doesn't need to be a question of privilege. I'll just read from a couple of articles from 2014, for example: Conservatives to table bill that will reorganize Elections Canada. The Conservative government will introduce changes to the Elections Act this week that caucus members expect to restructure the office in charge of investigating [elections].... Conservative sources expect the bill to reorganize...the branch of Elections Canada that investigates and prosecutes electoral crimes. ... “close loopholes to big money, and give law enforcement sharper teeth, a longer reach and a freer hand.” The bill would remove the Commissioner of Canada Elections, where the investigators work, from Elections Canada and set it up as separate office, sources say.

There are numerous such examples over the last few years, in which specific details of bills were released up to a month in advance, and no question of privilege was raised.

Would you consider this a precedent that we should be looking at?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

The precedents we look at are those in which the Speaker has had to make a ruling.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If there is no reason to make a ruling, we shouldn't consider that a precedent at all?

My point is that things like this happen all the time and all of a sudden we're looking at it as a question of privilege. I don't necessarily see it as one. The bill was not released in its own right, but over the years we have had many cases in which details of what may or may not be in a bill have been released. I don't see where we can go with this.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Again, Mr. Graham, the House saw fit to send this matter to the committee, and the House has asked the committee to look at it, so the committee is seized with it. That's all I can say.

The Chair:

You're splitting your time?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Hello, Mr. Bosc.

I just want to continue with my colleague's thought.

As a new member, I've been hearing a lot about various government bills on the news, and we continue to hear a lot of information. Even before, as a non-member, I gathered what the government was about to do when the Conservatives had introduced Bill C-24. There was tons of news around that. For the most part, we knew a fair amount of what was going to be in that bill. We knew that they were going to cover the issue of lost Canadians. We knew they were going to cover shorter wait times, and a longer time to qualify for citizenship. There were tons of comments made about dual citizenship and taking away someone's citizenship if terrorism or other acts of criminality had occurred. This was buzzing around in the news for quite some time, and I thought it was quite normal for there to be some buzz in the media, and some talk by members and ministers about introducing certain bills. The Prime Minister had tweeted about Bill C-24, and there were video clips of the minister giving little tidbits of what to expect in that upcoming bill, whether a month or two days prior to the bill.

This all seemed to be quite normal. There were no questions of privilege.

I understand that you're saying you only address the question when it occurs in the House, but it seems that a certain standard has been set for a long time now. Whether or not that's right is something this committee has to decide, but I think it is important for us to figure out how we continue from this point.

The way I see it, a lot of bills are discussed, perhaps not in that much detail. To me this seems very similar to what was discussed about Bill C-24, and maybe a lot less than that. That may not be the standard we should look to or adhere to in the future, but certainly I think we need to define more clearly, going forward, what is a question of privilege, when it necessarily arises, and what the responsibilities of members are regarding a bill.

Obviously within caucus and in the House there had been a lot of talk about this and a lot of other bills. What is the defining line? Where do we set the parameters as to what goes outside and is a breach, and what is inside? Is that something you can shed more light on?

(1125)

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Again, in the material you received I would draw your attention to the reference to the Speaker's ruling of November 5, 2009. That one is of interest given what you've just said. In that case the Speaker found there was no prima facie case of privilege since—and I'm paraphrasing here—the minister had assured the House that no details of the measures being proposed in the bill were publicly disclosed, and only the broad terms of the policy initiative contained in the bill had been.

That gives you an idea of the kinds of things the Speaker might look at. That's one example.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Broad policy versus specifics of what's in the bill?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Yes. In that particular ruling that's what the Speaker referred to.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

From reading some of the snippets of the media reports regarding Bill C-14, we've been talking a lot about not what's in the bill, but what may not be in the bill. Could this be perhaps seen as journalists' speculation at times around talk that has been discussed?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

It's not really for me to say.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay. I think it's very interesting because all the precedents that we have seen so far have been talking about contents of the bill and not necessarily about what may not be in the bill. That seems to be the case we have before us today. As you were saying previously, we may not have a particular case that can be completely similar in facts, but we have a case before us that's not necessarily talking about contents and that's the standard I've been reading in the previous case law that we have before us.

Thank you for your input. My colleague would like to ask a question.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Very quickly then, it means that the precedents you look at are only precedents where someone rose in the House and raised a question of privilege, but there could very well be many other precedents where no question of privilege was ever raised that could be similar to this?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

It could be. Sure.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll go on to Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

To pick up on where Blake ended and build on what David was saying, I think you have to look at the language included in these articles. I think there are very significant differences here. As David Graham mentioned, the article that he cited had the very key words “expected” and “may have” in terms of the point that he was making, but just quoting this Globe and Mail article from April 12 it's basically saying the bill “will exclude those who only experience mental suffering”, “The bill also won’t allow for advance consent”, and “there will be no exceptions for ‘mature minors’”.

Those are very definitive statements.

It may be a different writing style. I doubt it. David's a former journalist and I'm a former journalist and news director, though not to the esteem of my friend here. We have experience in this field. It's showing the writing style is very clear.

When you're writing like this it's basically saying we have information saying this. It is very much a matter of fact and not a guess, not it's expected, it may have, it may consider this.

I think there's something here. I think the committee needs to really study this. I don't think we should just brush this off. There are very clear points that the privilege was violated here. I hope the committee continues to look at that.

Mr. Bosc, do you see any issues of the committee asking the government to respond to what Mr. Christopherson was starting with? Do you see any problem with that? I just want to confirm before we move in this direction.

(1130)

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Again, it's up to the committee to decide if it wants to invite witnesses or seek information on the point Mr. Christopherson was making. That's up to the committee. Sure, it could be done.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Now as we know that, and we're looking at the wording, and Ruby pointed out some other cases, but again the wording that she mentioned was having those key words.... I'm guessing in looking back, if there was an issue it should have been raised. I don't know why, I can't speak to that because I wasn't here, but clearly there must have been something that those in the opposition at the time felt was not a breach. But as I said here, the language in this article as we all read it clearly shows this is a statement of fact, rather than reporters' speculation. I think it goes beyond that.

I know you mentioned, and other people have mentioned, that where we go from here is basically up to the committee, that we can do as we so choose. We can move in the direction we want. I appreciate that.

Looking a couple of steps forward, what would be your advice on how we prevent this kind of thing happening in the future? Can you give us a couple of points where you think it might work?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

I'd simply draw your attention to the case of March 2001, which again is in your documentation. In that particular case, further steps were taken. The committee obtained documents from the government. It states that in October 2001, the government house leader provided the committee with an updated guide to making federal acts and regulations.

Steps were taken subsequent to that event. I think steps were taken in the government as well to rectify certain things. These are examples of the kinds of things that are possible.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I'd like to head in the direction of asking the government to respond to what Mr. Christopherson was raising. I think that's a fair avenue to take.

Are there any other witnesses you think we should have here that might be of use to us?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

That's entirely up to the committee.

In the past, if you look at these cases, you'll see different avenues followed: the member who raised the point in the first place, possibly the minister, or government officials. That's what was done in those cases that I'm referring to.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I think we did put the justice minister on notice that we might be calling her. I guess we have started that process as well.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

That's up to the committee, of course.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you very much.

I'd like to go back to the idea that there could very well have been many precedents that are very similar to this that wouldn't have come to your attention because they were never raised as precedents in Parliament.

One example that I would like to point out is on the so-called Fair Elections Act, Bill C-23. I'm looking here at an article by Stephen Maher on February 2, which was two days before that bill was tabled in the House. To go back to Mr. Schmale's point, in the first sentence it says the Conservative government will introduce changes. Then, three paragraphs down “Conservative sources”; another one says it promised the government will “close loopholes to big money, and give law enforcement sharper teeth, a longer reach and a freer hand”. Then it goes on to say, “The bill would remove the Commissioner of Elections Canada, where the investigators work, from Elections Canada and set it up as a separate office, sources say.”

Would this not be considered very similar to the issue we're dealing with? But there was never any point of privilege raised in the House, because perhaps this is considered normal and expected when you're dealing with legislation.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

It's hard for me to comment. I'm not familiar with the details of the case.

(1135)

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

We have to be very careful here. I assure Mr. Richards that we are taking this very seriously, because what we decide here is going to set a precedent.

I would be very concerned if we're setting a precedent in which we cannot talk in generalities about legislation that is being proposed, consult with Canadians, and that this may close dialogue in the future. I'm reminded, for instance, of the advice that we're given when doing private members' bills, where we do want to consult broadly with stakeholders and with colleagues. We can't give out the text of the bill, but we can certainly speak about what may or may not be included in the bill.

Could Mr. Dufresne or Mr. Bosc answer what you advise new MPs when it comes to private members' legislation?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

When concerns have been raised—talking about the disclosure of the content of bills once the bill has been put on notice—there was some discussion about consultation in advance, the development of policy, and so on.

If you look at the precedent, as we stated at the outset, the reviews from this committee and from speakers looked at what type of information was disclosed, when it was disclosed, how detailed it was, how public it was, and once that occurred, what remedial steps were taken. Were apologies given? Were corrective measures put in place to prevent this recurring? Were directives given, and so on? The whole context is looked at.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

But there could very well be many precedents in which this never came to the attention, because there was never a question of privilege raised.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

There may well be.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I'm sharing my time with Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I was just going to stress Mr. Schmale's point about conjecture. Another more recent example that I thought was quite interesting occurred when the federal government under Harper introduced the citizenship law, Bill C-24. This is a quote from an article on January 24, 2014: The federal government will introduce several changes to Canada's citizenship rules after members of Parliament return to Ottawa next Monday following a six-week hiatus, says Citizenship and Immigration Minister Chris Alexander.

He goes on to give very specific examples for several pages in the article. I won't read the whole thing. I don't have that much time.

It's clearly the minister saying in advance of the bill what's going to be in it, very specifically, and nobody considered that a breach of privilege at the time. The Conservative caucus itself could have raised this if they thought it was such a big deal. They didn't.

I think there's an immense amount of precedent that says this is not a breach of privilege. That's the position I will stick with. I don't have any further comments.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

On a point of order, it sounded as though Mr. Graham was about to stop. He was quoting from a document. I was going to invite him to give it, as could Ms. Vandenbeld, to the clerk so that we could all look at those things. There shouldn't be a problem with that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's no problem.

To answer David Christopherson's point very quickly, he asked if I'm challenging the Speaker. No, the Speaker said this is a prima facie case of privilege. It looks like one. It's up to us to decide if there is one. In my opinion, it looked like one at first blush, but when I look at it closely, I don't see one. To answer your point, no, I'm not challenging the Speaker.

To Scott, I don't have a problem with that.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Okay. We're going on to Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Sorry. I wouldn't have eaten into Mr. Graham's time if I'd known I was about to go next.

It seems we're moving into debate here. The rules seem to me to be quite clear in this matter, and this does constitute a breach of privilege. We can review the rules.

I think what is being asserted by the Liberals is that a convention has developed of saying that if the rules are violated in this way, it's just a pro forma violation. We can all live with it. We ought not to be objecting to it. Conventions do from time to time develop, both that something that is formally prohibited is in practice permitted and the reverse. Something that is formally permitted is beyond the pale of acceptable behaviour. That then becomes something that is prohibited and practised. We all get the point that if the Governor General started vetoing laws, which in theory he could do legally, we would start looking for a replacement Governor General because he would have gone beyond what is conventionally acceptable behaviour.

I think the Liberals are arguing that a convention has developed. I'm willing to accept that the Liberals have developed this kind of conventional point of view because they did not move questions of privilege when these items they've pointed to.... I think Mr. Graham's case is less convincing than Ms. Vandenbeld's, but that's why I've asked to see the articles, so I can see if the facts correspond with the assertions.

If they failed to move questions of privilege at that point, that suggests that they'd accepted a certain way of behaving, which they now seek to turn into a modus vivendi, a way of operating, all the time in the future. If we say this was okay, then we are saying that this will happen every time. This will become the standard of behaviour. The Liberal government will always be releasing select details—not all the details came out— of its legislation ahead of time. I accept the fact that they will not be doing this on budgets, as clearly there's a very strict rule that we all accept in that regard, but it looks to me as though they are trying to move in that direction.

Therefore I implore colleagues not to go in the direction of saying that this was okay and that this is somehow what the new standard should be. That is effectively saying that Parliament, the House of Commons, will be sidelined. This will be the status quo from now on. Indeed, that is the exact assertion that the Liberals are making right now, that the Liberals were advised to make. Your research bureau did good work and got you those points, but it was an unacceptable practice. If it ever happened in the past, it's unacceptable now. Our convention should be to say Parliament, the House of Commons, is where legislation is revealed.

Let's be clear about the leak that occurred with regard to Bill C-14. It was meant to turn the debate in a certain direction. It was meant to have the effect of causing opposition on the side saying the bill doesn't go far enough to gel rather than opposition on the side saying that the bill goes too far. It's a very clever and, I might say, a very successful communications strategy based on what's happened since that time. But it gutted Parliament's role in this process. It was unacceptable. It was wrong. There is no excuse for it happening. I come down on the side of saying the convention should be that we follow the letter of the rules and not that we deviate from them.

That's all I have to say. Thank you.

(1140)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I want to follow up on Mr. Reid's comments. I thank him for suggesting that perhaps some of the past behaviour of the previous Conservative government was inappropriate, because that seems to be what he's suggesting. At least on the government side, we recognize that.

I'm going to get back to the point that Mr. Christopherson raised, which was with respect to the apology that had been put by the chief government whip, which was...if there is in fact a finding of privilege in this particular case. I think that's our responsibility and our role here today as a committee. It's to determine clearly, so that we have a clear precedent going forward, what the appropriate conduct is. What action should we or should we not take in terms of disclosure of material before the House, so that members have the first opportunity to consider contents of legislation that is before it at first blush, as opposed it being out there in the public more broadly?

That's why I get back to my original point, which is the possession of the bill, because it is the contents of the bill itself that require us, that give us the capacity as members, to determine whether something is in or not in the legislation. We have these media reports that clearly talk about these broad intentions or policy brushes, but it doesn't give us the substantive language of each of the particular elements that we need to consider as members of Parliament.

In fact, you could see all of us debating the issue as we were voting on the various substantive motions that were before the House yesterday, because we ultimately had the content of both the bill and the proposed amendments before us. Again, what I'm struggling with, frankly, is to understand the nature of the privilege. I get the broad brush of it, which is the intention that we get the material first, but in lieu of actually having the substantive bill before us.... Again, when I read the disclosure of the two media articles, there is no clear evidence that the reporters in question or the media sources in question actually had the bill. They may have had discussions, and then we have to decide whether those discussions or those disclosures constitute a breach of members' privileges. That, to me, is the distinction that I'm trying to deal with.

I welcome commentary, because I'm trying to understand. What is the nature of the breach? Did a breach take place and what is the evidence before us?

(1145)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks.

I appreciate what Mr. Chan is saying. I get a sense the government sort of got.... Talking about privilege, this thing is borderline privilege with respect to being able to do your job, and I don't know why the government would want to put us on edge in matters of privilege. I can't imagine this is helpful to your cause. I leave it with you. I know it's aggravating the hell out of me.

I hear the point Mr. Chan is making. It sounds a bit like the government has two tracks going. One is if they can effectively kill this through some of the arguments that Mr. Reid effectively dissected. In the other case, we get Mr. Chan, who says, “You know, we're in your hands and we're ready to go the other way”. The story isn't about the government trying to kill it—it looks like they're trying to hit that sweet spot. I get it.

Mr. Chan made a very good point, as he usually does. If we look at our notes, though, we see the government in the past said that they reviewed all their procedures—and I think those procedures might have been reviewed by this committee—and they went back and improved those procedures and then published them in the government's response to the committee report.

Clearly, there is an ability to define and identify what information we're talking about. If the last government was prepared to acknowledge something had gone wrong, and they made changes, I don't need to take the argument too far to suggest that this government now has an obligation to also acknowledge that there is a process, that there is information.

I agree completely with Mr. Reid. Either we change the rules so that this is not considered a breach, or we really do something. When it's raised in the House as a breach we know the kind of attention it gets—a whole flurry of activity. It's a big deal inside the bubble, a very big deal.

When the Speaker says he sees a prima facie case, and that means that effectively it would take a motion to refer it to PROC, then the House is saying this is really important and they've dealt with it and it is going to PROC. If it comes to PROC and all PROC does is whimper away and wimp out on the deal and say that it's not a big deal, then what are we doing to our system of privilege? We're watering down our own rights.

Either those rights are there and they're identifiable and supportable and we're prepared to support them all the way through to taking action against those who violate them, or we're not.

If the government wants to suggest that we change the rules, if we follow Madam Vandenbeld's point that these things are fairly routine—and I'm not trying to put words in her mouth—then we ought to make a change. But to me, what we ought not do is go down the road that Mr. Reid said could happen. We make a big deal of it in the House, and we talk about privilege, and the Speaker gets in full flight and does his thing and it gets sent off, and then it comes here and it effectively withers away and dies. That's not helping any one of us.

Given that the last government recognized there were procedures and that they could improve those procedures, I would suggest that if this government hasn't bothered to do any kind of review, what they're doing is forcing us to do it. If we have to take the time to do it, we can. I suggest that one of the places to start is the previous protocol—or ask the government if they have a protocol. But I have to tell you, the government is not doing itself any favours treating this the way they did, especially given the new era that they are supposedly bringing us into.

Thanks.

The Chair:

Okay, we'll open this up a little bit. Does anyone have any more questions for the clerks, so we can let them go?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I'm respectful of your time. I want to invite you, at the discretion of my fellow committee members, to stay to deal with the other matter that we are about to discuss—

(1150)

Mr. Scott Reid:

About the question of privilege regarding the Prime Minister.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Yes, we'd like to know whether you're prepared to speak to that today.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

We have other engagements. We had counted on being here until noon.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Fair enough, thank you, Mr. Bosc.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Actually there is one thing. It's conceivable you would know the answer to this.

This is for you, Mr. Bosc, particularly. I've been on this committee for over a decade. It's the first time we're faced with having two matters of privilege before us at the same time, but I'm sure it's not the first time it's ever happened. Is there a normal practice for how procedure and House affairs, or the relevant committee in whatever Westminister system, ought to deal with them when it has two matters of privilege? Do we just do them chronologically, in the order they come to us, or what is the practice?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

This question came up earlier. In fact, it's up to the committee entirely to decide on its priorities. Since there is no obligation to report at all, the committee can do what it wishes on either case. Therefore it follows that if the committee has other priorities, it can decide itself in which order to pursue them.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I was absent earlier. It sounds like you've dealt with this, but let me ask the question. The committee is not actually required to report back at all to the House of Commons. It could simply say it is not going to do anything.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

There are examples of that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I see. Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Chair.

If I'm moving ahead of the debate I'm sure you'll tell me quickly. I'm jumping ahead to the business part of it, but they are all linked.

We have two matters of privilege, and one directly involves named members. Therefore the issue hangs over, in this case, the Prime Minister, whereas for the other one we have unknown people. When it comes to these kinds of things, I always think what if it were me at the end of the table facing the rest of my colleagues, what would I want? How would I want to be treated? What would the environment be like? I have to tell you if something like this were hanging over me, I would very much appreciate a quick hearing to deal with it effectively. Whatever it's going to be, don't leave that hanging over me especially as we head into the summer.

Just based on that thinking alone, Chair, I'm hoping that when we move to the business portion in about 10 minutes we would acknowledge that that matter of privilege should take precedence over this one, given the fact that there are named individuals involved. This hangs out there over them that whole time, and that's not to anyone's advantage.

The Chair:

Okay, I'd like to thank the Clerk and the Law Clerk for coming. We've had you a lot this year and we really appreciate that. We know you are really busy, and we appreciate your time.

We'll suspend for a minute and then we'll get back to business in just a minute or two, not very long.

(1150)

(1200)

The Chair:

We are in order.

Before we start, there are two things.

Welcome, Karen Vecchio.

Second, at a previous meeting, Mr. Reid asked our researcher to research something, and I just want him to respond to that.

Mr. Andre Barnes (Committee Researcher):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

It's the same question that Mr. Chan had for Mr. Bosc. It was whether or not there were similar instances of premature disclosure of a bill on notice found in other jurisdictions. Going back to 2001, I looked into the U.K. House of Lords, the U.K. House of Commons, the Australian Senate, the Australian House of Representatives, and New Zealand and I did not find anything.

I would note that I found cases of premature disclosure of committee documents that were in camera, but that happens quite frequently. In fact, it has happened fairly recently here. It's more analogous to a case that happened not that long ago when a pre-budget consultation document was leaked, so it's not necessarily analogous to the case before the committee.

Mr. Scott Reid:

What about the instances cited by Ms. Vandenbeld and Mr. Graham? They're from our jurisdiction, not from Australia, but are those sufficiently parallel to look at? They never came before the House, though. Is that the problem? Is that why you didn't look at them?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

Those were included in the briefing. As I understood it, the request was to check other jurisdictions.

Mr. Scott Reid:

In addition to our own.

Mr. Andre Barnes: Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid: Is that because such leaks haven't occurred, or because a convention has developed that it's okay to have leaks of that sort, or because the rules of order are just different?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

It would only be speculation on my part to comment on that although it might just be a specific Canadian convention that, when a bill is on notice, that bill is off limits. I could look into other jurisdictions to see if they have something like that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Maybe that's the thing to do, to actually look at whether the rules are different. It's harder to find practices because they're often not codified the same way. Would you be able to try that?

Mr. Andre Barnes:

I can either check in their manual, which is the equivalent to the O'Brien and Bosc, or I can just contact their clerk's office in those jurisdictions to get back to me.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Before we go to the second matter, I want to just finish dealing with the first matter.

I want to dismiss Mr. Bosc and Mr. Dufresne, given that we're starting to have an internal discussion here about where we want to go with the issue of privilege.

My sense of it coming from the table or from the clerk is that it's ultimately up to us to decide what the nature of privilege is. What's really important is that, if we're to do anything, it's to give clear guidance going forward. I think that might be the point that you're making, David; let's set the ground rules so we have a clear understanding of what's acceptable practice and not acceptable practice. I have no problem with that because we can then avoid getting into this kind of conundrum, whereas I'm scratching my head asking myself if this is a breach of privilege or not.

It's incumbent upon us to set the ground rules. Maybe there is that lack of clarity that you noted, Scott, with this sort of creeping, evolving conventional practice of talking about things. The question is whether we cross the line or we don't cross the line, particularly once matters have been put on notice before the House. That's what I'm struggling with.

I'm also in your hands as to where you all want to take this. Are there specific witnesses?

I get the point. David has asked the question: has an investigation commenced with respect to this? Right now I have no sense of where the breach comes from. I'm just going to be upfront about it; I have no idea. It could have come from anywhere. I'm in your hands with respect to where you want to take this.

We do not want to have the situation where parliamentarians are not the first ones looking at these substantive pieces of legislation that we ultimately have to vote on. I get that point and I'm not dismissing that in any way. It is a very serious issue for me, and I think for all members on the government side, which is why the chief government whip said that, if there is in fact a determination of breach, we apologize for the fact. Let's put some processes in place. I'm all for it. I just want to get it clear.

I want to be able to say where the bright line is so that we know what to do. What's the guidance? What is the standard of practice?

I'm in your hands.

(1205)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you, Arnold, for that.

What we are trying to do is get information, through the analyst, that helps us determine where the rules lie and where the conventions lie. That is information as to background.

As for this incident, the obvious thing is to try to find out additional facts as to the source of this particular leak. I think the best way of doing that would be to invite as witnesses the minister's chief of staff, Lea MacKenzie, and the minister's senior communications adviser, Joanne Ghiz. I could be wrong. Those may not be the individuals who were there at the time. If I am mistaken, then I would want to adjust the names, but they could provide us with information. They could confirm to us that they themselves were not the source of it, that it was done deliberately—assuming that to be the case. In addition, they could indicate how large the circle is as to individuals who had access to the documentation at that point.

At some point, either someone was careless and it slipped out, which is highly unlikely—I say that because we would have more than this select slice of information, were that the case—or someone deliberately leaked some of the information, which I think is the only plausible hypothesis. At any rate, those two could provide information.

I would be happy to have the minister herself here. I understand that we can't force the minister to come and also, in all fairness, I suppose the minister is presumably designing the policy, as opposed to designing the communications strategy. The minister is not a communications expert, but I would move that we have those two come as witnesses.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson, go ahead.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I might add to that. Again, I don't want to make a mountain out of a molehill. I was surprised there was no answer at all, and I am still not getting an answer. Mr. Chan says he doesn't know, and I accept that, of course.

The chief government whip was here, and we can't even get an answer to the question of whether the government, after apologizing for something they said was horribly wrong and shouldn't have happened, conducted an internal investigation. Did they have an investigation?

The other thing is that our notes tell us that, back in 2001—I realize it is going back aways—in the resolution to that issue, which is similar to this but of course not quite exactly the same.... They then updated and revised their “Guide to Making Federal Acts and Regulations”. That was 15 years ago. I don't even know if such a thing is around, but there has to be some kind of a guidebook and policies that exist today. I can't imagine we would go from 2001 with detailed processes, only to find out in 2016 that everything is gone. It is possible, but it would be surprising.

To me, Mr. Chair, it would be worth our time to talk to the chief government whip, again, to reiterate why he apologized. Mr. Chan, supported by other colleagues of his making that argument, says he is not sure what exactly the breach is, and yet their own chief government whip at the time felt that he owed the House an apology and gave one. Clearly, to some degree, even the whip acknowledged that a breach had taken place, at least a prima facie case of a breach.

In bringing in the chief government whip, I would have at least two questions. One, what is the current version of “Guide to Making Federal Acts and Regulations” and any successor documents that are now in place? I don't know what the new government has done vis-à-vis that policy with regard to where it was in the last government. Maybe that is something we need, too. Two, did you change it? Did the government change the process? Did the Conservatives actually have something right in that case, and the government now has monkeyed with it and made it worse? I don't know, so I think we deserve to know that.

Those two questions alone are worth calling in the chief government whip. Why did the chief whip believe there was a breach? What was it that he was apologizing for? Is there or was there any kind of an internal government investigation to find out who the culprits were?

Third, what policies or guides are in place vis-à-vis “Guide to Making Federal Acts and Regulations”? I think those would be at least three pertinent questions, off the top of my head, that would be properly placed before the chief government whip, so I would suggest his name, Mr. Chair.

(1210)

The Chair:

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Let me respond to Mr. Christopherson's assertion that the chief government whip apologized for a breach. I think he apologized. He said, “We apologize if there is a finding of a breach.” I would invite you to read the record more carefully with respect to his comments in the House of Commons.

I don't have an opinion with respect to the chief government whip. I do want to respond to Mr. Reid's suggestion about calling two staffers from the Minister of Justice's office. I would be of the view that it would be more appropriate on the doctrine of ministerial responsibility to simply call the minister.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm not against that at all, believe me, but I think that we can't require the minister to come here. When I say that, on the other hand, the Liberals can vote anything, and you can also arrange to have the minister not appear. Ultimately whether we have witnesses, be it the minister or the minister's staff coming here, is up to you all and not up to us.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

No, I follow.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm still going to move that we invite these individuals. The possibility also exists, and this worries me, that the minister would say truthfully, “I don't know, someone else handled that stuff”, but that reason would be insufficient. The minister did have a lot on her plate and may genuinely not know. I'm going to keep these names before us, but I do take the point to very much welcome the minister's presence here. In fairness to the minister, we might want to wait until Bill C-14 has been dealt with, because she does have something else on her plate at the moment.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I wanted to clarify with the clerk, have we made a request from this committee for an invitation, for the availability of the minister on this issue yet? I can't remember, because I've been in and out, and I apologize.

The Chair:

The committee hasn't made a decision on inviting her, but the committee did want to give her a heads-up because of her limited time that we may be calling her in June. The clerk did give her that heads-up.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Mr. Reid, I would invite you to amend your motion. You could speak to the two individuals in question, but I still think the doctrine applies that the minister is responsible, so she can give the testimony on behalf of these two staffers.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'll take you up on the invitation. Understanding that the minister is responsible under the doctrine of ministerial responsibility, but also accepting the reality of life that she is not omniscient...I stand to be corrected, but I guess she's not omniscient. If she is, I'm going to want to ask her about the stock market.

Let me amend the motion to invite the minister, accompanied by her chief of staff and communications adviser. At that point, I think it would be clear to all of us this is the normal practice. The minister might be the one answering questions, but she would have the capacity to turn to these people for assistance if she gets stuck on any point.

(1215)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I leave it to the minister to respond in terms of who would support her in giving her evidence that would ultimately be helpful to this committee, but I am typically reluctant to call specific officials, unless we had evidence in advance that they were somehow involved in the situation. I see none right now to suggest that, and I think it breaches the convention with respect to the doctrine of ministerial responsibility. We call the minister, and the minister calls whatever support that she requires.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'll say in response to that, I do not mean to suggest these individuals are culpable. That's something we simply can't know. They're merely people who are in positions that deal with this kind of material. They would have information at a more detailed level than the minister would, I suspect, as to how many hands this information was in, what the processes are for security of the material, and that kind of thing. I'll leave it there.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Chair.

I don't know if Mr. Reid would take it as a friendly amendment to include the chief government whip, and whether you want me to formally move an amendment, or whether you want a separate motion. I'm in your hands on that. I'm in concurrence with the starting point of those two.

I did want to state to Mr. Chan and others that this business of staff is always a tricky one. Bear in mind that this committee always retains the right to demand any—and I think I've got the three right—papers, people, and documents, or at least close to that. That right is absolute.

As a matter of convention, starting with the minister, since they're accountable in keeping staff out of the direct line of fire if there's no need for them to be there, is a good one. I'm prepared to support that notion as we approach it, but I just hope that no one thinks that this necessarily ends it, or that we can't go to staff. Having been a staff—and I'm one of those, and there are quite a few around here—it's easy for us to put ourselves in those shoes and the last thing you want to do as a staffer is to be at the end of the table facing the opposition members and whatever might come. I get that. However, at the end of the day, if we have to do that to get at what we determine to be the truth, we still have that right. One is the niceties of how we'll approach it, and the other is, if we have to, the reserve of actual authority and power that this committee does have to produce whatever it wants to appear at the end of the table.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I would agree with that if it were evidence that comes out perhaps through disclosure from the minister.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm willing to take that approach. I think Mr. Reid is too. I'm hearing him. I don't want to put words in his mouth, but my sense is that he was prepared to go that way as long as we understand that if we start chasing our tail or we're going in circles or bringing in a staff person to give direct evidence that is clearly needed to assist the committee in their work, then that's where I'm going to go. Then we'll talk about how we do that because once they're there, it's a unique situation whereby all this power is in our hands and you have very few rights. You have no lawyer. You're protected from any kind of court action, based on anything you say, but nonetheless there's no bigger court than Parliament at the end of the day.

Hopefully, we have a meeting of the minds in how we're going to approach this as the details come up.

I would just come back to the point, Chair, if you're considering my request to have the chief government whip here, is it part of Mr. Reid's motion, or do I need to do a separate motion? I'm in your hands, sir.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I would suggest a separate motion, Mr. Christopherson.

I want to respond to the suggestion of the chief government whip. I just don't think the chief government whip would add anything. Your concern ultimately is if there's an investigation, it would be a departmental one. Obviously, the department that is responsible for the process would be the one that would have conducted reviews, so I think the starting point for me is the minister.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Chair, if you're allowing the dialogue back and forth, I hear your point, but I still think it's relevant that this “Guide to Making Federal Acts and Regulations”, and whatever its current 2016 version is...it would seem to me that this is under the responsibility of the whip. If you want to say to me that's under the responsibility of the House leader, or whoever you want, I don't care, I just want somebody in here with some responsibility for that policy to talk about what it is and to tell us whether or not it's been changed from what the previous government had. I think that's very relevant.

(1220)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I have no idea.

Mr. David Christopherson:

As I said, I don't care. Just give us a government representative, preferably an elected one, who can answer what is the current policy that we're referring to in 2001, and has this government made any changes to that protocol policy from what the last government had? These are very valid questions, I think.

The Chair:

It might be the Privy Council Office.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

It might be the Privy Council Office. I just don't think it falls.... The whip is not technically—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Who do you want to give me?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I'm just trying to understand. The chief government whip is not a member of the executive council...well actually he is, so I take it back. I'm just trying to find who would be the responsible ministerial—

The Chair:

I think we should research—

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Can we get back to you on that?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Agreed. I was watching the clock.

Where are we?

The Chair:

They'll get back to you on that when they find out who's responsible.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

It appears that it's on the Privy Council Office website.

Mr. David Christopherson:

All right, and then the motion that some yet-unnamed person from the government appear before us to speak to what the policy is, then you can fill in the blank.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Okay. We know it is from the Privy Council Office; we will advise you once we get the right elected official.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I appreciate that. I'm staying with the elected person, going with the idea that we're the ones who are front-line accountable. If you want to bring somebody else, let's talk about it, but I'd rather deal with other elected people right now.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I guess I'd also point out that the whip was here during the discussion today for quite some time. He must have felt he had something to offer or to add in some way. There were some questions Mr. Christopherson had that I think would have been appropriately answered by him. He was the one who got up in the House and made the apology, which apparently wasn't an apology because now we're not sure if there was something to apologize for, but anyway, we'll determine that, I guess. He obviously felt he had something to add or something to contribute since he was here. I still think it would be advisable for him to be called.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

[Inaudible—Editor] and we'll just deal with calling the minister? You can decide whether you agree or disagree.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes. Bring some information. We'll deal with it at the next meeting.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Okay. We'll have something by Thursday.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay, I can live with that.

The Chair:

We'll go back to Mr. Reid's motion.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Can we amend it to “the Minister of Justice”, to request the Minister of Justice?

The Chair:

“...that the Minister of Justice be invited to appear as a witness as soon as possible before the committee”?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Do we even do friendly amendments in Parliament or is that a Robert's Rules of Order thing?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

You move it and I'll second it, okay?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Fair enough. I think this makes it procedurally correct. I'll be happy to remove my last one and put this one forward. I don't know if seconding is necessary, but thank you, Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

It's not necessary, but okay, I'll support it.

The Chair:

As soon as possible, right?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, as soon as conveniently possible. We all understand she has some other stuff on her plate.

The Chair:

Okay. Is there any discussion on the motion?

(Motion agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Chair, I haven't yet heard you say that you've received the referral from the House, but I'm assuming that has happened and that we have the referral. My suggestion would be that we move to that right away and begin to deal with it.

The Chair:

Sure.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Agreed.

The Chair:

Go ahead, David. Do you want to open the discussion?

Mr. David Christopherson:

I can if you wish.

The most important thing I have to say is really not even my words. I think we all understand the seriousness, and I think that was reflected in the Prime Minister's third apology.

To get things started, I'd like to read a statement from Madame Brosseau and then I will have it circulated. I'd like to read it first so that it's very clear this is her statement, which I'm reading on her behalf. It's pretty self-explanatory. I'll have a few comments after that, and then let's see where we go from there.

I am quoting a statement from Ruth-Ellen Brosseau, the MP for Berthier—Maskinongé, and it reads as follows: The matter that is before PROC today is focused on a breach of the rights that are afforded to Members of Parliament. If anything impedes a Parliamentarian from carrying out the role their constituents elected them to undertake, it constitutes a serious matter. In this case it was the Prime Minister himself that caused this breach when his inappropriate physical intervention with Conservative Whip Gordon Brown on the floor of the House of Commons resulted in physical contact that caused me to miss a vote. The details of the unprecedented physical interaction between the Prime Minister and members of the opposition are well documented, and such an incident would not be acceptable in any workplace. It left many Members stunned and raised important questions about the conduct of the Prime Minister in a House that was already confronted with unprecedented government measures to limit debate. I am pleased that PROC is moving forward to deal with the referral of the incident today. I believe that this, coupled with the Prime Ministers' admission that his conduct was unacceptable, provide closure to this issue. I accept his apology and look forward to returning my focus to representing the people of Berthier—Maskinongé. It is my sincere hope that all Members will work to ensure that we never see this conduct repeated, and also that we take this opportunity to recommit to improving the tone of debate in Parliament.

I have one other thing to say, and then I'll just open the floor.

Madame Brosseau is not able to be with us today. She is actually in China on parliamentary trade matters on behalf of Parliament.

Obviously, Chair, I'll just say that the motion itself makes direct reference to Madame Brosseau, and certainly our caucus is taking its lead from the member for Berthier—Maskinongé. It is her wish and her belief that all of the attention and the fact that we're focused on this here now...as well as the fact that, although it required three attempts, nonetheless, a comprehensive apology was given.

On a personal note, I just want to note the question from Madame Petitpas Taylor. Following the Prime Minister's comment, she got up and asked him whether, given what was going on in the House, there was anything mitigating that had happened, that would affect and mitigate his culpability, his responsibility. I think that was the essence of the question.

To his credit, the answer came back unequivocally that, no, the Prime Minister acknowledged that his actions stood alone, were unacceptable, and required a full apology.

(1225)



He made that apology, and I'm here to advise colleagues that my colleague, Ruth Ellen Brosseau, considers that apology and this hearing today to be sufficient to close the matter and move forward, with the caveat that, hopefully, we won't see a repeat by anyone.

I think maybe that's a good place for me to end, Chair, and obviously I reserve my right to speak again toward the end if necessary.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. That was very moving.

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

First of all I want to thank you, Mr. Christopherson, on behalf of not only myself but of all the members of the government for reading Madam Brosseau's statement into the record today. We know that what transpired on May 18 was not a good day for Parliament, for all of us. For example, I look at our conduct yesterday. We know that we behaved much better yesterday, let's put it that way, and I hope that this becomes the standard of practice for all of us in the House of Commons.

I understand we all have very strong personalities and we get into heated debates. Things that led up to the circumstances on May 18 caused tempers for many of the members to rise for various reasons. It is what it is. We all know what transpired that day. I take the fact that starting from the Prime Minister all the way down to all of the members involved, we want to move on and that we need to conduct ourselves in a much more respectful manner. I hope it's a learning moment for all of us.

We're sure to get into instances again in the future, to be blunt, where we will feel strongly about particular issues, but at the end of the day I hope that we're all respectful enough to one another that we can have differences of opinion, that this is the forum in which we express those differences of opinion. When we cast our ballot, which is the ultimate expression of our democratic values in Parliament, we should try to avoid the circumstances that arose that particular day. I'm grateful for the statement from Madam Brosseau. I hope I speak for my colleagues that if this is the way in which those who were most affected by the actions of the Prime Minister, to whom you know he unreservedly apologized...then we accept that and thank you for it.

(1230)

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have a question to Mr. Christopherson and then, depending on his response, I have a second question to him.

Madam Brosseau's statement is not as clear as I think she may have intended it to be on the question that I'm going to ask you right now. Is it her preference that this committee desist as of today from pursuing this matter and that this be our final meeting on the issue? I'm not clear whether that is the case, so we should ask that.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Are you asking me if that is her position?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, that's right, her position.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I can answer on her behalf, and the answer is yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

In that case, might I suggest that today we learned from Mr. Bosc—others may have known this but I did not—that as a committee we make a decision as to whether or not we continue to pursue matters of privilege. I think the appropriate way of making a decision to not pursue a matter of privilege should always be to not simply let it drop but to actually formally bring it to conclusion by means of a motion. The motion could simply be that the issue of privilege presently before us, beyond which issue it is—

Mr. David Christopherson: Be considered resolved.

Mr. Scott Reid: Or something to that effect. I'll leave it to you to do it. The point is to say that it ends here. We do it by means of a motion and the majority agrees and it makes it very clear.

Would you be willing to move a motion to that effect?

Mr. David Christopherson:

I would. I think what you're suggesting, and I'm probably on the same wavelength, is that the idea of letting it just drop and that's how it ends is not healthy, that it would be better if we issue a report and in that report we can say whatever we decide. If it's consistent with what Ruth Ellen is asking for, then it would recognize her statement. We could probably include it in the report. Then following that, if there is a motion, if there is the opportunity, send a report to the House. It has some merit.

What's the alternative? Could we still move a motion and not go to the House?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

We could report back. We don't have to, but we could choose to report back.

The Chair:

I think Mr. Reid's suggestion is more in line with the spirit of what you would like because if you do a report any member of the House can call a three-hour debate on it and someone drags it all out.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm just seeing it. I wish I had that before. We'll talk about advice and timing after this meeting, but I'm just going to bite the bullet and acknowledge that we prefer not to do a report too.

The Chair:

Could you make a motion and finish this?

Mr. David Christopherson:

I may need some guidance in terms of an appropriate type of motion, but let me try. It is: that the committee considers the matter of the privilege referral from the House on—and fill in the date—to have been resolved and that it is the opinion of the committee that no further action is required.

(1235)

The Chair:

Is that agreeable to Mr. Reid?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Sure.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's something I'm hoping to change, but that's off the top of my head, Chair.

Then we could just end it with a motion and call it a day.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I'm substantively in agreement. I just want to suggest maybe a slight modification to allow the opportunity for Ruth Ellen's statement to get on the record, as well as just to simply acknowledge the apology of the Prime Minister and that it has been accepted by Ruth Ellen and now we consider the matter to be closed. Something like that.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I think the language gets us there, Chair. I don't think there's much disagreement on principle.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

And somehow if we can include some language to talk about...

Mr. David Christopherson:

About it not happening again in the future, that sort of thing.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

No. It's actually in Ruth Ellen's statement.

Mr. David Christopherson:

In the motion.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

In the motion, yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Would you read that back?

The Chair:

The motion reads, “In light of the statement by the member from...who therein accepted the Prime Minister's apology, we consider that no further action need to be taken on this motion of privilege.”

Does that sound good? Is there anyone opposed? Carried.

(Motion agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Thank you, David.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, could I raise another matter?

The Chair:

Yes. We do have some time and I do have some other business. Only three of you responded to the letter on the Austrian delegation. We also have the motion on the emergency hours, which I think we could do in 30 seconds.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Has anybody ever read the Edgar Allan Poe story, The Tell-Tale Heart, in which a man murders somebody, buries him under the floorboards, and then the sound of his beating heart gets louder and louder and louder and eventually drives the perpetrator insane?

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

You should have asked the Clerk that. He's responsible. The Clerk was here and you should have asked him.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Here's my question and this is more to our clerk actually. I recognize there are all kinds of limitations on what you can do, but whenever possible until this construction is done would you be able to move us to some other room—for example, there are two upstairs—instead of this one? If it's not possible I understand, but the thought may have crossed your mind independently. It's worse here.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The Wellington Building is due to be open any day now. Can we move there at the earliest opportunity?

The Chair:

And then return to 112-North? I'd like to be in this building, if we can.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: When there's no jackhammering.

The Chair: Now that we're in goodwill and good spirits maybe we could deal with this minor motion of the Speaker setting the hours of emergency debate.

The only holdup we have on the debate is Mr. Christopherson would like the word “agreement” instead of “consultation”. The clerks who drafted this have suggested that that's not necessarily a good idea for several reasons. One is this is the format that's used throughout the Standing Orders and the Speaker making decisions.

Second of all, in other parliaments he doesn't even have to consult because of the emergencies. He just sets the hours to come back in an emergency.

I'm hoping we could pass this the way it was handed out, that the Speaker will consult with members, but call Parliament after an emergency when he can, if it's okay with Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm afraid it's not. I'll take that back and consult and see if we can come back with another compromise to get there, but that language I can't agree to.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I previously asked for a deferral. Just to remind everyone, my point previously was that if we're going to look at the issue of members' privileges broadly, as we're going through the family-friendly issue, let's deal with it as a package. Let's get your concerns from your caucus. Let's put it all together.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Sorry. What are you talking about now?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

We're talking about the emergency powers and the change to Standing Order 28, right?

Mr. David Christopherson: Yes.

(1240)

The Chair:

My point is that we could have an emergency any day. We just want to have the Speaker be able to call the House back when it's appropriate.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I understand, but the words do matter, and “agreement” versus “consultation” has a world of implications, Mr. Chair. I think you know that. We're not trying to delay this. We're not trying deliberately to delay it; there's no purpose in that.

The Chair: Yes, okay, but we can come back on—

Mr. David Christopherson: Yes, and maybe we can even have some bilateral discussions to see if we can come up with a word or a phrase.

Mr. Scott Reid:

If I might just raise a point related to this, I can tell you in a nutshell why I would object to using the word “agreement”.

Remembering the last such emergency, on October 21, 2014, it would have been extremely difficult as a practical matter, given the fact that communications had broken down and people were locked up for a fair time and then were taken under guard by police. In my case, I didn't get out of here until 11 p.m.

The Chair:

The cellphones were shut down too.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It might actually be impossible to get agreement, so “consultation”.... This is the sort of power that it's very hard to imagine being abused. I can't think of how one would abuse this particular power, and hence “consultation” seems to be reasonable.

Otherwise, effectively, not only do individual House leaders have a veto over the new time, but it might be that they are simply unavailable, and hence you literally can't bring Parliament back without violating the Standing Orders, and that would be a meaningful issue.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I appreciate that. Thank you.

Chair, let me commit to this, because I get the importance. We want to get it in place. You're right: just like that, we could have a problem.

Perhaps we could defer it one more time to even the next meeting to allow us to explore and see if we can find language. If we can't, then I accept that we've done everything we can, and we'd be ready to hold a vote.

The Chair:

If it's good with Mr. Chan. Okay.

For the next item, we have the Austrian people. They want to talk about procedure. Three of you responded, which didn't help much, because one said that we should have it during committee, another said that we should not have it during committee, and the third person was Ms. Petitpas Taylor, who's very easy to get along with and said that she'd go with what everyone else wants.

Are there any other comments on that, even just to break the tie?

Mr. David Christopherson: What's the issue, Chair?

The Chair: There's a parliamentary delegation from Austria, and they're interested in procedure. They want to meet with PROC or with those in PROC who are available.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Right. Normally, in my experience as a chair and in the rest of the years I've been here, the chair implores as many people as possible to show up in support, but at the end of the day, the chair has to carry the can. That's why you get the big bucks.

The Chair:

Yes, but the question is, at a committee meeting or not in a regular scheduled time? That's in the memo I sent out to you.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I would say I'd leave it to the chair, because sometimes I've done those things in the summer.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Mr. Chair, we have a lot of committee business that we need to deal with. Perhaps a suggestion would be to have it outside of our committee hours, but I'm flexible.

The Chair:

You've changed? Okay. We'll do it outside committee hours.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, I'm not speaking for my colleagues, just for myself, but the observation I would make is that in the past we've normally done these things outside of committee hours.

The Chair: Okay. I sense agreement on that.

Mr. Scott Reid: If we do it for the Austrians, then how are we going to stop the Slovenians from wanting the same treatment?

The Chair:

Okay. We'll set up a time outside committee hours, so anyone who can make it, that would be great.

What else did we have in committee business? I think that was it.

This committee never ceases to impress me with your comportment, rationale, and collegiality under the circumstances of a system that's meant to create confrontation. I think you all deserve a lot of credit.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Essayons de maintenir la tradition d'être essentiellement dans les temps.

Bonjour et bienvenue à la 24e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, en cette première session de la 42e législature. Cette réunion est publique.

Je souhaite la bienvenue à titre officieux à trois personnes que j'ai connues au primaire et au secondaire, il y a 50 ans. Vous pouvez deviner qui ils sont.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président: L'autre, comme vous pouvez probablement le deviner est un étudiant. Beaucoup de députés sont dépassés de nos jours par leurs étudiants, et Maris est là. Bienvenue.

Nous accueillons Marc Bosc, greffier par intérim, et Philippe Dufresne, légiste et conseiller parlementaire, ainsi que des visiteurs.

À simple titre d'information, sachez que notre projet de rapport provisoire tant attendu portant sur la vie de famille sera publié jeudi après-midi. Il est en train d'être traduit.

En ce qui concerne le premier point à l'ordre du jour ce matin, j'informe ceux qui n'étaient pas ici à ce moment-là que nous avons déjà entendu les déclarations préliminaires du greffier et du légiste au sujet de la question de privilège en lien avec le projet de loi C-14, et qu'à peine leurs déclarations terminées, nous avons été convoqués aux fins d'un vote. Ces témoins sont revenus pour répondre à nos questions. À la deuxième heure, nous traiterons de l'autre question de privilège. Il est plus que probable que ce seront des travaux du Comité. Nous en traiterons pendant la deuxième heure ainsi que de toute autre question que les députés voudront soumettre.

Sans plus tarder, je crois que nous allons effectuer le premier tour. Nous allons commencer par M. Chan.

M. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Encore une fois, je veux remercier M. Bosc et M. Dufresne de leur présence. Je veux aussi m'excuser, parce que je n'étais pas présent lorsque vous avez fait vos déclarations préliminaires, mais j'ai eu le temps de lire la transcription de vos déclarations.

Évidemment, ceux d'entre nous qui sont membres du parti ministériel prennent très au sérieux toute question renvoyée à notre comité relativement aux privilèges des députés. Quant à ma question, je n'ai pas trouvé d'élément de réponse dans votre déclaration préliminaire, monsieur Bosc, et je crois que mes collègues et moi-même, concernant la nature des conclusions antérieures de divulgation prématurée de l'information, apprécierions que vous nous disiez s'il faut qu'il y ait obligatoirement une réelle divulgation d'un projet de loi avant son dépôt sur le bureau de la Chambre ou si la simple discussion de la teneur du projet de loi suffit pour motiver une telle conclusion.

Encore une fois, je voulais simplement comprendre, de votre point de vue, sur la base de précédents historiques, toute donnée probante que vous pourriez nous communiquer et qui m'aiderait à comprendre s'il y a eu effectivement atteinte au privilège, ou non.

M. Marc Bosc (greffier par intérim, Chambre des communes):

Si vous permettez, je vais commencer par vous renvoyer, vous, M. Chan et les autres membres du Comité au document que le personnel du Comité a fait circuler il y a déjà quelque temps, lequel présente quatre cas différents.

Ce que je dirais également, avant d'entrer dans le vif du sujet, c'est que chaque cas est toujours un peu différent des autres. Il n'y a pas vraiment de comparaison directe possible parce que les circonstances sont différentes. Les cas que la Chambre a jugé être une question de privilège et qui ont été transmis au Comité comprennent ceux de 2001, lesquels, à mon avis, ressemblent probablement le plus au cas présent.

Il y a d'autres cas que vous pourriez prendre en compte. Encore une fois, ils sont dans la documentation fournie. Il y a celui de 2010 où il est question d'affaires émanant des députés, et de nouveau en 2009, un projet de loi émanant du gouvernement, bien que dans ce dernier cas, il n'y avait pas de présomptions suffisantes.

L'élément principal que le Comité doit prendre en considération, c'est le sentiment que, étant donné les éléments de preuve réunis, le droit des députés à être les premiers à prendre connaissance des projets de loi a été respecté. L'idée là-dedans, c'est que les députés doivent être en mesure d'exercer leurs fonctions. Le principe, c'est que les députés devraient être les premiers à avoir accès à de l'information sur les projets de loi et que tous les députés devraient aussi être les premiers à avoir accès à ces renseignements.

Voilà les grandes lignes de la question, de mon point de vue. Je ne sais pas si cela correspond à ce que vous vouliez.

(1105)

M. Arnold Chan:

J'ai un peu de mal avec ça, monsieur Bosc. Je voulais simplement essayer de comprendre. Si vous prenez le cas de mars 2001, c'est un exemple très précis d'une situation où le gouvernement a effectivement informé les médias à l'exclusion des députés de l'opposition. Ce n'est pas forcément le cas ici.

Ce qui me donne aussi du mal, c'est ceci. Lorsque j'examine les deux reportages dont il est question, encore une fois, je ne vois aucune preuve évidente que les journalistes en question ou les deux organes de presse en question étaient effectivement en possession du projet de loi avant qu'il ne soit communiqué au Parlement. Encore une fois, ce qui me donne du mal, c'est le concept de possession physique du document lui-même ou d'une discussion sur la teneur du projet de loi avant qu'il ne soit déposé. J'ai vu à de nombreuses occasions des gouvernements qui discutaient de projets de loi qu'ils se proposaient de présenter à la Chambre, qui parlaient de ce que pourrait contenir un projet de loi en particulier, ou non. Je ne considère pas cela comme étant nécessairement une atteinte aux privilèges des députés. Je pourrais le considérer comme étant un cas évident d'atteinte aux privilèges, si quelqu'un avait entre les mains une copie d'un projet de loi qui n'a pas encore été déposé devant le Parlement. C'est cela qui me donne du mal. Dans les exemples fournis dans le document, j'essaie d'aller au coeur de ce problème en particulier.

M. Marc Bosc:

Je comprends votre problème.

Par ailleurs, nous devons vraiment affirmer au départ que ce n'est pas à nous de prendre cette décision à la place du Comité.

M. Arnold Chan:

Non, je suis d'accord.

M. Marc Bosc:

C'est vraiment au Comité, sur la base de la preuve réunie, qu'il incombe d'arriver à une conclusion, d'une façon ou d'une autre. C'est vraiment à cela que la question se résume. Vous pouvez convoquer des témoins, vous pouvez inviter diverses personnes qui peuvent vous renseigner sur la façon dont cette information est sortie, etc.

M. Arnold Chan:

Bien sûr.

En fin de compte, les pratiques anglaises influencent beaucoup notre mode de gouvernance parlementaire également. Y a-t-il d'autres exemples dans l'histoire où il y a eu divulgation prématurée de renseignements et qui aideraient le Comité à orienter sa réflexion au sujet de la situation à laquelle nous faisons face aujourd'hui?

M. Marc Bosc:

Peut-être. Nous pourrions chercher de ce côté, mais je doute que ce soit le cas.

M. Arnold Chan:

Chaque situation est plutôt unique.

M. Marc Bosc:

Oui, mais ce n'est pas seulement cela. Les Parlements ont chacun leurs procédures et usages et ils agissent très différemment dans des dossiers comme celui-ci. Encore une fois, une comparaison directe est difficile, je dirais. Je peux voir ce qu'on peut trouver, mais je n'ai pas grand espoir, disons.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je vous remercie.

Je vous sais gré de vos observations jusqu'à présent.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Nous allons passer à M. Richards.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Je vous remercie d'être venus aujourd'hui. J'ai quelques questions.

Au sujet de la première, j'ai l'impression qu'on essaie ici de prétendre qu'il n'y a eu aucun détail du projet de loi qui a été vraiment communiqué aux médias avant sa présentation. Si vous lisez les articles, je crois qu'il est évident que certains éléments du projet de loi ont été présentés. Bien sûr, les articles eux-mêmes utilisent des formules telles que « selon une source connaissant bien le projet de loi » ou « selon une source n'ayant pas l'autorisation de discuter publiquement du projet de loi ». Regardez les reportages de la CBC: « des sources ont déclaré que le Cabinet libéral » ou « des sources disent à la CBC [...] ». Personne ne sait qui sont ces sources, mais au bout du compte, c'est un peu en quoi consiste notre tâche. C'est d'essayer de déterminer s'il y a eu violation et par qui.

De plus, lorsque vous regardez l'article lui-même, vous constatez qu'il mentionne un certain nombre d'éléments. Je pourrais les énumérer ici. Je vais citer quelques phrases simplement pour donner des exemples: [...] un projet de loi qui ne s'appliquera pas aux personnes dont les souffrances sont uniquement mentales, par exemple les personnes atteintes de troubles psychiatriques. Le projet de loi ne permet pas non plus le consentement préalable...

Je pourrais continuer avec celui-là.

On continue en disant ceci: Le projet de loi du gouvernement est modulé de manière à adopter une approche beaucoup plus étroite que celle recommandée par un comité parlementaire mixte...

On affirme également que le gouvernement prévoit repousser la question des personnes souffrant de problèmes psychologiques, mais non physiques.

Des éléments qui sont assurément contenus dans le projet de loi ont été divulgués.

Nous voyons ensuite un article publié ce matin sur le site iPolitics, dans lequel le leader parlementaire du gouvernement, interrogé sur un autre projet de loi qui pourrait être présenté, déclare ce qui suit: Si je parle d'un projet de loi possible avant qu'il ne soit présenté à la Chambre, l'opposition soulèvera une question de privilège, déclarant d'un ton courroucé que je parle d'un projet de loi avant qu'il ne soit présenté.

C'est bien qu'il le reconnaisse, mais en plus, je crois que le ton adopté ressemble à celui d'un gouvernement qui ne prend pas la question vraiment au sérieux, et c'est un problème. Je crois que c'est là quelque chose sur lequel le Comité doit se pencher. Je sais qu'il n'est pas de votre ressort de nous conseiller sur ce que nous devrions faire, ou non, nécessairement, mais c'est sûrement quelque chose dont le Comité, à mon avis, devrait traiter.

Par conséquent, une remarque est nécessaire pour que le gouvernement comprenne que ces questions sont graves, qu'il faut les prendre au sérieux et que nous ne tolérerons pas que ce genre de choses se reproduisent à l'avenir. Si le Comité cherche à en faire la remarque, quelles sont les options à notre disposition pour que ce soit clair et qu'on en fasse un exemple, si c'est ce que le Comité décide de faire?

(1110)

M. Philippe Dufresne (légiste et conseiller parlementaire):

Ce que je pourrais dire, c'est qu'à la lumière des précédents, les décisions antérieures de la Chambre et les rapports antérieurs du Comité, pour reprendre les propos de M. Bosc, ont examiné l'ampleur de l'information partagée et le degré de détail, qu'il ait été question de la teneur d'un projet de loi ou de renseignements déjà publiés; donc, ce sont là les faits qu'il vous faut établir.

Par ailleurs, on a aussi tenu compte des excuses exprimées et des correctifs apportés, ce qui a également influencé les conclusions. Dans ces décisions antérieures, il en a été question dans le rapport du Comité ou dans les décisions prises de prime abord par le Président de la Chambre. C'est ce que je dirais des décisions antérieures.

M. Blake Richards:

Une autre question de privilège a été référée au Comité. D'après moi, au moins, c'est une nouvelle situation. Je ne suis pas certain que le Comité a déjà connu une telle situation. Je me demande si vous pourriez nous donner des conseils sur la meilleure façon de traiter ce dossier.

Évidemment, nous avons celle-ci et nous avons le cas de l'agression physique dont nous sommes tous au courant, où le premier ministre a eu un contact physique avec une autre députée, et ce geste aurait empêché cette dernière de voter. Que devrait faire le Comité face à ces deux questions de privilège? Devrait-on les traiter dans l'ordre chronologique? Devrait-on les traiter en même temps? Quels seraient vos conseils à l'égard de ce que le Comité devrait faire pour traiter ces deux dossiers de manière appropriée?

M. Marc Bosc:

Le Comité a plusieurs points à l'ordre du jour, je suppose. Il a diverses priorités, et c'est au Comité qu'il incombe de déterminer comment il veut procéder. Ce n'est pas à nous de dire au Comité ce qu'il devrait faire ou non.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Avez-vous des conseils à donner ou d'autres exemples de rappel au Règlement — que ce soit dans les provinces ou dans d'autres parlements de tradition anglaise — en ce qui concerne l'agression physique d'un député par un autre député, de sorte que nous ayons une idée de ce qu'il en est et qui pourrait orienter notre réflexion sur la manière d'aborder cette question de privilège?

(1115)

M. Marc Bosc:

Encore une fois, monsieur le président, est-ce que nous traitons des deux cas aujourd'hui, ou seulement d'un? Serons-nous convoqués de nouveau?

Le président:

Vous avez été invité à traiter du projet de loi C-14 aujourd'hui; si vous voulez traiter de... Je vous laisse le choix. Je sais que vous ne vous êtes pas préparé.

M. Marc Bosc:

Essentiellement, monsieur le président et monsieur Richards, la méthode que le Comité adoptera dans les deux cas est la même ou sera probablement la même. Autrement dit, vous réunissez de l'information, vous évaluez cette information et vous formulez une recommandation sur la base de ce que vous avez trouvé. Ce n'est pas très différent, dans un cas comme dans l'autre.

M. Blake Richards:

J'ai remarqué que, dans certains autres exemples qu'on nous a donnés de dossiers antérieurs du même genre, la divulgation prématurée de la teneur d'un projet de loi, les opinions semblent être quelque peu divergentes concernant le fait que le contenu d'un projet de loi ait été divulgué ou non. Il arrive qu'il soit difficile d'établir si quelqu'un l'a simplement deviné ou si la teneur du projet de loi a été divulguée.

S'il est impossible d'établir ce fait, y a-t-il des conseils sur la manière de procéder? Évidemment, le Comité devra essayer d'en faire un avertissement par rapport à tout projet de loi futur du gouvernement.

M. Marc Bosc:

Encore une fois, dans la documentation que le Comité a reçue plus tôt, diverses options sont présentées, allant de la décision de ne pas intervenir parce qu'il n'y a pas eu violation ou atteinte de privilège, jusqu'à l'autre bout du spectre, qui consisterait à conclure qu'il y a eu violation et à recommander par conséquent une mesure disciplinaire. Toutes ces options sont possibles. Mais comme l'a indiqué Philippe, dans certains cas, les excuses ou les mesures déjà prises à la Chambre sont jugées suffisantes par le Comité. C'est une autre possibilité. Cela fait partie des choses que le Comité peut envisager.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Nous passons à M. Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président, et je vous remercie tous les deux d'être présents aujourd'hui.

Comme j'ai été confronté au même dilemme plusieurs fois, je n'ai pas beaucoup de questions. La plupart de mes questions concerneraient des détails quant aux circonstances. Je n'aurai pas nécessairement besoin de toute la période de sept minutes pendant ce tour. Je sais, ce sera la deuxième fois, en passant.

Monsieur le président, si vous le permettez, et je compte sur votre sagesse pour me guider, étant donné que le 14 avril, le projet de loi C-14 a été déposé, ce fut le jour où s'est produite la fuite. Le whip en chef du gouvernement a reconnu qu'il y avait eu une fuite et a présenté ses excuses. Du moins, ça a été rapporté. Les notes disent « sans réserve », et je les prends au pied de la lettre. Quand on pose la question de savoir qui en a tiré profit, il est plutôt évident que ce fut le gouvernement. Personne d'autre n'a été avantagé par cette fuite. Franchement, il serait difficile pour quelqu'un d'autre que le gouvernement d'avoir l'information à faire couler en premier lieu.

Est-ce que le gouvernement a mis en branle une enquête de son côté? Il est évident que c'est un des siens qui a coulé l'information. Est-ce que quelqu'un là-bas peut me donner une réponse, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Ça dépend de vous, si quelqu'un veut répondre.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est une demande factuelle. Est-ce que le gouvernement, étant donné l'importance de cet incident et du fait que le whip en chef du gouvernement ait tout de suite pris la parole et admis qu'il y avait un problème...? Je pourrais consulter le hansard, mais connaissant la personne, je suis sûr que c'était sincère et complet. Mais ça soulève la question suivante: si le gouvernement est sérieux à ce sujet, est-ce qu'il a pour autant lancé une enquête interne pour établir qui l'a fait, étant donné qu'il est pratiquement certain que c'était un membre du personnel auxiliaire ou un député du gouvernement, quelqu'un attaché au gouvernement? Je pense que c'est une question valable.

Il semble que la réponse soit un non haut et fort.

Le whip en chef du gouvernement est présent. Je suis certain qu'il sera heureux de nous aider.

On pourrait entendre une mouche voler.

Ça pose la question. Si c'est aussi important, il est difficile de joindre le geste à la parole. Si le gouvernement est sincère lorsqu'il affirme que la situation le trouble vraiment — je prends cette déclaration au pied de la lettre — on penserait qu'il aurait fait savoir qu'une enquête interne serait effectuée puisque le coupable est vraisemblablement une personne au sein de son organisation. S'il ne fait pas cela, je ne sais pas où diable ça nous mène. C'est tout ce que j'ai à dire.

(1120)

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Nous avons beaucoup parlé de précédents et nous avons discuté de quatre cas qui se sont produits au cours des deux dernières décennies. Je pense qu'il y a pas mal de précédents qui montrent que ce n'est pas nécessairement une question de privilège. Je vais simplement lire une couple d'articles publiés en 2014: Les conservateurs vont déposer un projet de loi visant à réorganiser Élections Canada. Le gouvernement conservateur va proposer des modifications à la Loi électorale, cette semaine, qui, comme l'espère le groupe parlementaire, entraîneront une restructuration du bureau responsable des enquêtes [en matière électorale]... Des sources conservatrices s'attendent à ce que le projet de loi réorganise... la direction d'Élections Canada qui fait enquête et engage des poursuites en cas d'actes de malveillance en matière électorale. [...] « combler les lacunes qui profitent aux riches et renforcer les pouvoirs de police et donner à ceux-ci une plus grande portée et une plus grande liberté d'action ». Le projet de loi retirera le poste de commissaire d'Élections Canada, dont relèvent les enquêteurs, et le placera dans un organisme distinct, selon des sources.

Il y a eu de nombreux exemples du genre au cours des dernières années, où les détails précis de projets de loi ont été divulgués jusqu'à un mois d'avance, et aucune question de privilège n'a été soulevée.

Considérez-vous cela comme un précédent que nous devrions examiner?

M. Marc Bosc:

Les précédents que nous examinons sont les affaires où le Président a dû prendre une décision.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

S'il n'y a aucune raison de prendre une décision, nous ne devrions pas considérer la situation comme un précédent?

Ce que je veux dire, c'est que des situations du genre se produisent tout le temps et, tout à coup, l'une d'elles est considérée comme une question de privilège. Je ne la considère pas nécessairement comme en étant une. Le projet de loi n'a pas été divulgué à proprement parler, mais au fil des années, nous avons eu beaucoup de cas où des détails sur ce qui pourrait constituer ou non un projet de loi ont été divulgués. Je ne vois pas où nous pouvons aller avec ça.

M. Marc Bosc:

Encore une fois, monsieur Graham, la Chambre a jugé bon de confier cette question au Comité, et la Chambre a demandé au Comité de se pencher sur la question, donc elle en a saisi le Comité. C'est tout ce que je peux dire.

Le président:

Vous partagez le temps accordé?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Bonjour, monsieur Bosc.

Je veux simplement poursuivre la réflexion de mon collègue.

En tant que nouvelle députée, j'entends beaucoup de choses sur divers projets de loi dans les actualités et nous continuons d'entendre beaucoup de choses. Même auparavant, quand je n'étais pas une députée, j'ai compris ce que le gouvernement s'apprêtait à faire lorsque les conservateurs ont déposé le projet de loi C-24. Il y a eu des tonnes de reportages à ce sujet. Essentiellement, nous savions pas mal ce qui allait constituer le projet de loi. Nous savions qu'il serait question des Canadiens dépossédés de leur citoyenneté. Nous savions qu'il serait question de raccourcir le temps d'attente et de rallonger la période préalable à l'admissibilité à la citoyenneté. Il y avait des masses de commentaires au sujet de la double citoyenneté et de la révocation de la citoyenneté en cas d'accusations de terrorisme ou autres infractions pénales. Les médias en ont beaucoup parlé pendant longtemps et j'ai pensé que c'était normal qu'il y ait un peu de débats dans les médias et des entrevues avec des députés et des ministres au sujet du dépôt de certains projets de loi. Le premier ministre avait publié un gazouillis au sujet du projet de loi C-24, et il y avait des clips vidéo du ministre faisant des apartés sur ce à quoi s'attendre dans le projet de loi, que ce soit un mois ou deux jours avant le dépôt du projet de loi.

Tout cela semblait plutôt normal. Il n'était pas question de privilège.

Je crois comprendre que vous affirmez ne traiter de la question que si elle est soulevée à la Chambre. Mais il semble qu'un certain standard a été établi depuis longtemps maintenant. Que ce soit bien ou non, c'est quelque chose que le Comité devra déterminer, mais je pense qu'il est important que nous décidions de ce que nous allons faire à partir de maintenant.

De mon point de vue, beaucoup de projets de loi sont discutés, peut-être pas d'une manière aussi détaillée. À mon avis, ça ressemble beaucoup à ce qui a été discuté au sujet du projet de loi C-24, et peut-être beaucoup moins que cela. Ce n'est peut-être pas la norme vers laquelle nous devrions nous tourner ou que nous devrions respecter à l'avenir, mais il est certain que nous devons définir plus clairement ce qu'est une question de privilège, dans quelle circonstance elle est nécessairement soulevée et quelles sont les responsabilités des députés concernant un projet de loi.

Il est évident qu'au sein du groupe parlementaire et à la Chambre, on parle beaucoup de cela et de beaucoup d'autres projets de loi. Où se situent les limites? Où est-ce qu'on établit les paramètres de ce qui est hors limite et qui constitue une atteinte au privilège et de ce qui est acceptable? Est-ce que c'est là quelque chose sur laquelle il faut apporter un meilleur éclairage?

(1125)

M. Marc Bosc:

Encore une fois, dans le matériel reçu, j'attirerais votre attention sur la mention de la décision du Président de la Chambre le 5 novembre 2009. Elle présente un intérêt en raison de ce que vous venez de dire. Dans le cas en question, le Président a conclu qu'il n'y avait pas de présomptions suffisantes puisque — et je paraphrase — le ministre avait assuré la Chambre qu'aucun détail des mesures proposées dans le projet de loi n'avait été divulgué et que seulement les modalités générales de l'initiative gouvernementale l'avaient été.

Cela vous donne une idée du genre de choses sur lesquelles le Président pourrait se pencher. C'est un exemple.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

La politique générale par opposition aux détails du projet de loi?

M. Marc Bosc:

Oui. Dans cette décision en particulier, c'est ce à quoi le Président a fait allusion.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Après avoir lu des bribes des reportages sur le projet de loi C-14, nous avons beaucoup parlé, non de ce qui est dans le projet de loi, mais de ce qui n'est pas dans le projet de loi. Est-ce qu'on ne pourrait pas considérer cela comme des conjectures de journalistes, qui ont été discutées à l'occasion d'entretiens?

M. Marc Bosc:

Ce n'est pas à moi de le dire.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord. Je pense que c'est très intéressant, parce que tous les précédents dont nous avons pris connaissance parlent de la teneur du projet de loi et pas nécessairement de ce qui pourrait ne pas être dans le projet de loi. Cela semble le cas que nous étudions aujourd'hui. Comme vous l'avez déjà dit, nous n'aurons pas nécessairement un cas qui lui ressemble tout à fait, mais nous avons un cas où il n'est pas nécessairement question de contenu et c'est cette norme sur laquelle j'ai lu dans la jurisprudence soumise.

Merci pour votre aide. Ma collègue voudrait vous poser une question.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Très brièvement, cela veut dire que les précédents que vous consultez sont seulement ceux où la Chambre a été saisie d'une question de privilège, mais il pourrait très bien y en avoir plusieurs autres où aucune question de privilège n'avait été soulevée, qui pourrait ressembler à celle-ci?

M. Marc Bosc:

C'est possible, en effet.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous passons à M. Schmale.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Je vous remercie beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Pour revenir sur le point soulevé par Blake et ajouter aux propos de David, je crois qu'il faut examiner le libellé de ces articles. Je pense que les différences sont très importantes. Comme l'a indiqué David Graham, l'article qu'il a cité contenait les mots clés « espère » et « pourrait » dans les remarques formulées, et le simple fait de citer le Globe and Mail du 12 avril équivaut à affirmer fondamentalement que le projet de loi « ne s'appliquera pas aux personnes dont les souffrances sont uniquement mentales », « que le projet de loi ne permettra pas non plus le consentement préalable », et « qu'il n'y aura pas d'exceptions pour les mineurs matures ».

Ce sont là des déclarations sans équivoque.

C'est peut-être un style d'écriture différent. J'en doute. David est un ancien journaliste et je suis un ancien journaliste et chef des informations, mais pas aux yeux de mon ami ici présent. Nous avons de l'expérience en ce domaine. Ça montre que le style d'écriture est très clair.

Quand vous écrivez comme cela, vous dites en fait que vous avez de l'information à cet effet. On énonce vraiment des faits et non des hypothèses, on ne parle pas d'espérances, de possibilités, ni de considérations.

Je crois qu'il y a quelque chose là-dedans. Je pense que le Comité doit vraiment étudier la question. Je ne crois pas que nous devrions simplement écarter le sujet. Il y a des éléments très clairs qui montrent qu'il y a eu violation de privilège. J'espère que le Comité continuera d'examiner la question.

Monsieur Bosc, avez-vous des objections à ce que le Comité demande au gouvernement de réagir à l'observation précédente de M. Christopherson? Pensez-vous qu'il y aura des problèmes? Je veux simplement confirmer la chose avant que nous prenions cette direction.

(1130)

M. Marc Bosc:

Encore une fois, c'est au Comité de décider s'il veut convoquer des témoins ou demander des renseignements concernant le point soulevé par M. Christopherson. C'est au Comité de décider. Bien sûr, c'est possible.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Maintenant que nous savons cela, et que nous examinons la formulation, et que Ruby a mentionné d'autres cas, mais, encore une fois, l'énoncé dont elle parlait contenait ces mots clés... Si on revient sur le passé, je suppose que s'il y avait eu un problème, ça aurait dû être soulevé. Je ne sais pas pourquoi, je ne peux pas commenter parce que je n'étais pas là, mais il est évident qu'il a dû y avoir quelque chose que les membres de l'opposition de l'époque ont jugée ne pas être une violation. Mais comme je l'ai déjà dit, le libellé de cet article que nous avons lu montre clairement qu'il s'agit d'un énoncé des faits plutôt que d'une hypothèse de journaliste. Je pense que ça va bien au-delà.

Je sais que vous avez indiqué, comme d'autres l'ont fait, que la route que nous empruntons à partir d'ici dépend essentiellement du Comité, que nous pouvons faire ce que nous voulons. Nous pouvons aller dans la direction que nous voulons. J'en conviens.

Dans un avenir rapproché, qu'est-ce que vous nous conseillez de faire pour éviter que ce genre de situation ne se reproduise à l'avenir? Pouvez-vous nous donner une ou deux idées qui, à votre avis, pourraient fonctionner?

M. Marc Bosc:

Je veux simplement attirer votre attention sur le cas de mars 2001 que vous avez en main. Dans ce cas en particulier, des mesures ont été prises. Le comité a obtenu des documents auprès du gouvernement, on indique qu'en octobre 2001, le leader parlementaire du gouvernement a remis au comité une version à jour du guide, intitulé Lois et règlements: l'essentiel.

Des mesures ont été prises par la suite. Je crois que des mesures ont également été prises par le gouvernement pour rectifier certaines choses. Voilà des exemples du genre de choses possibles.

M. Jamie Schmale:

J'aimerais emprunter la voie voulant qu'on demande au gouvernement de répondre à la question soulevée par M. Christopherson. Je crois que c'est une option raisonnable.

Y a-t-il d'autres témoins que nous devrions convoquer car, à votre avis, ils pourraient nous renseigner?

M. Marc Bosc:

Ça dépend entièrement du Comité.

Si vous étudiez les cas précédents, vous constaterez les diverses routes suivies: le député qui a soulevé la question au premier chef, possiblement le ministre, ou les représentants du gouvernement. C'est ce qui a été fait dans les cas dont je parle.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je crois que nous avons prévenu le ministre de la Justice que nous pourrions le convoquer. Je suppose que nous avons entamé ce processus également.

M. Marc Bosc:

C'est au Comité de décider, bien sûr.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Madame Vandenbeld, c'est à vous.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je vous remercie.

J'aimerais revenir à l'idée qu'il est fort possible qu'un grand nombre de précédents semblables à la situation actuelle pourraient ne pas avoir été portés à votre attention parce que la question n'avait pas été soulevée au Parlement.

Un exemple sur lequel j'aimerais m'étendre, c'est le projet de loi sur l'intégrité des élections, le projet de loi C-23. Je consulte ici un article signé par Stephen Maher en date du 2 février, soit deux jours avant le dépôt du projet de loi à la Chambre. Pour revenir à l'argument de M. Schmale, dans la première phrase, on peut lire que le gouvernement conservateur présentera des modifications. Ensuite, trois paragraphes plus loin, on parle de sources conservatrices; un autre affirme que le gouvernement va « combler les lacunes qui profitent aux riches et renforcer les pouvoirs de police et donner à ceux-ci une plus grande portée et une plus grande liberté d'action ». Il continue en disant que « Le projet de loi retirera le poste de commissaire d'Élections Canada, dont relèvent les enquêteurs, et le placera dans un organisme distinct, selon des sources. »

Est-ce que ça ne ressemble pas beaucoup à la question que nous traitons? Il n'y a pourtant aucun rappel au Règlement ni question de privilège soulevée à la Chambre, peut-être parce que c'est considéré normal et que c'est ce à quoi on s'attend lorsqu'on s'occupe de projets de loi.

M. Marc Bosc:

Je peux difficilement me prononcer. Je ne connais pas en détail le cas en question.

(1135)

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Nous devons être très prudents. Je peux assurer à M. Richards que nous prenons cette affaire très au sérieux, car la décision que nous prendrons ici établira un précédent.

Je ne voudrais surtout pas que nous établissions un précédent qui nous empêcherait de parler, dans les grandes lignes, de la loi proposée, de consulter les Canadiens, car cela pourrait nuire au dialogue à l'avenir. À propos des initiatives parlementaires, par exemple, on nous a conseillé de consulter largement les parties prenantes et nos collègues. Nous ne pouvons pas communiquer le texte d'un projet de loi, mais nous pouvons certainement parler de ce qu'il pourrait ou contenir ou non.

M. Dufresne ou M. Bosc pourraient-ils me dire ce qu'ils conseillent aux nouveaux députés pour les projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Quand des doutes ont été émis — à propos de la divulgation de la teneur d'un projet de loi après son inscription au Feuilleton — il y a eu des discussions au sujet des consultations préalables, de l'élaboration de la politique, etc.

Si vous prenez les précédents, comme nous l'avons dit au départ, votre comité et les Présidents de la Chambre ont examiné le genre de renseignements divulgués, le moment où ils ont été divulgués, dans quelle mesure c'était de façon détaillée ou publique et quelles mesures correctrices ont ensuite été prises. A-t-on présenté des excuses? A-t-on mis des mesures correctives en place pour éviter que cela ne se reproduise? Des directives ont-elles été données, etc.? On examine tout le contexte.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Il est fort possible qu'il y ait eu de nombreux précédents qui n'ont jamais retenu l'attention, parce que la question de privilège n'a jamais été soulevée.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

C'est très possible.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je partage mon temps avec M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je veux seulement revenir sur ce qu'a dit M. Schmale au sujet des suppositions. Un autre exemple plus récent, que je trouve assez intéressant, a eu lieu quand le gouvernement Harper a présenté le projet de loi C-24 sur la citoyenneté. Voici ce que disait un article du 24 janvier 2014: Le gouvernement fédéral apportera plusieurs changements aux règles régissant la citoyenneté canadienne lorsque les députés rentreront à Ottawa, lundi prochain, après six semaines de relâche, a déclaré Chris Alexander, le ministre de la Citoyenneté et de l'Immigration.

Viennent ensuite plusieurs pages d'exemples très précis. Je ne lirai pas l'article en entier. Je n'ai pas beaucoup de temps.

De toute évidence, le ministre a dit à l'avance quelle serait la teneur du projet de loi, de façon très précise, et personne n'y a vu, alors, une atteinte au privilège. Le caucus conservateur aurait pu lui-même s'y opposer s'il avait jugé cela si grave. Il ne l'a pas fait.

Je pense qu'il y a énormément de précédents montrant que cela ne porte pas atteinte au privilège. J'en demeure convaincu. Je n'ai rien d'autre à ajouter.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

J'invoque le Règlement, car M. Graham semblait sur le point de s'arrêter. Il citait un document. J'allais l'inviter à le remettre à la greffière, comme Mme Vandenbeld pourrait le faire également, afin que nous puissions tous en prendre connaissance. Cela ne devrait pas susciter d'objection.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'y vois pas d'objection.

Pour répondre très rapidement à David Christopherson, il a demandé si je contestais l'opinion du Président. Non. Le Président a déclaré qu'il s'agissait d'une question de privilège de prime abord. C'est à première vue. C'est à nous de décider si c'est effectivement le cas. À mon avis, la question de privilège semblait se poser de prime abord, mais elle ne se pose plus lorsque j'examine les choses de plus près. Je répondrais donc que non, je ne conteste pas l'opinion du Président.

Je répondrais à Scott que je n'y vois pas d'objection.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Très bien. C'est au tour de M. Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Désolé. Je n'aurais pas empiété sur le temps de M. Graham si j'avais su que je serais le suivant.

Apparemment, nous nous lançons dans un débat. Le Règlement me semble assez clair à ce sujet, et cela constitue une atteinte au privilège. Nous pouvons examiner le Règlement.

Les libéraux affirment, je crois, qu'aux termes d'une convention, si le Règlement est violé de cette façon, c'est seulement une violation de pure forme. Nous pouvons tous la tolérer. Nous ne devrions pas protester. De temps à autre, des conventions s'établissent pour autoriser des choses qui sont interdites officiellement ou l'inverse. Un acte qui est autorisé officiellement peut être considéré comme un comportement inacceptable. Il devient alors interdit. Nous comprenons tous que si le gouverneur général commençait à opposer son veto à des lois, ce qu'il peut, en théorie, faire en toute légalité, nous lui chercherions aussitôt un remplaçant parce que cela dépasserait les limites de l'acceptable.

Les libéraux font valoir, je pense, qu'une convention s'est établie. Je suis prêt à accepter que les libéraux ont adopté cette façon de voir, car ils n'ont pas soulevé la question de privilège dans les circonstances dont ils ont parlé… Je pense que l'exemple de M. Graham est moins convaincant que celui de Mme Vandenbeld, mais c'est pourquoi j'ai demandé à voir les articles en question pour vérifier si les faits correspondent bien aux affirmations qui ont été faites.

S'ils n'ont pas soulevé la question de privilège à ce moment-là, cela laisse entendre qu'ils ont accepté un certain type de comportement qu'ils veulent maintenant transformer en modus vivendi, en mode opératoire à appliquer en tout temps. Si nous disons que c'est acceptable, nous acceptons que cela se produise à chaque fois. Cela deviendra la norme de comportement. Le gouvernement libéral divulguera toujours à l'avance certains détails de ses lois — il n'a pas tout révélé. Je reconnais qu'il ne le fera pas pour le budget, car il y a évidemment des règles très strictes que nous acceptons tous à cet égard, mais j'ai l'impression que les libéraux essaient de s'orienter dans cette direction.

J'implore donc mes collègues de ne pas dire que c'est acceptable et que cela devrait devenir la nouvelle norme. Cela reviendrait à mettre le Parlement, la Chambre des communes, à l'écart. Telle sera la situation à partir de maintenant. Voilà exactement ce qu'affirment les libéraux, ce qu'il leur a été conseillé de dire. Votre service de recherche a bien travaillé et vous a fourni ces arguments, mais c'est une pratique inacceptable. Même si c'est déjà arrivé par le passé, c'est maintenant inacceptable. Nous devrions avoir pour convention de dire que c'est au Parlement, à la Chambre des communes que les lois sont révélées.

Parlons clairement de la fuite qui s'est produite au sujet du projet de loi C-14. Elle visait à orienter le débat dans une certaine direction. Elle visait à semer la pagaille dans les rangs de ceux qui trouvaient que le projet de loi n'allait pas assez loin pour tenir debout, plutôt que dans les rangs de ceux qui trouvaient qu'il allait trop loin. Vu ce qui s'est passé depuis, c'était une stratégie de communication très astucieuse et qui a porté ses fruits. Néanmoins, elle a sapé le rôle du Parlement. C'est inacceptable. C'est répréhensible. C'est inexcusable. Nous devrions avoir pour convention de suivre le Règlement à la lettre et non pas de s'en écarter.

C'est tout ce que j'ai à dire. Merci.

(1140)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je voudrais faire suite à ce qu'a dit M. Reid. Je le remercie de laisser entendre que le comportement passé de l'ancien gouvernement conservateur n'a peut-être pas toujours été approprié, car c'est ce qu'il semble dire. Au moins, nous le reconnaissons, du côté ministériel.

J'en reviens à l'argument de M. Christopherson au sujet des excuses du whip en chef du gouvernement, qui étaient… s'il y a eu effectivement atteinte au privilège dans le cas qui nous intéresse. Je pense que c'est à nous qu'il incombe de l'établir, ici, aujourd'hui. Le Comité doit établir clairement, afin que nous ayons, à l'avenir, un précédent bien clair, quelle est la conduite appropriée. Que devons-nous faire ou ne pas faire en ce qui concerne la divulgation des projets de loi dont la Chambre est saisie afin que les députés soient les premiers à examiner leur teneur au lieu que ces renseignements soient plus largement diffusés?

Voilà pourquoi j'en reviens à mon argument initial concernant la possession du projet de loi, car c'est sa teneur qui nous permet, en tant que députés, de savoir si quelque chose figure ou non dans la loi. Nous avons les rapports diffusés par les médias qui parlent clairement des intentions générales ou des orientations politiques de la loi, mais sans nous donner le libellé précis de chacune des dispositions que nous devons examiner en tant que députés.

En fait, nous avons tous débattu de la question quand nous avons voté sur les diverses motions de fond qui ont été présentées à la Chambre hier, parce que nous avions devant nous la teneur à la fois du projet de loi et des amendements proposés. Encore une fois, j'ai du mal à comprendre la nature de l'atteinte au privilège. Je comprends qu'il s'agit de nous donner la primeur de l'information, mais sans avoir vraiment le projet de loi sous les yeux… Encore une fois, quand je lis les renseignements divulgués dans les deux articles parus dans les médias, rien ne prouve clairement que les journalistes en question ou les sources en question aient eu le projet de loi entre les mains. Ils ont peut-être participé à des discussions et nous devons alors décider si ces discussions ou ces divulgations constituent une atteinte au privilège des députés. Voilà la distinction que j'essaie de faire.

Je vous invite à répondre, car j'essaie de comprendre. Quelle est la nature de l'atteinte? Cette atteinte a-t-elle eu lieu et quelle preuve en avons-nous?

(1145)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

Je comprends ce que dit M. Chan. J'ai l'impression que le gouvernement a plus ou moins… C'est un cas limite d'atteinte à nos privilèges et à notre capacité de faire notre travail. Je ne vois pas pourquoi le gouvernement veut nous pousser à bout sur les questions de privilège. Je ne peux pas voir en quoi cela peut aider votre cause. Je vous laisse y réfléchir. En tout cas, cela m'exaspère.

Je comprends ce que veut dire M. Chan. Le gouvernement semble vouloir suivre deux pistes. D'un côté, il espère pouvoir mettre fin au débat grâce à certains des arguments que M. Reid a bien disséqués. De l'autre, nous avons M. Chan qui dit: « Nous nous en remettons à vous et nous sommes prêts à aller dans l'autre direction ». Le gouvernement semble non pas vouloir étouffer l'affaire, mais plutôt essayer de se montrer conciliant. Je comprends.

M. Chan a présenté un excellent argument, comme il le fait habituellement. Néanmoins, si nous examinons nos notes, nous voyons que par le passé, le gouvernement a dit qu'il avait examiné toutes ses procédures — et je pense qu'elles ont peut-être été examinées par le Comité — qu'il les a améliorées et les a publiées dans sa réponse au rapport du Comité.

Il est certainement possible de définir et d'établir quels sont les renseignements dont nous parlons. Si l'ancien gouvernement était prêt à reconnaître que quelque chose clochait et s'il a apporté des changements, je peux facilement faire valoir que le gouvernement actuel a l'obligation de reconnaître également qu'il y a une procédure à suivre à l'égard de l'information.

Je suis entièrement d'accord avec M. Reid. Soit nous changeons le Règlement afin que ce ne soit pas considéré comme une atteinte au privilège, soit nous prenons les mesures qui s'imposent. Quand la question de privilège est soulevée à la Chambre, nous savons que cela retient l'attention et engendre beaucoup d'activités. Cela déclenche une forte réaction à l'intérieur de la bulle.

Quand le Président dit qu'il s'agit, de prime abord, d'une atteinte au privilège, ce qui se traduit par l'adoption d'une motion proposant son renvoi au Comité, la Chambre déclare que l'affaire est vraiment importante, qu'elle l'a examinée et renvoyée au PROC. Si le Comité se contente de quelques gémissements et dit que ce n'est pas bien grave, que faisons-nous de notre privilège? Nous édulcorons nos droits.

Ou bien ces droits existent bien, sont identifiables et justifiables et nous sommes prêts à les soutenir jusqu'au bout en prenant des mesures contre ceux qui les violent ou bien nous n'en faisons rien.

Si le gouvernement propose de modifier le Règlement, si nous nous en tenons à l'argument de Mme Vandenbeld voulant que ce soit quelque chose d'assez habituel — je ne voudrais pas lui faire dire ce qu'elle n'a pas dit — nous devrions le modifier. Néanmoins, j'estime que nous ne devons pas suivre la voie que M. Reid nous a décrite. Nous en faisons une grosse affaire à la Chambre, nous invoquons notre privilège, le Président intervient et rend sa décision, l'affaire est renvoyée au Comité, mais quand elle arrive ici la révolte retombe. Nous serons tous perdants.

Étant donné que l'ancien gouvernement a reconnu qu'il y avait des procédures en place et qu'il pouvait les améliorer, si le gouvernement actuel ne s'est pas donné la peine de les réexaminer, il nous force à le faire. Si nous devons prendre le temps de nous en charger, nous pouvons le faire. Je suggère de commencer par le protocole précédent — ou de demander au gouvernement s'il a un protocole. Je dois toutefois vous dire que le gouvernement ne sert pas ses intérêts en procédant comme il l'a fait, d'autant plus qu'il était censé nous conduire vers une nouvelle ère.

Merci.

Le président:

Très bien. Nous allons élargir un peu la discussion. Quelqu'un a-t-il d'autres questions à poser aux greffiers afin que nous puissions les laisser partir?

M. Arnold Chan:

Je sais que votre temps est précieux. Si mes collègues du Comité sont d'accord, je désire vous inviter à rester pour traiter de l'autre question dont nous allons discuter…

(1150)

M. Scott Reid:

La question de privilège concernant le premier ministre.

M. Arnold Chan:

Oui, nous aimerions savoir si vous êtes prêts à en parler aujourd'hui.

M. Marc Bosc:

Nous avons d'autres engagements. Nous pensions être ici jusqu'à midi.

M. Arnold Chan:

Très bien, merci, monsieur Bosc.

M. Scott Reid:

En fait, j'ai une question. Il est possible que vous connaissiez la réponse.

Elle s'adresse particulièrement à vous, monsieur Bosc. Je siège à ce comité depuis plus de 10 ans. C'est la première fois que nous sommes saisis de deux questions de privilège en même temps, mais ce n'est sans doute pas la première fois que cela arrive. Le Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre ou le comité compétent d'un parlement sur le modèle de Westminster a-t-il une procédure habituelle à suivre lorsqu'il est saisi de deux questions de privilège? Les examinons-nous dans l'ordre où elles nous ont été renvoyées ou quelle est la procédure?

M. Marc Bosc:

Cette question a déjà été soulevée. En fait, c'est au Comité qu'il revient de décider de ses priorités. Comme il n'a aucune obligation de faire rapport, le Comité peut faire ce qu'il veut dans un cas comme dans l'autre. Il s'ensuit donc que si le Comité a d'autres priorités, il peut décider lui-même dans quel ordre s'en occuper.

M. Scott Reid:

J'étais absent tout à l'heure. Il semble que vous en ayez déjà parlé, mais permettez-moi de poser la question. Le Comité n'a aucune obligation de faire rapport à la Chambre des communes. Il pourrait simplement dire qu'il ne compte rien faire.

M. Marc Bosc:

C'est déjà arrivé.

M. Scott Reid:

Je vois. Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Si je devance le débat, vous allez certainement vous empresser de me le dire. Je vais parler de nos travaux, mais tout est relié.

Nous avons deux questions de privilège dont l'une concerne directement des personnes nommément désignées. Cela vise, dans ce cas, le premier ministre tandis que dans l'autre, ce sont des personnes inconnues. Dans ce genre de situation, je me demande ce que je souhaiterais si j'étais face à mes collègues, au bout de la table? Comment voudrais-je qu'on me traite? Que se passerait-il? Je dois vous dire qu'en pareille situation, j'apprécierais vivement une audience rapide pour régler efficacement la question. Quel que soit votre verdict, ne laissez pas planer l'ambiguïté, surtout à l'approche de l'été.

Compte tenu de ces réflexions, monsieur le président, j'espère que lorsque nous passerons à nos travaux, dans une dizaine de minutes, nous reconnaîtrons que cette question de privilège devrait avoir préséance sur celle-ci étant donné que des personnes nommément désignées sont en cause. Elles sont dans une situation ambiguë, ce qui n'est dans l'intérêt de personne.

Le président:

Très bien, je voudrais remercier le greffier et le légiste d'être venus. Nous vous avons souvent vus cette année, ce que nous apprécions vraiment. Nous savons que vous êtes très occupés et nous vous remercions de nous avoir donné de votre temps.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pendant une minute et nous reprendrons dans une minute ou deux, dans peu de temps.

(1150)

(1200)

Le président:

Nous reprenons la séance.

Avant de commencer, j'aurais deux choses à dire.

Bienvenue, Karen Vecchio.

Deuxièmement, lors d'une séance antérieure, M. Reid a demandé à notre attaché de recherche de rechercher un renseignement et je voudrais simplement qu'il réponde à cette demande.

M. Andre Barnes (attaché de recherche auprès du comité):

Merci, monsieur le président.

C'était la même question que celle que M. Chan a posée à M. Bosc. Il s'agissait de vérifier s'il y avait eu des cas semblables de divulgation prématurée d'un projet de loi inscrit au Feuilleton dans d'autres pays. En remontant jusqu'à 2001, j'ai cherché à la Chambre des Lords du Royaume-Uni, à la Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni, au Sénat australien, à la Chambre des représentants d'Australie et de Nouvelle-Zélande, mais je n'ai rien trouvé.

J'ai trouvé des cas de divulgation prématurée de documents de comité qui avaient été communiqués à huis clos, mais cela se produit assez souvent. En fait, c'est arrivé assez récemment ici. Cela s'apparente davantage à un cas qui a eu lieu assez récemment lorsqu'un document relatif aux consultations prébudgétaires a fait l'objet d'une fuite. Les circonstances ne sont donc pas tout à fait les mêmes que celles du cas dont le Comité est saisi.

M. Scott Reid:

Qu'en est-il des exemples que Mme Vandenbeld et M. Graham ont cités? Ils ont eu lieu au Canada et non pas en Australie, mais s'agit-il de circonstances assez similaires? Ils n'ont toutefois jamais été soulevés à la Chambre. Est-ce ce qui pose problème? Est-ce la raison pour laquelle vous ne les avez pas examinés?

M. Andre Barnes:

Ils ont été inclus dans le document d'information. On m'avait demandé, je crois, de faire une recherche dans d'autres pays.

M. Scott Reid:

En plus du nôtre.

M. Andre Barnes: Oui.

M. Scott Reid: Est-ce parce que ces fuites n'ont pas eu lieu, parce que ce genre de fuites est jugé acceptable ou parce que le Règlement est tout simplement différent?

M. Andre Barnes:

Ce n'est qu'une simple hypothèse de ma part, mais il se pourrait qu'au Canada nous ayons coutume de considérer qu'un projet de loi ne peut faire l'objet d'aucune divulgation une fois inscrit au Feuilleton. Je pourrais vérifier si d'autres pays ont le même genre de convention.

M. Scott Reid:

Peut-être faudrait-il voir si les règles sont différentes. Il est plus difficile de trouver les pratiques qui ont cours car souvent, elles ne sont pas codifiées de la même façon. Pourriez-vous essayer de le faire?

M. Andre Barnes:

Je peux vérifier dans leur manuel, qui est l'équivalent de l'ouvrage de O'Brien et Bosc, ou simplement contacter le bureau du greffier de ces pays pour avoir la réponse.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Avant d'entamer notre deuxième affaire, je voudrais en finir avec la première.

Je voudrais laisser partir M. Bosc et M. Dufresne étant donné que nous commençons à avoir une discussion interne au sujet de ce que nous voulons faire de la question de privilège.

D'après ce qui a été dit ici ou par le greffier, c'est à nous de décider de ce qu'est la nature du privilège. Si nous faisons quoi que ce soit, il est vraiment important d'établir des directives claires pour l'avenir. C'est peut-être ce que vous avez fait valoir, David. Établissons les règles de base afin que nous sachions clairement ce qui est acceptable et ce qui ne l'est pas. Je n'y vois aucune objection si cela peut nous éviter de nous retrouver devant ce genre de dilemme, car j'avoue ne pas savoir s'il y a eu ou non atteinte au privilège.

Il nous incombe d'établir les règles. Il y a peut-être un manque de clarté, comme vous l'avez mentionné, Scott, au sujet de l'habitude que nous avons prise progressivement de parler de certaines choses. La question est de savoir si nous pouvons ou non en parler lorsqu'elles ont été inscrites au Feuilleton. Voilà ce que j'essaie d'établir.

D'autre part, je m'en remets à vous quant à la suite à donner. Allons-nous entendre certains témoins?

Je comprends. David a demandé si une enquête a été entamée à ce sujet. Pour le moment, j'ignore d'où vient la fuite. Je vais simplement être franc avec vous; je n'en ai aucune idée. Elle pourrait provenir de n'importe où. Je vous laisse décider de ce que vous voulez faire.

Nous ne voulons pas que les parlementaires ne soient pas les premiers à se pencher sur les projets de loi sur lesquels nous sommes appelés à voter. Je comprends cela et je suis entièrement d'accord. Je prends cette question très au sérieux comme, je pense, tous les ministériels, et c'est pourquoi le whip en chef du gouvernement a dit que s'il y a eu effectivement une fuite, nous présentons nos excuses. Mettons une procédure en place. Je suis tout à fait pour. Je veux seulement que ce soit clair.

Je veux pouvoir dire quelle est la règle à suivre afin que nous sachions quoi faire. Quelle est la directive à suivre? Quelle est la norme de pratique?

Je m'en remets à vous.

(1205)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci, Arnold.

Nous essayons d'obtenir, par l'entremise de notre analyste, des renseignements qui nous aideront à établir quelles sont les règles et les conventions. Ce sont des renseignements de base.

Pour ce qui est de cet incident, il s'agit, bien sûr, de recueillir des faits supplémentaires quant à la source de cette fuite. À mon avis, la meilleure façon de procéder serait d'inviter à témoigner la chef de cabinet de la ministre, Lea MacKenzie, ainsi que la conseillère en communications principale de la ministre, Joanne Ghiz. Je me trompe peut-être. Ce ne sont peut-être pas les personnes qui étaient là à ce moment-là. Si je me trompe, nous changerons les noms, mais ces personnes pourront nous fournir des renseignements. Elles pourraient nous confirmer qu'elles ne sont pas elles-mêmes la source de la fuite, que cela a été divulgué délibérément, si c'est le cas. De plus, elles pourraient nous donner une idée du nombre de personnes qui avaient accès aux documents à ce moment-là.

À un moment donné, ou bien quelqu'un a été négligent et a laissé échapper ces renseignements, ce qui est très peu probable — je dis cela, car sinon il y aurait eu d'autres renseignements moins sélectifs — ou bien quelqu'un a divulgué délibérément certains renseignements, ce qui me semble être la seule hypothèse plausible. Quoi qu'il en soit, ces deux personnes pourraient nous renseigner.

Je serais heureux de faire comparaître la ministre. Je sais que nous ne pouvons pas la forcer à venir et je suppose aussi qu'elle conçoit la politique et non pas la stratégie de communication. La ministre n'est pas une spécialiste des communications, mais je proposerais que nous fassions venir ces deux personnes comme témoins.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai quelque chose à ajouter. Sans vouloir en faire une montagne, je m'étonne que nous n'ayons eu aucune réponse. M. Chan dit qu'il ne sait pas et je l'accepte, bien entendu.

Le whip en chef du gouvernement est venu ici et nous n'avons même pas pu obtenir de réponse quant à savoir si le gouvernement a mené une enquête interne après avoir présenté des excuses pour un incident dont il a dit qu'il était terriblement regrettable et n'aurait jamais dû arriver. A-t-on mené une enquête?

D'autre part, d'après nos notes, en 2001 — je sais que c'est assez lointain — pour la résolution de cette question dans des circonstances assez similaires, mais pas tout à fait semblable… Il y a eu ensuite une mise à jour et une révision du guide intitulé « Lois et règlements: l'essentiel ». C'était il y a 15 ans. Je ne sais même pas si ce document existe encore, mais il doit y avoir actuellement un guide et des politiques quelconques. Je ne peux pas croire que nous ayons eu une procédure détaillée en 2001 et que tout ait disparu en 2016. C'est possible, mais ce serait étonnant.

Monsieur le président, je crois qu'il vaudrait la peine de parler de nouveau au whip en chef du gouvernement, pour qu'il nous redise pourquoi il a présenté des excuses. M. Chan déclare, avec l'appui d'autres collègues, qu'il ne voit pas vraiment où est l'atteinte au privilège et pourtant son propre whip en chef du gouvernement a jugé bon de présenter des excuses à la Chambre. Dans une certaine mesure, le whip lui-même a reconnu qu'il y avait eu atteinte au privilège, du moins à première vue.

J'aurais au moins deux questions à poser au whip en chef du gouvernement. D'abord, quelle est la version actuelle du guide « Lois et règlements: l'essentiel » et de tout document qui l'a remplacé? J'ignore ce que le gouvernement a fait de cette politique par rapport à ce qu'elle était sous l'ancien gouvernement. C'est peut-être un document dont nous avons besoin également. Deuxièmement, l'avez-vous modifié? Le gouvernement a-t-il modifié la procédure? Les conservateurs avaient-ils une bonne procédure que le gouvernement actuel a modifiée et dégradée? Je n'en sais rien et je pense que nous devons le savoir.

Ces deux questions justifient à elles seules la convocation du whip en chef du gouvernement. Pourquoi ce dernier croyait-il qu'il y avait eu atteinte au privilège? De quoi s'est-il excusé? Y a-t-il eu une enquête gouvernementale interne pour découvrir qui étaient les coupables?

Troisièmement, quelles sont les politiques ou les lignes de conduite en place vis-à-vis du guide « Lois et règlements: l'essentiel »? Voilà au moins trois questions pertinentes qui me viennent immédiatement à l'esprit et qu'il faudrait poser au whip en chef du gouvernement. Je suggère donc son nom, monsieur le président.

(1210)

Le président:

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Permettez-moi de répondre à l'affirmation de M. Christopherson selon laquelle le whip en chef du gouvernement a présenté des excuses pour une atteinte au privilège. Il a, je pense, effectivement présenté des excuses. Il a dit: « S'il est établi qu'il y a eu atteinte aux privilèges, nous présentons nos excuses ». Je vous invite à lire le compte rendu plus attentivement pour voir ce qu'il a déclaré à la Chambre des communes.

Je n'ai aucune opinion au sujet du whip en chef du gouvernement. Je voudrais répondre à la suggestion de M. Reid de convoquer deux membres du personnel du bureau de la ministre de la Justice. Au nom du principe de la responsabilité ministérielle, il me semble plus approprié de simplement faire venir la ministre.

M. Scott Reid:

Je n'ai rien contre, croyez-moi, mais je ne pense pas que nous puissions exiger que la ministre vienne ici. D'un autre côté, les libéraux peuvent voter dans n'importe quel sens et s'arranger pour que la ministre ne comparaisse pas. En fin de compte, c'est vous qui décidez si nous allons faire comparaître des témoins, que ce soit la ministre ou son personnel.

M. Arnold Chan:

Non, je vous suis.

M. Scott Reid:

Je vais quand même proposer que nous invitions ces personnes. Il est également possible, et cela m'inquiète, que la ministre dise en toute bonne foi: « Je ne sais pas, quelqu'un d'autre s'en est occupé », mais cette raison serait insuffisante. La ministre a un emploi du temps très chargé et il se peut qu'elle soit dans l'ignorance. Je vais maintenir les noms que j'ai suggérés, mais je serais tout à fait d'accord pour que la ministre vienne. Nous pourrions attendre que le projet de loi C-14 ait été examiné, car elle a beaucoup de pain sur la planche en ce moment.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je voudrais vérifier auprès de la greffière si nous avons déjà demandé si la ministre serait disponible à propos de cette affaire? Je ne m'en souviens pas, car je n'ai pas toujours été présent et veuillez m'en excuser.

Le président:

Le Comité n'a pas décidé de l'inviter, mais vu son emploi du temps très serré, nous voulions l'avertir à l'avance que nous pourrions lui demander de venir en juin. La greffière l'en a avertie.

M. Arnold Chan:

Monsieur Reid, je vous inviterais à modifier votre motion. Vous pourriez parler aux deux personnes en question, mais je persiste à croire que le principe de la responsabilité ministérielle exige que la ministre témoigne au nom de ses deux employées.

M. Scott Reid:

Je vais saisir votre invitation. Sachant que la ministre est responsable en vertu du principe de la responsabilité ministérielle, mais reconnaissant aussi qu'elle n'est pas omnisciente… Je me trompe peut-être, mais je suppose qu'elle ne l'est pas. Si elle l'est, je vais la questionner au sujet du marché boursier.

Permettez-moi de modifier la motion de façon à inviter la ministre, accompagnée de sa chef de cabinet et de sa conseillère en communications. Tout le monde conviendra, je pense, que c'est ce qui se fait habituellement. La ministre pourrait répondre aux questions, mais elle aura la possibilité de consulter ces personnes si elle ne connaît pas la réponse.

(1215)

M. Arnold Chan:

Je vais laisser à la ministre le soin de dire qui l'accompagnera pour l'aider à fournir un témoignage utile au Comité, mais j'hésite généralement à convoquer des fonctionnaires bien précis, à moins que nous n'ayons la preuve qu'ils ont joué un rôle. Je n'en vois aucune preuve pour le moment et j'estime que cela va à l'encontre du principe de la responsabilité ministérielle. Nous allons faire venir la ministre et cette dernière se fera assister par les personnes de son choix.

M. Scott Reid:

Je répondrais à cela que je n'ai pas voulu dire que ces personnes étaient coupables. Nous ne pouvons pas le savoir. Ce sont simplement des personnes qui ont accès à ce genre de documents en raison du poste qu'elles occupent. Je soupçonne qu'elles sauront beaucoup mieux que la ministre entre combien de mains ces renseignements se sont retrouvés, quelle est la procédure suivie pour assurer la sécurité des documents et ce genre de choses. J'en resterai là.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je ne sais pas si M. Reid accepterait un amendement amical visant à inclure le whip en chef du gouvernement, et si vous voulez que je propose officiellement un amendement à cet effet ou si vous préférez une motion distincte. Je vous laisse décider. Je suis d'accord pour commencer par ces deux personnes.

Je voudrais dire à M. Chan et aux autres que la comparution du personnel est toujours délicate. N'oublions pas que le Comité a toujours le droit d'exiger — et je pense que ce sont bien ces trois choses — des renseignements, des personnes et des documents, ou du moins à peu près cela. Ce droit est absolu.

La convention voulant que l'on commence par les ministres est une bonne chose étant donné qu'ils doivent protéger les employés contre les attaques directes s'ils n'ont pas besoin d'être présents. Je suis prêt à appuyer ce principe, mais personne ne pensera, j'espère, que les choses s'arrêteront là ou que nous ne pourrons pas convoquer le personnel. Si nous avons déjà été des employés — j'en ai été un comme plusieurs autres ici — nous pouvons nous mettre facilement à leur place et nous ne voudrions surtout pas nous retrouver au bout de la table face aux membres de l'opposition. Je peux le comprendre. Néanmoins, si nous sommes obligés de le faire pour établir la vérité, nous avons toujours ce droit. Il y a, d'une part, la façon d'aborder la question et de l'autre, l'autorité et le pouvoir que le Comité peut exercer, si nécessaire, pour assigner qui il veut à comparaître au bout de la table.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je serai d'accord si nous obtenons des preuves suite au témoignage de la ministre, par exemple.

M. David Christopherson:

Je suis prêt à accepter cette approche. Je crois que M. Reid aussi. Je comprends son point de vue. Sans vouloir parler à sa place, je le crois disposé à procéder ainsi ,à la condition que si nous tournons en rond ou si nous avons besoin de faire comparaître un employé dont le témoignage direct sera nécessaire pour aider le comité à faire son travail, c'est ce que nous ferons. Nous verrons ensuite comment procéder, car une fois que la personne est là, tout le pouvoir est entre nos mains et elle a très peu de droits. Elle n'a pas d'avocat. Elle n'a aucune protection contre une action en justice reposant sur ce qu'elle aura dit, mais il n'y a néanmoins pas de plus grand tribunal que le Parlement.

J'espère que nous nous mettrons d'accord sur la façon de procéder lorsque nous en serons là.

Monsieur le président, j'en reviens à la question de savoir si ma demande de faire comparaître le whip en chef du gouvernement doit faire partie de la motion de M. Reid ou si je dois présenter une motion distincte? Je m'en remets à vous, monsieur.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je suggère de présenter une motion distincte, monsieur Christopherson.

Je voudrais répondre à la suggestion concernant le whip en chef du gouvernement. Je ne pense pas que ce dernier ajouterait quoi que ce soit. Si une enquête a lieu, ce sera au niveau du ministère. Bien entendu, le ministère responsable sera chargé de l'enquête et je pense donc que nous devons commencer par la ministre.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, si vous nous permettez de poursuivre cet échange, je comprends votre point de vue, mais je continue de croire que le guide intitulé « Lois et règlements: l'essentiel » et la version en vigueur en 2016… sont sous la responsabilité du whip. Si vous me dites que c'est sous la responsabilité du leader du gouvernement à la Chambre ou de quelqu'un d'autre, je n'y vois pas d'inconvénient, mais je veux seulement faire venir ici une personne ayant certaines responsabilités à l'égard de cette politique pour nous dire en quoi elle consiste et si elle a été modifiée ou non par rapport à la politique du gouvernement précédent. Cela me paraît très pertinent.

(1220)

M. Arnold Chan:

Je n'en ai aucune idée.

M. David Christopherson:

Comme je l'ai dit, peu m'importe. Donnez-nous simplement un représentant du gouvernement, de préférence un élu, qui peut nous dire à quoi ressemble actuellement la politique dont nous parlions en 2001 et si le gouvernement actuel a modifié ce protocole par rapport à celui qu'appliquait l'ancien gouvernement? Ce sont des questions tout à fait valides, je pense.

Le président:

Cela pourrait être le Bureau du Conseil privé.

M. Arnold Chan:

Cela pourrait être le Bureau du Conseil privé. Je ne pense pas que ce soit du ressort… Le whip n'est pas…

M. David Christopherson:

Quel nom voulez-vous me donner?

M. Arnold Chan:

J'essaie seulement de comprendre. Le whip en chef du gouvernement n'est pas membre du conseil exécutif… en fait, il l'est et je retire donc ce que j'ai dit. J'essaie seulement de voir qui assumerait la responsabilité ministérielle…

Le président:

Je pense que nous devrions faire une recherche…

M. Arnold Chan:

Pouvons-nous vous donner une réponse plus tard?

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord. Je surveillais l'horloge.

Où en sommes-nous?

Le président:

Ils vous répondront quand ils auront trouvé qui est responsable.

M. Arnold Chan:

Il semble que ce soit dans le site Web du Bureau du Conseil privé.

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien, et vous pourrez alors ajouter dans la motion le nom de la personne du gouvernement qui comparaîtra devant nous pour parler de cette politique.

M. Arnold Chan:

Très bien. Nous savons que cela vient du Bureau du Conseil privé; nous vous informerons lorsque nous aurons le nom de l'élu compétent.

M. David Christopherson:

Je l'apprécie. Je préfère que ce soit un élu étant donné que c'est nous qui sommes responsables en première ligne. Si vous voulez faire comparaître quelqu'un d'autre, parlons-en, mais je préférerais avoir affaire à d'autres élus pour le moment.

M. Blake Richards:

Je soulignerais également que le whip a passé un certain temps ici, aujourd'hui, pendant notre discussion. Il devait penser qu'il avait quelque chose à offrir ou à ajouter. Je pense qu'il aurait pu répondre à certaines des questions de M. Christopherson. C'est lui qui s'est levé à la Chambre pour présenter des excuses qui, apparemment, n'en étaient pas vraiment, car nous ne sommes pas certains qu'il avait la moindre raison de le faire, mais je suppose que nous verrons ce qu'il en est. De toute évidence, il pensait avoir quelque chose à ajouter ou une contribution à apporter étant donné qu'il était là. Je persiste à croire qu'il serait souhaitable de le convoquer.

M. Arnold Chan:

[Note de la rédaction: inaudible] et nous nous contenterons de faire venir la ministre? Vous pouvez décider si cela vous convient ou non.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui. Apportez-nous des renseignements. Nous examinerons la question à la prochaine séance.

M. Arnold Chan:

Très bien, nous aurons quelque chose d'ici jeudi.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord. Je peux accepter cela.

Le président:

Nous allons passer à la motion de M. Reid.

M. Arnold Chan:

Pouvons-nous la modifier pour mentionner « la ministre de la Justice », afin que la ministre de la Justice soit invitée?

Le président:

« … la ministre de la Justice soit invitée à comparaître comme témoin »?

M. Scott Reid:

Apportons-nous des amendements amicaux au Parlement ou est-ce prévu dans Robert's Rules of Order?

M. Arnold Chan:

Vous proposez la motion et je vais l'appuyer, d'accord?

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. Cela devrait la rendre recevable. Je me ferai un plaisir de retirer ma motion précédente et de proposer celle-ci. Je ne sais pas s'il est nécessaire de l'appuyer, mais merci, monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Ce n'est pas nécessaire, mais je vais l'appuyer.

Le président:

Le plus tôt possible, n'est-ce pas?

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, le plus tôt possible. Nous savons tous qu'elle a déjà du pain sur la planche.

Le président:

Très bien. Voulez-vous discuter de la motion?

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, je ne vous ai pas entendu dire que vous aviez reçu le renvoi de la Chambre, mais je suppose que oui. Je suggère que nous commencions immédiatement à l'examiner.

Le président:

Certainement.

M. Arnold Chan:

D'accord.

Le président:

Allez-y, David. Voulez-vous ouvrir la discussion?

M. David Christopherson:

Je peux le faire, si vous le désirez.

Les choses les plus importantes que j'ai à dire ne sont même pas mes propres paroles. Nous comprenons tous, je pense, la gravité des faits et je pense que les troisièmes excuses que le premier ministre a présentées en témoignent.

Pour commencer, je voudrais lire une déclaration de Mme Brosseau que je vais ensuite distribuer. Je voudrais d'abord la lire afin qu'on comprenne bien qu'il s'agit de sa déclaration, que je vais lire en son nom. C'est assez explicite. J'ajouterai ensuite quelques observations et nous verrons ce que nous déciderons.

Je cite une déclaration de Ruth-Ellen Brosseau, la députée de Berthier—Maskinongé, qui se lit comme suit: L'incident étudié aujourd'hui par le Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre relève d'une question de violation des droits qui sont accordés aux députés. Si quoi que ce soit empêche un parlementaire de remplir son rôle à l'égard de ceux et celles qui l'ont élu, il s'agit d'un enjeu sérieux. Dans le cas présent, c'est le premier ministre lui-même qui a causé cette violation lorsque son intervention physique inappropriée à la Chambre des communes auprès du whip conservateur, Gordon Brown, a entraîné un contact physique qui m'a empêchée de participer au vote. Les détails de cette interaction physique sans précédent entre un premier ministre et un membre de l'opposition sont amplement documentés. Tout incident de cette nature serait considéré comme inacceptable dans tout autre lieu de travail. Ce qui s'est produit a laissé plusieurs députés sous le choc et a soulevé des questions importantes sur la conduite du premier ministre à la Chambre alors que celui-ci venait d'adopter des mesures gouvernementales sans précédent pour limiter le débat. Je suis heureuse que le Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre aille de l'avant avec l'examen de cet incident aujourd'hui. Je crois que cela, ensemble avec le fait que le premier ministre ait reconnu que sa conduite était inacceptable, permet de clore cet enjeu. J'accepte ses excuses et je suis impatiente de pouvoir remettre toute mon attention sur mon travail au nom de mes concitoyens de Berthier—Maskinongé. J'espère sincèrement que tous les députés travailleront pour s'assurer qu'une telle conduite ne se reproduise plus jamais et que nous saisissions cette occasion pour réitérer notre engagement à améliorer le ton des débats au Parlement.

J'ai une autre chose à dire et je lancerai ensuite la discussion.

Mme Brosseau n'a pas pu se joindre à nous aujourd'hui. Elle est en Chine pour s'occuper de questions parlementaires touchant le commerce au nom du Parlement.

Bien entendu, monsieur le président, je dirais simplement que la motion mentionne directement Mme Brosseau, et que notre caucus se range à l'opinion exprimée par la députée de Berthier—Maskinongé. Elle souhaite et elle croit que toute l'attention que nous avons portée à cette affaire ici… que même s'il a fallu s'y prendre en trois fois, des excuses ont été présentées en bonne et due forme.

Personnellement, je voudrais simplement mentionner la question que Mme Petitpas Taylor a posée. À la suite des observations du premier ministre, elle s'est levée pour lui demander si, compte tenu de ce qui s'était passé à la Chambre, des circonstances atténuantes diminuaient sa culpabilité, sa responsabilité. Je pense que c'était l'essence de sa question.

Il faut reconnaître que le premier ministre a répondu sans équivoque que son geste était inacceptable et exigeait des excuses en bonne et due forme.

(1225)



Il a présenté des excuses et je suis ici pour vous informer que ma collègue, Ruth Ellen Brosseau, considère que ces excuses et l'audience d'aujourd'hui suffisent à clore cette affaire en espérant qu'une telle conduite ne se reproduira plus jamais.

Je pense que je devrais peut-être m'arrêter là, monsieur le président et bien sûr, je me réserve le droit de reprendre la parole vers la fin, si nécessaire.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. C'était très émouvant.

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Tout d'abord, je tiens à vous remercier, monsieur Christopherson, en mon propre nom et aussi au nom de tous les membres du gouvernement, d'avoir lu aujourd'hui a déclaration de Mme Brosseau. Nous savons que ce qui s'est passé le 18 mai n'a pas marqué un bon jour pour le Parlement, pour aucun d'entre nous. Par exemple, prenons notre conduite d'hier. Nous savons que nous nous sommes beaucoup mieux conduits hier et j'espère que cela deviendra la norme pour nous tous à la Chambre des communes.

Je sais que nous avons tous des personnalités très fortes et que nous nous lançons dans des débats très animés. Les événements qui ont conduit à l'incident du 18 mai ont échauffé les esprits d'un grand nombre de députés pour diverses raisons. Les choses sont ce qu'elles sont. Nous savons tous ce qui s'est passé ce jour-là. Je sais que du premier ministre jusqu'au dernier des députés qui étaient impliqués, nous voulons tous clore cet incident et nous conduire d'une façon beaucoup plus respectueuse. J'espère que ce sera une leçon pour nous tous.

Pour être franc, il y aura certainement d'autres cas de ce genre à l'avenir à propos d'enjeux qui nous tiendront beaucoup à coeur, mais j'espère que nous sommes suffisamment respectueux les uns envers les autres pour pouvoir avoir des divergences d'opinions et les exprimer dans cette tribune. Lorsque nous votons, ce qui est l'expression ultime de nos valeurs démocratiques au Parlement, nous devrions essayer d'éviter le genre de situation qui s'est produite ce jour-là. Je suis reconnaissant à Mme Brosseau d'avoir fait cette déclaration. J'espère parler au nom de mes collègues en disant que si c'est la façon dont les personnes qui ont été les plus touchées par la conduite du premier ministre et à qui il a présenté toutes ses excuses… nous l'acceptons et nous vous en remercions.

(1230)

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai une question à poser à M. Christopherson et ensuite, selon sa réponse, je lui poserai une deuxième question.

La déclaration de Mme Brosseau n'est pas aussi claire qu'elle le souhaitait peut-être, je pense, à propos de la question que je vais vous poser maintenant. Préfère-t-elle que le Comité cesse, aujourd'hui même, de poursuivre cette affaire et que ce soit notre dernière séance à ce sujet? Je ne sais pas vraiment si c'est le cas, alors je vous le demande.

M. David Christopherson:

Me demandez-vous si c'est sa position?

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, c'est exact, sa position.

M. David Christopherson:

Je peux répondre en son nom et la réponse est oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Dans ce cas, puis-je dire qu'aujourd'hui, nous avons appris de M. Bosc — d'autres le savaient peut-être, mais pas moi — que notre Comité peut décider de poursuivre ou non les questions de privilège. Je pense que la bonne façon de décider de ne pas donner suite à une question de privilège devrait toujours être de la conclure au moyen d'une motion au lieu de simplement la laisser tomber. La motion pourrait simplement porter que la question de privilège dont nous sommes saisis au-delà de laquelle…

M. David Christopherson: Soit considérée comme étant réglée.

M. Scott Reid: Ou un libellé à cet effet. Je vous laisse vous en charger. Il s'agit de dire que cela ne va pas plus loin. Nous le faisons au moyen d'une motion qui est approuvée à la majorité et qui rend les choses bien claires.

Seriez-vous prêt à proposer une motion à cet effet?

M. David Christopherson:

Oui. Vous voulez dire, je pense, et je suis sans doute sur la même longueur d'onde que vous — qu'il n'est pas très sain de simplement laisser tomber cette affaire et qu'il serait préférable d'émettre un rapport dans lequel nous pourrons annoncer notre décision. Si c'est conforme à ce que demande Ruth Ellen, sa déclaration sera ainsi reconnue. Nous pourrions probablement l'inclure dans le rapport. Ensuite, s'il y a une motion, nous pourrions, si possible, envoyer un rapport à la Chambre. Cela présente certains avantages.

Quelle serait l'autre solution? Pourrions-nous proposer une motion sans faire de rapport à la Chambre?

M. Arnold Chan:

Nous pourrions faire un rapport. Ce n'est pas nécessaire, mais nous pourrions décider de faire un rapport.

Le président:

Je pense que la suggestion de M. Reid correspond davantage à ce que vous souhaitez, car si vous faites un rapport, n'importe quel député peut demander un débat de trois heures qui s'éternisera.

M. David Christopherson:

Je viens de m'en rendre compte. J'aurais dû le faire avant. Nous parlerons de conseils et de dates après cette réunion, mais je vais seulement serrer les dents et reconnaître que nous préférons également ne pas faire de rapport.

Le président:

Pourriez-vous proposer une motion pour en finir?

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai peut-être besoin de conseils pour la forme à donner à ma motion, mais laissez-moi essayer. Voici: Que le Comité considère la question de privilège que la Chambre lui a renvoyée le — inscrire la date — comme étant réglée et est d'avis qu'aucune autre mesure n'est requise.

(1235)

Le président:

M. Reid est-il d'accord?

M. Scott Reid:

Certainement.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est un texte que j'espère pouvoir modifier, mais c'est ce qui m'est venu spontanément, monsieur le président.

Nous pourrions ensuite terminer simplement en proposant une motion et nous arrêter là.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je suis assez d'accord. Je voudrais seulement suggérer une légère modification pour permettre à la déclaration de Ruth Ellen d'être consignée au compte rendu et reconnaître que le premier ministre a présenté des excuses que Ruth Ellen a acceptées et que maintenant, l'affaire est close. Quelque chose dans ce genre.

M. David Christopherson:

Je pense que le libellé est satisfaisant, monsieur le président. Je ne pense pas que nous soyons vraiment en désaccord sur le principe.

M. Arnold Chan:

Et si nous pouvions inclure quelques mots pour parler de…

M. David Christopherson:

Du fait que cela ne doit plus se reproduire, de ce genre de chose.

M. Arnold Chan:

Non. Cela figure dans la déclaration de Ruth Ellen.

M. David Christopherson:

Dans la motion.

M. Arnold Chan:

Dans la motion, oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Pourriez-vous la relire?

Le président:

Voici la motion: « Que, compte tenu de la déclaration de la députée de… où elle accepte les excuses du premier ministre, le Comité ne prenne pas d'autre mesure relativement à cette question de privilège ».

Cela vous semble satisfaisant? Quelqu'un s'y oppose? Adoptée.

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir Procès-verbal])

Le président: Merci, David.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, pourrais-je soulever une autre question?

Le président:

Oui. Il nous reste du temps et j'ai d'autres sujets à aborder. Seulement trois d'entre vous ont répondu à la lettre au sujet de la délégation autrichienne. Nous avons aussi la motion sur les horaires en situation d'urgence que nous pourrions régler, je pense, en 30 secondes.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Quelqu'un a-t-il lu l'histoire d'Edgar Allan Poe, Le coeur révélateur, dans laquelle un homme en assassine un autre, l'enterre sous le plancher et devient fou en entendant le son de son coeur qui bat de plus en plus fort?

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président:

Vous auriez dû poser la question au greffier. C'est de son ressort. Le greffier était là et vous auriez dû lui poser la question.

M. Scott Reid:

Voici ma question et elle s'adresse davantage à notre greffière. Je reconnais qu'il y a toutes sortes de limites à ce que vous pouvez faire, mais quand les travaux de construction seront terminés, pourriez-vous nous faire déménager dans une autre salle — par exemple, il y en a deux en haut — au lieu de rester ici? Si ce n'est pas possible, je comprendrais, mais vous y avez peut-être songé vous-même. C'est pire ici.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'édifice Wellington doit rouvrir d'un jour à l'autre. Pourrions-nous déménager là-bas le plus tôt possible?

Le président:

Et retourner ensuite dans la salle 112-Nord? J'aime être dans ce bâtiment, si c'est possible.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Lorsqu'on n'entend pas le marteau-piqueur.

Le président: Puisque nous sommes dans un esprit de bonne volonté, peut-être pourrions-nous examiner cette petite motion du Président concernant l'horaire des débats en situation d'urgence.

La seule chose qui nous freine est que M. Christopherson voudrait remplacer le mot « consultation » par le mot « accord ». Les greffiers qui ont rédigé ce texte ont laissé entendre que ce n'est peut-être pas une bonne idée, pour plusieurs raisons. L'une d'elles est qu'il s'agit de la forme utilisée dans l'ensemble du Règlement et pour les décisions que prend le Président.

Deuxièmement, dans les autres parlements, il n'a même pas à consulter qui que ce soit du fait qu'il s'agit d'une situation d'urgence. Il se contente de fixer l'heure de la reprise des séances en cas d'urgence.

J'espère que nous pourrons adopter cette motion sous la forme proposée où il est dit que le Président consultera les députés, mais rappellera le Parlement après une urgence lorsqu'il pourra le faire, si M. Christopherson est d'accord.

M. David Christopherson:

Je crains que non. Je vais prendre conseil et voir si nous pouvons trouver une autre solution, mais je ne peux pas accepter ce libellé.

M. Arnold Chan:

J'avais déjà demandé un report. Pour vous rafraîchir la mémoire, j'ai fait valoir que si nous examinons la question des privilèges des députés en général dans le cadre de notre étude des mesures propices à la famille, examinons le tout en même temps. Voyons ce qui préoccupe votre caucus. Étudions le tout en même temps.

M. David Christopherson:

Désolé. De quoi parlez-vous maintenant?

M. Arnold Chan:

Nous parlons des pouvoirs d'urgence et de la modification de l'article 28 du Règlement, n'est-ce pas?

M. David Christopherson: Oui.

(1240)

Le président:

Nous pourrions avoir une situation d'urgence n'importe quand. Nous voulons simplement que le Président puisse rappeler la Chambre lorsque c'est la chose à faire.

M. David Christopherson:

Je comprends, mais les mots sont importants et le remplacement du mot « consultation » par le mot « accord » a énormément de conséquences, monsieur le président. Je crois que vous le savez. Nous n'essayons pas de retarder les choses. Nous n'essayons pas de les retarder délibérément; cela ne servirait à rien.

Le président: D'accord, mais nous pouvons en revenir à…

M. David Christopherson: Oui, et nous pourrions peut-être même tenir des discussions bilatérales pour voir si nous pouvons trouver un mot ou une phrase.

M. Scott Reid:

Si vous me permettez une remarque, je peux vous dire pourquoi je m'opposerais à l'emploi du mot « accord ».

Lors de la dernière situation d'urgence, le 21 octobre 2014, cela aurait été extrêmement difficile, en pratique, étant donné que les communications avaient été coupées et que les gens sont restés longtemps enfermés sous la garde de la police. Dans mon cas, je ne suis pas sorti d'ici avant 11 heures du soir.

Le président:

Les téléphones cellulaires ne fonctionnaient pas non plus.

M. Scott Reid:

Il pourrait être impossible d'obtenir un accord et donc « consultation »… Il est très difficile d'imaginer qu'on puisse abuser de ce genre de pouvoir. Je ne vois pas comment quelqu'un abuserait de ce pouvoir et le mot « consultation » semble donc raisonnable.

Autrement, non seulement les leaders des partis à la Chambre peuvent s'opposer au nouvel horaire, mais il se pourrait qu'ils ne soient pas disponibles. Il ne serait donc pas possible de rappeler le Parlement sans violer le Règlement, ce qui poserait un sérieux problème.

M. David Christopherson:

Je le comprends. Merci.

Monsieur le président, je m'engage à régler cela, car je comprends que c'est important. Nous voulons que cette mesure soit en place. Vous avez raison: ce libellé pourrait nous poser un problème.

Nous pourrions peut-être reporter cette question, une fois de plus, jusqu'à la prochaine séance, pour nous permettre de voir si nous pouvons trouver un libellé. Si ce n'est pas possible, je reconnaîtrai que nous aurons fait le maximum et nous serons prêts à voter.

Le président:

Si cela satisfait M. Chan. Très bien.

Nous avons ensuite les Autrichiens. Ils veulent parler de procédure. Trois d'entre vous ont répondu. Cela ne nous aide pas beaucoup, car la première personne a dit que nous devrions le faire pendant une séance du Comité, la deuxième que nous ne devrions pas le faire pendant une séance du Comité et la troisième était Mme Petitpas Taylor, qui est très conciliante et a dit qu'elle se rangerait à l'avis des autres.

Voulez-vous en discuter ne serait-ce que pour les départager?

M. David Christopherson: De quelle question s'agit-il, monsieur le président?

Le président: Il y a une délégation parlementaire autrichienne qui s'intéresse à la procédure. Elle désire rencontrer notre Comité ou les membres de notre Comité qui sont disponibles.

M. David Christopherson:

Bien. Normalement, quand j'étais président et pendant les années où je siégeais ici, le président implorait le maximum de gens de venir le soutenir, mais finalement, c'est sur lui que cela retombait. Voilà pourquoi vous êtes si bien payé.

Le président:

Oui, mais la question est de savoir si ce sera lors d'une séance de comité ou en dehors? Cela figure dans la note que je vous ai envoyée.

M. David Christopherson:

Je dirais que je laisse le président décider, car j'ai parfois fait ce genre de choses pendant l'été.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Monsieur le président, nous avons beaucoup de travaux dont nous devons nous occuper. Nous pourrions peut-être tenir cette réunion en dehors de nos heures de séance, mais je suis flexible.

Le président:

Vous avez changé d'avis? Très bien. Nous le ferons en dehors des heures de séance.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, je parle seulement pour moi et non pas au nom de mes collègues, mais je dirais que par le passé, nous avons généralement fait ce genre de choses en dehors des heures de séance.

Le président: Très bien. Je sens que tout le monde est d'accord.

M. Scott Reid: Si nous le faisons pour les Autrichiens, comment allons-nous empêcher les Slovènes de demander le même traitement?

Le président:

D'accord. Nous allons fixer une heure en dehors de nos heures de séance et si vous pouviez être là, ce serait formidable.

Quelles questions nous reste-t-il à régler? Je pense que c'est tout.

Ce Comité ne cesse jamais de m'impressionner en raison de votre comportement, de votre logique et de votre collégialité malgré un système propre à susciter des affrontements. Je pense que vous êtes tous très méritants.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on May 31, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.