header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-09-28 PROC 70

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning, and welcome to the 70th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

Today we are beginning our study of Bill C-50, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act (political financing).

We're pleased to have with us today the Honourable Karina Gould, Minister of Democratic Institutions. She is accompanied by officials from the Privy Council Office, Robert Sampson, counsel and senior policy adviser, democratic institutions, and Allen Sutherland, assistant secretary to cabinet, and machinery of government.

Welcome. It's great to have you here, Minister, to help us with Bill C-50, giving us your views, and answering our questions.

I'll turn the floor over to you and thank you very much for coming. [Translation]

Hon. Karina Gould (Minister of Democratic Institutions):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Good morning, everyone. This is your 70th meeting today. Congratulations for that. It is important.

I will acknowledge, though, that I have mixed feelings about being here today.[English]

I am honoured to be before you again to talk about legislation that makes our democracy more open and transparent, but I'm also saddened to recall that my previous appearances at this committee included the participation of my dear friend and colleague, the member of Parliament for Scarborough—Agincourt, Arnold Chan. He was both an outstanding parliamentarian and a really great guy. His passing has left an enormous gap in this committee and in the House of Commons and, I'm sure, in all of our hearts.

I just wanted to put that on the record.[Translation]

Our focus today is on Bill C-50, An Act to amend the Canada Elections Act (political financing). This bill would amend the Canada Elections Act to create an unprecedented level of openness and transparency surrounding political fundraisers.

Bill C-50 required the hard work and dedication of many public servant officials, so before I start, I would like to acknowledge and thank them for their contribution.

Thank you for your commitment to this legislation.[English]

The Government of Canada has promised to set a higher bar on the transparency, accountability, and integrity of our public institutions and the democratic process. Today I'm addressing one of our initiatives that will help reach this objective. This year we celebrate, in addition to the 150th anniversary of Confederation, the 35th anniversary of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Canadians cherish our charter. It is a model for new democracies around the world.

Section 3 of the charter guarantees every citizen the right to vote and to run in an election. The freedoms of association and expression enshrined in section 2 of the charter include the right of Canadian citizens and permanent residents to make a donation to a party and to participate in fundraising activities. Of course, these rights are subject to reasonable limitations.

Political parties represent a vital component of our democratic system. They unite people coming to the table from different regions, and with a variety of perspectives, backgrounds, and experiences. Parties mobilize ordinary citizens to champion ideas and work to get others to join them.

In my speech in the House of Commons, I quoted former Supreme Court Justice Frank Iacobucci. He said, “Political parties provide individual citizens with an opportunity to express an opinion on the policy and functioning of government.”[Translation]

Each time that Canadians vote in an election for a political party that shares their objectives or world view, it is one of the ways in which they play an active and engaged role in their society. We see this as an opportunity to make our country a better place for our children and grandchildren. Some Canadians even choose to work or volunteer for a political party.

But not everyone has the time or inclination to become active in politics as a volunteer. Perhaps they can do that, and something else as well. Still, they may want their voices heard. For many Canadians, making a financial contribution to a political campaign is a meaningful way to play a direct role in our democracy and an important form of democratic expression. Choosing to financially support a political party is something we must continue to uphold and protect.[English]

Everyone in this room knows that donations given by people who believe in us, who believe in what we stand for, make our work possible, and we must continue to ensure that Canadians are free to contribute to political parties in an open and transparent manner.

It bears noting that Canada is known around the world for the rigour of its political financing regime. Companies, industry associations, unions, or any organization for that matter, cannot give funds to any politician or political party, and there's a strict limit on individual contributions. Canadian citizens and permanent residents can contribute a maximum of $1,550 annually to each of the following: a registered party, a leadership contestant, and an independent candidate. In addition, they can donate a total of $1,550 to a contestant for nomination, a candidate in an election, and/or a riding association. Contributions are reported to Elections Canada and the name, municipality, province, and postal code of those who contribute more than $200 are published online.[Translation]

Bill C-50 will build on this existing regime. Where a fundraising event requires any attendee to contribute or pay a ticket price totalling more than $200, the name and partial address of each attendee, with certain exceptions, will be published online. The exceptions are: youth under 18, volunteers, event staff, media and support staff for the minister or party leader in attendance.[English]

As I said during second reading debate in the House of Commons, Canadians take political fundraising seriously. There are serious consequences for disobeying the law, and that is why the Canada Elections Act provides tough sanctions for those who break the rules. The penalties include fines of up to $50,000, up to five years in jail, or both.

Although Canadians can be proud of our already strict regulations for political financing, we recognize that they have the right to know even more than they do now when it comes to political fundraising events.[Translation]

Bill C-50 aims to provide Canadians with more information about political fundraising events in order to continue to enhance trust and confidence in our democratic institutions.

If passed, Bill C-50 would allow Canadians to learn when a political fundraiser that has a ticket price or requires a contribution above $200 is happening and who attended.

This legislation would apply to all fundraising activities attended by cabinet ministers, including the Prime Minister, party leaders, and leadership contestants when a contribution or ticket price of more than $200 is required of any attendee. This provision also applies to appreciation events for donors to a political party or contestant.

(1110)

[English]

These provisions apply to all parties with a seat in the House of Commons.

Bill C-50 would require parties to advertise fundraising events at least five days in advance. Canadians would know about a political fundraiser before the event takes place, giving them an opportunity to inquire about a ticket, if they wish.

Bill C-50 would also give journalists the ability to determine when and where fundraisers are happening. At the same time, political parties would retain the flexibility to set their own rules for providing media access and accreditation.[Translation]

Parties would be required to report the names and partial addresses of attendees to Elections Canada within 30 days of the event. That information would then become public.

The bill would also introduce new offences in the Canada Elections Act for those who don't respect the rules, and require the return of any money collected at the event. These sanctions would apply to political parties, rather than the senior political leaders invited to the events.

We propose a maximum $1,000 fine on summary conviction for offences introduced under Bill C-50. And if rules are broken, then contributions collected at events would have to be returned.[English]

This new level of transparency will further enhance Canadians' trust in the political system, and that's good for everyone. If passed, Bill C-50 would fulfill our government's promise to make Canada's political financing system much more transparent to the public and the media. This is one of many actions we are taking to improve, strengthen, and protect our democratic institutions.

We are also taking action to increase voter participation and to enhance the integrity of elections through Bill C-33, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act, and we have partnered with the Communications Security Establishment to protect Canada's democracy from cyber-threats.[Translation]

As I noted in my speech in the House of Commons, Samara Canada issued a report indicating 71% of Canadians said they are fairly satisfied or very satisfied with how democracy works in Canada. While this report suggests that Canadians have confidence in their democracy, we recognize there is always room for improvement. That's why we've decided to shine a light on political fundraising activities and build upon our already strong and robust system for political financing in Canada.[English]

I am eager to hear the opinions of committee members. This is important legislation that affects all of us, and I hope you share my desire to ensure Canadians know more about fundraising events.

I look forward to your questions.

Thank you for the invitation to be here before you today.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister.

Now we go to the seven-minute round, and we'll start with Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Thank you, Minister, for attending today and for your presentation.

With respect to the advertising of the event on the political party's website, can you expand on when that has to happen, in what cases it has to happen, and the timing?

Hon. Karina Gould:

As outlined in the legislation, if a cabinet minister, prime minister, party leader, or leadership contestant is present at an event where they are raising funds for a political party, for themselves, or for a riding association, the event must be prominently displayed and advertised five days in advance on a party's central website.

The ownership resides both within the party and the organizing entity to ensure that this information is publicly available. The location of the event, the time it is happening and the date, the price and the contribution required must be on that advertisement, as well as contact information for an organizer so members of the public or the media may be able to inquire about the event itself.

(1115)

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay, that's great.

I know the amount that was chosen is $200. I know it's hard to choose an amount. Can you expand on why that was the amount where this would apply?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes. With regard to public disclosure, $200 is already in the Canada Elections Act. Information about individuals who make contributions of $200 or more is publicly disclosed on Elections Canada's website. It's an agreed upon disclosure amount that already exists, that's why this level was chosen.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you.

I know you spoke briefly about the penalties. There's the $1,000 fine, and also if the rules aren't followed, the contributions may be returned. Can you talk a little about how that decision is made and if there's any recourse? If, for example, a mistake was made, a name was left out, that sort of situation, how would that be handled?

Hon. Karina Gould:

The intent is not to penalize people who make mistakes or where accidents happen, but rather entities or individuals who are deliberately trying to hide information. As in all the penalties and processes within Elections Canada, a process is always followed, and a dialogue about this ensues between either the Chief Electoral Officer or the commissioner of Elections Canada and individuals, parties, or political entities.

Of course, the penalties would be on a graduated system. There's an opportunity for organizers to submit the information that was lacking if it was accidental.

However, if this is not the case and it was discovered to be intentional, then there's a sliding scale of penalties that range from the maximum being a $1,000 fine and.... The legislation says that as soon as a political entity learns they have contravened the rules, they must return the donations. I might ask my officials to jump in just for the technical details.

I'm going to turn to one of my officials to clarify that.

Mr. Robert Sampson (Counsel and Senior Policy Advisor, Democratic Institutions, Privy Council Office):

Thank you, Minister.

As soon as the person who has breached one of the terms of the bill becomes aware, they have 30 days to return the amount of the contributions.

In terms of the graduated approach to penalties and enforcement, as with all offences and breaches under the Canada Elections Act, the commissioner of Canada Elections has a number of options and tools available, starting with a caution letter, then a compliance agreement. There's a $1,000 fine upon prosecution and conviction, so that would be reserved for the most serious instances.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

That's very good to hear. We don't want people penalized for an inadvertent error. You're making it clear that it has to be intentional. There's been a lot of notice. That's great.

With respect to the list of the names of those who appear, I know that a group is excluded in the bill: volunteers, minors, journalists, and people providing services.

What about guests who appear as guests? Say an MP in the Hamilton area is having an event and I show up as a guest but I'm not paying, and the minister is going to be present. What's my obligation? Do I simply put my name on the list? I'm there and I'm not paying the fee, but it's important that if I don't pay a fee my name is still on the list. Is that the requirement?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes, it's not your individual obligation, it would be the obligation of the organizing entity—

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Right, yes.

Hon. Karina Gould:

—to ensure that everyone who is present, and not one of those exceptions, would be reported on.

The idea is that if you're hosting a fundraising event and an individual purchases a table, all of those guests must be reported on even if they did not specifically make a contribution to the party or political entity specifically.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Right.

Hon. Karina Gould:

It's to capture that so it's clear who is attending these events so that the public has access to this information. Of course, they can go through it and scrutinize it and pose questions or raise issues that they may see as a result of being able to see exactly who is present at these events.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay, that's great. The focus is on presence and it's not on the payment, which is good.

How much time do I have, Chair?

(1120)

The Chair:

You have 45 seconds.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay.

Could you speak a little about how the rules apply during a general election?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes.

Recognizing that things are always a little more hectic during a general election, we have modified the advertising in advance and reporting regulations so that there is not the requirement to advertise in advance during a general election; however, all events with a contribution required of $200 or more would be required to be reported on within 60 days of the end of the election.

The Chair:

Now we'll go to Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

First of all, just let me make a comment about our colleague, Arnold, who would have had a lot of thoughtful insights were he to be present at today's meeting.

I know, Minister, you were at his service on the weekend. I saw you there. It was a very busy service. There were a lot of people there. I saw at least three of the colleagues who are here, and I know there were others whom I didn't see. It's just an indication of how well respected he was on all sides of the House.

I want to ask you, if I might test the chair's indulgence on this point a little bit, about a matter that is not the matter on which you are appearing before us. It's not about Bill C-50; rather it's about the legislation that may be forthcoming regarding the subject matter of the CEO's report on the 42nd election.

What we've been trying to determine here in this committee is whether your legislation is likely to be forthcoming soon or whether it's further away. That will determine our course of action. Do we reopen our discussions into that matter, or do we just say that there is no point in pursuing it, there is not time for us to report back to you, for the information to get to you, or for the legislative drafting to occur?

I know when you were asked by the media, you were reluctant to respond. You want to make those comments in Parliament first, but we're now in Parliament so I thought I could maybe prevail upon you.

The Chair:

As the member knows, I'm very indulgent and I leave it up to the witnesses. They don't have to answer things that aren't on the subject, but they're welcome to.

Hon. Karina Gould:

I'm happy to answer this as a first question.

First of all, I want to thank all the members of this committee, and particularly the different parties, for the report that you have already provided to me, as well as the reports that were provided over the summer, because those have all gone into the thinking as to what I'm considering in terms of moving forward.

I am hopeful to be able to do something soon, but to be able to speak much more broadly on that, I probably can't before I speak about it in the House. I would say that everything that has been provided is going into my considerations for next steps, and I do really appreciate the work that has been done, and the additional work that was done by each of the parties on this committee over the summer. That was an important deadline for next steps.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I think I can parse the words. My own sense is that further pursuit by this committee of work in that direction might get to you after your own internal deadline. I think that's what I heard. Although you didn't actually say that, I think that's what I read between the lines.

Thank you, Mr. Chair, for your indulgence on that matter.

Let me turn, then, to Bill C-50. I would just say that I find the bill unobjectionable, but also not really very substantive in that holding a fundraiser, which has been characterized as a cash-for-access fundraiser or a pay-to-play fundraiser, is not against the law. Once the legislation is passed, it still won't be against the law. There will be some reporting requirements, but nothing will have changed substantially.

The thing that people objected to has also not been addressed. The objection was that if you have sufficient money to buy tickets, you can have access to the direct presence of a minister of the crown, or indeed to the prime minister. I don't see that as having been resolved. The issue was never that the law was being violated. It was that a kind of ethical sniff test was not being met. I just don't see any evidence that this is actually being addressed.

Let me ask the obvious question. Why didn't you pass a law that said, as it did in Ontario, you can't have this kind of event, full stop?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I appreciate your question.

The premise of this is that fundraising is a legitimate activity that all political parties do whether they're in government or in opposition, and it is a Canadian's right to be able to contribute to a political party. The premise of this is really based on ensuring that right as a form of democratic expression, but also ensuring that Canadians have access to information so that they can make those judgments themselves with regard to who is attending and what is going on at these events.

All of us have attended fundraising events in some capacity and generally know that these are events where you have people who support a political party, who support you perhaps as a candidate, and want to contribute to that campaign. I think this legislation is based on that premise.

You're right. The law indeed wasn't being broken, but it's also based on the fact that since 1974, successive governments have introduced legislation that would make fundraising more limited. I believe it was your previous government that limited the amount of individual contributions. That was a positive move.

The previous Liberal government to that banned union, corporation, and organization donations. That was an important move. They also introduced bringing in nomination and leadership contestants into the fundraising fold because prior to that there were a number of leadership contestants who didn't disclose who their main fundraisers were, and that was a significant issue.

This is a continuation of those practices in order to ensure that fundraising be recognized as an important and necessary tool for political dialogue and political parties in this country, and also to ensure that we're continuing to expand the transparency and openness and the information that Canadians have so that they know who their political leaders are engaging with.

(1125)

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have less than a minute. Thank you, Mr. Chair, for warning me of that.

It seems to me the fundamental issue has not been dealt with. Did you consider doing what Ontario has done? They haven't banned donations. In fact, donations are still larger in dollar terms in Ontario than they are federally. They just said you can't have these events where a person pays and therefore gets access to the prime minister, or in that case, the premier.

Did you consider that? If so, why did you not go that route?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Different provinces are doing different things based on their own political experiences. I respect what each province has decided to do and, of course, we looked at all the different options when considering this legislation. Personally, I think it is important to ensure that we are shining the light on these activities and not driving things underground either. It is important that we maintain the robust system we have and that we are doing what we can to provide even greater access to information on these events.

That's the direction we have chosen to go.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Now we'll go to Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Very good. Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Minister, for attending. It's good to see you again.

Before I get into Bill C-50, I just want to ask your opinion on something. I realize you are not planning to bring this in, but it's relative to this, and it has to do with public financing of elections. Fantastic, healthy democracy comes from it. The politics are horrible.

Pleasantly surprise me. Tell me you are planning— I'm assuming you're not planning—to bring in this change. However, I'd like to know whether you are thinking about that and whether you believe, as our minister, that it's healthy for democracy or not. Given that your government brought it in and then the Conservatives took it out, I'd like to hear your thinking on that, please.

Hon. Karina Gould:

There is certainly a role for public financing within elections and within democracy, and we actually still have that in many respects with regard to the reimbursements that political parties, candidates, and riding associations receive after an election. Political parties are reimbursed 50% of their expenditures post-election, and candidates are reimbursed 60%; so there is still significant public financing in elections, and that is important. I think we have struck a balance with regard to individuals being able to express themselves and support the parties of their choice, but also to ensure that we still have a strong public mandate when it comes to the political system.

(1130)

Mr. David Christopherson:

I would love to debate that with you sometime, but I do appreciate your giving me your unvarnished opinion. Thank you.

Moving now specifically to Bill C-50, Chair, my colleague Mr. Reid just said that Bill C-50 was not very substantive in his opinion. He's being very kind. This has so little impact at the end of the day that this could be a Seinfeld episode.

Let me pick one: five days, for instance; now democracy will be saved because five days ahead of a fundraising event, you can now find that event on a website prominently. We'll come back to “prominently” in a moment. Five days; in over three decades of public life, I have never heard of a significant fundraiser being pulled together in five days. Clearly, the organizers would have known that this event was coming for a long time, well before five days. What's with the five days? Who are you trying to kid?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thank you for your question.

With regard to the five days, this is a conversation I've had with all the critics, members of this committee, as well as the political parties. Part of it is to ensure that we don't provide undue burden on what are often voluntary organizations when they're organizing events. This is feedback that I received from the consultations that I did with political parties prior to developing this legislation.

Also, there's a reasonableness in terms of ensuring that it's sufficient time for the public or journalists to be able to determine that these events are taking place, and to ensure that they have enough time to decide whether they're going to pose questions or to ask if they can cover the event. Essentially, it's a balance between ensuring that the information is out there with enough advance notice while also recognizing that we don't want to place an undue burden on what are often voluntary organizations that are bringing these things together.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I would submit, with respect, that it's meant to minimize it being out there, thereby negating the benefit that's supposed to be there.

You said, “sufficient time”. Really, with only five days, you pretty much have to have somebody whose job description it is within each of our parties to monitor the website every day so that you don't miss any of those five whole days that are going to be there if you want to see it ahead of time. To me, it's a joke. That, in large part, is a symbol of how you're spinning this piece of legislation like it makes a big difference, but in reality, it doesn't.

I know I'm going to run out of time—I always do—but we have lots of time because we have days and days scheduled. While I'm still on the five days, you said that it has to be prominently displayed on the website. Define “prominently”, please.

Hon. Karina Gould:

I think this legislation actually does make a significant difference, because for the first time in Canadian history, we're actually requiring parties and political entities to disclose this information, to advertise, to let the Canadian public know, and then of course to disclose who is actually attending this. This has never happened before.

With regard to prominent display, that means it should be easy to find; it should be accessible. The reason we chose to put this on central party websites as opposed to that of every riding association or leadership candidate, is so that if there is someone who is very interested in this file, they have one place per party where they can go to find out all of this information, because we do want this to be easily accessible to Canadians and to the media.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Fair enough.

Let me push further along the vein that this doesn't make any difference. You make a big deal about their having to post who attended the fundraiser if it was over $200. Don't they have to post it anyway? All this does is it gets it out there a little quicker, maybe. That information is already on Elections Canada's website. Is that correct?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Some of it would be. If you individually have made that donation, then yes, it would be, but it wouldn't be necessarily known that you attended a fundraiser. Currently, for anyone who makes a contribution over $200, their information is publicly displayed, but it's not connected to a fundraising event.

What this legislation does is it states that if you specifically are attending one of these events, it will be reported on within that event. What it also changes is that even if you as an individual did not make a contribution to the party, political entity, or actor designate, if you attended, your information would also be made public.

(1135)

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm sure that's going to scare all those wealthy people away. Well done.

Anyway, that's to be continued at another time. I believe my time has expired. I look forward to continuing engagement on this thing.

Hon. Karina Gould:

As do I.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Christopherson, and now we'll go to Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister, for coming before us today.

Mr. Reid brought up a point in terms of different models, and he suggested the Ontario model. I noticed the previous 10 years, being involved in politics in St. Catharines back in my riding.... There's a previous member of Parliament, and many ministers, and Prime Minister Harper came through on a number of occasions. There weren't fundraisers that were open to the public or that you could buy tickets for, but there was a suspicious certain segment of donors and supporters by invitation only to those events.

I'm wondering if you can explain how this legislation increases transparency in the political process in terms of donations to those types of events?

Hon. Karina Gould:

This legislation looks to capture any event for which an invitation or ability to participate or attend requires a cost of over $200. That would include appreciation events for donors. If you're an individual who has donated $200 or more to a riding association or a political party and, in return, are invited to an event where only individuals who have made that contribution are invited to attend, and one of the designated political actors is present, those would be captured as well.

We had long thoughts and conversations about those to ensure that we're creating a system that is holistic and captures where there is a ticket purchase required or a cost associated in order to be able to attend.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

The legislation captures individuals such as leadership candidates who may not hold a seat in Parliament. Why is it important to capture those individuals within the framework of this legislation?

Hon. Karina Gould:

While not every leadership contestant may become prime minister or leader of the official opposition or leader of an opposition party, every opposition party leader, leader of the official opposition or prime minister has at one point been a leadership contestant. It's important to ensure that Canadians have access to that information as well, because those are individuals who are seeking to become decision-makers and to hold public office.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Just to clarify something, so this legislation covers.... It's not necessarily donations of $200 as a ticketed price of $200. Can you explain that and the rationale for it?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Again, we thought long and hard about this, and the way it works in Elections Canada currently is that you only have to report on the contribution amount, not the actual cost of the event itself. There were concerns that there could be a $500 ticket price, but the contribution value would be considered $199 and therefore would not be captured. To make it clean and simple, it was a $200 cost associated with attending so that there couldn't be games played around what was a contribution and what was part of the cost of hosting the event itself.

Of course, we do see some events that are listed $199, but we're hopeful it's something people will not try to get around.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

You've said before, and you said during your introduction, that Canada has one of the most robust systems in the world when it comes to political financing. Can you expand on that for us?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Sure. As I've reiterated many times with regard to political financing in Canada, we have strict limits around individual donations: $1,550 per person per year within the different buckets available to them. There are no corporate, union or organization donations permitted, and of course, if you donate over $200, then it is publicly required that you disclose that.

I think when you look around the world, it is a very strong standard when it comes to political financing and how we engage in our democracy. I've said many times, and I firmly believe this, that contributing to a political party, entity, or actor is an important form of democratic expression, but as I outlined, within reason and within a limit. I think we've struck that balance here in Canada.

(1140)

Mr. Chris Bittle:

When drafting the legislation, did you look at other models in other countries?

Hon. Karina Gould:

We certainly looked around the world at different examples, but we also looked internally here in Canada at what different provinces are doing. With some rare exceptions, the federal level is definitely one of the strictest with regard to political contributions, even within Canada.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

You've said it, and we've all agreed. We've all attended and hosted fundraising events, and called individuals for fundraising. It can be a difficult thing, but it's necessary for our democracy. Have we struck the right balance here for Canadians to participate in democracy and for their right to know who's attending these fundraising events?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I think so. It is Canadians' right to be able to contribute to a political party, so they can still do that as individuals, but within a reasonable limit. I think the $1,550 that's roughly tied to inflation every year is reasonable. I think that, as has been established at the federal level for many years—I don't know if you know the exact year when the $200 threshold came in. Do you know the year?

A voice: I don't know the year.

Hon. Karina Gould: Okay. I think that's generally accepted as a reasonable threshold. I think that's an important threshold, too, because there were suggestions or debates about lowering the threshold. However, important points were raised about the fact that, as Canadians, it is also your right to privately support a party, just as you can go into the voting booth and vote for who you want in secret without anyone being able to know. You can say whatever you want outside of that voting booth. That's not publicly disclosed, just as under the $200 limit you should be able to support a party. All that is reported to Elections Canada, but it's not publicly disclosed because it's your right to be able to support that.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you, Minister.

The Chair:

We'll now go on to a five-minute round, and we'll start with Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister, for taking some time to be here with us today.

For those who are listening today, and I have no doubt, based just purely on your star power as the Minister of Democratic Institutions—

Hon. Karina Gould:

My star power?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Sure.

Anyway, for those who are listening today, I'd like to quickly summarize the actual reason you're here today and how Bill C-50 came to be, and I want to be clear about it. It's because the Liberal Party was selling access to the Prime Minister at events where tickets were costing up to $1,525. That's the reason. These were cash-for-access events, where the Prime Minister has openly admitted that he had people trying to lobby him, which was a clear violation of Liberal Party rules and a clear violation of the Prime Minister's own ethics code. These cash-for-access events resulted in the Ethics Commissioner and the Commissioner of Lobbying launching investigations. The only reason Bill C-50 is before us today is that the Liberal Party got caught breaking those rules. In fact, the Prime Minister got caught breaking the very rules that he himself created.

Just for a little clarity, I'd like to read from the Prime Minister's own “Open and Accountable Government”, a principle document. I'll just read the first paragraph of annex B. It's a brief one: Ministers and Parliamentary Secretaries must avoid conflict of interest, the appearance of conflict of interest and situations that have the potential to involve conflicts of interest.

Further down it says: There should be no preferential access to government, or appearance of preferential access, accorded to individuals or organizations because they have made financial contributions to politicians and political parties.

I wonder, Minister, if you could explain why the Prime Minister just doesn't simply abide by the rules, the ones that he himself, in fact, set in place. If he would just abide by those rules, then we wouldn't have to be having this conversation.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thank you for your comments.

I think, particularly over the past week, we've noticed how important this legislation is, given the fact that the leader of the official opposition has also been engaged in events that have not been publicly disclosed, and initially refused to admit that he was taking part in those events. I think that this legislation clearly outlines why it's important for political leaders to be more open and transparent, particularly about raising money and who they're interacting with. I think that it's a recognition that we can do better. Whether we're in government or the opposition, we should all be doing better to ensure that we're providing that openness and transparency for Canadians to see what's going on.

I do want to comment that lobbyists are covered under the Lobbying Act, and they do have additional responsibilities with regard to how they govern themselves and how they act. That's something separate. Within this legislation, we have made clear—because governments and the Canada Elections Act tend not to regulate the internal activities of parties—that parties still have the authority to determine who can attend fundraisers and who cannot.

(1145)

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. Thank you. To me, that didn't really explain why the Prime Minister didn't simply choose to follow the rules rather than making a legislative change.

At any rate, I'd like to ask you about the June 19 fundraising event the Liberal Party held that featured the Prime Minister speaking. It was after promising to abide by the rules of Bill C-50 and be open to the media. Can you explain why, even after that, the Liberal Party staff restricted media access? I know of at least a couple of instances where it happened. The Ottawa bureau chief of the Huffington Post, Althia Raj, and Joan Bryden from the Canadian Press were being denied access, or restricted access. Can you explain why, once the media was allowed inside, they were cordoned off in one particular area and not allowed to mingle with the guests? Can you explain why a Montreal reporter with the Canadian Press was told to leave?

Minister, I don't understand why you're bothering to put rules in place when it's quite clear that the Liberal Party is simply going to break them.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Well, first of all, I'm the Minister of Democratic Institutions, here on behalf of the Government of Canada. While I'm a Liberal member of Parliament, I'm not here on behalf of the Liberal Party of Canada. Those questions would be better posed to the Liberal Party itself.

However, with regard to the media, it's important to note that we didn't choose to legislate media's access because I believe fundamentally that the democratic institutions of the government should not be legislating the media, but their having the information will provide them more access to be able to pose those questions, to scrutinize, and to hold public office holders to account.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I guess the question remains, why put rules in place if the Liberal Party is planning on breaking them anyway?

The Chair:

Sorry, Mr. Richards—

Hon. Karina Gould:

The law is not yet in place. That's why we're here.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, but Liberals, they just can't follow them. They'll find all kinds of creative ways around them, as they already have, I'm sure.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Richards. Your time is up.

We'll go now to a five-minute round with Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

I think all of us remember that when Stephen Harper became leader, we never learned who most of his contributors were to that leadership. The caps were effectively non-existent at that time. He wasn't the prime minister yet, but he sure as heck wanted to be—and he did become the prime minister. Andrew Scheer has the same attitude, I believe, that he would like to be prime minister one day. I believe that's why he's doing this.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Are you jumping to conclusions there, or...?

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have no intention of helping him get there, but his intention, when he sells those fundraising tickets, is to be the future prime minister. That's his objective. So I think it is important that the leaders, the contenders from any party, participate in this.

I don't know if you have any further comments on that, given Mr. Richards' intervention a minute ago.

Hon. Karina Gould:

I think it's important that leadership contestants and leaders of parties are included in this, because we don't know what will happen in the next election. I think all of us on all sides of the table have hopes for what will happen, and will work hard to achieve that outcome, but at the same time, we don't know. For example, whereas someone might argue that as the leader of the third party you should not be subject to these rules, in our case, we were in fact the third party and then formed a majority government. So I think it is important that we do know who is attending these events and contributing to parties.

Furthermore, with regard to leadership contestants, I think it's very important. I think the issue you raised about former Prime Minister Harper, when he was the leader, is very important. We know that he raised over $1 million but only publicly disclosed $144,000 of contributions. That raises a question. That's why the rules were changed in 2003-04.

As I said, this is a continuation of the work done by different governments of different political stripes to ensure that we are having more openness, more transparency, and more reasonableness in our political financing system.

(1150)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Unfortunately, these rules are not retroactive, I guess.

Hon. Karina Gould:

No. They're only on a forward basis.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You talked about third parties. What about parties that don't have a seat in the House, for example, the Rhinoceros Party and the Marijuana Party? Are they affected by these rules?

Hon. Karina Gould:

No. Small parties without a seat in the House are not affected by these rules. That's really with regard to ensuring that we're not placing an undue burden on organizations that are largely run by volunteers and perhaps are quite small.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

I want to go back to Mr. Reid's very first question and go a little bit off topic, with the chair's indulgence. Just to put this in perspective for you, we put a lot of work into the CEO report, as you know. There was one issue that we never managed to deal with, and that was recommendation A39 on the broadcasting regime.

I don't know what to do with it. It's a really big thing. It's a very difficult question. I was looking at your mandate letter, and I found that you had another comment with regard to broadcasting related to the “independent commissioner to organize political party leaders' debates”. I'm wondering if there's some way we can help you, or if you can tie these together, or if we should be looking at these together. Do you have any thoughts on that?

Hon. Karina Gould:

That would actually be very useful if this committee would be interested in engaging on that section of the CEO report with regard to the broadcasting regime and also with an eye to the other element of my mandate with regard to the debates commission. I think this is an important step we do need to take, but I think it would be really useful to hear PROC's input as we move forward in that area as well.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I still have time. I'll share it with Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

I just have a quick point of clarification. According to the penalties we're talking about—and we're introducing new penalties with this, obviously—we're talking about reimbursing the cost if it's not properly advertised. Is that the full $200? It takes a certain amount of that money to do the event, but what is...? Yes, basically that's it. The $200, the full price, has to come back. So basically the expense of putting off this event falls back onto the association.

Mr. Robert Sampson:

Thank you for the question. If you look at the way the legislation is drafted, it captures both events, where it's a contribution of $200 and an amount paid of $200. What this means is that in the event that it's an amount paid, that's not an amount paid minus the cost of running. It means that as soon as a ticket price hits more than $200, the event is captured. One of the reasons for this was that it can take some time to calculate the exact value of the benefit that's conferred upon an attendee at a fundraiser. So, because there is a 30-day limit for reporting....

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes, I was asking about the payback, though, the penalty. When you have to pay back the $200 to the individual, is it minus the cost of the event and you reimburse that, or is it the full $200?

Mr. Robert Sampson:

You pay it all back.

Mr. Allen Sutherland (Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet, Machinery of Government, Privy Council Office):

It's whatever the amount is. So, if it's a $400 event, it's $400.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go on to Mr. Nater for five minutes.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister, for joining us today.

I am new to this committee, so I hope the committee will indulge me. I'm new to the procedure side of things.

Hon. Karina Gould:

There have been lots of indulgences today.

Mr. John Nater:

I appreciate that.

I did enjoy the walk down memory lane of past leadership conventions. I wonder whether there was any consideration given to renaming proposed subsection 384.3(3), which excludes minors from being publicized, in honour of Joe Volpe, from his Liberal leadership run. I wonder if there was any consideration given to that.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thank you, and welcome to the committee.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. John Nater:

I'm learning from Mr. Christopherson.

Hon. Karina Gould:

You will note in the legislation that conventions are actually excluded from this, because we recognize that with regard to people who have maybe made contributions...and leaders or cabinet ministers are also party members, so they are therefore going to be there. However, if there were a fundraising event that was organized while a convention was taking place, that would be captured.

Mr. John Nater:

For example, next year in Halifax the Liberals will be having their convention. Those who donated $1,500 to the Laurier Club would still have access to the Prime Minister in a private reception in Halifax.

(1155)

Hon. Karina Gould:

This would also be the case for the Conservatives or the New Democrats, because the ability to actually regulate the flow at conventions, we understand, would be a considerable burden. However, as with any of the other parties that are represented in the House, if the Conservative Party were organizing their convention, and they had a fundraiser with their party leader that was separate from the actual convention itself, and where there was an additional requirement to pay, that would be captured.

Mr. John Nater:

So you can still advertise the Laurier Club, have the donations in advance, and have the event—

Hon. Karina Gould:

Well, it would be separate. Again, understand that as a convention, people are going to be milling around. That would be a very big burden for any party, including the Conservatives or the New Democrats.

Mr. John Nater:

I'm just stating that there is that exception. You could advertise the $1,500 donation for a private reception.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes, that was done based on consultations with all of the political parties ahead of time, really trying to balance that need for transparency and accountability, but also recognizing what's doable and reasonable when you have really large crowds.

Mr. John Nater:

I want to get back to the five-day notice, which a number of members have commented on. I know many members host annual events, which are long-standing events. Often RSVPs come in late. If a minister were to RSVP to attend a member's fundraising event within two or three days of the event, what would happen? Would they be permitted to attend the event, or would they be forbidden—

Hon. Karina Gould:

That would be captured under the legislation as it currently stands.

The five days is a minimum requirement. I invite all parties to advertise well in advance. I think we all know, as individuals who have to raise money, that often you advertise significantly more in advance, because you want more people to attend.

The legislation is designed, however, so that if one of these designated political actors were even to just show up at the event, even if they didn't know they were coming, that event would be captured. Of course, they would still have to meet the reporting requirements, but they should have received the advertising and might receive those...and would be subject to the penalties for not having done the advertisement in advance.

Mr. John Nater:

Can you repeat that last fact? Was it that they wouldn't be penalized for not...?

Hon. Karina Gould: Yes.

Mr. Robert Sampson:

Perhaps it would be useful to know that there's a provision that requires corrections and updates to the advertising as information changes. If there is new information that a minister is attending which wasn't available prior, the advertising would be updated.

That should address a situation in which there's a last-minute decision for a minister to appear.

Mr. John Nater:

You could, then, have a fundraising event for $1,500 advertised well in advance, and then lo and behold, a day before, the prime minister gives notice to show up, or advertises one day before.

Mr. Robert Sampson:

Yes.

Hon. Karina Gould:

But it would be subject to the reporting requirements afterwards.

Mr. John Nater:

It would also be a burden for the media to try to cover that event, with five minutes' notice.

Hon. Karina Gould:

I would hope that individuals and parties might respect the spirit of the legislation.

The Chair:

Thank you. Now we'll go to Ms. Sahota, for five minutes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you, Minister, for appearing here today. I've learned a lot more about the legislation. I think it is a great step in the right direction.

I'm a little surprised to hear that this isn't going to make any difference at all now that media are in the event. Media constitute a channel through which so many people learn so much about what is actually happening. Most of these events were held in complete secrecy and still continue to be held in secrecy by some parties.

I think the Liberal Party has raised the bar now. The Prime Minister also has raised the bar and the standard of being more transparent. Once this legislation is in place, I think we'll be able to hold all parties accountable after the fact concerning who is attending these events.

Right now, Mr. Scheer is still refusing to reveal who's attending and is stating that it's only relevant to know in the case of prime minister's events, but it's not relevant to know who donates to him, as he is not a public office holder, but of course, he is in fact a public office holder.

Why did you find that it was important to make sure that all the various parties and candidates who, as you've said before, don't have a seat in the House reveal who's attending their fundraisers?

Also, can you in general talk a bit more about the Canadian system? I know that you think we have a very robust fundraising system and that even in the past, Elections Canada laws were technically still being followed. Why is this extra step necessary at this time?

(1200)

Hon. Karina Gould:

Many of those points have been raised, but I'm happy to reiterate responses to them, particularly when it comes to party leaders.

It's because quite frankly we don't know what's going to happen in the next election or who may hold the balance of power, who may be in government. These are individuals who are seeking to be decision-makers for the country; therefore, it's important that they be part of this regime.

One thing I want to mention that hasn't come up yet is that we're also making technical amendments with regard to nomination and leadership contestant campaigns to ensure that they're more in line with actual candidate and party expenses during an election. Currently, neither leadership contestants nor nomination contestants, if they have spent money on their campaigns in those contests, have to report it beforehand, if the nomination or the leadership contest hasn't begun yet.

It's important to bring those rules in line, so that we continue to have a fair and level playing field in politics at all levels and at all points in time. This is something that PROC has also recommended, in your CEO report.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

That's an excellent step. I think this is another great big part. Are there other examples you can leave the committee with of safeguards that have been put in place with regard to campaign fundraising, financing, other than the ones we talked about today?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Sure, the key message I would leave with the committee is that we do have good, strict rules when it comes to fundraising in Canada, but this is an additional step that is in line with a long history of continuously improving our political financing laws and regime in Canada. This is going to have a substantial impact on how we move forward on political fundraising, particularly with people who are able to make decisions. Of course, this is going to change the way that Canadians see and understand fundraising activities as well, because they are going to have information on it. Bringing it into the light, into the open, is an important step, and I hope that all of us, regardless of which party we are in, are able to support this legislation but also to abide by it.

I should note, however, as with most legislation, this comes into force six months after it receives royal assent, to provide parties and individuals the time they need. So, while current leadership contests or current leaders are not captured, I encourage them to participate in the spirit of this legislation.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister, for attending today.

I'd also like to commend all the committee members. Obviously there is a difference of opinion, but that's democracy, and you have expressed your opinions very civilly and respectfully, and I appreciate that.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Je vous souhaite la bienvenue à la 70e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Nous entreprenons aujourd'hui notre étude du projet de loi C-50, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada (financement politique).

Nous avons le plaisir d'accueillir aujourd'hui l'honorable Karina Gould, ministre des Institutions démocratiques. Elle est accompagnée de fonctionnaires du Bureau du Conseil privé: Robert Sampson, conseiller juridique et conseiller principal en politiques, et Allen Sutherland, secrétaire adjoint du Cabinet, Appareil gouvernemental.

Madame la ministre, je vous souhaite la bienvenue au Comité. Nous sommes enchantés que vous soyez venue nous aider dans notre étude du projet de loi C-50 en nous faisant part de votre point de vue et en répondant à nos questions.

Merci beaucoup d'être venue. La parole est à vous. [Français]

L'hon. Karina Gould (ministre des Institutions démocratiques):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Bonjour à tous. C'est votre 70e réunion aujourd'hui, et je vous en félicite. C'est important.

Je dois vous dire, toutefois, que je suis un peu émue d'être ici aujourd'hui.[Traduction]

Je suis honorée d'être à nouveau devant vous pour vous parler de mesures législatives qui rendent notre démocratie plus ouverte et plus transparente. Mais je suis également triste à la pensée que, lors de mes comparutions précédentes devant le Comité, notre cher ami et collègue Arnold Chan, député de Scarborough—Agincourt, était présent parmi nous. C'était à la fois un parlementaire hors pair et un homme exceptionnel. Sa perte a laissé un grand vide au Comité, à la Chambre des communes et j'en suis sûre, dans nos coeurs à tous.

Je tenais à ce que cela figure au compte rendu.[Français]

Aujourd'hui, nous nous penchons sur le projet de loi C-50, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada (financement politique). Ce projet de loi permettrait de modifier la Loi électorale du Canada pour porter l'ouverture et la transparence du financement politique à un niveau sans précédent.

Le projet de loi C-50 a exigé beaucoup de travail et de dévouement de la part de nombreux fonctionnaires. Alors, avant de commencer, je tiens à souligner leur contribution et à les en remercier.

Merci de votre engagement envers ce projet de loi.[Traduction]

Le gouvernement du Canada a promis de rehausser les normes de transparence, de reddition de comptes et d'intégrité de nos institutions publiques et du processus démocratique. Aujourd'hui, j'aborde une initiative qui nous aidera à atteindre cet objectif. Cette année, nous célébrons, en sus du 150e anniversaire de la Confédération, le 35e anniversaire de la Charte des droits et libertés. Les Canadiens chérissent notre Charte. Elle constitue un modèle pour les nouvelles démocraties du monde entier.

L'article 3 de la Charte garantit à chaque citoyen le droit de voter et de présenter sa candidature lors d'une élection. Les libertés d'association et d'expression enchâssées dans l'article 2 de la Charte confèrent aux citoyens canadiens et aux résidents permanents le droit de faire un don à un parti et de participer à des activités de financement. Bien entendu, ces droits sont assujettis à des limites raisonnables.

Les partis politiques constituent une composante vitale de notre système démocratique. Ils unissent des gens de différentes régions qui ont divers points de vue, antécédents et expériences. Les partis permettent de mobiliser des citoyens ordinaires pour qu'ils se fassent les champions de certaines idées et persuadent d'autres citoyens de se joindre à eux.

Dans mon discours à la Chambre des communes, j'ai cité l'ancien juge de la Cour suprême, Frank lacobucci, qui avait dit: « Les partis politiques offrent aux citoyens une occasion d'exprimer leurs opinions sur les politiques et le fonctionnement du gouvernement. »[Français]

Chaque fois que les Canadiens votent pour un parti politique qui partage leurs objectifs ou leur vision sur le monde, c'est pour eux un moyen de jouer un rôle actif et engagé dans la société. Nous y voyons une occasion de faire de notre pays un endroit meilleur pour nos enfants et nos petits-enfants. Certains Canadiens choisissent même de travailler bénévolement pour un parti politique.

Cependant, tous n'ont pas le temps ou l'envie de faire activement de la politique comme bénévole. Peut-être peuvent-ils faire cela et autre chose en plus. Pourtant, ils peuvent vouloir se faire entendre. Pour beaucoup de Canadiens, une contribution financière à une campagne politique est un moyen majeur de jouer directement un rôle dans notre démocratie et une importante forme d'expression démocratique. Nous devons continuer à maintenir et à protéger la capacité de choisir de soutenir financièrement un parti politique.[Traduction]

Tous ceux qui sont présents ici savent que les dons versés par les gens qui croient en nous et en ce que nous défendons rendent notre travail possible. Nous devons donc continuer à veiller à ce que les Canadiens soient libres de contribuer aux partis politiques d'une façon ouverte et transparente.

Il vaut la peine de noter que le Canada est connu dans le monde entier pour la rigueur de son régime de financement des partis politiques. Il est interdit aux entreprises, aux associations du secteur privé, aux syndicats et à tous les autres organismes de verser des fonds à un acteur politique ou à un parti politique, et les contributions personnelles sont rigoureusement limitées. Les citoyens canadiens et les résidents permanents peuvent verser une contribution maximale de 1 550 $ par an à chacune des entités suivantes: un parti enregistré, un candidat à la direction d'un parti et un candidat indépendant. De plus, ils peuvent faire un don total de 1 550 $ à un candidat à l'investiture, à un candidat à une élection ou à une association de circonscription. Les contributions sont déclarées à Élections Canada, et le nom, la municipalité, la province et le code postal de ceux qui versent plus de 200 $ sont publiés en ligne.[Français]

Le projet de loi C-50 reposera sur ce régime existant. Chaque fois que la participation à une activité de financement exigera une contribution ou l'achat d'un billet dépassant 200 $, le nom et l'adresse partielle du participant, sous réserve de certaines exceptions, seront affichés en ligne. Les exceptions sont les suivantes: les jeunes de moins de 18 ans, les bénévoles, le personnel nécessaire à l'activité, le personnel médiatique et le personnel de soutien du ministre ou du chef de parti présent.

[Traduction]

Comme je l'ai dit lors du débat de deuxième lecture à la Chambre, les Canadiens prennent au sérieux le financement des partis politiques. Le non-respect de la loi entraîne de sérieuses conséquences. En effet, la Loi électorale du Canada prévoit des sanctions sévères pour les contrevenants, pouvant atteindre 50 000 $ d'amende, cinq ans d'emprisonnement ou les deux.

Les Canadiens peuvent être fiers de notre réglementation déjà rigoureuse du financement politique, mais nous reconnaissons qu'ils ont le droit d'en savoir encore plus qu'ils n'en savent maintenant au sujet des activités de financement politique.[Français]

Le projet de loi C-50 vise à fournir aux Canadiens davantage d'information au sujet des activités de financement des partis politiques pour continuer à rehausser leur confiance à l'égard de nos institutions démocratiques.

S'il est adopté, le projet de loi C-50 permettrait aux Canadiens de savoir quand une activité de financement politique est payante, quand une contribution de plus de 200 $ est exigée et qui y a participé.

Ce projet de loi s'appliquerait à toutes les activités de financement auxquelles participent des membres du Conseil des ministres, y compris au premier ministre, aux chefs de parti et aux candidats à la direction lorsqu'une contribution ou l'achat d'un billet de plus de 200 $ est exigé. Cette disposition s'appliquerait aussi aux activités de reconnaissance des donateurs à un parti politique ou à un candidat.

(1110)

[Traduction]

Ces dispositions s'appliquent à tous les partis siégeant à la Chambre des communes.

Le projet de loi C-50 obligerait les partis à annoncer les activités de financement au moins cinq jours à l'avance. Les Canadiens connaîtraient ainsi l'existence d'une activité de financement politique avant sa tenue, ce qui leur donnerait la possibilité de se procurer un billet, s'ils le souhaitent.

Le projet de loi C-50 permettrait aussi aux journalistes de connaître le lieu et la date des activités de financement. En même temps, les partis politiques auraient la latitude nécessaire pour établir leurs propres règles d'accès et d'accréditation des médias.[Français]

Les partis seraient tenus de déclarer à Élections Canada le nom et le code postal des participants dans les 30 jours suivant l'activité. Cette information serait alors rendue publique.

Le projet de loi introduirait aussi de nouvelles infractions dans la Loi électorale du Canada visant ceux qui ne respecteraient pas les règles et il exigerait le retour des sommes recueillies lors de l'activité. Ces sanctions s'appliqueraient aux partis politiques plutôt qu'aux dirigeants politiques invités aux activités.

Nous proposons une amende maximale de 1 000 $ sur déclaration de culpabilité par procédure sommaire dans le cas des infractions introduites au moyen du projet de loi C-50. En cas d'infractions aux règles, il faudra que les contributions recueillies soient retournées.[Traduction]

Cette nouvelle norme de transparence rehaussera la confiance des Canadiens dans le système politique, ce qui est avantageux pour tout le monde. S'il est adopté, le projet de loi C-50 permettrait au gouvernement de tenir la promesse qu'il a faite d'accroître la transparence du système de financement politique du Canada pour le public et les médias. C'est l'une des nombreuses mesures que nous prenons pour améliorer, renforcer et protéger nos institutions démocratiques.

Nous nous efforçons également d'accroître la participation des électeurs et d'améliorer l'intégrité du processus électoral grâce au projet de loi C-33, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada et d'autres lois en conséquence. Nous avons formé à cet effet un partenariat avec le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications pour protéger la démocratie canadienne contre les cybermenaces. [Français]

Comme je l'ai mentionné dans le discours que j'ai prononcé à la Chambre des communes, Samara Canada a publié un rapport selon lequel 71 % des Canadiens sont assez satisfaits ou très satisfaits du fonctionnement de la démocratie au Canada. Même si ce rapport laisse entendre que les Canadiens ont confiance en leur démocratie, nous reconnaissons que des améliorations sont toujours possibles. C'est pourquoi nous avons décidé d'exposer au grand jour les activités de financement politique et de renforcer le système déjà solide et robuste dont nous disposons au Canada en matière de financement politique.[Traduction]

J'ai hâte de connaître les opinions des membres du Comité. Ces importantes mesures législatives nous touchent tous. J'espère que, tout comme moi, vous souhaitez que les Canadiens en sachent plus sur les activités de financement.

Je suis maintenant prête à répondre à vos questions.

Merci encore de votre invitation à comparaître devant vous aujourd'hui.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, madame la ministre.

Nous passons maintenant à un tour de questions de sept minutes. À vous, madame Tassi.

Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre, de votre présence au Comité et de votre exposé.

En ce qui concerne l'affichage des activités de financement sur le site Internet du parti politique, pouvez-vous nous en dire davantage sur les délais prévus et les circonstances dans lesquelles cela doit se faire?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Comme on peut le voir dans le projet de loi, si le premier ministre, un ministre, un chef de parti ou un candidat à la direction d'un parti doit assister à une activité au cours de laquelle des fonds sont recueillis pour lui-même, pour un parti politique ou pour une association de circonscription, l'activité doit être annoncée cinq jours d'avance à un endroit bien en vue du principal site Web du parti.

La responsabilité de le faire incombe tant au parti qu'à l'entité organisatrice. L'annonce doit préciser le lieu de l'activité, la date et l'heure à laquelle elle aura lieu, la contribution ou le prix exigés ainsi que les coordonnées d'une personne chargée de l'organisation, afin de permettre aux membres du public et aux médias de se renseigner sur l'activité.

(1115)

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'accord. C'est très bien.

Je sais que le montant choisi est de 200 $. Je sais aussi qu'il est difficile d'opter pour un montant donné. Pouvez-vous nous dire pourquoi ce montant a été choisi?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui. En matière de divulgation, le montant de 200 $ figure déjà dans la Loi électorale du Canada. Des renseignements sur les personnes qui font des contributions de 200 $ ou plus sont publiés sur le site Web d'Élections Canada. C'est le seuil convenu de divulgation. Voilà pourquoi ce montant a été choisi.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Je vous remercie.

Je sais que vous avez brièvement parlé des sanctions. Il y a l'amende de 1 000 $ et l'obligation de restituer les contributions si les règles n'ont pas été observées. Pouvez-vous nous en dire davantage sur la façon dont les décisions sont prises à cet égard? Y a-t-il un recours possible? Par exemple, qu'arrive-t-il si une erreur est commise ou si un nom est omis involontairement?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Le projet de loi vise à pénaliser non des gens qui font une erreur involontaire, mais les entités et les personnes qui cherchent délibérément à cacher des renseignements. Comme pour tous les processus et les sanctions d'Élections Canada, il y a une procédure à suivre dans le cadre de laquelle le directeur général des élections ou le commissaire aux élections fédérales prend contact avec les particuliers, les partis ou les organismes politiques intéressés.

Bien sûr, les sanctions sont progressives, et les organisateurs ont la possibilité de présenter les informations qui manquaient, si la non-observation des règles était accidentelle.

Toutefois, si ce n'est pas le cas et s'il est établi que le manquement était délibéré, il y a des sanctions progressives comprises entre l'amende maximale de 1 000 $ et… Le projet de loi dit que l'entité politique doit restituer les contributions aussitôt qu'elle apprend qu'il y a eu manquement aux règles. Je vais peut-être demander à mes collaborateurs de parler des détails.

Un des fonctionnaires qui m'accompagnent va donner des précisions à ce sujet.

M. Robert Sampson (conseiller juridique et conseiller principal en politiques, Institutions démocratiques , Bureau du Conseil privé):

Merci, madame la ministre.

Dès que la personne qui a manqué à l'une des dispositions du projet de loi se rend compte de ce manquement, elle doit restituer les contributions dans les 30 jours qui suivent.

En ce qui concerne les sanctions progressives et les mesures d'exécution, comme dans le cas de toutes les infractions et violations prévues dans la Loi électorale du Canada, le commissaire aux élections fédérales peut recourir à un certain nombre de moyens, allant de la lettre de mise en garde jusqu'à l'entente de conformité. Une amende de 1 000 $ est prévue en cas de poursuites et de condamnation. Cette sanction est donc réservée aux cas les plus graves.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Cela est bon à savoir. Il ne faudrait pas que des gens soient pénalisés pour une erreur involontaire. Vous avez donc précisé qu'il n'y a sanction que si l'acte commis est délibéré. Il y a de nombreux avertissements. C'est très bien.

Pour ce qui est des noms à publier, je sais que certains groupes sont exclus dans le projet de loi: les bénévoles, les mineurs, les journalistes et les fournisseurs de services.

Qu'en est-il des invités? Supposons qu'un député de la région de Hamilton organise une activité à laquelle un ministre assiste et que j'y prenne part comme invitée sans verser une contribution. Quelles sont mes obligations? Dois-je donner mon nom? Si je suis là sans payer, est-il obligatoire que mon nom figure dans la liste?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui, mais ce n'est pas une obligation pour vous. C'est l'entité organisatrice qui doit le faire…

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Je comprends.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

… pour s'assurer que toutes les personnes présentes, à l'exception des personnes exclues, figurent sur la liste.

Le principe suivi dans ce cas, c'est que si une personne paie pour toute une table dans le cadre d'une activité de financement, toutes les personnes assises à la table doivent figurer sur la liste même si elles n'ont pas elles-mêmes versé une contribution au parti ou à l'entité politique.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'accord.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Le but est de nommer toutes les personnes qui ont assisté à une activité de financement pour que le public ait accès à ce renseignement. Bien sûr, les gens sont ainsi en mesure d'examiner la liste, de poser des questions ou de signaler un problème.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'accord. C'est très bien. On insiste donc sur la présence plutôt que sur le montant versé. C'est une bonne chose.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il, monsieur le président?

(1120)

Le président:

Vous avez encore 45 secondes.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'accord.

Pouvez-vous nous parler brièvement des règles qui s'appliquent pendant des élections générales?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui.

Conscients du fait qu'il y a beaucoup de mouvement pendant des élections générales, nous avons modifié les exigences relatives au préavis et à la déclaration des activités. L'affichage d'avance n'est pas exigé dans ce cas, mais toutes les activités où des contributions de 200 $ ou plus sont exigées doivent être déclarées dans les 60 jours qui suivent la fin des élections.

Le président:

C'est maintenant au tour de M. Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je voudrais tout d'abord dire quelques mots au sujet de notre collègue, Arnold, qui nous aurait fait profiter de judicieux commentaires s'il avait été présent parmi nous aujourd'hui.

Je sais, madame la ministre, que vous avez assisté à ses funérailles le week-end dernier. Je vous ai vue là. Beaucoup de gens étaient présents. J'ai vu au moins trois de nos collègues du Comité, et je sais qu'il y en avait d'autres que je n'ai pas vus. C'était un témoignage du respect que tous les députés lui portaient, quelle que soit leur affiliation politique.

Si la présidente veut bien faire preuve d'indulgence, je vous demanderai des renseignements sur une question qui n'a rien à voir avec l'objet de votre comparution devant nous. Elle concerne non le projet de loi C-50, mais un projet de loi qui pourrait nous parvenir sur l'objet du rapport du DGE sur la 42e élection générale.

Au Comité, nous aimerions savoir si nous pouvons nous attendre à recevoir bientôt votre projet de loi ou s'il n'arrivera que plus tard. Cela nous permettrait de planifier notre travail. Y a-t-il lieu de reprendre nos discussions sur la question, ou bien devons-nous croire qu'il est inutile de le faire parce qu'il n'y aurait pas assez de temps pour vous présenter un rapport et pour que vous en preniez connaissance avant la rédaction du projet de loi?

Je sais que vous n'avez pas voulu répondre quand la question vous a été posée par les médias. Vous préférez mettre le Parlement au courant d'abord, mais comme nous sommes ici au Parlement, j'ai pensé que vous seriez peut-être disposée à nous renseigner.

Le président:

Comme le député le sait, je suis très indulgent: je laisse les témoins prendre eux-mêmes la décision. Ils n'ont pas à répondre à des questions extérieures au sujet à l'étude, mais nous serions heureux s'ils sont disposés à le faire.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je vais essayer de répondre en considérant que c'est une première question.

J'aimerais tout d'abord remercier tous les membres du Comité, et particulièrement les différents partis, pour le rapport qui m'a déjà été transmis ainsi que pour les rapports que vous avez produits au cours de l'été. Nous avons tenu compte de votre point de vue dans notre réflexion sur ce que nous envisageons de faire à l'avenir.

J'espère être en mesure d'agir bientôt, mais je ne pourrai probablement pas vous donner beaucoup de détails avant d'avoir pris la parole à ce sujet devant la Chambre. Je dirais donc que tout ce qui m'a été envoyé est pris en considération dans la préparation des prochaines étapes. Je vous suis très reconnaissante de tout ce que vous avez fait et du travail supplémentaire que chacun des partis représentés au Comité a réalisé au cours de l'été. C'était une importante échéance en prévision des étapes suivantes.

M. Scott Reid:

Je crois pouvoir interpréter plus ou moins ces paroles. J'ai l'impression que tout travail supplémentaire que ferait le Comité dans ce domaine ne vous parviendrait qu'après votre propre échéance interne. C'est ce que j'ai cru comprendre. Même si vous ne l'avez pas dit, c'est l'impression que j'ai tirée de vos propos.

Monsieur le président, je vous remercie de l'indulgence dont vous avez fait preuve.

Je vais maintenant revenir au projet de loi C-50. Je dirai simplement que je n'y vois rien d'inacceptable. En même temps, je trouve qu'il manque un peu de substance. À l'heure actuelle, l'organisation d'une activité de financement du genre « accès contre espèces » n'est pas illégale. Une fois ce projet de loi adopté, la situation restera la même. Il y aura quelques exigences de déclaration, mais rien de concret n'aura changé.

Le principe contre lequel les gens se sont élevés n'est pas touché. Les gens avaient protesté parce qu'il suffisait d'avoir les moyens de payer un billet pour avoir accès à un ministre ou même au premier ministre. Ce problème n'est pas réglé. Personne n'a jamais prétendu que cette pratique était illégale. C'est simplement qu'elle n'était pas jugée tout à fait conforme à l'éthique. Or, je ne vois rien dans le projet de loi qui modifie la situation.

Je vais maintenant vous poser la question évidente: pourquoi n'avez-vous pas prévu des dispositions interdisant tout simplement ce genre d'activité de financement, comme l'Ontario l'a fait?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je vous remercie de votre question.

Le projet de loi est basé sur le principe que le financement politique est une activité légitime à laquelle se livrent tous les partis, qu'ils soient au gouvernement ou dans l'opposition. De plus, les Canadiens ont le droit de contribuer au financement d'un parti politique. Le projet de loi vise à confirmer ce droit comme forme d'expression démocratique et à permettre aux Canadiens d'avoir accès à des renseignements leur permettant de porter eux-mêmes un jugement sur les activités de financement et les personnes qui y participent.

Nous avons tous assisté à des activités de financement politique à un titre ou à un autre. Nous savons en général que les gens qui assistent à ces activités appuient un parti politique, ou vous appuient vous-même comme candidat et souhaitent contribuer à votre campagne. Je crois que le projet de loi se fonde sur ce principe.

Vous avez raison. En organisant ces activités, personne ne contrevenait à la loi. Elles se basent sur le fait que, depuis 1974, les gouvernements successifs ont adopté des mesures législatives destinées à limiter les activités de financement. Je crois que c'est votre gouvernement qui a limité le montant des contributions individuelles. C'était une décision positive.

Le gouvernement libéral précédent avait interdit les dons provenant des syndicats, des sociétés et des organisations. C'était également une décision importante. Il avait également soumis les candidats à l'investiture et à la direction des partis aux limites de financement parce que de tels candidats avaient auparavant omis de rendre publique l'identité de leurs principaux agents de financement, ce qui avait occasionné des problèmes.

Le projet de loi est un prolongement de ces pratiques. Il reconnaît que la collecte de fonds constitue un moyen politique important et nécessaire pour le dialogue politique et les partis du pays et renforce en même temps la transparence, l'ouverture et l'accès aux renseignements pour que les Canadiens soient au courant des contacts entretenus par leurs dirigeants politiques.

(1125)

M. Scott Reid:

Il me reste moins d'une minute. Merci, monsieur le président, de m'en avertir.

J'ai l'impression que le problème fondamental n'est pas réglé. Avez-vous envisagé de faire comme l'Ontario? La province n'a pas interdit les dons qui, en fait, sont plus importants que ceux qui sont permis au niveau fédéral. Elle a simplement interdit les activités dans le cadre desquels des personnes paient pour avoir accès au premier ministre.

L'avez-vous envisagé? Sinon, pourquoi n'avez-vous pas suivi cette voie?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Différentes provinces ont pris différentes mesures en fonction de leurs propres expériences politiques. Je respecte leurs décisions. Il est évident que nous avons examiné les différentes options au stade de l'élaboration du projet de loi. Personnellement, je crois qu'il est important que ces activités aient lieu au grand jour et ne soient pas cachées. Il est important de maintenir le système rigoureux que nous avons et de faire tout notre possible pour assurer un accès encore plus grand aux renseignements concernant ces activités.

C'est l'orientation que nous avons choisie.

M. Scott Reid:

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

À vous, monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Très bien. Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre, de votre présence. Nous sommes heureux de vous revoir.

Avant d'aborder le projet de loi C-50, je voudrais avoir votre avis sur une question. Je me rends compte que vous n'avez pas l'intention d'adopter une telle mesure, mais elle est liée à ce que nous examinons. Il s'agit du financement public des élections, qui favorise une démocratie extraordinaire, une saine démocratie. L'aspect politique est affreux.

Voulez-vous me surprendre agréablement? Pouvez-vous me dire que vous envisagez — je sais que ce n'est pas le cas — de faire adopter ce changement? J'aimerais cependant savoir si vous y pensez et si vous croyez ou non, en votre qualité de ministre, que c'est une mesure qui favorise une saine démocratie. Compte tenu du fait que votre gouvernement avait adopté cette mesure, que les conservateurs ont abolie par la suite, j'aimerais savoir ce que vous en pensez.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Le financement public joue certainement un rôle dans les élections et dans la démocratie. Nous en avons de nombreux éléments, comme en témoignent les remboursements que reçoivent les partis politiques, les candidats et les associations de circonscription après les élections. Les partis politiques récupèrent 50 % de leurs dépenses, et les candidats, 60 %. Nous avons donc un financement public assez considérable des élections, ce qui est important. Je crois que nous avons réalisé un juste équilibre en permettant aux gens de s'exprimer et d'appuyer le parti de leur choix, tout en veillant à maintenir un mandat public fort en ce qui concerne le système politique.

(1130)

M. David Christopherson:

J'aimerais beaucoup avoir l'occasion, à un moment donné, de discuter de cette question avec vous, mais je vous suis reconnaissant de la franchise avec laquelle vous avez présenté votre point de vue. Je vous remercie.

Monsieur le président, en ce qui concerne le projet de loi C-50, mon collègue, M. Reid, est d'avis qu'il manque un peu de substance. Je le trouve très généreux. En fin de compte, le projet de loi a une si faible incidence qu'on pourrait en faire un épisode de Seinfeld.

Je vais vous donner un exemple: le délai de cinq jours. Nous allons sauver la démocratie en exigeant qu'une activité de financement figure à un endroit bien en vue du site Web d'un parti politique cinq jours avant qu'elle ait lieu. Je reviendrai à l'expression « bien en vue » dans quelques instants. Cinq jours. Après plus de 30 ans de vie publique, je n'ai jamais entendu parler d'une importante activité de financement qui ait été organisée en cinq jours. De toute évidence, les organisateurs savent que l'activité se tiendra bien plus de cinq jours avant. Alors, pourquoi cinq jours? Qui essayez-vous de faire marcher?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je vous remercie de votre question.

J'ai discuté du délai de cinq jours avec tous les porte-parole des partis, les membres du Comité et les partis eux-mêmes. L'un des objectifs poursuivis était de ne pas imposer un fardeau indu aux organisations souvent bénévoles qui organisent les activités. Cela était ressorti au cours des consultations que j'ai tenues avec les partis politiques avant l'élaboration du projet de loi.

De plus, le délai me semblait raisonnable s'il s'agit de laisser assez de temps pour que le public ou les journalistes soient au courant de la tenue des activités et puissent penser aux questions à poser ou aux permissions à obtenir pour couvrir l'activité. Il s'agissait essentiellement de parvenir à un certain équilibre pour veiller à ce que l'information soit disponible suffisamment à l'avance tout en reconnaissant qu'il ne faudrait pas imposer un fardeau trop lourd aux organisations souvent bénévoles qui organisent les activités.

M. David Christopherson:

Je soutiens, avec respect, que le délai vise à minimiser le temps pendant lequel l'information est disponible et, partant, à prévenir l'avantage qu'il y a à être au courant suffisamment à l'avance.

Vous avez dit que vous voulez « laisser assez de temps ». En réalité, avec un délai de cinq jours seulement, il faudrait presque avoir une personne à plein temps dans chacun de nos partis pour vérifier tous les jours le site Internet afin de ne pas manquer les activités devant avoir lieu dans les cinq jours suivants. Pour moi, c'est vraiment une plaisanterie qui montre que, pour l'essentiel, ce projet de loi auquel vous attribuez beaucoup d'importance n'en a pas en réalité.

Je sais que je vais manquer de temps — cela m'arrive toujours —, mais nous aurons tout le temps nécessaire parce que nous devons siéger des jours et des jours. Pendant que j'en suis encore à la question des cinq jours, j'aimerais que vous me donniez une définition de l'endroit « bien en vue » où l'information doit paraître sur le site Internet.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je crois en fait que le projet de loi revêt une grande importance. Pour la première fois dans notre histoire, nous imposons aux partis et aux entités politiques de communiquer cette information, de la rendre publique, d'en informer les Canadiens et ensuite de faire savoir qui a assisté aux activités. Cela n'a jamais été fait auparavant.

Pour ce qui est de l'endroit bien en vue, nous voulons dire par là que l'information doit être accessible et facile à trouver. La raison pour laquelle nous exigeons que les renseignements soient affichés sur le site principal du parti, par opposition aux sites des associations de circonscription et des candidats à la direction, c'est que nous voulons que les gens qui s'intéressent beaucoup à ce dossier puissent trouver ce qu'ils cherchent à un seul endroit pour chaque parti. Nous voulons en effet que l'information soit facilement accessible pour les Canadiens et les médias.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord.

Je voudrais aller un peu plus loin pour montrer que le projet de loi n'aura aucune influence. Vous insistez beaucoup sur l'affichage de la liste des personnes qui assistent à une activité de financement si la contribution dépasse 200 $. Cet affichage n'est-il pas obligatoire de toute façon? Tout ce que fait le projet de loi, c'est peut-être de faire en sorte que l'affichage se fasse plus rapidement. Les renseignements sont déjà affichés sur le site d'Élections Canada, n'est-ce pas?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

En partie. Si vous avez fait un don à titre personnel, les renseignements sont affichés, mais on ne saurait pas nécessairement que vous avez assisté à une activité de financement. À l'heure actuelle, si une personne verse une contribution de plus de 200 $, ses coordonnées doivent être affichées, mais elles n'ont pas à être liées à une activité de financement.

En vertu du projet de loi, si vous assistez à une de ces activités, vos coordonnées seront affichées avec le compte rendu de l'activité. De plus, même si vous n'avez fait aucune contribution au parti, à l'entité politique ou à une personne désignée, votre seule présence impose que vos coordonnées soient rendues publiques.

(1135)

M. David Christopherson:

Je suis sûr que cela va empêcher toutes ces grandes fortunes de se montrer le nez. Tant mieux.

Quoi qu'il en soit, nous allons devoir poursuivre à un autre moment. Je crois que mon temps de parole est écoulé. J'espère que nous aurons l'occasion de reprendre cette discussion.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Moi de même.

Le président:

Je vous remercie, monsieur Christopherson. La parole est maintenant à M. Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, madame la ministre, de votre présence au Comité.

M. Reid a parlé de différents modèles, en insistant sur l'initiative ontarienne. J'ai noté ce qui s'est passé dans les 10 dernières années parce que je suis l'activité politique à St. Catharines, où se trouve ma circonscription… Il y a un ancien député et de nombreux ministres ainsi que le premier ministre Harper qui sont venus un certain nombre de fois. Il ne s'agissait pas d'activités de financement ouvertes au public, pour lesquelles on pouvait acheter des billets. Il y avait plutôt une catégorie suspecte de donateurs et de partisans qui ne pouvaient assister à ces activités que sur invitation.

Pouvez-vous nous expliquer de quelle façon le projet de loi augmente la transparence du processus politique pour ce qui est des dons offerts à l'occasion d'activités de ce genre?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Le projet de loi s'applique à toute activité à laquelle on ne peut participer, assister ou être invité qu'en versant un montant supérieur à 200 $. Cela comprend les activités organisées pour remercier les donateurs. Si vous avez fait un don de 200 $ ou plus à une association de circonscription ou à un parti politique et qu'en contrepartie, vous êtes invité à une activité à laquelle seuls sont conviés les gens qui ont versé une contribution et à laquelle assiste une personne désignée, l'obligation s'applique.

Nous avons beaucoup réfléchi et beaucoup discuté de ces questions pour nous assurer de créer un système holistique qui inclut les activités pour lesquelles il faut acheter un billet ou payer un prix afin de pouvoir assister.

M. Chris Bittle:

Le projet de loi s'applique à des personnes telles que les candidats à la direction d'un parti qui ne siègent pas au Parlement. Pourquoi est-il important d'assujettir ces personnes au projet de loi?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Les candidats à la direction d'un parti ne sont pas tous susceptibles de devenir premiers ministres, chefs de l'opposition ou chefs d'un parti d'opposition. Toutefois, tout chef d'un parti d'opposition, tout chef de l'opposition et tout premier ministre a été, à un moment donné, candidat à la direction d'un parti. Il est donc important de s'assurer que les Canadiens ont accès à ces renseignements aussi. En effet, ces personnes cherchent à occuper des postes importants et à devenir titulaires de charges publiques.

M. Chris Bittle:

J'aimerais avoir une précision. Le projet de loi s'applique… ce n'est pas nécessairement aux dons de 200 $ versés comme prix d'un billet de 200 $. Pouvez-vous nous expliquer les motifs de ces dispositions?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Encore une fois, nous avons longuement réfléchi à cet aspect. À l'heure actuelle, il faut déclarer à Élections Canada le montant de la contribution et non le coût réel de l'activité. On s'est inquiété du fait que le prix d'un billet peut s'élever à 500 $, mais que la valeur de la contribution n'atteigne que 199 $, ce qui permettrait de l'exclure. Pour rendre les choses claires et nettes, nous avons décidé que les 200 $ représenteraient le coût associé à la participation. Ainsi, on n'a pas à se demander si le montant constitue une contribution ou s'il sert aussi à couvrir le coût d'organisation de l'activité.

Bien sûr, on voit des activités annoncées à 199 $, mais nous espérons que les gens ne chercheront pas à contourner la loi.

M. Chris Bittle:

Vous avez déjà dit — et vous l'avez répété dans votre introduction — que le Canada a l'un des systèmes les plus rigoureux du monde au chapitre du financement politique. Pouvez-vous nous en dire davantage à ce sujet?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Très volontiers. Comme je l'ai déjà dit à maintes reprises au sujet du financement des activités politiques au Canada, nous avons fixé des limites strictes sur les dons: 1 550 $ par personne et par année dans les différentes catégories disponibles. Les dons de sociétés, de syndicats et d'organisations ne sont pas autorisés et, bien sûr, si vous faites une contribution de plus de 200 $, vous avez l'obligation de le déclarer.

Par rapport aux règles établies dans les autres pays, c'est une norme très rigoureuse de financement politique et d'expression démocratique. J'ai souvent soutenu — et je le crois très fort — que le versement d'une contribution à un parti, à une entité politique ou à un candidat est une importante forme d'expression démocratique, mais, comme je l'ai dit, cela doit s'inscrire dans des limites raisonnables. Je crois que nous sommes parvenus à un juste équilibre au Canada.

(1140)

M. Chris Bittle:

Lors de l'élaboration du projet de loi, avez-vous examiné les modèles d'autres pays?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Nous avons certainement considéré des modèles appliqués dans différents pays du monde. Nous avons aussi étudié ce que font les différentes provinces. À quelques rares exceptions, le modèle fédéral est le plus strict en ce qui concerne les contributions politiques, même au niveau interne.

M. Chris Bittle:

Vous l'avez dit, et nous avons tous été d'accord. Nous avons tous assisté à des activités de financement ou en avons nous-mêmes organisé. Cela peut être difficile, mais ces activités sont nécessaires à notre démocratie. Avons-nous trouvé un juste équilibre permettant aux Canadiens tant de participer à la démocratie que de jouir du droit de savoir qui a assisté à ces activités?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je le crois. Les Canadiens ont le droit de verser des contributions à un parti politique et peuvent encore le faire à titre personnel, pourvu que ce soit dans des limites raisonnables. J'estime raisonnable le plafond de 1 550 $, qui est rajusté tous les ans plus ou moins selon l'inflation. Cela est établi au niveau fédéral depuis un certain nombre d'années… Je ne sais pas si vous connaissez l'année exacte où le seuil de 200 $ a été fixé. Le savez-vous?

Une voix: Je ne connais pas l'année.

L'hon. Karina Gould: D'accord. Je crois que ce chiffre est généralement accepté comme seuil raisonnable. Il est aussi important parce que certains ont proposé de le réduire. Toutefois, d'importants arguments ont été avancés à l'appui du droit des Canadiens d'appuyer un parti politique, droit qui fait pendant au droit de vote. C'est le droit de chacun de se prononcer en secret en faveur d'un parti. Vous pouvez dire ce que vous voulez à l'extérieur de l'isoloir. Cela ne sera pas rendu public, pas plus que les contributions de moins de 200 $. Tout est déclaré à Élections Canada, mais les petites contributions ne sont pas affichées parce que chacun a le droit d'appuyer le parti de son choix.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci, madame la ministre.

Le président:

Nous allons maintenant passer à un tour de questions à cinq minutes. À vous, monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre, d'avoir pris le temps de comparaître devant le Comité aujourd'hui.

Pour ceux qui nous écoutent aujourd'hui, et je ne doute pas, compte tenu de l'éclatant prestige que vous confère votre titre de ministre des Institutions démocratiques…

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Mon éclatant prestige?

M. Blake Richards:

Oui, bien sûr.

Quoi qu'il en soit, pour ceux qui nous écoutent aujourd'hui, j'aimerais résumer brièvement la vraie raison de votre présence ici et du dépôt du projet de loi C-50. Je veux être clair à ce sujet. C'est parce que le Parti libéral monnayait l'accès au premier ministre au cours d'activités où les billets coûtaient jusqu'à 1 525 $. Voilà la raison. Il s'agissait d'activités d'« accès contre espèces ». Le premier ministre a admis en public qu'il recevait des gens qui faisaient du lobbying et qui cherchaient à exercer des pressions sur lui, ce qui est contrevient clairement aux règles du Parti libéral et au code d'éthique du premier ministre. Ces activités d'accès contre espèces ont amené la commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique ainsi que la commissaire au lobbying à ouvrir des enquêtes. La seule raison pour laquelle nous sommes saisis aujourd'hui du projet de loi C-50, c'est que le Parti libéral a été pris en flagrant délit de violation des règles. En fait, le premier ministre a été pris en flagrant délit de violation des règles qu'il avait lui-même établies.

Pour préciser les choses, je voudrais lire un extrait du document Pour un gouvernement ouvert et responsable qui énonce les principes mêmes du premier ministre. Je vais juste lire le premier paragraphe de l'annexe B, qui est assez bref: Les ministres et les secrétaires parlementaires doivent éviter tout conflit d'intérêts, toute apparence de conflit d'intérêts et toute situation pouvant donner lieu à un conflit d'intérêts.

Plus loin, on peut lire ce qui suit: Il ne doit y avoir aucun accès préférentiel au gouvernement, ou apparence d'accès préférentiel, accordé à des particuliers ou à des organismes en raison des contributions financières qu'ils auraient versées aux politiciens ou aux partis politiques.

Je me demande, madame la ministre, si vous pouvez nous expliquer pourquoi le premier ministre ne respecte pas simplement les règles qu'il a lui-même mises en place. S'il s'était simplement conformé à ces règles, nous n'aurions pas eu à tenir cette discussion.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je vous remercie de vos commentaires.

Je crois que nous avons remarqué, surtout la semaine dernière, à quel point ce projet de loi est important, compte tenu du fait que le chef de l'opposition officielle a lui-même organisé des activités qui n'ont pas été rendues publiques et qu'au départ, il a refusé d'admettre qu'il y avait pris part. Je crois que le projet de loi énonce clairement les raisons pour lesquelles il importe que les dirigeants politiques soient plus ouverts et transparents, surtout en ce qui concerne la collecte de fonds et l'identité des personnes avec qui ils ont des contacts. Je pense qu'il témoigne du fait que nous pouvons faire mieux. Que nous soyons au gouvernement ou dans l'opposition, nous devons tous essayer de mieux faire afin d'assurer aux Canadiens l'ouverture et la transparence qu'ils souhaitent au sujet de ce qui se passe.

Je tiens à ajouter que les lobbyistes sont assujettis à la Loi sur le lobbying et qu'ils ont d'autres responsabilités touchant la façon dont ils agissent et réglementent leurs propres activités. Ce sont là des obligations distinctes. Dans le projet de loi à l'étude, nous établissons clairement — puisque les gouvernements et la Loi électorale du Canada tendent à ne pas réglementer les activités internes des partis — que les partis conservent le pouvoir de déterminer qui peut ou ne peut pas assister à leurs activités de financement.

(1145)

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Je vous remercie. Pour moi, vous n'avez pas vraiment expliqué pourquoi le premier ministre n'a pas simplement choisi de se conformer aux règles au lieu de proposer des modifications législatives.

Je voudrais vous interroger au sujet de l'activité de financement organisée le 19 juin par le Parti libéral, au cours de laquelle le premier ministre a pris la parole. Cette activité est postérieure à la promesse de respecter les règles prévues dans le projet de loi C-50 et de faire preuve d'ouverture envers les médias. Pouvez-vous nous expliquer pourquoi, même après cette promesse, le personnel du Parti libéral a imposé des restrictions sur l'accès des médias? Je sais que cela s'est produit au moins à deux occasions. La directrice du bureau d'Ottawa du Huffington Post, Althia Raj, de même que Joan Bryden, de la Presse canadienne, n'ont pas pu assister ou ont été soumises à des restrictions. Pouvez-vous nous expliquer pourquoi, une fois les représentants des médias admis, ils ont été cantonnés dans une zone particulière et n'ont pas été autorisés à se mêler aux autres invités? Pouvez-vous nous dire pourquoi un journaliste montréalais de la Presse canadienne a reçu l'ordre de quitter les lieux?

Madame la ministre, je ne comprends pas pourquoi vous prenez la peine de mettre en place des règles quand il est tout à fait clair que le Parti libéral n'en tiendra tout simplement pas compte.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Eh bien, tout d'abord, il est vrai que je suis ministre des Institutions démocratiques et que je représente ici le gouvernement du Canada. Toutefois, même si je suis députée libérale, je ne parle pas ici au nom du Parti libéral du Canada. Vous devriez poser vos questions au Parti libéral lui-même.

Quoi qu'il en soit, en ce qui concerne les médias, il est important de noter que nous n'avons pas décidé de réglementer l'accès des médias parce que je crois fermement que les institutions démocratiques du gouvernement devraient éviter de le faire. J'estime en même temps qu'en disposant des renseignements prévus dans le projet de loi, les médias auront un meilleur accès, ce qui leur permettra de poser des questions, de fouiner et de tenir responsables les titulaires de charges publiques.

M. Blake Richards:

La question demeure sans réponse: pourquoi mettre en place des règles si le Parti libéral compte les violer de toute façon?

Le président:

Je regrette, monsieur Richards…

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Le projet de loi n'est pas encore adopté. Nous sommes ici pour qu'il le soit.

M. Blake Richards:

Oui, mais les libéraux ne peuvent tout simplement pas se conformer aux règles. Ils trouveront toutes sortes de moyens pour les contourner, comme ils l'ont déjà fait, j'en suis sûr.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Richards. Votre temps de parole est écoulé.

Nous poursuivons le tour de cinq minutes avec M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je vous remercie.

Lorsque Stephen Harper a été élu à la direction du Parti conservateur, nous n'avons jamais su qui étaient ses principaux bailleurs de fonds. Nous nous en souvenons tous. À l'époque, il n'y avait en pratique aucun plafond de contribution. Il n'était pas encore premier ministre, mais il n'y a pas de doute qu'il souhaitait le devenir. Andrew Scheer a la même attitude, je crois. Il voudrait bien devenir premier ministre un jour. Je crois que c'est pour cette raison qu'il agit ainsi.

M. Scott Reid:

Sautez-vous aux conclusions, ou bien…

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'ai pas du tout l'intention de l'aider à réaliser son voeu, mais il est clair, lorsqu'il vend des billets pour des activités de financement, qu'il aspire à être le futur premier ministre. C'est son objectif. Par conséquent, je crois qu'il est important que les chefs de parti et les candidats à la direction soient assujettis à ces dispositions, quel que soit leur parti.

Je ne sais pas si vous avez d'autres observations à faire à ce sujet, compte tenu de la dernière intervention de M. Richards.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je crois qu'il est important que les candidats à la direction des partis et les chefs de parti soient inclus parce que nous ne savons pas ce qui arrivera aux prochaines élections. Nous nourrissons tous certains espoirs quant aux résultats et travaillerons fort pour les réaliser, mais nous ne savons pas ce que nous réserve l'avenir. Par exemple, quelqu'un pourrait affirmer que le chef du troisième parti n'a pas à être assujetti à ces règles. En fait, nous étions nous-mêmes le troisième parti, ce qui ne nous a pas empêchés de former un gouvernement majoritaire. Bref, il est important de savoir qui assiste à ces activités et qui verse des contributions aux partis.

Dans le cas des candidats à la direction, c'est également très important. Je pense que la question que vous avez soulevée au sujet de l'ancien premier ministre Harper, du temps où il était candidat à la direction du parti, est très pertinente. Nous savons qu'il a recueilli plus d'un million de dollars, mais qu'il n'a rendu publiques que des contributions de 144 000 $. On peut donc s'interroger. Voilà pourquoi les règles ont changé en 2003-2004.

Comme je l'ai dit, le projet de loi s'inscrit dans le prolongement des mesures prises par différents gouvernements de différents partis pour veiller à ce qu'il y ait plus d'ouverture et de transparence et que le financement politique soit assujetti à des limites raisonnables.

(1150)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Malheureusement, ces règles ne sont pas rétroactives. Du moins, je le suppose.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Non, elles ne s'appliqueraient qu'après l'entrée en vigueur de la loi.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez parlé de tiers partis. Qu'en est-il cependant des partis qui n'ont pas de représentants à la Chambre, comme le Parti Rhinocéros ou le Parti Marijuana? Sont-ils touchés par ces règles?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Non. Les petits partis qui ne siègent pas à la Chambre ne sont pas touchés. En effet, nous ne voulons pas imposer un fardeau indu à des organisations essentiellement constituées de bénévoles et qui sont probablement très petites.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

J'aimerais revenir à la toute première question de M. Reid pour parler, avec la permission du président, d'un sujet qui n'est pas directement lié à notre étude. Je dirai, pour mettre les choses en perspective, que nous avons consacré beaucoup d'efforts au rapport du directeur général des élections, comme vous le savez. Il y a cependant une question que nous n'avons jamais réussi à régler, celle de la recommandation A39 concernant le régime de radiodiffusion.

Je ne sais pas ce qu'il convient d'en faire. C'est une question à la fois très importante et très difficile. Ayant examiné votre lettre de mandat, j'ai vu un commentaire relatif à la radiodiffusion qui mentionne un « commissaire indépendant chargé d'organiser les débats des chefs des partis politiques ». Je me demande si nous avons la possibilité de vous aider, si vous pouvez vous débrouiller de votre côté ou s'il serait utile d'examiner la question en commun. Qu'en pensez-vous?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Il serait en fait très utile que le Comité s'occupe de cette partie du rapport du DGE concernant le régime de radiodiffusion ainsi que de l'autre élément de mon mandat relatif à la commission chargée des débats. Je crois que c'est une importante mesure que nous devons prendre, mais je pense qu'il serait vraiment utile pour moi de connaître le point de vue de votre comité tandis que nous avançons dans ce domaine.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il me reste un peu de temps. Je vais le partager avec M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

J'aimerais juste avoir une précision. Parmi les nouvelles sanctions prévues, il est question de rembourser le coût si l'activité n'est pas adéquatement annoncée. Parlons-nous du plein montant de 200 $? L'organisation de l'activité coûte quelque chose, mais qu'arrive-t-il… Oui, c'est essentiellement cela. Le plein prix — 200 $ — doit être restitué. Cela revient à dire que le coût de l'organisation de l'activité doit être assumé par l'association.

M. Robert Sampson:

Je vous remercie de votre question. Dans le projet de loi, le libellé de cette disposition englobe deux choses: la contribution de 200 $ et le montant versé de 200 $. S'il s'agit du montant versé, il faut restituer le tout, sans soustraire le coût d'organisation. Autrement dit, dès qu'un billet dépasse les 200 $, l'activité est assujettie aux dispositions. L'une des raisons, c'est qu'il faut souvent un certain temps pour calculer le montant exact de l'avantage accordé à une personne qui assiste à une activité de financement. Par conséquent, compte tenu du délai de déclaration de 30 jours…

M. Scott Simms:

Oui, mais je parlais de la restitution, de la sanction. S'il faut rembourser 200 $ à la personne, peut-on soustraire le coût d'organisation ou bien faut-il restituer le plein montant?

M. Robert Sampson:

Il faut rembourser le plein montant.

M. Allen Sutherland (secrétaire adjoint du Cabinet, Appareil gouvernemental, Bureau du Conseil privé):

La règle s'applique au montant, quel qu'il soit. S'il s'agit d'une activité à 400 $, le montant à rembourser est de 400 $.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Monsieur Nater, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre, de votre présence parmi nous aujourd'hui.

Comme je suis nouveau ici, j'espère que le Comité fera preuve d'indulgence. Je ne suis pas très familiarisé avec les questions de procédure.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Il a fallu faire preuve de beaucoup d'indulgence aujourd'hui.

M. John Nater:

Je m'en rends compte.

J'ai bien aimé qu'on évoque le souvenir des congrès au leadership du passé. Je me demande si on a envisagé de rebaptiser le paragraphe proposé 384.3(3), qui exclut les mineurs, en l'honneur de Joe Volpe, compte tenu de sa course au leadership du Parti libéral. Je me demande si on a pensé à le faire.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je vous remercie. Je vous souhaite la bienvenue au Comité.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. John Nater:

J'apprends en observant M. Christopherson.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Vous noterez, dans le projet de loi, que les congrès sont exclus parce que nous nous rendons compte que les gens qui ont peut-être versé des contributions… Les chefs et les ministres sont également membres d'un parti et seront donc présents. Toutefois, si une activité de financement est organisée parallèlement à un congrès, elle serait assujettie aux dispositions du projet de loi.

M. John Nater:

Par exemple, les libéraux tiendront leur congrès de l'année prochaine à Halifax. Ceux qui font un don de 1 500 $ au Club Laurier auraient encore accès au premier ministre au cours d'une réception privée à Halifax.

(1155)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Ce serait également le cas pour les conservateurs et les néo-démocrates parce que nous croyons savoir que la réglementation des présences aux congrès peut constituer un fardeau considérable. Toutefois, comme pour les autres partis représentés à la Chambre, si le Parti conservateur tient son congrès et organise, en dehors du congrès lui-même, une activité de financement payante à laquelle assiste le chef du parti, l'activité serait assujettie.

M. John Nater:

Ainsi, vous pouvez encore annoncer le Club Laurier, recevoir des dons d'avance et organiser une activité…

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Eh bien, elle serait distincte. Encore une fois, il faut comprendre qu'un congrès attire beaucoup de gens. Ce serait un très grand fardeau pour n'importe quel parti, y compris les conservateurs et les néo-démocrates.

M. John Nater:

Je mentionne simplement qu'il y a une exception. Vous pouvez annoncer un don de 1 500 $ pour une réception privée.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui, nous avons procédé ainsi après avoir consulté d'avance tous les partis politiques. Nous avons vraiment essayé de parvenir à un juste équilibre permettant de favoriser la transparence et la responsabilité tout en reconnaissant ce qui est faisable et raisonnable quand on a affaire à de grandes foules.

M. John Nater:

Je veux revenir au délai de cinq jours qui a suscité des commentaires de la part de quelques membres du Comité. Je sais que beaucoup de députés organisent depuis longtemps des activités annuelles. Il arrive souvent que les gens ne confirment leur présence que très tard. Qu'arrive-t-il si un ministre ne renvoie son carton pour assister à une activité de financement que deux ou trois jours avant qu'elle ait lieu? Sera-t-il autorisé à assister ou bien sera-t-il refoulé…

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Ce cas est prévu dans les dispositions actuelles de la loi.

Le délai de cinq jours est un minimum. J'invite tous les partis à annoncer leurs activités plus longtemps d'avance. Comme nous devons tous recueillir des fonds, nous savons que les activités sont souvent annoncées longtemps d'avance parce qu'on veut que plus de gens y assistent.

Le projet de loi est cependant conçu pour que ses dispositions s'appliquent même si l'une des personnes désignées ne fait qu'une courte apparition ou ne sait pas si elle assistera ou non. Bien sûr, les personnes en cause doivent satisfaire à leur obligation de déclaration. Elles devraient avoir reçu l'annonce… Elles seraient aussi passibles de sanctions si elles n'ont pas annoncé l'activité d'avance.

M. John Nater:

Pouvez-vous répéter, s'il vous plaît? Avez-vous dit que ces personnes ne seraient pas pénalisées si elles ne…?

L'hon. Karina Gould: Oui.

M. Robert Sampson:

Il serait peut-être utile de mentionner qu'une disposition du projet de loi prévoit de faire des corrections et des mises à jour si l'information change. Si on apprend qu'un ministre qui ne devait pas assister à une activité s'y rendra quand même, l'annonce peut être mise à jour.

Cela s'appliquerait dans les situations où un ministre décide d'assister à une activité à la dernière minute.

M. John Nater:

Vous pouvez donc organiser une activité de financement à 1 500 $ et l'annoncer longtemps d'avance, après quoi, juste par hasard, le premier ministre décide la veille qu'il y va quand même.

M. Robert Sampson:

Oui.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Il serait cependant assujetti après coup à l'obligation de déclaration.

M. John Nater:

Ce serait aussi difficile pour les médias de couvrir l'activité s'ils n'en sont avertis que cinq minutes d'avance.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

J'espère que les gens et les partis respecteront l'esprit de la loi.

Le président:

Je vous remercie. La parole est maintenant à Mme Sahota pour cinq minutes.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre, de votre présence parmi nous aujourd'hui. J'en ai beaucoup appris sur le projet de loi. Je crois que c'est un grand pas dans la bonne direction.

Je suis un peu surprise d'apprendre que ces mesures n'auront aucune influence maintenant que les médias seront présents. Beaucoup de gens ne sont au courant de ce qui se passe que par l'entremise des médias. La plupart de ces activités avaient lieu en secret et continuent à être organisées en secret par certains partis.

Je crois que le Parti libéral a maintenant rehaussé les normes. Le premier ministre l'a également fait afin de favoriser une plus grande transparence. Lorsque le projet de loi sera mis en oeuvre, je crois que nous pourrons tenir tous les partis responsables après coup quant à ceux qui assistent aux activités de financement.

À l'heure actuelle, M. Scheer refuse encore de dire qui a assisté, affirmant que les renseignements à ce sujet ne sont pertinents que dans le cas des activités auxquelles assiste le premier ministre. D'après lui, il n'est pas important de savoir qui lui a versé des contributions puisqu'il n'est pas titulaire d'une charge publique. De toute évidence, il est bel et bien titulaire d'une charge publique.

Pourquoi avez-vous décidé qu'il est important de veiller à ce que les différents partis et les différents candidats qui, comme vous l'avez dit, ne sont pas représentés à la Chambre rendent publique l'identité de ceux qui ont assisté à leurs activités de financement?

De plus, pouvez-vous nous en dire davantage sur le régime canadien en général? Vous croyez, je le sais, que nous avons un système de financement politique très rigoureux et que, même dans le passé, la Loi électorale du Canada était appliquée. Pourquoi ces mesures supplémentaires sont-elles nécessaires maintenant?

(1200)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Beaucoup de ces questions ont déjà été posées, mais je suis heureuse d'y répondre encore une fois, surtout dans le cas des chefs de parti.

En toute franchise, nous l'avons fait parce que nous ne savons pas ce qui arrivera aux prochaines élections: qui détiendra la balance du pouvoir, qui formera le gouvernement, etc. Les chefs de parti cherchent à devenir les dirigeants du pays. Par conséquent, il est important de les inclure dans ce régime.

Il y a une chose que je voudrais mentionner parce qu'elle n'a pas été évoquée jusqu'ici. Nous apportons aussi des modifications techniques relatives aux campagnes des candidats à l'investiture et des candidats à la direction des partis pour les aligner sur les campagnes électorales des candidats et des partis au chapitre des dépenses. À l'heure actuelle, ni les candidats à l'investiture ni les candidats à la direction n'ont à déclarer d'avance les fonds qu'ils consacrent à leur campagne si la course à l'investiture ou à la direction n'a pas encore commencé.

Il est important d'aligner ces règles pour que nous puissions continuer à avoir un système politique équitable à tous les niveaux et à tous les moments. C'est d'ailleurs une mesure que votre comité a préconisée dans son rapport concernant les recommandations du DGE.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'est une excellente mesure. Je crois que c'est un autre élément important. Avez-vous d'autres exemples à signaler au Comité quant aux mesures prises au sujet du financement des campagnes et du financement politique, à part ce dont nous avons parlé aujourd'hui?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui. Mon principal message au Comité, c'est que nous avons de bonnes règles strictes régissant le financement politique au Canada. Le projet de loi représente une étape de plus qui s'inscrit dans le prolongement des mesures continuellement prises pour améliorer notre régime et nos lois sur le financement politique au Canada. Il aura d'importants effets sur nos progrès futurs dans ce domaine, particulièrement dans le cas des gens qui sont en mesure de prendre des décisions. Bien sûr, ces mesures modifieront la façon dont les Canadiens voient et comprennent les activités de financement parce qu'ils disposeront de plus de renseignements. Il est important de tout mettre au grand jour. J'espère donc que nous pourrons tous, indépendamment de notre parti, appuyer le projet de loi et nous y conformer.

Je dois cependant noter que, comme la plupart des mesures législatives, le projet de loi n'entrera en vigueur que six mois après avoir reçu la sanction royale. Cela laissera aux partis et aux particuliers le temps nécessaire pour s'adapter. Par conséquent, même si les courses à la direction et les candidats actuels ne sont pas assujettis à ces dispositions, je les encourage vivement à participer et à se conformer à l'esprit de la loi.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci.

Le président:

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre, de votre présence au Comité aujourd'hui.

Je voudrais aussi féliciter tous les membres du Comité. Nous avons bien sûr des divergences d'opinions, mais c'est la démocratie. J'ai trouvé que vous avez tous exprimé votre point de vue d'une manière très civile et respectueuse. Je vous en remercie.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on September 28, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.