header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-09-21 PROC 68

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. Welcome to the 68th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

We're in public briefly for this portion of the meeting.

This morning we received notice from Mr. Richards that he was resigning as the committee's first vice-chair. Accordingly, I will now give the floor to the clerk, who will proceed to the election of the new vice-chair.

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

Honourable members, pursuant to Standing Order 106(2) the first vice-chair must be a member of the official opposition. I'm now prepared to receive motions for the first vice-chair.

Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

I nominate Scott Reid.

The Clerk:

It has been moved by Mr. Simms that Scott Reid be elected first vice-chair of the committee.

Are there any further motions?

Is it the pleasure of the committee to adopt this motion?

(Motion agreed to)

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Chair, before we go in camera I just want to make note of this historical moment at which the government has of course broken one of its biggest promises, to keep parliamentary secretaries off the committee. We now enter the new regime where we have not one but two parliamentary secretaries on the committee, breaking the government's promise about how it was going to do things differently around here.

Thank you.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

If I could, I would just follow that up, Mr. Chair.

I appreciate Mr. Christopherson's comments. I'm happy to give him page 32 from our platform, which says we will also change the rules so that ministers and parliamentary secretaries no longer have a vote on committees. That's a promise fulfilled and something that we will continue to uphold. I just want to correct the record on that point.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Because they can't vote, they brought in two to ride shotgun.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Vice-Chair):

Actually, on the same point, can we just have clarification about what the role of PSs on committee is? I have no opposition to PSs being here. I know they aren't voting. I'm wondering if they are, for example, questioning witnesses. When we have rotations here, do they affect that sort of thing?

The Chair:

I'll have the clerk state what's in the standing order now.

The Clerk:

Following changes to the Standing Orders, parliamentary secretaries were added to the committee as non-voting members. They have all the rights and privileges of a regular committee member, save for the right to vote and to move motions, and they are not counted for the purposes of quorum. That sums it up.

Mr. Scott Reid (Vice-Chair):

Right.

They are ex officio in that sense; they don't count one way or the other.

What about when we get to things like questioning witnesses? Would they just take a government slot? So nothing changes and the rotations are the same?

The Clerk:

That's correct.

Mr. Scott Reid (Vice-Chair):

All right.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Under previous rules, the parliamentary secretaries were not allowed into in camera meetings except by a special motion. My understanding is that now we would expect that one or two of these parliamentary secretaries would have the right to be at in camera meetings of the committee. Is that correct?

The Clerk:

The Standing Orders do permit that.

Mr. David Christopherson:

The government may want to stand on the technicality of what the exact wordsmithing in their report was, but no logically thinking Canadian believes for one minute that this is anything other than making sure that you have parliamentary secretaries here to ride shotgun on the government members to make sure they don't stray from the government line, therefore watering down the whole concept that this government ran on about doing democracy differently, in particular committees.

I'm not going to go on at great length today, because I intend to go on at great length for the next two years every chance I get. When there is one of them is sitting there, I will be raising this point and reminding Canadians that the promise that this government, the Liberals, brought to Canadians about doing parliamentary business differently was a lie.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Vice-Chair):

I can address that, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Go ahead.

Mr. Scott Reid (Vice-Chair):

I'm glad Mr. Christopherson raised that matter. I was going to ask about the rules regarding in camera meetings.

Yesterday I had the chance to substitute in for Mr. Richards at the meeting at which we were discussing our agenda. I was uncertain, because it's a new role for me, what the limitations are for the members. I'm not referring really to PSs; I'm referring to all members of Parliament other than those who are actually on the subcommittee, just for some clarification as to who can and can't be there.

(1110)

The Clerk:

Standing Order 119 states that: Any Member of the House who is not a member of a standing, special or legislative committee, may, unless the House or the committee concerned otherwise orders, take part in the public proceedings of the committee, but may not vote or move any motion, nor be part of any quorum.

That applies to all members of the House. They are all welcome to attend public meetings.

The Clerk:

When we speak of in camera sessions, I'll read from Chapter 20 of O'Brien and Bosc, page 1077: Neither the public nor the media is permitted at in camera meetings, and there is no broadcasting of the proceedings. Usually, only the committee members, the committee staff and invited witnesses, if any, attend in camera meetings. Members of the House who are not members of the committee normally withdraw when the committee is meeting in camera. However, the committee may allow them to remain in the meeting room, just as it may allow any other individual to remain.

Mr. Scott Reid (Vice-Chair):

Right. Normally we would just take a consensus, but if necessary we would decide the matter by means of a majority vote.

The Clerk:

That's correct.

Mr. Scott Reid (Vice-Chair):

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Richards, would you like to speak?

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Yes. Have we finished with the questioning on that?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

If you recall at our meeting on November 17, I had given notice of a motion. I would like to bring it forward for discussion at this point, Mr. Chair.

The motion was

That the Committee invite Paul Szabo, Sven Spengemann, Veena Bhullar, Jamie Kippen, and a representative from the Parkhill Group to appear to answer all questions related to the correspondence sent to the Chair of the Procedure and House Affairs Committee on October 28, 2016, regarding alleged breaches of the Canada Elections Act in Mississauga—Lakeshore.

Given that one of the members listed there was available here at the committee today, I thought it might be a good opportunity to see if we can clarify some of these alleged breaches of the Canada Elections Act, and bring forward this motion for some discussion, and see if we can make some progress with it.

The Chair:

A motion has been moved. It's open for debate. We're distributing copies of the motion.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

I would like to move to adjourn debate at this time.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham moved to adjourn the meeting.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The debate, not the meeting.

The Chair:

The debate.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Can you at least wait until the documents are circulated before we shut things down?

Mr. Blake Richards:

I have a point of order, Mr. Chair.

I saw the documents were being distributed. I had certainly intended to make some remarks. I would assume other colleagues may wish to have some discussion. I think it's out of order for someone to move debate before people have even had the document circulated to them.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks, Chair.

In terms of making things in order, if we're going to debate this motion, and it relates to correspondence sent October 28, 2016, I as one member of this committee will need that document in front of me before I can comment on whether or not we act on that document.

I make that as a point of order that until I have that document in front of me, further discussion on this, Chair, I'm contending is out of order because I don't have all the information as one member of the committee. I don't know if other members have a copy of that letter right in front of them. I don't.

(1115)

The Chair:

The motion is non-debatable, so I have to put the question.

Mr. Scott Reid (Vice-Chair):

The motion you're talking about, I assume, is Mr. Graham's motion. Is that correct, the motion to adjourn?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Point of order, Mr. Chair, just to clarify.

I had indicated in a point of order that I felt it was out of order to move that while people were still having the documents distributed to them so that they would be able to determine whether they wanted to comment.

I can understand the government's reluctance to want to have a debate on the motion, but I would assume it might be out of order for them to even be able to procedurally take some kind of approach like that prior to people even having had a chance to look at the motion. I would think people may have wanted to have debate.

I'm asking for you to rule on whether it is, in fact, in order for them to move that.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Point of order.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

At the risk of getting too far in the weeds, it looks we're going to, I'm afraid.

I would also make the case that Mr. Richards is entitled to have his first comment. It's his motion. He asked that it be brought forward. It's normally—I don't know if courtesy, and I would seek from the clerk whether it's an absolute rule—a courtesy and the culture of this place that, if somebody moves a motion, they're at least given the respect to be given an opportunity to say something about it, particularly before a member of the government majority slams the whole thing shut.

I would seek some further clarification, Chair, on the appropriateness of moving on a motion that makes reference to a piece of correspondence that we do not have in front of us. I would ask you, Chair, to rule on that, and my point of order is that we are not in order to deal with this motion without a copy of the correspondence that's referenced in the motion.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

[Inaudible—Editor] in front of you. That's not debatable.

The Chair:

Related to the letter, it has been distributed to everyone, but—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Not today.

The Chair:

No, not today.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Does anybody else have it in front of them right now?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No.

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, okay. That's my point.

The Chair:

The clerk says the dilatory motion is legally on the floor, so we have to have a vote on it.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Even though you didn't give the mover of the motion a chance to speak just because technically David got on the list first? You're going to let this whole thing be shut down based on that, Chair.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Further to that point, I believed I did have the floor. I was simply allowing a courtesy because I was moving forward something that we hadn't seen in a while. I was simply allowing the documents to be distributed, and I kind of paused to allow that to happen. I would have believed I had the floor at that point.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Mr. Chair, the motion—

Mr. Blake Richards:

The motion is on the floor.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

The clerk has advised us of the rules. It should proceed to a vote.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Welcome to the new era.

Okay. We can play that way, too.

The Chair:

We are going to suspend just for a minute so I can discuss this with the clerk.

(1115)

(1125)

The Chair:

I'm prepared to rule on that point of order. I think Mr. Richards is right in the sense that it's a courtesy for the person who proposed the motion to have the first speaking slot. It's not a rule but it's often the way things are done. I apologize that I didn't leave time for that, but I did recognize Mr. Graham in the process, so I have to allow the vote to proceed. Nevertheless, I apologize to Mr. Richards for not going to him first in the time when nothing was happening.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Chair, with the greatest respect, you just acknowledged that your mistake caused a member to lose his right, a right he would otherwise have. You have the means to fix that by giving Mr. Richards the floor. I find it hard to believe that you would articulate a right denied, recognize that you caused it, and then not take the opportunity to fix it.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Mr. Chair, I too find it disappointing that you would make such a ruling, because you do have the opportunity to correct the mistake you made in recognizing somebody else while I had the floor. I'll just point out that I don't think it would have taken a lot of time to deal with bringing forward this motion. I noticed that the member, Mr. Spengemann, was present. I'm not here to try to assassinate someone's character. In fact, it's the very opposite. I'm trying to give him an opportunity.

(1130)

Mr. Scott Simms:

He had a point of order, and now he's actually talking about his motion.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Well, I—

Mr. Scott Simms:

I think the ruling was—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Hold on, Mr. Simms, I'm in the middle of a point of order here.

The Chair:

Yes, but please talk about the point of order and not the motion.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm getting to that. There was an opportunity for the member, while he was here, to clarify and hopefully be able to...There are allegations that hang over his head, and he should have the opportunity to correct those. I was simply making that attempt. and I would have explained that, had I been given the opportunity I was due, given that I did have the floor. I think it would have been appropriate for you to make that ruling. Maybe you can still reconsider, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

In regard to Mr. Christopherson's point, I talked about a courtesy and a procedure that often occurs, but I didn't suggest that I had taken away a person's right.

So I'll call the vote.

Mr. Scott Reid (Vice-Chair):

Hang on, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Yes?

Mr. Scott Reid (Vice-Chair):

My understanding of how the rules work is that as long as Mr. Richards hasn't surrendered the floor, he has it. So if you're ruling that Mr. Graham had the floor, then I'm challenging that ruling.

The Chair:

Okay, the ruling is challenged. We have to vote on whether the ruling of the chair should be sustained.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'd like a recorded vote.

The Chair:

Okay.

We are voting on the question of whether the ruling of the chair should be sustained.

(Ruling of the chair sustained: yeas 5; nays 4)

Now we'll call the vote.

Mr. David Christopherson:

This is a recorded vote.

The Chair:

On the motion that the debate be now adjourned.

(Motion agreed to: yeas 5; nays 4)

Mr. Blake Richards:

I have a point of order.

Is it appropriate for a member to vote on a motion that names that member as one of the potential witnesses? Is this something that is appropriate?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Well, we didn't have a vote on a motion.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Well, we had a vote to adjourn the debate on the motion, so it does relate to the motion.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We had a vote to adjourn the debate, period.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I wonder if—

An hon. member: Huh. Isn't that interesting?

The Chair:

The motion is adopted. Debate is adjourned.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Can you rule on my point of order, please?

The Chair:

Okay. Just repeat that, please.

Mr. Blake Richards:

We obviously had a vote on a motion to adjourn debate on a motion that did call for one of the members who voted on that motion to appear as a witness. Is that appropriate? Is there not a conflict of interest in that, potentially? Is it appropriate for that member to vote on that motion?

The Chair:

Okay. We'll suspend again for a moment.

(1130)

(1145)

The Chair:

We're back in session.

We looked at the conflict of interest code for members. It doesn't appear that this particular vote abrogated that, so I rule that the vote stands.

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I have a point of order, Chair.

First, thank you for the clarification on that. I wasn't sure of the correctness of that, or the incorrectness.

Although I do note that Mr. Spengemann has been subbed out of the committee now, he is still present. I wonder if he could confirm for us—because this may change the ruling, I don't know—whether or not there's any legal action currently under way that he would be a party to, related to this. Would that then change the ruling?

Mr. Scott Simms:

Mr. Chair, he's just doing his motion. We just voted not to do exactly what he's doing.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm just trying to clarify whether we're....

Maybe Mr. Spengemann could begin by clarifying for us whether there is any legal action.

The Chair:

Points of order are meant to deal with the rules, not in debate.

Mr. Blake Richards:

But obviously that may in fact change the ruling. I don't know; that's why I asked if we could get some clarification on that, and if you could then clarify whether that would in fact cause any change to the ruling. That would obviously make a difference in what would be in the code or anything else. Is that correct? That's why I asked for the ruling.

Mr. Scott Simms:

We voted on adjournment, sir.

We vote on adjournment, not on what he's talking about, and therefore his point of order has to go toward the point of adjournment, not to the matter he brought up in his earlier motion.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's a point of order about whether or not the rules were followed correctly.

The Chair:

Thank you for that point of order, Mr. Richards, but at this point that doesn't affect my decision. Thank you.

Yes, Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

On a point of order, Chair, I seek some clarification from the government in terms of proceeding.

The current lead for the government is Mr. Bittle. He is the deputy House leader, which is a pretty strong tie to the government agenda. I was a former House leader in another place, so I know the role. What I'm taking note of is the government's new rule, where they broke their promise about parliamentary secretaries on committees. They go out of their way to make a big deal of the fact that their new parliamentary secretaries and their role here is not that big: it's not that big a role; they don't have the right to vote; they don't have the right to play the full role that a member does. And yet, I want to note, one of those non-voting parliamentary secretaries is sitting right next to Mr. Bittle, who is in the lead position for the government.

Isn't it interesting that the main reason we want to keep parliamentary secretaries—

An hon. member: [Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. David Christopherson: I'm...S. O.

(1150)

Mr. Scott Simms:

No, this is debate, sir.

Mr. David Christopherson:

The main reason we're asking parliamentary secretaries to not be on committees—

Mr. Scott Simms:

We are upholding the law as it stands —

Mr. David Christopherson:

—is because of the undue—

Mr. Scott Simms:

—in the Standing Orders. They're not voting on it.

Mr. David Christopherson:

As far as I know, I have the floor.

Mr. Scott Simms:

They haven't voted this. It's in the Standing Orders.

Mr. David Christopherson:

As far as I know I have the floor, so why is his microphone on?

The Chair:

. Mr. Christopherson, you're on a point of order, so is there a specific rule—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, I'm asking what role Mr. Fillmore is playing, given that the government is suggesting that the parliamentary secretaries don't play a big role and he doesn't vote and yet there he is, sitting there right beside Mr. Bittle where he can lean into his ear and tell him exactly how he should be voting.

I'm just asking for some clarification. Are the parliamentary secretaries running this show or not? If they aren't, why are they playing such a role in terms of how they're even setting up the structure of the committee?

Nothing personal, Mr. Fillmore, it's strictly the position.

The Chair:

There is nothing in the rules about where people sit, so are you making anything else in the point of order?

Mr. David Christopherson:

I was seeking some guidance from the government as to what role Mr. Fillmore is going to play, since they suggest parliamentary secretaries are not playing a big role and yet there he is in the second-in-command seat, so I'm just seeking some guidance from the government as to what's going on?

The Chair:

Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

This isn't a warship. There is no second-in-command seat. What you're talking about is you're trying to bring up a point of order based on the rules by which.... They're not voting. That's the way the Standing Orders go. I think we should dispense with this and get on with the agenda.

The parties across the way will talk about the fact that we're delaying the agenda. We want to get on with it for the record today.

The Chair:

Okay, thank you for that.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Scotty, you're good at talking. Explain to me what role Mr. Fillmore plays and how this is a positive addition, especially in light of the promise you made not to have parliamentary secretaries on the committee?

Mr. Scott Simms:

He is a member, pursuant to the standing order, without any voting. He just indicated earlier what the promise was and fulfilled.

I actually fell into your little trap and started debating with you. Congratulations—

Mr. David Christopherson:

It's worth debating.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I think it's worth debating because of the fact that they're upholding what they said that we would do and the Standing Orders reflect it. Your point of order, sir, is about the standing order that we are upholding right now.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Which broke your promise.

The Chair:

Okay, we're heard enough on this point of order. Thank you.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We're going to suspend briefly so we will into camera to go on to the next item, which is committee business.

Anyone who is not supposed to be in the room should leave now that we're going in camera.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Bienvenue à cette 68e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Cette partie de la séance se déroulera devant public.

Nous avons reçu ce matin un avis de M. Richard nous informant de sa démission en tant que premier vice-président du Comité. Par conséquent, je laisserai maintenant la parole au greffier qui procédera à l'élection d'un nouveau vice-président.

Le greffier du Comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

Membres du Comité, conformément au paragraphe 106(2) du Règlement, le premier vice-président doit être un député de l'opposition officielle. Je suis maintenant prêt à recevoir des motions pour le poste de premier vice-président.

Monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Je propose Scott Reid.

Le greffier:

M. Simms propose que Scott Reid soit élu premier vice-président du Comité.

Y a-t-il d'autres propositions?

Plaît-il au Comité d'adopter cette motion?

(La motion est adoptée.)

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Monsieur le président, avant de passer à huis clos, j'aimerais souligner que nous vivons un moment historique. Évidemment, le gouvernement a brisé l'une de ses promesses les plus importantes, soit d'empêcher les secrétaires parlementaires de siéger au Comité. Nous entrons dans une nouvelle ère alors que nous comptons non pas un, mais bien deux secrétaires parlementaires au Comité, ce qui brise la promesse du gouvernement de faire les choses différemment.

Merci.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Si vous me le permettez, monsieur le président, j'aimerais simplement réagir à cette intervention.

Je respecte les propos de M. Christopherson. Je serai heureux de lui fournir la page 32 de notre plateforme où il est précisé que nous modifierons également les règles de façon à ce que les ministres et secrétaires parlementaires ne puissent plus avoir droit de vote aux comités. Cette promesse a été tenue et nous continuerons de l'honorer. Je voulais simplement le préciser aux fins du compte rendu.

M. David Christopherson:

Parce qu'ils n'ont pas droit de vote, ils sont maintenant deux à être de la partie.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid, vous avez la parole.

M. Scott Reid (vice-président):

En fait, pour poursuivre sur le même sujet, pourrait-on avoir des précisions sur le rôle des secrétaires parlementaires au Comité? Je n'ai aucune objection à ce qu'ils soient ici. Je sais qu'ils n'ont pas droit de vote. Mais, je me demande si, par exemple, ils ont le droit d'interroger les témoins. Leur participation aura-t-elle un impact au moment d'établir la liste des intervenants?

Le président:

Je vais demander au greffier de vérifier dès maintenant le Règlement à ce sujet.

Le greffier:

À la suite des changements apportés au Règlement, les secrétaires parlementaires ont été ajoutés au Comité à titre de membres n'ayant pas droit de vote. Ils jouissent de tous les mêmes droits et privilèges que les membres réguliers du Comité, sauf le droit de vote et le droit de proposer des motions. De plus, ils ne sont pas comptés pour le quorum. Voilà.

M. Scott Reid (vice-président):

D'accord.

En ce sens, ils sont membres d'office, mais ils ne comptent d'aucune façon.

Qu'en est-il de l'interrogation des témoins? Est-ce qu'ils prendraient simplement la place d'un député du parti au pouvoir? Donc, rien ne change, les rotations demeurent les mêmes?

Le greffier:

C'est exact.

M. Scott Reid (vice-président):

D'accord.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson, vous avez la parole.

M. David Christopherson:

En vertu des règles précédentes, les secrétaires parlementaires ne pouvaient pas participer aux séances à huis clos, sauf si une motion spéciale en ce sens était adoptée. Si j'ai bien compris, nous pouvons maintenant nous attendre à ce qu'un ou deux secrétaires parlementaires aient le droit de participer aux séances à huis clos du Comité. Est-ce exact?

Le greffier:

Le Règlement le permet.

M. David Christopherson:

Le gouvernement voudra peut-être se cacher derrière l'aspect technique du libellé de son rapport, mais, logiquement, aucun Canadien ne croit un seul instant que cette manoeuvre ne sert à autre chose qu'à s'assurer que les secrétaires parlementaires puissent surveiller les membres ministériels du Comité pour s'assurer que ceux-ci ne s'éloignent pas de la position du gouvernement, diluant ainsi le concept selon lequel ce gouvernement allait faire les choses différemment, notamment aux comités.

Je ne m'étendrai pas sur le sujet aujourd'hui, car j'ai l'intention de m'étendre sur le sujet chaque fois que j'en aurais l'occasion au cours des deux prochaines années. Dès qu'un des secrétaires parlementaires participera à une séance du Comité, je soulèverai ce point et rappellerai aux Canadiens que le gouvernement, les libéraux, a brisé sa promesse aux Canadiens de faire les choses différemment.

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (vice-président):

J'aimerais réagir à cette intervention, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Allez-y.

M. Scott Reid (vice-président):

Je suis heureux que M. Christopherson ait soulevé la question. J'allais justement demander quelles sont les règles concernant les séances à huis clos.

Hier, j'ai eu la chance d'agir en tant que substitut à M. Richards lors de la séance relative à l'ordre du jour. Puisqu'il s'agit pour moi d'un nouveau rôle, je n'étais pas certain de bien connaître les restrictions pour les membres du Comité. Je ne fais pas référence ici aux secrétaires parlementaires, mais bien à tous les députés qui ne siègent pas au Sous-comité. Je voulais simplement avoir des précisions à savoir qui peut participer ou non aux séances à huis clos.

(1110)

Le greffier:

Conformément à l'article 119 du Règlement: Tout député qui n'est pas membre d'un comité permanent, spécial ou législatif peut, sauf si la Chambre ou le comité en ordonne autrement, prendre part aux délibérations publiques du comité, mais il ne peut ni y voter ni y proposer une motion, ni faire partie du quorum.

Cela s'applique à tous les députés de la Chambre. Tous peuvent participer aux séances publiques.

Le greffier:

En ce qui a trait aux séances à huis clos, au chapitre 20 d'O'Brien et Bosc, on précise ceci: Ni le public ni les médias ne sont admis aux séances à huis clos, et il n'y a aucune diffusion des délibérations. D'ordinaire, seuls les députés membres, le personnel du comité et les témoins invités, le cas échéant, assistent à une séance à huis clos. Les députés qui ne font pas partie d'un comité se retirent normalement lorsque celui-ci siège à huis clos. Cependant, le comité peut les autoriser à rester dans la salle, tout comme il peut admettre tout autre individu.

M. Scott Reid (vice-président):

D'accord. Habituellement, il suffirait de demander le consensus des membres, mais, au besoin, la question peut être tranchée par un vote majoritaire.

Le greffier:

C'est exact.

M. Scott Reid (vice-président):

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Richards, souhaitez-vous intervenir?

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Oui. Avons-nous terminé la discussion sur le sujet?

Le président:

Oui.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous vous souviendrez que lors de la séance du 17 novembre, j'ai présenté un avis de motion. Monsieur le président, j'aimerais maintenant proposer cette motion aux fins de discussion.

Ma motion est la suivante:

Que le Comité invite Paul Szabo, Sven Spengemann, Veena Bhullar, Jamie Kippen et un représentant de Parkhill Group à témoigner afin de répondre à toutes les questions sur la correspondance envoyée au président du Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre le 18 octobre 2016 relativement aux infractions présumées à la Loi électorale du Canada dans Mississauga-Lakeshore.

Puisque l'un des députés mentionnés participe à la séance d'aujourd'hui, je me suis dit que l'occasion serait bonne pour apporter des précisions concernant certaines des infractions présumées à la Loi électorale du Canada. C'est la raison pour laquelle je propose cette motion, aux fins de discussion, afin de faire progresser ce dossier.

Le président:

Une motion a été proposée et nous pouvons en débattre. Nous distribuons à l'instant des copies de la motion.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez la parole.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je propose que le débat soit ajourné.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham propose l'ajournement de la séance.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'ajournement du débat, pas de la séance.

Le président:

L'ajournement du débat.

M. David Christopherson:

Pourriez-vous attendre que les documents aient été distribués avant de tout arrêter?

M. Blake Richards:

Monsieur le président, j'invoque le Règlement.

J'ai vu que l'on procédait à la distribution des documents. J'avais certainement l'intention d'intervenir dans le débat sur cette motion, et je présume que certains de mes collègues en avaient eux aussi l'intention. Je crois qu'une motion proposant l'ajournement du débat avant même que les autres membres du Comité aient pu prendre connaissance du document est irrecevable.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Pour faire les choses dans l'ordre, si nous voulons discuter de la motion, qui porte sur une correspondance du 28 octobre 2016, je vais devoir avoir le document sous les yeux. En tant que membre du Comité, je ne peux pas dire si nous devons y donner suite.

J'invoque le Règlement. Jusqu'à ce que j'aie le document sous les yeux, je considère que toute discussion à ce sujet est irrecevable, monsieur le président, étant donné que je n'ai pas la totalité de l'information à titre de membre du Comité. J'ignore si d'autres membres ont la lettre en main, mais pas moi.

(1115)

Le président:

Puisque la motion ne peut pas faire l'objet d'un débat, je dois la mettre aux voix.

M. Scott Reid (vice-président):

J'imagine que vous parlez ici de la motion de M. Graham visant à ajourner la discussion?

M. Blake Richards:

J'invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président. J'aimerais demander une précision.

J'ai indiqué lors d'un rappel au Règlement que je trouve inacceptable de proposer cette motion pendant que le document est en train d'être distribué aux membres du Comité, pour qu'ils puissent décider s'ils souhaitent intervenir.

Je peux comprendre la réticence des députés ministériels à discuter de la motion, mais sur le plan de la procédure, je suppose qu'ils ne peuvent même pas agir ainsi avant même que les gens n'aient eu la chance de lire le texte. Je pense que les gens auraient souhaité en discuter.

En fait, je vous demande de trancher et de dire si leur proposition est même recevable.

M. David Christopherson:

J'invoque le Règlement.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Au risque de s'enliser dans la procédure, je crains fort que ce soit ce qui arrive.

Je souhaite également faire valoir que M. Richards a droit à la première remarque. C'est sa motion. Il a demandé de la soumettre. Normalement — j'ignore si c'est par courtoisie, et je demanderais au greffier de nous confirmer si c'est une règle absolue —, par courtoisie et suivant la culture du Parlement, lorsqu'une personne propose une motion, nous avons au moins le respect de lui donner la chance d'en parler, surtout avant qu'un député d'un gouvernement majoritaire ne lui claque la porte au nez.

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais obtenir des précisions sur la recevabilité d'une motion qui porte sur une correspondance que nous n'avons pas sous les yeux. Je vous demande de vous prononcer là-dessus, monsieur. Mon rappel au Règlement, c'est qu'il n'est pas acceptable de parler d'une motion sans avoir une copie de la lettre à laquelle elle fait référence.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

[Inaudible] ... devant vous. La question ne peut pas faire l’objet d’un débat.

Le président:

En ce qui concerne la lettre, elle a été distribuée à tout le monde, mais…

M. David Christopherson:

Pas aujourd'hui.

Le président:

Non, ce n'était pas aujourd'hui.

M. David Christopherson:

Est-ce que quelqu'un d'autre l'a sous les yeux?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Non.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord. Voilà justement où je veux en venir.

Le président:

Le greffier m'informe que nous sommes légalement saisis de la motion dilatoire. Nous devons donc passer au vote.

M. David Christopherson:

Même si vous n'avez pas donné à l'auteur de la motion la chance de parler, pour la seule raison que, techniquement, David s'est retrouvé sur la liste en premier? Monsieur le président, vous allez donc permettre l'arrêt de toute la procédure pour cette raison.

M. Blake Richards:

À ce sujet, je croyais en fait que j'avais la parole. Je faisais simplement preuve de courtoisie puisque je proposais une chose que nous n'avions pas vue depuis un moment. Je laissais simplement du temps pour la distribution des documents, ce pour quoi j'ai marqué une pause. J'aurais donc cru que j'avais la parole à ce moment.

M. Chris Bittle:

Monsieur le président, la motion…

M. Blake Richards:

Nous sommes saisis de la motion.

M. Chris Bittle:

Le greffier nous a expliqué les règles. Nous devons procéder au vote.

M. David Christopherson:

Bienvenue dans l'ère nouvelle.

Bien, nous aussi pouvons jouer de cette manière.

Le président:

Nous allons suspendre la séance une minute pour que je puisse en discuter avec le greffier.

(1115)

(1125)

Le président:

Je suis prêt à rendre ma décision sur ce rappel au Règlement. Je pense que M. Richards a raison de dire que, par souci de courtoisie, la personne qui propose la motion est habituellement la première à intervenir. Ce n'est pas une règle, mais c'est souvent ainsi que les choses se passent. Je suis désolé de ne pas lui avoir laissé le temps de parler, mais ce faisant, j'ai bel et bien accordé la parole à M. Graham. Je dois donc autoriser le vote. Je présente néanmoins mes excuses à M. Richards puisque je ne lui ai pas donné la parole en premier pendant qu'il ne se passait rien.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, avec tout le respect que je vous dois, vous venez de reconnaître qu'en raison de votre erreur, un député a été privé de son droit, un droit qu'il aurait autrement exercé. Vous avez les moyens d'y remédier en donnant la parole à M. Richards. J'ai peine à croire que vous reconnaissiez qu'un droit a été bafoué par votre faute, sans profiter de l'occasion pour corriger la situation.

M. Blake Richards:

Monsieur le président, je suis moi aussi déçu de votre décision, étant donné que vous avez la chance de réparer l'erreur que vous avez faite en accordant la parole à quelqu'un d'autre pendant que c'était mon tour. Je précise qu'il ne m'aurait probablement pas fallu beaucoup de temps pour présenter la motion. J'ai remarqué que le député Spengemann était présent. Je ne suis ici pour trucider personne. À vrai dire, c'est tout le contraire. J'essaie de lui donner une chance.

(1130)

M. Scott Simms:

Il faisait un rappel au Règlement, et il est en train de parler de sa motion.

M. Blake Richards:

Et bien, je…

M. Scott Simms:

Je pense que la décision est…

M. Blake Richards:

Un instant, monsieur Simms. Je suis au beau milieu d'un rappel au Règlement.

Le président:

D'accord, mais veuillez parler de ce point, et non pas de la motion.

M. Blake Richards:

J'y arrive. Puisque le député était présent, il avait la chance de clarifier les choses et de pouvoir, espérons-le… Des allégations pèsent sur lui, et il devrait avoir l'occasion de les démentir. C'est simplement ce que j'essayais de faire. Je l'aurais expliqué, si on m'avait donné la chance qui m'était due, étant donné que j'avais bel et bien la parole. Je pense que vous auriez dû rendre une décision en ce sens. Vous pouvez peut-être encore revenir sur la décision, monsieur le président.

Le président:

En réponse à l'argument de M. Christopherson, j'ai parlé de courtoisie et d'une procédure courante, mais je n'ai jamais dit que j'avais bafoué le droit de qui que ce soit.

Passons au vote.

M. Scott Reid (vice-président):

Un instant, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Oui?

M. Scott Reid (vice-président):

Selon ma compréhension du fonctionnement des règles, tant que M. Richards n'a pas cédé la parole, c'est encore son tour. Par conséquent, si vous déclarez que M. Graham avait la parole, je conteste cette décision.

Le président:

D'accord, la décision est donc contestée. Nous devons maintenant nous prononcer pour déterminer si la décision de la présidence doit être maintenue.

M. Blake Richards:

Je demande un vote par appel nominal.

Le président:

D'accord.

Nous nous prononçons maintenant pour déterminer si la décision de la présidence doit être maintenue.

(La décision de la présidence est maintenue par 5 voix contre 4.)

Nous allons maintenant passer au vote.

M. David Christopherson:

Ce sera un vote par appel nominal.

Le président:

Il s'agit de la motion visant à ajourner la discussion.

(La motion est adoptée par 5 voix contre 4.)

M. Blake Richards:

J'invoque le Règlement.

Est-il indiqué qu'un député se prononce sur une motion alors que son nom apparaît parmi les témoins visés par la motion? Est-ce convenable?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Eh bien, le vote ne portait pas sur une motion.

M. Blake Richards:

À vrai dire, nous venons de voter pour ajourner la discussion sur cette motion, de sorte que le vote se rapportait à la motion.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous avons voté pour ajourner la discussion, un point c'est tout.

M. Blake Richards:

Je me demande si…

Un député: Hum! Intéressant, n'est-ce pas?

Le président:

La motion est adoptée, et la discussion est ajournée.

M. Blake Richards:

Pouvez-vous s'il vous plaît rendre une décision sur mon rappel au Règlement?

Le président:

D'accord. Veuillez répéter, s'il vous plaît.

M. Blake Richards:

Nous venons évidemment de voter sur une motion visant à ajourner la discussion sur une motion qui cite à comparaître un des députés qui a justement voté. Cela est-il approprié? Ne pourrait-il pas y avoir un conflit d'intérêts? Est-il convenable que ce député puisse se prononcer sur la motion en question?

Le président:

Je vois. Nous allons encore suspendre la séance un instant.

(1130)

(1145)

Le président:

Reprenons.

Nous avons vérifié dans le Code régissant les conflits d'intérêts des députés. Puisqu'il ne semble pas que ce vote en particulier soit annulé, je déclare la décision maintenue.

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

J'invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président.

Tout d'abord, je vous remercie de cette précision. Je n'étais pas convaincu de la recevabilité du vote.

Même si je remarque que M. Spengemann a été substitué au sein du Comité, il est encore dans la salle. Je me demande s'il pourrait nous confirmer — car cela pourrait changer la décision, je l'ignore — si une action en justice à laquelle il est mêlé est actuellement en cours au sujet de cette affaire. Une telle situation changerait-elle quoi que ce soit à la décision?

M. Scott Simms:

Monsieur le président, il ne fait que parler de sa motion. Nous venons justement de voter pour ne pas faire ce qu'il fait exactement.

M. Blake Richards:

J'essaie simplement de vérifier si nous…

Peut-être M. Spengemann pourrait-il commencer par nous dire si une action en justice est en cours.

Le président:

Les rappels au Règlement servent à parler des règles, pas des débats.

M. Blake Richards:

Mais la réponse pourrait évidemment changer la décision. Je l'ignore. C'est pourquoi je lui demande des précisions à ce sujet, après quoi vous pourrez dire si cela aurait une incidence quelconque sur la décision. Voilà qui changerait évidemment la donne, par rapport au Code ou au reste, n'est-ce pas? C'est pour cette raison que j'ai demandé à la présidence de se prononcer.

M. Scott Simms:

Nous avons voté pour ajourner la discussion, monsieur.

Le vote portait sur l'ajournement, pas sur ce dont il parle, de sorte que son rappel au Règlement doit être lié à l'ajournement, et non pas à la question qu'il a soulevée dans sa motion précédente.

M. Blake Richards:

J'invoque le Règlement pour déterminer si les règles ont été respectées.

Le président:

Je vous remercie de votre intervention, monsieur Richards, mais cet argument n'a aucune incidence sur ma décision. Merci.

Oui, monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

J'invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président. J'aimerais demander au gouvernement qu'il nous donne des éclaircissements sur la procédure.

M. Bittle est actuellement leader pour le gouvernement. En fait, il est le leader parlementaire adjoint, une fonction ayant un lien assez étroit avec le programme du gouvernement. J'ai déjà été leader parlementaire dans un autre lieu, de sorte que je connais le rôle. Ce qui me frappe, c'est la nouvelle règle du gouvernement, par laquelle il manque à sa promesse relative aux secrétaires parlementaires au sein des Comités. Les libéraux font des pieds et des mains pour dire haut et fort que le rôle des nouveaux secrétaires parlementaires parmi nous est négligeable: leur rôle n'est pas si important; ils n'ont pas le droit de vote; et ils n'assument pas un rôle intégral au même titre qu'un simple député. N'empêche que je tiens à signaler qu'un de ces secrétaires parlementaires sans droit de vote est justement assis à côté de M. Bittle, le leader du gouvernement.

N'est-il pas intéressant que la raison principale pour laquelle nous voulons garder les secrétaires parlementaires…

Un député: [Inaudible]

M. David Christopherson: Je parle du règlement.

(1150)

M. Scott Simms:

Non, il s'agit d'un débat, monsieur.

M. David Christopherson:

La principale raison pour laquelle nous demandons aux secrétaires parlementaires de ne pas siéger aux comités…

M. Scott Simms:

Nous respectons les dispositions qui sont actuellement…

M. David Christopherson:

… est le préjudice…

M. Scott Simms:

… dans le Règlement. Ils ne votent pas.

M. David Christopherson:

Que je sache, c'est moi qui ai la parole.

M. Scott Simms:

Les secrétaires parlementaires n'ont pas voté sur la motion. C'est prévu au Règlement.

M. David Christopherson:

Pourquoi son microphone est-il ouvert puisque la parole est à moi?

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson, vous avez invoqué le Règlement, et une disposition précise…

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, je cherche à connaître le rôle de M. Fillmore, étant donné que le gouvernement laisse entendre que les secrétaires parlementaires ne jouent aucun rôle de taille et ne votent pas. Il est pourtant assis juste à côté de M. Bittle, où il peut se pencher à son oreille pour lui dire exactement comment voter.

Je demande simplement des précisions. Les secrétaires parlementaires mènent-ils le bal ou non? Dans le cas contraire, pourquoi jouent-ils un rôle semblable dans la façon même dont le Comité est organisé?

N'en faites pas une affaire personnelle, monsieur Fillmore; je m'en prends strictement à votre position.

Le président:

Il n'y a rien dans le Règlement à propos de l'emplacement où les gens s'assoient. Avez-vous autre chose à dire dans votre rappel au Règlement?

M. David Christopherson:

Je voulais obtenir des éclaircissements et me faire expliquer le rôle que M. Fillmore va jouer, puisque les libéraux prétendent que les secrétaires parlementaires ne jouent aucun rôle important. Il occupe pourtant le siège du commandant adjoint. J'aimerais simplement que le gouvernement me dise ce qui se passe.

Le président:

Monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

Nous ne sommes pas dans un navire de guerre. Il n'y a donc aucun siège de commandant adjoint. En fait, vous essayez de faire un rappel au Règlement fondé sur des règles selon lesquelles… les secrétaires parlementaires ne votent pas. C'est ce que dit le Règlement. Je pense que nous devrions nous arrêter ici et revenir à l'ordre du jour.

Les partis d'en face disent que nous retardons les travaux. Sachez toutefois que nous souhaitons aller de l'avant aujourd'hui.

Le président:

Bien, je vous remercie.

M. David Christopherson:

Scott, vous êtes un bon parleur. Expliquez-moi le rôle de M. Fillmore et en quoi il s'agit d'une amélioration, compte tenu surtout de votre promesse de ne pas inclure de secrétaires parlementaires au sein des comités.

M. Scott Simms:

Conformément au Règlement, il est un membre du Comité sans droit de vote. Il a expliqué tout à l'heure quelle était la promesse et en quoi elle a été tenue.

Je viens d'ailleurs de tomber dans votre petit piège en commençant à débattre avec vous. Félicitations…

M. David Christopherson:

C'est un débat utile.

M. Scott Simms:

Je pense qu'il vaut la peine d'en débattre étant donné que la promesse a été tenue et que le Règlement en tient compte. Monsieur, votre rappel au Règlement porte sur les règles que nous respectons actuellement.

M. David Christopherson:

Qui va à l'encontre de votre promesse.

Le président:

D'accord, nous en avons assez entendu à ce sujet. Merci.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

Le président:

Nous allons brièvement suspendre la réunion. Nous poursuivrons ensuite à huis clos pour traiter du prochain point à l'ordre du jour, à savoir les travaux du Comité.

Ceux qui ne devraient pas être dans la salle doivent maintenant partir étant donné que nous passons à huis clos.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on September 21, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.