header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-03-27 PROC 95

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. Welcome to meeting 95 of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

I want to deal with a couple of business matters quickly in case we have to go to a vote again. Due to a change in the membership of our committee, the first order of business is the election of the second vice-chair. Since they have to be from the NDP, and the NDP has only one member, I don't think it'll be a hard process. I'll turn it over to the clerk for the official process.

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

Thank you.

Pursuant to Standing Order 106(2), the second vice-chair must be a member of an opposition party other than the official opposition. I'm prepared to receive motions for the office of second vice-chair.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I move Mr. Stewart.

The Clerk:

It has been moved by Mr. Graham that Mr. Stewart be elected as second vice-chair of the committee. Is it the pleasure of the committee to adopt the motion?

(Motion agreed to)

The Clerk: I declare the motion carried. Mr. Kennedy Stewart is declared duly elected second vice-chair of the committee.

The Chair:

Congratulations.

If you would, please pass on our best wishes to Mr. Christopherson. He certainly made significant contributions to this committee. We're like a family, and he was part of our family.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart (Burnaby South, NDP):

I'll do my best to fill his large shoes, and I will pass on your regards. Thank you very much for your support.

The Chair:

Thank you.

For the next item of business, we have distributed a budget for witnesses. I think the total is $28,000. There's a little room there in case we get more witnesses. Is everyone agreed?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Carried.

Another quick piece of business is being handed around. As you know, Parliament is now trying to advertise a bit more about what committees are doing, through Twitter and the website. We have distributed what the wording would be. Does anyone have any comments on it? It seems to be pretty simple.

Okay. We could discuss it more later, but we have a bunch of witnesses lined up for this study, so unless people have other suggestions or we are interrupted by something, we'll continue to let the clerk try to arrange the witnesses the various parties have organized for the next few meetings.

Potentially the main estimates will be tabled after April 16. Because the Speaker and those people are hard to get, I'm suggesting that we tentatively set aside Thursday, April 26 for the main estimates with the Speaker and those witnesses we normally have for that. Okay.

(1105)



Before that, we'll have witnesses the parties have suggested.

Claudine Santos, Senator Patterson's assistant, is joining us at the table.

Is there any other business? The Liaison committee wants to know all of our travel plans between July and December. Does the researcher have exotic places we can go yet?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The Wellington Building.

The Chair:

We'll be travelling to the Wellington Building on occasion. We'll put in a “nil report” unless anyone provides anything else. We can always change it later.

We'll now continue our study of indigenous languages in the proceedings of the House of Commons. We are pleased to be joined by two senators, the Honourable Serge Joyal and the Honourable Dennis Patterson.

Thank you both for being here.

For members' information, former senator Charlie Watt was supposed to participate in this panel but he had a last-minute scheduling conflict with ITK, so he won't be joining us today.

It's kind of ironic, Mr. Patterson. I was at your committee last night, and now you're at my committee this morning. Senator Watt presented there too, and it was great to hear him. Just so the committee members know, the two witnesses last night at the Senate Arctic committee spoke in Inuktitut. That was great.

We'll turn the floor over to Senator Joyal.

Thank you for coming.

Hon. Serge Joyal (Senator, Kennebec, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I want to thank the members of the committee who have extended the invitation.[Translation]

I am very pleased to be able to join you this morning.[English]

I wish to provide the committee the context in which the Senate decided to allow the use of aboriginal languages, singularly Inuktitut, in the debates of the chamber and at the committee level.

That stems from 2006, so it's already a long time, as you know, 12 years ago. There were two Inuit senators, Senator Charlie Watt and Senator Adams. Senator Watt was appointed in 1984 and Senator Adams was appointed in 1977, so they were very long-standing senators. In all fairness, their first language is really Inuktitut; it's not English. When they tried to express themselves in English, for them it was like it is for me. I'm French-speaking, and when I speak in English, well, I have to make an additional effort. Concepts in one language, as you know, are difficult to translate into another language.

We noticed on the floor of the Senate that those two senators could not really take part as much, or as fully, as other senators could since they were not being allowed to use their language. There was a motion introduced on the floor of the chamber in 2006 by former Senator Corbin, who was an Acadian. The motion called on the Senate to study whether aboriginal people had the right to use their language in Parliament, and also, what we should be doing to make sure the system provided for the use of an aboriginal language as a third language group aside from English and French.

The question was referred to the Standing Committee on Rules, Procedures and the Rights of Parliament. I happen to have been a member of that committee for the last 20 years. That gives you my age. Personally, I have always held that the aboriginal people of Canada should have the right to speak their language. I was Secretary of State for Canada from 1982 to 1984, and Mr. Bagnell will remember that I was the co-chair of the Special Joint Committee on the Constitution in 1980-81. One of the key issues we had to deal with in those years—more than 38 years ago—was the recognition of the rights of aboriginal peoples in Canada; that is, section 35 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, under the Constitution Act of 1982.

I'll read that section, because it's a very important element that you should take into consideration. Section 35 states: The existing aboriginal and treaty rights of the aboriginal peoples of Canada are hereby recognized and affirmed.

There's also paragraph 2(b) of the charter, which speaks about freedom of expression: freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression, including freedom of the press and other media of communication.

The Supreme Court of Canada, through those years, has interpreted section 35 and paragraph 2(b), which is about freedom of expression. In one of its landmark decisions in the Haida case in 2004, the famous Supreme Court case, the court stated: Put simply, Canada’s Aboriginal peoples were here when Europeans came, and were never conquered.

The conclusion is that they are there. They have their rights, their culture, and their identity. They have the right to express it and manifest it. This landmark case was preceded by another one in 1988, the Ford case, whereby the Supreme Court determined the scope of freedom of expression. What do we mean when we say that somebody has the right to express himself or herself? The court stated:

(1110)

The “freedom of expression” guaranteed by s.2(b) of the Canadian Charter and s.3 of the Quebec Charter includes the freedom to express oneself in the language of one's choice. Language is so intimately related to the form and content of expression that there cannot be true freedom of expression by means of language if one is prohibited from using the language of one's choice. Language is not merely a means or medium of expression; it colours the content and meaning of expression. It is a means by which a people may express its cultural identity. It is also the means by which one expresses one's personal identity and sense of individuality. The recognition that "freedom of expression" includes the freedom to express oneself in the language of one's choice does not undermine or run counter to the express or specific guarantees of language rights in s. 133 of the Constitution Act, 1867 and ss. 16 to 23 of the Canadian Charter.

It applies to you and to us in the Senate.

In other words, section 133 states quite clearly that both languages could be used in the debates of the chamber of Parliament, and I will read section 133: Either the English or the French Language may be used by any Person in the Debates of the Houses of the Parliament of Canada and of the Houses of the Legislature of Quebec; and both those Languages shall be used in the respective Records and Journals of those Houses....

The courts stated quite clearly in 1988 that the use of a language other than English and French doesn't run counter to section 133. This is a very key issue, and we reflected upon that in the Senate when we had to review the basis on which a senator, in those instances, or a member of Parliament would decide to use a third group of languages. That would not run counter to section 133.

You would certainly know there is another section of the charter, section 22, that reads as follows, and I will read it for your benefit: Nothing in sections 16 to 20 abrogates or derogates from any legal or customary right or privilege acquired or enjoyed either before or after the coming into force of this Charter with respect to any language that is not English or French.

In other words, the charter recognized that there are other languages that have customary rights or legal rights. In the Senate in those days we were reflecting on that situation—and I remind you, that was in 2008, so it's already 10 years ago—we thought that to try to take the best means to allow a senator to speak his or her aboriginal language would not run contrary to the letter of the Constitution or to the rights that stem from the various decisions, the various treaty rights, and the general status of the aboriginal people in Canada.

Moreover since then there has been the report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. I want to draw your attention to sections 13 to 17 of the report. That was not contemplated in the Senate chamber, because that was prior to our use of aboriginal languages. I will read the first one, which is recommendation 13: We call upon the federal government to acknowledge that Aboriginal rights include Aboriginal language rights.

In other words, not to recognize aboriginal rights if you recognize aboriginal language rights and think or pretend that you will recognize aboriginal rights is a contradiction.

That's what this bill in the Senate, Bill S-212, stems from. It's the third time I have introduced this bill in the Senate. It was introduced for the first time in 2009. It is entitled, An act for the advancement of the aboriginal languages of Canada and to recognize and respect aboriginal language rights. This bill has been adopted at second reading and it is currently at the aboriginal affairs committee in the Senate.

(1115)



I want to stress that because on February 14 the Prime Minister made a formal statement in relation to the replacement of the Indian Act. I will read a paragraph of the Prime Minister's statement in Parliament. It was not long ago, a month or so.: To guide the work of decolonizing Canadian laws and policies, we adopted principles respecting Canada's relationship with indigenous peoples. To preserve, protect, and revitalize indigenous languages, we are working jointly with indigenous partners to develop a First Nations, Inuit, and Métis languages act.

That was the commitment of the government.

I think your work has to take place within that context. We have tried in the Senate, through our procedures—

I know my time is going on—

Mrs. Sylvie Boucher (Beauport—Côte-de-Beaupré—Île d'Orléans—Charlevoix, CPC):

We have to vote.

The Chair:

Have you almost finished?

Do we have the unanimous consent of the committee to let him finish here? We have half-hour bells.

Some hon. members: Agreed.

Hon. Serge Joyal:

I'll conclude. I know the time is short. I understand the pressure under which you work and exercise your responsibilities.

I would draw your attention to that general context in which we are in an evolving situation. I met with the Minister of Heritage two years ago when I introduced that bill, to inform her that this was my third initiative in relation to that. She pledged to launch consultations with aboriginal leaders throughout all of Canada, and the government has fully committed to introducing a languages protection bill.

We in the Senate have shown that it is possible to have a third group of languages used, aboriginal languages specifically, by, of course, having the opportunity to inform the Senate clerk or the committees clerk before that group of languages is used, to make sure that there is an interpreter available and there is a capacity for that senator to use that language and to be understood. Presently, of course, anyone can use any language, but if he or she is not understood, then it's not worth the paper on which that statement is printed and that MP or senator cannot fully participate in the deliberative and legislative functions of the chamber.

We thought it would be possible to do that in the chamber. In the beginning there were objections, no doubt about that, and those who said asked, if we were to do it, what kind of precedent we would be creating for other languages and so forth. We canvassed those issues and we came to the conclusion that aboriginal people have a particular status. They have had constitutional protection through the years. As I said, they have never been conquered. They were there before my own ancestor arrived in 1649, who happened to be, by the way, a translator.

When the missionaries came to Canada in those years, they had to hire people to use as interpreters because none of the European settlers spoke aboriginal languages. The first thing they had to do was to learn aboriginal languages, because aboriginal languages were spoken. In those years, during the French regime and up to the Treaty of Paris of 1763, aboriginal leaders were speaking their aboriginal languages and not learning French; it was the French who were learning the aboriginal languages.

It's the situation now that they are trying to reintegrate into the Canadian mainstream, with their identity, with pride in speaking their languages. Of course, it is the responsibility of the Government of Canada, which through the residential school system obliterated aboriginal languages, to take the initiative and steps to reinstate for them the right to speak their languages.

It is in that context that the Senate took the initiative some 12 years ago to allow, progressively, the use of languages. Today, the two Inuit senators have retired from the Senate. Senator Adams has retired, and Senator Watt retired last month. There are no Inuit senators in the Senate presently. There are seven aboriginal senators in the chamber. We have devised a system through which it is possible to use an aboriginal language by, as I said, giving notice before so that there is an interpreter available and that there is a possibility for them to use their language effectively.

I certainly suggest to you to look into that carefully. Use the precedent that took place in the Senate. Senator Patterson was appointed in 2008 and came into the chamber just at the moment we were really recognizing the use of aboriginal languages. I think he could testify by himself on his experience in the Northwest Territories where there are—how many?—11 languages.

(1120)

Hon. Dennis Glen Patterson (Senator, Nunavut, C):

There are eight, plus French and English.

Hon. Serge Joyal:

There are eight aboriginal languages plus French and English, and of course in Nunavut there are four languages.

The precedent of a legislature using an aboriginal language in Canada exists in the Northwest Territories and in Nunavut. In fact, there was a fact-finding mission of senators who went to Nunavut in 2008 to look into how it works and how it is integrated into the daily practice, because in Nunavut, 89% of the debate takes place in Inuktitut.

The Chair:

Thank you, Senator.

Mr. Patterson, how long is your brief?

Hon. Dennis Glen Patterson:

Tell me how much time. I'm open. I was told roughly 10 minutes. I can probably make it shorter than that.

The Chair:

If you could do it in five...because we have to go and vote. We'll be back from the vote at 12 o'clock, and our next witnesses are supposed to be at 12 o'clock.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Mr. Chair, will we have an opportunity to question these witnesses at 12 o'clock?

The Chair:

We could try to extend into the next witnesses' time a bit.

Can you stay a few minutes after 12 o'clock?

Hon. Serge Joyal:

I can.

The Chair:

Okay. Why don't you give us the first five minutes, and then we'll go to vote?

Mrs. Sylvie Boucher:

The buses are a problem.

(1125)

The Chair:

We'll do it when we come back then.

We'll suspend to vote, but then we'll come back right after the vote.



(1205)

The Chair:

Good afternoon. Welcome back to the 95th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

Because of our time constraints, we've brought in our other witnesses so they can listen until we get to them. We continue our study.

We're pleased to be joined by Floyd McCormick, Clerk of the Yukon Legislative Assembly; and Danielle Mager, Manager, Public Affairs and Communications of the Legislative Assembly of the Northwest Territories.

Thank you both for making yourselves available today. We got delayed a bit, so we're finishing off our previous witnesses. You're welcome to listen.

We're not going to spend too much time, senators, but we'll have Mr. Patterson's statement for however long he wants and then maybe have one question from each party, and then we'll go on to our other witnesses.

Mr. Patterson is a great chair of the Arctic committee of the Senate, which is a new committee that has just started. I really appreciate going to those meetings. You do a great job chairing.

You're on.

(1210)

Hon. Dennis Glen Patterson:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair. I'm very pleased and honoured to appear today to discuss the issue of rights and rules respecting indigenous languages in the House of Commons.

Just as a bit of background, I am a former MLA, a cabinet minister, and I was a premier in the government of the NWT between 1979 and 1995, so I've had some experience with questions of indigenous languages in the context of Parliament.

In the eighties, there was a push from the government of Pierre Elliott Trudeau to make the NWT officially bilingual. New Brunswick had just become officially bilingual, and the government of the day was urging other provinces and territories to follow suit. There was a lot of pressure on us in the NWT to become officially bilingual.

At the same time, we had a number of MLAs whom we described as unilingual. They spoke only aboriginal languages, or if they could speak English or French, they were clearly handicapped. At the time, as my colleague said, there were also nine aboriginal languages spoken in the NWT that we were very concerned about supporting and enhancing. The prospect of becoming officially bilingual in English and French without also recognizing and supporting the aboriginal first languages of the majority of our population was unacceptable.

What did we do? We engaged with the Secretary of State at the time, the equivalent of which is now the Minister of Heritage, who was the Honourable Serge Joyal. We secured substantial support for the recognition and enhancement of aboriginal languages alongside becoming officially bilingual.

In 1984 the GNWT passed the Official Languages Ordinance. It recognized English and French as official languages but also recognized the status of aboriginal languages. In our first ordinance, we called them official aboriginal languages.

I mention that because the end result was that aboriginal languages, with subsequent amendments in the NWT and Nunavut, came to have equal status alongside English and French as official languages in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut. Members of both of those assemblies could then—and can now—fully participate in their first languages in a fulsome debate on the complex issues that mattered most to them and their constituents. There is, at significant cost I will say, simultaneous interpretation available in both of those assemblies in the official aboriginal languages of the NWT and Nunavut. We were able to debate complex land claims and political development of the NWT, including a major proposal to divide the NWT and create the new territory of Nunavut, with the full participation of unilingual MLAs who were also respected elders. I think this background may be helpful to you in your discussion of this issue as it pertains to the House of Commons.

I want to say that language should not serve as a disincentive for full participation in our democracy on the part of aboriginal people. We have to respect section 35 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms in the Constitution Act, as Senator Joyal has outlined, and understand that aboriginal languages are a fundamental expression of aboriginal rights.

In my opinion, if the primary language of a parliamentarian is an indigenous language, we must make every effort to ensure that the relevant accommodations are made to facilitate their ability to participate in meaningful and robust debate on the issues of the day. My respectful advice to your committee would be that, when there are members of Parliament who need to communicate in an aboriginal language other than English or French, in order to fully participate and exercise their rights and privileges as MLAs, as MPs, then full simultaneous translation services should be provided, including translation of documents. That's what is being done in the legislatures of the NWT and Nunavut.

(1215)



Otherwise, any member who wishes to speak in an aboriginal language in Parliament should be allowed to speak with simultaneous translation available upon reasonable notice as is done in the Senate. So just to make it clear, if a member's privilege to debate and communicate is impeded by his inability to participate in English or French and that member is an aboriginal member, then full translation privileges should be extended. I'm not sure if that is the case today in the House of Commons, and it would be up to your committee, of course, to determine that. But otherwise—and I think this is really the question that's before you now—a member who wishes to speak in an aboriginal language in Parliament should be allowed to speak with simultaneous translation available but upon reasonable notice. This is what we've done in the Senate, and I think it's working well, and I think it may be a very useful precedent for your committee to consider.

That's my advice. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Senator Patterson.

Senator Joyal, we can have personal opinions, but you've certainly set the legal boundaries framework we're working in. That was great.

We'll go around with one questioner from each party.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How long do we have?

The Chair:

You talk very fast, so it won't be that long.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We're talking about notice. What is a reasonable notice period and does it vary for different languages?

Hon. Serge Joyal:

Forty-eight hours is normally the period. It has proven, so far as Inuktitut is concerned, to be a reasonable deadline for a senator to inform the clerk that he or she would want to address the Senate or the committee in that language. We think that 48 hours is a reasonable period of time in which to make it available especially—and it's always the same—to make sure that the interpreters are available. As I say, I think that the House of Commons—and I say that with the greatest respect for the House—and we in Canada are in the process of evolution. We're trying to reinstate a situation that has been lost and erased and deleted from history. So you can't do that.... My first boss on the Hill was former and late Minister Jean Marchand, who Mr. Bagnell might have known.

You are almost old enough to be a senator, Mr. Bagnell.

He always said that you can't have a transatlantic ship turn on a dime; you have to take a direction. The important thing is to have a direction and to do it in a practical way, not to try to change your rules immediately. I don't think it's what I would advise you to do. That's not the way we did it in the Senate, and it has proved to be successful. It's how you do it practically.

After a while, as I say, it's part of a general effort of the overall system in Canada to reinstate aboriginal peoples' full participation in mainstream Canada. So I think that what you could do certainly is to follow suit, the way the Senate has done it, and I think you are going to help the Senate to continue to improve our approach to it. And we could share the capacity of the interpreter. There won't be one interpreter available for the chamber and one available for the Senate. We could pool those resources and share them so that we have a reasonable approach as we do with safety on the Hill, because we are in the process of adapting to a new situation. The government has stated that they fully endorse the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. You as a member of Parliament may remember that article 13 of the United Nations declaration reads “Indigenous peoples have the right to revitalize, use, develop and transmit to future generations their histories, languages, oral traditions.” It is within that trend that we put our efforts.

(1220)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So the answer is 48 hours.

Have any languages besides Inuktitut been tried in the Senate?

Hon. Serge Joyal:

No, not at this stage. However, what we do and what I suggest you do is that when there is a new senator appointed, the clerk can ask the new senator if they would consider using the aboriginal language and explain the process to them. For instance, after a general election, when you have a new House of Commons, the clerk could, of course, ask aboriginal MPs if it is their wish and so forth, so there is a way to plan ahead of time, rather than one day having somebody stand up and say, “I want to speak in an aboriginal language.” I think there is a way to plan all this in a rational way that could be helpful, as I say, for the whole system to adapt to this situation.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have one final question before I turn it over.

In the Senate, do you use the Inuktitut in Hansard? Is it translated, and how long does that take?

Hon. Serge Joyal:

As I say, in the beginning, we considered asking the senators to have their text already translated, so that it could be printed in Hansard. That's a way to start. As I say, we all learn from the experience. To have it printed the next day, within the same time limit, could be a way to start. Otherwise, there might be a time lag of two days before it is reprinted, but it is always better to have it at the same time.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate it. Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Go ahead, Mr. Patterson.

Hon. Dennis Glen Patterson:

Mr. Chair, maybe I could just quickly add that in the Senate, in the aboriginal peoples committee, we have offered translation for Cree and North Slavey speakers.

The Chair:

Okay. Thank you.

You're next, Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I realize that we don't have a lot of time, so I'm just going to throw a couple of questions out.

Either of you can feel free to answer, as you see appropriate. The first question is on the reasonableness of the time frame.

Senator Patterson, during your time in Northwest Territories politics, I'm curious as to whether there was any notice period or whether there it was simultaneous, as a member spoke.

Second—more generally and more to Senator Patterson, I would suspect—are you provided currently with any additional resources, through the Senate budget, for your own communications with your constituents in Inuktitut or in other indigenous languages, in terms of emails or newsletters—we have householders on the House side—and do you have resources such as that for translation?

Finally, regarding the cost factor, are you aware of the cost of the current pilot project in the Senate?

Those are my three questions. I'll throw it open for you to reply as you see fit.

Hon. Dennis Glen Patterson:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

In the Northwest Territories and Nunavut, there is no notice provision required because with unilingual members, there is full simultaneous interpretation available in all official languages of the territories, which include the aboriginal languages. As I mentioned, it's actually quite an expensive undertaking to have full-time interpreters. In fact, the Hansard in Nunavut is also translated into Inuktitut. Providing notice has never been an issue in those assemblies.

In the Senate, we have had occasions in committees where witnesses have provided information in Inuktitut in written form that has been translated, but there is no budget for senators or in the Senate for translation of aboriginal languages. It's just absorbed within the overall administrative costs of the Senate. For each senator who wishes to provide translation services, as I do, it's absorbed within the member's budget. Thank you.

Hon. Serge Joyal:

I just want to confirm what Senator Patterson has mentioned. It is within the overall envelope of services to senators that the funds are made available. We're not talking a big amount of money because it's not on a daily basis. It's not as if we would have to earmark one position for a permanent translator. So far, we've been able to operate within the present budget envelope. It's the same with committees. A committee can always go back to the internal economy committee, which is the same board that you have, and request it. If the fisheries committee, for instance, is travelling in the north and will need a translator, it could apply to the internal economy committee for a specific budget for that kind of trip. We've never really had any problem, in terms of having the resources needed to hire the translator or to do the interpretation when a committee travelled, for either the aboriginal affairs committee or the fisheries and oceans committee.

(1225)

The Chair:

Thank you, Senator.

Vice-Chair Kennedy.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Senators, thank you very much for your testimony and good insights.

My question is for you, Senator Joyal. You've cited the Constitution in various court cases. I'm just wondering if you consider indigenous languages to have the same status, constitutional or otherwise, as French and English.

Hon. Serge Joyal:

They don't have the same status as English or French, which is provided very clearly in the Constitution in sections 16 to 20 of the charter and in section 23, of course, for the teaching of official languages to minorities in various provinces, but they have a status. It's not a totally comparable status, but there's no doubt that they have a status, and I think it's fair with regard to what I call the evolution capacity of the Constitution.

Through the years, as I quoted in some decisions, the courts have been able to read into the Constitution the overall architecture of the Constitution. As one of those fundamental principles that stems from the secession reference of 1998—you may be familiar with the case—the court has identified what they call the underlying principles of the Canadian architecture of the Constitution. One of those is the protection of minority rights. Those are the elements that infuse the system.

As I say, the bill of rights is recognized in the Royal Proclamation of 1763 by the new sovereign of the land, and that royal proclamation is part of the Constitution. It's in the annex. In fact, it's the first document of the annex of the Constitution. I think that it was done, really, with the clear perception that in fact the rights of the aboriginal peoples were there at the beginning. They have been lost, but they were there, so they have a different status than English and French do.

French rights were reinstated by the Quebec Act and of course by the Constitution of 1867 and then the charter, but the aboriginal rights have never been erased per se. They are inherent. They have a different constitutional status, but they are there.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

We had the historic Tsilhqot'in apology yesterday, which I'm grateful to the Prime Minister for doing. I think it was a very important thing to do, especially since I'm a representative from British Columbia.

In a speech later in the Senate foyer, the regional chief said that Canada was initially envisioned as perhaps one nation, which didn't work, an English-speaking nation. Of course, we had a two-nation concept of French and English, but he reinforced this emerging idea of a three-nation Canada, so that we all think of ourselves in a state that has three nations, with the third nation having multiple nations within it.

I think what this is moving toward, with translation in the House, is reinforcing that idea of a three-nation concept of Canada, but I'm wondering if the third nation isn't quite as equal. I wonder where we're heading and how far we can or should go with this.

Hon. Serge Joyal:

I thank you for the question. You would need to ask me to come back to elaborate on this because—

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

I'm sorry about that. It's worth thinking about.

Hon. Serge Joyal:

—as you know, I'm a veteran of constitutional negotiations stemming back into the 1970s.

I have always resisted the use of the word “nation” to try to—how should I say this?—singularize groups in Canada. As I say, we are different peoples. We come from different historical backgrounds. Our presence in Canada stems from various centuries.

As the aboriginal people have stated, “We're here to stay.” They will never leave. They have been here from time immemorial. My ancestors came here 400 years ago. We're here to stay. I won't go back to Bergerac, where my ancestors come from. It's the same for any new Canadians that were sworn in yesterday. What we try to share is the right of each person to try to develop according to his or her choice within a complexity of identities.

I always resist saying that they are the French Canadians and they arrived in 1604 or 1608. Then the Brits came in 1763, and then there are others who came. I always resist having a vision of Canada that divides. We come from so many different backgrounds, and the nature of Canada, I should say, is to celebrate that, to recognize that.

As I say and as Senator Patterson has clearly mentioned, those are inherent rights of the aboriginal people as much as I as a French Canadian have the inalienable right to speak my own language as much as I want and to speak the other language as much as I want.

(1230)

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

It does differ when we start to codify and we start to allocate resources. I'm wondering how we are allocating resources—not just in this case—to enforce these different identities. I think this is a very important enforcement of an identity within our Parliament. I think it's a very important step forward, but I'm wondering if we're doing enough. They say that advance notice would be great, because it's administratively difficult to have simultaneous translation, yet in the Northwest Territories they have accommodated this.

Is this going far enough?

Hon. Serge Joyal:

It's a beginning. We are trying to listen.

The Supreme Court has said about the charter that it should be interpreted in a liberal and purposive way. When I say liberal, I don't mean the Liberal Party, but in an open, evolutionary way. I think that all the rights included in the charter and the Constitution have been interpreted throughout years of evolution. We're at the preliminary phase of recognizing the rights that aboriginal people inherently have to speak their language. We won't change the system overnight, and I would not suggest to you to do it overnight. We want to make sure that we recognize their identity and their capacity to speak their language. We'll adjust the system [Translation]

according to the needs,[English]

as much as they request it and as much as the budget allows. The minister has announced in this budget some funds to support the teaching of a second language in English provinces and in Quebec. We would hope to have much more money, but that's the amount of money we have.

On the other hand, you cannot deny the money. That would be equivalent to denying the rights. It would be meaningless, not worth the paper on which it's printed.

As I say, it's up to the responsible persons of the day, the government of the day, the MPs and the senators, to see how we will adjust the system. Both of us are happy to be here to talk to you about how we have adjusted the system in the Senate, because we thought it was the proper thing to do. We didn't work under a Supreme Court injunction that said, “Now you can speak Inuktitut or you can speak Cree or Dene.” We thought it was the right thing to do as Canadians.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We have a tiny question by Ms. Boucher, and then we're going to go on to our other witnesses. [Translation]

Mrs. Sylvie Boucher:

Good afternoon. Your comments are very interesting. I normally sit on the Standing Committee on Official Languages, where this topic comes up too.

My question is very simple. I have indigenous friends and they tell me that their culture has a number of dialects. How can we go about choosing from the dialects that are spoken? Each community has its own language.

Can you enlighten me on that, Mr. Joyal?

Hon. Serge Joyal:

There are a number of indigenous languages and large language families, including Algonquian, which has at least five different dialects. The same goes for the Cree and Ojibway families. There are regional variations.

I believe that it is up to each indigenous member of Parliament or senator to determine which language he or she will use, so that it becomes possible to find interpreters. In fact, it is more a matter of ensuring that we can have interpretation than of determining absolutely what the three indigenous languages spoken in the Parliament of Canada will be. I do not believe that should be rigidly established at the outset.

As you said, in a number of communities, the language has to be learned again and better taught, not only through the oral tradition, but also through the education system of the indigenous peoples themselves. Things will evolve. Basically, it is about a member or a senator choosing to speak a certain language and having an interpreter available to translate that language specifically.

(1235)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Senators. We certainly appreciate your presentations here. There's some very valuable information.

Hon. Serge Joyal:

I apologize. I'm getting enthusiastic about this.

The Chair:

That's great. Your passion is great for this topic.

Now we'll add Floyd McCormick, Clerk of the Yukon Legislative Assembly, and Danielle Mager, Manager, Public Affairs and Communications, Legislative Assembly of the Northwest Territories.

From Mr. McCormick, you have some brief comments and also the law in the Yukon, which was sent to you the other day. Just this morning, you got a statement from the Northwest Territories as well.

I understand that you don't have much of an opening statement, Floyd. Is that true?

Mr. Floyd McCormick (Clerk of the Assembly, Yukon Legislative Assembly):

That's correct, Mr. Chair. I would be prepared to just take questions from the committee members.

The Chair:

Thank you.

It's great to have you with us.

I'm sorry for the delays for you guys, but being clerks, you know how parliamentary procedures work. We get delays sometimes.

Danielle, if you'd like to make an opening statement, you're on.

Ms. Danielle Mager (Manager, Public Affairs and Communications, Legislative Assembly of the Northwest Territories):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you to the committee for inviting me to speak to you today.

As you mentioned, my name is Danielle Mager. I'm the Manager of Public Affairs and Communications with the Legislative Assembly of the Northwest Territories. In my role, I am responsible for booking interpreters and for scheduling the broadcasting network.

As you're aware, in the Northwest Territories, we have 11 official languages. It's the only political region in Canada that recognizes that many languages. The population of our territory is approximately 45,000, with half of that population residing in the capital city of Yellowknife. Approximately 10% of the population, about 5,000 people, speak an aboriginal language.

Of these official languages, nine are aboriginal and belong to three different language families: Dene, Inuit, and Cree. Aboriginal languages are most frequently spoken in smaller communities throughout the Northwest Territories.

In the NWT legislature we have 19 members, three of whom speak an indigenous language on the floor of the House on a regular basis. This includes our Speaker, who speaks Tlicho every day during session. We have three interpreting booths in our chamber, and we have the ability to interpret in three official languages of the Northwest Territories. When we are in session, we switch these languages off every week, but we do have Tlicho on a permanent basis for the Speaker.

If a member chooses to read his or her member's statement in an official language of the Northwest Territories, they will be given an additional 30 seconds to read the statement in both English and the official language. If the member does intend to use an official language on the floor of the House, we do request that they provide us at least 24 hours' advance notice so that we have the ability to book the interpreter. As you can imagine, in the Northwest Territories it can be challenging to bring people into the capital city when we have 33 communities throughout the entire territory.

I do have some things that I've culled from the members' handbook about the official languages services. First, it states: The Official Languages Act of the Northwest Territories guarantees Members the right to use any official language in the debates and other proceedings of the Legislative Assembly. As set out in the Act the official languages of the Northwest Territories are Chipewyan, Cree, Tlicho, English, French, Gwich'in, Inuktitut, Inuvialuktun, Inuinnaqtun, North Slavey and South Slavey.

Under “Classification of Official Languages Services”, it states: At the outset of each Legislature, the Office of the Clerk will consult with each Member to determine service level requirements.

Under essential service, it states: An Official Language will be designated “essential” if: a Member indicates that he or she has limited or no ability in English and requires the use of another Official Language; or a Member indicates that he or she has some fluency in English but prefers to use another Official Language where possible. If a language is deemed to be essential, simultaneous interpretation services will be made available for all sittings of the House and all Committee meetings at which the Member is scheduled to attend.

Under “Provisional”, the handbook states: An official language will be designated as provisional if a Member indicates that he or she is fluent in English but desires to use another official language at times during Assembly proceedings. In such instances, interpretation services will be provided when reasonable advance notice is given to the Office of the Clerk that such language services are desired. The contact for such requests is the [manager of public affairs and communications]. Members should endeavour to provide at least four hours' notice if they wish to have provisional interpretation services available during a House or committee proceeding. Every effort will be made to find a qualified interpreter.

Under “Non-Essential”, it states: An Official Language would be designated as “non-essential” if no Member indicates the ability to use the language during Assembly proceedings. In such instances, interpretation services in this language will not be made available as a matter of routine practice.

Under “Translation of Documents”, the handbook states: Written translation services, where reasonable and practicable, will be provided for designated documents in all of the essential languages, as well as upon reasonable request for documents in any of the provisional and non-essential languages. Designated documents include, but are not limited to, the Orders of the Day, bills or bill summaries, amendments to bills, motions and committee reports.

Under “Broadcast Services”, it states: The Office of the Clerk will endeavour to provide public broadcast coverage of House proceedings in as many official languages as [feasible]. The broadcast coverage will be provided on a rotational basis and will attempt to achieve equality of status and equal right and privileges for all official languages.

In the legislative assembly, we broadcast to all 33 communities throughout the territory and also to the rest of Canada through Bell ExpressVu and Shaw Direct. We also provide House proceedings on all of our social media platforms.

(1240)



That concludes my opening statement, and I am available for any questions the committee might have.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. Meegwetch. Mahsi cho. Gunalcheesh.

I'll go to a five-minute round for each party and then just open it up informally for people who still have questions.

Monsieur Graham, from the Liberals, go ahead, please.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I notice in the briefing notes we received that Yukon permits any of the three languages to be spoken but there is no guarantee of being understood. Is that correct?

Mr. Floyd McCormick:

That's correct. The languages act provides that anyone participating in a parliamentary proceeding can address the proceeding in English, French, or a Yukon aboriginal language, of which there are eight, but there is no duty to provide interpretation or translation.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

For written records, if they speak in one of the eight languages besides English and French, is the Hansard translated or how does that work?

Mr. Floyd McCormick:

We work with the members to try to get a transcription into the Hansard. We usually rely on the member to provide whatever written notes they might have in order for the transcript to reflect the language in which the member addressed the House.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the Northwest Territories, is there a bank of translators and interpreters available who you keep a database on, so that you have people for every language available on relatively short notice? You said translation is always available at the scheduled meetings for these members who have it as an essential language. However, for example, from time to time, I go to committees that I'm not a member of. If they want to do something other than their regular scheduling, do you have translators ready to go, on call, for the essential languages?

Ms. Danielle Mager:

We do. We have a bank of interpreters that we go to. For instance, for our Tlicho interpretation, we have one main interpreter we go to, but if she's not available, there is someone else we can go to. It's the same for most of the languages.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you have a database for translators even for the languages that are not deemed essential in your legislature?

Ms. Danielle Mager:

We do.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, and how is Hansard handled in your case?

Ms. Danielle Mager:

It is the same as in the Yukon. It would be the members who would provide us with the written documentation that we could provide to Hansard.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mentioned earlier something about “reasonable request”, that on reasonable request, translations are provided. Have there been a lot of unreasonable requests?

(1245)

Ms. Danielle Mager:

It would be a matter of the time involved. Because some of the interpreters have to come from different northern communities, “reasonable request” means whether we would be able to provide them with transportation to the city in a timely fashion.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How much does this interpretation and translation service cost the Northwest Territories? Do you have a sense of that?

Ms. Danielle Mager:

I don't have the exact number, but our interpreters range from $300 to $450 per hour, and if they are travelling from outside the capital city, we will pay for their travel and accommodation and provide them with a per diem.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't have any more questions. I might come back to you in the general round. Thank you very much.

The Acting Chair (Mr. Kennedy Stewart):

Thanks very much.

We'll go to Mr. Reid for five minutes.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Thank you very much. I'm glad to see you in the chairman's position. I think this is your first time there. Well done.

The Acting Chair (Mr. Kennedy Stewart):

Thank you.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I want to address my questions to Ms. Mager.

First, you read your standing orders, and the word Chipewyan is in there. I assume that is just another way of saying Dene. Is that correct?

Ms. Danielle Mager:

The Dene language has a family of languages within it. Chipewyan is part of the Dene language: Chipewyan, Cree, and Gwich'in.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I see. You listed those three separately in the list you went through. Cree and Chipewyan are listed separately, and the third one you mentioned was—

Ms. Danielle Mager:

—Gwich'in.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right. Thank you.

On Tlicho versus the others, there's a bit of a hierarchy as things stand now. You can correct me if I'm wrong here, but I'm assuming it's not the case that Tlicho is given some type of priority over other indigenous languages based on a larger number of speakers; it's based effectively on demand because of the fact that the speaker is a Tlicho speaker. Is that correct?

Ms. Danielle Mager:

That's correct.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Would that likewise be true for the fact that you ask members if there are any unilingual speakers of indigenous languages as a way of figuring out where you should place your priorities? That's also not an attempt to create a hierarchy of languages, but rather to create a practical response to demand?

Ms. Danielle Mager:

Absolutely. If there are members who speak an official language on the floor of the House on a regular basis, we will aim toward those languages more than toward the other non-spoken languages.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Do you have any members who are unilingual speakers of their language, or who at any rate don't speak English with sufficient proficiency to be full participants in debates unless they're participating in their indigenous language?

Ms. Danielle Mager:

Right now we do not. As Senator Patterson mentioned earlier, when Nunavut was still a part of our territory, we did have some members who spoke only Inuktitut.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm struck that there seems to be, at a practical level, a difference between Inuktitut and all other indigenous languages in Canada. There seems to be the capacity to carry on life as a unilingual Inuktitut speaker, which is something that is not characterized by the other indigenous languages in Canada. It seems to have an advantage in that respect.

I ask this question—I'm not explaining this to you as much as I am to my colleagues—because I think at the federal level we'll experience the same thing. There will be people coming here whose purpose in speaking the indigenous language they bring with them is to serve as part of reinforcing that language as opposed to being part of a practical need for themselves in order to be understood. I think that's a relevant consideration that we're going to have in the future.

I have one last question. You mentioned the Tlicho interpreter who's available on demand. Is that person a resident of Yellowknife?

Ms. Danielle Mager:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

With the other languages, if the need for an interpreter arises, is it the case that you have Yellowknife residents who could be used as interpreters, or would you have to go elsewhere in the territory to find people who are capable of being interpreters?

Ms. Danielle Mager:

We would have to go outside of the capital city, because there are not many official language speakers who could capture that broad a language base. We would have to go outside of Yellowknife.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have one last question in that regard, then. You don't have to answer this right now. Perhaps we could draw upon our analysts to do some research for us in this regard.

I think we would face a similar situation at the federal level if we had a request to speak one of the languages that.... I think it might be easier with Inuktitut. There are many Inuktitut speakers in Ottawa. But if we had a Salish speaker, for example, it might be difficult to find a translator; I just pulled that language out of a hat. We're going to face issues as to the practicality of how to do that. You have experience, so I'm hoping we could simply draw upon your experience in order to find a model that would guide us a little bit and give us some idea as to costs.

(1250)

Ms. Danielle Mager:

Absolutely. I don't have those numbers right now, but it's something I could definitely work on with your analysts.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Mahsi.

Mr. Stewart, I just wanted to make sure you knew that there was no free ride being vice-chair.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Yes. That's right.

The Chair: You work hard.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart: Wow. I have to roll up my sleeves to cover this committee.

Thank you very much for your testimony today. It's very useful.

I'm just wondering how often you review your own system. When you do your reviews, do you go to other jurisdictions to continually learn about how to improve your own system? That would be within Canada or perhaps outside of Canada.

Ms. Danielle Mager:

Sorry, is that to me?

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Sure. If you have something to offer, that would be great.

Ms. Danielle Mager:

As far as a review goes, our review is just based on feedback from the public and whether or not people are actually watching us. We do have an annual review. We will actually call the communities to see if people are viewing the proceedings and if they're listening to them in the official languages.

We also do a full gauge as to how many interpreters we bring in for each language. We do calculate, on about a yearly basis, which languages we're utilizing more often than others.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Thanks.

Do you have anything to add, Mr. McCormick?

Mr. Floyd McCormick:

I would say it's probably similar for us in the sense that we respond mostly to whatever feedback we get from members or the general public in terms of what kinds of services they want us to provide. There has been more emphasis in the last few years on ensuring, for example, that when a member speaks in French in the House, the words appear in French in Hansard. We've been able to work out a system to make that work. There hasn't been the same demand with regard to indigenous languages.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Thank you.

I also have a question for both of you. Often when you see debates and things on television, you'll have a sign language interpreter in a little box up in the top corner. Sometimes those are done in a remote way, so the interpreter is not actually in the room, they're in some studio somewhere else. I'm wondering if you've ever experimented with remote translation, where the interpreter would be on call and would be able to do this remotely.

Either one of you can start.

Ms. Danielle Mager:

In the Northwest Territories we have not experienced anything remotely. We have travelled for public hearings with the standing committees and we've had interpreters from the communities come into the public hearing and do simultaneous interpretation, but we've never done anything via video conferencing, or anything remotely with technology.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

And how about—

The Chair:

Floyd.

Mr. Floyd McCormick:

The situation here in Yukon is similar. When some of our committees travel to communities, we try to ensure there is someone there who speaks the local indigenous language in case that's necessary, but we have not had people participate by video conference or teleconference, similar to the way we're doing it right now.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Through your travels looking at this issue, do you know of any jurisdictions where they would use remote interpretation services?

Ms. Danielle Mager:

I don't, sorry.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Okay, that's that.

We talked about the large parts, the mechanics of your system day to day, but are there any quirks that we should look out for if we start to put this in place? Were there any hiccups in the system that you overcame quickly and that we might try to avoid as we're putting it in here?

Let's start with Mr. McCormick.

Mr. Floyd McCormick:

Given that the Yukon Legislative Assembly doesn't provide simultaneous interpretation for any languages, I guess I really don't have anything to offer you in that regard.

(1255)

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Ms. Mager.

Ms. Danielle Mager:

In the Northwest Territories, because it is such a large land mass, we do sometimes have challenges with travel. That's something that is completely beyond our control.

Another concern is accommodation. If you have to book people travelling in from different areas, you have to make sure there is accommodation available. It might not be a problem in Ottawa, but it is sometimes in Yellowknife.

Reliability is also a concern. You have to make sure that you find people who are reliable and able to provide the service. Reference checking, I think, would be important.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

I have just one more question.

You say you continually check, on an annual basis, with people in the communities to see how they're dealing with this. Can you give us some sense of the feedback? I can imagine it would be quite a thing to not hear your language often and then to turn on the television and hear it spoken. Can you give a sense of the feedback, the highs and lows, perhaps?

Ms. Danielle Mager:

Lots of the feedback we've received has been very positive, especially when we reached out to the elders in some of the smaller communities. They really appreciate the fact that when they turn on their TV to watch the proceedings of the legislative assembly, they can listen to it in their official language.

As far as negative feedback goes, I haven't received any, to date.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Okay, thank you. [Translation]

The Chair:

Mahsi, Drin Gwiinzih Shalakat[English]

I just have a quick question for Ms. Mager.

You said people watch it on TV. So if someone's speaking Tlicho and it's on TV, how do the people who speak the other eight languages and English and French know what the person's saying?

Ms. Danielle Mager:

When we do our scheduling, we rotate it. We have the four audio languages, so when we're scheduling, there's audio one, which is the floor language, audio two, which is usually Tlicho, and then audio three and audio four, which we rotate on a regular basis.

When we're scheduling our broadcasting, we will normally start with the live proceedings because they go for two hours and they're always in the floor language, which is mainly English. After the two hours of live, we will go to Tlicho, then to another aboriginal language, and then another, and then we'll go back to English. We rotate the languages so that it's not just the aboriginal language.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll have an unofficial round.

Is there anyone?

Ms. Tassi, do you want to go?

Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Thank you both for your participation today.

In my view, we've heard different testimony and opinion with respect to this being a right that we have to recognize, that an indigenous language should be able to be spoken in the House and understood. The other side of it is getting it right. It's that balance.

Can each of you comment on how you feel about that? Is the priority that we recognize the right and just accept the bumps and perhaps mishaps that we experience on the way, or should be emphasis be on starting it, but making sure that when we do it, we do it right?

Ms. Danielle Mager:

In my experience, I think that, especially in Canada, language revitalization is incredibly important. As we continue to grow the languages and to educate the youth, I think it's very important for them to be able to listen to especially House proceedings, which affect everyone in the Northwest Territories, in their official language. I think, from my experience, that even though there are bumps and bruises along the way, allowing people to hear the proceedings in their languages is so important that it's worth the risk.

The Chair:

Mr. McCormick, go ahead.

Mr. Floyd McCormick:

I would refer back to the ruling the Speaker of the House of Commons made last June with regard to the question of privilege, in which he talked about which services would be offered in the House proceedings as being a matter for the House to decide.

The House has to consider, obviously, what is required in order for members to fully participate in the proceedings, but the House can also not ignore the fact that resources are required to make that a reality and whether or not there is sufficient demand or requirement—however you want to phrase it—to justify the expenditure of particular resources, which could involve changes to the layout of the chamber, purchasing of equipment, hiring of personnel, as well as operation and maintenance costs.

When you look at the requirements that are faced for indigenous languages in all parts of the country, that may or may not be the best use of resources going into indigenous languages.

(1300)

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Chair.

I have just one very brief question, a clarification, for Ms. Mager.

You mentioned that the floor language is channel one, and it's typically English. I want to clarify then. Is each of the indigenous languages that are used then translated into English on that channel as well?

Ms. Danielle Mager:

Yes, that's correct.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I believe you mentioned earlier that the cost was in the neighbourhood of $300 to $400 dollars an hour in the Northwest Territories. Is that right?

Ms. Danielle Mager:

That's right.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's not the amount that's paid as an hourly rate to the translators. I assume that's all costs in. Is that right?

Ms. Danielle Mager:

No, that's the hourly rate provided to the interpreters.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Oh, that seems....

Ms. Danielle Mager:

Sorry, they interpret for two hours every day during session.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That seems really high, if you don't mind my saying so.

Ms. Danielle Mager:

It's a rate issued by the interpreters and not by us.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay.

Does anybody know much the interpreters are paid here in Ottawa?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

They can answer over the translation.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is it the same rate in Yukon as well?

Mr. Floyd McCormick:

We don't employ interpreters in the House, so it's not really an issue for us.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay, maybe our analysts can find out what it is for Nunavut.

The Chair:

We are having them as witnesses later on.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Oh, all right. We're going to cancel this question. Thank you.

Cost is always a matter that's on our minds.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Are there any Liberal questions? Going once....

Would either of you like to give any closing statements or advice to our committee?

Ms. Danielle Mager:

I don't think so. I wish you the best of luck.

The Chair:

Okay, thank you very much. We appreciate your taking time out, especially extra time because of the delay.[Translation]

Thank you.[English]

Mahsi cho. Gunalcheesh. Sóga senlá. Meegwetch.

We'll let you know what's happening. Thank you.

Ms. Danielle Mager:

Thank you.

Mr. Floyd McCormick:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We've scheduled, just for this committee, the rest of the month. There's no meeting on Thursday, but the first three meetings back, we'll be bringing the witnesses people have suggested, and on April 26 there will be the main estimates, tentatively. That includes protective services, the Chief Electoral Officer, and the Speaker and the Clerk of the House. That takes us to May, unless the ruling of privilege this morning was positive, but I don't think it was. No. Okay.

Is there anything else for the good of the nation?

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Bienvenue à la 95e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

J'aimerais traiter rapidement de quelques questions d'ordre administratif, au cas où nous devrions aller encore une fois voter. En raison d'un changement dans la composition de notre comité, le premier point à l'ordre du jour est l'élection du deuxième vice-président. Comme il doit être du NPD, et que le NPD n'a qu'un seul représentant au Comité, je ne pense pas que ce sera un processus difficile. Je vais céder la parole au greffier pour le processus officiel.

Le greffier du comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

Merci.

Conformément au paragraphe 106(2) du Règlement, le deuxième vice-président doit être un député d'un parti de l'opposition autre que l'opposition officielle. Je suis prêt à recevoir des motions pour le poste de deuxième vice-président.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je propose M. Stewart.

Le greffier:

M. Graham propose que M. Stewart soit élu deuxième vice-président du Comité. Plaît-il au Comité d'adopter la motion?

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le greffier: Je déclare la motion adoptée et M. Kennedy Stewart dûment élu deuxième vice-président du Comité.

Le président:

Félicitations.

Si vous le voulez bien, transmettez nos salutations à M. Christopherson. Il a certainement apporté une contribution importante au Comité. Nous sommes comme une famille, et il faisait partie de notre famille.

M. Kennedy Stewart (Burnaby-Sud, NPD):

Je vais faire de mon mieux pour être à la hauteur et je vais lui transmettre vos salutations. Merci beaucoup de votre appui.

Le président:

Merci.

Pour le prochain point à l'ordre du jour, nous avons distribué un budget pour les témoins. Je crois que le total est de 28 000 $. Il y a une petite marge de manoeuvre au cas où nous aurions plus de témoins. Est-ce que tous sont d'accord?

Des voix: D'accord.

Le président: Adopté.

On vous distribue un document concernant un autre point rapide à l'ordre du jour. Comme vous le savez, le Parlement essaie maintenant de faire un peu plus de publicité sur les activités des comités, par l'entremise de Twitter et de son site Web. Nous avons distribué le texte. Y a-t-il des commentaires à ce sujet? Cela me semble assez simple.

D'accord. Nous pourrons en discuter davantage plus tard, mais nous avons de nombreux témoins qui sont prévus pour cette étude, donc à moins que quelqu'un ait d'autres suggestions ou que nous soyons interrompus par quelque chose, nous allons continuer de laisser le greffier essayer d'organiser la comparution des témoins prévue par les divers partis pour les prochaines réunions.

Le Budget principal des dépenses pourrait être déposé après le 16 avril. Étant donné que le Président et les personnes sont très occupés, je propose que nous réservions provisoirement le jeudi 26 avril pour l'étude du Budget principal des dépenses avec le Président et les témoins que nous recevons normalement pour cela. D'accord.

(1105)



Auparavant, nous allons entendre les témoins que les partis ont proposés.

Claudine Santos, l'adjointe du sénateur Patterson, se joint à nous à la table.

Y a-t-il d'autres questions? Le Comité de liaison veut connaître tous nos plans de voyage entre juillet et décembre. Le chercheur a-t-il encore des endroits exotiques à nous proposer?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'édifice Wellington.

Le président:

Nous nous rendrons à l'occasion à l'édifice Wellington. Nous allons indiquer « rien à signaler », à moins que quelqu'un d'autre suggère autre chose. Nous pourrons toujours changer cela plus tard.

Nous allons maintenant poursuivre notre étude des langues autochtones dans le cadre des travaux de la Chambre des communes. Nous sommes heureux d'accueillir deux sénateurs, l'honorable Serge Joyal et l'honorable Dennis Patterson.

Merci à vous deux d'être ici.

À titre d'information pour les membres du Comité, l'ancien sénateur Charlie Watt était censé participer à ce groupe, mais il a eu un conflit d'horaire de dernière minute avec l'ITK, alors il ne se joindra pas à nous aujourd'hui.

C'est un peu curieux, monsieur Patterson. J'étais présent à votre comité hier soir, et vous êtes ici ce matin. Le sénateur Watt a lui aussi présenté un exposé, et j'ai été ravi de l'entendre. Pour la gouverne des membres du Comité, les deux témoins qui ont comparu hier soir au Comité sénatorial de l'Arctique ont parlé en inuktitut. C'était très bien.

La parole va maintenant au sénateur Joyal.

Merci d'être venus.

L'hon. Serge Joyal (sénateur, Kennebec, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je tiens à remercier les membres du Comité qui nous ont invités.[Français]

Je suis très heureux de pouvoir être avec vous ce matin.[Traduction]

J'aimerais expliquer au Comité le contexte dans lequel le Sénat a décidé d'autoriser l'utilisation des langues autochtones, l'inuktitut en particulier, dans ses débats et dans ceux de ses comités.

Comme vous le savez, cela remonte déjà à 2006, il y a 12 ans. Il y avait deux sénateurs inuits, le sénateur Charlie Watt et le sénateur Adams. Le sénateur Watt a été nommé en 1984, et le sénateur Adams, en 1977, ce qui veut dire qu'il s'agissait de sénateurs d'expérience. Pour être honnête, leur langue maternelle est l'inuktitut, et non pas l'anglais. Lorsqu'il fallait qu'ils s'expriment en anglais, c'était comme pour moi. Je parle français, et quand je parle en anglais, je dois faire un effort supplémentaire. Comme vous le savez, les concepts dans une langue sont difficiles à traduire dans une autre langue.

Nous avons remarqué sur le parquet du Sénat que ces deux sénateurs ne pouvaient pas vraiment participer autant que les autres puisqu'ils n'avaient pas le droit d'utiliser leur langue. Une motion a été présentée en 2006 par l'ancien sénateur Corbin, un Acadien. Elle demandait au Sénat d'étudier si les Autochtones avaient le droit d'utiliser leur langue au Parlement, et aussi ce que nous devrions faire pour nous assurer que le système prévoit l'utilisation d'une langue autochtone, comme troisième groupe linguistique, en plus de l'anglais et du français.

La question a été renvoyée au Comité permanent du Règlement, de la procédure et des droits du Parlement. Je suis membre de ce comité depuis 20 ans. Cela vous donne une idée de mon âge. Personnellement, j'ai toujours soutenu que les Autochtones du Canada devraient avoir le droit de parler leur langue. J'ai été secrétaire d'État pour le Canada de 1982 à 1984, et M. Bagnell se souviendra que j'étais coprésident du Comité spécial mixte sur la Constitution en 1980-1981. L'un des principaux problèmes que nous avons dû régler au cours de ces années, c'est-à-dire il y a plus de 38 ans, c'est la reconnaissance des droits des peuples autochtones au Canada, c'est-à-dire l'article 35 de la Charte des droits et libertés, en vertu de la Loi constitutionnelle de 1982.

Je vais lire cet article, car il s'agit d'un élément très important dont il faudrait tenir compte. L'article 35 dit: Les droits — ancestraux ou issus de traités — des peuples autochtones du Canada sont reconnus et confirmés.

Il y a aussi le paragraphe 2b) de la Charte, qui parle de la liberté d'expression: liberté de pensée, de croyance, d'opinion et d'expression, y compris la liberté de la presse et des autres moyens de communication.

Au fil de ces années, la Cour suprême du Canada a interprété l'article 35, ainsi que le paragraphe 2b), qui porte sur la liberté d'expression. Dans une de ses décisions marquantes dans l'affaire Haïda en 2004, la fameuse cause de la Cour suprême, la Cour a déclaré: En bref, les Autochtones du Canada étaient déjà ici à l'arrivée des Européens; ils n'ont jamais été conquis.

La conclusion est qu'ils sont là. Ils ont leurs droits, leur culture et leur identité. Ils peuvent les exprimer et les manifester. Cette affaire historique a été précédée d'une autre en 1988, l'affaire Ford, dans laquelle la Cour suprême a déterminé la portée de la liberté d'expression. Que veut-on dire quand on dit que quelqu'un a le droit de s'exprimer? La Cour a déclaré:

(1110)

La « liberté d'expression » garantie par l'alinéa 2b) de la Charte canadienne et l'article 3 de la Charte québécoise comprend la liberté de s'exprimer dans la langue de son choix. La langue est si intimement liée à la forme et au contenu de l'expression qu'il ne peut y avoir de véritable liberté d'expression linguistique s'il est interdit de se servir de la langue de son choix. Le langage n'est pas seulement un moyen ou un mode d'expression. Il colore le contenu et le sens de l'expression. C'est pour un peuple un moyen d'exprimer son identité culturelle. C'est aussi le moyen par lequel on exprime son identité personnelle et son individualité. Reconnaître que la « liberté d'expression » englobe la liberté de s'exprimer dans la langue de son choix ne compromet ni ne contredit les garanties expresses ou précises de droits linguistiques à l'article 133 de la Loi constitutionnelle de 1867 et aux articles 16 à 23 de la Charte canadienne.

Cela s'applique à vous et à nous, au Sénat.

Autrement dit, l'article 133, dont je vais faire lecture, stipule très clairement que les deux langues peuvent être utilisées dans les débats au Parlement: Dans les chambres du parlement du Canada et les chambres de la législature de Québec, l'usage de la langue française ou de la langue anglaise, dans les débats, sera facultatif; mais dans la rédaction des archives, procès-verbaux et journaux respectifs de ces chambres, l'usage de ces deux langues sera obligatoire...

Les tribunaux ont dit très clairement en 1988 que l'utilisation d'une langue autre que l'anglais et le français ne va pas à l'encontre de l'article 133. Il s'agit d'une question très importante, et nous en avons tenu compte au Sénat lorsque nous avons examiné la base sur laquelle un sénateur, dans ce cas précis, ou un député déciderait d'utiliser un troisième groupe de langues. Cela n'irait pas à l'encontre de l'article 133.

Vous savez certainement qu'il y a un autre article de la Charte, l'article 22, qui est ainsi libellé et que je vais vous lire: Les articles 16 à 20 n'ont pas pour effet de porter atteinte aux droits et privilèges, antérieurs ou postérieurs à l'entrée en vigueur de la présente Charte et découlant de la loi ou de la coutume, des langues autres que le français ou l'anglais.

Autrement dit, la Charte reconnaît qu'il y a d'autres langues qui ont des droits coutumiers ou des droits légaux. À l'époque, au Sénat, nous réfléchissions à cette situation — je vous rappelle que c'était en 2008, donc il y a déjà 10 ans — et nous pensions que le fait d'essayer de prendre les meilleurs moyens pour permettre à un sénateur de parler sa langue autochtone ne serait pas contraire à la lettre de la Constitution ou aux droits qui découlent des diverses décisions, des divers droits issus de traités et du statut général des peuples autochtones au Canada.

De plus, depuis, il y a eu le rapport de la Commission de vérité et de réconciliation. J'attire votre attention sur les articles 13 à 17 du rapport, qui n'ont pas été pris en compte au Sénat, car c'était avant que nous utilisions les langues autochtones. Je vais lire la première recommandation, la recommandation 13: Nous demandons au gouvernement fédéral de reconnaître que les droits des Autochtones comprennent les droits linguistiques autochtones.

Autrement dit, le fait de ne pas reconnaître les droits ancestraux, alors que l'on reconnaît les droits linguistiques autochtones et qu'on pense ou prétend reconnaître les droits des Autochtones, est une contradiction.

C'est de cela que découle le projet de loi S-212 du Sénat. C'est la troisième fois que je présente ce projet de loi au Sénat. Il a été présenté pour la première fois en 2009. Il s'intitule Loi visant la promotion des langues autochtones du Canada ainsi que la reconnaissance et le respect des droits linguistiques autochtones. Il a été adopté en deuxième lecture et il est actuellement au Comité sénatorial des peuples autochtones.

(1115)



Je tiens à le souligner parce que, le 14 février, le premier ministre a fait une déclaration officielle au sujet du remplacement de la Loi sur les Indiens. Je vais lire un paragraphe de la déclaration du premier ministre au Parlement. C'était il n'y a pas si longtemps, un mois environ: Afin d'orienter le travail consistant à décoloniser les lois et les politiques canadiennes, nous avons adopté des principes concernant la relation du Canada avec les peuples autochtones. Pour préserver, protéger et revitaliser les langues autochtones, nous travaillons avec des partenaires autochtones pour élaborer, de façon conjointe, une loi sur les langues des Premières Nations, des Inuits et des Métis.

C'était l'engagement du gouvernement.

Je pense que votre travail doit se faire dans ce contexte. Nous avons essayé au Sénat, par nos procédures...

Je sais que mon temps de parole achève...

Mme Sylvie Boucher (Beauport—Côte-de-Beaupré—Île d'Orléans—Charlevoix, PCC):

Nous devons voter.

Le président:

Avez-vous presque terminé?

Avons-nous le consentement unanime du Comité pour le laisser terminer? La sonnerie va retentir pendant une demi-heure.

Des voix: D'accord.

L'hon. Serge Joyal:

Je vais conclure. Je sais que le temps passe vite. Je comprends la pression à laquelle vous êtes soumis dans votre travail et l'exercice de vos responsabilités.

J'attire votre attention sur le contexte général dans lequel nous évoluons. J'ai rencontré la ministre du Patrimoine, il y a deux ans, lorsque j'ai présenté ce projet de loi, pour l'informer que c'était ma troisième initiative à cet égard. Elle avait promis de lancer des consultations auprès des dirigeants autochtones partout au Canada, et le gouvernement s'est pleinement engagé à présenter un projet de loi sur la protection des langues.

Au Sénat, nous avons montré qu'il est possible d'utiliser un troisième groupe de langues, les langues autochtones en particulier, en ayant évidemment la possibilité d'informer le greffier du Sénat ou le greffier du comité avant que ce groupe de langues ne soit utilisé, afin de s'assurer qu'il y a un interprète disponible et que le sénateur a la capacité d'utiliser cette langue et d'être compris. À l'heure actuelle, bien sûr, n'importe qui peut utiliser n'importe quelle langue, mais s'il n'est pas compris, alors cela ne vaut pas le papier sur lequel cette déclaration est imprimée, et le député ou le sénateur concerné ne peut pas participer pleinement aux délibérations et aux fonctions législatives de la Chambre.

Nous pensions qu'il serait possible de le faire au Sénat. Au début, il y a eu des objections, cela ne fait aucun doute, et certains se sont interrogés sur le genre de précédent que nous créerions pour les autres langues, si nous le faisions, et ainsi de suite. Nous avons examiné ces questions et nous sommes arrivés à la conclusion que les Autochtones ont un statut particulier. Ils ont bénéficié d'une protection constitutionnelle au fil des ans. Comme je l'ai dit, ils n'ont jamais été conquis. Ils étaient là avant l'arrivée de mon propre ancêtre, en 1649, qui était, soit dit en passant, un traducteur.

Lorsque les missionnaires sont arrivés au Canada à cette époque, ils ont dû embaucher des gens pour servir d'interprètes, parce qu'aucun des colons européens ne parlait les langues autochtones. La première chose qu'ils devaient faire, c'était d'apprendre les langues autochtones, parce que ce sont ces langues qui étaient parlées. Au cours de ces années, pendant le régime français et jusqu'au Traité de Paris de 1763, les dirigeants autochtones parlaient leurs langues autochtones et n'apprenaient pas le français; ce sont les Français qui apprenaient les langues autochtones.

Les Autochtones essaient maintenant de se faire reconnaître à part entière dans la société canadienne, avec leur identité, avec la fierté de parler leur langue. Bien entendu, il incombe au gouvernement du Canada qui, par l'entremise du système des pensionnats, a anéanti les langues autochtones, de prendre l'initiative et de prendre des mesures pour redonner aux Autochtones le droit de parler leur langue.

C'est dans ce contexte que le Sénat a pris l'initiative, il y a une douzaine d'années, d'autoriser progressivement l'utilisation de ces langues. Aujourd'hui, les deux sénateurs inuits ont pris leur retraite du Sénat, le sénateur Adams, il y a quelques années, et le sénateur Watt, le mois dernier. Il n'y a pas de sénateurs inuits au Sénat à l'heure actuelle, mais sept sénateurs autochtones. Nous avons conçu un système par lequel il est possible d'utiliser une langue autochtone en donnant, comme je l'ai dit, un avis préalable, afin qu'il y ait un interprète disponible et que l'utilisation de cette langue soit efficace.

Je vous suggère d'examiner la question attentivement. Servez-vous du précédent qui a été créé au Sénat. Le sénateur Patterson a été nommé en 2008 et a commencé à siéger au moment même où nous avons reconnu réellement l'utilisation des langues autochtones. Je pense qu'il pourrait témoigner lui-même de son expérience dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest où il y en a — combien? —11 langues.

(1120)

L'hon. Dennis Glen Patterson (sénateur, Nunavut, C):

Il y en a huit, plus le français et l'anglais.

L'hon. Serge Joyal:

Il y a huit langues autochtones, plus le français et l'anglais, et bien sûr, au Nunavut, il y a quatre langues.

Le précédent d'une assemblée législative utilisant une langue autochtone au Canada existe dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest et au Nunavut. En fait, une mission d'étude a été menée par des sénateurs qui sont allés au Nunavut en 2008 pour examiner comment cela fonctionnait et comment cela était intégré au quotidien, parce qu'au Nunavut, 89 % des débats se déroulent en inuktitut.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le sénateur.

Monsieur Patterson, combien de temps dure votre exposé?

L'hon. Dennis Glen Patterson:

Dites-moi combien de temps j'ai. Je suis ouvert. On m'a dit environ 10 minutes. Je peux probablement être plus bref.

Le président:

Si vous pouviez le faire en cinq... parce que nous devons aller voter. Nous reviendrons du vote à midi, et nos prochains témoins sont censés être là à midi.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Monsieur le président, sera-t-il possible d'interroger ces témoins à midi?

Le président:

Nous pourrions essayer d'empiéter un peu sur le temps de parole des prochains témoins.

Pouvez-vous rester quelques minutes après midi?

L'hon. Serge Joyal:

Je peux le faire.

Le président:

D'accord. Pourquoi ne donnez-vous pas les cinq premières minutes de votre exposé, après quoi nous irons voter?

Mme Sylvie Boucher:

Les autobus représentent un problème.

(1125)

Le président:

Nous le ferons à notre retour.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pour voter, mais nous reviendrons tout de suite après le vote.



(1205)

Le président:

Bonjour. Bienvenue à la 95e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

En raison de nos contraintes de temps, nous avons invité nos autres témoins afin qu’ils puissent écouter jusqu’à ce que nous puissions les entendre. Nous poursuivons maintenant notre étude.

Nous sommes heureux d’accueillir Floyd McCormick, greffier de l’Assemblée législative du Yukon; et Danielle Mager, gestionnaire, Relations publiques et communications de l’Assemblée législative des Territoires du Nord-Ouest.

Merci à vous deux de vous être rendus disponibles aujourd’hui. Comme nous avons pris un peu de retard, nous terminons maintenant avec nos témoins précédents. Nous vous invitons à les écouter.

Nous n’allons pas passer trop de temps, mesdames et messieurs les sénateurs, mais nous allons entendre la déclaration de M. Patterson pendant le temps qu’il voudra, après quoi nous aurons peut-être une question de chaque parti, et nous passerons ensuite aux autres témoins.

M. Patterson est un excellent président pour le Comité sénatorial spécial sur l’Arctique, un nouveau comité qui vient de faire ses débuts. J'aime beaucoup assister à ces réunions. Vous faites un excellent travail de président.

Vous avez la parole.

(1210)

L'hon. Dennis Glen Patterson:

Merci beaucoup monsieur le président. Je suis très heureux et honoré de témoigner aujourd’hui pour discuter de la question des droits et des règles concernant l'utilisation des langues autochtones à la Chambre des communes.

Pour vous situer un peu, je suis un ex-député provincial, un ministre du Cabinet, et j’ai été premier ministre du gouvernement des Territoires du Nord-Ouest entre 1979 et 1995. J’ai donc une certaine expérience des questions relatives aux langues autochtones au Parlement.

Dans les années 1980, le gouvernement de Pierre Elliott Trudeau insistait pour que les les Territoires du Nord-Ouest soient officiellement bilingues. Le Nouveau-Brunswick venait tout juste de devenir officiellement bilingue, et le gouvernement de l’époque exhortait les autres provinces et territoires à emboîter le pas. Dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest, il y avait beaucoup de pression pour que le territoire devienne officiellement bilingue.

À ce moment, plusieurs de nos députés provinciaux pouvaient être décrits comme étant unilingues. Ils ne parlaient que des langues autochtones, ou s’ils parlaient l’anglais ou le français, ils n'étaient clairement pas à l'aise dans cette langue. À l’époque, comme mon collègue l’a dit, nous étions très déterminés à soutenir et à améliorer les neuf langues autochtones parlées dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest. La perspective de devenir officiellement bilingue en anglais et en français sans reconnaître et appuyer les premières langues autochtones de la majorité de notre population était inacceptable.

Qu’avons-nous donc fait? Nous avons mobilisé le secrétaire d’État de l’époque, dont l’équivalent est maintenant le ministre du Patrimoine, l’honorable Serge Joyal. Nous avons obtenu un appui important à la reconnaissance et à l’amélioration des langues autochtones en plus de devenir officiellement bilingues.

En 1984, le gouvernement des Territoires du Nord-Ouest a adopté l’Ordonnance sur les langues officielles. Elle reconnaissait l’anglais et le français comme langues officielles, mais elle consacrait aussi le statut des langues autochtones. Dans notre première ordonnance, nous avons parlé de langues autochtones officielles.

Si j'en parle, c'est parce qu'en fin de compte, les langues autochtones, avec des modifications ultérieures dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest et au Nunavut, sont devenues des langues officielles égales à l’anglais et au français dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest et au Nunavut. Les députés de ces deux assemblées ont pu alors — et peuvent encore — participer pleinement dans leur langue à un débat approfondi sur les enjeux complexes qui comptent le plus pour eux et pour leurs électeurs. Il y a aussi, moyennant des coûts assez élevés, l'interprétation simultanée qui est offerte dans les deux assemblées dans les langues officielles autochtones des Territoires du Nord-Ouest et du Nunavut. Nous avons pu débattre de revendications territoriales complexes et du développement politique des Territoires du Nord-Ouest, y compris une proposition majeure visant à diviser les Territoires du Nord-Ouest et à créer le nouveau territoire du Nunavut, avec la pleine participation de députés unilingues qui étaient aussi des aînés respectés. Je pense que ce contexte pourrait vous être utile dans vos discussions à ce sujet en ce qui concerne la Chambre des communes.

Je tiens à dire que la langue ne devrait pas dissuader les Autochtones de participer pleinement à notre vie démocratique. Nous devons respecter l’article 35 de la Charte des droits et libertés dans la Loi constitutionnelle, comme l’a souligné le sénateur Joyal, et comprendre que les langues autochtones représentent une expression fondamentale des droits des Autochtones.

À mon avis, si la langue principale d’un parlementaire est une langue autochtone, nous devons faire tous les efforts possibles pour que les accommodements pertinents soient faits afin de faciliter leur capacité de participer à un débat sérieux sur les questions d’actualité. Je conseillerais respectueusement à votre comité que, lorsqu’il y a des députés qui doivent communiquer dans une langue autochtone qui n'est ni le français ni l'anglais, afin de participer pleinement et d’exercer entièrement leurs droits et privilèges de députés, il faudrait offrir des services complets d'interprétation simultanée, y compris la traduction de documents. C’est ce qui se fait dans les assemblées législatives des Territoires du Nord-Ouest et du Nunavut.

(1215)



Autrement, tout député qui souhaite s’exprimer dans une langue autochtone au Parlement devrait être autorisé à parler avec l’interprétation simultanée, sous réserve d’un préavis raisonnable, comme c’est le cas au Sénat. Donc, pour que les choses soient bien claires, si le privilège d’un député de débattre et de communiquer est entravé par son incapacité de participer en anglais ou en français et que ce député est Autochtone, il doit pouvoir compter sur des services d’interprétation complets. Je ne sais pas si c’est le cas actuellement aujourd’hui à la Chambre des communes, et ce serait évidemment à votre comité de le déterminer. Mais autrement — et je pense que c’est la véritable question que vous devez vous poser —, un député qui souhaite parler dans une langue autochtone au Parlement devrait être autorisé à profiter d'un service d'interprétation simultanée, mais sous réserve d'un préavis raisonnable. C’est ce que nous avons fait au Sénat, et cela fonctionne bien, et cela pourrait servir de précédent très utile pour votre comité.

C’est du moins ce que je vous conseille. Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup sénateur Patterson.

Sénateur Joyal, nous pouvons tous avoir des opinions personnelles, mais vous avez assurément défini le cadre juridique à l'intérieur duquel nous travaillons. C’était formidable.

Nous allons maintenant accorder une question à un député de chacun des partis.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Combien de temps avons-nous?

Le président:

Comme vous parlez très vite, cela ne sera pas très long.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Puisqu'il est question de préavis, quel est le délai de préavis raisonnable et varie-t-il selon les langues?

L'hon. Serge Joyal:

La période est normalement de quarante-huit heures. En ce qui concerne l’inuktitut, il s’agit d’un délai raisonnable dans lequel un sénateur doit informer le greffier qu’il souhaite s’adresser au Sénat ou au comité dans cette langue. Nous pensons que 48 heures constitue un délai raisonnable pour offrir un service d'interprétation, surtout — et c’est toujours la même chose — pour s’assurer que des interprètes sont disponibles. Comme je l’ai dit, je pense que la Chambre des communes — et je le dis avec le plus grand respect pour la Chambre —, mais nous, au Canada, sommes en train d’évoluer. Nous essayons de rétablir une situation qui a été perdue, effacée et supprimée de l’histoire. L'on ne peut donc pas faire cela... Mon premier patron sur la Colline était l’ancien et regretté ministre Jean Marchand, que M. Bagnell a peut-être connu.

Vous êtes presque assez vieux pour être sénateur, monsieur Bagnell.

Il disait toujours qu’on ne pouvait pas faire tourner un navire transatlantique sur une pièce de dix sous; il faut prendre une direction. L’important, c’est d’avoir une orientation et de la suivre de façon pratique, et non d’essayer de changer les règles immédiatement. Ce n'est pas ce que je vous conseillerais de faire. Ce n’est pas ainsi que nous avons procédé au Sénat, et nous avons connu du succès. C’est la bonne façon de procéder d'un point de vue pratique.

Après un certain temps, comme je l’ai dit, cela fait partie d’un effort général du régime canadien visant à rétablir la pleine participation des peuples autochtones à la vie de la société canadienne. Vous pourriez donc assurément faire comme le Sénat, et vous allez sûrement aider le Sénat à continuer d’améliorer son approche. Nous pourrions en outre partager la capacité de l’interprète. Il n’y aura pas un interprète disponible pour la Chambre et un autre pour le Sénat. Nous pourrions mettre ces ressources en commun et les partager afin d’adopter une approche raisonnable comme nous le faisons pour la sécurité sur la Colline, parce que nous sommes en train de nous adapter à un nouveau contexte. Le gouvernement a déclaré qu’il appuie sans réserve la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones. À titre de député, vous savez peut-être que l’article 13 de la Déclaration des Nations unies précise que « les peuples autochtones ont le droit de revivifier, d’utiliser, de développer et de transmettre aux générations futures leur histoire, leur langue, leurs traditions orales ». C’est dans cette optique que nous déployons nos efforts.

(1220)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La réponse est donc 48 heures.

Y a-t-il des langues autres que l’inuktitut qui ont été utilisées au Sénat?

L'hon. Serge Joyal:

Non, pas à ce jour. Ce que nous faisons toutefois, et ce que je vous suggère de faire, c’est que lorsqu’un nouveau sénateur est nommé, le greffier peut demander au nouveau sénateur s’il envisagerait d’utiliser une langue autochtone, et il lui explique le processus. Par exemple, après une élection générale, lorsqu’il y a une nouvelle représentation à la Chambre des communes, le greffier pourrait évidemment demander aux députés autochtones s’ils souhaitent utiliser une langue autochtone, afin qu’il y ait moyen de planifier à l’avance, plutôt que de se trouver un jour dans la situation ou quelqu’un annonce soudainement son intention de s'exprimer dans une langue autochtone. Il y a moyen de planifier tout cela de façon rationnelle et utile, comme je l’ai dit, pour adapter tout le système à cette situation.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J’ai une dernière question avant de céder la parole.

Au Sénat, utilisez-vous l’inuktitut dans le hansard? Est-il traduit, et combien de temps faut-il pour le traduire?

L'hon. Serge Joyal:

Comme je l’ai dit, au début, nous avons envisagé de demander aux sénateurs de faire traduire leur texte afin qu’il puisse être imprimé dans le hansard. C’est un bon début. Comme je l’ai dit, nous apprenons tous de l’expérience. L’impression le lendemain, dans le même délai, pourrait être une façon de commencer. Autrement, il pourrait y avoir un délai de deux jours avant l'impression, mais il est toujours préférable d’avoir la traduction de tous les débats en même temps.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis d'accord. Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Patterson, c'est à vous.

L'hon. Dennis Glen Patterson:

Monsieur le président, je pourrais peut-être ajouter rapidement qu’au Sénat, au comité des peuples autochtones, nous avons offert la traduction aux conférenciers qui s'expriment en Cri et en Esclave du Nord.

Le président:

D’accord. Merci.

Monsieur Nater, vous avez la parole.

M. John Nater:

Merci monsieur le président.

Comme nous n’avons pas beaucoup de temps, je vais me contenter de quelques questions.

N’hésitez pas à répondre à l’une ou l’autre de ces questions, si vous le jugez approprié. La première porte sur le caractère raisonnable du délai.

Sénateur Patterson, quand vous faisiez de la politique dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest, j’aimerais savoir s’il y avait un délai de préavis ou s’il y avait un service d'interprétation simultanée, comme l’a signalé un député.

Deuxièmement — et je m’adresse de façon plus générale au sénateur Patterson, j’imagine —disposez-vous actuellement de ressources supplémentaires, par l’entremise du budget du Sénat, pour vos propres communications avec vos électeurs en inuktitut ou dans d’autres langues autochtones, pour ce qui est des courriels ou des bulletins — nous avons des bulletins parlementaires du côté de la Chambre — et avez-vous des ressources de ce genre pour la traduction?

Enfin, en ce qui concerne le facteur coût, connaissez-vous le coût du projet pilote en cours au Sénat?

Ce sont là mes trois questions. Je vous invite à répondre comme bon vous semble.

L'hon. Dennis Glen Patterson:

Merci monsieur le président.

Dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest et au Nunavut, il n’y a pas de préavis obligatoire parce que des services d'interprétation simultanée complets sont offerts dans toutes les langues officielles des territoires pour les députés unilingues, ce qui inclut les langues autochtones. Comme je l’ai dit, il est très coûteux d’avoir des interprètes à temps plein. En fait, le hansard du Nunavut est aussi traduit en inuktitut. Le préavis n’a jamais constitué un problème dans ces assemblées.

Au Sénat, il est arrivé que des témoins fournissent par écrit de l’information en inuktitut qui a été traduite, mais il n’y a pas de budget pour les sénateurs ou au Sénat pour la traduction des langues autochtones. Les dépenses sont simplement absorbées au titre des coûts administratifs généraux du Sénat. Pour chaque sénateur qui souhaite offrir des services de traduction, comme je le fais, ces dépenses sont prises en charge au moyen du budget du parlementaire. Merci.

L'hon. Serge Joyal:

Je veux simplement confirmer ce qu'a dit le sénateur Patterson. C'est dans l’enveloppe globale des services aux sénateurs que les fonds sont rendus disponibles. Cela ne représente pas une grosse somme d’argent parce que cela ne couvre pas des besoins sur une base quotidienne. Ce n’est pas comme si nous devions réserver un poste à un traducteur permanent. Jusqu’à maintenant, nous avons pu fonctionner dans les limites de l’enveloppe budgétaire actuelle. C’est la même chose pour les comités. Un comité peut toujours s’adresser au Comité de la régie interne, qui est semblable au vôtre, et faire une demande. Si le Comité des pêches, par exemple, se déplace dans le Nord et a besoin d’un interprète, il pourrait s’adresser au comité de la régie interne pour obtenir un budget précis pour ce genre de voyage. Nous n’avons jamais vraiment eu de difficulté à obtenir les ressources nécessaires pour embaucher un interprète ou pour obtenir des services d’interprétation lorsqu’un comité a voyagé, que ce soit pour le comité des affaires autochtones ou le comité des pêches et des océans.

(1225)

Le président:

Merci monsieur le sénateur.

Vice-président Kennedy.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Messieurs les sénateurs, merci beaucoup de votre témoignage et de votre précieuse contribution.

Ma question s’adresse à vous, sénateur Joyal. Vous avez cité la Constitution dans diverses causes devant les tribunaux. Je me demande si vous considérez que les langues autochtones ont le même statut, constitutionnel ou autre, que le français et l’anglais.

L'hon. Serge Joyal:

Elles n’ont pas le même statut que l’anglais ou le français, qui est très clairement prévu dans la Constitution aux articles 16 à 20 de la Charte et à l’article 23, bien sûr, pour l’enseignement des langues officielles aux minorités dans diverses provinces, mais elles ont néanmoins un statut. Ce n’est pas un statut totalement comparable, mais il ne fait aucun doute qu’elles ont un statut, et je pense que c’est à juste titre en ce qui concerne ce que j’appellerais la capacité d’évolution de la Constitution.

Dans certaines décisions rendues au fil des ans, comme je l’ai mentionné, les tribunaux ont pu établir l’architecture globale de la Constitution en en interprétant le texte. Parmi les principes fondamentaux qui découlent du renvoi sur la sécession de 1998, et vous en avez peut-être entendu parler, la Cour a déterminé ce qu’elle appelle les principes sous-jacents de l’architecture canadienne de la Constitution. L’une d’elles est la protection des droits des minorités. Ce sont les éléments qui alimentent le système.

Comme je l’ai dit, la Déclaration des droits est reconnue dans la Proclamation royale de 1763 par le nouveau souverain du pays, et la Proclamation royale fait partie de la Constitution. Elle est inscrite en annexe. En fait, il s'agit même du premier document de l’annexe de la Constitution. Je pense que cela a été fait suivant la prémisse de base selon laquelle les droits des peuples autochtones existaient au départ. Ils ont été perdus, mais ils existaient bel et bien, ce qui fait qu’ils ont un statut différent de celui de l’anglais et du français.

Les droits relatifs au français ont été rétablis par la Loi sur le Québec et, bien sûr, par la Constitution de 1867, puis par la Charte, mais les droits autochtones n’ont jamais été effacés comme tel. Ils sont intrinsèques. Ils ont un statut constitutionnel différent, mais ils existent.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Nous avons entendu hier les excuses historiques des Tsilhqot’in, ce dont je suis reconnaissant au premier ministre. Je pense que c’était très important, d’autant plus que je représente la Colombie-Britannique.

Dans un discours qu’il a prononcé plus tard dans le foyer du Sénat, le chef régional a dit que le Canada avait initialement été envisagé comme une seule nation, anglophone, mais cela n'a pas fonctionné. Bien entendu, nous avons ensuite eu le concept des deux nations fondatrices, une s'exprimant en français et l’autre en anglais, mais il a renforcé cette idée émergente d’un Canada formé de trois nations, de sorte que nous nous imaginons tous dans un État qui compte trois nations, dont la troisième compte plusieurs nations.

Je pense que ce vers quoi nous nous dirigeons, avec la traduction à la Chambre, renforce l’idée d’un concept de trois nations du Canada, mais je ne suis pas sûr si la troisième nation a un statut tout à fait égal. Je me demande vers où nous nous dirigeons et jusqu’où nous pouvons ou nous devrions aller.

L'hon. Serge Joyal:

Je vous remercie de votre question. Vous devrez me demander de revenir pour en parler davantage parce que...

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Je suis désolé. Cela vaut la peine d’y réfléchir.

L'hon. Serge Joyal:

... comme vous le savez, ma participation aux négociations constitutionnelles remonte aux années 1970.

Je n'ai jamais aimé utiliser le mot « nation » pour chercher, disons, à distinguer certains groupes au Canada. Je le dis souvent, nous sommes tous différents. Nous avons tous des antécédents historiques différents. Nous sommes tous arrivés au Canada à différents moments sur une période de plusieurs siècles.

Comme l'ont dit les Autochtones, « nous ne sommes pas près de nous en aller ». Ils ne partiront jamais. Ils sont ici depuis des temps immémoriaux. Mes ancêtres sont venus ici il y a 400 ans. Nous resterons ici. Je ne retournerai jamais vivre à Bergerac, la ville de mes ancêtres. Il en est de même pour tous les nouveaux Canadiens qui ont été assermentés hier. Chaque personne a le droit d’essayer de se développer à sa façon dans une foule d’identités.

Je n'aime pas parler de l'arrivée des Canadiens français en 1604 ou en 1608, puis de celle des Britanniques en 1763 et des autres groupes qui sont venus après eux. Je n'aime pas dépeindre un Canada divisé. Nous venons d'antécédents extrêmement divers, et la nature du Canada, devrais-je dire, est de célébrer cela, de reconnaître cela.

Comme je l’ai dit et comme le sénateur Patterson l’a clairement mentionné, il s’agit de droits inhérents des peuples autochtones, tout comme j’ai le droit inaliénable, à titre de Canadien français, de parler ma propre langue autant que je le veux et de parler l’autre langue autant que je le veux.

(1230)

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Tout cela change quand il s'agit de codifier et d'affecter des ressources. Je me demande comment nous répartissons les ressources pour faire respecter ces différentes identités. Je ne parle pas seulement du cas présent. À mon avis, cela permet de souligner l’identité au sein du Parlement. Pour moi, il s'agit d'un progrès très important. Je me demande cependant si nous en faisons assez. Certains disent qu'il faut donner un préavis parce qu’il est difficile d'organiser la traduction simultanée. Pourtant, dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest, on réussit très bien à s'organiser.

En faisons-nous assez?

L'hon. Serge Joyal:

C'est un bon début. Nous nous efforçons de bien écouter.

La Cour suprême affirme que nous devrions interpréter la Charte de façon libérale et intentionnelle. Quand je dis libérale, je ne parle pas du parti, mais d’une attitude ouverte et évolutive. Je pense bien qu'au fil des ans, nous avons interprété tous les droits inclus dans la Charte et dans la Constitution. Nous en sommes à l’étape préliminaire de la reconnaissance des droits inhérents qu'ont les peuples autochtones de parler leur langue. Nous ne changerons pas le système du jour au lendemain, et je ne vous suggère pas non plus de faire les choses si rapidement. Nous tenons cependant à reconnaître l'identité des Autochtones et à leur donner l'occasion de parler leur langue. Nous allons corriger le système. [Français] selon les besoins,[Traduction]

... tant qu’ils le demandent et tant que le budget le permettra. Le ministre a annoncé dans ce budget des fonds pour appuyer l’enseignement d’une langue seconde dans les provinces anglophones et au Québec. Nous espérions en recevoir beaucoup plus, mais c'est tout ce dont nous disposons.

Par contre, on ne peut pas refuser ces fonds. Cela équivaudrait à nier les droits. Cela n’aurait aucun sens et ne vaudrait vraiment pas grand-chose.

Comme je l’ai dit, les personnes responsables, le gouvernement au pouvoir, les députés et les sénateurs devront trouver des moyens de corriger le système. Nous avons tous deux le plaisir de venir vous décrire la façon dont nous avons modifié le système du Sénat, parce qu'à notre avis, cela s'imposait. Nous ne nous pliions pas à une injonction de la Cour suprême nous ordonnant de parler l’inuktitut, le cri ou le déné. Nous étions convaincus qu'à titre de Canadiens, nous nous devions de le faire.

Le président:

Merci.

Mme Boucher a une question rapide à poser, puis nous passerons la parole à nos autres témoins. [Français]

Mme Sylvie Boucher:

Bonjour. Vos propos sont très intéressants. Je siège normalement au Comité permanent des langues officielles, où ce sujet est également abordé.

Ma question est très simple. J'ai des amis autochtones qui me disent que leur culture inclut plusieurs dialectes. Comment peut-on procéder et choisir parmi les dialectes qui sont parlés? Chaque communauté a sa propre langue.

Pouvez-vous m'éclairer à ce sujet, monsieur Joyal?

L'hon. Serge Joyal:

Il y a plusieurs langues autochtones et de grandes familles linguistiques, notamment celle de l'algonquin, qui comporte au moins cinq différents dialectes. Il en va de même pour la famille du cri et celle de l'ojibwé. Il y a des variations régionales.

Je crois qu'il revient à chaque député ou sénateur autochtone de déterminer quelle langue il ou elle utilisera, de façon à ce qu'il soit possible d'obtenir de l'interprétation. En effet, il s'agit davantage de s'assurer de pouvoir obtenir de l'interprétation que de déterminer de façon absolue les trois langues autochtones qui seront parlées au Parlement du Canada, par exemple. Je ne crois pas qu'on doive codifier cela de façon rigide au début.

Comme vous le disiez, dans plusieurs communautés, la langue doit être réapprise et mieux enseignée, non seulement au moyen de la tradition orale, mais également par l'entremise du système d'éducation des Autochtones. Une évolution se ferait. Il s'agirait essentiellement que le député ou le sénateur choisisse de parler une langue donnée et qu'un interprète soit disponible pour traduire cette langue en particulier.

(1235)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, honorables sénateurs. Nous sommes très heureux d'avoir entendu vos allocutions. Vous nous avez fourni des renseignements extrêmement précieux.

L'hon. Serge Joyal:

Excusez-moi. Ce sujet me passionne.

Le président:

Nous vous comprenons tout à fait. Tout cela est vraiment passionnant.

Nous allons maintenant entendre M. Floyd McCormick, greffier de l’Assemblée législative du Yukon et Danielle Mager, gestionnaire, Affaires publiques et Communications, Assemblée législative des Territoires du Nord-Ouest.

Monsieur McCormick, vous avez quelques brefs commentaires à présenter et vous allez nous expliquer la loi du Yukon, qui vous a été envoyée l’autre jour. Pas plus tard que ce matin, vous avez également reçu une déclaration des Territoires du Nord-Ouest.

On m'a dit que vous n'alliez pas prononcer d'allocution, Floyd. Est-ce vrai?

M. Floyd McCormick (greffier de l'Assemblée, Assemblée législative du Yukon):

Oui, c'est vrai, monsieur le président. Je suis simplement prêt à répondre aux questions des membres du Comité.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous sommes très heureux de vous avoir avec nous.

Je suis désolé de vous avoir fait attendre, mais vous êtes greffiers, alors vous connaissez les procédures parlementaires. Il y a parfois des retards.

Danielle, nous allons entendre votre allocution. À vous la parole.

Mme Danielle Mager (gestionnaire, Relations publiques et des communications, Assemblée législative des Territoires du Nord-Ouest):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je remercie le Comité de m'avoir invitée à comparaître aujourd'hui.

Comme vous l'a dit le président, je m'appelle Danielle Mager. Je suis gestionnaire des affaires publiques et des communications à l’Assemblée législative des Territoires du Nord-Ouest. J'ai entre autres pour tâche de réserver les services d'interprétation et de fixer les horaires de radiodiffusion.

Comme vous le savez, les Territoires du Nord-Ouest ont 11 langues officielles. C’est la seule région politique au Canada qui reconnaisse tant de langues. Nous avons une population d’environ 45 000 habitants, dont la moitié vit dans la capitale de Yellowknife. Près de 10 % de la population, soit environ 5 000 personnes, parlent une langue autochtone.

Parmi ces langues officielles, neuf sont des langues autochtones appartenant à trois familles linguistiques différentes, celles des Dénés, des Inuits et des Cris. Les langues autochtones sont surtout parlées dans les petites communautés des Territoires du Nord-Ouest.

À l’Assemblée législative des Territoires du Nord-Ouest, nous avons 19 députés, dont trois parlent régulièrement une langue autochtone. Cela comprend notre président, qui parle le tlicho tous les jours de la session. Nous avons trois cabines d’interprétation à la Chambre, ce qui nous permet d’interpréter dans trois langues officielles des Territoires du Nord-Ouest. Lorsque nous siégeons, cependant, nous n'engageons que les interprètes du tlicho en permanence pour le président.

Si un député décide d'intervenir dans une langue officielle des Territoires du Nord-Ouest, nous lui accordons 30 secondes de plus pour lire son intervention aussi en anglais. Si un député a l’intention de s'exprimer dans une langue officielle sur le parquet de la Chambre, nous lui demandons un préavis d’au moins 24 heures afin que nous puissions réserver les services d'un interprète. Comme vous pouvez l’imaginer, il est souvent difficile de faire venir des gens dans la capitale, car notre territoire ne compte que 33 communautés.

J'ai tiré du manuel des députés quelques segments sur les langues officielles. Tout d'abord, on y indique que: La Loi sur les langues officielles des Territoires du Nord-Ouest garantit aux députés le droit d’utiliser toute langue officielle dans les débats et autres délibérations de l’Assemblée législative. Cette loi reconnaît les langues officielles suivantes: le chipewyan, le cri, le tlicho, l'anglais, le français, le gwich’in, l'inuktitut, l'inuvialuktun, l'inuinnaqtun ainsi que la langue des Esclaves du Nord et la langue des Esclaves du Sud. [Traduction]

À la section sur la classification des services linguistiques, on peut lire: Au début de chaque législature, le Bureau du greffier consultera chaque député et députée pour déterminer le niveau de service qui lui sera nécessaire. [Traduction]

Au sujet des services essentiels: Une langue officielle sera désignée « essentielle » si: Un ou une députée souligne sa connaissance limitée ou nulle de l'anglais et désire s'exprimer dans une autre langue officielle; Un ou une députée souligne sa relativement bonne maîtrise de l’anglais, mais préfère s'exprimer autant que possible dans une autre langue officielle. Si la langue demandée est jugée essentielle, on offrira des services d’interprétation simultanée à toutes les séances de la Chambre et à toutes les réunions du Comité auxquelles cette personne participera. [Traduction]

Dans la section sur les langues provisoires: Une langue officielle sera désignée provisoire si un ou une députée souligne sa bonne maîtrise de l’anglais, mais souhaite parfois s'exprimer dans une autre langue officielle pendant les délibérations de l’Assemblée. Dans de tels cas, le Bureau du greffier engagera des services d’interprétation s'il reçoit un préavis raisonnable. Le [gestionnaire des affaires publiques et des communications] est responsable d'engager ces services. Les députés devront s’efforcer de donner un préavis d’au moins quatre heures s’ils souhaitent obtenir des services d’interprétation provisoire pendant les délibérations de la Chambre ou pendant des séances de comité. Le Bureau fera tous les efforts possibles pour trouver un interprète qualifié. [Traduction]

Dans la section sur les services non essentiels: Une langue officielle serait désignée comme « non essentielle » si aucun député ne se dit capable d’utiliser cette langue pendant les délibérations de l’Assemblée. Dans de tels cas, on n'offrira pas de services d’interprétation quotidiennement dans cette langue. [Traduction]

Au sujet de la traduction de documents: Lorsqu'il le sera raisonnable et faisable, on fournira la traduction écrite de documents désignés dans toutes les langues essentielles ainsi que dans des langues provisoires et non essentielles si la demande est raisonnable. Les documents désignés comprennent, sans toutefois s’y limiter, les ordres du jour, les projets de loi ou leurs résumés, les amendements aux projets de loi, les motions et les rapports des comités. [Traduction]

Voici ce que prévoit le manuel au sujet de la radiodiffusion: Le Bureau du greffier s’efforcera de diffuser publiquement les délibérations de la Chambre dans le plus grand nombre de langues officielles possibles. On effectuera ces radiodiffusions sur une base cyclique afin de le faire dans toutes les langues officielles en respectant tous les droits et privilèges de manière égale. [Traduction]

L’Assemblée législative diffuse ses émissions dans les 33 communautés du territoire et dans le reste du Canada par l’entremise de Bell ExpressVu et de Shaw Direct. Nous affichons également les délibérations de la Chambre sur toutes nos plateformes de médias sociaux.

(1240)



Voilà, c'est tout ce que j'avais à vous dire. Je me ferai un plaisir de répondre aux questions des membres du Comité.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Meegwetch. Mahsi cho. Gunalcheesh.

Nous entamerons maintenant une ronde de cinq minutes de questions pour les membres de chaque parti, puis nous inviterons tous ceux qui auront encore des questions à les poser de façon non structurée.

Monsieur Graham, du Parti libéral, vous avez la parole.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai lu dans les notes d'information que nous avons reçues que le Yukon permet aux parlementaires de s'exprimer dans n'importe laquelle des trois langues officielles sans se soucier de ce que leurs collègues comprennent ce qu'ils disent. Est-ce vrai?

M. Floyd McCormick:

Oui, c'est juste. La Loi sur les langues officielles permet aux participants des débats parlementaires de s'exprimer en anglais, en français ou dans une langue autochtone du Yukon, et il y en a huit, sans devoir fournir des services d’interprétation ou de traduction.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Qu'en est-il des comptes rendus lorsqu'un parlementaire s'exprime dans l'une des huit autres langues que le français ou l'anglais? Faites-vous traduire le hansard? Quel processus suivez-vous?

M. Floyd McCormick:

Nous demandons aux députés d'envoyer si possible une transcription de leur intervention pour le hansard. Les députés nous fournissent leurs notes écrites pour que la transcription reflète la langue dans laquelle ils se sont exprimés.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Tenez-vous une banque de données sur les traducteurs et les interprètes des Territoires du Nord-Ouest qui vous permet d'obtenir des services dans chaque langue disponible dans un délai relativement court? Vous nous avez dit que l'interprétation est toujours offerte dans la langue essentielle des participants aux réunions. Toutefois, il m'arrive de temps en temps de participer à des comités auxquels je ne siège pas régulièrement. Si cela arrivait à un comité, auriez-vous des interprètes prêts à aller sur appel travailler dans une autre langue essentielle?

Mme Danielle Mager:

Oui. Nous avons une banque d'interprètes que nous pouvons appeler. Par exemple pour le tlicho, nous avons notre interprète principale, mais si elle n'est pas disponible, nous appelons quelqu'un d'autre. Il en est de même pour la plupart des langues.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Tenez-vous une banque de données sur les interprètes qui travaillent dans des langues désignées non essentielles?

Mme Danielle Mager:

Bien sûr.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. Comment préparez-vous le hansard, chez vous?

Mme Danielle Mager:

De la même façon qu'au Yukon. Les députés nous remettent leurs documents écrits que nous insérons dans le hansard.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez parlé plus tôt d'une « demande raisonnable » pour obtenir des services d'interprétation. Avez-vous reçu de nombreuses demandes non raisonnables?

(1245)

Mme Danielle Mager:

C'est une question de délais. Comme certains interprètes viennent de différentes communautés nordiques, une « demande raisonnable » nous permet d'organiser leur déplacement pour qu'ils arrivent à temps pour la réunion.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quels sont les tarifs des interprètes et des traducteurs dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest? Avez-vous une idée de ces coûts?

Mme Danielle Mager:

Je n'ai pas de chiffres exacts, mais nos interprètes facturent entre 300 et 450 $ par heure. De plus, s'ils viennent de l'extérieur de la capitale, nous payons leurs déplacements et leur hébergement et nous leur versons une indemnité journalière.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'ai plus de questions à vous poser pour le moment. J'en aurai peut-être d'autres pendant la ronde générale. Merci beaucoup.

Le président suppléant (M. Kennedy Stewart):

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons la parole à M. Reid pour cinq minutes.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Merci beaucoup. Je suis heureuse de vous voir occuper le fauteuil de la présidence. Je crois que vous le faites pour la première fois. Vous vous en tirez très bien.

Le président suppléant (M. Kennedy Stewart):

Merci.

M. Scott Reid:

Ma question s'adresse à Mme Mager.

Vous avez commencé par nous lire votre Règlement, et j'y ai entendu le mot chipewyan. Est-ce une autre façon de désigner le déné?

Mme Danielle Mager:

La langue dénée regroupe plusieurs langues, dont le chipewyan. Il y a le chipewyan, le cri et le gwich'in.

M. Scott Reid:

Je comprends. Vous les avez citées séparément dans votre liste. Le cri et le chipewyan sont deux langues distinctes, et la troisième était...

Mme Danielle Mager:

... le gwich'in.

M. Scott Reid:

Ah oui, merci.

À l'heure actuelle, entre le tlicho et les autres, il y a une sorte de hiérarchie. Corrigez-moi si je me trompe, mais je présume que vous ne favorisez pas le tlicho par rapport aux autres langues autochtones parce qu’un plus grand nombre de personnes le parlent? Le tlicho est en demande parce que le président le parle, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Danielle Mager:

C'est cela.

M. Scott Reid:

Est-ce que vous demandez aux députés si certains d'entre eux sont unilingues en une langue autochtone pour établir vos priorités? Vous ne créez pas une hiérarchie langagière, mais vous établissez ces priorités pour mieux répondre à la demande, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Danielle Mager:

Mais bien sûr. Si certains députés parlent régulièrement l'une de ces langues à la Chambre, nous faisons plus d'efforts pour fournir de l'interprétation dans cette langue que pour celles dans lesquelles personne ne s'exprime.

M. Scott Reid:

Avez-vous des députés qui ne parlent que leur langue autochtone, ou tout au moins qui ne parlent pas assez bien l'anglais pour participer pleinement aux débats?

Mme Danielle Mager:

À l'heure actuelle, non. Comme le sénateur Patterson l'a dit plus tôt, quand le Nunavut faisait encore partie de notre territoire, nous avions quelques députés qui ne parlaient qu'inuktitut.

M. Scott Reid:

Je suis frappé de la différence qu'il semble y avoir entre l’inuktitut et toutes les autres langues autochtones au Canada. Les gens semblent pouvoir passer leur vie entière en ne parlant qu'inuktitut, ce qui n’est pas le cas des gens qui parlent les autres langues autochtones au Canada. J'y vois un avantage curieux.

Je pose surtout cette question à l'égard de mes collègues, parce que j'ai bien l'impression qu’au niveau fédéral, nous allons faire face à un phénomène similaire. Certaines personnes viendront ici en s'exprimant dans leur langue autochtone pour la faire prévaloir au lieu de le faire par besoin de se faire comprendre. J'ai bien l'impression que nous allons nous heurter à cela à l'avenir.

J'ai une dernière question. Vous avez mentionné votre interprète principale de tlicho qui fournit ses services sur demande. Habite-t-elle à Yellowknife?

Mme Danielle Mager:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Si vous avez besoin d'interprètes dans les autres langues, y a-t-il des résidants de Yellowknife qui pourraient offrir leurs services d'interprètes, ou êtes-vous obligés de vous adresser ailleurs pour trouver des interprètes compétents?

Mme Danielle Mager:

Nous sommes obligés de les chercher hors de la capitale, car très peu de personnes parlent un si grand nombre de langues. Nous devons les chercher hors de Yellowknife.

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai une dernière question, dans ce cas. Pas besoin de répondre tout de suite. Nous pourrions peut-être demander à nos analystes de nous faire une recherche là-dessus.

Je pense que nous serions confrontés à la même situation au niveau fédéral si nous avions une demande pour une des langues qui... Ce serait peut-être plus facile avec l'inuktitut. Il y a bien du monde qui parle l'inuktitut à Ottawa. Mais si nous avions quelqu'un parlant salish, par exemple, nous pourrions avoir du mal à trouver un interprète. J'ai pris cette langue au hasard. Nous n'aurons pas de moyen pratique d'y arriver. J'espère que nous pourrions nous inspirer de votre expérience pour trouver un modèle qui nous guiderait un petit peu et nous donnerait une idée des coûts.

(1250)

Mme Danielle Mager:

Absolument. Je n'ai pas ces chiffres ici, mais je pourrais certainement y travailler avec vos analystes.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Mahsi.

Monsieur Stewart, je voulais être sûr que vous savez que la vice-présidence ne donne pas de privilège.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Oui, c'est juste.

Le président: Vous travaillez fort.

M. Kennedy Stewart: Wow. Je dois retrousser mes manches pour couvrir notre comité.

Merci beaucoup de votre témoignage. Il est très utile.

À quelle fréquence examinez-vous votre système. Lorsque vous le faites, allez-vous continuellement dans d'autres administrations voir comment améliorer votre propre système? Au Canada ou peut-être même à l'étranger.

Mme Danielle Mager:

Désolée, c'est pour moi?

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Oui. Si vous avez quelque chose à dire, ce serait formidable.

Mme Danielle Mager:

En ce qui concerne l'examen, le nôtre est fondé sur les commentaires du public et sur la question de savoir si on nous regarde vraiment. C'est un exercice annuel. Nous appelons les collectivités pour voir si les gens suivent les délibérations et s'ils le font dans les langues officielles.

Nous faisons aussi l'évaluation complète du nombre d'interprètes dont nous retenons les services pour chaque langue. Nous vérifions, à peu près tous les ans, quelles sont les langues que nous utilisons plus souvent que les autres.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Merci.

Vous auriez quelque chose à ajouter, monsieur McCormick?

M. Floyd McCormick:

Je dirais que c'est probablement la même chose pour nous, en ce sens que nous réagissons surtout aux commentaires que nous recevons des députés ou du grand public au sujet des services qu'ils attendent de nous. Depuis quelques années, nous nous efforçons davantage de faire en sorte, par exemple, que les propos tenus en français à la Chambre sont publiés en français dans le hansard. Nous avons mis au point un système qui fonctionne pour cela. Nous n'avons pas eu la même demande pour les langues autochtones.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Merci.

J'ai aussi une question pour vous deux. Souvent, lorsque vous suivez des débats et ainsi de suite à la télévision, vous voyez un interprète en langue des signes dans un petit encadré en haut de l'écran. Parfois, il travaille à distance; il n'est même pas dans la salle, mais dans un studio quelconque ailleurs. Avez-vous déjà fait l'essai de l'interprétation à distance, où l'interprète est sur appel et peut travailler à distance.

L'un d'entre vous peut commencer.

Mme Danielle Mager:

Dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest, nous n'avons rien tenté de faire à distance. Nous nous sommes déplacés pour des audiences publiques avec les comités permanents et nous avons fait venir des interprètes des collectivités pour l'interprétation simultanée, mais nous n'avons jamais travaillé en vidéoconférence, ni rien fait à distance avec la technologie.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Et que dire de...

Le président:

Floyd.

M. Floyd McCormick:

C'est la même chose ici au Yukon. Lorsque certains de nos comités se rendent dans les collectivités, nous essayons de voir à ce qu'il y ait quelqu'un parlant la langue autochtone locale pour le cas où ce serait nécessaire, mais nous n'avons pas eu de participation par vidéoconférence ou téléconférence, comme maintenant.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Vos voyages vous ont-ils mis en contact avec des administrations utilisant des services d'interprétation à distance?

Mme Danielle Mager:

Non, désolée.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Très bien, c'est ainsi.

Nous avons parlé des éléments importants, de la mécanique quotidienne de votre système, mais y a-t-il quelques petits pièges à surveiller si nous commençons à mettre cela en place? Le système a-t-il fait ressortir des pépins que vous avez surmontés rapidement et que nous pourrions tâcher d'éviter dans ce que nous faisons ici?

Commençons par M. McCormick.

M. Floyd McCormick:

Étant donné que l'Assemblée législative du Yukon n'offre pas d'interprétation simultanée pour aucune des langues, je dirais que nous n'avons rien à vous dire à cet égard.

(1255)

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Madame Mager.

Mme Danielle Mager:

Dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest, parce qu'ils sont immenses, les voyages nous posent parfois des problèmes. Cela échappe complètement à notre maîtrise.

Il y a aussi le problème de l'hébergement. S'il faut faire des réservations pour des gens qui viennent d'un peu partout, il faut être sûr qu'il y a de l'hébergement disponible. Ce n'est peut-être pas un problème à Ottawa, mais c'en est un à Yellowknife.

La fiabilité est un autre problème. Il faut être sûr de trouver des gens qui sont fiables et qui sont capables d'assurer le service. Le contrôle des références, je pense, est important.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Une dernière question.

Vous dites que vous vérifiez continuellement, chaque année, auprès des habitants des collectivités pour voir comment ils s'y prennent. Pouvez-vous nous donner une idée de leur rétroaction? J'imagine que ce serait pas mal intéressant pour eux d'ouvrir le téléviseur et d'entendre leur langue pour une rare fois. Pouvez-vous nous donner une idée de la rétroaction, des hauts et des bas, peut-être?

Mme Danielle Mager:

Une bonne part de la rétroaction que nous avons reçue, surtout de la part des aînés dans certaines petites collectivités, était très positive. Ils apprécient vraiment le fait que, lorsqu'ils ouvrent leur téléviseur pour suivre les délibérations de l'Assemblée législative, ils peuvent les entendre dans leur langue officielle.

Quant aux commentaires négatifs, je n'en ai pas encore eu.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Très bien, merci. [Français]

Le président:

Mahsi, Drin Gwiinzih Shalakat.[Traduction]

J'ai une brève question pour Mme Mager.

Vous avez dit que les gens suivent les débats à la télévision. Donc, si quelqu'un parle dogrib et que c'est télévisé, comment ceux qui parlent les huit autres langues et l'anglais et le français savent-ils ce qui se dit?

Mme Danielle Mager:

Lorsque nous établissons notre horaire, nous faisons une rotation. Nous avons les quatre langues audio: l'audio 1, pour la langue parlée dans l'enceinte de l'Assemblée, l'audio 2, habituellement pour le dogrib, et ensuite l'audio 3 et l'audio 4, en alternance.

Dans notre horaire, nous commençons normalement par les débats en direct, qui durent deux heures et qui sont toujours dans la langue parlée dans l'enceinte de l'Assemblée, l'anglais surtout. Après les deux heures de direct, nous passons au dogrib, puis à une autre langue autochtone, puis à une autre encore, avant de revenir à l'anglais. Nous faisons une rotation des langues, et ce n'est donc pas uniquement la langue autochtone.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous avons un tour officieux.

Y a-t-il quelqu'un?

Madame Tassi, vous voulez y aller?

Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Merci, à vous deux, de votre participation.

À mon avis, nous avons entendu différents témoignages et avis selon lesquels il faut reconnaître ce droit, le droit de parler une langue autochtone à la Chambre et d'être compris. Reste à bien faire les choses. C'est l'équilibre à réaliser.

Pourriez-vous nous dire, chacun d'entre vous, quel est votre sentiment à ce sujet? La priorité est-elle de reconnaître le droit et d'accepter les bosses et peut-être les accidents toujours possibles, ou devrions-nous juste commencer, quitte à rajuster le tir le moment venu?

Mme Danielle Mager:

D'après mon expérience, je pense que, surtout au Canada, la revitalisation linguistique est incroyablement importante. Pendant que nous développons les langues et éduquons les jeunes, il sera important qu'ils puissent suivre dans leur langue officielle surtout les travaux de la Chambre qui touchent tout le monde dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest. D'expérience, je pense que, malgré les bosses et les bleus ramassés en cours de route, permettre aux gens de suivre les délibérations dans leur langue en vaut bien le risque.

Le président:

Monsieur McCormick, allez-y.

M. Floyd McCormick:

Je me reporterais à la décision que le Président de la Chambre des communes a rendue en juin dernier sur la question de privilège, où il a dit que c'est à la Chambre de décider quels services seront offerts dans ses délibérations.

Évidemment, la Chambre doit se demander ce qu'il faut pour que les députés participent à fond à ses travaux, mais du même coup elle ne peut pas fermer les yeux sur le fait qu'il faudra des ressources pour que cela devienne réalité et doit se demander s'il y a ou non une demande ou un besoin suffisant — peu importe la façon de formuler cela — pour justifier la dépense de ressources particulières qui pourraient nécessiter des changements à la disposition de l'enceinte, l'achat d'équipement, le recrutement de personnel, en plus des coûts de fonctionnement et d'entretien.

Quand on songe aux besoins pour les langues autochtones dans tous les coins du pays, on peut se demander si c'est la meilleure utilisation à faire des ressources consacrées aux langues autochtones.

(1300)

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Ma question est très brève, une demande de précision, pour Mme Mager.

Vous avez mentionné que la langue parlée dans l'enceinte de l'Assemblée est sur le canal 1, et qu'elle est typiquement l'anglais. Je voudrais une clarification: chacune des langues autochtones utilisées est-elle alors traduite en anglais sur ce canal également?

Mme Danielle Mager:

Oui, c'est bien cela.

M. John Nater:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Je crois que vous avez mentionné tantôt que le coût était dans les 300 $ à 400 $ l'heure dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest. Est-ce exact?

Mme Danielle Mager:

C'est exact.

M. Scott Reid:

Ce n'est pas le tarif horaire des interprètes. Je suppose que c'est tout compris. C'est bien cela?

Mme Danielle Mager:

Non, c'est le tarif horaire des interprètes.

M. Scott Reid:

Oh, cela semble...

Mme Danielle Mager:

Désolée, ils font de l'interprétation pour deux heures par jour pendant la session.

M. Scott Reid:

Cela semble très élevé, si vous me permettez de le dire.

Mme Danielle Mager:

Le tarif est établi par les interprètes, pas par nous.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien.

Quelqu'un sait-il combien les interprètes sont payés ici à Ottawa?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ils peuvent vous répondre dans leur micro.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid:

Est-ce le même tarif au Yukon?

M. Floyd McCormick:

Nous n'employons pas d'interprètes à la Chambre; ce n'est donc pas un problème pour nous.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien, peut-être que nos analystes pourront voir ce que c'est au Nunavut.

Le président:

Ils témoigneront plus tard.

M. Scott Reid:

Oh, très bien. Annulons cette question. Merci.

Le coût est toujours une préoccupation.

Le président:

Merci.

Y a-t-il des questions du côté des libéraux? Une fois...

Quelqu'un d'entre vous aimerait-il faire une déclaration de clôture ou aurait-il des conseils à donner au Comité?

Mme Danielle Mager:

Je ne crois pas. Je vous souhaite la meilleure des chances.

Le président:

Parfait. Merci beaucoup. Nous vous remercions de votre temps, surtout du temps supplémentaire causé par le retard.[Français]

Je vous remercie.[Traduction]

Mahsi cho. Gunalcheesh. Sóga senlá. Meegwetch.

Nous vous ferons savoir ce qui se passe. Merci.

Mme Danielle Mager:

Merci.

M. Floyd McCormick:

Merci.

Le président:

Notre horaire est fixé pour le reste du mois. Nous n'avons pas de réunion jeudi, mais à nos trois premières séances après notre retour, nous ferons comparaître les témoins qu'on nous a suggérés, et le 26 avril est la date provisoire pour le Budget principal des dépenses. Cela comprend les services de protection, le directeur général des élections, et le Président et le greffier de la Chambre. Cela nous amène en mai, à moins que la décision sur le privilège de ce matin n'ait été positive, mais je ne le pense pas. Non. Très bien.

Y a-t-il autre chose pour le bien de la nation?

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on March 27, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.