header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-02-07 PROC 47

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1205)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good afternoon.

Welcome to the 47th Meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. The meeting is being televised.

The subcommittee on agenda and procedure met last Thursday and recommended in its fifth report that today's meeting with the Minister of Democratic Institutions, the Hon. Karina Gould, be an hour, followed by committee business.

Is it the pleasure of the committee to adopt the subcommittee report?

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

I'd be happy to adopt it as long as we are clear publicly on something that I just clarified with you and the clerk privately, which is that this would not have the effect of extinguishing the committee's resolution adopted on November 29 that the minister come in for two hours to answer questions regarding MyDemocracy.ca and the government's planned agenda for electoral reform.

The Chair:

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

I will respond from the government side with respect to that. We would be prepared to provide the minister for a second hour.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That would make me happy. My understanding is that we would regard this as being the first of the two hours.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

That's correct.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That sounds good to me.

The Chair:

Okay. Does the committee agree to approve the subcommittee report?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

(Motion agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Minister Gould is accompanied today by two officials from the Privy Council Office, Ian McCowan, deputy secretary to cabinet for governance; Natasha Kim, director of democratic reform; as well as by the parliamentary secretary, Andy Fillmore.

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Colleagues, do you want to adopt this subcommittee report or do you want to do that under—

The Chair:

We already did.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Okay.

I also want to raise at this time an issue that I've already raised informally with my colleagues.

I would like to take a seven-minute round, colleagues, to ask a series of questions on cybersecurity with respect to the minister's mandate letter. However, I'm proposing that the second Liberal seven-minute round be punted to our final five-minute round and that the five-minute round be moved to where the seven-minute round would be. I would ask that we go in camera for my seven minutes at the very end of the questioning of the minister, to be as minimally disruptive to the process as possible.

Would that be acceptable to my colleagues?

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Provisionally, I think it is. The obvious question is what are the planned rounds of questions in a one-hour spot?

The Chair:

It's just the regular rounds.

Mr. Scott Reid:

So five minutes....

The Chair:

It's seven minutes for the first four. The second round is five minutes for four and then it's three minutes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Do we have any objection to that, Blake?

That sounds fine.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thanks, Chair.

Mr. Chan was kind enough to give me a heads-up ahead of time to let me know what was coming. The only thing I would say that Mr. Chan left out of what he had mentioned to me was that if, for any reason at all, we believe this doesn't need to be in camera, that it's not a security question that requires us to stay in camera, that we would get back out right away. With that proviso and that understanding of erring on the side of caution when it comes to security issues, it makes all the sense in the world. However, if it's not what it appears to be, then it's understood that we would jump back out and be back in public and deal with those issues in the public domain.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Agreed.

The Chair:

I'll now turn the floor over to the minister.

Thank you for coming, Minister. You have 10 minutes.

Hon. Karina Gould (Minister of Democratic Institutions):

Okay, great.

Thank you very much.[Translation]

Good afternoon everyone.

I am delighted and honoured to be here with you today.[English]

Good afternoon, and thank you for your invitation to appear today.

It is an honour to be before the committee this afternoon. I was appointed minister just four weeks ago today, and this is my first appearance as a minister before a committee of the House. I'm delighted that it's with all of you today.

I would like to introduce my parliamentary secretary, Andy Fillmore, member of Parliament for Halifax, and my deputy minister, Ian McCowan, who is the deputy secretary of governance of the Privy Council Office. Also joining us are Allen Sutherland, assistant secretary to the cabinet, and Natasha Kim, director of democratic reform.

I am pleased to be here before the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs with its valuable knowledge and insights on many of the electoral matters mandated to me by the Prime Minister. I have a deep respect for committees and the important role they play in our Parliament. I'm eager to engage, consult, and work with the committee to improve Canada's democracy. The studies you conduct and the years of experience you bring to the table are a few of the many reasons I will particularly value working with all members of this committee and hearing your contributions to these files.

I would like to focus my remarks today on my new mandate letter, as well as on BillC-33, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act. If it pleases the House to adopt the bill at second reading, I would, of course, look forward to returning to this committee to discuss it in more detail.

I will turn now to my mandate letter. As you know, my overarching goal, as Minister of Democratic Institutions, is to strengthen the openness and fairness of Canada's public institutions. I have been mandated to lead on improving our democratic institutions and to restore Canadians' trust and participation in our democratic processes.[Translation]

I have been mandated to lead on improving our democratic institutions and to restore Canadians' trust and participation in our democratic process.[English]

In terms of my specific mandate, allow me to begin with the topic of electoral reform, a topic on which I know there are strongly held views. Much has been said about this already.

Our government consulted broadly with Canadians on electoral reform over the past year. Any proposed changes to the foundational values of how we elect our representatives should have the broad support of Canadians. More importantly, Canadians would expect to be consulted before embarking on a change of this magnitude.

Public consultations came in many forms. In reaching out to Canadians, there was tremendous work done by the Special Committee on Electoral Reform, several members of which are here today; by members of Parliament representing all parties in the House; by the cross-country ministerial tour; and through the government's engagement of over 360,000 individuals in Canada through Mydemocracy.ca.

In fact, the consultations launched on electoral reform make it one of the largest and farthest reaching consultations ever undertaken by the Government of Canada. This conversation was at times spirited, and it was a conversation in which many had legitimate and passionate views. I respect and thank each and every Canadian who participated in these discussions on something as fundamental as how we choose to govern ourselves.

I appreciate the diversity of views. It was our responsibility to listen to what Canadians said in these consultations and to take that into account.

(1210)

[Translation]

A clear preference for a new electoral system, let alone a consensus, did not emerge from these consultations.

Without a clear preference for change, much less a specific preferred alternative system, a referendum could be divisive and not in Canada's interests.[English]

Consequently, changing the electoral system is not within the mandate the Prime Minister has given me. We listened to Canadians and made a difficult decision, but I am confident it was the responsible one. The first past the post system may not be perfect. No electoral system is, but it has served this country for 150 years and advances a number of democratic values Canadians hold dear, such as strong local representation, stability, and accountability.

My job is to strengthen and protect our democratic institutions. We remain committed to improving this country's electoral system in many ways, which I will turn to now. There is much useful work to be done to improve Canada's democracy, and I look forward to working with the committee on this important responsibility.

First, I would like to highlight new items in my mandate letter to strengthen and protect the integrity of the democratic process. As we have seen globally, there is increased concern that Canada's electoral process could be susceptible to cyber-attacks in a bid to destabilize Canada's democratic governments or influence the outcome of an election. We must guard against this.

In ensuring the integrity of our democratic institutions, I have been mandated, in collaboration with the Minister of National Defence and the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, to lead the government of Canada's efforts to defend the Canadian electoral process from cyber-threats.

This will include working with the Communications Security Establishment to analyze risks to Canada's political and electoral activities, and to release this assessment publicly. As well, I intend to ask CSE to offer advice and information to Canada's political parties on best practices they may wish to consider when it comes to cybersecurity.

As I've previously stated, this is about assisting parties to protect themselves. Ensuring the safety of our democratic system is a non-partisan issue. It is vital that we protect Canada's democratic infrastructure from cyber-threats. I hope you will agree that we must protect our democracy from emerging threats.

I've also been mandated to introduce legislation to examine and tighten the rules surrounding fundraisers attended by the Prime Minister, ministers, party leaders, and leadership contestants. [Translation]

Federally, Canada has among the strongest and most stringent political financing rules in the world. Nonetheless, it is essential that Canadians continue to have confidence in our political finance and fundraising laws, and we must seek ways to ensure such confidence in the strength of our system is regularly enforced. [English]

One such way to do that is to bring even more light to fundraising activities. We believe that Canadians have a right to know even more than they do now about political fundraising. We will take action to ensure that fundraisers are conducted in publicly available spaces, advertised in advance, and reported on in a timely manner after the fact. These changes will increase openness and help ensure that Canadians have continued trust in their political financing regime and in their political system generally.

I look forward to discussing with other parties any additional ways we can enhance transparency in the fundraising system. This is an area where all parties have an interest and experience to bring to bear.

I will also work on recommending options to create an independent commissioner to organize political party leaders' debates, reviewing the limits on the amounts political parties and third parties can spend during and between elections, proposing measures to ensure that spending between elections is subject to reasonable limits, as well as supporting the president of the Treasury Board and the Minister of Justice in reviewing the Access to Information Act. I am confident you share a desire to work on these important matters with our government.

In addition, I am the lead minister in relation to Senate reform, including the government's non-partisan, merit-based Senate appointments process to fill Senate vacancies.

I am also responsible for working to pass amendments to the Canada Elections Act to make the Commissioner of Canada Elections more independent from government and to work to repeal the the elements of the Fair Elections Act that make it harder for Canadians to vote.

In terms of this final point, as you know, the government has already introduced Bill C-33, which proposes seven measures in this regard. This bill is designed to increase voter participation by breaking down barriers to voting while enhancing the efficiency and integrity of Canada's elections. These elements are at the heart of our electoral system and I am pleased with the legislation that has been put forth. Should the House refer Bill C-33 to committee after second reading I would look forward to working with the committee in its study of this legislation.

While not a specific item in my mandate letter, as I noted earlier, it is my overarching mandate to strengthen and protect our democratic institutions. That includes continually working to improve the Canada Elections Act and the administration of elections. I am very pleased that this committee is charged with the same goal particularly in relation to your current study into the Chief Electoral Officer's recommendations report following the 42nd general election. I know this committee has been working quite diligently on this report, which includes 132 detailed recommendations to further modernize and strengthen the integrity and accessibility of our electoral system. Your work will help inform the government in the next step of modernizing our electoral system. I welcome your insights into these matters and improving the Canada Elections Act with you.

I'm eager to begin the hard work necessary to achieve these mandate commitments given to me by the Prime Minister.

(1215)

[Translation]

Canada's democracy remains the envy of the world, but we should never become complacent. Our system is trusted by Canadians and renowned worldwide because we are constantly working to improve it.[English]

I hope I can count on your expertise and your contributions on Bill C-33, on your contributions and expertise on the recommendations from the CEO of Elections Canada, and as I continue to work to fulfill the mandate set before me.

Thank you again for inviting me here today. I look forward to working on my mandate, I look forward to working with all of you, and I would be happy to take your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

We'll start our first round of seven-minute questions with Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you.

Thank you, Minister Gould, for being here today. Congratulations on your new role.

You spoke a little about your mandate to work with the defence minister and the Minister of Public Safety regarding cyber-attacks on our electoral system. What are some of your main worries and what areas will you be focusing on? Why do you think this is an important part of your mandate?

I also want to highlight a bit of what we heard today at a youth conference we were both at. I thought that was quite interesting. There was one youth who came up at a Canadian universities event and spoke a little about algorithms and news that is fed to us online. I think that's been a concern. It's been brought up in a lot of other committees that I sit on. It influences the way we think when we're targeted by websites and presented the fake news that we've been hearing a lot about. What are some of your thoughts on this and how it relates to your mandate?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thank you very much for the question.

I think it's a very important and timely question to be asking. It has been four weeks now. I haven't had the opportunity at this point to sit down with CSE. We've had some preliminary discussions, but that's something that will be coming in the near term in terms of what this looks like and what the breadth of the mandate will look like.

My mandate letter talks specifically about political parties and ensuring that the Communications Security Establishment is analyzing, monitoring, and reviewing what the potential threats to political parties' information systems could be and then providing information as to how they can protect themselves.

It's really important that we do this right and that Canadians have the confidence that this is not about the CSE going in and looking at political parties' information systems, but rather about them providing an overview about best practices on how they can protect themselves and identify potential emerging threats.

The conversation you raised this morning was in regard to a young man who works in artificial intelligence who was talking about the fact of how news sources in many ways, in some respects, can be targeted to individuals based on their preferences and the silo effect of how we consume media and information as citizens. His concerns were about how we ensure that we get a diversity of views that are reaching many individuals.

I think that is definitely an area we need to be considering and looking at. It's something that I'm definitely concerned about, but it's a question of how we as a government, we as parliamentarians, and we as political leaders engage with this. I think in Canada we have one of the highest per capita uses of Facebook, and we know that Facebook and other social media will push information to you based on your own preferences. So how do we ensure that people are getting a diversity of viewpoints to make informed choices, but also have the digital literacy to be able to look at these and understand where they're coming from and make those informed choices?

It's a really important conversation to be having. It's something to start thinking about. As political leaders, it's incumbent upon us to make sure that we're doing what we can to ensure people have that access to diverse points of view and different sources of information. I think it's a really important thing.

It will be about us determining what is the breadth of democratic institutions in Canada and does that include the media, and then how do we work in partnership with the media for them to have access to those tools as well. That's something that I think will come in time. Of course, I welcome points of view and ideas or thoughts from either this committee or other members of Parliament on that.

(1220)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you. It was definitely a big concern for him and the other youth sitting at my table.

I'm going to share my time, if there is any, with Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

How much time do you have left?

The Chair:

There is two and a half minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I want to get into process a bit. You're aware that the procedure and House affairs committee has been studying the Chief Electoral Officer's report for some time now. I think if we look at how much is left, we have a good 20 or 30 meetings left on it, and possibly more. There's an awful lot to do.

It's been in camera. I can't go into the details with you, but I know that it's within your mandate and your job to bring in more legislation on democratic reform, on changes in general.

I wonder if you can give us a sense of timelines, if you have any idea of when you're expected to do stuff and if it be helpful for us to get our reports to you, or if you want us to get interim reports out. Do you have any comments on that?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes. Thank you very much.

I appreciate that the committee is currently reviewing the recommendations from the CEO of Elections Canada following the past election. I appreciate that there are 132 recommendations, so this is quite a big task nonetheless.

I really look forward to receiving your input on those in terms of the direction as we move forward. Of course, we have an election in three years. We don't want to push it too long, because we want to make sure that those recommendations can get in ahead of time and with enough time for Elections Canada to implement those.

If there is a possibility for interim reports, which I believe the chair had maybe commented about in The Hill Times, I would welcome that. The depth and the breadth of the study you're undertaking is very valuable.

I hope I can count on you to get those to the public and to me in a timely fashion and that we can get to work on implementing legislation that will be in effect for the next election. I know that for many members of this committee it's very important that we make sure we get this done, so that ahead of 2019 we don't face some of the issues we faced in 2015.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How much time do I have?

The Chair:

You have 20 seconds.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid, go ahead.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Minister, thank you for being here. Thank you, as well, to your very competent staff and your parliamentary secretary; it's good to see you here.

Thank you also for making time to meet with me on Tuesday of last week.

I want to ask you a number of questions. I submitted a letter to you yesterday to assist you, recognizing that some of these things are matters on which you might not be prepared if you didn't have a bit of advance time to work on them. I apologize for the fact that they came to you with only 24 hours' notice, but we only learned you'd be here Friday afternoon—not quite after work hours, but after I had departed, at any rate.

I have a series of five questions. I might just read from the list and then ask you them. If you don't mind, I'll start with the third question. These all relate to the MyDemocracy.ca survey or instrument. The third question on that list is, has the government retained or destroyed the data produced by responses to the field test and the final MyDemocracy.ca survey?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thank you so much.

I appreciate the fact that you sent the questions so we could be prepared for them. I have brought two technical staff with me today who are prepared to answer these for you.

(1225)

Mr. Ian McCowan (Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet (Governance), Privy Council Office):

Mr. Reid, I'll start, and Ms. Kim can add in as she sees fit.

In terms of the data elements, Vox Pop still has the data set. There are two data elements that have been generalized, the year of birth and the postal code, simply because the analysis around those has already been done. Other than those two elements, the data set is with Vox Pop.

I'm not sure if Ms. Kim has anything to add.

Ms. Natasha Kim (Director, Democratic Reform, Privy Council Office):

No, I don't, other than to say that the final report has been published on the website.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. This allows me to move to questions four and five, which were really alternatives. Given that the data hasn't been destroyed, will you commit to sharing it with Parliament or with the general public, while obviously excluding information that could be connected with specific individuals?

Mr. Ian McCowan:

Mr. Reid, you've just gone to the heart of the issue. You'll be aware from the Vox Pop survey and final report that the government has indicated publicly that they would only be receiving data back in aggregate form. That has been clearly stated.

We just got your request yesterday night, so we are going to have to review it, but it's going to be reviewed in the context of what I just said, namely that there is a commitment on the part of the Government of Canada to get only aggregate data back in this exercise and, obviously, to ensure that all privacy requirements are met. What I would say, if it's satisfactory, is that we'll take that one away. We just got it last night. The concern is the one that you yourself have identified.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right. The fact that the minister is coming back for a second meeting will allow us to deal with this further. We'll pursue it at that time. Let's just leave it there.

I'll turn now to question number one. Did the government exclude from the final MyDemocracy.ca survey any questions that were included in the November 2016 field test for the survey or that were recommended for inclusion by Vox Pop Labs' academic advisory group?

Mr. Ian McCowan:

I am going to need Ms. Kim's help on this, but let me just start by describing the overall response. As for why the field test was done, there were a number of objectives. One was to ensure that in the end survey we would have a limited number of questions—obviously, you get a higher response rate when that's done, making sure that usability is high—but another was specifically for the purpose of developing the archetypes, groupings, or clusters that were fed back as part of the response to the survey.

As for your question about what was different in the field test versus the final one, I think there were six factors at play that led to changes between the two. First, as I said, there was an effort made to use the pretest to determine what the best clusters were. There was some analytic work going on in that regard. Second, there was an effort to see how the survey length could be brought to an appropriate size in order to maximize the user experience and response rates.

The third thing was trying to avoid unnecessary duplication. There were a number of questions that were in a similar kind of space. Fourth, a few questions were removed, as they were perceived as being too sensitive in our effort to ensure that the questionnaire was well received by Canadians writ large.

Fifth, some questions were used to assess user satisfaction, whether there were issues encountered, and how users responded to them. Finally, as was noted in the media, there were a few questions that were accidentally included in the pretest, and that obviously was not replicated in the final survey.

I don't know if Ms. Kim wants to add to that, but that's a quick summary.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Let me just hop in then. Thank you.

That was a double-barrelled question I asked. The answer is yes, there were some questions that were in the field test that were not in the final survey. You didn't answer regarding any questions or recommendations for inclusion by the Vox Pop Labs advisory group, and because I'll be out of time before I can ask the next question, I'll just ask it now.

Are you willing to share what those questions were? Moreover, are you willing to share the results of the answers to those questions, the ones that were asked in the field test that were not included in the final survey?

Mr. Ian McCowan:

You asked three questions, and if I don't get to them all, Mr. Reid, you can follow up in the next round and make sure I get them covered.

In terms of the results, I'd give the same answer that I gave last time, that it is subject to our having a look at what exactly can be provided, given the pledges made on the government's only getting aggregate data and making sure that privacy rights are respected.

As for your question about the development or the design, the questions were developed over a number of weeks. It involved Vox Pop, who have some expertise in this area, and an outside academic panel. There were obviously departmental officials. They're exempt staff involved in those discussions, so it was an iterative process, and it was not something that was done in one moment. That was basically the nature of the development process.

I'm not sure if Ms. Kim has anything she wants to add.

(1230)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thanks. We're out of time. To all the participants, thanks. It's much appreciated.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Very good. Thank you, Chair.

Minister, thank you very much for coming. I've congratulated you privately. Let me publicly congratulate you on your ascension to cabinet.

While I have a moment, I will also give my public congratulations in addition to my private ones to my colleague Filomena Tassi, who has also been appointed deputy whip of the government. I wish both of you well. I know you'll do a great job.

Minister, thank you so much for being here. As you can appreciate, this is like the last meeting with your predecessor. These really aren't meet-and-greets, hi-how-are-you courtesy meetings. We specifically called you in to deal with a couple of issues that are affecting our work. I can't go too far. We're limited because it's in camera work, but I don't think it's any big secret that the work at committee has seized up until we get these issues resolved. I can't get into the specifics, but we need some answers here that will allow us to get back to work, so I'm going to be dealing with some rather mundane issues to most people, but they are critically important for us.

You stated that you have deep respect for committees. I've heard this from the government. The Prime Minister enunciated it during the campaign all the way through and said committees were going to matter and were going to be respected. That's the issue. One of the big issues was that we were in the midst, as you rightly alluded to, of going through the Chief Electoral Officer's report. We were doing good work. We had our sleeves rolled up. We were identifying things that we could quickly agree on and setting aside the harder things that we needed to spend time on. Then all of a sudden, out of nowhere, Bill C-33 landed with a thud in the middle of our work.

It left us with a real problem, because if you say you respect the work of the committees, then it would have made sense for you to wait until we had issued at least some reports to give some advice on legislation you might be considering. But the way it was done, there was total disregard for the work we're doing. It left us—me anyway, I'll speak for myself—feeling that it is a make-work project. Why bother doing all this if the government is going to ignore it and just do what it wants?

There is that issue. Then the second, somewhat attached issue is this. I appreciate Mr. Graham's raising it, and you did allude to it in part, but I really need something clear on this, Minister, with respect. The second part of this is going forward. I had said we wanted an absolute guarantee that you aren't going to do that again. Mr. Chan and Mr. Graham argued that we could appreciate that the government can't give that kind of a blanket assurance in case we get bogged down. I understood all that. Again, I think you made some reference to that in your remarks.

What we were looking for was respect for our process, to find some way we could communicate so we would know what you are considering and you would ask us if we would turn our attention to that particular area to give you our thinking and to help advise you. You can choose to take it or not, but to just continue to produce electoral reform bills—and, by the way, as you know, getting rid of some of that awful unfair elections act stuff is a priority.... But procedures matter and committees matter, so we need some assurance that the work we are doing is actually meaningful and that the government is considering it; otherwise, why would we bother doing it? We would just go on to other things.

I'm looking for two things, if you will. One is an acknowledgement that the government was wrong. An apology would be nice and not that difficult, because it really was so wrong and disrespectful. Second, I'd like a further undertaking that there will be more dialogue so that we can actually do work that does help inform your decisions in a timely way.

Thank you, Chair.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thank you so much, David. I look forward to working with you and I'm glad we have such strong bay area support.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's harbour, Minister, Hamilton Harbour, not Burlington Bay.

(1235)

Hon. Karina Gould:

We could discuss that outside of this committee. I'm here four weeks to the day of being appointed because I believe in the importance of the committee and in the work you're doing. I really respect the work that you're doing.

In terms of communication, Andy Fillmore, my parliamentary secretary, is here. His job is to be engaged with Parliament. I don't have a specific work plan at this time in terms of when future legislation will come forward. I want to be in touch with the committee on that to make sure that we understand what the schedule is, what you're working on, and how we can work in concert. Ultimately, I know you and I are here for the same reason, because we want to make sure that we're doing what's right for Canadians. I know that you have a lot of experience and knowledge on this committee, and a lot of good years behind you—

Mr. David Christopherson:

It sounds like a lifetime achievement award. Way to go.

Hon. Karina Gould:

—and ahead of you, of course.

We want to make sure that we're getting those elements of the Fair Elections Act repealed and, of course, that we're working.... I said in my comments to David but I'm going to repeat it right now, that the work you're doing on the Chief Electoral Officer's report, on his recommendations, is valuable. I think those are two pieces that can work in tandem and in concert. I will take those recommendations very seriously to see if there are further things that can be done to ensure that we update the Elections Canada Act as best as possible and that we're doing what we need to do for Elections Canada and supporting Canadians' access to democracy.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks, Minister.

How much time do I have, Chair?

The Chair:

Three minutes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks.

Quickly, could we have a recognition that Bill C-33 was wrong, please, to allow us to get down to our work? You can't say you respect the committee and the government, and then insult the work of this committee and not have some kind of an apology or a recognition that it was wrong to do that. Please.

Hon. Karina Gould:

I'm a new minister. I want us to get started on the right foot. I want us to start working together on this, so I'm going to say let's start with me, from a place of respect, and I'm going to do that with you. I'm looking forward to working on this. We have legislation that's before the House. I'm looking forward to coming to committee, but I want to allow you some time to make sure you get the work done that you need on the recommendations, so that we can work together to do what we need to do for Canadians.

So, David, I look forward to working with you on this, because I know we can get this done.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You're not making it easy, Minister.

Whatever little time I have left, I'd like to give to my friend, Mr. Cullen. It's probably about 30 seconds.

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP):

You mentioned starting on the right foot. Your first job as minister was to kill the central promise that your government made on electoral reform. It's like you were hired to run a company that then declared bankruptcy. It seems to me that if you want to beat down cynicism, keeping a promise would be really important.

The Chair:

Five seconds.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Minister, you said earlier that your government was elected on a false majority. Do you still believe that?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I had said that some people, when talking about electoral reform, had put that forward in terms of why we needed to reform the system. I think it's incumbent upon all of us as parliamentarians, as leaders in our community, to make sure that we are constantly encouraging people to get involved in the democratic process. Whether something—a policy—is put forward that we agree or disagree with, it's extraordinarily important for all of us as leaders and politicians to make sure that we continue to engage Canadians on issues they're passionate about.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So you don't believe it anymore?

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, for five minutes.

Sorry?

Oh, it's Filomena's turn. Okay. Ms. Tassi first, please.

Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

I'd like to begin by thanking my colleague, Mr. Christopherson, for his congratulations. I appreciate that and it's very well received. Like everyone else on the committee, Minister, I'd like to congratulate you and thank you for your dedication and hard work.

I'd like to read from your mandate letter, which says that you are mandated to do the following: Bring forward options to create an independent commissioner to organize political party leaders' debates during future federal election campaigns, with a mandate to improve Canadians' knowledge of the parties, their leaders, and their policy positions.

I would like you to comment on why you believe it's important to establish an independent commissioner in order to organize leaders' debates.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thank you very much, Filomena, and welcome to the committee.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thanks.

Hon. Karina Gould:

It's our first day together. I look forward to working with you on this as well.

When it comes to leaders' debates, I think we saw quite clearly in the last election how, depending on the preferences of particular leaders, debates happened or did not happen. The one that comes to mind in particular is the women's debate, which I think was very important and should have gone through, regardless of a political leader deciding not to participate. It is also about setting the number of debates that are required for Canadians to engage with and listen to, and hearing the ideas and policies that different political parties have through the leaders of each of those parties.

I think this is important, and this is an important step in terms of regulating and mandating how many debates we have. Then, of course, it's up to the different political party leaders as to whether they choose to participate in them or not. However, they should happen regardless. I think that's important, so that Canadians have some kind of predictability when it comes to debates. They have predictability in terms of understanding and knowing when and how they can hear from leaders of different political parties and gain access to that information.

(1240)

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay, thank you.

You mandate letter, as well, provides that you are to “enhance transparency for the public at large and media in the political fundraising system for Cabinet members, party leaders and leadership candidates.”

Can you comment on why the government has decided to enhance the fundraising system, and why you believe it's important?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thank you for the question.

This is with regard to political fundraising, specifically fundraisers attended by cabinet ministers, party leaders, or those aspiring to be leaders. The fact of the matter is that while we have some very strict rules in Canada with regard to fundraising, we think it can be more accessible. The information can be more timely with regard to public access to this information.

This is something that I look forward to working with the committee on. At some point, legislation will have to be developed. Of course, this will probably come before this committee, so I look forward to your input on this, and your ideas in terms of how we can strengthen our political fundraising laws, particularly this one. I'll be looking forward to working with you on this.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay, thank you.

How much time do I have?

The Chair: Two minutes.

Ms. Filomena Tassi: Okay, I'll share my time with MP Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Thank you.

Minister, like you, I'm new here today at this committee, but I'm certainly not new to the House. As Mr. Christopherson pointed out and Mr. Graham alluded to, I was here during the unfair/fair elections act, whatever the name it goes by these days.

Section 3 of the charter says, “Every citizen of Canada has the right to vote in an election...”. It's quite clear. Witness testimony at that time a few years ago, time after time, witness after witness, not just here in Canada, but also in Europe, pointed to what the former bill was trying to do, which was to limit that right to vote.

An analysis of section 3 of the charter says “There is an onus on the government to prevent unreasonable administrative [barriers] to the exercise of [our] democratic rights”. It's our responsibility to make sure that these barriers do not exist. The thrust of that last piece of legislation was to put up barriers to those they felt they wanted to disenfranchise.

In my limited time, could I get your comment on this, and how, as minister, I hope you would not be in favour of putting up any more administrative barriers, and to enfranchise the most vulnerable in society to exercise their democratic right in section 3?

The Chair: You have 20 seconds for the answer.

Mr. Scott Simms: Sorry.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Okay, in 20 seconds, I think that Bill C-33, should it pass second reading and come to committee and be implemented in law, would address many of those issues that you raise. I think it would be an important step forward to making sure that all Canadians have access to voting, which, as you say, is their right.

Thank you.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Minister, thanks for being here.

I'm going to start with a yes or no question. I promise that in my remaining questions, I'll give you more opportunity to expand upon your answer, but I'd like to start with a yes or no.

Is your government committed to ensuring that there's no foreign influence in our elections?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you. I appreciate your indulgence on the yes or no, just timing-wise.

After your mandate letter talks about getting rid of the electoral reform promise, in the first bullet of the things you are instructed to do, the Prime Minister indicates that you're supposed to “lead the Government of Canada's efforts to defend the Canadian electoral process from cyber threats”. I was thinking about that because we don't have electronic voting or online voting, but utilize paper ballots, the good old-fashioned method of voting. Unless your government has some intention of ignoring another of the recommendations the committee makes and goes to an electronic ballot or some kind of online voting, I don't see much of a threat of some kind of hack of our election results, or something like that.

I think there is something else. Party financing is mentioned in your mandate letter, and I believe it was in your predecessor's too. It talks about looking at political party financing and third party financing, and the limits on that. One of the things I think there is a serious concern about is foreign money influencing elections through third party spending. I want to get your sense on that and whether it is something your government, in the changes you've been mandated to make, will be looking at and dealing with, that is, foreign financing via third party spending in elections and the influence that would then have on elections.

Is that something that you're committed to doing? When would we expect to see something in that regard?

(1245)

Hon. Karina Gould:

That's an interesting question. Thank you for raising it.

I want to go back to the beginning of your question, though, about political parties being hacked. Recent events have demonstrated that this is a very real issue, and it's something that we need to be attuned to and proactive on. In fact, just two weeks ago, the Australian Signals Directorate said they were actually—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Sorry, Minister, I hate to interrupt you, but I have a very limited amount of time and have only about two minutes remaining. I understand that you probably have something you want to say, but could you get to the subject of the question I've asked because I want to make sure we get there. The question is about foreign financing.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes, sure. As it stands right now, foreign entities cannot give money to political parties or candidates, but—

Mr. Blake Richards:

They can to third parties.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Part of my mandate will be to look at spending limits for third parties. That's an interesting point you raised, and I'd be interested to hear more of your thoughts on that as we move forward.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. Given that you've indicated that your government is committed to ensuring that there is no foreign influence in our elections, and you've indicated that it's something you're committed to as a government, I think it's important that you deal with this issue. It's something that I would encourage you to look at.

When the Chief Electoral Officer was before the Standing Senate Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs, there were a number of questions asked in this regard. The Chief Electoral Officer confirmed that there is significant concern that third parties can be foreign-funded in terms of surveys, websites, calling services doing push-polls and things like that, including communications with electors, all of which can be funded by them. If you are committed as a government to ensuring that foreign influence isn't part of our elections, you will have to deal with this. I would encourage you to do that quickly.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Okay.

Do I have time to respond?

Mr. Blake Richards:

You do, yes.

Hon. Karina Gould:

I appreciate that. I think that's a really interesting point to raise. I don't know what your deliberations have been because they've been in camera, but if this is something that the committee wants to comment on, I would welcome that feedback.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Go ahead, Mr. Schmale, for five minutes, and then we'll go to Mr. Chan.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you very much, Chair. I appreciate that. Thank you to the Minister. I had the pleasure of meeting your father at an agricultural event in Nestleton almost a year ago now. He told me you were elected at the same time I was, so I was glad to meet him. Your father seems like a great guy.

I was listening to your conversation about looking into how people are sent information via Facebook and Twitter that is aligned with their political views. I was taken aback by your answer looking at the way you can almost control information and the government controlling information that people get. Personally, when I heard that, my back went up. That wasn't the line of questioning I was going to go on, but I'm interested to hear your thoughts about what you plan to do when you say that the government is going to ensure that people get a wider range of information.

(1250)

Hon. Karina Gould:

I think you misheard me, because it was more about ensuring the integrity of information. It's actually not the government controlling information at all. It was more a general comment about the way our media landscape is at the moment. I think it's incumbent upon us as community leaders, as politicians, and as a government to think about how we ensure that integrity of the media moving forward, but, obviously, the government can't control and will not be controlling that kind of information.

The comment was more with regard to how information is currently consumed by Canadians, by people around the world, and the kinds of tools we can offer our citizens to provide them with the ability to discern the quality of the information they are receiving.

I think this is something that is very much at a preliminary stage of deliberation and something we're very much just coming to grips with. I certainly didn't mean it in the way you suggested.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Okay. I just want to make sure the government isn't controlling or showing people what information they think people should be reading.

Hon. Karina Gould:

No. Absolutely not.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Okay.

I want to move on to what you said before about cyber-attacks. As my colleague Mr. Richards said, you can't really hack paper ballots. If you're able to speak to it, what threats do you potentially know about, or what are you looking at to help protect our systems, so to speak?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thanks for the question.

I want to be clear that at this point we don't know of any potential or existing threats that have come to Canadian political parties or the Canadian political system, but we did see in a recent election of one of our close allies attempts to influence the election and to collect information from political parties. As I was starting to tell your colleague Mr. Richards, the Australian Signals Directorate has recently offered the same kind of information and best practices to its political parties because it has experienced some attempts to access the information political parties have. France has also made similar offers and will be offering a session to its political parties at the end of the month. We know some of our other allies have also experienced this.

Really, this is a proactive step for—

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Yes. I believe in security. I'm with you on that. I think the issue in the States was the release of emails. I'm not sure if the people in the DNC were mad because they got caught or because they wrote them. I think it might have been because they got caught.

Hon. Karina Gould:

It wouldn't be about the government protecting those systems. It would be about their providing this information to all political parties on how they can best protect the integrity of their systems, because it's not just about emails. Political parties do have information with regard to Canadians. I think our government believes it's important to protect that. Of course, it would be at the discretion of political parties to take us up on this offer.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I have one more quick comment. You were talking about the fundraising. I think you're correct that currently what's going on with the Prime Minister doesn't break the law, but it does break the ethical laws.

I would think to make it easier—

Hon. Karina Gould:

I didn't say that.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

No, I did.

Hon. Karina Gould:

But you said I was correct, and I didn't say that.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

To make it easier, instead of changing the law or strengthening the law, it would be easier just to ask him to stop doing what he's doing.

I have only a minute left, and if it's okay with the chair, I would like to give my time to my colleague Elizabeth May.

Ms. Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, GP):

I'm very grateful.

Thank you, Jamie.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I really have only one question. I think there's a conflict in your mandate letter. As one of my colleagues said earlier, this may be above your pay grade to answer. I don't think it's about pay grade. I know your mandate letter comes from the Prime Minister.

It's very fundamental to your role as Minister of Democratic Institutions, as you said in your opening, to restore Canadians' trust and to encourage participation. Yet your mandate letter puts you in a position of immediately breaking trust with Canadians by withdrawing the commitment to electoral reform.

My question is not to ask you to sort out that conflict but to ask whether you are willing to pursue with members of Parliament who want to find potentially a middle ground so you can, through electoral reform, restore the trust of Canadians in the promise the Liberals made.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thank you, Elizabeth, for your question, and thanks for joining us here today. I look forward to working with you on many different issues as we have in the past and as we move forward.

I think there are many aspects of my mandate that will continue to enhance trust and respect in democracy, which I look forward to working on. I think it's also important that we spent a long time consulting with Canadians. A lot of people in this room spent a lot of time consulting with Canadians and we heard many different points of view, and all of them were valid, because everyone has their own point of view and their own perspective on that. So I think it's important that we listen to Canadians and I think it's important that we take this step forward and that we continue to work with the committee and with members of Parliament to do what we can to enhance trust and democracy.

(1255)

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Mr. Chan, I understand that you don't need to go in camera.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I don't think I need to go in camera. I've listened to the lines of questions from all my colleagues and I think I'm on the same subject matter. If we're all confident that it has already been on the public record, I'm fine to continue in the open.

Thank you, Minister. I've listened carefully and my questions all relate to the first line in your mandate letter regarding cybersecurity threats. I specifically want to follow up on some of the comments you already made to both my colleague David and my colleague Blake's line of questioning on cybersecurity threats.

How does the Communications Security Establishment liaise with political parties as you work with it along with the Minister of National Defence and the Minister of Public Safety? Should we be basically reaching out and providing designated individuals who will be working with you, with these other ministers, and with the CSE? Then I think what is most important from the perspective of political parties—and I recognize you already answered this question by saying that the intent of your mandate letter is to provide best practices—concerns any information that might be shared by the political parties with the CSE and with you and the other ministers. How do we have confidence that this information will be compartmentalized and not shared with other political parties?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thank you for that question, because it raises a really important point. I think I said this already but I'll reiterate that this is not about the government or the CSE going and seeking information from political parties; it's about their providing information to political parties. At no point, at least in this mandate and in this particular item, does the government receive information from political parties. I think that's a really important distinction to be made, because if this is to be successful and we are to provide support and assistance to political parties, then parties and Canadians need to know that this is about providing assistance on how they can protect their information, as opposed to collecting and going in and taking any information.

Did you want to add to that?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

As a follow-up on that, Minister, will there be any sort of risk assessment engaged in by the CSE—

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

—in terms of potential threats as you provide that advice to political parties? Would it extend to all political parties, not just the parties in the House of Commons but potentially others that are not currently represented? How far would that mandate go?

Hon. Karina Gould:

That's something that needs to be explored. I think as it's worded right now, it's all political parties represented in the House, but that's a conversation to be had with the Communications Security Establishment. They have not yet done this analysis because it has not been part of the mandate. That's a conversation I'll be having with them to explore how to develop this, but it will be important that they do a landscape analysis of what are existing threats, emerging threats, and potential threats. There will be a public analysis of this, but there will also be more information given specifically to political parties so they can take that information and use it how they best see fit.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

In terms of any information gathered through this particular process, what would the reporting mechanism be back to Parliament? Would it be back to this committee, would it be through the public safety committee, or would it potentially even be to the new national security and intelligence committee of parliamentarians proposed in Bill C-22?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I think that's still to be determined. However, I do believe that it would be very important for this to be reported back to Parliament. If Bill C-22 passes, that committee would certainly be monitoring and have access to this information. That committee would have purview over anything that deals with security intelligence or the CSE, so it would be. However, again I think it is important to highlight and to stress that the information collected would not be information from political parties. It's about providing political parties information to protect themselves. We need to make that distinction really clear—

Mr. Arnold Chan: Of course.

Hon. Karina Gould:—so that people have confidence in this.

(1300)

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I just want to follow-up in what little remaining time I have, about two minutes perhaps—

The Chair:

One minute and a half.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

—with respect to questions that my friends in the official opposition raised regarding.... We basically use a paper ballot process, but in part of the recommendations in the public report from the Chief Electoral Officer, Elections Canada is exploring the use of technology as a basis to improve the voting process. It actually provided a demonstration to the committee on some of that proposed new use of technology.

Is there anything we need to look at as a committee, as you move forward on your mandate letter, that you think might be a potential risk to the integrity of the voting process, as Elections Canada begins to explore greater use of technology as a basis of enhancing the voting process?

Hon. Karina Gould:

That's a really important question, and something for us to consider.

If I'm not wrong, I believe the Netherlands this past weekend confirmed that it was going back to paper ballots because of potential risk.

We do need to keep in mind and in our consideration that there are technologies that can help and assist people with disabilities to make voting more accessible for them. How can the procedure and House affairs committee look at some of those technologies and ensure their integrity to make sure that there's no possibility for tampering, so we know that those votes are integral, valid, and respect the democratic process?

I would definitely encourage the committee to take all of that into consideration as we move forward.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

One final quick question.

Again, this wasn't clear when I reviewed your mandate letter, Minister, but as you go through the review of cybersecurity threats, is it within your mandate to make recommendations back to the President of the Treasury Board for additional resources, should there be an assessment of potential risk to the integrity of data, for example, within Elections Canada, or within political parties?

Do you have the ability, basically, to give us the capacity to deal with it?

Hon. Karina Gould:

If you would like to interpret the mandate letter as my being responsible for democratic institutions and the integrity of the system, those are things that we need to be mindful of and keep in consideration as we move forward.

I would certainly welcome the committee's perspective on those, and how we move forward. It's so important that Canadians have confidence in the system, so that when an election happens, they know they can trust the results and continue to move forward with it.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister, and officials for coming.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We'll suspend for 15 minutes and go in camera for committee business.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1205)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour.

Bienvenue à la 47e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Les délibérations sont télédiffusées.

Le Sous-comité du programme et de la procédure s'est réuni jeudi dernier et il a recommandé dans son cinquième rapport que la séance d'aujourd'hui avec la ministre des Institutions démocratiques, l'honorable Karina Gould, soit d'une durée d'une heure, après quoi nous discuterons des travaux du Comité.

Plaît-il au Comité d'adopter le rapport du Sous-comité?

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

J'appuierai volontiers la motion pourvu que, publiquement, nous nous entendions bien sur un point que je viens de tirer au clair en privé avec vous et avec le greffier, soit que cette motion n'aura pas pour effet d'annuler la résolution adoptée par le Comité le 29 novembre et portant que la ministre doit comparaître pendant deux heures pour répondre à des questions au sujet de MaDémocratie.ca et du programme de réforme électorale que le gouvernement envisage.

Le président:

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

Je vais réagir au nom du parti ministériel. Nous serions disposés à prévoir une deuxième heure de séance avec la ministre.

M. Scott Reid:

Cela me satisferait. Si je comprends bien, nous considérerions la comparution d'aujourd'hui comme la première de ces deux heures.

M. Arnold Chan:

C'est exact.

M. Scott Reid:

Cela me convient.

Le président:

Très bien. Le Comité approuve-t-il le rapport du Sous-comité?

Des voix: D'accord.

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: La ministre Gould est accompagnée aujourd'hui par deux fonctionnaires du Bureau du Conseil privé, Ian McCowan, sous-secrétaire du Cabinet à la gouvernance, et Natasha Kim, directrice de la réforme démocratique, et par le secrétaire parlementaire, Andy Fillmore.

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Chers collègues, voulez-vous adopter ce rapport du Sous-comité ou préférez-vous...

Le président:

C'est chose faite.

M. Arnold Chan:

Très bien.

Je voudrais aussi soulever maintenant une question que j'ai abordée officieusement avec mes collègues.

Chers collègues, je voudrais utiliser un tour de sept minutes pour poser une série de questions sur la cybersécurité, à la lumière de la lettre de mandat de la ministre. Toutefois, je propose que le deuxième tour de sept minutes des libéraux soit substitué à leur dernier tour de cinq minutes, ce tour de cinq minutes remplaçant le tour de sept minutes. Je demanderais que nous siégions à huis clos pour cette période de sept minutes, à la toute fin des questions que nous avons à poser à la ministre, de façon à perturber la séance le moins possible.

Cela semble-t-il acceptable à mes collègues?

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Pour l'instant, je dirais que oui. Mais une question s'impose: quels sont les tours prévus pour une comparution d'une heure?

Le président:

Les tours habituels.

M. Scott Reid:

Donc, cinq minutes...

Le président:

Sept minutes pour les quatre premières questions. Au deuxième tour, c'est cinq minutes. Ensuite, nous passons à trois minutes.

M. Scott Reid:

Des objections, Blake?

Cela semble convenir.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

M. Chan a eu l'obligeance de me prévenir pour que je sache à quoi m'attendre. La seule chose qu'il a oublié de me dire, c'est que si, pour quelque motif, nous jugeons le huis clos inutile, si des raisons de sécurité ne justifient pas la poursuite du huis clos, nous reprendrons aussitôt la séance publique. À cette réserve près et étant entendu que nous privilégierons la prudence en matière de sécurité, la proposition est tout à fait logique. Toutefois, si la situation diffère de ce qu'il semble, il est entendu que nous reprendrons tout de suite la séance publique et nous discuterons de ces questions en public.

Le président:

Très bien.

M. Arnold Chan:

D'accord.

Le président:

Je vais maintenant donner la parole à la ministre.

Merci d'avoir accepté de comparaître, madame la ministre. Vous avez 10 minutes.

L'hon. Karina Gould (ministre des Institutions démocratiques):

Très bien.

Merci beaucoup.[Français]

Bon après-midi à toutes et à tous.

Je suis ravie et honorée d'être ici avec vous aujourd'hui.[Traduction]

Bonjour. Merci de m'avoir invitée à comparaître.

C'est un honneur de comparaître devant le Comité cet après-midi. Il n'y a aujourd'hui que quatre semaines que j'ai été nommée ministre, et c'est ma première comparution à ce titre devant un comité de la Chambre. Je suis ravie que ce soit devant vous tous.

Je vous présente mon secrétaire parlementaire, Andy Fillmore, député d'Halifax, et mon sous-ministre, Ian McCowan, qui est sous-secrétaire à la gouvernance au Bureau du Conseil privé. Sont également avec nous Allen Sutherland, secrétaire adjoint au Cabinet, et Natasha Kim, directrice de la réforme démocratique.

Je suis heureuse de prendre la parole devant le Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, qui a de précieuses connaissances et perspectives concernant un grand nombre de questions électorales dont le premier ministre m'a chargée. J'ai un profond respect pour les comités et le rôle important qu'ils jouent au Parlement. Je me réjouis à l'idée d'avoir des échanges avec le Comité, de le consulter et de travailler avec lui afin d'améliorer la démocratie au Canada. Les études qu'il réalise et les années d'expérience qu'il réunit sont deux des nombreuses raisons pour lesquelles je tiens tellement à travailler avec tous ses membres et à prendre connaissance de ce qu'il a à dire de ces dossiers.

Aujourd'hui, je voudrais parler surtout de ma nouvelle lettre de mandat et du projet de loi C-33, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada. Si la Chambre veut bien adopter le projet de loi à l'étape de la deuxième lecture, je comparaîtrai devant le Comité avec plaisir pour en discuter de façon plus détaillée.

Voyons maintenant ma lettre de mandat. Comme vous le savez, mon objectif général, à titre de ministre des Institutions démocratiques, est d'assurer plus d'ouverture, plus de transparence dans les institutions publiques canadiennes. J'ai reçu comme mandat la tâche d'améliorer les institutions démocratiques et de rétablir la confiance des Canadiens envers leurs processus démocratiques et leur participation à ces processus.[Français]

On m'a confié la responsabilité d'améliorer nos institutions démocratiques, de rétablir la confiance des Canadiens à l'égard des processus démocratiques et d'accroître la participation des Canadiens à ces processus.[Traduction]

Quant aux éléments plus précis de mon mandat, permettez-moi de parler d'abord de la réforme électorale, question sur laquelle il existe des opinions très arrêtées. On a déjà dit bien des choses de cette réforme.

Au cours de l'année écoulée, le gouvernement a mené au sujet de la réforme électorale de vastes consultations auprès des Canadiens. Toute modification proposée aux valeurs fondatrices des modalités de l'élection de nos représentants doit jouir d'un large appui dans l'opinion. Plus important encore, les Canadiens veulent être consultés avant que nous n'amorcions une transformation de cette ampleur.

Les consultations publiques ont pris de nombreuses formes. Pour rejoindre les Canadiens, il y a eu un travail énorme accompli par le Comité spécial sur la réforme électorale, dont plusieurs membres sont ici présents, et des députés de tous les partis. Il y a eu aussi une tournée ministérielle dans tout le Canada, et le gouvernement a eu des échanges avec plus de 360 000 personnes grâce à MaDémocratie.ca.

Les consultations sur la réforme électorale ont été parmi les plus importantes et les plus étendues jamais entreprises par le gouvernement du Canada. Les échanges ont été parfois animés et des opinions légitimes et très senties se sont exprimées. Je respecte et remercie tous les Canadiens qui ont participé au débat sur un élément tout à fait fondamental: la façon dont nous nous gouvernons.

Je comprends la diversité des opinions. Nous avions la responsabilité d'écouter ce que les Canadiens ont dit pendant ces consultations et d'en tenir compte.

(1210)

[Français]

Les consultations ne nous ont pas permis de dégager une nette préférence à l'égard d'un nouveau système électoral, encore moins d'atteindre un consensus à cet égard.

Comme il n'y avait pas de préférence pour le changement et encore moins pour une solution de rechange, un référendum pourrait semer la discorde et ne servirait pas les intérêts du Canada.[Traduction]

En conséquence, la modification du régime électoral ne figure pas dans le mandat que le premier ministre m'a confié. Nous avons écouté les Canadiens et pris une décision difficile, mais j'ai l'assurance que c'était un choix responsable. Le scrutin uninominal à un tour n'est peut-être pas parfait. Aucun système électoral ne l'est. Mais il a bien servi le Canada pendant 150 ans, et il sert des valeurs démocratiques auxquelles les Canadiens sont attachés, comme une solide représentation locale, la stabilité et la responsabilité.

Mon travail consiste à renforcer et à protéger nos institutions démocratiques. Nous sommes toujours déterminés à améliorer le système électoral de notre pays, et c'est ce dont je vais vous parler à l'instant. II y a beaucoup d'importants travaux que nous pouvons faire pour améliorer la démocratie canadienne, et j'ai hâte de travailler avec le Comité pour m'acquitter de mon importante responsabilité à cet égard.

Je voudrais attirer l'attention sur des éléments nouveaux de mon mandat, qui vise à renforcer et à protéger l'intégrité du processus démocratique. Comme nous l'avons vu à l'échelle mondiale, on craint de plus en plus que le processus électoral du Canada ne puisse être la cible de cyberattaques qui visent à déstabiliser les gouvernements démocratiques du Canada ou à influencer les résultats des élections. Nous devons nous protéger contre cette menace.

Pour garantir l'intégrité de nos institutions démocratiques, le ministre de la Défense nationale, le ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile et moi-même sommes chargés de travailler en collaboration et de diriger les efforts déployés par le gouvernement du Canada pour défendre le processus électoral du Canada contre les cybermenaces.

Il faudra notamment travailler avec le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications pour analyser les risques pour les activités politiques et électorales au Canada et rendre cette analyse publique. J'entends demander aussi au CST de conseiller et d'informer les partis politiques au Canada au sujet des pratiques exemplaires à suivre en matière de cybersécurité.

Comme je l'ai déjà dit, il s'agit d'aider les partis à se protéger. La sécurité de notre régime démocratique est une question qui transcende les partis. Il est indispensable que nous protégions contre les cybermenaces l'infrastructure démocratique du Canada. J'espère que vous conviendrez que nous devons protéger notre démocratie contre les nouvelles menaces.

J'ai aussi reçu le mandat de proposer un projet de loi afin d'examiner et de resserrer les règles sur les activités de financement auxquelles participent le premier ministre, les ministres, les dirigeants de parti et les candidats à la direction des partis.[Français]

Sur le plan fédéral, le Canada dispose des règles de financement des partis politiques les plus strictes au monde. Néanmoins, il est essentiel que les Canadiens continuent d'avoir confiance en nos lois sur le financement politique et les collectes de fonds. Dans cette optique, nous devons chercher à faire en sorte que cette confiance relativement à la solidité de notre système soit régulièrement confortée.[Traduction]

Une solution consisterait à jeter encore plus de lumière sur ces activités. Selon nous, les Canadiens ont le droit d'en savoir encore plus sur le financement politique. Nous prendrons des mesures pour garantir que les activités aient lieu dans des salles ouvertes au public, qu'elles soient annoncées au préalable et qu'elles fassent rapidement l'objet d'un rapport après coup. Ces changements assureront plus d'ouverture et aideront à faire en sorte que les Canadiens continuent de faire confiance au régime de financement politique et à leur système politique en général.

J'ai hâte de discuter avec les autres partis de moyens supplémentaires de rendre le système de financement plus transparent. Sur ce point, tous les partis ont un intérêt et peuvent faire valoir leur expérience.

Je vais aussi essayer de recommander diverses options pour créer un poste de commissaire indépendant chargé d'organiser les débats des chefs des partis politiques, d'examiner les limites des montants que les partis politiques et des tiers peuvent dépenser pendant et entre les élections, de proposer des mesures pour veiller à ce que les dépenses entre les élections soient soumises à des limites raisonnables, et je vais aider le président du Conseil du Trésor et la ministre de la Justice à examiner la Loi sur l'accès à l'information. J'ai bon espoir que vous voudrez travailler avec le gouvernement à ces importants dossiers.

Je suis aussi la principale ministre chargée de la réforme du Sénat, y compris du processus impartial et fondé sur le mérite suivi pour nommer les sénateurs.

Je dois également travailler à faire modifier la Loi électorale du Canada pour rendre le commissaire aux élections fédérales plus indépendant du gouvernement et à faire abroger les éléments de la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections qui compliquent la tâche des Canadiens qui veulent voter.

À propos de ce dernier point, vous savez que le gouvernement a déjà présenté le projet de loi C-33, qui propose sept mesures à ce sujet. Il vise à augmenter la participation des électeurs en éliminant des obstacles à l'exercice du vote, tout en améliorant l'efficacité et l'intégrité des élections au Canada. Ces éléments sont au coeur de notre système électoral, et je suis heureuse que ce texte législatif ait été proposé. Si la Chambre renvoyait le projet de loi C-33 au Comité après la deuxième lecture, je travaillerais volontiers avec le Comité à l'étude de cette mesure.

Bien que ce ne soit pas là un élément précis de ma lettre de mandat, c'est mon mandat général, comme je l'ai déjà dit, de renforcer et de protéger nos institutions démocratiques. Cela comprend un travail constant en vue d'améliorer la Loi électorale du Canada et l'administration des élections. Je suis très heureuse que le Comité ait le même objectif, notamment dans son étude des recommandations du directeur des élections formulées après les 42es élections générales. Je sais que le Comité a travaillé avec diligence à ce rapport, qui présente 132 recommandations détaillées visant à moderniser et à renforcer l'intégrité et l'accessibilité de notre système électoral. Vos travaux aideront à guider le gouvernement à la prochaine étape de la modernisation de notre système électoral. J'ai hâte de connaître vos idées sur ces questions et d'améliorer avec vous la Loi électorale du Canada.

J'ai hâte de m'attaquer au dur travail qui sera nécessaire pour honorer les engagements du mandat que le premier ministre m'a confié.

(1215)

[Français]

La démocratie du Canada fait l'envie du monde, mais il ne faut pas se reposer sur nos lauriers pour autant. Notre système est réputé à l'échelle mondiale et les Canadiens y font confiance parce que nous cherchons toujours à l'améliorer.[Traduction]

J'espère que je peux compter sur vos compétences et votre participation dans l'étude du projet de loi C-33, et sur votre apport et vos compétences pour l'étude des recommandations du directeur général d'Élections Canada, tandis que je continuerai à travailler pour remplir le mandat qui est le mien.

Merci encore de m'avoir invitée aujourd'hui. J'ai hâte de travailler à la réalisation de mon mandat et de collaborer avec vous tous. C'est avec plaisir que je répondrai à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci, madame la ministre.

Nous allons entamer le premier tour avec Mme Sahota. Chacun aura sept minutes.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci.

Merci de votre présence, madame la ministre Gould. Je vous félicite de vos nouvelles fonctions.

Vous avez dit un mot de votre mandat de collaboration avec le ministre de la Défense nationale et le ministre de la Sécurité publique au sujet des cyberattaques contre notre système électoral. Quelles sont vos principales préoccupations et à quels aspects vous intéresserez-vous surtout? Pourquoi estimez-vous que c'est une partie importante de votre mandat?

Je voudrais aussi revenir brièvement sur ce que nous avons entendu aujourd'hui à une conférence pour les jeunes à laquelle nous avons assisté toutes les deux. Cette conférence a été très intéressante. Un jeune qui a pris part à une activité des universités canadiennes a dit un mot des algorithmes et des informations diffusées en ligne. C'est un sujet de préoccupation qui a été soulevé dans beaucoup d'autres comités où je siège. Notre façon de penser est influencée lorsque nous sommes ciblés par des sites Web et recevons les fausses nouvelles dont nous avons beaucoup entendu parler. Qu'en pensez-vous? Quel est le lien avec votre mandat?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Merci beaucoup de la question.

Voilà une question qu'il est très important de poser et qui tombe à point nommé. Je suis en poste depuis aujourd'hui quatre semaines. Je n'ai pas encore pu discuter avec le CST. Nous avons eu des échanges préliminaires, mais c'est une question que nous aborderons sous peu pour voir de quoi il retourne et quelle sera l'ampleur du mandat.

Ma lettre de mandat parle précisément des partis politiques et dit qu'il faut veiller à ce que le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications analyse, surveille et examine les menaces qui peuvent peser sur les systèmes d'information des partis politiques pour ensuite leur dire comment ils peuvent se protéger.

Il est très important que nous nous y prenions correctement et que les Canadiens sachent que le CST ne va pas s'immiscer dans les systèmes d'information des partis politiques, mais donnera plutôt à ceux-ci une vue d'ensemble sur les pratiques exemplaires, sur les moyens de se protéger et de repérer les menaces qui risquent d'émerger.

Les échanges de ce matin dont vous parlez concernaient un jeune homme qui travaille en intelligence artificielle. Il disait comment, de bien des manières, des sources d'information peuvent être orientées vers des internautes en fonction de leurs préférences et il a parlé de l'effet de silo dans notre consommation des médias et de l'information, comme simples citoyens. Ce qui le préoccupait, c'était la préservation de la diversité des opinions qui atteignent les gens.

C'est assurément un élément dont nous devons nous occuper. C'est certainement une question qui m'inquiète, mais il faut voir comment le gouvernement, les parlementaires et les dirigeants politiques peuvent intervenir. Le Canada est l'un des plus grands utilisateurs, par habitant, de Facebook, et nous savons que Facebook et d'autres médias sociaux fournissent l'information en fonction des préférences de chacun. Comment faire en sorte que les gens soient exposés à des points de vue divers pour pouvoir faire des choix éclairés, qu'ils soient assez bien initiés au numérique pour recevoir l'information et comprendre d'où elle vient, de façon à faire des choix éclairés?

Il est vraiment important de tenir ce débat. Il faut commencer à réfléchir à la question. Il incombe aux dirigeants politiques de faire ce qu'ils peuvent pour que les citoyens aient accès à divers points de vue et à différentes sources d'information. C'est très important.

Il nous faudra déterminer ce qu'il faut englober dans les institutions démocratiques au Canada. Comprennent-ils les médias? Comment travailler en partenariat avec les médias pour qu'ils aient accès à ces outils également? Cela viendra en temps et lieu. Bien sûr, je me réjouis d'entendre les points de vue, les idées, les réflexions du Comité et ceux d'autres députés à ce sujet.

(1220)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci. C'était vraiment une grande préoccupation pour ce jeune homme et pour d'autres jeunes qui étaient à ma table.

Je vais partager mon temps, s'il m'en reste, avec M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Combien de temps vous reste-t-il?

Le président:

Deux minutes et demie.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je voudrais parler un peu de la démarche à suivre. Vous savez que le Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre étudie le rapport du directeur général des élections depuis un certain temps. À voir tout ce qu'il reste à faire, il faudra encore consacrer à ce travail 20 ou 30 séances, voire davantage. La tâche est énorme.

Le travail s'est fait à huis clos. Je vous épargne les détails, mais cette question se rattache à votre mandat et votre rôle est de proposer d'autres mesures législatives sur la réforme démocratique et les changements à apporter en général.

Pourriez-vous nous donner une idée des délais, si vous avez quelque idée du moment où on attend de vous des résultats? Serait-il utile que nous vous communiquions nos rapports? Voulez-vous recevoir des rapports provisoires? Vous avez quelque chose à nous dire à ce sujet?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui. Merci beaucoup.

Je comprends que le Comité est en train d'étudier les recommandations que le directeur général des élections a formulées après les dernières élections. Comme il y en a 132, la tâche est redoutable.

J'ai vraiment hâte de connaître votre point de vue sur l'orientation à prendre à l'avenir. Il y aura des élections dans trois ans. Nous ne voulons pas trop attendre, car nous voulons donner suite aux recommandations assez tôt pour qu'Élections Canada ait le temps de les mettre en oeuvre.

S'il est possible d'obtenir des rapports provisoires, comme le président l'a laissé entendre dans le Hill Times, sauf erreur, alors tant mieux. Par son sérieux et son ampleur, l'étude que vous entreprenez est très précieuse.

J'espère pouvoir compter sur vous pour publier et me communiquer ces rapports dans les meilleurs délais, et j'espère que nous pourrons mettre en place des mesures législatives qui s'appliqueront aux prochaines élections. Pour de nombreux membres du Comité, il est très important de faire ce travail de façon que, en 2019, nous n'ayons pas les mêmes problèmes qu'en 2015.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Vous avez 20 secondes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid, à vous la parole.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame la ministre, merci d'être parmi nous. Merci également à vos collaborateurs très compétents et à votre secrétaire parlementaire. Il est agréable de vous accueillir.

Merci aussi d'avoir pris le temps de me rencontrer mardi dernier.

J'ai quelques questions à vous poser. Je vous ai remis une lettre hier pour vous aider, car il est vrai qu'il vous aurait été difficile de répondre à certaines à moins d'avoir un certain temps pour vous préparer. Je regrette de ne vous avoir donné que 24 heures d'avis, mais nous n'avons été informés de votre comparution que vendredi après-midi. Pas tout à fait après les heures de travail, mais, de toute façon, j'étais parti.

J'ai cinq questions à vous poser. Je peux les lire à partir de la liste et vous les poser. Si vous n'avez pas d'objection, je commencerai par la troisième. Elles portent toutes sur l'enquête ou le questionnaire de MaDémocratie.ca. Voici la troisième question. Le gouvernement a-t-il conservé ou détruit les réponses données aux essais sur le terrain et à l'enquête finale de MaDémocratie.ca?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Merci beaucoup.

Je vous remercie de nous avoir fait parvenir les questions pour que nous nous préparions. Je suis accompagnée de deux experts techniques qui sont prêts à vous répondre.

(1225)

M. Ian McCowan (sous-secrétaire du Cabinet (Gouvernance), Bureau du Conseil privé):

Monsieur Reid, je vais commencer, après quoi Mme Kim pourra compléter comme elle le jugera bon.

Pour ce qui est des données, Vox Pop en a toujours toute la série. Deux éléments des données ont été généralisés: la date de naissance et le code postal. C'est que les analyses sur ces données sont terminées. En dehors de ces deux éléments, Vox Pop a toujours la série de données en sa possession.

Je ne sais pas au juste si Mme Kim a quoi que ce soit à ajouter.

Mme Natasha Kim (directrice, Réforme démocratique, Bureau du Conseil privé):

Non, sauf que le rapport final a été publié sur le site Web.

M. Scott Reid:

Bon. Voilà qui me permet de passer aux questions quatre et cinq, qui étaient en réalité des questions de rechange. Comme les données n'ont pas été détruites, vous engagerez-vous à les communiquer au Parlement ou au grand public tout en écartant les renseignements qui pourraient être rapportés à des personnes précises?

M. Ian McCowan:

Monsieur Reid, vous venez de toucher le coeur du problème. Vous devez savoir, d'après l'enquête Vox Pop et le rapport final, que le gouvernement a déclaré officiellement qu'il ne recevrait que des données agrégées. Cela a été dit clairement.

Nous n'avons reçu votre question qu'hier soir. Nous allons devoir l'étudier, mais cela se fera dans le contexte de ce que je viens de dire: le gouvernement du Canada s'est engagé à ne recevoir que des données agrégées et à respecter toutes les exigences quant aux renseignements personnels. Je dirai, si cela vous convient, que nous allons mettre cette question de côté. Nous l'avons reçue hier soir. Notre préoccupation est celle que vous avez décrite.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien. Comme la ministre comparaîtra de nouveau, cela nous permettra de revenir sur la question. Nous en discuterons à ce moment-là. Restons-en là.

Voyons maintenant la première question. Le gouvernement a-t-il exclu de l'enquête finale de MaDémocratie.ca des questions utilisées dans les essais de novembre 2016 ou que le groupe consultatif d'universitaires de Vox Pop Labs a recommandé d'inclure?

M. Ian McCowan:

J'aurai besoin de l'aide de Mme Kim, cette fois. Commençons par une réponse globale. L'essai sur le terrain avait un certain nombre d'objectifs. L'un d'eux était de faire en sorte que, dans le sondage final, le nombre de questions soit limité — on obtient ainsi un meilleur taux de réponse et les résultats ont une grande utilité —, mais il fallait aussi développer les archétypes, les groupes, les groupements qui ont été utilisés dans la réponse à l'enquête.

Qu'y avait-il de différent entre l'essai sur le terrain et l'enquête finale? Six facteurs ont amené des changements entre les deux étapes. D'abord, je le répète, on a essayé d'utiliser l'essai pour voir quels étaient les meilleurs groupements. Il y a eu des analyses là-dessus. Deuxièmement, on a essayé de voir comment on pouvait ramener l'enquête à la bonne longueur pour maximiser l'expérience de l'usager et le taux de réponse.

Troisièmement, il fallait éviter les doublons inutiles. Il y avait des questions qui étaient semblables dans le même espace. Quatrièmement, quelques questions ont été retirées parce qu'elles semblaient trop délicates, puisque nous voulions que le questionnaire soit bien reçu par l'ensemble des Canadiens.

Cinquièmement, quelques questions ont servi à évaluer la satisfaction de l'usager, à voir quelles avaient été les difficultés et comment les répondants avaient réagi. Enfin, comme il a été signalé dans les médias, quelques questions avaient été accidentellement incluses dans l'essai préalable, et elles n'ont évidemment pas été reprises dans l'enquête finale.

J'ignore si Mme Kim veut ajouter quelque chose, mais c'est là un résumé rapide.

M. Scott Reid:

Permettez-moi d'intervenir, dans ce cas.

Ma question était double. La réponse est oui: certaines questions utilisées dans l'essai ne se retrouvaient pas dans l'enquête finale. Vous n'avez pas répondu au sujet des questions du groupe consultatif de Vox Pop Labs ou des éléments qu'il a recommandé d'inclure dans l'enquête. Comme je manquerai de temps pour poser la question suivante, je la pose tout de suite.

Êtes-vous prêt à dire quelles étaient ces questions? Et êtes-vous disposé à communiquer les réponses données aux questions utilisées dans l'essai et non retenues dans l'enquête finale?

M. Ian McCowan:

Vous avez posé trois questions. Si je ne réussis pas à répondre à toutes, monsieur Reid, vous pourrez revenir à la charge au tour suivant et vous assurer que je le fais.

Pour ce qui est des résultats, je vais donner la même réponse que la dernière fois: il faut voir exactement ce qu'il est possible de fournir, vu l'engagement du gouvernement à ne publier que des données agrégées et à respecter les droits à la protection des renseignements personnels.

Quant à votre question sur l'élaboration ou la conception, les questions ont été élaborées pendant quelques semaines. Vox Pop, qui a des compétences en la matière, et un groupe d'universitaires indépendants ont participé au travail. Il y avait aussi des fonctionnaires, évidemment. Ce sont des membres du personnel exonéré qui ont participé. Le processus s'est échelonné sur une certaine période. Cela ne s'est pas fait tout d'un coup.

Mme Kim aurait peut-être quelque chose à ajouter.

(1230)

Le président:

Merci.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci. Nous n'avons plus de temps. Merci à tous les participants. Je vous suis très reconnaissant.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien. Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame la ministre, merci beaucoup de votre présence. Je vous ai félicitée en privé d'avoir accédé au Cabinet. Je vous félicite maintenant publiquement.

Puisque j'ai un instant, je félicite aussi publiquement, après l'avoir fait en privé, ma collègue Filomena Tassi, qui a été nommée whip adjointe du gouvernement. Mes meilleurs voeux vous accompagnent. Je sais que vous ferez de l'excellent travail.

Madame la ministre, merci beaucoup de votre présence. Comme vous pouvez le comprendre, nous sommes dans la même situation qu'à la dernière séance avec celle qui vous a précédée. Ce ne sont pas des séances d'accueil et de mondanités. Nous vous avons convoquée expressément pour examiner un ou deux problèmes qui ont une incidence sur notre travail. Je ne peux pas aller trop loin. Nous sommes limités parce qu'il s'agit d'un travail à huis clos, mais je ne pense pas révéler un grand secret en disant que le travail du Comité reste paralysé jusqu'à ce que nous réglions ces problèmes. Sans entrer dans les détails, je dirai qu'il nous faut des réponses pour pouvoir reprendre le travail. Je vais aborder des questions qui sembleront sans intérêt pour la plupart des gens, mais elles sont cruciales pour nous.

Vous avez professé un profond respect pour les comités. Le gouvernement en a fait autant. Le premier ministre a affirmé la même chose pendant toute la campagne électorale. Les comités allaient être pris au sérieux et respectés. Voilà le hic. L'un des problèmes, c'est que nous étions en train d'étudier le rapport du directeur général des élections, comme vous l'avez dit fort justement. Nous avions retroussé nos manches et nous faisions du bon travail. Nous repérions des points sur lesquels nous pouvions nous entendre rapidement, quitte à laisser de côté ceux qui exigeaient plus de temps. Puis, soudain, le projet de loi C-33 est arrivé comme un pavé dans la mare.

C'est là un vrai problème. Si vous respectez le travail des comités, il aurait été logique d'attendre au moins que nous produisions quelques rapports pour donner des conseils sur les mesures législatives à envisager. Mais on a agi avec un manque total de respect pour notre travail. Cela nous donne à penser, du moins à moi, qu'il s'agit d'un projet qui n'est là que pour nous occuper. Pourquoi se donner cette peine si le gouvernement ne tient aucun compte de notre travail et agit simplement à sa guise?

Il y a donc ce problème-là. Le deuxième est connexe. Je suis reconnaissant à M. Graham de l'avoir soulevé. Vous y avez fait un peu allusion, mais j'ai vraiment besoin d'une réponse claire à ce sujet, madame la ministre, sauf votre respect. La deuxième partie, c'est ce qui arrivera désormais. J'ai dit que nous voulions la garantie absolue que vous n'agiriez pas de nouveau de la sorte. MM. Chan et Graham ont soutenu que nous pouvions comprendre que le gouvernement ne pouvait donner une assurance totale, au cas où le Comité s'enliserait. J'ai bien compris. Je crois que, dans votre déclaration, vous avez fait allusion à ce fait.

Ce que nous voulions, c'est que notre démarche soit respectée. Il fallait trouver un moyen de communiquer pour que nous sachions ce que vous envisagez. Il fallait que vous nous demandiez d'étudier cette question pour vous faire part de notre réflexion et de nos conseils. Vous pouvez décider de les suivre ou non, mais simplement continuer à produire des projets de loi de réforme électorale... Soit dit en passant, vous n'êtes pas sans savoir que c'est une priorité que d'éliminer une partie de cette loi électorale atrocement injuste. Mais les procédures comptent et les comités ont leur place. Nous avons donc besoin de l'assurance que notre travail rime à quelque chose et que le gouvernement en tient compte. Autrement, pourquoi nous donner cette peine? Nous passerons à autre chose.

J'attends deux choses, en somme. D'abord, l'aveu que le gouvernement a eu tort. Des excuses seraient les bienvenues et ce n'est pas si difficile, puisque ce comportement a été tellement inadmissible et irrespectueux. Deuxièmement, je voudrais l'engagement à nouer un meilleur dialogue pour que nous puissions faire un travail qui aide à informer vos décisions de façon opportune.

Merci, monsieur le président.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Merci beaucoup, David. Il me tarde de travailler avec vous, et je me réjouis que nous ayons des appuis si solides dans la baie.

M. David Christopherson:

Il s'agit d'un port, madame la ministre. Il s'agit de Hamilton Harbour et non de Burlington Bay.

(1235)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Nous pourrions discuter de cela en dehors du comité. Je comparais exactement quatre semaines après ma nomination parce que je reconnais l'importance du comité et de son travail. Je respecte vraiment votre travail.

Pour ce qui est des communications, M. Andy Fillmore, est ici. Son travail sera de communiquer avec le Parlement. Pour l'instant, je n'ai pas de plan de travail précis qui dise quand des projets de loi seront proposés. Je veux avoir des contacts avec le comité à ce propos pour m'assurer que nous comprenons ce qu'est le programme, ce à quoi vous travaillez et comment nous pouvons travailler de concert. Au bout du compte, je sais que vous et moi sommes ici pour la même raison: veiller à ce que nous fassions ce qui est bien pour les Canadiens. Je sais que le comité à une expérience et des connaissances importantes, que ses membres ont de longues années d'expérience derrière eux...

M. David Christopherson:

On dirait un prix d'excellence pour l'ensemble de nos réalisations. Encore beaucoup à faire.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

... et beaucoup de bonnes années devant eux.

Nous voulons faire abroger certains éléments de la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections et, évidemment, travailler à... J'ai dit à David et je vais répéter que votre travail sur le rapport du directeur général et ses recommandations est précieux. Ce sont là deux éléments auxquels nous pouvons travailler de concert. Je vais prendre ces recommandations très au sérieux et voir ainsi ce que nous pouvons faire encore pour moderniser la Loi électorale du Canada le mieux possible. Nous devons faire ce qu'il faut pour Élections Canada et pour appuyer l'accès à l'expression démocratique dans l'intérêt des Canadiens.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, madame la ministre.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Trois minutes.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

Rapidement, serait-il possible d'admettre que le projet de loi C-33 a été une erreur, de sorte que nous puissions nous attaquer à notre travail? Vous ne pouvez pas dire que vous respectez le comité et le Parlement et ensuite insulter le comité et son travail sans ensuite présenter des excuses ou reconnaître qu'il était malavisé d'agir de la sorte. Je vous en prie.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je suis une nouvelle ministre. Je veux que nous commencions du bon pied, que nous travaillions de concert là-dessus. Commençons donc avec moi, dans une attitude respectueuse et je collaborerai avec vous. J'ai hâte de m'attaquer à cette question. La Chambre a été saisie d'un projet de loi. J'ai hâte qu'il soit renvoyé au comité, mais je veux vous laisser le temps de faire le travail que vous devez faire sur les recommandations de sorte que nous puissions collaborer pour faire ce qui s'impose dans l'intérêt des Canadiens.

En somme, David, j'ai hâte de travailler avec vous parce que je sais que nous pouvons nous acquitter de cette besogne.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous ne facilitez pas les choses, madame la ministre.

Le peu de temps qu'il me reste, je voudrais le céder à mon collègue, M. Cullen. Il y a sans doute une trentaine de secondes.

M. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NPD):

Vous avez parlé de partir du bon pied. Votre premier travail comme ministre a été de renoncer à la principale promesse que votre gouvernement a faite au sujet de la réforme électorale. C'est comme si vous aviez été engagée pour diriger une entreprise qui a ensuite déclaré faillite. Si vous voulez combattre le cynisme, il me semble qu'il serait important de savoir tenir une promesse.

Le président:

Cinq secondes.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Madame la ministre, vous avez dit par le passé que votre gouvernement avait été élu avec une fausse majorité. Le croyez-vous toujours?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

J'ai dit que certains, à propos de réforme électorale, ont avancé cet argument pour montrer la nécessité d'une réforme. Il appartient à tous les parlementaires, comme chefs de file leur milieu, d'encourager leurs concitoyens à participer au processus démocratique. Que nous soyons d'accord ou non sur une politique proposée, il est extraordinairement important que nous tous, comme chefs de file et hommes et femmes politiques, continuions d'échanger avec les Canadiens au sujet des enjeux qui les passionnent.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous ne le croyez donc plus?

Le président:

Monsieur Graham a la parole. Cinq minutes.

Pardon?

C'est le tour de Filomena? Très bien. Mme Tassi d'abord. Je vous en prie.

Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Je commencerai par remercier mon collègue, M. Christopherson, de ses félicitations. Je lui suis reconnaissante et je les accepte volontiers. Comme tous les autres membres du comité, madame la ministre, je vous félicite et je vous remercie de votre dévouement et de votre travail acharné.

Je voudrais lire un passage de votre lettre de mandat, qui dit que vous avez pour mission de: Présenter des options pour créer un poste de commissaire indépendant chargé d’organiser les débats des chefs des partis politiques lors des futures campagnes électorales fédérales, avec le mandat d’améliorer les connaissances des Canadiens et des Canadiennes en ce qui concerne les partis, leurs chefs et leurs positions stratégiques.

Pourquoi croyez-vous qu'il est important de créer un poste de commissaire indépendant pour organiser les débats des chefs des partis politiques?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Merci beaucoup, Filomena, et bienvenue au comité.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

C'est notre première journée ensemble. J'espère collaborer avec vous aussi.

À propos des débats des chefs de parti, nous avons vu clairement aux dernières élections que ces débats pouvaient avoir lieu ou ne pas avoir lieu selon les préférences de certains chefs. Je songe notamment au débat sur les femmes, qui me semble très important et aurait dû avoir lieu, que tel ou tel chef décide d'y participer ou de ne pas le faire. Il s'agit aussi d'établir le nombre de débats nécessaires pour que les Canadiens s'y intéressent et les écoutent et se renseignent sur les idées et les politiques que les différents partis politiques proposent par la voix de leur chef.

Cela me semble important. C'est une mesure importante que de régir, de définir le nombre de débats qui doivent avoir lieu. Ensuite, il revient aux différents chefs de décider d'y participer ou non. Mais les débats devraient se tenir de toute façon. C'est important pour que les Canadiens sachent à quoi s'attendre. Ils devraient savoir quand et comment ils pourront entendre les chefs des différents partis politiques et avoir accès à cette information.

(1240)

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'accord. Merci.

Votre lettre de mandat dit aussi que vous devez « accroître considérablement la transparence pour le grand public et les médias à l’égard du système de financement politique faisant intervenir le Cabinet, les chefs de partis et les candidats à la chefferie ».

Pourquoi le gouvernement a-t-il décidé d'améliorer le système de financement et pourquoi estimez-vous que c'est important?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Merci de cette question.

Il s'agit du financement politique et plus précisément des activités de financement auxquelles participent des ministres, des chefs de parti ou des aspirants à un poste de chef. En réalité, même si le Canada a des règles très strictes sur le financement politique, nous croyons que ces activités peuvent être plus accessibles. L'information devrait venir en temps opportun et le public devrait y avoir accès.

J'ai hâte de travailler là-dessus avec le comité. Il faudra à un moment donné élaborer un projet de loi. Ce projet sera probablement renvoyé au comité. J'ai donc hâte de connaître votre point de vue à ce sujet et les idées que pouvez avoir pour renforcer nos lois sur le financement politique et plus particulièrement celui-ci. Il me tarde de collaborer avec vous à ce sujet.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Très bien, merci.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président: Deux minutes.

Mme Filomena Tassi: D'accord. Je vais partager mon temps de parole avec le député Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Merci.

Comme vous, madame la ministre, je suis un nouveau venu au comité, mais certainement pas à la Chambre. Comme M. Christopherson l'a signalé et M. Graham y fait allusion, j'étais ici lorsqu'a été étudiée la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections, peu importe le titre qu'elle mérite aujourd'hui.

L'article 3 de la Charte dispose: « Tout citoyen canadien a le droit de vote et est éligible aux élections... » Rien de plus clair. Tous les témoignages à l'époque, il y a quelques années, chaque fois, témoin après témoin, non seulement au Canada, mais aussi en Europe, ont dénoncé l'objectif du projet de loi, qui était de limiter le droit de vote.

Une analyse de l'article 3 de la Charte précise: « Le gouvernement a le devoir d’empêcher que des obstacles administratifs non raisonnables n’entravent l’exercice des droits démocratiques. » Nous avons la responsabilité de nous assurer que ces obstacles sont abolis. Le but de ce dernier projet de loi était de dresser des obstacles devant ceux que le gouvernement voulait priver de leur droit de vote.

Dans le peu de temps que j'ai, pourriez-vous dire ce que vous en pensez? J'espère que vous n'êtes pas favorable à la multiplication des obstacles administratifs, mais comment, à titre de ministre, allez-vous protéger pour les plus vulnérables de notre société l'exercice du droit démocratique que l'article 3 leur reconnaît?

Le président: Vous avez 20 secondes pour répondre.

M. Scott Simms: Désolé.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Merci. En 20 secondes, je dirai que le projet de loi C-33, s'il est adopté en deuxième lecture et devient loi, réglera un bon nombre des problèmes que vous soulevez. Selon moi, ce serait une étape importante pour nous assurer que tous les Canadiens peuvent voter, ce que, comme vous le dites, ils ont le droit de faire.

Merci.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci.

Le président:

M. Richards.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame la ministre, merci d'être parmi nous.

Je commence par une question qui appelle un oui ou un non. Je promets que, pour mes autres questions, je vous laisserai plus de latitude, mais je voudrais commencer par un oui ou non.

Votre gouvernement est-il déterminé à faire en sorte qu'aucune influence étrangère ne joue dans nos élections?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci. Je vous remercie d'avoir bien voulu en rester là. C'est pour faire vite.

Après le passage de votre lettre de mandat qui porte sur l'abandon de la promesse de réforme électorale, au premier des paragraphes à puce qui énumère vos instructions, le premier ministre précise que vous êtes censée « diriger les efforts du Canada en vue de défendre le processus électoral du Canada contre les cybermenaces ». J'y songeais parce que nous n'avons pas le vote électronique ni le vote en ligne, mais utilisons toujours cette bonne vieille méthode qu'est le bulletin de papier. À moins que le gouvernement n'ait l'intention de ne pas tenir compte d'une autre recommandation du comité et n'opte pour le scrutin électronique ou un genre de vote en ligne, je ne vois pas une grande menace de piratage de nos résultats électoraux, par exemple.

Il y a autre chose. Le financement des partis est mentionné dans votre lettre de mandat, comme il l'était dans celle de la ministre précédente. Il s'agit d'examiner le financement des partis politiques et le financement par des tierces parties et les limites à imposer à cet égard. Une préoccupation réelle est la crainte que des capitaux étrangers n'influencent les élections par le biais des dépenses de tierces parties. Qu'en pensez-vous? Compte tenu des changements que vous avez été chargée d’apporter, le gouvernement se penchera-t-il sur le financement par des étrangers par le biais des dépenses électorales de tierces parties et son influence éventuelle sur des élections?

Êtes-vous déterminée à faire quelque chose à cet égard? Quand pouvons-nous attendre des mesures à ce sujet?

(1245)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Voilà une question intéressante. Merci de la poser.

Permettez-moi cependant de revenir sur le début de votre question, à propos du piratage informatique des partis. Des faits récents ont montré que c'était là un vrai problème. Il faut être à l'écoute et proactif. Il y a à peine quinze jours, l'Australian Signals Directorate a dit qu'elle était en fait...

M. Blake Richards:

Désolé, madame la ministre, je m'en veux de vous interrompre, mais j'ai très peu de temps et il ne me reste que deux minutes. Je comprends que vous veuillez dire quelque chose à ce sujet, mais pourriez-vous passer à l'objet de ma question. Je voudrais que nous y arrivions. Ma question porte sur le financement par des étrangers.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui, bien sûr. Dans l'état actuel des choses, les intérêts étrangers ne peuvent pas donner d'argent à des partis politiques ni à des candidats, mais...

M. Blake Richards:

Ils peuvent en donner à des tierces parties.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Mon mandat prévoit que je dois étudier les limites de dépenses des tierces parties. Vous soulevez un point intéressant et je voudrais que, à l'avenir, vous m'en disiez un peu plus long sur votre réflexion à ce sujet.

M. Blake Richards:

Très bien. Comme vous avez dit que le gouvernement est déterminé à écarter toute influence étrangère dans nos élections et que le gouvernement est déterminé à faire quelque chose à ce sujet, il serait important que vous agissiez. Je vous encourage à vous intéresser à la question.

Lorsque le directeur général des élections a comparu devant le Comité sénatorial permanent des affaires juridiques et constitutionnelles, on lui a posé quelques questions à ce sujet. Il a confirmé l'existence de craintes sérieuses selon lesquelles des tierces parties peuvent recevoir des fonds de l'étranger pour des sondages, des sites Web, des services d'appel utilisés pour faire des sondages visant à influencer les répondants, par exemple, et avoir des communications avec les électeurs. Tout cela peut être influencé par l'étranger. Si le gouvernement tient à éviter toute influence étrangère dans nos élections, il devra faire quelque chose. Je vous exhorte à agir rapidement.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

D'accord.

Ai-je le temps de répondre?

M. Blake Richards:

Oui.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je comprends. C'est un point très intéressant à soulever. Je ne suis pas au courant de vos délibérations, puisqu'elles se sont déroulées à huis clos, mais si le comité veut faire des observations à ce sujet, je serais heureuse de connaître ses réactions.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

À vous, monsieur Schmale. Vous avez cinq minutes. Ce sera ensuite M. Chan.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président. Je comprends. Merci à la ministre. J'ai eu le plaisir de rencontrer votre père à une activité agricole à Nestleton, il y a près d'un an. Il m'a dit que vous aviez été élue en même temps que moi. J'ai été heureux de faire sa connaissance. Il semble très sympathique.

J'ai prêté attention à vos échanges au sujet du fait que, sur Facebook et Twitter, l'usager se fait envoyer de l'information qui correspond à ses opinions politiques. J'ai été renversé par votre réponse. Vous avez dit qu'on peut presque contrôler l'information et que le gouvernement peut contrôler l'information que les internautes reçoivent. Pour ma part, cela m'a estomaqué. Je n'allais pas poser mes questions là-dessus, mais je voudrais savoir ce que vous entendez faire, puisque vous dites que le gouvernement veillera à ce que les gens reçoivent une information plus variée.

(1250)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Vous m'avez mal comprise. Je voulais plutôt parler de l'intégrité de l'information. Le gouvernement ne contrôle pas du tout l'information. C'était un commentaire général sur la situation actuelle des médias. Il nous appartient, comme chefs de file dans nos milieux, comme politiques et comme gouvernement, de réfléchir aux moyens de garantir l'intégrité des médias à l'avenir, mais il est évident que le gouvernement ne peut pas contrôler et ne contrôlera pas ce genre d'information.

J'ai voulu parler de la façon dont l'information est consommée en ce moment par les Canadiens et les internautes du monde entier et des moyens à proposer aux Canadiens pour qu'ils soient à même de juger de la qualité de l'information reçue.

Nous amorçons à peine notre réflexion sur le problème. Je n'ai certainement rien voulu dire qui ressemble à ce que vous avez compris.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Très bien. Je veux seulement m'assurer que le gouvernement ne contrôle pas l'information et ne veut pas dicter aux gens ce qu'ils devraient lire.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Non, absolument pas.

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'accord.

Je voudrais passer à ce que vous avez dit plus tôt des cyberattaques. Comme mon collègue M. Richards l'a dit, les bulletins de vote sur papier sont à l'abri de ces attaques. Pour peu que vous puissiez en parler, de quelles menaces êtes-vous au courant? Quels moyens envisagez-vous pour protéger nos systèmes?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Merci de votre question.

Soyons clairs. Pour l'instant, nous ne sommes au courant d'aucune menace possible ou existante qui pèserait sur les partis politiques canadiens ou le système politique canadien, mais nous avons observé au cours d'une élection récente chez des alliés proches des tentatives visant à influencer l'élection et à recueillir de l'information que détenaient des partis politiques. Comme j'ai commencé à le dire à votre collègue, M. Richards, Australian Signals Directorate a récemment proposé le même genre d'information et de pratiques exemplaires à ses partis politiques parce qu'elle avait observé des tentatives d'accès à l'information des partis. La France a aussi proposé la même chose et elle offrira une séance d'information à ses partis politiques à la fin du mois. Nous savons que d'autres alliés ont également eu le même genre d'expérience.

Il s'agit en fait d'une mesure proactive pour...

M. Jamie Schmale:

Oui. Je suis convaincu de l'importance de la sécurité. Je suis d'accord avec vous. Je crois que, aux États-Unis, le problème a été la divulgation de courriels. Je ne sais pas trop si les gens du Comité national démocrate étaient furieux parce qu'ils se sont fait prendre ou parce qu'ils avaient écrit ces messages. Peut-être plutôt parce qu'ils se sont fait prendre.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Ce ne serait pas le gouvernement qui protégerait ces systèmes. Il fournirait de l'information à tous les partis politiques sur les meilleurs moyens de protéger l'intégrité de leurs systèmes. Car il n'y a pas que les courriels. Les partis politiques ont des renseignements sur les Canadiens. Le gouvernement juge important de les protéger. Il appartiendrait bien sûr aux partis d'accepter ou non les moyens offerts.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Encore une réflexion rapide. Vous avez parlé du financement. Vous avez raison de dire que ce qui se passe du côté du premier ministre n'est pas illégal, mais cela va à l'encontre des lois de l'éthique.

Je crois que, pour faciliter les choses...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je n'ai pas dit cela.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Non, c'est moi qui le dis.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Vous avez dit que j'avais raison, mais je n'ai rien dit de tel.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Pour faciliter les choses, au lieu de modifier la loi ou de la resserrer, il serait plus simple de demander au premier ministre d'arrêter de faire ce qu'il fait.

Il ne me reste qu'une minute, mais si le président est d'accord, je vais la céder à ma collègue Elizabeth May.

Mme Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, PV):

Je vous suis très reconnaissante.

Merci, Jamie.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je n'ai en fait qu'une seule question. Selon moi, il y a une incompatibilité dans votre lettre de mandat. Comme un collègue l'a déjà dit, quelqu'un d'un niveau supérieur devrait peut-être répondre. Mais je ne crois pas que ce soit une question de niveau. Votre lettre du mandat vient du premier ministre.

Un élément fondamental de votre rôle de ministre des Institutions démocratiques, comme vous l'avez dit dans votre déclaration liminaire, consiste à rétablir la confiance des Canadiens et à encourager la participation. Pourtant, votre lettre de mandat vous oblige à trahir immédiatement la confiance des Canadiens en retirant l'engagement relatif à la réforme électorale.

Je ne vous demanderai pas de dissiper cette incompatibilité, mais plutôt de dire si vous êtes disposée à poursuivre le travail avec les députés qui veulent parvenir à un compromis pour que vous puissiez, par la réforme électorale, rétablir la confiance des Canadiens à l'égard de la promesse des libéraux.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Merci de votre question, Elizabeth, et merci d'être avec nous aujourd'hui. J'ai hâte de travailler avec vous à beaucoup de dossiers comme nous l'avons fait par le passé et le ferons à l'avenir.

De nombreux aspects de mon mandat permettront de continuer à renforcer la confiance et le respect à l'égard de la démocratie, et je veux y donner suite. Il est également important de consacrer beaucoup de temps à la consultation des Canadiens. Vous êtes nombreux ici à avoir beaucoup consulté les Canadiens et nous avons entendu maints points de vue, qui se défendent tous, car tout le monde a son opinion et sa façon de voir. Il est donc important d'écouter les Canadiens, de franchir un pas de plus, de continuer à travailler avec le comité et les députés pour faire ce que nous pouvons pour renforcer la confiance et la démocratie.

(1255)

Le président:

Merci, madame la ministre.

Monsieur Chan, je crois comprendre que vous n'avez pas besoin du huis clos.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je ne pense pas avoir besoin du huis clos. J'ai écouté les questions de tous mes collègues et je crois que j'aborde le même sujet. Si nous pensons tous que la question est déjà du domaine public, je suis d'accord pour poursuivre en public.

Merci, madame la ministre. J'ai écouté attentivement, et mes questions se rapportent toutes à la première ligne de votre lettre de mandat concernant les menaces à la cybersécurité. Je voudrais revenir précisément à des propos que vous avez tenus en réponse à mon collègue David et aux questions de Blake sur les menaces à la cybersécurité.

Comment le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications assure-t-il la liaison avec les partis politiques dans le cadre de votre travail avec le ministre de la Défense nationale et le ministre de la Sécurité publique? Devrions-nous essentiellement proposer des personnes désignées qui travailleront avec vous, avec d'autres ministres et avec le CST? Alors, le plus important, du point de vue des partis politiques — et je reconnais que vous avez déjà répondu à la question en disant que l'objectif fixé dans votre lettre de mandat est de proposer des pratiques exemplaires — concerne l'information que les partis politiques peuvent communiquer au CST, à vous et aux autres ministres. Comment pouvons-nous avoir l'assurance que cette information sera mise à part et non communiquée aux autres partis politiques?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Merci de cette question, car elle fait ressortir un point très important. Je l'ai déjà dit, mais je répéterai que le gouvernement ou le CST n'entendent pas demander de l'information aux partis politiques, mais plutôt leur en fournir. Jamais, en tout cas aux termes de ce mandat et de cet élément du mandat, le gouvernement ne reçoit de renseignements des partis politiques. La distinction est vraiment importante, car si nous voulons réussir, nous devons fournir un soutien et une aide aux partis politiques, et alors les partis et les Canadiens doivent savoir qu'il s'agit d'apporter une aide pour qu'ils puissent protéger leur information et non de recueillir de l'information, d'intervenir pour prélever des renseignements.

Vous avez quelque chose à ajouter?

M. Arnold Chan:

Dans le même ordre d'idée, madame la ministre, le CST fera-t-il une sorte d'évaluation des risques...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui.

M. Arnold Chan:

... des menaces lorsque vous donnerez ces conseils aux partis politiques? Cela vaudra-t-il pour tous les partis politiques et pas seulement pour ceux qui sont représentés aux Communes? Quelle est la portée de votre mandat?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

C'est une question à étudier. Selon le libellé actuel, il s'agit de tous les partis politiques représentés à la Chambre, mais il faudra en discuter avec le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications. Il n'a pas encore fait cette analyse, car cela ne fait pas partie de son mandat. Nous devrons en discuter avec ses responsables pour voir comment s'y prendre, mais il sera important que le CST analyse le contexte des menaces existantes, émergentes et possibles. Il y aura une analyse publique de la question, mais il y aura aussi une information plus abondante remise expressément aux partis politiques pour qu'ils puissent en faire l'usage qui leur semblera convenir.

M. Arnold Chan:

Pour l'information recueillie au cours de cette démarche, quel sera le mécanisme de rapport au Parlement? Fera-t-on rapport à ce comité-ci, au Comité de la sécurité publique ou même au nouveau Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement proposé dans le projet de loi C-22?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Cela reste à voir. Néanmoins, je crois qu'il serait très important de faire rapport au Parlement. Si le projet de loi C-22 est adopté, ce nouveau comité contrôlerait certainement cette information et y aurait accès. Le mandat du comité s'étendrait à tout ce qui se rapporte au renseignement ou au CST. Je répète tout de même qu'il est important de souligner que les renseignements recueillis ne proviendraient pas des partis politiques. Il s'agit de donner aux partis politiques des renseignements pour qu'ils se protègent. Cette distinction doit être limpide...

M. Arnold Chan: Bien sûr.

L'hon. Karina Gould: ... pour que chacun ait confiance.

(1300)

M. Arnold Chan:

Je voudrais revenir, dans le peu de temps qu'il me reste, environ deux minutes, peut-être...

Le président:

Une minute et demie.

M. Arnold Chan:

... sur des questions que mes collègues de l'opposition officielle ont soulevées au sujet de... Nous utilisons essentiellement des bulletins de vote sur papier, mais, selon les recommandations du rapport public du directeur général des élections, Élections Canada étudie le recours aux moyens technologiques pour améliorer le processus de scrutin, proposant même au comité une démonstration de certaines utilisations nouvelles de la technologie.

Y a-t-il quelque chose que le comité devrait étudier, tandis que vous appliquez votre lettre de mandat, si vous pensez qu'il peut y avoir un risque pour l'intégrité du processus de vote, puisque Élections Canada commence à étudier une utilisation plus large de la technologie pour améliorer ce processus?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

C'est une question vraiment importante, et nous devons nous en saisir.

Sauf erreur, les Pays-Bas ont confirmé le week-end dernier qu'ils reviendront aux bulletins sur papier à cause des risques.

Il faut se rappeler que des technologies peuvent aider les électeurs handicapés à voter plus facilement et il faut en tenir compte. Comment le Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre peut-il étudier certaines de ces technologies et garantir leur intégrité de façon à éviter tout risque d'abus et nous assurer que ces votes sont authentiques, valables et respectueux du processus démocratique?

J'encourage évidemment le comité à tenir compte de tout cela à l'avenir.

M. Arnold Chan:

Une dernière question rapide.

Ce n'était pas très clair à la lecture de votre lettre de mandat, madame la ministre, mais dans votre examen des menaces à la cybersécurité, votre mandat vous permet-il de faire des recommandations au président du Conseil du Trésor pour qu'il accorde des ressources supplémentaires si une évaluation révélait un risque pour l'intégrité des données à Élections Canada ou dans les partis politiques?

En somme, pouvez-vous nous donner la capacité de lutter contre les menaces?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Si vous voulez interpréter la lettre de mandat comme me confiant la responsabilité des institutions démocratiques et de l'intégrité du système, ce sont là des éléments qu'il ne faudra pas perdre de vue à l'avenir.

Ce serait un plaisir de connaître le point de vue du comité à ce sujet, au sujet de ce qu'il convient de faire à l'avenir. Il est très important que les Canadiens aient confiance dans le système pour que, lorsque viennent les élections, ils sachent qu'ils peuvent faire confiance aux résultats et aller de l'avant.

M. Arnold Chan:

Merci.

Le président:

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre, ainsi que les fonctionnaires, d'avoir accepté de comparaître.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Merci.

Le président:

Nous allons suspendre la séance pendant un quart d'heure et nous siégerons ensuite à huis clos pour discuter des travaux du comité.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on February 07, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.