header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-03-22 PROC 13

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

I call this meeting to order. This is meeting number 13 of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs in the first session of the 42nd Parliament.

At the moment, we are in public, but as I indicated, members, since we are planning to discuss witnesses for our first order of business for the study of a family-friendly House of Commons, I would suggest that we go in camera.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Mr. Chair, before we get there, I appreciate that. but there's an item of business that ought to be dealt with in public before we go in camera. That is the motion I moved back on February 25, which has been discussed but not voted on at every meeting since that time, relating to the members of the Senate advisory panel.

You may recall, it was to bring them before this committee within the month of March to deal with all aspects of their mandate. Just to make the point here, this was raised before March had started, and it has been raised at every meeting in the month of March, as well as at the last meeting in the month of February. There's only one more meeting in the month of March, and therefore, it seems reasonable to have a vote on this motion, up or down, today. So, I wonder if we could just deal with that item of business.

I have nothing to add to the discussions we've had about this, except to note that if it is of concern to the Liberal members, who have been delaying a vote on this for a month now, that the month of March is nearly over and it would be difficult to get the members of the panel and that at this point the actual first run of appointments has been made, I accept the validity of all those points and would be prepared to accept a friendly amendment that the members of the advisory panel be invited to come here in March or April, depending on what works for them.

I wonder if we could deal with that item first, and then I'd be happy to go in camera to deal with the witness list for the family-friendly changes to the Standing Orders.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Christopherson and then Ms. Sahota.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

I just wanted to echo Mr. Reid's request that we deal with that motion. I mean, at some point, even now, you could suggest that it's a bit after the fact, but there are points to be made, and if we're not dealing with it now, then I can't imagine when we would.

I agree. We should do it now.

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

I'm okay with going ahead and having the vote now. Let's do it.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Ms. Sahota and others, I would say simply this. If the amendment were made to extend it so it could be dealt with in March or April, thereby giving us.... March means having the witnesses here on Thursday, which might be problematic.

If that amendment were to be made, would that seem like a reasonable amendment? Obviously, the amendment can't be made if it's not supported by a majority of the committee, so I just ask that question.

It would simply allow the witnesses to come here in either March or April. We have only one meeting left in March. It might genuinely be inconvenient for them at this point to come in on 48 hours' notice, especially as they are in different places and there's an issue with having to first set up some kind of meeting, presumably involving multiple teleconferences. I see the logistical issues. That was the suggestion. It gives a bit more flexibility.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You mean on your motion.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes. I'm just trying to be as reasonable as possible.

Also, frankly, David, since you raised this, it is to make the point that, if this is voted down, it is because of the desire on the part of the government to simply have as closed a system as possible and as little public information as possible, and not to give an excuse to say that oh, well, there's no time.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Good. I appreciate that. Thank you.

Thanks, Chair.

The Chair:

Are there any comments?

David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I will just say very briefly that I've already made my point fairly clear as to why I disagree with the intent of the motion. It's not about the schedule, and I am prepared to vote at this time.

Mr. David Christopherson:

There's one more thing. We have to agree to do it first. I was just saying that it's not a vote. We actually have a debate under way that we have to pick up on.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm prepared to vote when you are.

The Chair:

Okay. Does anyone else want to speak to this motion?

Mr. Scott Reid:

You mean to the amendment, right?

The Chair:

I mean to the amendment.

Would everyone consider that to be a friendly amendment, to say that in March or April they could come?

Is there any objection to that? Okay, we can consider it amended.

(Amendment agreed to)

The Chair: Let me read the motion: That the federal members of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments be invited to appear before the committee before the end of March or April 2016, to answer all questions relating to their mandate and responsibilities.

All in favour of the motion.

(1110)

Mr. David Christopherson:

Whoa, whoa. I would like to speak.

The Chair:

Okay. I did ask if there was more debate and no one said anything.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm sorry. I was listening to you wrap things up, and you switched from describing to action. I'm sorry.

I wanted an opportunity to respond, and particularly to Mr. Graham's comments, because I believe that was one of the last presentations we heard. He was kind enough to reference me in his remarks and I want to return the favour.

In responding to his screed of March 8, it was interesting that he said: David Christopherson referred to this lack of a vote as a big mistake as we walked out of the room, a comment which I found regrettable as I do in fact have a good deal to say on the topic and appreciate having the time to say it.

Fine. I let him off the hook and the member wants to draw attention to it. That's fine.

The fact of the matter is that we were in the middle of a committee meeting. The government wanted a vote that would affirm the selection list to their new selection process, and we were having all kinds of debates here. The government really wanted that motion and, of course, they were going to win it because they have a majority. We all went out of our way to extend the meeting so that we would stay in order and the government could get to that motion, and the second to last thing we dealt with was an opposition issue. Then, instead of the government taking advantage of all the planning they had done and the extending of the meeting and going on for five or 10 minutes, instead of actually having that vote, they walked out and left the vote sitting on the table.

I was just pointing out the lack of focus, and the lack of the government's keeping an eye on what it wanted to achieve. They blew it.

Then Mr. Graham felt it necessary to give me an opportunity to point out again how the committee didn't even seem to know what they were doing. Anybody who's looking a little quizzical can go back and check the minutes. You'll see exactly what I'm talking about.

At the moment the government could have moved the motion they wanted, which was that this committee would have formally, even with the opposition voting against it.... With a majority they would have carried it and they would have got their affirmation. Instead, they didn't let it happen. After all the work we did to get to that part of the meeting so they could have this particular vote, we got there and they didn't call for the vote.

You want to give me an opportunity to underscore the incompetence of the government members on that particular issue again, so I'd take the opportunity, Mr. Graham.

I also found it quite interesting that further into the diatribe, he said, “As it happens, I do like the Senate in principle, and believe it has a fundamental and inherent value to our process...”.

I just wanted to say, Chair, through you to Mr. Graham, that this sounds like the ultimate Liberal insider. I don't know how much real-world work the member has done between school and getting involved in politics, but I know that the member is very active in the Liberal Party, very well connected, very well respected, I might say, and very well regarded. But this whole idea of “Oh, I'm that comfortable with the Senate and I want to bring it nice and close”, that's the viewpoint of the ultimate insider who sees a Senate appointment as the culmination of an insider's career.

The last thing I wanted to mention was that—I'm actually laying the groundwork for using this later, but I'm mentioning it now because it was in this context—Mr. Graham further said: While nobody on this side of the room knows how many motions were introduced and defeated, under the Conservatives' draconian use of in camera meetings, I would be hard pressed to believe no attempts were ever made.

On that one, I agree, and I intend to use that quote, if I can recall it at the time—because I have a lot of stuff—when we get back to my in camera motion, because it does speak directly to that.

I just wanted an opportunity to do that and to point out to colleagues that I agree with Mr. Reid. I mean, there was an attempt, and there still is, to try to deal with goodwill, for the most part. We're going to get into our troughs of partisanship, as I just did, but for the most part, we try to rise above that, and I don't think the government played fair with this at all. I'm not attacking, but there really was an attempt to be fair-minded on the part of Mr. Reid in terms of trying to have a timely visit by the minister.

If colleagues from the government benches will recall, it's in the committee Hansard. I actually said that I was going to take a risk and “trust the government”, because I wanted an absolute date for when the minister would come. Instead they insisted on language that said “when it fits the minister's schedule”. I raised the concern that's often used as a fig leaf, and when the time comes, they claim their schedule doesn't let them come. Then they can't come to the committee until it's far from being timely. That's exactly what happened, unfortunately.

(1115)



I want to point out to the government that I'm very disappointed. I did go out on a limb. You didn't need my vote to win, but you did need it to provide some sense that you weren't playing politics and were trying to be fair-minded. I took you at your word. I gave you my precious vote and said that I would trust, and I think that trust was betrayed, quite frankly.

It looks to me like the government has played games with this whole thing. In particular, the official opposition has been very strident in going after the government in terms of the detailed process on this, but so what? I mean, that's part of the process. Part of the problem is the secrecy around the selection process with the Senate. I'm not sure that the government has done themselves any favours by the process that they followed.

I just wanted to get a couple of those things off my chest. Unless somebody sparks a further response from me, I'm ready to vote.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

There are just a couple of things that I think are relevant.

Mr. Graham indicated that he had given us reasons earlier why he would be voting against this motion. I'm hoping to persuade him to reconsider voting against it on the following basis. He, along with Arnold Chan, indicated that we didn't need to get the members of the advisory panel back. Notwithstanding the fact that members of the advisory panel were prohibited from answering some questions, or in some cases I was prohibited from asking questions on the basis of the mandate we'd had at the earlier set of meetings, he said that we didn't need to get them back because those questions would be answered by the minister when the minister was here.

We got the minister here on March 10 and asked her a number of questions. In answer to some of the questions, she said, “I don't know. That's not what I was in charge of. It's a panel that has set up certain processes and acted independently of my control.”

Therefore, these are questions that I believe Mr. Graham may well have believed, in good faith, would be answered by the minister when she was here on March 10. She indicated that she could not answer them at that time. It was not a matter of her withholding information from us. She simply did not possess that information. The members of the panel were the only ones who could answer these questions.

There are some additional questions that seem logical to ask at this time, given the nature of the appointments. In fact we have literally no information at all—at all—on the reasons for this new information or these unexpected changes, the most obvious one being the appointment of seven people to the Senate when we were promised five. Something happened that was a deviation from the initial announcement and from, I have to assume, the initial plan as well. It does seem unlikely to me that the Prime Minister would have announced appointing five people, all the while thinking—I could do my Montgomery Burns imitation here—that he was really going to appoint seven people to the Senate. Even if he did have that kind of Mephistophelean inclination, I just don't think he'd use it for this purpose. And I'm not accusing him of being Montgomery Burns, just to be clear about that. But something happened that made us go to seven instead of five.

Here's my question. It's not the only question I want to ask, but it's a question I would want to ask. We are told that the way the process is set up, the panel makes five recommendations for each vacancy. The Prime Minister has the discretion to take from the list or to not take from the list. Now, when it comes to someone like Chantal Petitclerc, I find it hard to believe that her name was not on the list. But when it comes to the former head of the transition team for the Prime Minister, I mean, was he actually nominated through that process or was it simply an old-fashioned kind of nomination, where the Prime Minister says he needs somebody who he thinks will be a good representative of the government in the Senate? It's not, incidentally, an unreasonable position to take; it's just unreasonable to take it while pretending you're taking a different approach.

That could be what happened. Mr. Harder may or may not have been appointed through the regular process. I would want to ask that question. Was he one of the people who was on the list, or was he someone who was appointed from outside? If we say this is a transparent system—and the word “transparent” is used, not “quasi-transparent”, or “opaque”, or “frosted glass”, but “transparent”—then that's a reasonable question to get an answer to. The government gave no indication. They didn't say that, yes, they got.... The Prime Minister could say this, by the way. He's under no obligation not to indicate that, yes, he took him from outside the list. Likewise, the head of Premier Wynne's transition team was appointed. Was she from outside the list or not?

It's possible that both these people were recommended by independent nominations that came from the charitable sector, or a union, or something like that. It's possible that wasn't the case. But these seem like reasonable things to be asking. There would be a limit to what we can ask because of the “Protected B” status of information contained on those nomination forms, but we can comply with those rules and still ask some of the questions I'm outlining here.

(1120)



It seems reasonable to bring them before us to answer those questions, which do not put them in a position of disclosing information that it's inappropriate for them to disclose, given the formal agreement, or vow, or oath, or whatever it is that they undertook when they first came here. I'll conclude with that.

Finally, in the spirit of precision that my friend Mr. Graham likes so much—he pointed out, of course, on a previous occasion, that I had talked for 1,200 seconds in elaborating my points—I just want to point out that because we didn't deal with this at that meeting as I had requested, this has been delayed now since February 25, through March 8, March 10, March 22, which is today, which means that thanks to the unwillingness of the government to take a vote until a month had passed and the process was completed, we have been delayed by 139,968,000 seconds. I would like to bring that delay to a conclusion, although I'm in no position to stop others from speaking. Perhaps, if people are willing, we could try having our vote now.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Reid, for that precision.

Is there any other debate on the motion?

We'll call the vote on the motion.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's a recorded vote.

The Chair:

Yes, it's a recorded vote.

(Motion as amended negatived: nays 5; yeas 4)

The main item for business for this meeting is the witness list, the list that we got yesterday. Normally we go in camera to discuss witnesses. I'd just ask the committee....

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Mr. Chair, I would bring to your attention the fact that my motion is still outstanding regarding in camera.

However, I think that given the government's proposal that witness lists be in camera and the fact that at this stage I'm not likely to oppose that, although we haven't finished the discussions, I just wanted to say that I'm willing to go in camera on this in the absence of having set those ground rules, given that the matter at hand is not as divisive. Certainly, it's not a partisan divide and therefore, I don't think we'll get into the kinds of problems that we could if we haven't clarified what we can do in camera and what can be said outside, etc.

All of this is to say that I will support going in camera as long as it's understood that it's without prejudice, that we're not setting a pattern, and it's based on the belief that this is a non-partisan and non-controversial issue, and therefore, we should be able to do it without having finalized those rules.

I'm still looking forward at the earliest opportunity to get back in and nail that down so that as we go forward we don't have these lingering questions about what our rules of engagement are.

With that understanding, Mr. Chair, I'd be prepared to support going in camera to deal with the witness list.

(1125)

The Chair:

Is the government and the opposition in favour of going in camera?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes.

The Chair:

It's agreed. So we'll break for one minute.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

[Public proceedings resume]

(1210)

The Chair:

Okay, I'm going to ask again whether there is anyone opposed to the motion.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Well, it's in public now. They won't know the motion if you don't read it.

The Chair:

This is your motion.

Do you want to say it, or do you want me to say it again?

Mr. David Christopherson:

I couldn't repeat what you said if my life depended on it, and I'm not sure you can.

The Chair:

The motion is that the Speaker be asked to present to the committee a proposed change, or options of changes, to the Standing Orders, to deal with the concern he raised about him having the ability to deal with the hours of Parliament during or following an emergency.

Is anyone opposed to that motion?

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: The motion carried. It's our understanding that we'll deal with that as an issue by itself.

Now, what would the committee like to go on to?

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm okay with going with mine. The problem is that the point person on this particular file on the government side is not here, and I would certainly be respectful if they wanted that point first. If they want to plow ahead anyway and somebody else takes the lead to negotiate with me, I'm prepared to do that, but I'm also prepared to respect the fact that the member is not here.

He's done the homework to be the point person. If the government would prefer, I'm prepared to defer to the next available opportunity.

(1215)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think the member would appreciate the deferral.

The Chair:

He'd appreciate being here?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, a deferral would be appreciated, sir.

The Chair:

Okay, we'll wait for that.

Mr. David Christopherson:

We don't need a motion. We just need to understand that we won't do that right now out of respect for the honourable member. We'll pick it up as soon as we can, at the first opportunity.

The Chair:

Understood. Thanks, everyone, for the co-operation on that.

I do have another item that we should probably briefly chat about.

We have two witnesses who we need for main estimates, should we decide to call witnesses. One witness is the Chief Electoral Officer. We have to do the main estimates for his budget. Then we need to do the main estimates for the House of Commons, so we need the Clerk for that, and there's a deadline. The Clerk would be with the Parliamentary Protective Service, because they are two votes. I think we could do them both in the same hour.

What's the deadline for estimates before they just go ahead without us?

The Clerk:

May 31.

The Chair:

May 31.

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Absolutely we should be bringing them forward. I think it's important, and we should do it as soon as we can.

The Chair:

The suggestion is that we do this as soon as we can and that we definitely do it. It's our option whether or not to do it.

An hon. member: [Inaudible—Editor]

The Chair: Could they get here in half an hour? Probably not.

We could see if either of them is available, though the Clerk is not available on Thursday. It's pretty short notice. I'll work with the clerk to try to fit that in before May 31 for one hour.

Do we all agree that before May 31, we will have one hour for the Clerk and the protective services for those two votes, and one hour for the Chief Electoral Officer for the main estimates on Elections Canada?

Mr. Blake Richards:

We've had the Clerk here, but particularly with the Chief Electoral Officer, we might want to have a whole meeting for that. We've just been through an election. There are probably some significant questions. I think it would be advisable that we have a separate two-hour meeting with the Chief Electoral Officer to review the estimates.

The Chair:

We are already having a two-hour meeting with him on May 3.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, that's obviously for an informal informational session. We've been through those before.

I think it's important that he be here to answer questions from members. I think it should be a two-hour full meeting for that.

The Chair:

Are there any comments on that?

The suggestion is that the Clerk and protective services be one hour for their estimates, but the Chief Electoral Officer be two hours for his estimates.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'll just ask whether it is the intention of the Liberal members of the committee to block Conservative members, and me in particular, from asking questions other than those relating purely to the Chief Electoral Officer's estimates.

If, for example, I want to ask him about the timelines necessary to execute changes to the electoral system, or the point he made in his annual report that holding a referendum would require six months of preparations, that kind of thing—that's been very much on our minds on this side of the House—are the Liberal members going to say I'm not allowed to ask? Will they say, “Sorry, you can only ask about his estimates”, thereby denying us a chance to find out about another aspect of the transparent system, or are they going to be okay? I'll just ask them that.

The Chair:

Could you not ask him that on his two-hour briefing? Are you asking whether they're going to allow it?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I want it to be in a place that's actually public, so it's on the record and it's a public event, not at some....

The Chair:

We'll go to Ms. Vandenbeld and then Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

The Chief Electoral Officer is an officer of Parliament. Presumably, if we want to bring him in on any issue, we can ask him to come.

I'm cognizant, again, that we have a lot of witnesses to hear on the family-friendly Parliament study. When the Chief Electoral Officer comes, the estimates take one hour, so we can have that discussion. If there are other issues that you want to raise and ask the Chief Electoral Officer, I would imagine that we could let him know the subject area broadly and then have him come on that area, so he could be fully prepared if we're going to talk about other topics.

I would propose that we plan for one hour on the estimates and have him come for that. Should there be other topics, we can plan for calling the Chief Electoral Officer for another meeting.

(1220)

The Chair:

Let me give an update from the clerk.

Normally, the discussions on the main estimates are very broad, which would allow what you're asking for, Mr. Reid. Also, if we want to include his report on plans and priorities, it's often done at the same time as the main estimates.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That would be part of—

The Chair:

—the main estimates session.

Mr. Scott Reid:

—the main estimates. He did mention in his report the requirement for additional time.

The Chair:

That would be game.

Mr. Scott Reid:

All of that makes me think that, given the broad range of questions that ought to be asked, it would be more than a single hour. If we don't get him this spring on this, enough time will have expired that the door may have closed on certain options. It was the matter that I raised in my last question to the minister before the last break. It prompted some discussion. The Broadbent Institute indicated that it was also worried that the door was going to start closing very soon on certain options, potentially only being open for one type of change to the electoral system, which happens to be the one that the Prime Minister indicated a year ago is the one he likes. You can understand why I would want to have two hours.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks, Chair.

Ordinarily, I would agree entirely with bumping it up to two hours. I'm not opposed to it, but we do have a two-hour session tentatively set for May 3. That is to talk about everything to do with elections, virtually any question. I thought your guidance was pretty good, Chair, because you're right. At committee, you're allowed a lot more latitude than you are in the House, as a general rule. On estimates, you're allowed even further latitude because of the tradition and the nature of that business; people aren't boxed in to only being able to talk about one thing. If during the course of that meeting, we come up with issues that are going to be outside the parameters of the May 3 meeting, then by all means there should be a motion to extend it. It will be in public, so all of the pressure will be there. If there's good cause, we can set up a separate meeting to deal with that issue. But I suspect—and this is why I'm comfortable going with the process the way it's outlined—that virtually anything that we on the opposition, or the government, might want to ask would be eligible in that two hours and to raise the issue at least in the estimates process, where it can be signalled that we can talk about it further.

If we get to the point where something really important comes up during the meeting on the estimates, and some of my colleagues have said that they want to utilize that broader net, that's fair enough. I intend to do the same thing. I'm assuming the Chief Electoral Officer will just say that we can talk about that on May 3 with no problem, in which case we don't have a problem. But, if for some reason, and I can't think of what it might be now, but if something came up where it's not going to fit into the two hours, it's a legitimate issue, and we need more time, then by all means it's understood that a motion will be placed at that time and we as a committee would consider continuing.

I really think this is a safe way to go. The failsafe in there is that, if there are questions that can't be asked and/or can't be deferred over to the May 3 meeting, then by all means there's legitimacy to calling for that meeting to be extended for that sole purpose of talking about that one issue, if that's the only way we can get at it. I think this provides us with the opportunity to do that, if need be. Between this meeting and the two hours, I'm expecting that certainly any of the concerns I have, and I'm also anticipating any that other members may have, would be in order, would be allowed, and would be dealt with through one of the three venues offered up: the estimates hour, the two hours on May 3, or if necessary, a special meeting to deal with a special issue.

Thank you.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Based on that, it sounds to me as though you're saying it's probably quite important that meeting happen prior to the May 3 briefing.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

So you mean the two-hour meeting in public with the Chief Electoral Officer here.

The Chair:

Do you mean the estimates?

Mr. David Christopherson:

I mean so we have somewhere to send things if we want to talk about them further and not eat them up at that meeting.

(1225)

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's the only way that will work.

The Chair:

So should we do two hours for the estimates and priorities and plans?

Mr. David Christopherson:

We should have one hour on the estimates, but that meeting should happen before May 3.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

We'd have one hour for the Clerk, and one for the Chief Electoral Officer. That would be two hours.

Mr. David Christopherson:

But it has to be before May 3, before the next meeting.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

That's fine. It's one meeting on the estimates with one hour for the Clerk and one hour for the Chief Electoral Officer.

Mr. David Christopherson:

We'd have all the options in front of us, and we could either extend that meeting or push things to the May 3 meeting.

The Chair:

Before we go any further, I want some clarification.

My understanding is that the Chief Electoral Officer traditionally in June also brings a report on recommendations regarding the election that's just passed.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Is that for the May 3 meeting?

The Chair:

I don't think so. He's traditionally done two reports, one right after the election on how the election went, and that's what the briefing is basically about. Then later in the year, in June or when they've finished their analysis and everything, they come to PROC with a number of recommendations. Obviously, now we couldn't do that until probably the fall, if that's going to be the case—

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

That would give him an opportunity.

The Chair:

—which is probably fine as we're a few years out from an election.

Mr. Blake Richards:

So not knowing when that will take place, obviously it's important that we proceed with our plans. I'm firmly of the belief that one hour with the Chief Electoral Officer, given the magnitude of what he has to do and given some of the questions surrounding some of the changes that are coming.... There are a lot of questions for the Chief Electoral Officer. An hour is not very long and he has a very big mandate on behalf of all Canadians on our democratic freedoms. I think a two-hour session with him in public, at which there's an opportunity to ask about the estimates and other questions related to them is important.

I'll also add at this point that I am really troubled by the fact that we're starting to get more and more of this idea, and we've heard it again today, that we're going to box in members of Parliament about what they can and can't ask. If the Liberal government intends to try to do that, that's really quite concerning, because we're talking about the privilege of each individual member here to ask questions on behalf of their constituents. I'm really quite troubled by the fact that we're starting to get into this scenario where it's “Well, provide us a little bit of an idea ahead of time as to what you want to ask about and maybe we'll box it in so that we can't ask about other things”. That is really quite concerning to me. We don't want to start going down that road, because members of Parliament should have the freedom, on behalf of their constituents, to ask about whatever they choose to ask about when we have an officer of Parliament here before us.

The Chair:

We have two proposals, I think. Mr. Christopherson proposes that we have the Chief Electoral Officer for an hour on estimates, and then anything that we can't cover be deferred to May 3. Mr. Richards, and I'm sure the opposition agrees, proposes that we should have the estimates for two hours and also the briefing for two hours.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It seems to me, Chair, that right now the only difference is whether or not the initial meeting is one hour or two. I hear the arguments that Mr. Richards makes, and I don't disagree with anything that he is saying, but I am looking at the totality of all our responsibilities and all the things. We just finished talking about how tough it's going to be on that file, and I said that new stuff is coming, and here we are, already eating up more and more time. Time management is one of the key things that we do, and a lot of this stuff is non-partisan.

I hear Mr. Richards' points and I'm listening very carefully especially on this particular file. I like his attitude. I'm going to say parenthetically that I kind of wish I had heard that attitude a year or two ago. However, it's refreshing that it has arrived. But it seems to me—

Mr. Scott Reid:

I can explain. There's an explanation as to why that happened.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Do you want me to go on? I can: tick, tick, tick.

It seems to me though that we're not denying ourselves any options with what I've put forward, because I put forward that instead of two hours, we could do one hour with the understanding that virtually anything that would take more time would legitimately be part of the two-hour meeting. Keep in mind that with this officer, we have three hours planned for the very near future.

Again, if it's something that can't be dealt with within that one hour, we have the option of sending it over to the May 3 meeting when we'll have two hours with him. We've also agreed that if something comes up during that discussion that doesn't fit into the two-hour mandate of our meeting but we still believe is worth pursuing, it's understood that a motion would be placed and we would debate whether or not to continue that meeting.

I guess I'm saying why schedule that second hour, when every hour matters to us, if we don't have to? If it's necessary, we will, but if it's not necessary, we won't.

(1230)

The Chair:

I suppose for goodwill if one of the government members wanted to give up some time to the Conservatives during that time if they had more questions, that would be a possibility too. I will leave that up to the members.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It's always a possibility.

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota, you were on the list a long time ago and I ignored you. I'm sorry.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I think keeping it within one meeting is a good idea because, as Mr. Christopherson and I mentioned, we have a ton of things on our schedule. I think it's neat to keep the estimates and the Chief Electoral Officer within the one meeting, so one hour each. I agree, and any questions that we can't ask that day for whatever.... If you wanted to ask a particular question, you would probably be able to. I don't see why not.

We wouldn't be under the standing order that we were under for some of the other witnesses, which seems to be why there is some anxiety on that side. So within that time there should be plenty of time for everyone to ask the question that's most important to them.

The Chair:

The understanding is we would have one normal meeting for the main estimates, one hour for the Clerk and the protective services. In fact, if we finished a little early with that, we would then go on to the Chief Electoral Officer.

Then on May 3 we'd have his two-hour session and try to get anything in that we didn't in the first, but if there's still stuff, then we'd have a motion to call him back for yet another hour sometime. Is that okay? That's a compromise.

Mr. Blake Richards:

We're obviously not thrilled about the idea, but we see the numbers and we get where it's going.

Mr. Scott Reid:

We spent most of an hour debating on whether or not to spend an hour asking questions.

The Chair:

Okay, so that's how we'll proceed. We'll see if the clerk can attract these people at those times before May 3.

Is there any other business that people may think I've missed? Clerk, is there anything I missed on our to do list?

It's okay.

Does anyone have anything else? If not, we'll adjourn early.

The meeting stands adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Je déclare la séance ouverte. Il s'agit de la 13e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre pendant la première session de la 42e législature.

Pour l'instant, nous sommes en public, mais comme je l'ai mentionné, membres du Comité, puisque le premier point à l'ordre du jour porte sur la liste de témoins que l'on songe à appeler dans le cadre de l'étude des initiatives visant à favoriser une Chambre des communes propice à la vie de famille, je suggère que nous passions au huis clos.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Monsieur le président, je comprends, mais avant que nous en arrivions là, il y a un point dont nous devons traiter en public avant de passer au huis clos. Il s'agit de la motion que j'ai présentée le 25 février, qui a fait l'objet de discussions à toutes les réunions depuis, mais pas d'un vote. Elle se rapporte aux membres du Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat.

Vous vous souviendrez peut-être que la motion visait à les faire témoigner devant le Comité en mars pour parler de tous les aspects de leur mandat. Je tiens à préciser que la question a été soulevée avant le début du mois de mars et qu'elle l'a aussi été à chaque réunion de mars, ainsi qu'à l'occasion de la dernière réunion de février. Comme il ne reste qu'une seule autre réunion en mars, il semble raisonnable de mettre cette motion aux voix, pour ou contre, aujourd'hui. Alors je me demandais si on pourrait simplement traiter ce point à l'ordre du jour.

Je n'ai rien à ajouter aux discussions que nous avons tenues à ce sujet, sauf pour faire remarquer que si les députés libéraux, qui remettent le vote depuis maintenant un mois, se préoccupent du fait que mars est presque terminé, qu'il sera difficile de réunir les membres du comité et que, à ce stade, la première ronde de nominations a été faite, j'accepte la validité de tous ces points et je serais disposé à accepter une modification favorable pour que les membres du Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat soient invités à venir témoigner en mars ou en avril, selon ce qui leur convient le mieux.

Je me demande si nous pourrions traiter ce point en premier. Ensuite, je serais ravi de passer au huis clos afin d'examiner la liste de témoins pour apporter des changements au Règlement en vue de favoriser la vie de famille.

Le président:

Merci.

La parole est maintenant à M. Christopherson, qui la cédera ensuite à Mme Sahota.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

J'abonde dans le même sens que M. Reid et demande que l'on traite cette motion. À un moment donné, même maintenant, vous pourriez laisser entendre que c'est un peu après le fait, mais il y a des arguments à présenter, et si nous ne la traitons pas maintenant, je ne sais vraiment pas quand nous le ferons.

Je suis d'accord. Nous devrions le faire maintenant.

Le président:

Madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Je suis prête à ce qu'on passe au vote maintenant. Allons-y.

M. Scott Reid:

Madame Sahota et les autres, je tiens simplement à vous dire que si la modification visait à prolonger la motion pour que nous puissions la traiter en mars ou en avril, ce qui nous donnerait... Si on choisit mars, il faudrait accueillir les témoins jeudi, ce qui pourrait poser problème.

Est-ce que cette modification semblerait raisonnable? De toute évidence, elle ne peut être apportée sans l'appui de la majorité des membres du Comité, alors je ne fais que poser la question.

Elle permettrait simplement aux témoins de venir ici en mars ou en avril. Il ne nous reste qu'une seule réunion en mars. Peut-être ne seront-ils pas du tout disposés à venir témoigner à 48 heures d'avis, surtout s'ils se trouvent à différents endroits et s'il faut d'abord organiser une sorte de réunion, qui supposerait probablement de multiples téléconférences. Je vois les problèmes au plan logistique. C'est la suggestion qu'on a faite. Elle donne un peu plus de latitude.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous voulez dire en ce qui concerne votre motion.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui. J'essaie simplement d'être aussi raisonnable que possible.

Et franchement, David, puisque vous avez soulevé la question, c'est pour montrer que si la modification est rejetée, c'est parce que le gouvernement souhaite avoir un système aussi fermé que possible et donner aussi peu d'information que possible au public, et pas pour prétexter un manque de temps.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est bien. Je comprends. Merci.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Y a-t-il des commentaires?

David.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

J'aimerais simplement dire très brièvement que j'ai déjà dit clairement que je ne suis pas d'accord avec l'intention de la motion. Ce n'est pas une question d'échéancier, et je suis prêt à voter maintenant.

M. David Christopherson:

Il y a un autre point. Nous devons d'abord convenir de le faire. Je disais simplement qu'il ne s'agit pas d'un vote. Nous avons déjà entamé une discussion que nous devons poursuivre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis prêt à voter quand vous le serez.

Le président:

D'accord. Est-ce que quelqu'un d'autre veut parler de cette motion?

M. Scott Reid:

Vous voulez dire la modification, n'est-ce pas?

Le président:

Oui, je veux dire la modification.

Est-ce que tout le monde considère que le fait de dire que les membres du comité consultatif pourraient venir en mars ou en avril constitue une modification favorable?

Y a-t-il des objections? D'accord, nous pouvons considérer que la motion est modifiée.

(La modification est adoptée.)

Le président: Permettez-moi de lire la motion: Que les membres fédéraux du Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat soient invités à comparaître devant le Comité avant la fin de mars 2016, pour répondre à toutes les questions concernant leur mandat et leurs responsabilités.

Tous ceux qui sont en faveur de la motion?

(1110)

M. David Christopherson:

Oh là! J'aimerais parler.

Le président:

D'accord. J'ai demandé si quelqu'un avait quelque chose à ajouter, et personne n'a rien dit.

M. David Christopherson:

Désolé. Je vous écoutais récapituler, et vous êtes passé de la description à l'action. Désolé.

Je voulais avoir une occasion de répondre, en particulier aux commentaires de M. Graham, car je crois que c'était une des dernières présentations que nous avons entendues. Il a eu la gentillesse de parler de moi dans ses remarques, et je veux lui rendre la pareille.

S'agissant de sa missive du 8 mars, il est intéressant qu'il ait dit: Alors que nous quittions la salle, David Christopherson a déclaré que le fait de ne pas voter était une énorme erreur, commentaire que je trouve regrettable puisqu'en fait, j'ai beaucoup à dire sur le sujet et j'apprécie d'avoir le temps de le dire.

C'est bien. Je l'ai laissé passer, et le député veut attirer l'attention sur ce commentaire. Soit.

Le fait est que nous étions en pleine réunion du Comité. Le gouvernement voulait que l'on vote pour confirmer la liste de sélection de son nouveau processus de sélection, et nous tenions toutes sortes de discussions à ce sujet. Le gouvernement voulait vraiment que cette motion soit adoptée et, bien sûr, il allait arriver à ses fins parce qu'il est majoritaire. Nous nous sommes tous efforcés de prolonger la réunion pour suivre l'ordre du jour et faire en sorte que le gouvernement puisse en venir à cette motion, et l'avant-dernier point que nous avons traité a été une question de l'opposition. Ensuite, au lieu de tirer parti de toute la planification qu'il avait faite et de la prolongation de la réunion de 5 ou 10 minutes, au lieu de passer aux voix, les membres du gouvernement sont partis et ont laissé le vote en suspens.

Je faisais simplement remarquer le fait que le gouvernement n'est pas concentré sur les objectifs qu'il souhaite atteindre. Il a manqué son coup.

Ensuite, M. Graham a jugé bon de me donner une occasion de faire remarquer encore une fois comment le Comité ne semblait même pas savoir ce qu'il faisait. Quiconque a l'air un peu perplexe peut retourner en arrière pour lire le compte rendu. Vous comprendrez exactement ce dont je parle.

À ce moment-là, le gouvernement aurait pu présenter la motion qu'il voulait, et la faire adopter officiellement, même sans le vote de l'opposition, car avec sa majorité, il pouvait le faire. Au lieu de cela, il ne l'a pas fait. Après tout le travail que nous avons accompli pour arriver à cette partie de la réunion et permettre aux libéraux de tenir ce vote en particulier, le moment venu, ils n'ont pas demandé que la motion soit mise aux voix.

Vous voulez me donner une autre occasion de souligner l'incompétence des membres du gouvernement sur ce point en particulier, alors j'en profite, monsieur Graham.

J'ai aussi trouvé très intéressant qu'un peu plus loin dans sa diatribe, il a affirmé, « Il se trouve que moi, j'aime le principe du Sénat, qui, à mon avis, joue un rôle fondamental et inhérent dans notre processus... ».

Je tenais simplement à m'adresser à M. Graham par votre intermédiaire pour dire qu'on croirait que cela vient du dernier initié libéral. J'ignore dans quelle mesure le député a travaillé dans le vrai monde entre ses études et le début de sa carrière politique, mais je sais qu'il est très actif au sein du Parti libéral, qu'il a de très bonnes relations, qu'il est très respecté, je dirais, et qu'il est tenu en haute estime. Mais l'idée que « Oh, je suis tellement à l'aise avec le Sénat que je veux m'en rapprocher » est le point de vue du dernier initié qui voit une nomination au Sénat comme le point culminant de la carrière d'un initié.

La dernière chose que je voulais mentionner est que — en fait, je jette les bases d'un argument que je veux soulever plus tard, mais je le mentionne maintenant parce qu'il était dans ce contexte — M. Graham a ajouté: Bien que personne de ce côté-ci de la salle ne sache combien de motions ont été présentées et rejetées, j'ai du mal à croire, compte tenu de l'usage excessif qu'ont fait les conservateurs des réunions à huis clos, qu'aucune tentative n'a été faite en ce sens.

Je suis d'accord sur ce point et j'ai l'intention d'utiliser cette citation, si je peux m'en rappeler le moment venu — car j'ai beaucoup de choses — lorsque nous reviendrons à ma motion à huis clos, car il en est précisément question.

Je voulais simplement avoir l'occasion de le faire et de faire remarquer à mes collègues que je suis d'accord avec M. Reid. On a tenté, et on tente toujours, de traiter la question en faisant preuve de bonne volonté, du moins en général. Nous allons tous nous camper dans nos discours partisans, comme je viens de le faire, mais en général, nous essayons de nous élever au-dessus de la mêlée, et je ne pense pas que le gouvernement ait joué franc jeu dans ce cas. Pas du tout. Je n'attaque personne, mais M. Reid a vraiment tenté d'être juste lorsqu'il a essayé de faire en sorte que le ministre vienne en temps opportun.

Les collègues du gouvernement se rappelleront que le tout se trouve dans le compte rendu du Comité. En fait, j'ai dit que j'allais prendre le risque de « faire confiance au gouvernement », car je voulais connaître la date exacte de la visite ministérielle. Au lieu de cela, ils ont insisté pour employer un libellé qui disait « lorsque cela conviendra au ministre ». J'ai fait valoir que cette phrase sert souvent de prétexte pour ne pas se présenter à la réunion le moment venu. Le ministre ne peut alors assister à la réunion qu'une fois que le moment n'est plus du tout opportun. C'est exactement ce qui s'est passé, malheureusement.

(1115)



Je tiens à faire part au gouvernement de ma grande déception. J'ai pris un risque. Le gouvernement n'avait pas besoin de mon vote pour gagner, mais il en avait besoin pour donner l'impression qu'il ne faisait pas de la basse politique et qu'il s'efforçait d'être impartial. Je me suis fié à sa parole. J'ai donné mon précieux vote au gouvernement et, partant, ma confiance. Or, en toute franchise, j'estime que ma confiance a été trahie.

Il semble que le gouvernement s'est livré à des manoeuvres politiques dans ce dossier. Je souligne en particulier que l'opposition officielle a réclamé avec virulence que le gouvernement expose le processus détaillé qui a été suivi, mais qu'importe. Je sais que cela fait partie du processus. Une partie du problème tient au secret qui entoure le processus de sélection des sénateurs. Je suis loin d'être certain que le processus retenu par le gouvernement lui ait rendu service.

Je voulais simplement dire certaines choses que j'avais sur le coeur. À moins que quelqu'un ne m'amène à faire d'autres commentaires, je suis prêt à voter.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Christopherson.

Monsieur Reid, vous avez la parole.

M. Scott Reid:

J'estime que seuls quelques éléments sont pertinents.

M. Graham a indiqué nous avoir donné plus tôt certaines des raisons pour lesquelles il entend voter contre cette motion. J'espère le persuader de revenir sur sa position à la lumière des faits que voici. M. Graham, à l'instar de M. Arnold Chan, a indiqué qu'il n'était pas nécessaire de convoquer de nouveau les membres du comité consultatif. En dépit du fait que les membres de ce comité ont été empêchés de répondre à certaines questions et que j'ai moi-même été empêché de poser des questions qui s'inscrivent dans le droit fil du mandat établi au début de nos séances, M. Graham a affirmé qu'il n'y avait pas lieu de convoquer de nouveau ces témoins parce que la ministre répondrait aux questions lors de sa comparution devant le Comité.

Or, lorsque la ministre a comparu devant le Comité le 10 mars, nous lui avons posé de nombreuses questions auxquelles elle a répondu qu'elle ne savait pas, qu'elle n'était pas responsable de ce dossier et que le comité consultatif avait établi certains processus de façon indépendante.

Par conséquent, je crois que M. Graham a cru, en toute bonne foi, que la ministre répondrait à ces questions lors de sa comparution le 10 mars. Or, elle a indiqué ne pas être en mesure de répondre à ce moment-là. Je ne dis pas qu'elle a refusé de nous communiquer de l'information, je dis plutôt qu'elle ne l'avait tout simplement pas. Les membres du comité consultatif étaient les seuls à pouvoir répondre à ces questions.

Compte tenu de la nature des nominations, il semble logique de poser certaines questions additionnelles. En fait, nous ne disposons d'absolument aucune information sur les motifs de ces nouveautés ou de ces changements inattendus, dont le plus évident est la nomination au Sénat de sept personnes plutôt que de cinq tel que prévu. J'imagine qu'un événement quelconque a entraîné la modification de l'annonce initiale et, par voie de conséquence, du plan initial. Il me semble peu probable que le premier ministre ait annoncé la nomination de cinq personnes au Sénat alors qu'il savait — je pourrais faire une imitation de Montgomery Burns maintenant — qu'il allait en nommer sept. Par ailleurs, même si le premier ministre avait eu l'idée de tromper, je ne pense pas qu'il l'aurait fait dans cette situation. Je tiens à ce qu'il soit bien clair que je ne l'accuse pas de jouer les Montgomery Burns. Néanmoins, il s'est produit quelque chose qui a entraîné la nomination de sept sénateurs plutôt que de cinq.

Voici ma question. Ce n'est pas la seule que je veux poser, mais je tiens à la poser. On nous a dit que le processus prévoit que le comité consultatif fait cinq recommandations pour chaque vacance. Le premier ministre a la discrétion de tenir compte de cette liste s'il le souhaite. Pour ce qui est de la nomination d'une personne comme Chantal Petitclerc, j'ai du mal à croire que son nom ne figurait pas sur la liste. Cependant, je me demande si la candidature de l'ancien chef de l'équipe de transition du premier ministre a été soumise à ce processus ou si le premier ministre a plutôt procédé à l'ancienne et l'a nommé sachant qu'il représenterait bien le gouvernement au Sénat. Soit dit en passant, cette façon de faire n'est pas déraisonnable en soi. Ce qui est inacceptable c'est de procéder de cette façon en prétendant qu'on a retenu une approche différente.

C'est peut-être ce qui est arrivé. La nomination de M. Harder n'a peut-être pas été le résultat du processus régulier. J'aimerais donc poser la question suivante. Le nom de M. Harder figurait-il sur la liste ou sa nomination a-t-elle été exclue du processus? Si on soutient que nous avons un système transparent — et on utilise effectivement le terme « transparent », non « presque transparent » ou « opaque » ou « semi-transparent » —, il est alors raisonnable de poser cette question et de s'attendre à ce qu'on y réponde. Le gouvernement n'a donné aucune indication à cet égard. Il n'a dit ni oui ni non... Le premier ministre pourrait donner une explication. Rien ne l'oblige à ne pas reconnaître que le nom de M. Harder ne figurait pas sur la liste. Dans le même ordre d'idées, la chef de l'équipe de transition de la première ministre Wynne a elle aussi été nommée à un poste important. Son nom figurait-il sur une liste de candidats recommandés?

Il se peut que les deux personnes en question aient fait l'objet d'une recommandation indépendante soutenue par le secteur caritatif, un syndicat ou un autre organisme. Il se peut que ce ne soit pas le cas. Néanmoins, il semble raisonnable de s'interroger. Cependant, comme l'information contenue dans les formulaires de nomination est classée « Protégé B », certaines limites s'appliquent à ce qu'on peut demander. Quoi qu'il en soit, il est possible de poser certaines questions, ce que je fais, tout en respectant les règles.

(1120)



Il semble raisonnable de convoquer de nouveau les témoins pour qu'ils répondent à ces questions. Leur comparution ne les force pas à divulguer de l'information protégée, compte tenu de la déclaration solennelle ou du serment qu'ils ont fait lorsqu'ils ont comparu la première fois devant le Comité. Voilà ce que j'avais à dire à ce sujet.

Enfin, pour nous en tenir à la précision que mon estimé collègue, M. Graham, apprécie tant — il a un jour fait remarquer que j'avais fait un exposé de 1 200 secondes —, je signale que comme nous ne nous sommes pas prononcés lors de cette séance comme je l'avais demandé, le vote a été reporté au 25 février, puis au 8 mars, ensuite au 10 mars et, enfin, au 22 mars, soit aujourd'hui. Autrement dit, parce que le gouvernement a voulu attendre qu'un mois se soit écoulé et que le processus soit terminé avant de voter sur la question, nous sommes en retard de 139 968 000 secondes. J'aimerais que ce retard cesse de s'allonger, même si je ne suis pas en mesure d'empêcher les autres de prendre la parole. Si tout le monde est d'accord, nous pourrions procéder au vote maintenant.

Le président:

Merci de cette précision, monsieur Reid.

Quelqu'un d'autre souhaite-t-il intervenir au sujet de la motion?

Nous allons mettre la motion aux voix.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est un vote par appel nominal.

Le président:

Oui, c'est un vote par appel nominal.

(La motion modifiée est rejetée par 5 voix contre 4.)

Le principal point à l'ordre du jour de la séance est la liste des témoins que nous avons eue hier. Normalement, nous en discutons à huis clos. Je demanderais simplement au Comité...

Monsieur Christopherson, vous avez la parole.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, j'attire votre attention sur le fait que la motion que j'ai présentée sur le huis clos est toujours en suspens.

Cependant, comme le gouvernement a proposé que les listes de témoins soient examinées à huis clos et que je n'ai pas l'intention pour l'instant de m'y opposer, même si nous n'avons pas fini de discuter, j'accepte la tenue d'une séance à huis clos, faute de règles établies et compte tenu que la question ne suscite pas la controverse. En l'absence de différends partisans, nous ne devrions pas avoir de problèmes comme cela aurait pu être le cas si nous n'avions pas précisé entre autres ce qu'il est possible de faire à huis clos et ce qu'il est possible de dire à l'extérieur.

Bref, j'appuie l'idée de poursuivre la séance à huis clos à condition qu'il soit entendu que c'est sous réserve de tous droits, que nous ne créons pas un précédent et que cette décision est prise parce que nous traitons d'une question non partisane qui ne suscite pas la controverse et que, de ce fait, nous devrions pouvoir nous acquitter de la tâche sans avoir établi des règles définitives.

Néanmoins, je suis impatient d'établir les règles à la première occasion, pour qu'à l'avenir nous n'ayons pas à nous interroger sur la façon de procéder.

Monsieur le président, à ces conditions, je suis prêt à poursuivre la séance à huis clos pour étudier la liste des témoins.

(1125)

Le président:

Le gouvernement et l'opposition sont-ils d'accord pour poursuivre la séance à huis clos?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui.

Le président:

C'est entendu. Nous prenons une pause d'une minute.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

[La séance publique reprend.]

(1210)

Le président:

D'accord, je demande encore une fois si quelqu'un s'oppose à la motion.

M. David Christopherson:

Comme la séance est publique maintenant, les personnes qui nous écoutent ne connaîtront pas la teneur de la motion si vous n'en faites pas la lecture.

Le président:

Voici votre motion.

Voulez-vous la lire ou préférez-vous que je le fasse de nouveau?

M. David Christopherson:

Je ne pourrais pas répéter ce que vous avez dit même si ma vie en dépendait, mais j'espère que vous le pouvez.

Le président:

La motion porte que le Président soit tenu de présenter au Comité toute modification ou toutes possibilités de modifications au Règlement, pour régler le problème qu'il a soulevé quant à sa capacité d'intervenir à l'égard des heures du Parlement pendant ou après une situation d'urgence.

Quelqu'un s'oppose-t-il à cette motion?

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président: La motion est adoptée. Si je comprends bien, cette question fera l'objet d'un point distinct à l'ordre du jour.

Sur quoi le Comité aimerait-il se pencher maintenant?

M. David Christopherson:

Je suis prêt à ce que nous examinions la question que j'ai soulevée. Le problème c'est que le ministériel qui agit à titre de personne-ressource dans ce dossier est absent. Je comprendrais fort bien que les ministériels veuillent intervenir en premier. D'autre part, s'ils souhaitent amorcer la discussion quand même et que l'un d'entre eux est disposé à négocier avec moi, j'y suis disposé, mais je suis également prêt à attendre par respect pour le député.

Il a accepté d'agir à titre de personne-ressource. Si le gouvernement le veut, je suis disposé à reporter la question à la première occasion.

(1215)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je pense que le député apprécierait le report.

Le président:

Il aimerait être ici j'imagine.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, un report serait apprécié, monsieur.

Le président:

D'accord, c'est ce que nous attendrons.

M. David Christopherson:

Il n'est pas nécessaire de présenter une motion. Il suffit de comprendre que nous n'examinerons pas cette question tout de suite par respect pour le député. Nous l'étudierons dès que nous le pourrons, à la première occasion.

Le président:

D'accord. Je vous remercie tous de votre collaboration à cet égard.

Par ailleurs, nous devrions probablement discuter brièvement d'un autre point.

Nous devons entendre deux témoins au sujet du Budget principal des dépenses, si nous décidons de convoquer des témoins. L'un d'eux est le directeur général des élections, puisqu'il nous incombe d'examiner le Budget principal des dépenses de l'organisme qu'il dirige. Nous devons ensuite étudier le Budget principal des dépenses de la Chambre des communes. Pour ce faire, nous devons convoquer le greffier et il y a un délai à respecter. Le greffier serait convoqué en même temps que le Service de protection parlementaire, parce qu'ils font l'objet de deux postes budgétaires. Je pense que nous pourrions entendre les deux témoins au cours de la même heure.

Quel est le délai pour le Budget des dépenses avant qu'il ne soit présenté sans que le Comité ne l'ait examiné?

La greffière:

Le 31 mai.

Le président:

Le 31 mai.

Monsieur Richards, vous avez la parole.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Nous devrions absolument convoquer ces témoins. J'estime que c'est important et que nous devrions le faire le plus tôt possible.

Le président:

Le député estime qu'il faut certainement entendre ces témoins et qu'il faut le faire le plus rapidement possible. Je signale cependant que nous n'y sommes pas obligés.

Un député: [Inaudible—Éditeur]

Le président: Ces témoins pourraient-ils être ici dans une demi-heure? Probablement pas.

Nous pourrions nous renseigner pour savoir si l'un ou l'autre de ces témoins est disponible. Je sais toutefois que le greffier n'est pas disponible le jeudi. Nous ne leur donnons qu'un très court préavis. Je vais vérifier avec le greffier s'il est possible de trouver un moment, avant le 31 mai, où il pourrait venir témoigner pendant une heure.

Sommes-nous tous d'accord pour convoquer pour une séance d'une heure, avant le 31 mai, le greffier et un représentant des Services de protection parlementaire, au sujet des deux postes budgétaires correspondants, et le directeur général des élections, également pour une séance d'une heure sur le Budget principal des dépenses d'Élections Canada?

M. Blake Richards:

Le greffier a déjà comparu devant le Comité. Pour ce qui est de la comparution du directeur général des élections, nous pourrions peut-être prévoir une séance entière. Nous venons tout juste d'avoir une élection. Il y aura probablement des questions intéressantes. Je pense qu'il serait bon de prévoir une séance distincte de deux heures avec le directeur général des élections pour examiner le Budget principal des dépenses d'Élections Canada.

Le président:

Nous avons déjà prévu une séance de deux heures avec lui, le 3 mai.

M. Blake Richards:

Effectivement. Cependant, il s'agit d'une séance d'information non officielle. Nous avons déjà assisté à ce genre de séance.

Il est important que le directeur général des élections soit ici pour répondre aux questions des membres du Comité. J'estime que nous devons réserver une séance de deux heures complète à ce témoin.

Le président:

Quelqu'un souhaite-t-il faire des observations à ce sujet?

Le député suggère de consacrer une heure de séance au témoignage du greffier et à l'étude du Budget principal des dépenses des Services de protection parlementaire, mais une séance entière de deux heures au directeur général des élections et au Budget principal des dépenses de l'organisme qu'il dirige.

Monsieur Reid, vous avez la parole.

M. Scott Reid:

J'aimerais simplement savoir si les libéraux qui sont membres du Comité ont l'intention d'empêcher les membres conservateurs, moi en particulier, de poser des questions sur d'autres sujets que strictement le Budget principal des dépenses d'Élections Canada.

Je pourrais, par exemple, demander au directeur général des élections combien de temps il faut pour apporter des changements au système électoral, ou lui poser une question sur le fait qu'il a déclaré dans son rapport annuel que la tenue d'un référendum exigerait six mois de préparation. Ces questions préoccupent énormément les député de ce côté-ci de la Chambre. Les députés libéraux vont-ils dire que je n'ai pas le droit de poser ce genre de questions? Nous diront-ils que les questions doivent uniquement porter sur le Budget principal des dépenses? Si c'est le cas, cela nous priverait d'une occasion de découvrir un autre aspect du système transparent. J'aimerais simplement savoir s'ils vont nous permettre de poser des questions.

Le président:

Ne serait-il pas possible de poser ces questions lors de la séance d'information de deux heures? Demandez-vous si les députés libéraux permettront que vous posiez ces questions?

M. Scott Reid:

Je veux poser ces questions dans une arène publique, à l'occasion d'un événement public, pour que tout le monde soit au courant, non dans le cadre d'un...

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Vandenbeld, puis à Mme Sahota.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Le directeur général des élections est un agent du Parlement. Vraisemblablement, si nous souhaitons entendre son témoignage sur un sujet quelconque, il nous suffit de le convoquer.

Je sais également que nous avons de nombreux témoins à entendre sur l'étude des initiatives visant à favoriser un Parlement propice à la vie familiale. Lors de la comparution du directeur général des élections, seulement une heure sera consacrée au Budget principal des dépenses, nous pourrions ensuite aborder cette question. Si vous souhaitez aborder d'autres questions avec le directeur général des élections, j'imagine que nous pourrions lui donner une idée générale des sujets pour qu'il puisse se préparer en conséquence.

Je propose que nous convoquions le directeur général des élections pour un examen d'une heure sur le Budget principal des dépenses d'Élections Canada. Si nous souhaitons aborder d'autres sujets, nous pouvons le convoquer à une autre séance.

(1220)

Le président:

Permettez-moi de vous donner certaines précisions de la part du greffier.

Normalement, les discussions sur le Budget principal des dépenses sont très générales, ce qui vous permettrait de poser le genre de questions que vous souhaitez monsieur Reid. Par ailleurs, nous pourrions également examiner le rapport sur les plans et les priorités. Cet examen se fait souvent en même temps que celui du Budget principal des dépenses.

M. Scott Reid:

Cela ferait partie de...

Le président:

... la séance sur le Budget principal des dépenses.

M. Scott Reid:

... du Budget principal des dépenses. Le directeur général des élections a mentionné dans son rapport qu'il fallait plus de temps.

Le président:

Ce serait bien.

M. Scott Reid:

Tout cela me porte à croire qu'une séance de plus d'une heure serait de mise, vu le large éventail de questions que nous aurions à poser. Si nous ne convoquons pas le directeur général des élections ce printemps, il s'écoulera assez de temps pour que certaines options deviennent impossibles. C'est ce que j'avais fait valoir dans ma dernière question à la ministre avant la dernière relâche. Ce point avait déclenché quelques discussions. L'Institut Broadbent avait dit craindre que certaines options ne soient plus réalisables, car la porte se fermerait très bientôt et, au final, nous ne pourrions apporter qu'un seul type de changement au système électoral, soit celui préconisé par le premier ministre il y a un an. Vous comprendrez pourquoi je tiens à ce qu'on organise une réunion de deux heures.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Normalement, je serais tout à fait d'accord pour que l'on tienne une réunion de deux heures. Je ne m'y oppose pas, mais nous avons déjà prévu temporairement une séance de deux heures pour le 3 mai. C'est à cette occasion que nous parlerons de tout ce qui touche les élections et que nous pourrons poser pratiquement n'importe quelle question à ce sujet. J'ai trouvé votre observation plutôt bonne, monsieur le président, parce que vous avez raison. En règle générale, nous avons une beaucoup plus grande marge de manoeuvre aux comités qu'à la Chambre. Lorsqu'il s'agit de prévisions budgétaires, la tradition veut que notre marge de manoeuvre soit encore plus grande, de par la nature même du travail; les gens ne sont pas tenus de se limiter à un seul sujet. Si cette réunion met en évidence des questions qui dépassent les paramètres de la séance du 3 mai, alors n'hésitons pas à proposer une motion de prolongation. Comme ce sera une séance publique, la pression sera au rendez-vous. Si nous avons de bonnes raisons de le faire, nous pourrons organiser une autre réunion pour nous occuper de ces questions. Mais j'ai l'impression que toutes les questions seront recevables durant ces deux heures — et c'est pourquoi je suis à l'aise avec l'idée de maintenir le programme tel quel; du côté de l'opposition comme du côté du gouvernement, nous pourrons soulever pratiquement toutes les questions voulues, du moins, dans le cadre du processus budgétaire, à défaut de quoi nous pourrons décider d'y consacrer plus de temps.

Si jamais nous devions cerner un problème vraiment important durant la réunion sur le Budget principal des dépenses, c'est de bonne guerre, et certains de mes collègues ont dit vouloir profiter de la portée générale des discussions. J'ai l'intention de faire la même chose. Je suppose que le directeur général des élections dira simplement que nous pourrons en parler sans problème le 3 mai, et nous n'y voyons aucun inconvénient. Mais si, pour une raison ou pour une autre — et je n'ai pas d'exemple en tête pour l'instant —, nous avons besoin de plus de temps parce qu’une question légitime est soulevée et que les deux heures ne suffisent pas, alors il va de soi qu'une motion sera présentée à ce moment-là pour que le Comité examine la possibilité de poursuivre la discussion.

Je crois vraiment que la façon la plus sûre de procéder. Nous avons ainsi une garantie: s'il y a des questions que nous ne pouvons pas poser ou que nous ne pouvons pas reporter à la séance du 3 mai, alors il sera tout à fait légitime de demander que la réunion soit prolongée dans le seul but de discuter de la question particulière, en cas de nécessité. Entre cette réunion et la séance de deux heures, si je relève des inquiétudes, et je prévois que d'autres députés le feront aussi, je m'attends à ce qu'elles soient recevables, c'est-à-dire à ce qu'elles puissent être abordées dans le cadre de l'une des trois tribunes possibles: la réunion d'une heure sur le Budget principal des dépenses, la réunion de deux heures prévue pour le 3 mai ou, au besoin, une réunion spéciale consacrée à l'étude d'une question particulière.

Merci.

M. Blake Richards:

À la lumière de ces observations, vous êtes en train de dire, me semble-t-il, qu'il est peut-être très important de tenir une réunion avant la séance d'information du 3 mai.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous parlez donc de la séance publique de deux heures, durant laquelle comparaîtra le directeur général des élections.

Le président:

Voulez-vous dire la réunion sur le Budget principal des dépenses?

M. David Christopherson:

Ce que je veux dire, c'est que nous aurons l'occasion de reporter des questions si nous voulons en parler plus en profondeur, au lieu d'épuiser le temps dont nous disposerons durant cette réunion.

(1225)

Le président:

D'accord.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est le seul moyen d'y arriver.

Le président:

Devrions-nous consacrer deux heures au Budget principal des dépenses et au rapport sur les plans et les priorités?

M. David Christopherson:

Nous devrions consacrer une heure au Budget principal des dépenses, mais cette réunion devrait avoir lieu avant le 3 mai.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Nous consacrerions donc une heure au témoignage du greffier et une autre heure à celui du directeur général des élections, ce qui fait deux heures en tout.

M. David Christopherson:

Mais cela doit se faire avant le 3 mai, avant la prochaine réunion.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

C'est bien. Il s'agit d'une seule réunion sur le Budget principal des dépenses, dans le cadre de laquelle nous réserverons une heure au greffier et une autre heure au directeur général des élections.

M. David Christopherson:

Nous étudierions les différentes options à notre disposition, et nous pourrions soit prolonger cette réunion, soit reporter des questions à la séance du 3 mai.

Le président:

Avant d'aller plus loin, j'aimerais obtenir une précision.

À ma connaissance, le directeur général des élections présente habituellement en juin un rapport sur les recommandations concernant les dernières élections.

M. David Christopherson:

Parlez-vous de la séance du 3 mai?

Le président:

Je ne crois pas. Le directeur général des élections prépare d'habitude deux rapports. Le premier, qui est produit juste après les élections, porte sur le déroulement des élections; ce sera, au fond, l'objet de la séance d'information. Ensuite, plus tard dans l'année, en juin ou une fois l'analyse terminée, il comparaît devant le comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre pour présenter un certain nombre de recommandations. Bien entendu, dans l'état actuel des choses, nous ne pourrions pas tenir une telle réunion avant probablement l'automne, le cas échéant...

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Il aurait ainsi assez de temps.

Le président:

... ce qui est peut-être correct, car nous avons encore quelques années avant les prochaines élections.

M. Blake Richards:

Comme nous ne savons pas quand une telle réunion aura lieu, il est évidemment important que nous poursuivions nos plans. Je crois fermement qu’une séance d'une heure avec le directeur général des élections, étant donné l’ampleur de son travail ou de certaines questions liées aux modifications à venir... Nous avons beaucoup de questions à lui poser. Une heure, ce n’est pas assez, d’autant plus que le directeur général des élections remplit un très gros mandat pour le compte des Canadiens, mandat qui touche nos libertés démocratiques. À mon avis, il importe de l’inviter à une séance publique de deux heures, car nous pourrions ainsi poser des questions sur le Budget principal des dépenses et sur tout autre sujet connexe.

Je me permets d’ajouter que je suis vraiment troublé d’entendre parler de plus en plus, encore aujourd’hui, de l’idée selon laquelle les députés n’auront pas de marge de manoeuvre pour poser les questions qu’ils veulent. Si le gouvernement libéral a l’intention de procéder ainsi, c’est vraiment très inquiétant, parce qu’on parle du privilège de chaque député de poser des questions au nom de ses électeurs. Je suis vraiment déconcerté de voir qu’on commence à nous demander de donner, à l'avance, une idée des sujets que nous voulons aborder, histoire de restreindre l’étendue des questions et de peut-être nous empêcher de poser d’autres questions. Il y a vraiment de quoi s’inquiéter, selon moi. Ne commençons pas à emprunter cette voie, parce que les députés devraient avoir la liberté, au nom de leurs électeurs, de poser des questions sur n’importe quel sujet qu’ils jugent bon lorsqu’un haut fonctionnaire du Parlement vient témoigner devant un comité.

Le président:

Nous sommes saisis de deux propositions, je crois. M. Christopherson propose que nous invitions le directeur général des élections à une séance d'une heure sur le Budget principal des dépenses et que nous reportions à la séance du 3 mai toute question que nous ne pourrons pas aborder à ce moment-là. M. Richards propose, et je suis sûr que l'opposition est d'accord, que nous tenions plutôt une séance de deux heures pour l'étude du Budget principal des dépenses, ainsi qu'une séance d'information de deux heures.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Il me semble, monsieur le président, que, pour l'instant, le seul point de divergence, c'est la question de savoir si la réunion initiale sera d'une heure ou de deux heures. Je comprends les arguments de M. Richards, et je n'en disconviens pas, mais je tiens compte de nos responsabilités dans leur totalité. Nous venons tout juste d'expliquer à quel point ce sera un dossier difficile, et j'ai dit que nous serons saisis de nouvelles questions, mais nous voici en train de perdre de plus en plus de temps. La gestion du temps occupe le plus clair de nos discussions, et une bonne partie de ces questions n'ont rien de partisan.

Je comprends les points soulevés par M. Richards, et j'ai suivi très attentivement le débat, surtout en ce qui concerne ce dossier particulier. J'aime bien son attitude. Soit dit en passant, j'aurais tant voulu voir une telle attitude il y a un an ou deux. Qu'à cela ne tienne, il est rafraîchissant de travailler enfin dans un tel climat. Mais il me semble...

M. Scott Reid:

Je peux expliquer cela. Il y a une raison pour laquelle nous en sommes là.

M. David Christopherson:

Voulez-vous que je poursuive? Je veux bien, mais le temps file: tic-tac, tic-tac.

Ma proposition, me semble-t-il, ne nous prive d'aucune option, parce que j'ai proposé que nous tenions une séance d'une heure, au lieu de deux heures, en partant du principe selon lequel nous pourrions aborder pratiquement toute question légitime qui exigerait plus de temps durant la séance de deux heures. N'oublions pas que nous avons prévu de passer trois heures avec ce haut fonctionnaire dans un avenir très rapproché.

Je le répète, si une question ne peut être traitée à l'intérieur d'une heure, nous aurons l'option de la reporter à la séance du 3 mai, pendant laquelle nous aurons deux heures à consacrer au directeur général des élections. Nous avons également convenu que si, durant cette discussion, nous en venions à soulever un point qui ne s'inscrit pas dans l'objet de notre réunion de deux heures, mais qui mérite d'être examiné plus en profondeur, nous pourrions proposer une motion qui ferait l'objet d'un débat pour déterminer s'il faut, oui ou non, prolonger la réunion.

Là où je veux en venir, c'est la question suivante: pourquoi réserver une deuxième heure, si nous n'y sommes pas obligés, sachant que chaque heure compte pour nous? Si cela s'avère nécessaire, c'est ce que nous ferons, mais sinon, nous ne le ferons pas.

(1230)

Le président:

Je suppose que, pour faire preuve de bonne volonté, un des ministériels pourrait céder une partie de son temps de parole aux conservateurs, si ceux-ci avaient plus de questions à poser. Ce serait là une autre possibilité. Je laisserai cela à la discrétion des députés.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'est toujours une possibilité.

Le président:

Madame Sahota, j'ai votre nom sur la liste depuis un bon bout de temps, mais je vous ai délaissée. J'en suis désolé.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je crois que la tenue d'une seule réunion est une bonne idée, car, comme M. Christopherson et moi-même l'avons dit, notre programme est très chargé. À mon avis, c'est bien de consacrer une réunion à l'étude du Budget principal des dépenses et au témoignage du directeur général des élections; autrement dit, c'est une heure dans chaque cas. Je suis d'accord, et toute question que nous n'aurons pas l'occasion de poser ce jour-là pour quelque... Si on voulait poser une question particulière, ce serait possible. Je ne vois pas ce qui pourrait nous empêcher de le faire.

Nous ne serions pas sous le coup des dispositions du Règlement qui s'appliquent à certains des autres témoins, et c'est ce qui semble expliquer la crainte des députés d'en face. Bref, dans les délais établis, chaque membre du Comité aurait amplement le temps de poser la question qui lui tient à coeur.

Le président:

Si je comprends bien, nous convoquerions le greffier et un représentant des services de protection pour une séance normale d'une heure au sujet du Budget principal des dépenses. En fait, si nous parvenions à faire le tour de la question en moins de temps que prévu, nous pourrions alors passer au témoignage du directeur général des élections.

Ensuite, le 3 mai, nous tiendrions une séance de deux heures au cours de laquelle nous discuterions de toute question que nous n'avons pas eu l'occasion d'aborder durant la première séance; par contre, si des questions restaient toujours en suspens, nous pourrions alors proposer une motion afin de convoquer de nouveau le directeur général des élections à une autre séance d'une heure prévue pour plus tard. Cela vous convient-il? C'est un compromis.

M. Blake Richards:

Nous ne sommes évidemment pas très enchantés par l'idée, mais à voir la répartition du temps, nous comprenons ce qui se trame.

M. Scott Reid:

Nous avons passé presque une heure à nous demander s'il faut consacrer une heure aux questions.

Le président:

D'accord, c'est donc ainsi que nous procéderons. Reste à voir si la greffière pourra convoquer ces gens aux dates convenues avant le 3 mai.

Y a-t-il tout autre point qui m'a échappé? Madame la greffière, ai-je oublié quelque chose sur notre liste?

C'est bien.

Y a-t-il d'autres observations? S'il n'y en a pas, nous allons terminer de bonne heure.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on March 22, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.