header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-02-02 PROC 5

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

We'll get started.

I'd like to welcome Mr. Schmale, now a permanent member, to the committee. I think you'll enjoy it. We've been working well together.

Mr. Dusseault is here for Mr. Christopherson today. Welcome to the committee.

The Clerk's time is very valuable.

Thank you very much. I know you're a very busy man. You have a huge department to administer, so we really appreciate your being here today. In a family-friendly Parliament, recommendations have a lot of ramifications and technical consequences, and you know better than any of us what they might be, so we're really looking forward to getting your advice and technical advice on the ramifications of things we're considering.

Mr. Marc Bosc (Acting Clerk, House of Commons):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman and members of the committee. I'm glad to be here this morning. I have a short statement, and then I'll be happy to take your questions.

It's a pleasure for me to be here to provide you with assistance as you consider parliamentary reform initiatives that strive to create a more inclusive and family-friendly environment for members.[Translation]

Today, I will have a few remarks to make at the outset, and then I will be happy to answer any questions you may have and to come back if you wish.

My remarks will focus on general principles and concepts, and will contain a few references to the historical evolution of the Standing Orders relevant to the subject before you. I will also highlight areas for reform the committee may wish to consider in this study. [English]

Before I begin, I wish to convey the good wishes of the Speaker as you carry out your important work. He has asked me to let you know that he looks forward with interest to what the committee will bring forward as recommendations, not only those in the area of family friendliness but also, in due course, any recommendations about improving question period, decorum in general including applause, and making the work of members even more meaningful in the House and in committee.

Time is the most precious commodity any of us has. This is especially true for members of the House of Commons, whose lives are extremely busy with countless commitments and pressures. As all members know, a key factor that adds to stress is unpredictability, which makes planning infinitely more difficult.[Translation]

Time and its availability, or scarcity, as well as the predictability of how it is used, are critical for individual members. This also holds true for parties and caucuses and their roles and responsibilities in the House, and for the executive, given its obligation to bring before the House the program it has committed to advance.

Historically, the House has shown itself to be responsive to changes in the needs of members. The rules and conventions by which the House of Commons has chosen to govern itself have been in constant evolution since 1867. As such, while the fundamental business of Parliament has remained largely unchanged, the context in which members carry out their parliamentary responsibilities and how they fulfill them has led to regular adaptations. Standing orders and practices have changed in ways that are at times subtle and at times more obvious, often with a view to increased efficiency and the needs of members. [English]

Such changes were brought about in different ways. In some cases, the House adopted committee reports recommending certain changes. In others, the House considered a government motion inspired by committee recommendations, and in yet others, changes were made on the initiative of individual members, or the government, acting alone. In all cases a simple majority of the House is what is required to make a change to the Standing Orders.[Translation]

In the 1960s, changes in the Standing Orders at last brought a measure of certainty to the supply process, such that the total unpredictability of when the House would adjourn for the summer was greatly diminished. Clearly this was a family-friendly change.

(1110)

[English]

In 1982 the House adopted two key measures to make the House more family friendly. It eliminated evening sittings and it adopted a parliamentary calendar setting out sitting and non-sitting periods that allowed members to plan constituency work more effectively.

Additional changes in the 1990s further refined the times of House sittings to closely approximate what they are today.[Translation]

The possibility of having votes at 3 p.m. was codified in the Standing Orders in 2001. More recently, the use of autopilot mechanisms has been resorted to in order to bring a greater measure of predictability to the work of the House.

Co-operation between House leaders has long been beneficial as a vehicle for coordinating the day-to-day business of the House. By meeting regularly to consult on the sequence and timing of certain aspects of parliamentary business, a greater degree of predictability of the business of the House becomes possible.

Advances in technology have also been used wisely by members to help relieve some of the pressure to be here at all times. The e-notice system, a portal for electronic filing of notices of motions and written questions, is the perfect example as it provides members with an alternative to being present in order to file paper copies with original signatures at the journals branch. With this technology, they can submit notices wherever Internet access is available. [English]

Today's desire to look at ways to adapt is no different. Advances in technology, an increasingly high demand on members' time, the need for a work-life balance, and the heavy stresses of frequent and long-distance travel all contribute to the impetus for an examination and modification of the work day, week, and life of members of the House. Your invitation to me today is an indication that we may be at a point where there is a will to further refine the schedule and procedures of the House.

Rather than immediately get into the details of particular standing order changes, today I will set out three thematic areas that the committee may wish to explore as it pursues its review. Having read the transcript of the government House leader's appearance, I realize that some of this has already been touched upon, so forgive me if some points seem repetitive.[Translation]

First are votes.

Here the committee could look at the timing of votes, the way in which they are taken, including electronic voting, the duration of the bells, the way votes may be scheduled or deferred, and so on.[English]

Second, the committee may want to give consideration to the days and times of sittings. Factors to consider here would include: days of sittings, specifically the impact on parliamentary business of not sitting on Fridays, for example; the number of hours per sitting day; the start and end times of sittings on particular days; the possibility of two sittings on the same day; the total sitting hours in a week; and, of course, the calendar as a whole and how many weeks should be sitting weeks in a given year.

Third, and again with a view to alleviating some of the time pressures we are talking about, the committee may wish to examine the usefulness of a parallel chamber, a practice followed in Britain and in Australia, and perhaps elsewhere. Here, the committee could look at whether it would want to recommend such an alternate venue and if so, how it could function, when it could be convened to have its sittings, what limitations could be placed on what it could and could not do, and so on. In other words, would it exist for debate purposes only or for more?

In its consideration of these thematic areas, the committee will want to be mindful of consequences as varied as the impact on the progress of legislation, supply proceedings, private members' business, statements by members, question period, notice periods and requirements, committees and caucuses, parliamentary publications, special debates, and so on. It is a long but not insurmountable list.

As can readily be seen, each of these thematic areas carries with it numerous and complicated implications and consequences. Indeed, experience has shown that unintended consequences are probably likely.

Regardless of what changes may be adopted, a certain degree of unpredictability in House proceedings is likely to persist. There may be valid reasons from an opposition or government perspective for votes to occur unexpectedly, or at times, outside the norm, or for the House to sit longer than originally expected. This is likely to continue to be a reality of the parliamentary environment.

That said, changes can be made, and we will of course bring to bear whatever knowledge and resources the committee requires to thoroughly flesh out whatever proposals it chooses to make. Our role is to help the committee, and ultimately the House, to accomplish what it wishes to accomplish.

I'm happy to take your questions.

(1115)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Clerk.

The first round of questioning will be seven minutes: Liberal, Conservative, New Democrat, Liberal.

We'll start with Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Thank you very much for taking the time to appear before this committee.

I have not come across what you mentioned here about a parallel chamber. I don't think it's something that has come up in the discussions before. I'd be very interested to know what that actually means. You noted that it's done in Britain and Australia. Is this a chamber that would be similar to committees, where it would be given references from the main House of Commons? Presumably there would be votes in only one of the chambers.

Could you elaborate a little bit on that?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

As I understand it, it's primarily a debating chamber in the jurisdictions that employ that method. It's not too dissimilar from a committee of the whole, for those members who are familiar with that forum.

We could certainly do more research for the committee on that point, but my understanding is that it's primarily for debate. It's a mechanism by which more members of the House are able to get on the record their views and opinions.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Would they be televised?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

I don't believe they're televised in Britain or Australia, but we can check on that.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Okay.

I'm also interested in what you said about technology. I know that for things like notices of motions, we're already using technology, but of course we have the capacity with modern technology to be able to do much more with that.

I'd be particularly interested in the idea of whether or not votes could be done using technology, which would allow members to be present for votes even if they're not physically in the chamber, and whether there might be unexpected consequences or implications that you, in your experience, might be able to think of that we may not.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

We can tackle electronic voting in two ways. First, assuming that members are present and we have electronic voting, there are many examples of how that can be done. Many jurisdictions employ it. None is perfect, but if you're talking about saving time, it can permit the taking of votes during the bells, essentially. You can vote as soon as you get to the chamber. Once you've done that, you carry on your business and pursue other activities, as opposed to the bells ringing, everyone showing up, and everyone voting at the same time. It sort of defeats the purpose. That's assuming that everyone is present.

The next part of your question has to do with members not being present but still voting. It's certainly something that can be examined. There are certain fairly deep philosophical issues surrounding that. I wouldn't want to get into it today without doing much more research on them. Parliamentary privilege comes into play. There are a lot of factors to consider with such a proposition.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Do you know if there are other jurisdictions doing that?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

I'm not familiar with any at this time, no.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Okay.

Thank you.

The Chair:

You still have three minutes left.

(1120)

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I'll share my time.

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you.

I'm not aware of whether there's a certain number of sitting days that Parliament has to sit, or what two sittings in one day would actually look like. How would that function? How would that work?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

The parliamentary calendar provides for a set number of sitting days per calendar year if the House is in session. For 2016, that number is 127. In previous years the number was around 135. This year we have essentially one fewer sitting week than normal.

With regard to two sittings in a day, again it is entirely up to the committee how it wants to approach this if it wants to pursue that idea. On the longer days, Tuesdays and Thursdays, it would be possible, I believe, to split the day in half and have one sitting in the morning and one sitting in the afternoon. This idea comes, obviously, from the elimination of another sitting day, Friday. It's not necessary to do that if you keep Friday, but if you take one day out of the equation, there obviously would be serious consequences to the progress of legislation, to private members' business, and so on as a result. So you need to give that some consideration. It is certainly possible to have two sittings in a day, and that could be structured however the House wants to structure it.

What I'd like to stress about procedure is that it's very flexible. The House can decide to structure its proceedings any way it wants. There are really very few impediments to what the House can decide to do. It just has to keep track and be mindful of the consequences of whatever it decides. That's where people on the Procedural Services team, who I am offering to the committee today to help with this process, are able to provide that minute expertise on the standing order implications and on whatever else has to change if you make a certain change. That's what we are there for. We are certainly happy to help the committee in any of its work.

The Chair:

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thank you for being here today. We had the chance in the last Parliament to have you before our committee, and we always appreciate the thoughtful and considered advice that you provide to us in our deliberations here.

In your opening remarks, you certainly laid out very well some of the things that could be considered in making changes to the Standing Orders and also some of the things that have to be really thought through with regard to, as you mentioned, ensuring that we don't come out with any unintended consequences. I'd like to explore a couple of those areas a little further in the time we have.

The first is that one of the areas you mentioned was looking at consideration of the days and times of sittings. You mentioned specifically the impact of not sitting on Fridays and what that would mean for parliamentary business in some of the areas that you identified. You talked about the number of sitting hours per day, the start and end times of sitting days, and a number of other factors.

What I'd like to focus on first is that question period is a very important part of the day in Parliament. It provides the opposition with a very important opportunity to hold the government to account on behalf of Canadians; so question period and the impacts on it are key parts of anything we would want to consider. If we were to talk about eliminating Friday sittings, that certainly would or could have some impact on the amount of time in question period that the opposition would have to hold the government to account on behalf of Canadians.

I'm wondering if you could give us a bit more information on how that would be affected if Friday sittings were eliminated, and whether you have suggestions on how we could ensure that there wouldn't be less time provided for that very important function in Parliament.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Obviously, if you take a day out of the five-day sitting week—on Fridays the House sits for 4.5 hours from 10 to 2:30—that lost time, if you want to put it that way, could be made up on the four other days.

Historically, when the House has adjusted its sitting hours, it has tried to make sure that the number of sitting hours per week either increased or at least didn't go down. That's what was done previously. You could conceivably add the time lost for the various items at different times in the week.

(1125)

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm sorry to interrupt. Specifically on question period, though, obviously of that four and a half hours that we sit on a Friday, between the S.O. 31s and the questions, it's about an hour approximately, or maybe it's exactly an hour.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Obviously, of that four and a half hours, one of those hours would have to be for a very specific function, which I think is something that is a very key part of the opposition being able to hold the government to account. It's a key part of the day. It's one of the parts of the day where the opposition obviously has an opportunity to set the agenda or to at least ask the government, on behalf of Canadians, the questions they feel are important. Specifically on that, do you have thoughts on how it could be dealt with so we wouldn't lose some of that time?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

If you look at it from a purely mathematical standpoint, if you're losing 15 statements, or 16 statements, you could add them to each of the four other days. You could split them in four and add them in that way. Similarly, for questions, you could make a calculation and say that of the 45 minutes or 50 minutes of question period, let's apportion it, divide by four, and add it to the other days. That would be one way of doing it.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, purely in terms of enough time, that would certainly do it. Obviously, there are other considerations that we'd have to look at as well.

You mention a number of other areas when we talk about the elimination of Friday sittings and also in looking at all of the areas. You mention things like the impact there would be on the progress of legislation, on supply, on private members' business, and statements. We already talked about question period, but there are notice period requirements and the impact this would have on committees and caucuses. Those are a number of the things you mentioned.

Would you be able to elaborate on what you see specifically in regard to the elimination of Friday sittings? We'll focus on that. Could you give us some indication about some of the things you see being potentially problematic, or things that we would have to at least find ways to deal with? Could you elaborate on some of those points?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Sure. If you take something as simple as the number of supply days per period, by taking one day out of the five-day week, you've reduced the number of days the House sits by 20%. The number of supply days per period is set down in the Standing Orders, and it's fixed. That increases proportionally the number of supply days in each period relative to government business. That's one example.

For private members' business, you would lose an hour of private members' business. If you didn't make it up somewhere else, you'd lose that. For bills and notices, a bill can only be read once in a given day, so if you lose a day in a week, that delays the options. It reduces the options for the government.

For notice periods, if you take a day out, what do you do with that day? Do you allow it to continue to be a day that's valid for notice purposes or not? That's something to consider. This is where two sittings in a day kind of compensates for that. If you still have five sittings in a week, you could still accomplish a measure of what you would have accomplished or could have accomplished in a five-day week. Those are some examples, and there are of course many others.

Mr. Blake Richards:

In order to be able to compensate for that lost day, I can certainly see that especially for things like private members' business and for the progress of all legislation, including government legislation, having that there would be important. But in order to ensure there are those two sitting days in one day.... You talked earlier when talking about question period about adding some of that time to each day. How would that work crossed over with the idea of two sitting days in one day? Would you not almost need to put all those hours into one specific day in order for that to work without having other unintended consequences, or do you not think that would be an issue?

(1130)

Mr. Marc Bosc:

There are bound to be unintended consequences, as I said, particularly when we're combining several different changes to the Standing Orders.

Let's start with making up the time. It would be quite easy to add an hour of private members' business, the one lost on the Friday, either at the end of the day on Thursday or at the beginning of the day on Monday, let's say, or at the end of any other day for that matter. The government time lost, which is essentially two and a half hours, or a little less maybe because of routine proceedings, could be added on over several different days. You could sit a little bit later. That's just to maintain the number of hours in total.

The consequences for the sitting duration per se, say, on a Tuesday or a Thursday, the longest days now, would certainly exceed what it would have been on Friday for government business. If you're only having two and a half hours on a Friday, then sitting from, say, 9:30 or 10 o'clock on a Tuesday morning until near 2 p.m., you have a four-hour block there, or thereabouts. It's longer than a Friday would have been in that sense.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Taylor.

Ms. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

I'm going to share my time with David.[Translation]

I'd like to begin by thanking you for your presentation this morning, Mr. Bosc. I quite appreciate the briefing notes you provided for us.[English]

I have a quick question. Are you aware if the provincial or territorial legislatures in the country all sit five days a week, or if it's a minimum schedule that they have when they're sitting?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

I haven't done a full survey of all the provinces, but I don't believe that very many of them sit five days a week. A few do, but they don't all, that's for sure.

Ms. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

So the majority of them don't sit—

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Again, I hesitate to state that firmly because I haven't checked, but just from past knowledge, most of them do not.

Ms. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Thank you.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Bosc, for being here.

We talked a lot about sitting days, but maybe it would be more complicated to write and simpler to implement if we changed the entire language to “sitting hours” instead of “sitting days”.

Is that a possibility or something we could look at? What would be the consequences of that?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

It would require a lot of thinking; let me put it that way.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fair enough.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

So many Standing Orders are predicated on either “sitting day” or “sitting”. It would be a significant rethink of the way the Standing Orders are structured.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think that's why we're here: to redraw things as we need to, instead of being stuck in the past.

I have a number of other simple questions that are probably more difficult to answer.

Do you have any idea historically why we have an academic calendar for when we sit, why we rise in June and don't come back until the end of September? Would it make more sense—or maybe it doesn't make any sense at all—to sit, say, two weeks on and two weeks off year-round, as an example, instead of having seasons?

Is there any impact that you can think of?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

You know, that's entirely up to the House. History has shown us that people in Canada like to benefit from the summer months, their short summer season. I would say that at the outset, but certainly there's nothing stopping the House from amending the parliamentary calendar and sitting more weeks in the year. That's entirely possible.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Different weeks, right?

What would the consequences be if, let's say, we started sitting at 8 or 9 in the morning instead of 10 in the morning? That's just for the sake of argument; I'm not saying I want to do that. I don't particularly want to do that.

What would the impact on us be of starting our days earlier and ending them later in terms of the business of the House and the way it operates around here?

(1135)

Mr. Marc Bosc:

With starting earlier, you're getting into more party-driven impacts. A lot of parties will be planning their day at certain early hours ahead of the opening of the House. Regional caucuses might be meeting and other groups of members might be meeting at that time. That would have to be taken into consideration.

With any change to a schedule, you have to look at what other stuff is scheduled in the time you want to use up as an alternative. I'm not familiar with all the things that members are doing earlier in the day, but certainly any start time the House wants to implement is doable. There would be impacts obviously on staff who would have to be here in advance of the opening of the House. If you were talking about an 8 o'clock start for the House, that obviously would have quite serious impacts on everything from collective agreements, to overtime, to whatever. It could be an important change.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Those are very good points.

How about for votes? I don't know if it's the case right now, but is it possible to say that votes cannot under any circumstance take place on a Friday but we can have a sitting on a Friday? This would change the mathematics on the numbers of who would have to be here on Fridays.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

I'm not sure I understand the question.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Would it be possible to say, for example, that under no circumstance can a vote be held on Fridays, but we'll sit on Fridays anyway?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Right now we're almost there. It's very rare to have a vote on a Friday. The votes that do take place typically are what I would call procedural votes, where parties try to use dilatory tactics. Other than that, votes on legislation and so on don't generally take place on Fridays. There already is a reduced duty schedule, if I could put it that way. All parties approach Fridays in that way and reduce their presence to a degree.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

This is my final question. Again, I'm doing a lot of creative thinking here. We have the e-notice system which uses these wonderful secure IDs so we can do things from the office, from home, or from anywhere. Could that be used, or is there a good reason not to use that for votes in the House? We could vote from the riding, for example, using our secure IDs.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Again, I think this gets into a whole other area of discussion surrounding the role of members and what it is to be a deliberative assembly. It's a much bigger question than a practical one, if I could put it that way. That would almost require a separate examination. That would be a very significant change. I'm not saying it's impossible. I haven't really looked into it very much, but it is definitely significant.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think we haven't really defined the boundaries of what we're studying yet, and I want to see what those boundaries are.

Thank you very much for that.

The Chair:

Mr. Dusseault, I'm sorry. You were supposed to be before that round, but you're on now. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault (Sherbrooke, NDP):

All right. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Bosc, thank you for your presentation and the possible solutions you provided for our consideration. Indeed, I think that, in 2016, we should be having this conversation—and a good one at that—about making our procedures more flexible.

I want to start by drawing to everyone's attention the following question. What are the current rules governing maternity and paternity leave for members?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Members don't have any. That leave isn't available to members.

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

That confirms my information. Some of my colleagues in the NDP welcomed new babies into their families, and they had to deal with a number of challenges. The same thing could happen to other members of this Parliament in the future.

You presented a few options that allow members to do work without having to be on the Hill. You talked about the ability to file notices of motions electronically and all the measures that have already been taken to improve the situation, making it possible to perform a number of tasks from one's riding, without having to be here in person. What are your thoughts on increasing that flexibility so that members could perform more tasks remotely?

Take, for example, someone who has just had a baby and is at home or in their riding but wishes to express their concerns or make suggestions regarding a certain bill, by having a speech published in the record of proceedings, without reading it in the House. At first glance, does that idea strike you as problematic?

(1140)

Mr. Marc Bosc:

That isn't a House practice. But, as I said at the beginning of my presentation, the House is free to change its practices however it likes.

As far as I know, the only example of a situation where such a practice is allowed is upon returning from the Senate, following a Speech from the Throne; in that instance, the Speaker is allowed to have the throne speech published in the record of proceedings as if it had been read. In theory, then, it is possible.

Would the House want to provide for such a practice? It's possible, but I don't know.

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Very well. That's interesting.

Now I'd like to discuss the taking of votes, a routine practice here, in Ottawa. We could opt to group votes together at specific times, such as after question period. I think that's an idea worthy of some serious analysis.

On a few occasions during the last Parliament, the House leaders jointly saw to it that votes were grouped together at the same times. That made things a bit easier in terms of the necessity to be present in the House for oral questions and, then, votes immediately after.

No votes are held in the evening, which means that we don't have to come back. However, that can result in more votes being taken at the same time. And that gives rise to another question, the possibility of breaking up long voting periods.

Under the current procedure, does the Speaker have the authority to interrupt voting for a 5- or 10-minute break between votes, when 10 or 12 votes are scheduled after question period?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Currently, the Speaker doesn't have that authority, but there is nothing preventing the House from giving the Speaker that power.

As for the holding of votes at 3 p.m., you're right; that practice was adopted a few times. It works well insofar as the bells are generally not rung. I would point out, however, that a party wanting the ringing of the bells can always demand it. In order to ensure that voting can take place without the bells being rung, the possibility would have to be included in the Standing Orders.

That said, as you pointed out, when a large number of votes are taking place, the time required for that is added to the end of the day, as is the practice. That's another consideration to take into account.

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Indeed.

You may be able to enlighten us as to the procedure we should follow in order to make changes to the Standing Orders. I'm not sure whether you're able to comment on this, but I was wondering whether the best way to proceed might be to adopt a committee report here, in the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, laying out certain changes. The House could then adopt the report in order to implement the proposed changes.

Do you think that would be the best way for the committee to proceed?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Frankly, I don't have an opinion on the best approach to take since changes have been made to the Standing Orders in a variety of ways, including the one you just described.

I see that Mr. Reid is in the room. Just recently, he successfully had the Standing Orders changed by way of a private member's motion. Any method is acceptable. Of course, changes to the Standing Orders are more likely to work well when a consensus has been reached, but historically, changes to the Standing Orders have been made in a variety of ways, and not always that way.

(1145)

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Thank you.

My concern about eliminating Friday as a sitting day has mainly to do with the two hours, or just over, used for activities that could disappear if the decision was made to simply divvy up the 4.5 hours over the first 4 sitting days of the week. I worry about those hours being allocated exclusively to debate on government bills.

On the one hand, we would lose the time for routine proceedings, possibly making things more difficult for the government, which has, in fact, managed to accomplish a lot during that period. On the other hand, we would lose the time allocated to oral questions, members' statements and, above all, private members' business.

Say Friday as a sitting day is eliminated. Do you think we should maintain that 2-hour-and-15-minute period that includes routine proceedings, to ensure the activities I mentioned are retained in the first four sitting days?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

It will be up to the committee to decide how to recommend those kinds of changes. If it wishes to keep the fifth hour of private members' business, it can do so. If it wishes to maintain a fifth period for routine proceedings, it can do that as well.

Essentially, the committee has total freedom to recommend a structure that would accommodate the objectives you're describing. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you. That's time.

Mr. Schmale, you have five minutes.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Mr. Bosc, for your comments so far.

We've talked a lot about some of the proposed ideas. We've talked about some of the pros and cons. I want to continue and maybe pick your brain a bit more about some of the consequences of changing the sitting days and times.

Do you think it will, I don't want to say “overwhelm”, but is it at all a possibility that it will really pack in the parliamentary calendar so that the proper examination isn't being done?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Offhand, no, I don't think it would change all that much. Bear in mind that on a typical Friday, the House does not sit very many hours, or the same number. If those hours are taken up earlier in the other four days, then no time is lost for debate or for any other proceeding that the House may be taking up at that time, so I don't really see an impact in that sense.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Okay.

We talked a bit about the electronic tabling of bills, maybe doing it from our ridings and that kind of thing. Do you see any consequences from doing that, from being away from this place? Obviously a certain amount of work can be done here and only here. Do you see that as being an issue at all?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

As I said earlier, I think that gets the committee into a completely different realm of consideration. Distance legislation, legislating at a distance, voting at a distance, these are all fairly fundamental issues for any deliberative assembly, which would really require a lot of study and thought. I myself would want to read up on it and reflect on it before I gave an opinion one way or another.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

That would be a pretty significant change, I think.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

It would be a very significant change.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Based on what we know and obviously much research, if we were to make a change, do you think you could give us a timeline—it doesn't have to be exact—on when that could possibly come into effect? It would include such changes as tabling bills electronically, that kind of thing. I'm kind of looking for a timeline, just to see....

(1150)

Mr. Marc Bosc:

It's very hard for me to answer that question without knowing precisely what is being asked; I really can't. There may be technological implications that I'm not aware of. There may be requirements where we would have to build a system or devise other procedures internally to make that possible. I don't know at this stage. It would really depend on exactly what's being proposed.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Absolutely. I have noticed that a lot of the work we can do now is work that we can only do here, which I'm sure would be quite the hurdle to get over.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Yes, and if I may, it probably carries a fairly hefty price tag, in all likelihood.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I can imagine, yes.

In your notes you mentioned the parallel chamber. That's a very interesting comment.

Again, we've mentioned time and cost, and we're building a chamber now in West Block to accommodate the chamber when we do move. Obviously time and cost would come into that, and possibly the whole process in terms of setting up.

I'm guessing that's years away.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Well, it just depends. Probably the informatics people and the Journals people are having kittens hearing me say this, but it really depends on how complicated the committee wants to make it and the House wants to make it. It could be as simple as setting up what is essentially a large committee room. We do that all the time. Obviously, there would be implications for publications, if there is an expectation that there be an actual Hansard published. That would have to be considered, as would other factors, such as the televising of it and on which channel. All of those questions would have to be considered, but in terms of a physical set-up, it certainly is doable.

The Chair:

I'm sorry, it's over now.

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Bosc, for joining us today. I know how busy you are.

I'm going to split my time with Mr. Lamoureux. I'm just going to ask a couple of very quick questions.

I want to follow up on a point that Mr. Graham made, which is not so much about changing the number of sitting days as about sitting hours. Under Standing Order 43, members are allowed to speak for up to 20 minutes on a particular item. Is there any particular reason or convention that it is that particular period of time? Do you have any thoughts on, for example, if we were to reduce that amount of time to compress the calendar on a particular day a little bit?

I'm already noticing that a lot of members on the 20-minute speaking order are often splitting their time. Do you observe many members actually using up the full 20 minutes?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

It can happen. The length of speeches over time has been on a downward trend. There used to be no limit on the time members could speak. Then it went to, I think, 40 minutes—no, even longer than that initially, and then down to 40 minutes, and then down to 20 minutes, and then it was splittable, and so on. Again, it's entirely up to the committee to decide what is an appropriate length of time for a speech.

The only thing I would say is if you go too low, then you put at risk questions and comments. Let's say you said the maximum speech length would be five minutes. Well then, how long are questions and comments going to be? That's a problem.

The other thing I would say is I'd probably disabuse you of the illusion that reducing the length of speeches will reduce the number of members who actually get up to speak. With 338 members, more members will come forward to fill that time. That's what will happen.

An hon. member: That's a good thing.

Mr. Marc Bosc: And as Mr. Lamoureux just said, that's a good thing because it gives more members an opportunity to take the floor, but if you're thinking it will reduce the time the House sits, I doubt it.

The Chair:

Mr. Lamoureux.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux (Winnipeg North, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Bosc, I always appreciate your thoughts on these types of issues.

I think of it in terms of members of Parliament wanting to better serve their constituents both here in Ottawa and in their constituencies, and we factor in the importance of families at the same time. There is validity to looking at Fridays, as other provincial legislatures have done, yet provincial legislatures are more local than Ottawa is for the vast majority of ridings, so I think it is a responsible thing for us to be at least looking into it.

I learned something when you talked about this whole parallel chamber. I had never heard of that before.

Let me throw a thought that just started to evolve as I was listening to others speak. You say that you can divide up the questions. You can divide up the S.O. 31s and you can put them in that Monday-through-Thursday slot. The concern is with the debates and to a certain degree private members' hour. Technically we could have a double, and we often have two private members' hours in one day. That currently happens quite a bit, so we could actually designate a day, say Tuesday, as the day for a double private members' hour.

I don't know anything about this parallel chamber, but maybe you could have the parallel chamber sit on Fridays. You indicate that typically there are no votes and that it's just more of a debate day where you debate government business, which allows for ongoing supply motions, opposition days, private members' hour, everything that is done during the week. Then you could start off at 9 in the morning and go until 3 in the afternoon. In fact, we could have it increased by a half-hour or an hour to accommodate debates.

The votes seem to be of critical importance. If this were to prevent votes from occurring after, let's say, 4 o'clock on Thursdays, then every vote would be suspended until the following Monday.

On something of this nature—both aspects that I just finished talking about—can you give a personal opinion? Are you comfortable giving a personal opinion on something of that nature, as I qualified it at the beginning?

I'd be interested in your thoughts on that.

(1155)

Mr. Marc Bosc:

I hesitate to give personal opinions because that's all they are: personal opinions.

What I will say is this. With regard to votes, as I said in my opening remarks, we're still in a situation where we're dealing with parliamentary reality. There will be times when, whether on the opposition side or the government side, there are valid reasons for wanting to pursue things at times not otherwise typical for that kind of proceeding. It could be a procedural vote. It could be closure on a government motion or a bill. Who can predict? Who can predict where we would be on a Thursday and how important the measure would be to whoever is proposing it?

I hesitate to say that you could lay down some kind of rule for no votes after a certain hour. We have done it for Fridays, so by that logic you could do it. It's certainly doable, but consideration will have to be given to those other imperatives.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Mr. Chair, I'm going to start by saying that I don't think it's in the spirit of what the government proposed initially that parliamentary secretaries, who are not supposed to be members of committees and not have votes on committees, are nevertheless taking up question and answer time on committees. I'll be raising that with the House leaders when we have our meeting later today. That seems to me to be a violation of that intent, and I'm disappointed to see it happening here.

Turning to Mr. Bosc, thank you for being here. It's always a pleasure to have you at our committee; you are so well informed.

We've had a lot of interest in the subject of this parallel chamber, as it's being described. As a former resident of Australia who used to spend time in Canberra, I get the impression that they actually had quite a large purpose-built room for this, which was where this kind of debate would go on. Some kind of consideration was given to things like ease of access from that chamber to the chamber of the House of Representatives so that one could go back and forth.

In other words, if we were to do something like this here, I think having it at One Wellington Street would be less than ideal. Once all the renovations are done, having it over in the room that the Commons is going to be shifted into might be very much ideal, or in some other space that people can get to without having to brave the Ottawa winter. That's a thought I throw out.

In the absence of such, because all of this isn't going to happen until after a few years have gone by, had you thought at all about the issue of where we would put a room like this? I think it has to be a purpose-built dedicated room, with all the permanent simultaneous translation booths and so on, and assigned staff as well, I guess.

(1200)

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Having been to Canberra and having seen the room, I will say that it has a bit of a makeshift look even though it was purpose-built, because things were added after the fact. It's not a very large room. Now, the Australian House is smaller than ours, so that may account for that.

I think the concept of a parallel chamber really depends on how you conceive of it. If you conceive of it as a vehicle for members wishing to get a speech on the record, let's say, on a particular bill or a motion, it wouldn't necessarily involve huge attendance. It might have a different quorum requirement. There are a lot of things that can be tailor-made.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Does it have a quorum requirement at all, or does it have no quorum requirement?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

I don't know that there is. I'd have to check on that.

In the case of Australia, I think it sits three times a week, on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays. If I can put it this way, it's a safety valve for overflow House business. It's not a decision chamber per se. It's a debating chamber, so it allows more members to participate.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The debates are obviously recorded. They become part of the record in some form or another. Is it a record of some kind of committee of the whole or are they appended to the main Hansard?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

I don't know the answer to that question. We can certainly check.

Again, it would really be up to the House committee to decide how it would want to handle that if it went in that direction.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay.

I have another question, and you probably don't know the answer to this either, but it seems relevant to consider.

In Australia or Britain in the actual House of Commons, do they have an equivalent to our S.O. 31s, the one-minute member statements or some other similar type of vehicle, or is that sort of thing what effectively got moved over to the second chamber?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Again, I'd have to check. I don't know precisely the answer to that question. I'm not sure.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Welcome, Angelo Iacono.

Are there any Liberals who want the five-minute slot? If not, we'll go to the NDP in the next round. Okay.

Mr. Dusseault. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'm very glad to have the opportunity to ask a few more questions.

There's something I didn't have time to bring up earlier. A parallel chamber is indeed worthy of some consideration. My understanding is that it is used at the Palace of Westminster, in Great Britain. Through the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association, I was fortunate enough to take part in a week of procedural study there. I really enjoyed learning how things could be done; the experience gave me a lot of food for thought when I returned to Canada.

In Great Britain, they have what they call the Backbench Business Committee, which is made up solely of backbenchers, or members with no official title in the House of Commons. The committee decides on subjects for debate in the Palace of Westminster. If a backbencher wishes to raise an issue, they can apply to the Backbench Business Committee, which then decides on the agenda for the Palace of Westminster. The subjects are often raised on a member's personal initiative and can be quite specific. I think the committee meets once a week, on Friday, I believe. We could look into that further.

I wanted to know how such a parallel chamber might improve a member's family life. Would it mean more sitting time because there wouldn't be any votes or procedural activities? Is that why you suggested it as a way to create a more family-friendly environment for members?

(1205)

Mr. Marc Bosc:

I mentioned it solely to point out that the committee and the House have a number of options at their disposal to change the Standing Orders so as to establish a schedule that better accommodates the family needs of members. That's the only reason I brought it up. I have no preference for any one solution. I simply wanted to present the committee with a few possibilities and thematic areas it could consider.

As I said earlier, if it wasn't a parallel chamber or decision-making body where votes and such could take place, it would free up a lot of time for members wanting to return to their ridings rather than attending the sitting.

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Indeed. Say, for example, it was decided that the parallel chamber was going to be held on Fridays. Members preferring not to attend or not having an interest in the debate in hand wouldn't have to worry about the taking of a vote or the use of a procedural tactic in the House, because that wouldn't be possible in the second chamber.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

It would be up to the House to determine how to structure that second chamber.

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

It would be a significant change to the Standing Orders if, for instance, we were to follow the British model and create our own Backbench Business Committee. It would be a new standing committee, and it would also be necessary to provide for a parallel chamber in the Standing Orders. Those would be major changes to our current Standing Orders.

Mr. Marc Bosc:

Should the Backbench Business Committee be a standing committee of the House or an ad hoc committee of parliamentarians from all parties? That decision would be up to the House and the committee.

As for the creation of a parallel or second chamber, again, I believe it would be necessary to change the Standing Orders to allow such a chamber or, at the very least, to have the House adopt a motion to that effect.

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

It could be done informally. For instance, members could decide to gather in a room, could they not?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

I wouldn't go that far.

Previously, when the House wanted to try out a new or different procedure, it would do so by way of a motion authorizing a departure from the standard practice, even if the change was coming into effect permanently at a later time, say a year or two down the road. That's what is known as a sessional order, or a basic motion adopted by the House making it possible to change its practice. It's not necessarily included in the Standing Orders permanently.

A number of standing order changes have been made that way. That's something to consider. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Clerk, for coming. We appreciate your expertise. I'm sure we will probably have to call on it later. Did you want to make any closing comments?

Mr. Marc Bosc:

I would just say, Mr. Chairman, that it should be obvious now that the kinds of changes the committee is examining carry with them quite a few consequences and implications. I want to reiterate my offer to make available to the committee whatever staff the committee may require to further examine and ultimately prepare recommendations on these subjects.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. We really appreciate your help.

I just want to make sure we have our agenda set for the next meeting or two so we know what we're going to do.

One other piece of information that's available to us is that apparently, last year an all-party women's committee did a report on a family-friendly, inclusive parliament, which we could look at in one of our meetings to see what they were recommending.

As it stands, for Thursday we're going to get your report on other parliaments. We would ask that they include some of the questions you've been asking, on things like the Australian House and the parallel parliament, in which there seems to be quite a bit of interest here. Then we had scheduled to do committee business after that. Mr. Christopherson may or may not want to call his motion.

During this time, just as a reminder to anyone who's new here, the members here were going to go back to their whips and caucuses and House leaders to get any input from their caucuses by the end of the first week back, to give people time to get through two caucus meetings.

Under those circumstances, what would the committee like to do on the first Tuesday back after the break?

Mr. Richards.

(1210)

Mr. Blake Richards:

Probably what we'll hear on Thursday might help to inform a little bit what we might want to do to further this particular study. I think we're going to need to do a lot of examination. As we heard today from the Acting Clerk, there certainly is a lot of potential for unintended consequences here. We want to make sure we've fully considered all of those before we proceed.

Obviously, we will want to see what our analyst has for us on Thursday, and we can maybe have some discussion about that then.

While I have the floor, though, I would like to raise a matter. Something had been sent around by the clerk yesterday or the day before in regard to these order-in-council appointments made by the so-called independent advisory board for Senate appointments. Certainly it's within the purview of the committee to call the nominees to appear before the committee. I strongly believe, as this is a new process that's being instituted here, that it would be advisable and very important for us as a committee to call those nominees before committee sometime in the very near future to discuss the appointment and the process they're engaged in.

The Chair:

Should we discuss that at the subcommittee of agenda items as to when and what we would do about that?

Mr. Blake Richards:

As long as it's agreeable that we would be having them come in to appear, yes. We could certainly discuss the timing of that at the subcommittee, but I think we should get an indication that this is something that the government would not try to block or prevent from happening. It is important that they come in and that we hear about the process.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid and then....

Mr. Scott Reid:

Further to that, Mr. Chair, the first round of appointments is occurring very soon. Nominations, as I understand it, will be closed on the day after Valentine's Day, two weeks from today. When the nominations have closed, we assume the panel will be meeting and will be busy, so it seems reasonable to me that we should ask them to come here.

We're not inviting all of them, I assume, but the select people we can get—including, I would think, the chair—ought to be invited to come here prior to the 15th.

The Chair:

The 15th of February?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, the 15th of February, as it follows that their workload is going to be lower and then much higher. It seems like a reasonable alternative for us.

The Chair:

Are there any other comments?

Mr. Lamoureux.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

Blake, were you thinking of all of the committee appointments or were you thinking of one or two? Right on the surface, I think it could be a good thing to do. I'm interested in what it is you're really trying to get at. Is it all committee members? The timing is important, because they're going to be very busy, I'm sure—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Sure—

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

—as Scott has pointed out.

(1215)

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes. Mr. Reid just alluded to that as well, and being aware of what he just said, I think it's important that we do this as quickly as possible so that we're not into the period of time where they're going to be looking at the appointments themselves.

I agree that it should be as soon as possible. We might want to look at it right after the break, at the first meeting after the break, on the understanding that we may not be able to get all of them here. I think it's important that we try our best to get those we can. I think it would be important to have the chair, at the very minimum. Obviously, we would want to invite them all, and hopefully we can have at least a few of them come and appear. I would think that at least the permanent federal members would certainly be the most important. I don't know if others have other thoughts on this, but I would think that at a minimum it would be certainly the chair and hopefully the permanent federal members.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

Mr. Chair, some of my own colleagues have raised this particular issue. I have had some discussions about the possibility, if it were to come up at PROC, in terms of where it is we would like to be on this particular issue. I think it's being very open and reasonable. If that's what PROC.... I look to my colleagues and members of the committee if you want to have that discussion now, but I think that in principle it could be a good thing, as a couple of members have already approached me to get my thoughts on it. I'm interested in any other thoughts there might be, but in principle, yes, and then leave it with the subcommittee...?

The Chair:

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

The only issue I wanted to put to you, Mr. Richards, is whether you want to deal with it here or at the subcommittee on the agenda.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. I've just been having a quick discussion with my colleague. We were looking at the calendar.

Given that the appointments are moving forward in a pretty quick fashion, it might be advisable to try to see if it's possible to have.... I don't know the locations of these members, but it might be advisable for us to try to see if we can utilize some time on Thursday for that, because that would be before the process begins.

Certainly, we should be trying to move on this as quickly as we can, because this is a new process and we want to make sure that we've looked at and considered it before it begins.

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I just want some clarification as to exactly what we would be doing with the members. Would we be questioning them here for an hour or the duration? Is that what you're suggesting?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, absolutely. That's exactly it.

That's what the standing order would indicate that we do. We would have them come in to appear before the committee, and we would have a chance to ask them questions.

The Chair:

Just for clarification, the standing order allows us to “examine the qualifications and competence” of the appointees.

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I'm just mindful, given the timing that Mr. Richards has suggested, of whether it would be appropriate for the chair to approach the government to see whether this is in fact doable by Thursday. It's hard for us to know right now their availability.

I recognize the time sensitivity. We're going on a break week the following week. I think after we come back, this committee won't meet again until February 16, correct?

The Chair: Correct.

Mr. Blake Richards:

At the end of the day, obviously this should happen as quickly as can be done. I understand that Thursday is a tight timeline. I don't know the location of the chair or the other individuals, but I would ask if the chair, or the clerks on behalf of the chair, could approach and see if they could be here for Thursday. At a minimum, the chair and maybe some of the other permanent members could be here.

If need be, we could then utilize the first meeting after the break for the remainder of the appointments. If we just couldn't make it work for Thursday, obviously we'd have to consider that. However, I think it should be this Thursday, if possible. If it's absolutely not possible, certainly it should be the first meeting after the break, at a bare minimum.

The Chair:

Mr. Dusseault.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Perhaps I could simply move a motion and ask that the clerk look into the availability of the chair of this committee.

(1220)

Mr. Blake Richards:

Why not the other permanent members as well? It wouldn't hurt.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I'll amend that to include and/or all of the other members listed in the orders in council, and then to report back to the subcommittee on the agenda, just so that we would know—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Well, that would prevent the possibility of Thursday. I think we should give the chair and the clerk direction to try to see if they can come for Thursday. If they can't, then I think the backup date should be the first Tuesday after the break. Let's give some specific direction on that.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I was just thinking of process. We don't meet until Thursday, so it's hard for us to even have a conversation about whether they're available or not.

Mr. Blake Richards:

But we can authorize that conversation to occur. We don't have to have it reported back. If they're available, if we've authorized them to bring them in, there's nothing preventing them from coming on Thursday if they're available.

I think our backup option could be the Tuesday following the break. We have that ability as a committee to make that direction and have it carried out.

The Chair:

Mr. Lamoureux.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

Mr. Richards, just from listening to the motion, are you saying it's better that we get one or two who might be available to come as early as Thursday, or are you suggesting that we're better off to wait until the following time when they come before the committee and we have a larger number?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, that's kind of my thinking, that it would be best if we could get some clarity around the appointments and the process before it begins. I think if we can get the chair, or one or two of the members, on Thursday, I think that would be advisable for us to do.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

I think that was Arnold's suggestion in his motion, that as opposed to going to the subcommittee, if there are a couple of committee members, particularly the chair, who are available to come as early as this Thursday, we go ahead and invite them.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, I think we should. Exactly. I would agree.

The Chair:

Do we have a motion on the table to see if any of the members can come Thursday, and if not, the first Tuesday after the break? Is that your motion?

Mr. Arnold Chan:

That's fine. In terms of how the motion should read....

The Chair:

To the clerk, I'd like to ask for clarification. It says that the standing order allows us to examine their qualifications and competence. Can we ask them any other questions? Mr. Richards referred to how the process would work, which is separate and a whole different topic.

Okay, the clerk suggests that it's a hearing on the appointment, so whether the person is the person who should be appointed, basically, or they're qualified.

Are committee members clear on what they can ask?

Is there any further discussion on the motion?

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux:

Can we hear the whole motion, Mr. Chair?

The Chair:

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I move that the clerk be directed to see the availability of the chair of the independent advisory board on Senate appointments and/or any of the other appointees on their availability to appear before this committee for this Thursday, and if they are not, to see if they are available to appear on the following sitting of this committee, the following Tuesday, February 16.

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair:

That pretty well decides our committee business for now. I will mention that I was a little generous on the time slots today because we had enough time for the Clerk. When we're more pressed for time, I won't be so generous on your time allocations for questioning.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Allons-y.

J’aimerais souhaiter la bienvenue à M. Schmale, qui est maintenant membre permanent du Comité. Je crois que vous allez vous y plaire. Nous faisons du bon travail ensemble.

M. Dusseault remplace aujourd’hui M. Christopherson. Bienvenue au Comité.

Le temps du greffier est très précieux.

Merci beaucoup. Je sais que vous êtes un homme très occupé. Vous administrez un important service; nous sommes donc vraiment reconnaissants de votre présence aujourd’hui. Dans un Parlement propice à la vie de famille, les recommandations ont beaucoup de conséquences techniques, et vous êtes mieux placé que nous tous pour savoir ce qu’il en retourne. Nous avons donc vraiment hâte d’entendre votre avis et vos conseils techniques quant aux répercussions des initiatives que nous examinons.

M. Marc Bosc (Greffier par intérim, Chambre des communes):

Merci, monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité. Je suis heureux d’être ici ce matin. Je ferai un bref exposé, puis je répondrai avec plaisir à vos questions.

Je suis heureux d’être ici pour vous aider dans votre examen des initiatives de réforme parlementaire qui visent à créer pour les députés un environnement plus inclusif et propice à la famille.[Français]

D'entrée de jeu, je formulerai quelques observations. Par la suite, je répondrai avec plaisir à vos questions. Je comparaîtrai devant vous de nouveau, si vous le souhaitez.

Mes observations porteront principalement sur des principes et des concepts généraux, et je ferai référence à l'évolution du Règlement relativement au sujet qui nous occupe. Enfin, je présenterai quelques idées de réformes que le Comité voudra peut-être examiner dans le cadre de son étude.[Traduction]

Avant de commencer, je souhaite transmettre les meilleurs voeux de succès de la part du Président pour l’exécution de votre important travail. Il m’a demandé de vous dire qu’il attend avec intérêt les recommandations du Comité en ce qui concerne non seulement les initiatives favorisant la vie de famille, mais aussi, en temps voulu, l’amélioration de la période des questions, le décorum en général, dont les applaudissements, et toute mesure visant à rendre le travail des députés encore plus constructif, tant à la Chambre que dans les comités.

Le temps est ce que nous avons de plus précieux; c’est d’autant plus vrai pour les députés, qui mènent des vies très chargées et doivent composer avec d’innombrables engagements et pressions. Comme le savent tous les députés, l’imprévisibilité contribue grandement au stress, et elle complique énormément tout effort de planification.[Français]

Le temps — et sa profusion ou son insuffisance, de même que la prévisibilité de son utilisation — est essentiel aux députés. Il en va de même pour les partis et les caucus relativement à leurs rôles et responsabilités à la Chambre. C'est la même chose pour l'exécutif étant donné son obligation de soumettre à la Chambre le programme qu'il s'est engagé à promouvoir.

Dans toute son histoire, la Chambre s'est montrée sensible à l'évolution des besoins des députés. Les règles et les conventions par lesquelles la Chambre des communes a choisi de se gouverner ont subi de nombreux changements depuis 1867. En fait, si la nature fondamentale des travaux du Parlement est demeurée essentiellement la même, le contexte dans lequel les députés s'acquittent de leurs responsabilités parlementaires et la façon dont ils le font ont, pour leur part, entraîné des ajustements au fil du temps. Parfois subtiles, parfois plus évidentes, les modifications apportées au Règlement et aux usages ont souvent eu pour objectif d'accroître l'efficacité des députés et de répondre à leurs besoins.[Traduction]

Ces modifications ont vu le jour par différentes voies. Dans certains cas, la Chambre a adopté des rapports de comité dans lesquels étaient recommandés certains changements; dans d’autres, la Chambre a examiné une motion du gouvernement s’inspirant des recommandations d’un comité. Dans d’autres cas encore, ces changements ont été apportés à la seule initiative de députés ou du gouvernement. Quelle que soit la voie empruntée, une simple majorité de la Chambre est tout ce qu’il faut pour modifier le Règlement.[Français]

Dans les années 1960, des modifications au Règlement ont apporté, enfin, une certaine dose de certitude aux travaux des subsides, ce qui a grandement amélioré la capacité de prévoir à quel moment la Chambre ajournerait pour l'été. C'était là, manifestement, un changement favorable pour la vie de famille.

(1110)

[Traduction]

En 1982, la Chambre a adopté deux mesures importantes pour rendre la Chambre plus propice à la vie familiale: elle a aboli les séances en soirée et a adopté un calendrier parlementaire. L’établissement de périodes de séance et d’ajournement allait ainsi permettre aux députés de planifier plus efficacement leur travail en circonscription.

Dans les années 1990, d’autres changements ont amené les heures de séance de la Chambre à peu près à ce qu’elles sont aujourd’hui.[Français]

La possibilité de tenir les votes à 15 heures a été codifiée dans le Règlement en 2001. Plus récemment, la décision a été prise de recourir aux mécanismes de pilote automatique afin d'accroître la prévisibilité des travaux de la Chambre.

Depuis longtemps, la collaboration entre les leaders de la Chambre contribue positivement à la coordination des activités quotidiennes de celle-ci. Le fait qu'ils se réunissent régulièrement pour se consulter sur la séquence et le moment touchant certains aspects des travaux parlementaires a pour effet d'accroître là encore la prévisibilité des activités de la Chambre.

Par ailleurs, les députés ont judicieusement recours aux avancées technologiques pour ne pas avoir à être présents en tout temps. Le système d'avis électroniques, un portail de dépôt des motions et des questions écrites par voie électronique, en est un parfait exemple, car il offre aux députés une solution de rechange à la nécessité de déposer en personne les copies papier apposées des signatures originales à la Direction des journaux. Grâce à cette technologie, ils peuvent désormais soumettre des avis partout où ils ont accès à Internet. [Traduction]

La volonté actuelle de trouver des façons de s’adapter est la même. Les avancées technologiques, les pressions de plus en plus fortes sur l’horaire des députés, la nécessité d’un équilibre entre la vie professionnelle et personnelle et les grands stress découlant de déplacements longs et fréquents contribuent tous à l’élan vers un examen et une transformation de la vie professionnelle et des horaires journalier et hebdomadaire des députés. Votre invitation aujourd’hui est une indication que nous sommes en présence d’une volonté de préciser davantage l’horaire et les procédures de la Chambre.

Au lieu d’entrer immédiatement dans les détails de modifications particulières au Règlement, je présenterai aujourd’hui trois thèmes que le Comité voudra peut-être explorer dans le cadre de son étude. Ayant lu la transcription de la comparution du leader du gouvernement à la Chambre, je me rends compte que certains points ont déjà été abordés; pardonnez-moi si certains de mes propos semblent répétitifs.[Français]

D'abord, considérons les votes.

Ici, le comité pourrait se pencher, notamment, sur le moment des votes, leur déroulement, y compris dans le cas du vote électronique, la durée de la sonnerie d'appel, l'organisation ou le report des votes et ainsi de suite.[Traduction]

Ensuite, le Comité voudra peut-être examiner la question des jours et des heures de séance. Ici, les facteurs dont il faudrait tenir compte incluent les jours de séance, en particulier l’incidence sur les travaux parlementaires de l’élimination de la séance du vendredi, par exemple, le nombre d’heures de séance dans une journée, le début et la fin des heures de certains jours de séance, la possibilité de tenir deux séances la même journée, le nombre total d’heures de séance par semaine et, bien sûr, le calendrier dans son ensemble et le nombre de semaines de séance par an.

Enfin — et toujours en vue d’atténuer en partie les contraintes de temps dont il est question aujourd’hui —, le Comité voudra peut-être se pencher sur l’utilité d’une chambre parallèle, une pratique en usage en Grande-Bretagne et en Australie et peut-être ailleurs dans le monde. Ici, le Comité pourrait déterminer s’il veut recommander une telle avenue et, le cas échéant, le fonctionnement d’une telle chambre, le moment où elle pourrait siéger, les limites imposées sur ce qu’elle pourrait faire, etc. En d’autres mots, il s’agirait d’établir si cette chambre existerait uniquement à des fins de débats ou à des fins plus vastes.

En étudiant ces thèmes, le Comité voudra tenir compte des conséquences sur des éléments aussi variés que l’incidence sur l’examen des projets de loi, les travaux des subsides, les initiatives parlementaires, les déclarations de députés, la période des questions, les exigences et les délais en matière de préavis, les comités et les caucus, les publications parlementaires et les débats spéciaux, pour n’en nommer que quelques-uns. La liste est longue, mais elle n’est pas insurmontable.

Comme vous pouvez le constater, chacun de ces thèmes est porteur de nombreuses conséquences complexes; à dire vrai, les conséquences imprévues sont une probabilité.

Sans égard aux changements qui pourraient être adoptés, il est probable que les travaux de la Chambre continueront d’avoir leur lot d’imprévus. L’opposition ou le gouvernement, pour des motifs valables, pourrait vouloir tenir un vote inopinément ou à un moment inhabituel ou, encore, faire en sorte que la Chambre siège plus longtemps qu’il était prévu. Ce sont là des situations qui continueront sans doute de faire partie de la réalité de l’environnement parlementaire.

Cela dit, des changements sont possibles, et nous mettrons à contribution, bien sûr, les connaissances et les ressources dont le Comité aura besoin pour étoffer en profondeur toute proposition qu’il choisira de présenter. Notre rôle consiste à vous aider et, en définitive, la Chambre, à accomplir ce que vous voulez réaliser.

Je répondrai avec plaisir à vos questions.

(1115)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le greffier.

La première série de questions sera de sept minutes dans l’ordre suivant: libéral, conservateur, néo-démocrate et libéral.

Madame Vandenbeld, vous avez la parole en premier.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup d’avoir pris le temps de témoigner devant notre comité.

Je n’ai pas trouvé d’information en ce qui concerne la chambre parallèle dont vous venez de parler. Je ne crois pas qu’il en a été question dans nos discussions. J’aimerais vraiment savoir ce que cela signifie réellement. Vous avez mentionné que c’était en usage en Grande-Bretagne et en Australie. Cette chambre s’apparente-t-elle aux comités, c’est-à-dire qu’elle reçoit des ordres de renvoi de la Chambre des communes? Je présume que les députés votent seulement dans l’une des deux chambres.

Pourriez-vous nous donner un peu plus de détails à ce sujet?

M. Marc Bosc:

Selon ce que j’en comprends, il s’agit principalement d’une chambre à des fins de débats dans les pays où c’est en usage. Ce n’est pas très différent d’un comité plénier pour ceux d’entre vous qui connaissent cette tribune.

Nous pourrions certainement effectuer de plus amples recherches pour vous à cet égard, mais cette chambre est principalement utilisée à des fins de débats, selon ce que j’en comprends. C’est un mécanisme qui permet à plus de députés d’exprimer leurs vues et leurs opinions.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Les séances sont-elles télévisées?

M. Marc Bosc:

Je ne crois pas qu’elles le sont en Grande-Bretagne ou en Australie, mais nous pouvons vérifier ce point.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

D’accord.

Ce que vous avez dit au sujet de la technologie m’intéresse également. Je sais que nous utilisons déjà la technologie pour certains aspects comme les avis de motion, mais la technologie moderne nous permet bien entendu d’aller encore plus loin.

Serait-il possible de voter en ayant recours à la technologie, ce qui permettrait aux députés d’être présents pour les votes, même s’ils ne sont pas physiquement à la Chambre? En vous fondant sur votre expérience, entrevoyez-vous des conséquences imprévues, qui pourraient nous échapper, qu’une telle proposition pourrait avoir?

M. Marc Bosc:

Nous pouvons traiter de la question des votes électroniques de deux manières. Premièrement, si les députés sont présents et que nous avons des votes électroniques, nous avons bon nombre d’exemples de la façon dont cela peut se faire. Bon nombre l’utilisent. Aucun exemple n’est parfait, mais cela permet en gros de tenir des votes durant la sonnerie d’appel dans le but de gagner du temps. Les députés peuvent voter dès qu’ils arrivent à la Chambre. Lorsque c’est terminé, les députés peuvent poursuivre leurs activités, au lieu de faire retentir la sonnerie d’appel pour que tout le monde se présente et vote en même temps. Cela va en quelque sorte à l’encontre de l’objectif. Cette option présume que tout le monde est présent.

L’autre partie de votre question concerne le vote des députés non présents. C’est bien entendu un aspect sur lequel nous pouvons nous pencher. Cela soulève certainement de profondes questions philosophiques, mais je préfère m’abstenir d’en parler aujourd’hui sans avoir fait de plus amples recherches en ce sens. Le privilège parlementaire entre en ligne de compte. Il y a beaucoup d’autres facteurs à examiner en ce qui a trait à une telle proposition.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Savez-vous si cela se fait ailleurs dans le monde?

M. Marc Bosc:

Actuellement, je ne connais pas d’endroits où c’est le cas. Non.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

D’accord.

Merci.

Le président:

Il vous reste encore trois minutes.

(1120)

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je vais partager mon temps.

Le président:

Madame Sahota, vous avez la parole.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci.

Je ne sais pas si le Parlement doit siéger un certain nombre de jours ou la forme que prendrait en fait une journée de deux séances. Comment cela fonctionnerait-il? Comment procéderions-nous?

M. Marc Bosc:

Le calendrier parlementaire prévoit un certain nombre de jours de séance par année civile si la Chambre siège. En 2016, ce nombre est de 127. Pour ce qui est des années précédentes, le nombre était d’environ 135. Nous avons cette année en gros une semaine de moins qu’à l’habitude.

En ce qui a trait à une journée de deux séances, je répète que la décision vous appartient entièrement quant à la manière de le faire si vous décidez d’examiner cette idée. En ce qui concerne les jours plus longs, soit le mardi et le jeudi, je crois que ce serait possible de couper la journée en deux et d’avoir une séance le matin et une autre l’après-midi. Cela découle évidemment de l’élimination d’un autre jour de séance, à savoir la séance du vendredi. Ce n’est pas nécessaire de le faire si vous décidez de conserver la séance du vendredi. Cependant, si vous éliminez un jour de séance, cela aura évidemment de graves conséquences sur l’examen des projets de loi, les initiatives parlementaires, etc. Bref, il faut en tenir compte. Il est certes possible d’avoir une journée de deux séances, et cela pourrait être structuré de la manière dont la Chambre le décide.

J’aimerais rappeler que la procédure est très flexible. La Chambre peut décider de structurer ses activités selon son bon vouloir. Il y a vraiment très peu de contraintes quant à ce que la Chambre peut décider de faire. Il faut seulement être conscient des conséquences des décisions, et je vous invite aujourd’hui à mettre à profit dans le cadre de vos travaux la grande expertise de l’équipe des Services de la procédure en ce qui concerne les conséquences sur le Règlement et ce qu’il faut changer si vous apportez certaines modifications. C’est notre raison d’être. Nous sommes évidemment heureux de vous aider dans vos travaux.

Le président:

Monsieur Richards, vous avez la parole.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci de votre présence devant le Comité aujourd’hui. Nous avons eu l’occasion lors de la précédente législature de vous accueillir devant le Comité, et nous sommes toujours reconnaissants des conseils réfléchis et judicieux dont vous nous faites part devant le Comité.

Dans votre exposé, vous avez très bien expliqué certains éléments que nous pourrions considérer en vue de modifier le Règlement et certains aspects qu’il faut examiner soigneusement pour nous assurer, comme vous l’avez mentionné, de ne pas entraîner de conséquences imprévues. J’aimerais discuter un peu plus en détail de certains éléments dans le temps qui m’est imparti.

Premièrement, vous avez notamment parlé de l’examen des jours et des heures de séance. Vous avez expliqué les conséquences de l’élimination de la séance du vendredi et ce que cela signifierait pour les activités parlementaires dans les domaines que vous avez mentionnés. Vous avez parlé du nombre d’heures de séance par jour, le début et la fin des jours de séance et d’autres facteurs.

J’aimerais d’abord me concentrer sur la période des questions, parce que c’est une partie très importante de la journée au Parlement. Cela donne une excellente occasion à l’opposition de demander des comptes au gouvernement au nom des Canadiens. Donc, la période des questions et les conséquences sur cette période seront des éléments importants de toute proposition que nous examinerons. Si nous discutons de l’élimination de la séance du vendredi, cela pourrait certainement avoir des conséquences sur la durée de la période des questions et le temps qu’a l’opposition pour demander des comptes au gouvernement au nom des Canadiens.

Pourriez-vous nous expliquer plus en détail les conséquences qu’aurait l’élimination de la séance du vendredi sur la période des questions? Que nous suggéreriez-vous pour nous assurer de ne pas diminuer le temps prévu pour cette fonction très importante au Parlement?

M. Marc Bosc:

Évidemment, si vous éliminez l’un des cinq jours de séance de la semaine — le vendredi, la Chambre siège quatre heures et demie de 10 heures à 14 h 30 —, le temps perdu, pour le dire ainsi, pourra être repris pendant les quatre autres journées.

Par le passé, lorsque la Chambre a modifié ses heures de séance, elle a essayé de s’assurer que le nombre d’heures de séance par semaine augmentait ou, du moins, ne diminuait pas. C’est ce qui a été fait par le passé. On pourrait reprendre le temps perdu pour les divers travaux à d’autres moments dans la semaine.

(1125)

M. Blake Richards:

Je m’excuse de vous interrompre. En ce qui concerne précisément la période des questions, des quatre heures et demie de la séance du vendredi, les déclarations de députés et les questions prennent environ ou peut-être exactement une heure.

M. Marc Bosc:

Oui.

M. Blake Richards:

De toute évidence, une de ces quatre heures et demie devra être consacrée à une fonction très précise, ce qui, je crois, est un élément des plus fondamentaux pour permettre à l'opposition de tenir le gouvernement responsable de ses actions. C'est un moment clé de la journée. C'est l'un des moments où l'opposition a l'occasion de choisir le programme ou, à tout le moins, de poser au gouvernement, au nom des Canadiens, les questions qui sont importantes pour eux. Concernant cet aspect particulier, avez-vous une idée quant à la façon de procéder pour éviter qu'une partie de ce laps de temps soit perdu?

M. Marc Bosc:

D'un point de vue strictement mathématique, les 15 ou 16 déclarations que vous perdriez pourraient être ajoutées à chacune des quatre autres journées. Vous pourriez les diviser en quatre et les étaler sur autant de jours. Vous pourriez procéder de la même façon avec les questions. Vous pourriez prendre une partie des 45 ou 50 minutes de la période des questions et la répartir sur les autres jours. Ce serait une façon de procéder.

M. Blake Richards:

Oui, si l'objectif se limite à donner suffisamment de temps, cela peut fonctionner. Mais ce n'est évidemment pas le seul aspect dont il faut tenir compte.

Vous mentionnez un certain nombre d'autres domaines lorsqu'il est question d'éliminer les séances du vendredi, ainsi que la nécessité de considérer tous les aspects. Vous parlez des répercussions que ces changements pourraient avoir sur le progrès de la législation, les subsides, les affaires émanant des députés et sur les déclarations des députés. Nous avons déjà discuté de la période des questions, mais il y a aussi les exigences relatives aux périodes d'avis et les répercussions que cela pourrait avoir sur les comités et les caucus. Voilà certaines des choses dont vous avez parlé.

Pouvez-vous nous donner des précisions sur ce que vous comptez faire quant à l'élimination des séances du vendredi? Limitons-nous à cela. Pouvez-vous nous faire part de certaines des choses qui, selon vous, pourraient être problématiques, ou des problèmes pour lesquels il nous faudra, à tout le moins, trouver des solutions? Pouvez-vous nous en dire plus long à ce sujet?

M. Marc Bosc:

Bien sûr. Prenons quelque chose d'aussi simple que le nombre de jours désignés par période. En retranchant une journée de la semaine de cinq jours, vous réduisez de 20 % le nombre de jours que siège la Chambre. Le nombre de jours désignés par période est consigné dans le Règlement, et ce nombre est fixe. On se retrouve donc avec une augmentation proportionnelle du nombre de jours désignés par période pour les affaires émanant du gouvernement. C'est un exemple.

Les affaires émanant des députés perdraient une heure. Faute de la reprendre ailleurs, cette heure sera perdue. En ce qui concerne les projets de loi et les avis, précisons qu'on ne peut faire qu'une seule lecture d'un projet de loi une journée donnée. Or, si vous perdez une journée par semaine, cela occasionne des retards et réduit la marge de manœuvre du gouvernement.

En ce qui concerne les périodes de préavis, si vous supprimez une journée, qu'advient-il du délai? Continuez-vous à compter quand même cette journée comme faisant dûment partie de la période de préavis ou non? C'est quelque chose qui doit être évalué. C'est pourquoi le fait d'avoir deux séances en une journée permet d'une certaine façon de compenser ce manque. Si nous gardons cinq séances par semaine, nous serons quand même en mesure d'accomplir une certaine partie de ce que nous aurions accompli ou pu accomplir dans une semaine de cinq jours. Voilà quelques exemples, mais il y en a évidemment beaucoup d'autres.

M. Blake Richards:

Pour être en mesure de compenser cette journée perdue, je comprends très bien pourquoi il serait important de procéder de la sorte, surtout en ce qui a trait à des choses comme les affaires émanant des députés et pour le progrès de la législation, dont les projets de loi du gouvernement. Mais pour s'assurer qu'il y aura deux séances en une journée... Tout à l'heure, à propos de la période des questions, vous avez parlé de répartir ce temps sur les jours restants. Comment cela fonctionnerait-il avec l'idée d'avoir deux séances en une journée? Pour que cela fonctionne sans répercussions imprévues, serez-vous contraints de regrouper toutes ces heures dans un jour donné? Ne croyez-vous pas que cela posera un problème?

(1130)

M. Marc Bosc:

Comme je l'ai dit, nous nous attendons à ce qu'il y ait des répercussions imprévues, surtout si nous apportons plusieurs modifications distinctes au Règlement.

Commençons par trouver comment nous allons aménager le temps. Il serait fort simple d'ajouter une heure pour les affaires émanant des députés — celle qu'on aura perdue le vendredi —, soit à la fin de la séance de mardi ou au début de celle de lundi, ou même à la fin de n'importe quelle autre journée. Le temps perdu pour les affaires émanant du gouvernement, soit deux heures et demie — ou peut-être un peu moins, en raison des affaires courantes —, pourrait être repris en le répartissant sur plusieurs journées. Vous pourriez finir de siéger un peu plus tard. Le but est d'arriver au même total d'heures.

La conséquence relative à la durée de la séance proprement dite est que la période consacrée aux affaires du gouvernement sera assurément plus longue le mardi ou le jeudi — les journées les plus longues à l'heure actuelle — que ce qu'elle aurait été le vendredi. En effet, si vous n'y consacrez actuellement que deux heures et demie le vendredi, le fait de siéger le mardi de 9 h 30 ou 10 heures à près de 14 heures vous donnera un bloc d'environ 4 heures. En ce sens, c'est plus long que ce que permet le vendredi.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Taylor.

Mme Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Je vais partager mon temps avec David.[Français]

Monsieur Bosc, premièrement, j'aimerais vous remercier de votre présentation de ce matin. J'apprécie beaucoup les notes de breffage que vous nous avez fournies.[Traduction]

J'ai une courte question à vous poser. Savez-vous si toutes les assemblées législatives provinciales ou territoriales du pays siègent cinq jours par semaine, ou si elles s'en tiennent à un calendrier comportant un nombre minium de jours?

M. Marc Bosc:

Je n'ai pas fait d'enquête approfondie auprès de toutes les provinces, mais je ne crois pas qu'elles sont nombreuses à siéger cinq jours par semaine. Quelques-unes le font, mais pas toutes, je peux vous l'assurer.

Mme Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Donc, la majorité des assemblées ne siègent pas...

M. Marc Bosc:

Je le répète, je ne veux pas être catégorique à ce sujet, car je n'ai pas vérifié, mais d'après ce dont je me souviens, la plupart ne siègent pas cinq jours par semaine.

Mme Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Merci.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Monsieur Bosc, merci de votre présence.

Nous avons beaucoup parlé des jours de séance, mais ces changements seraient peut-être moins compliqués ou plus faciles à mettre en oeuvre si nous parlions d'« heures de séance » plutôt que de « jours de séance ».

Cela pourrait-il être une possibilité ou être pris en considération? Quelles seraient les répercussions de procéder de la sorte?

M. Marc Bosc:

Cela demande tout un effort de réflexion, c'est le moins que je puisse dire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

M. Marc Bosc:

Le Règlement contient un si grand nombre de dispositions qui font allusion à des « jours de séance » ou à des « séances ». Il faudrait repenser en profondeur la structure même du Règlement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je crois que c'est la raison pour laquelle nous sommes ici, soit pour réaménager les choses en fonction des besoins plutôt que de rester pris avec le passé.

J'ai un certain nombre d'autres questions simples auxquelles il sera probablement plus difficile de répondre.

D'un point de vue historique, avez-vous la moindre idée de la raison pour laquelle nos séances sont aménagées autour du calendrier scolaire, pourquoi nous suspendons nos travaux en juin et ne les reprenons qu'à la fin de septembre? Plutôt que d'avoir des saisons, ne serait-il pas plus sensé — ou peut-être que cela n'a aucun bon sens — de siéger en alternant, disons, deux semaines en Chambre et deux semaines de relâche durant toute l'année?

D'après vous, y aurait-il des inconvénients à cela?

M. Marc Bosc:

Vous savez, cette décision n'appartient qu'à la Chambre. L'histoire nous enseigne que les Canadiens aiment profiter des mois d'été, de leur courte saison estivale. C'est ce que je dirais d'entrée de jeu, mais il n'y a bien sûr aucune raison qui empêche la Chambre de modifier le calendrier parlementaire et d'ajouter des semaines de séance. C'est tout à fait possible.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

De nouvelles semaines, n'est-ce pas?

Qu'arriverait-il si nous commencions à siéger à 8 ou 9 heures plutôt qu'à 10 heures? Je lance l'idée aux fins de la discussion. Je ne dis pas que c'est ce que je voudrais faire. Je n'y tiens pas particulièrement.

Si nous commencions plus tôt et finissions plus tard, quelle incidence cela aurait-il sur les affaires de la Chambre et sur notre façon de fonctionner?

(1135)

M. Marc Bosc:

En commençant plus tôt, les répercussions sont surtout pour les partis. Beaucoup d'entre eux voudront planifier la journée aux petites heures, soit quelques heures avant l'ouverture de la séance. Il se peut que les caucus régionaux ou d'autres groupes de députés soient en réunion à ce moment-là. Il faudra tenir compte de cela.

Quelle que soit la modification, vous devez tenir compte de toutes les autres choses prévues aux heures que vous souhaitez annexer comme solution de rechange. Je ne sais pas tout ce que les députés font plus tôt dans la journée, mais assurément, tout horaire que la Chambre conviendra d'adopter peut fonctionner. Évidemment, il y aura des répercussions pour le personnel qui doit arriver en avance, avant l'ouverture des travaux. Si l'on envisage une ouverture de séance à 8 heures, il faut assurément s'attendre à ce que cela ait une incidence considérable sur tout ce qui s'appelle convention collective, heures supplémentaires et je ne sais quoi encore. Cela pourrait être un changement de taille.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce sont de très bonnes observations.

Qu'en est-il des votes? Je ne sais pas si c'est le cas à l'heure actuelle, mais serait-il possible de dire qu'un vote ne peut en aucun cas se tenir le vendredi, mais que nous pouvons siéger cette journée-là? Cela changerait la donne quant au nombre de personnes qui auraient à se présenter les vendredis.

M. Marc Bosc:

Je ne suis pas certain de comprendre la question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Serait-il possible de dire, par exemple, qu'un vote ne peut en aucun cas se tenir les vendredis, mais que nous siégerons quand même ces jours-là?

M. Marc Bosc:

Nous en sommes presque rendus là. Il est très rare qu'un vote ait lieu un vendredi. Quand il y en a, ce sont habituellement des votes que je qualifierais de procéduraux, car les partis s'en servent comme moyens dilatoires. Autrement, de façon générale, les votes sur les lois et autres ne se tiennent pas les vendredis. L'horaire du vendredi est déjà moins chargé que celui des autres jours. Tous les partis considèrent les vendredis sous cet angle et réduisent leur présence en Chambre dans une certaine mesure.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Voici ma dernière question. Encore une fois, j'essaie de sortir des sentiers battus. Nous avons ce système d'avis électroniques qui utilise ces formidables dispositifs SecurID pour nous permettre de travailler du bureau, de la maison, bref, de n'importe où. Pourrait-on utiliser ce système pour participer aux votes de la Chambre, ou y a-t-il une bonne raison qui nous empêcherait de le faire? Nous pourrions, par exemple, voter depuis notre circonscription en nous servant de ces dispositifs SecurID.

M. Marc Bosc:

Encore une fois, je crois que cela nous amène dans une tout autre sphère de discussion portant sur le rôle des députés et sur ce qui devrait être une assemblée délibérante. C'est une question beaucoup plus vaste que de simples considérations pratiques. Il faudrait presque l'examiner séparément. Ce serait un très grand changement. Je ne dis pas que c'est impossible. Je n'y ai pas vraiment beaucoup réfléchi, mais il s'agit assurément d'un changement considérable.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je crois que nous n'avons pas encore défini les limites de ce que nous étudions, et je veux voir jusqu'où vont ces limites.

Merci beaucoup de vos précisions.

Le président:

Monsieur Dusseault, je m'excuse. Vous deviez passer avant cette série de questions... c'est à vous maintenant. [Français]

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault (Sherbrooke, NPD):

D'accord. Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Bosc, je vous remercie de votre présentation et des pistes de solution que vous nous permettez d'envisager. En effet, je pense qu'en 2016, on se doit d'avoir cette conversation — et une bonne conversation — sur la flexibilité que l'on pourrait retrouver dans nos procédures.

D'entrée de jeu, je porterais à l'attention de tous la question suivante. Quelles sont les règles actuelles en matière de congés de maternité et de paternité pour un député?

M. Marc Bosc:

Les députés n'en ont pas. Cela n'existe pas pour les députés.

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Cela confirme l'information que j'avais. Certaines et certains de mes collègues au NPD ont vécu des naissances et ces personnes ont dû relever plusieurs défis. Cela pourrait arriver à l'avenir à d'autres députés de notre assemblée.

Vous avez mentionné quelques pistes de solution permettant de faire du travail à distance. Vous avez parlé des motions électroniques et de tout ce qui avait déjà été fait pour améliorer la situation, car on peut faire plusieurs choses à partir du comté sans avoir à se présenter ici, en personne. Que pensez-vous de la possibilité d'élargir cela encore davantage pour permettre de faire plus de choses à distance?

Prenons l'exemple d'une personne qui vient d'avoir un enfant, qui est à la maison ou dans son comté et qui aimerait soumettre ses préoccupations et ses suggestions relativement à un certain projet de loi par l'entremise d'un discours qui serait publié dans le compte rendu des travaux, sans toutefois qu'il soit prononcé à la Chambre. Selon vous, cette idée pose-t-elle problème à première vue?

(1140)

M. Marc Bosc:

Cela ne fait pas partie des pratiques de la Chambre. Par contre, comme je l'ai dit au début de ma présentation, la Chambre est libre de modifier ses pratiques comme elle le veut.

Le seul exemple que je connaisse d'une situation où l'on permet une telle pratique est lorsqu'on revient du Sénat, après un discours du Trône, et qu'on permet au Président de publier dans les Débats le discours du Trône comme s'il avait été lu. En principe, c'est donc possible.

Est-ce que la Chambre voudrait prévoir une telle pratique? C'est possible, mais je ne le sais pas.

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

D'accord. C'est intéressant.

Je voudrais maintenant parler de la tenue des votes, qui est une pratique courante ici, à Ottawa. On pourrait opter pour le regroupement des votes à des heures précises, par exemple, après la période des questions. Je pense que c'est une idée qui vaut la peine d'être bien analysée.

Lors de la dernière législature, il est arrivé à quelques reprises que les leaders parlementaires à la Chambre ont fait en sorte de se concerter pour qu'il y ait des votes regroupés aux mêmes heures. Cela facilitait un peu les choses pour ce qui est du besoin d'être présent à la Chambre pour la période des questions orales et, tout de suite après, pour les votes.

Finalement, il n'y a pas de vote le soir, ce qui nous permet de ne pas revenir. Cependant, cela peut faire en sorte qu'il y ait davantage de votes en même temps. Cette situation soulève une autre question, à savoir la possibilité qu'il y ait une interruption pendant les longues périodes de vote.

Par exemple, en vertu de la procédure actuelle, le Président est-il habilité à interrompre le vote de son propre gré pendant 5 ou 10 minutes, entre deux votes, si 10 ou 12 votes sont prévus après la période des questions?

M. Marc Bosc:

À l'heure actuelle, le Président n'a pas ce pouvoir, mais rien n'empêcherait que la Chambre le lui donner.

En ce qui concerne la tenue de votes à 15 heures, vous avez raison: cette pratique a été suivie à quelques reprises. Elle fonctionne bien dans la mesure où l'on ne fait généralement pas retentir la sonnerie. Je vous ferai par contre remarquer qu'un parti qui le désire peut toujours exiger que la sonnerie retentisse. Si l'on veut garantir que les votes se fassent sans sonnerie, il faudrait inclure cela dans le Règlement.

Cela dit, comme vous le soulignez, lorsqu'il y a un très grand nombre de votes, le temps utilisé à cette fin est ajouté à la fin de la journée, comme le veut la pratique. C'est un autre point à prendre en considération.

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

En effet.

Vous pouvez peut-être nous éclairer sur le processus à suivre pour ce qui est des changements au Règlement. Je ne sais pas si vous êtes en mesure de vous prononcer sur cette question, mais je me demande si la meilleure façon de procéder serait d'adopter ici, au Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, un rapport prévoyant certains changements. En deuxième lieu, la Chambre pourrait l'adopter de façon à ce que les changements proposés soient mis en oeuvre.

Pensez-vous que ce soit la meilleure façon de procéder de la part du Comité?

M. Marc Bosc:

Honnêtement, je n'ai pas d'opinion à formuler sur la meilleure voie à suivre étant donné que des changements ont été apportés au Règlement de multiples façons, incluant celle que vous décrivez.

Je vois que M. Reid est dans la salle. Tout récemment, il a réussi à changer le Règlement par l'entremise d'une motion émanant des députés. Tous les moyens sont acceptables. Il est certain que les changements au Règlement sont plus susceptibles de fonctionner correctement lorsqu'il y a un consensus, mais il est arrivé plusieurs fois au cours de notre histoire que des changements au Règlement soient faits de diverses façons, et pas toujours de cette manière.

(1145)

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Je vous remercie.

Mon inquiétude quant à la suppression de la séance du vendredi concerne principalement les deux heures, voire un peu plus, qu'on utilise pour des activités qui pourraient disparaître si on décidait simplement de répartir les 4,5 heures entre les quatre premiers jours de séance et que ces heures n'étaient destinées qu'aux débats sur des projets de loi émanant du gouvernement.

D'une part, on perdrait la période des affaires courantes, ce qui pourrait rendre les choses plus difficiles pour le gouvernement. En effet, ce dernier réussit à faire beaucoup de choses pendant cette période. D'autre part, on perdrait une période de questions orales, une période de déclarations des députés et, surtout, l'heure consacrée aux affaires émanant des députés.

Si on supprime le séance du vendredi, pensez-vous qu'il faudrait envisager de conserver ces 2,25 heures, incluant les affaires courantes, et s'assurer que ces travaux sont inclus dans les quatre premiers jours de séance?

M. Marc Bosc:

Il revient au Comité de décider comment il veut recommander de tels ajustements. S'il désire conserver la cinquième heure des affaires émanant des députés, il est possible de le faire. S'il souhaite conserver une cinquième période d'affaires courantes, il est possible de le faire également.

Essentiellement, le Comité a la pleine liberté de recommander une structure qui fonctionne pour les fins que vous décrivez. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci. Votre temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Schmale, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Bosc, je vous remercie des observations que vous avez faites jusqu'ici.

Nous avons beaucoup discuté des idées qui ont été proposées. Nous avons discuté de certains avantages et de certains inconvénients. J'aimerais poursuivre dans cette veine et sonder votre esprit au sujet de certaines des conséquences qu'occasionnerait la modification des jours et des heures de séance.

Est-il possible que ces changements fassent en sorte que le calendrier parlementaire soit tellement chargé — je ne veux pas dire engorgé — que le Parlement n'arrive plus à mener à bien ses études de façon appropriée?

M. Marc Bosc:

De prime abord, je dirais non. Je ne crois pas que les choses changeraient à ce point. N'oubliez pas que, lors d'un vendredi ordinaire, la Chambre ne siège pas beaucoup d'heures, du moins, pas le même nombre d'heures que les autres jours. Si ces heures sont prises plus tôt au cours des quatre autres jours, alors le temps réservé aux débats ou aux autres procédures en cours reste le même. Je ne vois donc pas d'incidence à cet égard.

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'accord.

Nous avons discuté un peu du dépôt électronique des projets de loi, de la possibilité de le faire depuis nos circonscriptions et tout ça. Voyez-vous des conséquences à procéder de la sorte, au fait d'être à distance? De toute évidence, une certaine partie du travail ne peut se faire qu'ici. Croyez-vous que cela soit un problème?

M. Marc Bosc:

Comme je l'ai dit, je pense que ces questions relèvent d'une tout autre sphère de préoccupations. L'adoption de loi à distance, la légifération à distance, le vote à distance, ce sont des enjeux d'une importance cruciale pour n'importe quelle assemblée délibérante, des enjeux qui demandent une étude et une réflexion approfondies. J'aimerais lire des choses là-dessus et réfléchir à la question avant de me prononcer de quelque façon que ce soit.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je crois que ce serait un changement très important.

M. Marc Bosc:

Ce serait un très important changement.

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'après ce que nous savons et, de toute évidence, beaucoup de recherche, en admettant que nous décidions de changer, croyez-vous qu'il vous serait possible de nous donner une idée — elle n'a pas besoin d'être précise — du moment où ce changement entrerait en vigueur? La transformation comprendrait des choses comme le dépôt électronique des projets de loi et d'autres aménagements semblables. J'essaie de voir quand cela pourrait se faire, par simple curiosité...

(1150)

M. Marc Bosc:

Il est très difficile pour moi de répondre à cette question sans savoir exactement ce qui est demandé; je ne peux vraiment pas répondre. Il y a peut-être des considérations technologiques que j'ignore. Il y a peut-être des exigences qui nous obligeraient à mettre au point un système ou à concevoir d'autres procédures internes pour arriver à nos fins. Pour l'instant, je ne sais pas. Cela dépendra vraiment de ce qui sera proposé.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Absolument. J'ai remarqué qu'une bonne partie du travail que nous accomplissons maintenant ne peut être fait qu'ici, ce qui constitue, j'en suis certain, un obstacle de taille à surmonter.

M. Marc Bosc:

Oui, et si je peux me permettre une remarque, le coût afférent serait probablement assez élevé.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je peux l'imaginer, oui.

Dans vos notes, vous parlez de la chambre parallèle. C'est une observation très intéressante.

Ici encore, nous avons évoqué le temps et le coût, et nous construisons actuellement une chambre dans l'édifice de l'Ouest pour accueillir la Chambre quand nous déménagerons. De toute évidence, le temps et le coût entreraient en ligne de compte, et peut-être tout le processus en ce qui concerne l'installation.

Je suppose que cela se concrétisera dans des années.

M. Marc Bosc:

Eh bien, cela dépend. Le personnel des services informatiques et des journaux doit pousser les hauts cris en m'entendant dire cela, mais tout dépend vraiment de la mesure dans laquelle le Comité et la Chambre veulent que ce soit compliqué. On pourrait simplement préparer ce qui serait essentiellement une vaste salle de comité. Nous le faisons tout le temps. À l'évidence, il y aurait des répercussions sur les publications, si on s'attend à ce que le hansard soit publié. C'est un point qu'il faudrait prendre en considération, tout comme d'autres facteurs, comme la télédiffusion des séances et le choix du canal. Toutes ces questions devraient être prises en compte, mais du point de vue de l'installation matérielle, c'est certainement faisable.

Le président:

Veuillez m'excuser, le temps est maintenant écoulé.

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur Bosc, de vous joindre à nous aujourd'hui. Je sais à quel point vous êtes occupé.

Je vais partager mon temps avec M. Lamoureux. Je poserai juste deux ou trois questions très brèves.

Je veux faire suite à un point soulevé par M. Graham, qui ne concerne pas tant la modification du nombre de jours de séance que celle des heures de séance. En vertu de l'article 43 du Règlement, les députés ont jusqu'à 20 minutes pour traiter d'un point donné. Y a-t-il un motif ou une convention qui explique l'adoption de cette période? Avez-vous envisagé la possibilité de réduire cette période pour compresser un peu le calendrier un jour donné, par exemple?

Je remarque déjà que bien des députés inscrits pour la période de 20 minutes partagent leur temps. Observez-vous un grand nombre de députés qui utilisent les 20 minutes au complet?

M. Marc Bosc:

Cela peut arriver. La longueur des discours tend à diminuer au fil du temps. À une époque, le temps de parole des députés était illimité. La période a ensuite été réduite à 40 minutes, il me semble — non, c'était encore plus long que cela initialement —, puis elle est passée à 40 minutes, puis à 20, après quoi les députés ont pu partager leur temps de parole. Ici encore, il revient entièrement au Comité de déterminer ce qui constitue la durée adéquate d'un discours.

Tout ce que je dirais, c'est que si vous réduisez trop la durée, vous mettez en péril les questions et les commentaires. Si vous fixez la durée des allocutions à 5 minutes, par exemple, quelle sera la longueur des questions et des commentaires? C'est un problème.

J'aimerais aussi dissiper l'illusion selon laquelle la réduction de la durée des discours fera diminuer le nombre de députés qui veulent prendre la parole. La Chambre comptant 338 députés, un plus grand nombre de députés voudront intervenir et utiliseront ce temps. Voilà ce qui arrivera.

Une voix: C'est une bonne chose.

M. Marc Bosc: Et comme M. Lamoureux vient de l'indiquer, c'est une bonne chose, car cela donne à un plus grand nombre de députés l'occasion de prendre la parole; mais si vous pensez que cela réduira le nombre d'heures de séance de la Chambre, je doute que ce soit le cas.

Le président:

Monsieur Lamoureux.

M. Kevin Lamoureux (Winnipeg-Nord, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Bosc, je suis toujours heureux de connaître votre avis sur ces types de questions.

Quand je réfléchis à la question, je me dis que les députés veulent mieux servir leurs électeurs ici, à Ottawa, et dans leurs circonscriptions, et nous tenons compte de l'importance des familles en même temps. Cela vaut la peine d'envisager de ne pas siéger les vendredis, à l'instar d'autres assemblées législatives, mais les assemblées législatives provinciales sont plus locales qu'Ottawa dans la vaste majorité des circonscriptions; je pense donc qu'il est responsable de notre part d'au moins envisager cette possibilité.

J'ai appris quelque chose quand vous avez évoqué la chambre parallèle. Je n'en avais jamais entendu parler.

Permettez-moi d'exposer une idée qui a commencé à germer pendant que j'écoutais d'autres personnes parler. Vous dites que vous pouvez diviser les périodes de questions. Vous pouvez diviser les déclarations des députés et les répartir du lundi au jeudi. Ce qui me préoccupe, ce sont les débats et, dans une certaine mesure, l'heure réservée aux affaires émanant des députés. Techniquement, nous pourrions tenir des périodes doubles, et nous réservons souvent deux heures aux affaires des députés dans une journée. Cela se produit assez fréquemment ces temps-ci; nous pourrions donc désigner une journée, disons le mardi, où nous tiendrions deux heures réservées aux affaires émanant des députés.

Je ne sais rien à propos de la chambre parallèle, mais elle pourrait peut-être siéger le vendredi. Vous indiquez qu'il n'y a habituellement pas de vote et qu'il s'agit surtout d'une journée où on débat des affaires du gouvernement, ce qui permet d'examiner les motions de crédit, d'organiser des journées de l'opposition, de tenir une heure réservée aux affaires émanant des députés et de s'occuper de tout ce qui se fait pendant la semaine. Nous pourrions commencer à 9 heures et poursuivre jusqu'à 15 heures. En fait, nous pourrions prolonger la journée d'une demi-heure ou d'une heure pour tenir des débats.

Les votes semblent revêtir une importance cruciale. Si cela devait empêcher la tenue de votes après, disons, 16 heures les jeudis, alors tous les votes seraient suspendus jusqu'au lundi suivant.

Pourriez-vous nous donner une opinion personnelle sur quelque chose de cette nature, sur les deux aspects dont je viens juste de finir de parler? Vous sentez-vous à l'aise de donner votre opinion personnelle sur quelque chose de cette nature, comme je l'ai indiqué au début?

J'aimerais connaître votre avis à ce sujet.

(1155)

M. Marc Bosc:

J'hésite à vous donner mes opinions personnelles, car c'est tout ce qu'elles sont: des opinions personnelles.

Je vous dirai ceci: en ce qui concerne les votes, comme je l'ai indiqué dans mon exposé, nous sommes dans une situation dans laquelle nous composons avec la réalité parlementaire. Il arrivera des moments où l'opposition ou le gouvernement voudront, pour des motifs valables, faire quelque chose pendant une période qui n'est habituellement pas prévue à cette fin. Il pourrait s'agit de tenir un vote de procédure ou de terminer l'étude d'une motion du gouvernement ou d'un projet de loi. Qui peut prédire? Qui peut prévoir l'endroit où nous serons un jeudi et l'importance que la mesure aura pour la personne qui la propose?

J'hésite à dire que vous pourriez établir une sorte de règle stipulant qu'il n'y a pas de vote après une certaine heure. Nous l'avons fait pour les vendredis; donc, par la même logique, vous pourriez le faire. C'est certainement faisable, mais il faudrait tenir compte des autres impératifs.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Monsieur le président, je vais commencer en disant que je ne pense pas qu'il soit conforme à l'esprit de ce que le gouvernement a proposé initialement que les secrétaires parlementaires, qui ne sont pas censés être membres de comités et qui n'y ont pas le droit de vote, utilisent néanmoins le temps réservé aux questions et aux réponses. Je soulèverai la question auprès des leaders à la Chambre quand nous tiendrons notre réunion plus tard aujourd'hui. Cela me semble contraire à l'intention du gouvernement, et je suis déçu de voir ce qui se passe ici.

Pour en revenir à M. Bosc, je vous remercie de témoigner. C'est toujours un plaisir de vous accueillir parmi nous; vous êtes si bien informé.

Nous nous sommes beaucoup intéressés au sujet de la chambre parallèle, telle que présentée. À titre d'ancien résidant de l'Australie qui a séjourné à Canberra, j'ai l'impression que le Parlement de ce pays disposait d'une grande salle prévue à cette fin et que c'était là que ce genre de débat se déroulait. On avait réfléchi à la facilité d'accès entre cette chambre et celle de la Chambre des représentants pour que les députés puissent aller et venir.

Autrement dit, si nous faisions quelque chose de semblable ici, je pense qu'il serait loin d'être idéal d'installer cette salle au 1, rue Wellington. Une fois toutes les rénovations effectuées, il serait vraiment idéal d'utiliser la salle dans laquelle la Chambre des communes s'installera ou une autre pièce où les gens peuvent se rendre sans devoir braver l'hiver d'Ottawa. C'est une idée que je lance.

En l'absence d'une telle disposition, puisque tout cela ne se concrétisera pas avant quelques années, avez-vous réfléchi un tant soit peu à l'emplacement d'une telle salle? Je pense qu'il faut que ce soit une salle expressément prévue à cette fin, dotée de cabines d'interprétation permanentes et de tout l'équipement nécessaire, ainsi que d'un personnel attitré, je suppose.

(1200)

M. Marc Bosc:

Comme j'ai été à Canberra et que j'y ai vu la salle, je dirai qu'elle avait l'air un peu improvisée même si elle était prévue à cette fin, car des choses avaient été ajoutées après coup. Ce n'est pas une très grande pièce. Mais la Chambre des communes de l'Australie est plus petite que la nôtre; cela pourrait expliquer les choses.

Je pense que le concept de la chambre parallèle dépend réellement de l'idée qu'on s'en fait. Si vous la concevez comme une tribune pour les députés qui souhaitent faire porter au compte rendu un discours sur un projet de loi ou une motion en particulier, par exemple, l'assistance ne serait pas nécessairement importante. L'exigence quant au quorum pourrait être différente. Bien des choses peuvent être adaptées.

M. Scott Reid:

Cette chambre exige-t-elle un quorum ou non?

M. Marc Bosc:

Je l'ignore. Je devrai vérifier.

Dans le cas de l'Australie, je pense que la Chambre siège trois jours par semaine, soit les lundis, les mercredis et les jeudis. Si je peux m'exprimer ainsi, c'est une soupape de sûreté quand les affaires de la Chambre débordent. On n'y prend pas de décisions comme telles. On y tient des débats, ce qui permet à un plus grand nombre de députés de participer.

M. Scott Reid:

Les débats sont de toute évidence enregistrés. Ils sont consignés sous une forme ou à une autre. Le sont-ils dans le compte rendu d'une sorte de comité plénier ou sont-ils annexés au hansard principal?

M. Marc Bosc:

J'ignore la réponse à cette question. Nous pouvons certainement vérifier.

Ici encore, ce serait en fait au comité de la Chambre de décider comment il veut procéder s'il emprunte cette voie.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

J'ai une autre question, et vous n'en connaissez probablement pas la réponse non plus, mais c'est un point qui semble pertinent à examiner.

En Australie ou en Grande-Bretagne, la Chambre des communes a-t-elle un équivalent de nos déclarations prévues à l'article 31, des déclarations d'une minute des députés ou une autre tribune semblable, ou est-ce que ce genre d'interventions a été transféré à la deuxième chambre?

M. Marc Bosc:

Une fois de plus, je devrai vérifier. Je ne connais pas la réponse précise à cette question. Je ne suis pas certain.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci.

Bienvenue, Angelo Iacono.

Est-ce que des libéraux souhaitent utiliser la période de cinq minutes? Si ce n'est pas le cas, c'est le NPD qui prendra la parole dans le prochain tour. D'accord.

Monsieur Dusseault. [Français]

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je suis très heureux de pouvoir poser encore quelques questions.

Il y a quelque chose que je n'ai pas eu le temps d'aborder tout à l'heure. Effectivement, la Chambre parallèle mérite quelques considérations. D'après ce que je comprends à cet égard, elle est utilisée au palais de Westminster, en Grande-Bretagne. J'ai eu la chance, avec l'Association parlementaire du Commonwealth, de participer à une semaine d'études de la procédure qui s'est tenue là-bas. J'ai bien apprécié la façon dont cela pouvait se faire. Cela m'a beaucoup fait réfléchir à mon retour au Canada.

En Grande-Bretagne, il y a le Backbench Business Committee, qui est composé uniquement de députés n'ayant aucun titre officiel à la Chambre des communes. Ce comité décide des sujets à être discutés au palais de Westminster. Si un député veut soulever un sujet, il peut le faire au Backbench Business Committee, qui décide ensuite de l'ordre du jour au palais de Westminster. Souvent, ces sujets sont d'initiative personnelle et sont assez précis. Je crois que cela se fait une fois par semaine. Il me semble que c'est le vendredi. On pourra faire davantage de recherche sur cette question.

Je me demande en quoi ce genre de Chambre parallèle pourrait améliorer la vie de famille. Y aurait-il un peu plus de temps de séance puisqu'il n'y aurait pas de votes, ni de procédure? Est-ce la raison pour laquelle vous avez soulevé ce point pour améliorer la vie de famille?

(1205)

M. Marc Bosc:

Je l'ai soulevé uniquement pour souligner que ce comité et la Chambre disposent de plusieurs moyens de modifier le Règlement afin d'en arriver à un horaire qui respecte mieux les besoins familiaux des députés. C'est simplement pour cette raison que je l'ai mentionné. Je n'ai de pas parti pris pour une solution en particulier. Je voulais juste faire état au Comité de quelques possibilités et domaines thématiques qu'il pourrait explorer.

Comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, si ce n'était pas une Chambre parallèle ou un organe décisionnel où il y aurait des votes et tout le reste, cela libérerait énormément les autres députés qui voudraient retourner dans leur circonscription plutôt que d'assister à cette séance.

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Effectivement. Si on déterminait, par exemple, que le vendredi est la journée consacrée à la Chambre parallèle, cela permettrait à tous les députés ne souhaitant pas être présents ou n'ayant pas d'intérêt pour le débat soulevé de ne pas être inquiets de la tenue d'un vote ou d'une tactique de procédure à la Chambre, car cela ne serait pas possible dans cette deuxième Chambre.

M. Marc Bosc:

Ce serait à la Chambre de déterminer la façon de structurer cette deuxième Chambre.

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Ce serait un changement majeur à nos règlements si, par exemple, on suivait le modèle britannique et qu'on instituait un genre de Backbench Business Committee. Ce serait un nouveau comité permanent et, par la suite, il faudrait prévoir une Chambre parallèle dans les dispositions du Règlement. Cela représenterait quand même des changements majeurs à notre Règlement actuel.

M. Marc Bosc:

Ce Backbench Business Committee devrait-il être un comité permanent de la Chambre ou un comité ad hoc de parlementaires de tous les partis? Ce sera à la Chambre et à ce comité de décider à cet égard.

En ce qui concerne la création d'une Chambre parallèle ou d'une deuxième Chambre, encore une fois, je crois qu'il faudrait un changement au Règlement pour permettre que ce soit fait ou, à tout le moins, une motion adoptée par la Chambre.

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Cela pourrait être informel. Par exemple, les députés pourraient décider de se rassembler dans une pièce, n'est-ce pas?

M. Marc Bosc:

Je n'irais pas jusque-là.

Dans le passé, lorsque la Chambre a voulu faire l'expérience d'une procédure nouvelle ou différente, elle l'a fait par voie de motion permettant une dérogation à la pratique habituelle, quitte à rendre permanent ce changement plus tard, soit un an ou deux ans plus tard. Cela est ce qu'on appelle un ordre sessionnel ou une simple motion adoptée par la Chambre faisant en sorte de changer la pratique de celle-ci. Ce n'est pas nécessairement inclus dans le Règlement de façon permanente.

Plusieurs changements au Règlement ont été faits de cette façon. C'est une chose à considérer. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le greffier, d'avoir témoigné. Nous apprécions votre expertise. Je suis certain que nous devrons faire appel à elle plus tard. Vouliez-vous faire une dernière remarque?

M. Marc Bosc:

Je dirais simplement, monsieur le président, qu'il devrait être évident maintenant que les genres de changements que le Comité examine auront une kyrielle de conséquences et d'implications. Je tiens à réitérer mon offre de mettre à la disposition du Comité tous les employés dont il pourrait avoir besoin pour examiner davantage ces questions et, finalement, préparer des recommandations à ce sujet.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Nous vous sommes très reconnaissants de votre aide.

Je veux simplement m'assurer que notre programme est établi pour la prochaine séance ou la suivante pour que nous sachions ce que nous allons faire.

Sachez qu'un autre document est à notre disposition: apparemment, un groupe de femmes de tous les partis a rédigé un rapport sur un Parlement inclusif favorable aux familles, que nous pourrions étudier au cours d'une de nos séances pour voir ce qu'il recommande.

Pour l'instant, nous allons recevoir votre rapport sur les autres parlements jeudi. Nous vous demanderions d'inclure certaines des questions que vous avez posées, sur des points comme la Chambre australienne et le Parlement parallèle, lesquels semblent susciter un intérêt substantiel. Nous devons ensuite examiner les affaires du comité. M. Christopherson pourrait vouloir présenter sa motion ou non.

Entre-temps, juste pour faire un rappel aux nouveaux venus, les membres du Comité doivent s'adresser à leur whip, leur caucus et leur leader à la Chambre pour obtenir leurs commentaires d'ici la fin de la première semaine suivant la pause afin d'accorder aux gens le temps d'assister à deux réunions du caucus.

Dans ces circonstances, qu'est-ce que le Comité souhaiterait faire le premier mardi suivant la pause?

Monsieur Richards.

(1210)

M. Blake Richards:

Ce que nous entendrons jeudi pourrait probablement nous aider un peu à savoir ce que nous voulons faire pour faire progresser la présente étude. Je pense que nous allons devoir procéder à un examen prolongé. Comme le greffier par intérim l'a souligné aujourd'hui, il y a bien des conséquences non intentionnelles à prendre en compte. Nous voulons nous assurer que nous les avons toutes soumises à un examen exhaustif avant d'aller de l'avant.

De toute évidence, nous voudrons voir ce que notre analyste a à nous présenter jeudi, et nous pourrions alors peut-être en discuter.

Pendant que j'ai la parole, cependant, j'aimerais soulever une question. La greffière a envoyé hier ou le jour précédant quelque chose à propos des nominations par décret effectuées par le prétendu comité consultatif indépendant des nominations au Sénat. Le Comité a certainement les compétences pour convoquer les personnes nommées devant lui. Comme il s'agit d'un nouveau processus instauré ici, je suis convaincu qu'il serait pertinent et très important que nous les convoquions dans un proche avenir pour discuter de la nomination et du processus auquel elles participent.

Le président:

Devrions-nous en discuter au sein du sous-comité chargé des points à l'ordre du jour afin de déterminer quand nous ferions quelque chose à ce sujet et ce que nous ferions?

M. Blake Richards:

Tant qu'il convient aux membres que nous les convoquions, oui. Nous pourrions certainement discuter du moment opportun au sein du sous-comité, mais je pense que nous devrions avoir une indication selon laquelle c'est une démarche que le gouvernement ne tentera pas d'empêcher. Il importe que les témoins viennent nous parler du processus.

Le président:

M. Reid, puis...

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, j'ajouterais que le premier volet de nominations est imminent. D'après ce que je comprends, le comité cessera d'accueillir des candidatures le lendemain de la Saint-Valentin, dans deux semaines. Une fois le processus de candidature terminé, nous présumons que le comité se réunira et sera fort occupé; il me semble donc raisonnable de demander à ses membres de comparaître.

Je présume que nous ne les inviterons pas tous, mais les personnes choisies pour comparaître — y compris, il me semble, le président — devraient être invitées à venir ici avant le 15.

Le président:

Le 15 février?

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, le 15 février, puisque la charge de travail du comité sera moins importante avant, puis augmentera considérablement après. Cela me semble une solution raisonnable pour nous.

Le président:

Est-ce que quelqu'un veut ajouter quelque chose?

Monsieur Lamoureux.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Blake, pensiez-vous à toutes les personnes nommées à ce comité ou pensiez-vous à une ou deux d'entre elles? De prime abord, je pense que cela pourrait être une bonne chose à faire. Je cherche à savoir ce que vous cherchez vraiment à faire. Voulez-vous convoquer tous les membres du comité? Le temps compte ici, car ils vont certainement être très occupés...

M. Blake Richards:

C'est certain...

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

... comme Scott l'a fait remarquer.

(1215)

M. Blake Richards:

Oui. M. Reid vient tout juste d'en parler également et, à la lumière de ses commentaires, je pense qu'il est important que nous agissions le plus rapidement possible, de façon à ne pas empiéter sur la période où ils examineront les nominations.

Je conviens que cela doit se faire le plus tôt possible. Nous pourrions nous pencher là-dessus dès la première séance suivant la relâche, en sachant que nous ne pourrons pas tous les faire venir. Nous devons faire de notre mieux pour avoir le plus de gens possible, au moins, le président. Naturellement, nous pourrions tous les convoquer dans le but d'en avoir au moins quelques-uns qui comparaissent. Je suis d'avis que les membres permanents seraient les plus importants. J'ignore si vous avez d'autres idées là-dessus, mais selon moi, il faudrait au moins faire témoigner le président et, j'ose espérer, les membres permanents du comité.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Monsieur le président, certains de mes collègues ont déjà soulevé cette question. J'avais discuté de la possibilité qu'on en parle au Comité. Je crois que c'est très raisonnable. Je compte sur mes collègues et les membres du comité pour me dire ce qu'il en est, mais je pense qu'en principe, ce serait une bonne chose, étant donné que quelques membres m'ont déjà demandé ce que j'en pensais. Je suis curieux de connaître votre avis sur la question, mais en principe, oui, et nous pourrions ensuite nous en remettre au sous-comité...?

Le président:

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

J'aimerais simplement demander à M. Richards s'il souhaite en discuter ici ou au Sous-comité du programme et de la procédure.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Je viens tout juste d'en discuter rapidement avec mon collègue. Nous regardions le calendrier.

Étant donné que les nominations se font assez rapidement, il pourrait être souhaitable de voir s'il est possible... Je ne sais pas où se trouvent ces personnes en ce moment, mais il serait bon d'essayer de les rencontrer jeudi, soit avant le début du processus.

Chose certaine, nous devrions bouger le plus rapidement possible dans ce dossier, puisqu'il s'agit d'un nouveau processus et que nous aimerions l'examiner avant qu'il ne soit enclenché.

Le président:

Madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'aimerais simplement avoir quelques précisions au sujet du déroulement. Allons-nous interroger les membres du comité pendant une heure? Est-ce bien ce que vous proposez?

M. Blake Richards:

Oui, absolument. C'est exactement ça.

C'est ce que stipule le Règlement. Nous les convoquerions devant le Comité pour leur poser des questions.

Le président:

Je tiens à préciser que le Règlement prévoit que le Comité « examine les titres, les qualités et la compétence » des personnes nommées.

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Puisque M. Richards souhaite qu'on procède rapidement, ne serait-il pas approprié que le président vérifie auprès du parti ministériel si cela peut se faire jeudi? Il est difficile de planifier lorsqu'on ne connaît pas leur disponibilité.

Je suis conscient qu'il faut faire vite. Nous serons en relâche la semaine prochaine. À notre retour, je crois que le Comité ne se réunira pas avant le 16 février. Est-ce exact?

Le président: Oui.

M. Blake Richards:

Une chose est sûre, il faut que ce soit fait le plus rapidement possible. Je suis conscient que jeudi, ça ne nous laisse pas beaucoup de temps. J'ignore les plans du président et des autres membres, mais je proposerais que le président ou la greffière leur demande s'ils sont disponibles jeudi. À tout le moins, nous pourrions convoquer le président et peut-être quelques autres membres permanents.

Au besoin, nous pourrions utiliser la première réunion après la relâche pour entendre les autres. Si nous ne pouvons pas le faire ce jeudi, c'est une option que nous devrons envisager. Idéalement, ce serait jeudi, mais si ce n'est pas possible, nous devrons y donner suite lors de la première séance suivant la relâche.

Le président:

Monsieur Dusseault.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je pourrais peut-être proposer une motion visant à demander à la greffière de vérifier la disponibilité du président du Comité.

(1220)

M. Blake Richards:

Tant qu'à y être, pourquoi ne pas vérifier également la disponibilité des autres membres permanents?

M. Arnold Chan:

Je vais donc modifier ma motion afin d'inclure et/ou tous les autres membres énoncés dans les décrets en conseil, puis d'en faire rapport au Sous-comité du programme et de la procédure, de manière à ce que nous sachions...

M. Blake Richards:

Cela éliminerait la possibilité de le faire jeudi. Je pense que nous devrions donner les directives au président et à la greffière afin qu'ils vérifient si les membres peuvent venir jeudi. Sinon, à ce moment-là, nous devrons nous réunir le premier mardi suivant la relâche. Je crois qu'il faudrait donner des directives précises à ce sujet.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je pensais au processus. Puisque nous n'allons pas nous réunir avant jeudi, il sera difficile de savoir s'ils sont disponibles ou non.

M. Blake Richards:

Mais nous pouvons autoriser cette discussion. Nous n'avons pas besoin d'en faire rapport. S'ils sont libres et s'ils sont autorisés à venir, il n'y a rien qui les empêche de venir jeudi.

L'autre option serait le mardi suivant la relâche. Notre Comité a la capacité de formuler ces directives.

Le président:

Monsieur Lamoureux.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Monsieur Richards, en ce qui concerne la motion, croyez-vous qu'il serait préférable de faire comparaître une ou deux personnes qui pourraient être disponibles jeudi ou d'attendre à la prochaine réunion afin de recevoir un plus grand nombre de personnes?

M. Blake Richards:

Selon moi, il serait bon d'en savoir un peu plus au sujet des nominations et du processus comme tel avant que celui-ci ne commence. Je pense que ce serait une bonne chose de rencontrer le président ainsi qu'un ou deux membres dès jeudi.

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

C'est d'ailleurs ce que propose la motion d'Arnold, c'est-à-dire qu'au lieu d'aller en sous-comité, s'il y a quelques membres du Comité, particulièrement le président, qui peuvent venir jeudi, nous pourrions les inviter et les faire témoigner à ce moment-là.

M. Blake Richards:

Absolument. Je suis d'accord.

Le président:

Avons-nous une motion visant à vérifier si les membres peuvent venir jeudi, et s'ils ne sont pas libres, le premier mardi suivant la relâche? Est-ce bien votre motion?

M. Arnold Chan:

C'est exact. La motion devrait donc se lire...

Le président:

J'aimerais demander une précision à la greffière. Le Règlement nous permet d'examiner leurs qualifications et leur compétence. Pouvons-nous leur poser d'autres questions? M. Richards a parlé du déroulement du processus, ce qui est un tout autre sujet.

D'accord, la greffière nous dit qu'il s'agit d'une audience sur les nominations, pour nous permettre de savoir si la personne qui devrait être nommée est qualifiée.

Est-ce que c'est clair pour tous les membres du Comité?

Souhaitez-vous discuter davantage de la motion?

M. Kevin Lamoureux:

Pouvons-nous entendre la motion au complet, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je propose que la greffière vérifie la disponibilité du président du Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat et/ou celle de toutes les autres personnes nommées afin que ceux-ci puissent comparaître devant le Comité ce jeudi, et s'ils ne sont pas libres, à la prochaine séance du Comité, soit le mardi suivant, le 16 février.

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président:

C'est ce qui détermine nos travaux pour l'instant. Sachez que j'ai été très généreux aujourd'hui pour ce qui est du temps alloué. Nous disposions de suffisamment de temps, mais lorsque ce ne sera pas le cas, je ne ferai pas preuve d'autant de générosité pendant la période de questions.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on February 02, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.