header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-10-19 PROC 74

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

I call the meeting to order.

Good morning, and welcome to the 74th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. This meeting is being held in public.

I'm going to give a bit longer preamble today because we're doing clause by clause.

Today we're proceeding with clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-50, An Act to amend the Canada Elections Act in relation to political financing. We have officials from the Privy Council Office, who are here to provide any assistance we need. We have Riri Shen, director of operations, democratic institutions, and Madeleine Dupuis, policy adviser, democratic institutions.

Thank you both for being here if we have any questions.

Before we begin, I'd like to provide members who haven't done this before with some information about how committees generally proceed with clause-by-clause consideration of a bill.

The committee will consider each of the clauses in the order in which they appear in the bill. Once I have called a clause, it is subject to debate and vote. If there are amendments to the clause in question, I'll recognize the member proposing the amendment, who may explain it. The amendment will then be open for debate. When no further members wish to intervene, the amendment will be voted on. Amendments will be considered in the order in which they appear in the package each member receives from the clerk. If there are amendments that are consequential to each other, they will be voted on together.

In addition, to be properly drafted in a legal sense, amendments must also be procedurally admissible. The chair may be called upon to rule amendments inadmissible if they go against the principle of the bill or beyond the scope of the bill, both of which were adopted by the House when it agreed to the bill at second reading, or if they offend the financial prerogative of the crown.

If you wish to eliminate a clause in the bill altogether, the proper course of action is to vote against the clause when the time comes, not to propose an amendment to delete it.

During the process, if the committee decides not to vote on a clause, that clause can be put aside by the committee so that we can revisit it later in the process.

Amendments have been given a number in the top right-hand corner to indicate which party submitted them. There is no need for a seconder to move an amendment. Once an amendment is moved, unanimous consent is required to withdraw it.

Once every clause has been voted on, the committee will vote on the title of the bill itself, and an order to reprint the bill may be required if amendments are adopted so that the House has a proper copy for use at report stage.

Finally, the committee will have to order the chair to report the bill to the House. That report only contains the text of any adopted amendments, as well as indication of any deleted clauses.

I thank the members for their attention. We will now proceed with clause-by-clause consideration.

(1105)

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Mr. Chair—

The Chair:

I think I have Mr. Christopherson first.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you very much.

Thanks for going through that. For some members, it's the first time they've done this. I've got to tell you that I sit on this and on the public accounts committee. Tyler and I were talking about how it's probably been about four or five years since I've done one too, so this is probably going to go a little bit less than smoothly as we work our way through it.

That's a nice cover or way for me to say, with very little elegance, I shall not be moving NDP-2, NDP-3, or NDP-4, Chair.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I have two questions with relation to the very helpful introduction you read to us. Thank you for that. I'll ask both questions and you can answer them.

Number one, I was going to ask if it is the case that any of the proposed amendments would, if adopted, have the effect of causing any of the other proposed amendments to be outside our consideration. If so, it would be helpful to know those in advance.

Number two, I'd like to know whether any of the amendments have, in your view, fallen outside of what is allowable, and if so I'd appreciate knowing that in advance as well, rather than waiting until we get to the individual items.

The Chair:

I'll try to answer both of those questions, but we're delighted to have a legislative clerk here today. Should I give the wrong answer, I'm sure he will correct me.

The first question is, yes, I will let you know when one precludes another.

Second, they all appear admissible.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay, thank you.

The Chair:

Okay, are we ready to roll?

There are no amendments on clause 1, so shall clause 1 carry?

(Clause 1 agreed to on division)

(On clause 2)

The Chair:

We have LIB-2. If it's adopted, amendment NDP-1 cannot be moved because of a line conflict.

Mr. Scott Reid:

NDP-1 was not withdrawn, correct?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Correct.

The Chair:

We have amendment LIB-1. Maybe you could present it, David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

This is to address the loophole that I brought up during questioning with the minister and her staff. If a minister of one party or a leader of another party shows up at somebody else's event, as the law is worded right now, that would make their event illegal. This would get rid of that loophole very simply.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Say that again, Dave.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Let's say the leader of the NDP shows up at my fundraiser—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Which happens all the time....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Well, Tom grew up in my riding, so I know him. Let's say that happened. My event would then become illegal, because I had a regulated person show up my event, and making it somebody from the same party solves that problem.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I was thinking about it, and I can think of a practical application that would cause me to want to support it. Notwithstanding our partisan differences, most of us get along quite well in Hamilton. In my view, Filomena is on the brink of having her shot at cabinet, so it could very well be that she could find herself being a cabinet minister and it wouldn't exactly be a headline for one of us to drop into another's event just on a collegial basis. It does happen. If I'm understanding what you're suggesting, because they're someone who shouldn't be there under the rules, the whole thing then is in some legal question and in trouble.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's because she is there, correct?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Right.

I guess what I would ask is whether there are any other unintended consequences. From that perspective, I think it makes sense, and I could see myself supporting it. Are there any unintended consequences to it, though?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Only if somebody crosses the floor at the event.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That ain't going to happen, so there you go.

(1110)

Mr. Scott Reid:

In all fairness, it's highly unlikely the minister would cross the floor at the event. Remember, he can go to Filomena's event without it triggering any problems, unless he gets appointed to cabinet, in which case it's a different story.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Then we'd get you to write a headline.

It ain't going to happen, so let's just shut that down.

My biggest problem is that adopting this would negate mine, I'm told. Can you help me understand exactly why that is, Mr. Legislative Clerk?

Mr. Olivier Champagne (Legislative Clerk, House of Commons):

The rule is that the committee can only amend the same line once. Basically that's the very simple rule. The Liberal amendment touches lines 3 to 5 and NDP-1 replaces lines 4 and 5, so that's why. It's a technical reason.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay, thanks.

Chair, perhaps I could, through you, ask Mr. Graham whether it's his intention to support my amendment. If it is, then maybe we could find a way to have one motion that gets us around this technicality. Otherwise, it looks as though we're going to have a bit of a clash.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Could I ask a question, then? It's related to that. Certainly it's technically feasible, but the question is whether it's allowable to amend LIB-1 to include the language that is in amendment NDP-1.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I believe it's technically possible, but to answer David's question, it's not my intention to support his amendment. If he'd like me to explain why, I'm happy to, but at this point it's not my intention to support it.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Why?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It expands this to every exempt staff in every office who attends any event, and I think that goes way beyond the intent and the scope of the bill.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Chair, perhaps you would allow a little flexibility.

The Chair: Yes.

Mr. David Christopherson: I hear you, and I posed the same question to Tyler when we were going through it. The answer is that if we simply identify it by title, all you have to do is give somebody a title that's not listed and you've gotten around the law. By just saying everybody who's in the office may... There's the the fact that it might feel like a bit of an overreach, but if we do it the other way, it's an underreach, because, as I say, you just create a title that's not there, and hocus-pocus, someone who normally shouldn't be there or would be covered by the law now isn't.

That was the only reason they used the language. I asked the same question: why would we say “such as”?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I get that, but it's not my intent to support in the bill to extend it to every exempt staff in every office, which is what this does, as I understand it.

You haven't introduced it yet, but—

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Because this is going to preclude debate on the NDP amendment, and that seems inherently unfair, the way to resolve this problem is to move a subamendment to LIB-1 that includes the content of NDP-1.

Mr. David Christopherson:

We could do mine first. Just change the order.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I don't think we can do yours first. We'd have to withdraw LIB-1 and then do yours first.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We can do it by unanimous consent.

Mr. Scott Reid:

All right. Let's see if there's unanimous consent for it. If not, I'll—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Can we move to NDP-1, Chair, by unanimous consent, and then return to LIB-1?

The Chair:

There are two options for proceeding, or three. Just carry on is one. Two is to propose a subamendment to LIB-1. Three is to, by unanimous consent, reverse the order, and if NDP-1 passes, then LIB-1 couldn't go ahead. If NDP-1 doesn't pass, LIB-1 could still proceed to debate.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Again, we get along fairly well here. Is it the intent of all the government members to vote against NDP-1?

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Yes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

The thing is, I have some sympathy for David's amendment, but I'm certainly sure as hell not going to vote for something that kills my motion before it even gets to the floor. It's just not going to happen.

If I can get a sense, though, that I'm spinning my wheels on mine, then that would give me a little bit of latitude to be supportive of David's.

Is that everybody saying you're not with me? Okay.

Mr. Randy Hoback (Prince Albert, CPC):

Why don't we just let you guys vote down his amendment and then go to your amendment?

A voice: Well, if we proceed with his—

(1115)

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, but if they're not going to include mine, there's no sense doing that option. That would be nice and neat. Otherwise I'm in a leap of faith. I can do that, but the cleanest would be if we could do mine first, let me sort of have my day in court—it will take 30 seconds—and then we can move on to LIB-1 and give me the latitude to support it.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Let's find out if we have unanimous consent to go to NDP-1 first.

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio (Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel, Lib.):

No.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. In that case, I move that LIB-1 be amended in the last line, by adding, after the word “subparagraph,”: or any person appointed under subsection 128(1) of the Public Service Employment Act, and

My assistant has advised me that I'm doing this ineptly, so give me a moment. He wouldn't have reported it that way, but that is the intent of what he's about to tell me.

The Chair:

While you're doing that, I want to ask a question for curiosity's sake. If David were having a fundraiser and it didn't have to be reported because no one important was there, such as your leader—

Mr. David Christopherson:

You've been to my fundraisers.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

—and we sent a minister, or if another party sent a minister, then you would have to report everyone, which would be a bit obnoxious.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, and you'd have to advertise it five days in advance.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes. Then I'd have to throw you out because you'd screw up my event.

A voice: That would be the headline: you throwing him out.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No, it would be worse than that, David. It would be worse than that because your event would become illegal if you hadn't announced five days in advance that they were going to crash your event, and that's why the loophole is there.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have been duly chastised.

Here is the amendment that I would have given you, had I been Dennis.

Voices Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid: The amendment contains two inclusions. At line 5, after the word “state”, we would add: , or a parliamentary secretary,

Mr. Clerk, I'll be giving this to you so you can see it afterwards.

Then in the last line, where the word “subparagraph” is followed by a comma, we would insert the words: or any person appointed under subsection 128(1) of the Public Service Employment Act

I'll give this to the clerk so he can see it.

The Chair:

Have people heard the terms of the amendment?

Is there any debate?

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's hard to follow that way. I'll just explain what I've done.

Now that we're debating this, I'm hoping that will provide Mr. Christopherson with a point to explain the merits of NDP-1. The purpose of this amendment is to allow him to have his moment before the committee to explain what he's trying to accomplish.

However, my understanding is that the wording of the relevant clause does not include some people who are actually the kinds of people who are in a position to either make decisions on their own or to assist in the making of decisions that could result in benefits accruing to people making a donation to be at the event. Hence, those people should also be included for an event at which they are the headliner, or at any rate are present, headlined or not, because their presence can be conveyed by means other than widely broadcasting the fact that they'll be present.

This includes parliamentary secretaries who do, after all, meet regularly with ministers. In a sense, they serve a role within the parliamentary context similar to that which an NCO, a non-commissioned officer, serves within a military unit to the commissioned officer. Likewise, persons appointed under subsection 128(1) of the Public Service Employment Act would include individuals who are effectively political staff, if I'm not mistaken. Mr. Christopherson can correct me.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I believe that's the goal of this amendment.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You've done a better job than I was going to.

The Chair:

Do you want to say something else about it?

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, as a matter of fact, I thank you very much, Mr. Reid. I appreciate that very much.

I won't do a whole speech, but you'll recall that I've had experience in this area and I know the kind of impact that a chief of staff and senior policy adviser can have on a minister. To leave the influence line at just the elected person does not, in my view, capture all the influences on a minister when he or she is making decisions. In a nutshell, that is my rationale.

I'd go a little longer if I had a chance of converting anyone. My odds of that look slim to none. I try to live in the real world.

(1120)

The Chair:

Okay, can we go to the vote on the subamendment that we just heard? I think it's pretty clear.

All in favour?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Can we get a recorded vote?

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

The vote is on the subamendment.

(Subamendment negatived: nays 5; yeas 4)

The Chair:

The subamendment is defeated.

Now we go to the amendment.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I've just got one comment. The proposer has already spoken.

I just wanted to say that I'll be voting for this amendment. I am disappointed by what just happened. We are trying to deal with the merits of each clause on its own. I think that we have a somewhat rarified concern that Mr. Christopherson—sorry, Mr. Graham—expressed. Nonetheless, it's a nice housekeeping measure.

The Chair:

Is there any other discussion?

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

NDP-2, 3, and 4 are withdrawn.

We go to NDP-5.

David, would you like to present this amendment?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes. The bill currently allows these thank-you events for maximum donors, and that type of event is excluded from this legislation. In my view, putting that exemption in place again still leaves lots of room for loopholes and getting around this. People know that they're going to get a double whack for their contributions. To me, it's the same game, but by a different name. This would prevent that exemption from happening.

The Chair:

Is there discussion?

Go ahead, Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you.

The purpose of the exemption acknowledges the logistical difficulties of enforcing this at a convention, with individuals moving around, and lining up who is in the room at the same time with certain individuals when there is coming and going.

Bill C-50 still ensures that if there is a ticketed event during a convention.... For example, at ours, there is always a Judy LaMarsh fundraiser to raise money for women candidates who are running. It's a separate ticketed event, and if a minister were to attend, that would be covered by this legislation.

The Chair:

We have Mr. Christopherson and then Mr. Reid.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I would say to my honourable friend that there is merit in that argument. I don't see why we aren't constructing legislation that carves that out but still ensures that these other thank-you events aren't happening.

I don't think it's the conventions that are the bigger problem; it's the opportunity for a second gathering with the high-priced, influential government decision-makers still in attendance. That is being exempted from the transparency that Bill C-50 is providing elsewhere. That's my problem.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm sorry; it sounded as though Ruby was going to respond to Mr. Christopherson. I don't want to get in the way of that.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

The purpose of that section isn't for appreciation events anywhere else, but only within a convention. Therefore, I think what you've just—

(1125)

Mr. David Christopherson:

Can you show me that? If I have that wrong and if the language is that clear....

Mr. Andy Fillmore (Halifax, Lib.):

Mr. Chair, I wonder if we could ask the officials to give us some guidance on this point.

The Chair:

Officials, go ahead.

Ms. Madeleine Dupuis (Policy Advisor, Democratic Institutions, Privy Council Office):

Yes, the exception is only for an appreciation event that is part of a convention. All other appreciation events are covered by the bill.

It's at line 4, on page 3.

The Chair:

Do you mean line 4 on page 3 of the bill?

Ms. Madeleine Dupuis:

Yes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

If I may, it's exclusion of contributor appreciation events. It doesn't say that in the title, but it says: (4) Despite subsection (3), a regulated fundraising event does not include any event that is a part of a convention referred to in subsection (2) and that is organized to express appreciation for persons who have made a contribution to the registered party or any of its registered associations, nomination contestants, candidates or leadership contestants.

The only exclusion is for those occurring at a convention, not outside of a convention.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That still leaves us with the same problem. Again, you're saying that it was too hard to keep track of it.

You're pulling together an event within the convention. I was thinking that if you're talking about a fundraising event during a convention, that may be one thing, but this is talking about pulling together those same people who are benefiting from having paid the maximum—I think in this case the Liberals have their Laurier Club—so these folks are going to be invited at a convention, but only they are going to be invited.

How would you have so much trouble keeping track of it when you'd have to invite them in the first place because they are maximum donors? They have to belong to your Laurier Club, and if that's the list you're drawing from to say that they're entitled to come, how is it so difficult to track? Why is that the issue?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

The issue isn't that it's difficult to track, because those individuals are already recorded in Elections Canada. It's who is there at what time with what individual, and there are comings and goings throughout the entire weekend.

When I speak about logistical difficulties, these individuals are already.... You can go to Elections Canada and find out who the maximum donors are, and that's not an issue. As we've all been to conventions, we understand who is moving around and the difficulties of pinning down the time frame. Just because individual X was in a lounge and a minister was in the lounge, it doesn't mean that they were even there at the same time or on the same day, which is what this bill is trying to get at.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's fair enough.

You could set it up so that nobody was really planning to do a whole lot of talking at the initial fundraiser, because the real deal was going to happen at the more exclusive one at the Laurier Club, where only those who paid the maximum were getting invited, and you'd be doing it under the guise of the convention. What would not be allowed anywhere else would be allowed because it's a convention.

When I was making reference to the convention, I was talking about fundraising events at the convention. There's all kinds of stuff going on. People are selling stuff. I have some sympathy for that. Still, at the convention you're going to pull together people who, by virtue of being Laurier Club members, are going to have a chance to go to an event and rub elbows with who knows whom, with no transparency whatsoever, all predicated on the fact that they are the top donors at another event or events.

To me, it's still providing access for cash. It's just that you paid the cash ahead of time.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Mr. Christopherson, at the beginning you said that it was okay at a convention and that your problem lay more with these events occurring outside of the conventions. Are you now rethinking the whole thing?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Well, that's because you said that this only applies to conventions. Why would I be arguing about something that's not included in the clause? You're the lawyer, not me. I'm just taking my lead from you.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

(1130)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

You're changing your issue, I think.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Well, no. If you want to give me a chance to make a macro-case about it, I will, but the clause in front of us is talking about the conventions. I'm just saying that you're still allowing what you say Bill C-50 provides transparency for, and when it's at a convention, it's opaque. That's all I'm saying.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you. I must say that after listening to the back-and-forth, I feel a bit like a contestant at the side of a Jell-O wrestling match who inexplicably decides to do a swan dive into the middle of it.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you for allowing us to have that back-and-forth.

Mr. Randy Hoback:

That's the best you've got?

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's better than what you would have had, Hoback.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid: I wanted to make some observations. I think this amendment by Mr. Christopherson was very well intended and I want to explain why I don't support it.

I should mention, by the way, that some of the comments I'm going to make are related to a situation that exists when you're in government but doesn't exist for us as an opposition party right now. In opposition, we only have to worry about the leader. He's the only person whose presence is guaranteed at the Leader's Circle event, which is our equivalent of the Laurier Club. Obviously, he'll be there, so we'd record that. However, if you're in government, you have ministers who will potentially be available depending upon the other things going on at the convention. Everybody knows that conventions are very chaotic events. You're dealing with all kinds of things. You have people doing interviews, which are hard to plan, with various media outlets. It's hard to plan which events will be top of mind at the time of a convention. For disclosure purposes, you could list every minister without actually promising the people who are being invited that they'll be there. That seems problematic, and it's one concern.

My more significant reason for not supporting this amendment is that at a convention you already have, by the nature of the event, media present, so it's easy to keep track of who's coming in and out. I think it was Chris Bittle who said that they are somewhat chaotic events in that people are wandering in and out, getting canapés. You may have more than one such event at a convention in order to accommodate people who are arriving at different times and so on, but the key thing is that reporters are there anyway. You have media accreditation. There's no danger of any sort of secret meeting.

Also, you have the largest number of donors who are donating for the traditional reasons. They already believe in the Liberal Party or the Conservative Party. They're willing to give the maximum. They're now a delegate at their convention. You have so many of those people that it would be a very odd time to try to have a quiet meeting with a Chinese billionaire, say. It doesn't seem like the sort of thing that's going to happen. Therefore, I think this is an area that was never a problem to start with.

The Chair:

We're voting on amendment NDP-5.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: We're now on NDP-6, and this vote will apply to NDP-8 as well, which is the consequential amendment.

We'll get David to present NDP-6, but first, go ahead, Mr. Reid,

(1135)

Mr. Scott Reid:

Under the formal rules, because clause 2 is being amended by NDP-6 in line 15, and LIB-2 is amending it differently, are these not the same thing nonetheless, or am I misunderstanding? In practice, if this were done, it wouldn't make sense to do LIB-2, or would it still make sense? I'm asking whether it's sensible, as opposed to what the formal rules are.

Mr. Olivier Champagne:

I'm sorry; could you repeat?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm wondering whether they duplicate the same thing in different sections, and therefore whether the de facto result would be that one makes the other unnecessary.

Mr. Olivier Champagne:

I would turn to the officials, because you're really asking what the results are in terms of legal effect.

Ms. Madeleine Dupuis:

Yes, Mr. Reid, both amendments would add a notice to Elections Canada, so they have the same goal. They're identical in terms of practical effect.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay.

I'll just ask the obvious question, then. To the Liberals here, given that fact, would you guys be comfortable in just withdrawing LIB-2 if NDP-6 passes?

Mr. Andy Fillmore:

Mr. Chair, could I ask the officials to clarify, through an implementation lens, which of the two options is favourable?

Ms. Madeleine Dupuis:

The motion in LIB-2 sets out the obligation to provide a notice separate from the obligation to advertise instead of putting them together, so it'll be easier from an enforcement perspective that the two obligations are separate, because then the offences are separate as well.

Mr. Andy Fillmore:

Then LIB-2 is preferable in that context.

Mr. Scott Reid:

In that case, Mr. Chair, would it be the case that Mr. Christopherson would be willing to withdraw his motion in order to allow the Liberal one to go ahead?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes.

The Chair:

Okay. NDP-6 is withdrawn. Can we have a vote on LIB-2? Everyone seems to be on side.

It applies to LIB-6. I guess it would be similar to the NDP amendment consequential to NDP-8. If we vote on this, it also applies to LIB-6.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Does LIB-6 automatically apply as a result of this? Is that how it works?

Mr. Olivier Champagne:

It's because LIB-2 would add a new subsection, proposed subsection 384.2(4.1), and there's a reference to that new subsection of the bill, so it's really a technical reference.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm just going to find LIB-6, if you don't mind.

The Chair:

I will call the vote.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: We'll go on to NDP-7. If this passes, or whatever happens with the vote, it'll apply to NDP-9 as well, which is another consequential amendment.

David, do you want to introduce this amendment?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you.

Again, it was Mr. Kingsley and I think Mr. Nater, to give credit for the thought, who suggested that without some kind of backup insurance policy, you could end up with senior people just showing up at the last minute; some might know they were coming—wink, wink, nudge, nudge—and some might not.

There was also this idea that if one minister can't make it, it's reasonable that, gee, if they are sick, a couple of days later it would be somebody else who would attend. I'm sorry: if it's the minister of tourism who is scheduled, but—wink, wink, nudge, nudge—everybody knows that they're going to have parliamentary flu and it's going to be the minister of finance, so you'd be wise to get your tail down there, that's doable. That is entirely possible.

When I raised that possibility with Mr. Kingsley when he was here, he said to just put it in the law that if you're not on the list five days beforehand, you can't go. I like that. That's what this amendment is about.

(1140)

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Mr. Christopherson must be much better at selling tickets than I am. Wink, wink, nudge, nudge, and tickets get sold.

In terms of the reality of the situation, if a particular individual is coming, you advertise that particular individual as long as you can and as hard as you can to sell the greatest number of tickets you can, and the “wink, wink, nudge, nudge” behind the scene is contrary to the spirit of the legislation. Even if we don't think we're all better than that, at the end of the day we want to sell the most tickets possible. I think this measure provides for that . Regardless of who attends, they'll still be covered within the final report, and there will be transparency. It's not that—wink, wink, nudge, nudge—the finance minister shows up, and the act doesn't apply.

I think I'm going to oppose this amendment because I think it's reasonable to allow that if someone got parliamentary flu or actual flu, another individual can be swapped in.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Well, if I can, Chair, my response is that it's nice the government says that would never happen, but if we were dealing with things that never happened, we'd never need this legislation, would we?

I don't buy that argument. It seems to me that if you mean what you say and there are no games being played—and I take you at your word—why not put it in the legislation? Why do I have to take your word? Why not put it in the legislation? Then we know for sure that nothing like that's going to happen.

The Chair:

Filomena is next.

Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

David, with respect to your point, the first thing I would say is, wouldn't you be best off advertising the heaviest hitter coming? Right? Would you agree? Aren't you better off if you're advertising you've got—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Let's say you're not sure.... Anyway, go ahead.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

In terms of that concern, I think that if you're having an event, you're going to advertise the person who's coming and you're not going to have someone else behind the scene who may be more influential—I shouldn't say that—or a more senior cabinet person. You'd put that in the advertisement. That just makes sense, and I think you'll agree with that.

The other thing is that in the event that you have a number of people coming and you've advertised that a cabinet minister is coming, and that person does get sick, with this amendment, you'd have a problem. You couldn't sub someone in.

For those two reasons, I think I won't be able to support the amendment.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Ruby.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'd just like a clarification from the departmental officials.

Even if a minister was swapped out, the way I'm reading this is that it allows for flexibility. It does happen. It happened to me when I really wanted a certain minister and I was planning and hoping for months beforehand, and it didn't end up working out. Then with weeks until the event, it ended up being somebody else. That person who does end up coming in the end has to be in the five-day notice, right?

Ms. Madeleine Dupuis:

Yes. Every regulated fundraising event needs to be advertised five days in advance with the name of the minister or party leader who is coming. If there's a change to the information in the notice, there is an obligation to update. If there's a change in ministers three days in advance, then there's the obligation to update the notice.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Would that minister still be allowed to attend if the notice was updated with the change of name three days before?

Ms. Madeleine Dupuis:

The notice needs to be updated as soon as feasible once there's a change, and if the change happens after the event started—that is, once the notice is no longer valid—they need to be in the report.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

Can we vote on this amendment then, please?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: We'll go on to LIB-3. If this amendment is adopted, Elizabeth May's motion, PV-2, cannot be moved, because there's a line conflict.

Mr. Scott Reid:

PV-2 is not the one right after it, however.

The Chair:

Also, the vote on LIB-3 would apply to a consequential amendment, LIB-7.

There would be two effects of voting for this: PV-2 could not be moved, and LIB-7 would apply to whatever the result of the vote is.

Could whoever is presenting this present the motion?

(1145)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

This is simply an Elections Canada request. It splits filing obligations and deadlines into separate requirements. It's a very simple change.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Could we hear from Ms. May about the logic behind her proposed amendment and its purpose?

The Chair:

Elizabeth, could you present PV-2?

Ms. Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, GP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Before I present, I apologize to the committee members, but I need to put it on the record that every time I am forced to be before a parliamentary committee, I am here under duress. This committee passed a motion that requires me to be here if I want to put forward amendments at this stage. Otherwise, but for the motion of this committee, I would have had rights to put forward these amendments at report stage.

Since report stage happens only once in the chamber, you don't have the conflict that I had just the week before Thanksgiving, when both Bill C-45 and Bill C-49 went to clause-by-clause consideration at the same time, and because of the motions passed in those committees, I had to present amendments at the same time.

I would particularly urge this committee, as the committee on procedure and House affairs, that this is the committee that should have determined whether my rights as an MP needed to be curtailed at report stage. Under the former prime minister, the PMO basically did an end run around PROC to change the way legislation is treated in the House, by passing identical motions committee to committee requiring members of Parliament in parties with fewer than 12 MPs, or independents, to bring their motions to committee with 48 hours' notice. This is to create a fake “opportunity” that denies me my rights at report stage.

That's the context in which I tell you that I am here under duress. I know a lot of you are unfamiliar with this situation, even though the committee passed this motion. You probably thought it was a friendly thing, a nice thing, but it has probably taken years off my life to try to get to every committee at clause-by-clause consideration, instead of having the rights I would otherwise have at report stage. It's particularly offensive to PROC. If you were, for instance, to repeal your own committee motion, I'd find that extremely helpful.

I'll be very brief. I understand that the conflict occurs with the Liberal amendment, which deals with lines 34 to 36 on page 6. So does mine.

PV-2 stands for Parti vert-2, because the clerks of the committees decided not to call my motions “Green Party” because then they would look like government motions, with a “G”. That's why it's Parti vert-2.

Parti vert-2 is in conflict with paragraph (b) of David's amendment. What I am trying to do with my amendment is ensure that it's not precluded that the reporting take place during an election. If you go to the bill, you see that I basically change the language. Where it says, “Subsections (1) to (6) do not apply in respect of a regulated fundraising event”, my amendment, Parti vert-2, would change the words “do not apply” to “continue to apply”, so that the fundraising rules within this legislation would apply during the writ period.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Is there any further discussion on LIB-3?

Mr. Reid, go ahead.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I want to ask whether the Liberals find what Ms. May is proposing to be reasonable, since there is no inherent conflict between what they are proposing and what she is proposing.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle, go ahead.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I guess there is.... I'm sorry. I'm not sure what—

Mr. Scott Reid:

This is a bit like what happened earlier.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I don't think there is an inherent conflict between—

Mr. Chris Bittle:

There is a conflict in purpose.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Am I wrong? Is it the case that there is actually a conflicting purpose?

Mr. Andy Fillmore:

Mr. Chair, I could perhaps shed some light on that, if invited to do so.

The Chair:

Sure, go ahead.

Mr. Andy Fillmore:

Thank you.

I think Ms. May's amendment is trying to impose the reporting requirements required at any time outside of a writ within the writ period. That would be the five-day advance notice and prompt reporting and all.

What the Liberal amendment is saying is that during the chaos of a writ—all the moving parts moving very quickly and stressed-out volunteers and everything—we would have a different regime, wherein all that reporting would happen after the fact, at the end of the writ period.

There is a difference in purpose here. We are very specifically trying to relieve the intense pressure on volunteers to do reporting when there is so much else going on in their and everyone else's lives during the writ period.

(1150)

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's certainly the case; there are pressures.

Let me deal with it this way. Mr. Chair, I'm going to propose an amendment to LIB-3. If you go down to paragraph (b) in proposed subsection 384.3(7), you see that it says: Subsections (1) to (6.1) do not apply in respect of a reg-

Do you see that? We'd just delete the words ”do not” and add in “continue to”, and that would accomplish exactly what Ms. May is trying to accomplish, while not eliminating or altering any other text in the Liberal amendment.

I think that would work. I don't think there's any technical problem with that. I'll just pass that to the clerk.

The Chair:

Do people understand what Mr. Reid's proposing? Is there any discussion?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Can I hear it again?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Why don't I just bring it down to show Mr. Christopherson?

The Chair:

Yes.

Is there any discussion on Mr. Reid's subamendment?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'm not sure I understand it still. I know that you had the benefit of seeing the visual, but....

Mr. Scott Reid:

Maybe the chair can either show it or read it.

The Chair:

The effect of what you're doing is it would apply during elections.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, that's right.

The Chair:

You can take it over to show Ruby.

Go ahead, Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Just very quickly, and to echo Mr. Fillmore's comments, we've all been through the election, and decisions happen in—I don't want to say moments, but you can find out the next day if a particular individual is coming to your riding, be it the Prime Minister or be it a party leader, so for logistic reasons I don't think I can support this subamendment.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, I wonder if we could just inquire for certainty—I did just do this on the fly—from the officials whether what I am proposing would have the effect of causing both the 30-day and the five-day requirements to apply or not. Could we ask them?

The Chair:

Do you mean during the election period?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, during the writ period. That's correct.

The Chair:

That's what you're trying to do.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It was what I was trying to do on the fly, but I'm actually not sure it accomplishes that. I just have to make sure that we all understand what's just happened, including me.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

Mr. Reid wants to know if the amendment he just proposed will cause the reporting to be the same during an election period as outside an election period.

Ms. Madeleine Dupuis:

Could we see what Mr. Reid has proposed?

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

It's not an unreasonable request.

Mr. Scott Reid:

While we're bringing this up, Mr. Chair, I should raise something.

I'm in the process, as a side project in my role as an MP, of trying to collect and put online all the documentation relating to the original design of the various parts of our Constitution, and the same problem we're encountering here occurred when the Constitution was being designed. It wasn't always clear that everybody who was involved knew what the implications were of various words that were being put in. Based on that lesson, it's always good to take our time and make sure we understand what we're doing.

(1155)

The Chair:

That's interesting.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Did they do something wrong in the construction, given that?

Mr. Scott Reid:

You're not asking that in the sense of whether they did things that could have been done better; you're asking whether they made mistakes. I think some people misunderstood, or understood incorrectly what was being done. That's always a danger.

The Chair:

Maybe if we get into another filibuster, you could elaborate on that.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid:

You have to wait till then, Mr. Christopherson.

The Chair:

The officials are ready.

Ms. Madeleine Dupuis:

The suggested amendment would not add any advertising requirement, because that's a separate provision. What it would do is make the 30-day reporting requirement apply during an election, and at the same time the requirement to file a report after an election within 60 days would also still be valid. You would have the double reporting requirement with that amendment.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Forgive me; you would effectively have to report twice. Is that right?

Ms. Madeleine Dupuis:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

On the same thing.

Ms. Madeleine Dupuis:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is there a way, Ms. Dupuis, that we could simply have the 30-day requirement apply?

Ms. Madeleine Dupuis:

The proposed subsections afterward in the bill—384.3(8), 384.3(9), 384.3(10), 384.3(11), 384.3(12)—all deal with reporting after an election, so those subsections would have to be removed.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I am so confused. Wasn't the original requirement of 30 days in the amendment that the Liberal amendment...? No, the original was a 30-day requirement, so what more do you want, Mr. Reid?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm trying to incorporate Ms. May's. I'm doing it on the fly and I'm not sure that I'm accomplishing it, which is why I'm asking these questions.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes, okay.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Chair, does all of this not turn on the issue of whether there should be a priority in getting this information out during an election so that the public has the benefit of knowing it, rather than after? Isn't that the issue in front of us? We've already captured the accountability part, so that's there. The question is whether or not fundraising during a campaign would be subject to some of these accountabilities during the course of the campaign. Is that not the difference?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

The average writ period is how long?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Well, the average just went up. If you mean the median—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It's 35 days.

The Chair:

We had a limit of 45.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It's 35 days, so I worry. What if the reporting requirement falls on E-day or...? Running a campaign is the craziest thing I've ever done, and I wonder at people who've done it more than once. They must be insane and out of their mind. Why would they repeat doing this over and over again? As I say this two years later, I'm probably going to do it again, but you're out of your head. It's complete insanity, and volunteers don't know what's happening.

The fast pace of that 30- or 35-day period on average is intense, so I worry if you have a fundraiser that falls right on E-day or the day before. I see a lot of people making errors in their reporting because they don't have the capability.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Ms. May.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I'm grateful for the chance to take the microphone again.

If there's anyone who understands Canadian election cycles and rules around Canadian elections, I think it's Jean-Pierre Kingsley, given his history as the person to hold the role longest. I'm just going to quote again what he said before the committee. If there is a time when people really need to know who is contributing, it is during the election period. We don't have [it] now. This bill would prevent that from happening at this critical moment in the existence of a democracy.

I hear what you're saying, Ruby, but I think my amendment wouldn't have created the doubling. The doubling of the reporting occurs when you combine my amendment with David's amendment. If there were some elegant way to ensure.... I mean, the big policy question before this committee is this: do you want to amend the act to deal with the concern raised by Jean-Pierre Kingsley that it's during an election when Canadians particularly want to know who's donating to different parties and candidates?

(1200)

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I appreciate those comments, but I think Mr. Kingsley was talking about something different in terms of overall donations. That is a completely different conversation from this very specific and narrowly focused piece of legislation, and engaging in this amendment doesn't achieve what Mr. Kingsley was seeking in his own testimony. How the event gets reported instantaneously is logistically difficult as individuals are handing you cheques on the day before the election. Perhaps 10 or 20 years down the road, if everything is online, it will become a lot easier to report it instantaneously, but I don't think Mr. Kingsley's recommendation is in line with the reality of how campaigns continue to work when your 75-year-old supporter comes in with a cheque. It goes to a volunteer and goes through a series of processes that may not be able to be reported in time for the election.

I think what Mr. Kingsley was talking about and what we're dealing with here are two different issues.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I have one comment. I'm having some trouble accepting “logistically difficult” as the reason not to do something. If that were the reason not to do something, half of the regulations around elections wouldn't exist because you can apply that “logistically difficult” test to it.

We do an awful lot of things in the campaign, as Ruby has said, that make campaign managers nuts because of all the things that they have to do that seem logistically difficult but that we have deemed are necessary to ensure that we have free and fair elections. I just make the comment that “logistically difficult” doesn't carry an awful lot of weight with me.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

If I can clarify, as a lawyer, I hate to use the word “impossible”, but when we're talking about this and when I'm using the words “logistically difficult”, we are getting to the point where it's unreasonable to put that upon volunteers in a particular situation. I understand what you are saying and I'll adjust my comments accordingly.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I hear what you are saying and I'm not adjusting mine.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Fair enough.

The Chair:

Can we vote on the subamendment?

Mr. Reid, on the subamendment...?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have no further comment on it.

The Chair:

I will call the vote.

(Subamendment negatived [SeeMinutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: We now go on to the amendment itself, LIB-3. Is there further discussion?

All in favour?

Mr. David Christopherson:

On division.

The Chair:

It carries on division.

(Amendment agreed to on division [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: The vote applies consequentially to LIB-7, as well, which is also passed.

Who is presenting on LIB-4?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I will speak in the name of whomever. Thank you.

This is another one from the CEO. It simply adds exemptions for people who are in support of a disabled person at an event. It would remove them from the reportable list. Did you catch it, David?

Mr. David Christopherson:

No. I had already looked at it earlier, so I think I'm okay.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I wasn't very articulate, so perhaps I need some assistance. Is it understood?

The Chair:

If a person is a professional helping a disabled person, they don't have to go on the list.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's right.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

Mr. Randy Hoback:

I have a question from my ignorance here. How do you take a member or a cabinet minister who is in a wheelchair and who has a professional member who is also a staffer who is politically active?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If they have another role, I don't think they'd be covered. If their role there is purely to support—

Mr. Randy Hoback:

Is that defined well enough in this amendment?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes. We can ask the officials if they find it defined well enough, but I believe it is. It states, “any person who attended the event solely to assist a person with a disability”. That's their only reason to be there, so they should not be on the list. They are solely there for that reason.

(1205)

The Chair:

All in favour? Opposed?

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Let's go on to PV-1, which is Parti vert.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

What did you say, Mr. Chair?

The Chair:

Do you want to present?

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Yes.

I think, by the way, if I can make a parenthetical comment about this legislation and the conversation we are having around the table, that it really makes the case that we need to look at more public financing of campaigning—

An hon. member: Hear, hear!

Ms. Elizabeth May:—and reduce the stress around fundraising. I do hope that the minister will look at what Jean Chrétien had done with the initial campaign reform and look at per-vote subsidy again, because it's not like the Government of Canada doesn't subsidize political parties. It does it through rebates for donors. It does it through the rebate at the end of an election campaign. The more we publicly finance election campaigns, the less we have this problem of which donors are in the room when the minister is there, and cash for access.

I will go quickly, because I can't be two places at once. Mr. Chair, I am going to come back for my next amendment and I'm going to let you know that now. I hope I get back in time, but the Board of Internal Economy is open today for the first time to members who aren't part of the star chamber, so I really want to have a peek. I'm going to scoot out and come back.

That said, this is an amendment based again on the testimony of Jean-Pierre Kingsley. My amendment would have the effect of deleting proposed paragraphs 384.3(3)(b) and 384.3(3)(c), which say that people are not going to be reported if they are there solely in the course of their employment. Just to quote again from the points that Jean-Pierre Kingsley made, “There are staff members in the Canadian political system who are exceedingly important”—and I hate to say it, but I'm adding my own little subtext here—and who are sometimes considered more important to donors than elected MPs. He said: There are staff members in the Canadian political system who are exceedingly important, and their attendance at an event [is something that] carries weight unto itself. So the automatic exclusion of those persons from being named, I think, turns us away from the purpose of the statute.

This is why my amendment would delete the exclusion of staffers from reporting requirements.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I understand what Ms. May is saying, but in my understanding, and perhaps we can talk to the analyst, this amendment would then include everyone who is there, so if there was an employee, a waiter, or a support staff person who was solely there for their employment purposes, their name would end up on the list.

I don't think that's what we want to accomplish here. Individuals who in the course of their employment are pouring wine or serving food would end up on a list to suggest they support a particular political party, which they may or may not in the course of their employment.

The Chair:

Can we ask the analyst if that is the result of this amendment?

Ms. Madeleine Dupuis:

Yes, that's the result. Persons employed in organizing the event, including waiters and media as well, would now be published.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That was my observation too. If the Prime Minister attends an event, are his RCMP guards going to be included as well?

The Chair:

With this amendment they would.

Mr. Scott Reid: That's obviously problematic.

The Chair: Are we ready to vote?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: We'll go on to LIB-5. This will apply to a consequential amendment of LIB-8, whatever way the vote goes.

Go ahead, Mr. de Burgh Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The amendment clarifies the event organizer's obligation to provide up-to-date information to parties, and applies both with respect to the event report and the initial event notice. In all cases, the organizing entity shall not include information on minors, volunteers, and persons who attended because they are employed at the event.

The Chair:

What's the intent of this amendment?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It clarifies the organizer's obligations. It's a clarification amendment.

The Chair:

Could you explain that in clear English? What does this amendment do?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have said nothing as clear as this today.

The Chair:

What does this amendment do?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It clarifies the event organizer's obligation to provide up-to-date information to parties, and applies both with respect to the event report and the initial event notice.

The information has to be correct before and after. It's a fix.

(1210)

Mr. Andy Fillmore:

Mr. Chair, it makes sure there's close coordination between the event organizers and the respective political parties, so the reporting, both ahead of the event and afterward, is consistent and accurate. If there are last-minute changes, for example, of venue or time, that those are reported properly.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

The consequences of not adopting this amendment would be what?

Mr. Andy Fillmore:

I'll defer to the officials on that.

Ms. Madeleine Dupuis:

Right now, organizers have the obligation to tell political parties the information they need to file their reports, but if the organizers become aware of a change in that information, they're not obligated to tell the party, and the party, not knowing, can't update the report. This would put the obligation on the organizers to update any reporting information if they're aware of it.

The Chair:

Is there any further debate?

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: LIB-5 and LIB-8 are carried.

PV-2 cannot be moved because LIB-3 was adopted. Those are all the amendments on clause 2. Can we vote on clause 2, as amended?

Mr. David Christopherson:

On division.

The Chair:

On division.

(Clause 2 as amended agreed to on division)

The Chair: I notice there are no amendments on clauses 3 to 8. I'm going to ask the legislative assistant if I can do one motion to deal with all of them.

(Clauses 3 to 8 inclusive agreed to on division)

(On clause 9)

The Chair:

All the amendments for clause 9 were all consequential, so we don't have to deal with NDP-8, LIB-6, NDP-9, LIB-7, and LIB-8.

Shall clause 9, as amended, carry?

(Clause 9 agreed to as amended on division)

(Clause 10 agreed to on division)

(On clause 11)

The Chair:

We're on PV-3. PV is not here, but it's deemed moved.

If anyone understands this amendment, do they want to present it?

Go ahead, David.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It ties to NDP-10, and it deals with the fine. I had gone notionally with a fine from $1,000 to $5,000. I was under the impression—

The Chair:

I forgot to say that if this passes, David, NDP-10 cannot be moved because of a line conflict.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, it's an either-or situation.

The Chair:

Elizabeth, we're on PV-3.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

I know. I heard that. I didn't think you'd get to clause 11 so quickly.

Thank you for giving me a chance to speak to it. It's very straightforward. Again, and particularly I suppose, I looked to the testimony of Jean-Pierre Kingsley, who thought that a $1,000 penalty was not going to have much of an impact. With the help of drafters, I put before you his suggestion that the penalty be related to the offence and be basically a doubling of whatever money was received that violated the scheme of this particular fundraising code.

It's a very straightforward amendment. Anybody who holds a fundraiser and collects funds that are in excess will find themselves paying basically double what they received.

The Chair:

I have Mr. Christopherson and then Mr. Reid.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks, Chair.

As you can see in NDP-10, which follows PV-3, I'm not married to an exact number or formula of penalty, but I am in agreement. A number of witnesses said that the $1,000 fine is really a bit low. In some cases, that really could just become the cost of doing business, and then people could just ignore the rules all they want.

I'm open to either. I just hope that we agree collectively that $1,000 is not enough. Then the question is, where is the comfort level for a majority of us?

(1215)

The Chair:

Mr. Reid is next, and then Mr. Graham.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Are we once again in a situation where the passage of one amendment would preclude the other from being debated?

The Chair:

Yes, NDP-10 could not be debated.

Mr. Scott Reid:

NDP-10 could not be debated.

The Chair:

Do you know what it is?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'd like to hear Mr. Christopherson explain what it is.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It raises the penalty from $1,000 to $5,000. Elizabeth's amendment would use the Kingsley formula of double the amount that was raised. Those are the two.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

May I ask the witnesses whether using the term “double the amount” means—

The Chair:

That was raised.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The question is, is that a reference to the amount that was raised if a person's name was left off the list? Does it mean the entire amount raised at the event, or is it going to vary from one situation to another?

You see what I'm getting at. There are two different ways. I just want to find out what your understanding is.

Ms. Madeleine Dupuis:

Could I ask you to repeat that, please?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Let's say you have an event at which the leader of the party is the headliner. That's done correctly. They leave off the name of attendee John Smith. Is the basis of the penalty John Smith's contribution of $400 so that now $800 is the penalty due, or is it that everything that was raised at the event is forfeit? That's one kind of infraction you could have.

Another kind of infraction you could have is that you intended to have headliner A, but headliner B shows up instead, or some other macro-level thing happens. Perhaps they forgot to register the event, and now they have $10,000 raised. Do you see what I'm getting at? There are two different ways in which this.... That's what I'm asking about.

Ms. Madeleine Dupuis:

It's a very good question. Unfortunately, it's unclear to me which of those would apply as it's currently drafted, because it says “obtained by committing the offence”. It's a little unclear. It would depend how Elections Canada interprets the provision.

The Chair:

Could we jump ahead to Ms. May and ask if she wants to clarify that?

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Thank you.

With all due respect to the analyst, I don't think that's unclear. That would be, as Jean-Pierre Kingsley's testimony suggested, specific to how much was achieved, how much was raised by committing the offence. It's not the entire event.

The Chair:

How do you quantify how much is raised if a different person comes?

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Scott asked about someone's name being left off the list. If the entire event is suspect because that's the offence, then it would be double the amount raised at the event. If it's a specific infraction that relates to a specific individual, it would be the amount related to that one individual.

An hon. member: How would you calculate that?

Ms. Elizabeth May: It would be based on what their donation was.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I understand what she is trying to do. I don't agree, but the larger point here is in a situation where you have a conviction under this act, you now have an Elections Act conviction for that person involved with that, which is a much bigger penalty than any monetary amount, because now your headline is “MP”—Minister, whatever—“convicted of Elections Act violation”. That's a much bigger punishment in any case. It's a political punishment, not a monetary punishment.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

That applies now regardless of the—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It would apply to this act as well. If you violate this act and you are convicted, you now have this additional penalty of being at the top of the national news.

The Chair:

We'll go to Mr. Hoback.

Mr. Randy Hoback:

With regard to the Green Party amendment, I have problems with not having a firm number there, because how you calculate that number becomes very confusing. That $1,000 might be too much, but twice the amount, if you're looking at that amount.... If a volunteer who puts together a fundraiser for me makes a mistake and raises $10,000 and all of a sudden my EDA, my electoral district association, has to cut a cheque for $20,000—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

—and hold a fundraiser to pay for it—

Mr. Randy Hoback:

Yes, exactly. To me that seems to be a little extreme and not really practical, but if it is a relevant amount, then it makes sense and then a penalty is paid.

I also think our colleague David made a point. There is the public perception and stigma that comes with that too.

(1220)

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota is next, and then Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I again wanted some clarification from the officials that the act originally would require the person who committed the offence to forfeit all the money raised at the fundraiser and then pay a $1,000 fine in addition. Is that correct?

Ms. Madeleine Dupuis:

That is if they are convicted. Then they pay the fine. The return of contributions occurs once they become aware that the fundraiser didn't meet the rules.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

If the fundraiser breaks the rules, then they forfeit all money they raised—

Ms. Madeleine Dupuis:

Then they have to return the contributions.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

—and it's not just from the one person who was left off the list. It's not just that portion.

Ms. Madeleine Dupuis:

It's all money fundraised.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

This added on top would mean that if, say, my EDA had a fundraiser at $30,000 or so, missed somebody or a couple of people or whatever, and the end result was it was considered an offence, then I would forfeit that $30,000, and then on top of that the EDA would have to pay $60,000. Is that what would happen with this amendment?

Ms. Madeleine Dupuis:

Yes.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

That was my question.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

These were some of my concerns when I first started to think about it, but as I said earlier, I'm not necessarily wedded to $5,000. I would hope a majority of us would agree that $1,000 is a little low. Can we come to an agreement on a higher number?

The Chair:

Is there any further debate on amendment PV-3?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

David, do you want to—

Mr. David Christopherson:

I don't need to give a speech. I've heard everything. If you can't support the $5,000, I hope we get a subamendment we can rally around. I'll leave it at that, Chair.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion on changing the penalty from $1,000 to $5,000?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, I'll speak in favour of it. There's an obvious problem with a $1,000 penalty for an event at which the price of admission is more than $1000.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

You have to return all of it.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I still think that $5,000 is a more reasonable number. If I'm not mistaken, it's up to $5,000. Is that right?

That seems reasonable. You get some discretion there.

The Chair:

Sorry; is it “up to”?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

[Inaudible—Editor]

Oh, no. You're changing it to $5,000. Sorry.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It says “not more than $5,000”, so it's “up to”.

The Chair:

Maybe we should ask the officials.

When it is “not more than $5,000”, who decides how much the fine is?

Ms. Madeleine Dupuis:

It would be the judge.

The Chair:

A judge?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

So it could drop to $10? Do we have that risk?

Mr. David Christopherson:

It's up to the judge.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's not unreasonable. If it's a purely technical oversight, you're still going to be nailed, actually, but you're not getting nailed with an additional fine.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You're going to get the headline, though.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

And forfeit all your funding.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I'd like to echo what Mr. Graham was talking about. We have to look at the entirety of what happens if there is a contravention of the act.

If you have your $10,000 fundraiser, you are giving that back, plus you're now facing a charge under the Elections Act, plus a conviction that carries a significant political penalty. I believe that a $1,000 fine on its own, with no additional punishment in terms of having to forfeit what you've raised, absolutely isn't enough, because you could raise $30,000 with a $1,000 cost of doing business, but if you're giving back $30,000 or $10,000 per riding association, plus being convicted under the Elections Act, politically I think the penalty is sufficient and encourages a significant level of deterrence overall.

(1225)

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Do I gather, then, that the government's not interested in a number anywhere between $1,000 and $5,000? They're just going to leave it at $1,000?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I'll speak for myself. I will vote in favour of leaving it at $1,000.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Given that you're a high-powered parliamentary secretary, I expect all your little followers will do exactly the same thing.

The Chair:

Ms. May, are you on the list to speak?

Ms. Elizabeth May:

I just wanted the conversation passed. I wanted to make sure it was up to $5,000.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's currently “up to $1,000”, so it's still the same idea, just with a higher threshold.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Can we have a recorded vote?

The Chair:

We will have a recorded vote on NDP-10.

(Amendment negatived: nays 5; yeas 4)

The Chair: Shall clause 11 carry?

Mr. David Christopherson:

On division.

(Clause 11 agreed to on division)

The Chair:

There are no proposed amendments in clauses 12 to 15. Do those all carry?

Mr. David Christopherson:

On division.

(Clauses 12 to 15 inclusive agreed to on division)

The Chair:

Shall the title carry?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Shall the bill carry?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I would like a recorded vote.

The Chair:

We will have a recorded vote on the bill.

The Clerk:

We will have a recorded vote.

Shall the bill, as amended, carry?

The Chair:

Thank you.

(Motion agreed to: yeas 5; nays 4)

The Chair: Shall I report the bill, as amended, to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Shall the committee order a reprint of the bill?

Mr. Scott Reid:

No.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

All in favour?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Okay. We're going to have a reprint.

Thank you. That was very thoughtful.

David, don't leave yet.

For the next meeting, we have two possibilities of things that we had agreed we would do next.

One is talking about specific standing rules or other changes to accommodate MPs with babies or very young children at that age.

The other is—

(1230)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a point of order. Can we let the officials go? Thanks.

The Chair:

Yes. Thank you very much.

The other thing was to approve the report on the sexual code of conduct. As you know, we had some amendments from...since that was in camera, maybe we should go in camera to do this for a couple of minutes.

Is it okay if people stay for a couple of minutes to define the next meeting?

For anyone who shouldn't be here, we're going to go in camera.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte.

Bonjour, et bienvenue à cette 74e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Cette séance a lieu en public.

Mon préambule sera un peu plus long aujourd'hui, parce que nous effectuons une étude article par article.

Ce matin, nous étudions le projet de loi C-50, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada (financement politique). Nous avons ici des fonctionnaires du Bureau du Conseil privé qui nous apporteront l'aide nécessaire. Il s'agit de Riri Shen, directrice des opérations, Institutions démocratiques et de Madeleine Dupuis, conseillère en politiques, Institutions démocratiques.

Nous vous remercions toutes deux d'être venues répondre aux questions que nous pourrions avoir.

Avant de commencer, je voudrais donner aux membres qui n'ont jamais participé à une étude article par article quelques renseignements sur la procédure habituelle.

Le Comité étudie les articles selon l'ordre où ils figurent dans le projet de loi. Lorsque je demande le vote sur un article, nous en débattons, puis nous votons. Si un membre propose un amendement à l'article en question, je lui donne la parole pour qu'il nous explique son amendement. Nous entamons alors le débat sur cet amendement. Une fois que nous avons entendu toutes les interventions, nous votons sur l'amendement. Nous étudierons les amendements en suivant l'ordre dans lequel ils se trouvent dans la trousse que chaque membre a reçue du greffier. S'il nous arrive d'étudier des amendements corrélatifs, nous les traiterons en un seul vote.

En outre, les amendements doivent être rédigés non seulement conformément aux normes législatives, mais aussi aux règles et usages de la Chambre des communes. Le président pourra juger irrecevables les amendements qui s'écartent du principe ou de la portée du projet de loi que la Chambre a établis en adoptant le projet de loi en deuxième lecture. Il les jugera également irrecevables s'ils empiètent sur la prérogative financière de la Couronne.

Si vous désirez éliminer totalement un article du projet de loi, vous devrez vous opposer à cet article au moment du vote, et non proposer un amendement pour l'éliminer.

Si le Comité décide de ne pas voter sur un article, il pourra le mettre de côté pour en reprendre l'étude à un moment ultérieur du processus.

Vous verrez dans le coin supérieur gauche le numéro de l'amendement qui indique quel parti le propose. Il n'y a pas besoin d'appuyer les amendements. Pour retirer un amendement proposé, il faudra le consentement unanime des membres du Comité.

Une fois que les membres du Comité auront voté sur tous les articles, ils voteront sur le titre du projet de loi. Si le Comité a adopté des amendements, il pourra ordonner la réimpression du projet de loi pour que la Chambre en reçoive une copie propre à l'étape du rapport.

Enfin, le Comité devra ordonner à son président de remettre le rapport à la Chambre. Ce rapport ne contiendra que le texte des amendements adoptés — s'il y a lieu — ainsi qu'une mention des articles du projet de loi qui auront été rejetés.

Je vous remercie de votre attention. Nous allons maintenant procéder à l'étude article par article.

(1105)

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Monsieur le président...

Le président:

Je crois que M. Christopherson avait demandé la parole avant vous.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci beaucoup.

Merci d'avoir présenté cette procédure. Certains membres n'y ont jamais participé. Je vous dirais que je siège à ce comité et à celui des comptes publics. J'en discutais justement avec Tyler en lui disant que je ne l'avais pas fait depuis bien quatre ou cinq ans et que l'étude ne se déroulera peut-être pas aussi facilement que nous l'espérons.

Tout cela pour annoncer avec tact et de manière peu élégante que je ne proposerai pas les amendements NDP-2, NDP-3 et NDP-4, monsieur le président.

Le président:

À vous la parole, monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'ai deux questions à vous poser au sujet de l'information très utile que vous venez de nous présenter — et je vous en remercie. Je vais vous poser ces deux questions d'une traite pour que vous y répondiez ensuite.

Premièrement, je voudrais savoir si les amendements que nous adopterons, s'il y en a, risquent d'en exclure d'autres de notre étude. Si tel est le cas, il serait utile que nous le sachions à l'avance.

Deuxièmement, je voudrais savoir si vous avez déjà trouvé des amendements qui, à votre avis, sont irrecevables, auquel cas je serais très reconnaissant de le savoir aussi à l'avance plutôt que de devoir attendre le moment de les étudier.

Le président:

Je vais essayer de répondre à vos deux questions, mais nous avons la chance d'avoir un greffier législatif qui, j'en suis sûr, se hâtera de me corriger si je vous donne une mauvaise réponse.

Pour votre première question, oui, je vous avertirai si un amendement en exclut un autre.

Pour votre deuxième question, tous les amendements me paraissent recevables.

M. Scott Reid:

Parfait, merci.

Le président:

Bon. Sommes-nous prêts à commencer?

Nous n'avons pas d'amendement pour l'article 1, alors adoptons-nous l'article 1?

(L'article 1 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 2)

Le président:

Nous avons LIB-2. Si nous l'adoptons, on ne pourra pas proposer l'amendement NDP-1 parce qu'il provoquera un conflit de ligne.

M. Scott Reid:

NDP-1 n'a pas été exclu, n'est-ce pas?

M. David Christopherson:

C'est cela.

Le président:

Nous avons l'amendement LIB-1. David, voudriez-vous nous le présenter?

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Il vise à corriger l'échappatoire que j'ai soulignée quand nous posions nos questions à la ministre et à ses collaborateurs. Si un ministre appartenant à un parti ou le chef d'un autre parti se présente à une activité organisée par une autre personne, selon le libellé actuel de la loi cette activité devient illégale. On se débarrasserait ainsi de cette échappatoire.

M. David Christopherson:

Répétez un peu cela, Dave.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Disons que le chef du NPD se présente à une activité de collecte de fonds que j'ai organisée...

M. David Christopherson:

Ce qui arrive constamment...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Voyez, Tom a grandi dans ma circonscription, alors je le connais. Disons que cela arrive. Mon activité deviendrait illégale parce qu'une personne réglementée s'y est présentée. S'il s'agit d'une personne du même parti, le problème est résolu.

M. David Christopherson:

J'y pensais justement, et j'y vois une application qui me permettrait de l'appuyer. Malgré les différents partis auxquels nous appartenons, nous nous entendons très bien à Hamilton. J'ai l'impression que Filomena est sur le point d'être nommée au Cabinet. Donc si elle devient ministre du Cabinet, il serait assez naturel que l'un de nous se présente à l'activité de l'autre par amitié. Cela arrive. Si je comprends bien ce que vous nous suggérez, comme les règles interdisent que cette personne se présente à cette activité, l'activité même devient illégale.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Parce qu'elle s'y est présentée, c'est cela?

M. David Christopherson:

C'est cela.

Je demanderai alors si sa présence entraîne des conséquences imprévues. De ce point de vue cela paraît logique, et je l'appuierais. Mais est-ce que cela entraînerait des conséquences imprévues?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Seulement si quelqu'un change d'allégeance à la suite de cette activité.

M. David Christopherson:

Cela ne se produira pas, alors voilà.

(1110)

M. Scott Reid:

Il est bien évident que le ministre ne risque aucunement de changer d'allégeance à la suite de cette activité. N'oubliez pas qu'il peut se présenter à une activité de Filomena sans causer de problèmes — à moins qu'il ne soit nommé au Cabinet, auquel cas la situation change complètement.

M. David Christopherson:

Alors nous vous demanderions de rédiger la manchette.

Cela ne se produira pas, alors laissons tomber tout cela.

Malheureusement, si nous adoptons cet amendement, le mien sera exclu si j'ai bien compris. Pourriez-vous m'aider à comprendre pour quelle raison, monsieur le greffier législatif?

M. Olivier Champagne (greffier législatif, Chambre des communes):

Selon la règle, le Comité ne peut apporter qu'un amendement à une ligne. C'est très simple. L'amendement libéral touche les lignes 3 à 5, et NDP-1 remplace les lignes 4 et 5. Alors voilà, c'est une raison technique.

M. David Christopherson:

Je comprends, merci.

Monsieur le président, vous pourriez peut-être demander pour moi à M. Graham s'il a l'intention d'appuyer cet amendement. Dans l'affirmative, nous pourrions trouver une motion qui contourne cette question de forme. Sinon, nous allons devoir en débattre.

M. Scott Reid:

Alors je peux demander le vote? Il est lié à cela. Techniquement, nous pourrions faire ce que vous dites, bien sûr, mais nous votons pour décider si nous pouvons amender LIB-1 afin d'y inclure le libellé de l'amendement NDP-1.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À mon avis, c'est techniquement possible, mais pour répondre à la question de David, je n'ai pas l'intention d'appuyer cet amendement. S'il désire que j'explique mon intention, je le ferai avec plaisir, mais pour le moment, je n'ai pas l'intention de l'appuyer.

M. Scott Reid:

Pourquoi?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Sa portée s'étend à tous les membres du personnel exemptés de n'importe quel bureau qui participeraient à l'activité en question. Je trouve qu'il dépasse de très loin l'intention et la portée du projet de loi.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, vous pourriez peut-être accorder une certaine souplesse.

Le président: Oui.

M. David Christopherson: Je comprends ce que vous dites, et j'ai posé cette même question à Tyler pendant notre discussion. La réponse est la suivante: si nous n'associons que le titre de la personne à cet article, les gens n'auront qu'à donner aux participants un titre qui n'est pas enregistré pour contourner l'article. Si nous indiquons que tous les employés de ce bureau peuvent... Il est évident que ce libellé semble étendre la portée un peu trop parce que, comme je le disais, il suffirait d'attribuer aux participants un titre qui n'existe pas, et abracadabra! la personne qui en vertu de la loi ne devrait pas assister à l'activité n'y assiste pas réellement.

C'est la seule raison qui explique ce libellé. J'ai posé donc la même question: pourquoi y insérer « comme »?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends, oui, mais je n'ai pas l'intention d'appuyer ce projet de loi s'il s'étend à tous les employés exemptés de n'importe quel bureau. Comme je le comprends, c'est la portée qu'il a maintenant.

Vous ne l'avez pas encore demandé, mais...

Le président:

À vous la parole, monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Comme nous risquons d'exclure le débat sur l'amendement du NPD, ce qui ne serait pas équitable, nous pourrions résoudre le problème en proposant un sous-amendement à LIB-1 en y incluant le contenu du NDP-1.

M. David Christopherson:

Nous pourrions traiter du mien en premier; changeons l'ordre de l'étude.

M. Scott Reid:

Je ne crois pas que nous puissions débattre du vôtre en premier. Il faudrait retirer l'amendement LIB-1, puis débattre du vôtre en premier.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous pouvons faire cela par consentement unanime.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. Voyons si nous avons un consentement unanime. Sinon...

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, pouvons-nous passer à l'amendement NDP-1 par consentement unanime, puis revenir à LIB-1?

Le président:

Nous avons le choix entre deux, ou même entre trois façons de procéder. Nous pouvons simplement poursuivre notre étude. Deuxièmement, nous pouvons proposer un sous-amendement à LIB-1. Troisièmement, nous pouvons modifier l'ordre de l'étude par consentement unanime et si nous adoptons l'amendement NDP-1, nous pourrons quand même débattre du LIB-1.

M. David Christopherson:

Je le répète, nous nous entendons relativement bien. Est-ce que tous les députés ont l'intention de s'opposer à l'amendement NDP-1?

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Oui.

M. David Christopherson:

Le fait est que même si je suis d'accord avec l'amendement de David pour certaines raisons, je ne vais pas voter pour une proposition qui risque d'exclure la mienne avant même que j'aie eu l'occasion de la présenter. Je ne permettrai pas cela.

Cependant, si j'ai l'impression que ma proposition patine, j'aurai de meilleures raisons d'appuyer celle de David.

Si je comprends bien, tout le monde est contre moi? D'accord.

M. Randy Hoback (Prince Albert, PCC):

Pourquoi ne votons-nous pas tout simplement pour rejeter cet amendement, puis nous passerons au vôtre?

Une voix: Mais si nous débattons du sien...

(1115)

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, mais si l'on n'y inclut pas le mien, nous n'avons aucune raison de procéder de cette façon. Ce serait clair et net. Autrement, je sauterai dans le vide. J'accepterai de le faire, mais la solution la plus convenable serait de débattre du mien en premier pour que j'aie, si l'on peut dire, l'occasion de plaider ma cause — il ne me faudra pas plus de 30 secondes —, puis nous pourrons débattre de l'amendement LIB-1, ce qui me donnera la marge de manoeuvre nécessaire pour l'appuyer.

Le président:

À vous la parole, monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Voyons si les membres du Comité acceptent unanimement de traiter l'amendement NDP-1 en premier.

M. Nicola Di Iorio (Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel, Lib.):

Non.

M. Scott Reid:

Parfait. Dans ce cas, je propose que l'on amende la dernière ligne de LIB-1 en y ajoutant, après le mot « sous-alinéa »: ou toute personne nommée en vertu du paragraphe 128(1) de la Loi sur l'emploi dans la fonction publique, et

Mon aide me dit que je fais cela très mal, alors donnez-moi quelques instants. Il ne s'est pas exprimé ainsi, mais c'est ce qu'il voulait me dire.

Le président:

Pendant ce temps, je vais poser une question pour satisfaire ma curiosité. Si David avait organisé un événement de collecte de fonds sur lequel il ne serait pas nécessaire de faire rapport, parce qu'aucune personne importante ne s'y présenterait, comme votre chef...

M. David Christopherson:

Vous avez assisté à mes collectes de fonds.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président:

...et que nous demandions à un ministre — ou si un autre parti y envoyait un ministre —, vous devriez alors faire rapport de toutes les personnes présentes, ce qui serait assez ennuyeux.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, et il faudrait annoncer leur présence cinq jours avant l'événement.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui. Alors je devrais vous jeter dehors, parce que vous bousillez mon événement.

Une voix: On lirait dans toutes les manchettes que vous m'avez jeté dehors!

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Non, ce serait bien pire, David. Ce serait pire, parce que votre activité deviendra illégale si vous n'avez pas annoncé cinq jours avant que ces personnes allaient venir à votre activité sans invitation. Voilà l'échappatoire que nous y voyons.

M. Scott Reid:

Me voilà bien puni.

Si j'étais Dennis, je vous aurais proposé cet amendement.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid: Cet amendement contient deux ajouts. À la ligne 5, après le mot « État », nous ajouterions: , ou un secrétaire parlementaire,

Monsieur le greffier, je vous remettrai cela tout à l'heure pour que vous puissiez le regarder.

Puis à la dernière ligne, après le mot « sous-alinéa » suivi d'une virgule, nous ajouterions: ou toute personne nommée en vertu du paragraphe 128(1) de la Loi sur l'emploi dans la fonction publique

Je vais remettre cela au greffier pour qu'il l'examine.

Le président:

Avez-vous tous entendu le libellé de cet amendement?

Y a-t-il débat?

M. Scott Reid:

Il est difficile de suivre cela de cette façon. Je vais expliquer ce que je viens de faire.

En discutant de cela, j'espère offrir à M. Christopherson une occasion d'expliquer les avantages de l'amendement NDP-1. Cet amendement vise à lui donner l'occasion d'expliquer au Comité ce qu'il désire accomplir.

Mais si je comprends bien, le libellé de l'article en cause n'inclut pas les personnes qui, justement, seraient bien placées pour décider elles-mêmes, ou pour inciter autrui à décider d'ajouter une contribution aux dons faits pendant l'activité en question. Ces personnes devraient donc être incluses dans le libellé sur une activité à laquelle elles joueraient un rôle important, ou à laquelle elles participeraient, que leur participation soit publicisée ou non. En effet, il est possible d'annoncer leur présence par d'autres moyens que par une publicité résonnante.

Ce groupe de personnes comprend des secrétaires parlementaires qui en fait rencontrent régulièrement des ministres. En un sens, leur rôle dans le contexte parlementaire ressemble beaucoup, dans l'armée, à celui d'un sous-officier face à son officier commissionné. De même, les personnes nommées en vertu du paragraphe 128(1) de la Loi sur l'emploi dans la fonction publique comprendraient des membres de personnel ministériel, si je ne m'abuse. M. Christopherson pourra me corriger.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Christopherson.

M. Scott Reid:

À mon avis, c'est l'intention de cet amendement.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous l'avez bien mieux présenté que je l'aurais fait moi-même.

Le président:

Avez-vous quelque chose à y ajouter?

M. David Christopherson:

Non, et je vous remercie beaucoup, monsieur Reid. Je vous en suis très reconnaissant.

Je ne vais pas me lancer dans un long discours, mais vous savez que j'ai de l'expérience dans ce domaine. Je sais quelle influence un chef de cabinet peut exercer sur un ministre. En limitant le rôle de cette influence aux élus, on ne capture pas, selon moi, toutes les influences que subit un ministre dans le cadre de sa prise de décisions. Vous avez-là mon raisonnement en quelques mots.

Je m'allongerais un peu si je pensais pouvoir convertir quelqu'un. Mais je n'ai pas l'impression d'avoir vraiment de chances d'y parvenir. Je m'efforce d'être aussi réaliste que possible.

(1120)

Le président:

Très bien, pouvons-nous voter sur le sous-amendement qui vient d'être proposé? Je pense qu'il est suffisamment clair.

Que tous ceux qui sont pour se manifestent.

M. Scott Reid:

Peut-on procéder par appel nominal?

Le greffier du Comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

Le vote porte sur le sous-amendement.

(Le sous-amendement est rejeté par 5 voix contre 4.)

Le président:

Le sous-amendement est rejeté.

Passons à l'amendement.

M. Scott Reid:

J'aurais une remarque à faire. L'auteur de l'amendement a déjà parlé.

Je voulais simplement dire que je vais voter en faveur de cet amendement, mais je suis déçu de ce qui vient de se passer. Nous essayons de réfléchir au bien-fondé de chaque disposition en soi. Je pense que nous avons là un souci qui se fait rare et que M Christopherson a exprimé — désolé, monsieur Graham —. Il reste que c'est une bonne mesure d'ordre administratif.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir leProcès-verbal ])

Les amendements NDP-2, 3 et 4 sont retirés.

Passons à l'amendement NDP-5.

David, voulez-vous le présenter?

M. David Christopherson:

Oui. Le projet de loi permet actuellement ces réceptions de remerciement destinées aux donateurs les plus importants, et ce genre de réception est exclu de la loi. J'estime que cette exemption permet trop d'échappatoires et de moyens de contourner la loi. Les gens savent qu'ils auront une double part pour leurs contributions. Pour moi, c'est la même histoire sous un autre nom. Cela nous permettrait d'éviter cette exemption.

Le président:

Y a-t-il des commentaires?

Allez-y, monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci.

Cette exemption vise à reconnaître les difficultés logistiques associées à l'exécution de ces dispositions à l'occasion d'un congrès, où des gens se déplacent et font la queue pour voir qui se trouve là en même temps que certaines personnes quand il y a du va-et-vient.

Le projet de loi C-50 prévoit quand même que, s'il y a un événement payant au cours d'un congrès... Par exemple, à notre propre congrès, il y a toujours une représentante du Fonds Judy LaMarsh qui recueille de l'argent pour les candidates aux élections. C'est un événement payant distinct, et, si un ministre s'y trouvait, c'est prévu par la loi.

Le président:

Écoutons M. Christopherson, puis M. Reid.

M. David Christopherson:

Je dirais à mon honorable collègue que son argument est valable. Je ne vois pas pourquoi nous ne sommes pas en train d'élaborer une loi qui circonscrive cela tout en veillant à ce que ces autres réceptions de remerciement n'aient pas lieu.

Je ne crois pas que les congrès soient le problème le plus important. C'est plutôt la possibilité d'un deuxième rassemblement avec des décideurs influents et très prisés du gouvernement toujours présents. Cela est actuellement exempté du principe de transparence par ailleurs prévu dans le projet de loi C-50. C'est ça, mon problème.

Le président:

C'est à vous, monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Je suis désolé. Je croyais que c'était Ruby qui devait répondre à M. Christopherson. Je ne voudrais pas être une entrave.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Cette disposition ne concerne pas les réceptions de remerciement dans d'autres circonstances, seulement dans le cadre d'un congrès. Je pense donc que vous avez simplement...

(1125)

M. David Christopherson:

J'aimerais bien voir cela. Si je me trompe et que la formulation est claire à ce point...

M. Andy Fillmore (Halifax, Lib.):

Monsieur le président, peut-on demander aux fonctionnaires compétents de nous éclairer un peu à ce sujet?

Le président:

Je vous en prie.

Mme Madeleine Dupuis (conseillère en politiques, Institutions démocratiques, Bureau du Conseil privé):

En effet, l'exemption porte uniquement sur les réceptions de remerciement faisant partie d'un congrès. Tous les autres cas sont assujettis au projet de loi.

Cela se trouve à la quatrième ligne de la page 3.

Le président:

Vous voulez dire la quatrième ligne de la page 3 du projet de loi?

Mme Madeleine Dupuis:

Oui.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Si je peux me permettre, il s'agit de l'exemption applicable aux réceptions de remerciement à l'intention des donateurs. Ce n'est pas dit dans le titre, mais on peut lire ceci: (4) Malgré le paragraphe (3), ne constitue pas une activité de financement réglementée toute activité qui fait partie du congrès visé au paragraphe (2) et qui est organisée en gage de reconnaissance envers les personnes qui ont fait une contribution au parti enregistré ou à l’une de ses associations enregistrées, à l’un de ses candidats à l’investiture, à l’un de ses candidats ou à l’un de ses candidats à la direction.

L'exemption s'applique exclusivement aux réceptions intégrées à un congrès et absolument pas aux autres.

M. David Christopherson:

Le problème reste entier. Là encore, vous dites que c'est trop difficile de faire le suivi.

Disons qu'on organise une réception dans le cadre du congrès. Si on parle de collecte de fonds dans le cadre d'un congrès, c'est une chose, mais il s'agit d'une réception où se retrouveront tous les gens qui profitent du fait d'avoir versé la contribution maximale — et je pense ici aux libéraux et à leur Club Laurier —, mais ces gens sont les seuls qui seront invités.

Comment auriez-vous de la difficulté à en faire le suivi quand vous devez les inviter justement parce qu'ils ont versé la contribution maximale? Il faut bien qu'ils appartiennent à votre Club Laurier, et si c'est la liste que vous utilisez pour déterminer qui peut être invité, pourquoi est-il si difficile de faire le suivi? Pourquoi est-ce un problème?

M. Chris Bittle:

Le problème n'est pas de faire le suivi, puisque que ces gens sont déjà inscrits dans les registres d'Élections Canada. La question est de savoir qui est là à quel moment avec qui, et il y a des va-et-vient durant tout le week-end.

Quand je parle de difficultés logistiques, ces gens sont déjà... On peut s'adresser à Élections Canada et demander qui sont les donateurs les plus importants, et ce n'est pas un problème. Nous avons tous participé à des congrès et nous savons qu'il y a beaucoup de va-et-vient et qu'il est difficile de déterminer l'échéancier. Ce n'est pas parce que telle personne est passée dans un salon et qu'un ministre y est passé également qu'ils s'y sont trouvés au même moment ou le même jour, et c'est ce à quoi on veut en venir dans le projet de loi.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord.

On pourrait s'arranger pour que personne n'ait vraiment l'intention de discuter grand-chose au cours de la première collecte de fonds, parce que les vrais échanges se passeraient au cours d'un événement plus exclusif, au Club Laurier, où seuls les donateurs les plus importants seraient invités, et le tout se déroulerait sous couvert du congrès. Ce qui ne serait pas permis ailleurs le serait dans ce cas parce qu'il s'agit d'un congrès.

Quand je parlais du congrès, je parlais des collectes de fonds qui s'y déroulent. Il se passe toutes sortes de choses. Les gens vendent des choses. Je n'y vois pas vraiment d'inconvénient. Mais, au congrès, on réunit des gens qui, parce qu'ils sont membres du Club Laurier, auront la possibilité d'être invités à une réception où seront en contact avec des gens qui ont des relations, sans aucune transparence, et simplement parce qu'ils sont les donateurs les plus importants dans le cadre d'autres événements.

J'estime que cela donne encore accès à l'argent. La seule différence est que l'argent a été donné à l'avance.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Monsieur Christopherson, au début, vous avez dit que c'était correct à un congrès et que votre souci concernait les événements hors congrès. Est-ce que vous êtes en train de revenir sur votre réflexion?

M. David Christopherson:

Eh bien, c'est parce que vous avez dit que cela ne s'applique qu'aux congrès. Pourquoi est-ce que je discuterais de quelque chose qui n'est pas inclus dans la disposition? C'est vous qui êtes juriste, pas moi. Je ne fais que suivre votre logique.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

(1130)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je crois que vous changez de sujet.

M. David Christopherson:

Non, pas du tout. Si vous voulez me donner une chance d'en faire une grosse affaire, je vais le faire, mais la disposition dont il est question parle des congrès. Je dis seulement que vous permettez encore ce que, d'après vous, le projet de loi C-50 est censé rendre transparent, et je dis que, quand cela se passe à un congrès, c'est opaque. C'est tout ce que je dis.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci. Je dois dire que, après avoir écouté ces allers-retours, je me sens un peu comme un concurrent assistant à un combat de lutte dans du Jell-O, qui décide inexplicablement de plonger dans la mêlée.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci de nous permettre ces allers-retours.

M. Randy Hoback:

C'est tout?

M. Scott Reid:

C'est mieux que ce que vous auriez offert, Hoback.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid: Je voudrais faire quelques observations. Je pense que l'amendement proposé par M. Christopherson partait de très bonnes intentions et je tiens à expliquer pourquoi je ne l'appuierai pas.

Je dois dire, en passant, que certaines des remarques que je vais faire sont liées à une situation qui existe quand on est au gouvernement, mais qui n'existe pas quand on est dans l'opposition, comme nous en ce moment. Dans l'opposition, on n'a à se soucier que du dirigeant. C'est la seule personne dont la présence est garantie à un événement organisé par le Leaders Circle, qui est notre équivalent du Club Laurier. Il sera évidemment présent, et ce sera donc enregistré. Mais, au gouvernement, certains ministres pourraient être présents selon le genre de choses qui se passeraient par ailleurs à ce congrès. Tout le monde sait que les congrès sont des événements très chaotiques. Il se passe toutes sortes de choses. Il y a des gens qui font des entrevues, lesquelles sont difficiles à planifier, avec divers organes d'information. Il est difficile de prévoir ce que seront les événements les plus importants au moment du congrès. Pour les besoins de la divulgation d'information, on pourrait faire la liste de tous les ministres sans promettre aux gens qui sont invités qu'ils seront effectivement présents. Cela semble problématique, et c'est une de mes raisons.

Ma raison la plus importante de ne pas appuyer cet amendement est que, à un congrès, par la nature même de l'événement et de la présence des médias, il est très facile de suivre qui arrive et qui s'en va. Je crois que c'est Chris Bittle qui a dit que ce sont des événements assez chaotiques où les gens entrent et sortent en mangeant des canapés. Il peut y avoir plus d'un événement de ce genre à un congrès pour accommoder les gens qui arrivent à des moments différents, etc., mais l'important est que les journalistes sont là de toute façon. Vous avez l'accréditation des médias. Il ne risque pas d'y avoir de réunion secrète.

De plus, c'est là que se trouve le plus grand nombre de donateurs qui versent des contributions pour les raisons habituelles. Ils sont déjà acquis au Parti libéral ou au Parti conservateur. Ils sont disposés à donner le maximum. Ils sont des délégués à leur congrès. Ils sont tellement nombreux que ce ne serait vraiment pas le moment d'avoir, disons, une réunion discrète avec un milliardaire chinois. Ce n'est pas le genre de choses qui risque d'arriver à mon avis. C'est pourquoi je pense qu'il n'y a tout simplement jamais eu de problème à ce sujet.

Le président:

Votons sur l'amendement NDP-5.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal ])

Le président: Nous en sommes maintenant à l'amendement NDP-6, et le vote comptera aussi pour l'amendement NDP-8, qui est consécutif du premier.

Nous écouterons David présenter l'amendement NDP-6, mais la parole est d'abord à vous, monsieur Reid.

(1135)

M. Scott Reid:

Selon les règles officielles, étant donné que l'article 2 du projet de loi est modifié par l'amendement NDP-6 à la ligne 15, et que l'amendement LIB-2 le modifie différemment, est-ce qu'il ne s'agit pas de la même chose quand même ou est-ce que je comprends mal? Dans la pratique, si c'est accepté, il serait inutile de voter sur l'amendement LIB-2, vous ne croyez pas? Je demande si cela a un sens par opposition à l'application des règles officielles.

M. Olivier Champagne:

Désolé, pourriez-vous répéter?

M. Scott Reid:

Je me demande s'il ne s'agit pas d'une reprise de la même chose dans différents articles et si, donc, le résultat de fait est que le premier amendement rendrait le deuxième inutile.

M. Olivier Champagne:

Je m'en remettrais aux fonctionnaires compétents parce que vous demandez en fait ce que cela donnerait sur le plan juridique.

Mme Madeleine Dupuis:

Oui, monsieur Reid, les deux amendements ajouteraient un avis à l'intention d'Élections Canada, et ils ont donc le même but. Ils sont identiques sur le plan des conséquences pratiques.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien.

Je vais donc poser la question qui s'impose. À nos collègues libéraux ici présents, accepteriez-vous de simplement retirer l'amendement LIB-2 si l'amendement NDP-6 est adopté?

M. Andy Fillmore:

Monsieur le président, je voudrais que les fonctionnaires compétents précisent, du point de vue de la mise en oeuvre, celle des deux solutions qui est la plus favorable.

Mme Madeleine Dupuis:

Dans l'amendement LIB-2, la motion énonce l'obligation de fournir un avis indépendamment de l'obligation d'annoncer le rassemblement. Cette solution serait donc plus facile à exécuter étant donné que les obligations sont distinctes parce que, dans ce cas, les infractions sont distinctes également.

M. Andy Fillmore:

L'amendement LIB-2 est donc préférable dans ce contexte.

M. Scott Reid:

Dans ce cas, monsieur le président, se pourrait-il que M. Christopherson soit disposé à retirer sa motion pour permettre de donner suite à la motion libérale?

M. David Christopherson:

Oui.

Le président:

Très bien, l'amendement NDP-6 est retiré. Pouvons-nous voter sur l'amendement LIB-2? Tout le monde semble être d'accord.

Cela s'applique à l'amendement LIB-6. Je dirais que c'est le même scénario que l'amendement consécutif du NPD. Si nous votons sur cet amendement, nous votons aussi sur l'amendement LIB-6.

M. Scott Reid:

L'amendement LIB-6 est-il automatiquement applicable en conséquence? C'est bien cela?

M. Olivier Champagne:

C'est parce que l'amendement LIB-2 ajouterait une nouvelle disposition, à savoir le paragraphe 384.2(4.1), et qu'il y a une référence à cette nouvelle disposition du projet de loi. Donc, c'est en fait une référence technique.

M. Scott Reid:

Je vais chercher l'amendement LIB-6, si vous n'y voyez pas d'inconvénient.

Le président:

Nous allons maintenant voter.

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal ])

Le président: Passons à l'amendement NDP-7. S'il est adopté ou peu importe ce qui arrive lors du vote, cela concerne aussi l'amendement NDP-9, qui est un autre amendement consécutif.

David, voulez-vous présenter cet amendement?

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

Encore une fois, c'est à M. Kingsley et, je crois, à M. Nater que nous devons cette idée que, à défaut d'une police d'assurance de secours, il pourrait arriver que des cadres supérieurs se présentent à la dernière minute. Certains sauraient peut-être qu'ils devaient venir — suivez mon regard — et d'autres, non.

Il y avait aussi l'idée que, si un ministre ne pouvait pas venir, il serait raisonnable, bon sang, s'il est malade, que, quelques jours plus tard, quelqu'un d'autre se présente à sa place. Je suis désolé, mais, si c'est le ministre du Tourisme qui est prévu, mais que — suivez mon regard — tout le monde sait qu'il va y avoir une grippe parlementaire et que c'est le ministre des Finances qui sera présent, vous feriez mieux d'y aller, c'est faisable. C'est tout à fait possible.

Quand j'ai parlé de cette possibilité avec M. Kingsley, il a suggéré de prévoir dans la loi que, si on n'est pas sur la liste cinq jours avant, on ne peut pas y aller. Je suis d'accord avec cela. C'est de cela qu'il est question dans cet amendement.

(1140)

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

M. Christopherson est sûrement meilleur que moi dans la vente de billets. Suivez mon regard, et hop, les billets se vendent.

Mais, en réalité, quand une personne est censée venir, on en fait la publicité aussi longtemps et aussi solidement que possible pour vendre le plus grand nombre de billets possible, et le «suivez mon regard» des coulisses est contraire à l'esprit de la loi. Même si on ne pense pas que nous sommes tous au-dessus de cela, au final, ce que nous voulons, c'est vendre le plus de billets possible. Et je crois que cette mesure le permet. Peu importe qui est présent, tout le monde est inclus dans le rapport final, et la transparence sera sauve. La question n'est pas — suivez mon regard — que le ministre des Finances se présente et que la loi ne s'applique pas.

Je crois que je vais voter contre cet amendement parce que je pense qu'il est raisonnable de permettre qu'une personne malade puisse être remplacée, qu'il s'agisse d'une grippe parlementaire ou d'une vraie grippe.

M. David Christopherson:

Eh bien, si vous permettez, monsieur le président, ma réponse est que le gouvernement est bien gentil de dire que cela ne se produirait jamais, mais si on traitait de choses qui ne sont jamais arrivées, on n'aurait jamais besoin de cette loi, n'est-ce pas?

Cet argument ne tient pas à mes yeux. Il me semble que, si vous pensez vraiment ce que vous dites et que personne ne joue de jeu — et je m'en tiens à ce que vous dites —, pourquoi ne pas le mettre dans la loi? Pourquoi devrais-je m'en tenir à ce que vous dites? Pourquoi ne pas le mettre dans la loi? Alors nous serons certains que rien de cela n'arrivera.

Le président:

C'est au tour de Filomena.

Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

David, pour en revenir à votre argument, la première chose que je dirais est ceci: ne vaudrait-il pas mieux annoncer la venue des poids lourds? Non? Vous ne croyez pas? N'est-il pas préférable pour vous d'annoncer ce que...

M. David Christopherson:

Disons que vous n'êtes pas sûr... En tout cas, continuez.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

À ce sujet, je crois que, si vous organisez un événement, vous allez annoncer votre invité, et il n'y aura pas quelqu'un d'autre en coulisse qui pourrait être plus influent — je ne devrais pas dire cela — ou, disons, un membre plus ancien du Cabinet. Vous l'annonceriez. C'est logique, et je pense que vous serez d'accord avec cela.

Il y a aussi qu'un certain nombre de personnes viendront à cet événement et que vous avez annoncé la venue d'un ministre du Cabinet. Supposons que cette personne tombe malade. Dans ce cas, cet amendement créerait un problème, puisque vous ne pourriez pas remplacer le ministre.

C'est pour ces deux raisons que je ne pourrai pas appuyer cet amendement.

Le président:

C’est à vous, Ruby.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'aimerais simplement obtenir une précision de la part des fonctionnaires du ministère.

Même si un ministre est remplacé, je crois comprendre qu'une certaine souplesse préside au processus. Ces choses-là peuvent se produire. Cela m'est arrivé quand je voulais vraiment rencontrer un certain ministre et que j'avais planifié et espéré cette rencontre des mois à l'avance, mais que cela n'a pas fonctionné. Ensuite, quelques semaines avant l'événement, c’est quelqu'un d'autre qui l’a remplacé. Le nom de la personne qui remplace ce ministre doit figurer dans l’avis envoyé cinq jours avant, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Madeleine Dupuis:

Oui. Chaque activité de financement réglementée doit être annoncée cinq jours à l'avance et l’annonce doit préciser le nom du ministre ou du chef de parti qui sera présent. Si un changement est apporté aux renseignements contenus dans l'avis, il y a une obligation de mise à jour. S'il y a un changement de ministre trois jours à l'avance, il y a obligation de mettre l’avis à jour.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Est-ce que le ministre serait toujours autorisé à assister à l’activité si l'avis est mis à jour trois jours à l’avance afin de faire état du changement?

Mme Madeleine Dupuis:

L'avis doit être mis à jour aussitôt que possible dès qu'il y a un changement, et si le changement survient après le début de l'événement, c'est-à-dire une fois que l'avis n'est plus valide, il doit figurer dans le rapport.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

Pouvons-nous donc mettre cet amendement aux voix?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous passons maintenant à l'amendement LIB-3. Si cet amendement est adopté, l'amendement d'Elizabeth May, PV-2, ne pourra pas être proposé parce que les deux entrent en conflit.

M. Scott Reid:

L'amendement PV-2 n'est toutefois pas le suivant.

Le président:

En outre, le vote sur l'amendement LIB-3 s'appliquerait à un amendement corrélatif, l'amendement LIB-7.

Le vote sur cette motion aurait deux effets, à savoir que PV-2 ne pourrait pas être proposé, et que LIB-7 s'appliquerait au résultat du vote, quel qu’il soit.

La personne qui présente cette motion pourrait-elle poursuivre?

(1145)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il s’agit simplement d’une demande à Élections Canada visant à diviser les obligations de dépôt et les délais en exigences distinctes. C'est un changement très simple.

M. Scott Reid:

Mme May pourrait-elle nous expliquer la logique qui sous-tend sa proposition d'amendement et sa raison d’être?

Le président:

Elizabeth, pouvez-vous présenter l'amendement PV-2?

Mme Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, PV):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Avant de prendre la parole, je m'excuse auprès des membres du Comité, mais je tiens à préciser que chaque fois que je suis forcée de comparaître devant un comité parlementaire, je m’y présente sous la contrainte. Le Comité a adopté une motion qui exige que je sois ici si je veux présenter des amendements à cette étape-ci. Si ce n’était de la motion du Comité, j'aurais pu présenter ces amendements à l'étape du rapport.

Comme l'étape du rapport n'a lieu qu'une seule fois à la Chambre, vous ne pouvez pas voir le conflit qui s’est présenté dans la semaine ayant précédé l’Action de grâces, lorsque les projets de loi C-45 et C-49 ont fait l'objet d'une étude article par article en même temps, et qu'en raison des motions adoptées par ces comités, j'ai dû présenter des amendements en même temps.

J'insiste particulièrement auprès de ce comité, le Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, pour dire que c'est lui qui aurait dû déterminer si mes droits de députée devaient être restreints à l'étape du rapport. Sous l'ancien premier ministre, son Cabinet a ni plus ni moins court-circuité le comité de la procédure afin de modifier la façon dont les projets de loi sont étudiés à la Chambre, en adoptant des motions identiques un comité à la fois, et en obligeant les députés des partis ayant moins de 12 députés ou les députés indépendants à faire précéder leurs motions au Comité d’un préavis de 48 heures. Cette façon de procéder vise à créer une occasion illusoire qui me prive de mes droits à l'étape du rapport.

C'est dans ce contexte que je tiens à préciser que je me trouve ici sous la contrainte. Je sais que bon nombre d’entre vous ne sont pas au courant de la situation, même si le Comité a adopté cette motion. Vous avez probablement pensé que c'était une mesure amicale, un beau geste, mais j’ai probablement perdu quelques années de ma vie à essayer d’assister aux réunions d’étude article par article de tous les comités, au lieu de bénéficier des droits qui auraient autrement dû m’être accordés à l'étape du rapport. C'est particulièrement insultant en ce qui concerne le comité de la procédure. Si vous pouviez, par exemple, abroger la motion de votre propre comité, cela ferait bien mon affaire.

Je serai très brève. Je crois comprendre que le conflit est occasionné par l'amendement libéral, qui porte sur les lignes 34 à 36, à la page 6, tout comme le mien.

PV-2 signifie Parti vert-2, parce que les greffiers des comités ont décidé de ne pas désigner mes motions “Green Party” étant donné qu'elles auraient alors ressemblé à des motions du gouvernement, en raison du “G”. C'est la raison pour laquelle l'amendement est appelé Parti vert-2

Parti vert-2 entre en conflit avec l'alinéa b) de l'amendement de David. Mon amendement vise à faire en sorte qu'il ne soit pas interdit de faire rapport pendant une élection. Si vous consultez le projet de loi, vous verrez que je modifie complètement le libellé. Là où il est précisé « Les paragraphes (1) à (7) ne s’appliquent pas relativement à l’activité de financement réglementée », mon amendement,Parti vert-2, remplacerait le libellé « ne s’appliquent pas » par « continuent de s’appliquer », si bien que les règles de ce projet de loi qui portent sur le financement s’appliqueraient pendant la période électorale.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci.

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires au sujet de l'amendement LIB-3?

Monsieur Reid, c’est à vous.

M. Scott Reid:

J’aimerais avoir si les libéraux pensent que ce que propose Mme May est raisonnable, puisqu'il n'y a pas de conflit intrinsèque entre ce qu'ils proposent et ce qu'elle propose.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle, allez-y.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je suppose qu'il y a... Je suis désolé. Je ne sais pas trop quoi…

M. Scott Reid:

C'est un peu comme ce qui s'est passé plus tôt.

M. Chris Bittle:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Je ne pense pas qu'il y ait un conflit intrinsèque entre...

M. Chris Bittle:

Il y a incompatibilité d'objectifs.

M. Scott Reid:

Ai-je tort? Peut-on dire qu’il y a incompatibilité d’objectifs?

M. Andy Fillmore:

Monsieur le président, si vous le permettez, j’aimerais peut-être faire la lumière à ce sujet.

Le président:

Bien sûr, allez-y.

M. Andy Fillmore:

Merci.

Je pense que l'amendement de Mme May vise à imposer les exigences de production de rapports à tout moment de la période électorale en dehors de l’émission du bref. Cela correspond au préavis de cinq jours, à l’exigence de rapports rapides et ainsi de suite.

L'amendement libéral signifie que, pendant le chaos qui caractérise une période électorale, quand tout se passe très rapidement, quand les bénévoles sont stressés et tout le reste, nous aurions un régime différent, dans le cadre duquel tous les rapports seraient présentés après coup, à la fin de la période électorale.

Il y a là une différence d'objectifs. Nous essayons très précisément d’atténuer la pression intense exercée sur les bénévoles pour qu'ils produisent des rapports à un moment où il y a tant à faire, pour eux comme pour tout le monde, pendant une période électorale.

(1150)

M. Scott Reid:

C'est assurément le cas pour ce qui est des pressions.

Permettez-moi de procéder comme suit. Monsieur le président, je vais proposer un sous-amendement à l'amendement LIB-3. Si vous passez à l'alinéa b) du paragraphe 384.3(7) proposé, vous verrez qu'il y est précisé: Les paragraphes (1) à (6 .1) ne s'appliquent pas relative…

Vous me suivez? Nous supprimons simplement les mots « ne s’appliquent pas » et nous ajoutons « continuent de s’appliquer », et cela permet d'accomplir exactement ce que propose Mme May, sans pour autant éliminer ou modifier toute autre partie du texte de l'amendement libéral.

Je pense que cela pourrait fonctionner. Je ne pense pas qu'il y aurait de problème technique. Je vais passer le tout au greffier.

Le président:

Tout le monde comprend ce que M. Reid propose? Y a-t-il des commentaires?

M. David Christopherson:

Pourrait-il répéter?

M. Scott Reid:

Pourquoi ne pourrais-je pas simplement remettre le texte à M. Christopherson?

Le président:

D'accord.

Y a-t-il des commentaires au sujet du sous-amendement proposé par M. Reid?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je ne suis pas encore sûre de bien comprendre. Je sais que vous avez eu l'avantage de voir le support visuel, mais…

M. Scott Reid:

Le président pourrait peut-être le montrer ou le lire à voix haute.

Le président:

Ce que vous proposez aurait pour effet de maintenir l’application pendant les élections.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est exact.

Le président:

Vous pouvez le montrer à Ruby.

C'est à vous, monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Très rapidement, et pour faire écho aux commentaires de M. Fillmore, nous avons tous vécu des élections, quand des décisions sont prises en… Je ne veux pas dire en quelques instants, mais vous pouvez savoir le lendemain si une personne en particulier s’en vient dans votre circonscription, que ce soit le premier ministre ou un chef de parti et pour des raisons de logistique, je ne peux donc pas appuyer ce sous-amendement.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, peut-être pourrions-nous simplement demander aux fonctionnaires si ce que je propose aurait pour effet de faire en sorte que les exigences relatives aux 30 jours et aux cinq jours s'appliquent ou non. Est-ce possible de leur demander?

Le président:

Voulez-vous dire pendant la période électorale?

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, pendant la période électorale. C'est exact.

Le président:

C'est ce que vous essayez de faire.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est ce que j'essayais de faire rapidement, mais je ne suis pas sûr que ce soit la bonne façon de procéder. Je dois simplement m'assurer que nous comprenons tous ce qui vient de se passer, moi le premier.

Des voix:Oh, oh!

Le président:

M. Reid veut savoir si l'amendement qu'il vient de proposer fera en sorte que l’exigence de production de rapports sera la même pendant une période électorale qu'en dehors d'une période électorale.

Mme Madeleine Dupuis:

Pourrions-nous voir ce que M. Reid a proposé?

Des voix:Oh, oh!

Le président:

Ce n'est pas une demande déraisonnable.

M. Scott Reid:

Pendant que nous y sommes, monsieur le président, j’aimerais soulever un autre point.

Dans mon rôle de député, je suis parallèlement en train de recueillir et d’afficher en ligne toute la documentation relative à la conception originale des différentes parties de notre Constitution, et le même problème que nous observons actuellement s'est produit lorsque la Constitution a été rédigée. Les parties prenantes n’avaient pas nécessairement conscience du poids de tous les mots inscrits dans le texte de la Constitution. Suivant cette leçon, il est toujours bon de prendre notre temps et de nous assurer de bien comprendre ce que nous faisons.

(1155)

Le président:

Voilà une observation intéressante.

M. David Christopherson:

Selon vos recherches, ont-ils commis des erreurs au moment de concevoir ce texte?

M. Scott Reid:

Vous ne demandez pas s'ils auraient pu faire mieux, mais bien s'ils ont commis des erreurs? Je crois que certaines personnes ont mal interprété ou mal compris ce qu’elles faisaient. C'est toujours un risque.

Le président:

Si jamais il se reproduit une période d’obstruction systématique, vous pourriez peut-être nous en apprendre davantage à ce sujet…

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid:

Pas avant cela, monsieur Christopherson.

Le président:

Les fonctionnaires sont prêts.

Mme Madeleine Dupuis:

L'amendement proposé n'ajouterait aucune exigence en matière de publicité, qui fait l’objet d’une disposition distincte. Il signifierait que l'exigence de production de rapports dans les 30 jours s'appliquerait pendant une élection et qu’en même temps, l'exigence de produire un rapport dans les 60 jours suivant une élection serait maintenue. Cette modification entraînerait une double exigence de déclaration.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous dites donc qu’il faudrait faire deux rapports, c'est bien cela?

Mme Madeleine Dupuis:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Sur le même sujet.

Mme Madeleine Dupuis:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Y a-t-il un moyen, madame Dupuis, de faire en sorte que seule l'exigence des 30 jours s'applique?

Mme Madeleine Dupuis:

Les paragraphes proposés par la suite dans le projet de loi, soit 384.3(8), 384.3(9), 384.3(10), 384.3(11) et 384.3(12) portent tous sur la production de rapports après une élection, si bien qu’ils devraient être supprimés.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je suis tellement confuse. L'exigence initiale des 30 jours n'était-elle pas inscrite dans l'amendement libéral...? Non, l'exigence initiale était de 30 jours, alors que voulez-vous de plus, monsieur Reid?

M. Scott Reid:

J'essaie d'incorporer l’amendement de Mme May. Je le fais rapidement, mais je ne suis pas sûr d’atteindre l’objectif visé, et c'est pourquoi je pose ces questions.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson, c'est à vous.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, tout cela ne revient-il pas à déterminer s'il faut accorder la priorité à la communication de cette information pendant une élection afin que le public ait la chance d’en prendre connaissance, plutôt qu'après? N'est-ce pas là le nœud de la question qui nous est soumise? Nous avons déjà réglé la question de l'obligation de rendre compte, et c'est donc chose faite. Il reste à savoir si les activités de financement menées au cours d'une campagne seraient assujetties ou non à certaines de ces exigences redditionnelles pendant la campagne. N'est-ce pas là la distinction?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Une période électorale dure combien de temps en moyenne?

M. David Christopherson:

En fait, cette durée moyenne vient d'augmenter. Si vous voulez parler de la durée médiane…

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'est 35 jours.

Le président:

Nous avions une limite de 45 jours.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'est 35 jours, donc je suis inquiète. Que se passera-t-il si l'exigence de production de rapport tombe le jour des élections ou...? Mener une campagne est la chose la plus folle que j'aie pu faire, et je me pose des questions au sujet de ceux qui l'ont fait plus d'une fois. Il faut être complètement fou. Pourquoi quelqu’un voudrait-il repasser par la même épreuve encore et encore? Comme je vous dis tout cela deux ans plus tard, je sais que je vais moi aussi probablement recommencer, mais il faut être complètement fou. C'est de la pure folie, et les bénévoles ne savent pas tout ce qui se passe.

Comme le rythme effréné de cette période de 30 ou 35 jours en moyenne est intense, je crains que quelqu’un organise une activité de financement qui tomberait le jour ou la veille des élections. Je crains que bon nombre de gens commettent des erreurs dans leurs rapports parce qu'ils n'ont pas la capacité requise.

Le président:

La parole est à vous, madame May.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Merci, monsieur le président. Je suis heureuse de reprendre la parole.

S'il y a une personne qui comprend les règles et les cycles électoraux au Canada, c'est bien Jean-Pierre Kingsley, qui a occupé le poste le plus longtemps. J’aimerais simplement citer à nouveau ce qu'il a dit devant le Comité. S'il y a une période où les citoyens doivent vraiment savoir qui sont les donateurs, c'est bien au cours d'une période électorale. Pour le moment, ce régime de production de rapports n'est pas en vigueur. En vertu de cette mesure législative, cette production de rapports au cours d'une période essentielle à la démocratie n'aurait pas lieu.

J'entends bien ce que vous dites Ruby, mais je pense que mon amendement n'aurait pas créé une double exigence. Une double exigence de production de rapports se produit lorsque vous combinez mon amendement à celui de David. S'il y avait une façon élégante de s'assurer... À vrai dire, la grande question de principe dont le Comité est saisi consiste à déterminer si nous voulons modifier la loi pour donner suite à l'inquiétude soulevée par Jean-Pierre Kingsley, à savoir que c'est précisément pendant les élections que les Canadiens veulent savoir qui verse des dons aux différents partis et candidats?

(1200)

Le président:

C’est à vous, monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je vous remercie de vos commentaires, mais je pense que M. Kingsley voulait en fait parler des dons globaux. C'est un sujet entièrement différent de cette mesure législative très précisément ciblée, et l’adoption de cet amendement n'aboutirait pas à ce dont parlait M. Kingsley dans son témoignage. Il est difficile d’un point de vue logistique de déclarer la contribution instantanément, étant donné que des gens vous remettent encore des chèques la veille de l'élection. Dans peut-être 10 ou 20 ans, si tout est affiché en ligne, il sera beaucoup plus facile de déclarer instantanément ces contributions, mais je ne pense pas que la recommandation de M. Kingsley corresponde à la réalité des campagnes actuelles, quand vous avez un partisan de 75 ans qui se présente avec un chèque. Ce chèque est remis à un bénévole et fait l'objet d'une série de processus qui ne peuvent peut-être pas être déclarés avant les élections.

Je pense que ce dont parlait M. Kingsley et le sujet qui nous occupe aujourd’hui sont deux questions entièrement différentes.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai un commentaire à faire. J'ai du mal à accepter l’excuse de la difficulté d'un point de vue logistique comme raison de ne pas s’acquitter d’une obligation. Si le critère de la difficulté d’un point de vue logistique suffisait à justifier l’inaction, la moitié des règlements entourant les élections n'existeraient pas.

Comme Ruby l'a dit, il se passe bien des choses au cours d’une campagne électorale, et les directeurs de campagne deviennent fous en raison de tout ce qu'ils doivent faire qui semble difficile sur le plan logistique, mais que nous avons jugé nécessaire pour garantir la tenue d'élections libres et justes. Je dis simplement que l’excuse de la difficulté d’un point de vue logistique ne m’émeut pas beaucoup.

M. Chris Bittle:

Si je peux me permettre, je déteste, comme avocat, utiliser le mot impossible, mais lorsque je parle de la difficulté d’un point de vue logistique dans ce contexte, c’est que j’estime déraisonnable d’imposer ce fardeau à des bénévoles dans une situation donnée. Je comprends votre objection et j’adapterai donc mes commentaires en conséquence.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vous comprends aussi, mais je n’adapterai pas les miens.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Chris Bittle:

D'accord.

Le président:

Pouvons-nous passer au vote sur le sous-amendement?

Monsieur Reid, un commentaire au sujet du sous-amendement...?

M. Scott Reid:

Je n'ai rien à ajouter.

Le président:

Passons donc au vote.

(Le sous-amendement est rejeté. [Voir le procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous passons maintenant à l'amendement à proprement parler, soit l'amendement LIB-3. Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

Tous ceux qui sont pour?

M. David Christopherson:

Avec dissidence.

Le président:

L'amendement est adopté avec dissidence.

(L'amendement est adopté avec dissidence. [Voir le procès-verbal])

Le président: Le vote s'applique en conséquence à l'amendement LIB-7, également adopté.

Qui présente l'amendement LIB-4?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais parler au nom de cette personne, qui qu'elle soit. Merci.

En voici un autre de la part du directeur général. Il ne fait qu'ajouter des exemptions pour les gens qui assistent une personne handicapée lors d'un événement. Cela ferait en sorte de les retirer de la liste à publier. Vous avez compris, David?

M. David Christopherson:

Non. Je l'avais déjà examiné plus tôt, alors je crois que ça va aller.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne me suis pas exprimé très clairement, j'ai peut-être besoin d'aide. Est-ce qu'on m'a bien compris?

Le président:

S'il s'agit d'un professionnel qui assiste une personne handicapée, il n'a pas à être inscrit sur la liste.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est exact.

Le président:

Est-ce qu'il y a débat?

M. Randy Hoback:

Je dois poser une question par pure ignorance. Comment doit-on traiter un député ou un ministre qui est en fauteuil roulant et dont s'occupe un membre professionnel qui est également un employé politiquement actif?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si la personne a une autre fonction, je ne crois pas que l'amendement en tienne compte. Si son rôle est simplement d'aider...

M. Randy Hoback:

Cela est-il suffisamment bien défini dans cet amendement?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui. Nous pouvons demander aux conseillers s'ils trouvent que c'est suffisamment bien défini, mais je crois que ce l'est. On y lit: « toute personne ayant assisté à l'événement dans le seul but d'accompagner une personne handicapée ». C'est la seule raison de sa présence, alors cette personne ne devrait pas figurer sur la liste. Elle n'est là qu'à cette fin.

(1205)

Le président:

Que ceux qui sont en faveur lèvent la main? Ceux contre?

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Passons à l'amendement PV-1, qui vient du Parti vert.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Qu'avez-vous dit, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Voulez-vous présenter l'amendement?

Mme Elizabeth May:

Oui.

Je crois, en passant, si je peux me permettre une petite digression à propos de ce projet de loi et de la conversation qu'il suscite autour de cette table, que tout cela milite en faveur d'un meilleur financement public des campagnes...

Un député: Bravo!

Mme Elizabeth May:... et d'une réduction du stress lié au financement. J'espère que le ministre s'inspirera de ce que Jean Chrétien avait fait lors de sa réforme initiale de la campagne électorale et qu'il envisage à nouveau les subventions par vote obtenu, car on ne peut pas dire que le gouvernement du Canada ne finance pas les partis politiques. Il le fait en donnant des remises aux donateurs. Il le fait par des remises à la fin de la campagne électorale. Le plus nous finançons publiquement les campagnes électorales, le moins surgit le problème de savoir quels donateurs se retrouvent en présence du ministre — ou combien d'argent on donne pour y avoir accès.

Je vais procéder rapidement, car je n'ai pas le don d'ubiquité. Monsieur le président, je vais revenir pour mon prochain amendement et je vais vous le faire connaître dès maintenant. J'espère revenir à temps, mais le Bureau de régie interne est ouvert pour la première fois aujourd'hui aux députés qui ne font pas partie de la Chambre étoilée, alors je tiens à aller y faire un tour. Je sors rapidement et je reviens.

Ceci dit, il s'agit d'un amendement basé sur le témoignage de Jean-Pierre Kingsley. Mon amendement aurait pour effet de supprimer les alinéas 384.3(3)(b) et 384.3(3)(c) voulant que les gens ne figurent pas au rapport s'ils sont présents aux seules fins de leur emploi. Pour reprendre les arguments de Jean-Pierre Kingsley: « Il y a des employés dans le système politique canadien qui sont excessivement importants » et — je regrette de le dire, c'est mon interprétation personnelle — qui sont jugés plus importants par les donateurs que des députés élus. Il a dit: Il y a des employés dans le système politique canadien qui sont excessivement importants et leur présence à une activité [est une chose qui] a du poids en soi. Par conséquent, le retrait de l'obligation de nommer ces personnes, à mon avis, nous éloigne de l'objet de cette loi.

C'est pourquoi mon amendement supprimerait l'exclusion des employés dans les exigences en matière de rapport.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je comprends ce que dit Mme May, mais il me semble — et peut-être devrions-nous en parler à la conseillère — que cet amendement s'appliquerait alors à toutes les personnes présentes. S'il y avait un employé, un serveur ou un assistant qui était présent dans le cadre de ses seules fonctions, son nom apparaîtrait sur la liste.

Je ne crois pas que ce soit là notre but. Les personnes qui, dans le cadre de leur emploi, versent du vin ou servent de la nourriture verraient leur nom sur une liste, ce qui laisserait entendre qu'ils soutiennent un parti politique en particulier, alors que ce n'est peut-être pas le cas.

Le président:

Pouvons-nous demander à notre analyste si cet amendement aurait cet effet?

Mme Madeleine Dupuis:

Oui, cela en serait l'effet. Le nom des personnes employées pour l'organisation de l'événement, incluant les serveurs et les membres des médias également, devrait figurer sur la liste.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est ce que j'ai observé également. Si le premier ministre assiste à un événement, est-ce que ses gardes du corps de la GRC seront aussi inclus?

Le président:

Avec cet amendement, ils le seraient.

M. Scott Reid: Ça pose problème, de toute évidence.

Le président: Sommes-nous prêts à passer au vote?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous allons passer à l'amendement LIB-5. Le résultat vaudra également pour l'amendement corrélatif LIB-8, peu importe l'issue du vote.

Allez-y, monsieur de Burgh Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cet amendement clarifie l'obligation de l'organisateur de l'activité de fournir des renseignements à jour aux partis et s'applique tant au rapport d'événement qu'à l'avis initial d'activité. Dans tous les cas, l'entité organisatrice n'inclura aucune information sur des mineurs, des bénévoles et des personnes présentes parce qu'elles sont employées pour l'événement.

Le président:

Quelle est l'intention derrière cet amendement?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il précise les obligations de l'organisateur. C'est un amendement de clarification.

Le président:

Pouvez-vous expliquer cela de façon limpide? Quel est l'objet de cet amendement?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'ai rien dit d'aussi clair de toute la journée.

Le président:

Quel est l'objet de cet amendement?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il clarifie l'obligation de l'organisateur de l'activité de fournir des renseignements à jour aux partis, ce qui s'applique tant au rapport d'événement qu'à l'avis initial d'activité.

Les renseignements doivent être justes, avant et après. C'est une amélioration.

(1210)

M. Andy Fillmore:

Monsieur le président, il vise à assurer une bonne coordination entre les organisateurs de l'activité et les partis politiques respectifs, de sorte que le rapport, tant avant qu'après l'activité, soit conséquent et rigoureux. Dans le cas où surviendraient des changements de dernière minute, par exemple, quant à l'endroit ou à l'horaire, qu'ils soient rapportés adéquatement.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Quelles seraient les conséquences de ne pas adopter cet amendement?

M. Andy Fillmore:

Je vous renvoie à la conseillère.

Mme Madeleine Dupuis:

Actuellement, les organisateurs ont l'obligation de communiquer aux partis politiques l'information dont ils ont besoin pour soumettre leurs rapports, mais si les organisateurs sont mis au courant d'un changement, ils n'ont pas l'obligation d'en aviser le parti. Sans cette information, le parti ne peut mettre à jour son rapport. Il obligerait donc les organisateurs à tenir à jour toute l'information qu'ils possèdent en vue du rapport, dès qu'ils en prennent conscience.

Le président:

Doit-on débattre davantage?

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Les amendements LIB-5 et LIB-8 sont adoptés.

L'amendement PV-2 ne peut être proposé, car LIB-3 a été adopté. C'étaient là les seuls amendements de l'article 2. Pouvons-nous voter sur l'article 2 modifié?

M. David Christopherson:

Adopté avec dissidence.

Le président:

Avec dissidence.

(L'article 2 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Je constate qu'il n'y a pas d'amendements aux articles 3 et 8. Je vais demander à l'adjoint législatif si je peux les mettre aux voix en une seule motion.

(Les articles 3 à 8 inclusivement sont adoptés avec dissidence.)

(Article 9)

Le président:

Tous les amendements pour l'article 9 sont corrélatifs, alors nous ne nous occuperons pas de NDP-8, de LIB-6, de NDP-9, de LIB-7 ni de LIB-8.

L'article 9 modifié est-il adopté?

(L'article 9 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

(L'article 10 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 11)

Le président:

Nous en sommes à l'amendement PV-3. Le PV est absent, mais il est proposé d'office.

Si quelqu'un comprend cet amendement, veut-il le proposer?

Allez-y, David.

M. David Christopherson:

Il est corrélatif à NDP-10 et il porte sur l'amende. J'avais proposé une amende de 1 000 à 5 000 $ en théorie. J'avais l'impression...

Le président:

J'ai oublié de mentionner, David, que s'il est adopté, NDP-10 ne pourra pas être proposé pour cause d'incompatibilité.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, c'est l'un ou l'autre dans ce cas-ci.

Le président:

Elizabeth, nous sommes arrivés à l'amendement PV-3.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Je sais. On me l'a dit. Je ne pensais pas que vous arriveriez à l'article 11 si rapidement.

Merci de me donner l'occasion d'en parler. C'est très simple. Encore une fois, je me suis référée au témoignage de Jean-Pierre Kingsley plus particulièrement, qui croit qu'une pénalité de 1 000 $ n'aura pas un impact suffisant. Avec l'aide des rédacteurs, j'ai préparé cette suggestion afin que l'amende soit en rapport avec l'infraction. En somme, il s'agit de doubler les sommes reçues en enfreignant le code d'éthique du financement.

C'est un amendement tout à fait simple. Toute personne qui tient une activité de financement et amasse des fonds excédentaires paierait le double de ce qu'elle a reçu.

Le président:

La parole est à M. Christopherson, puis à M. Reid.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Comme vous avez pu le voir dans l'amendement NDP-10, qui suit PV-3, je ne tiens pas mordicus à un chiffre exact ou à une formule particulière pour la pénalité, mais je suis d'accord. Nombre de témoins ont exprimé qu'une amende de 1 000 $ leur paraissait un peu timide. Dans certains cas, cela pourrait devenir une simple dépense liée aux affaires et les gens pourraient en venir à ignorer les règles comme bon leur semble.

Je suis ouvert aux deux. J'espère simplement que nous nous entendrons collectivement sur le fait que 1 000 $ sont insuffisants. Alors la question qui se pose est: quelle somme semble adéquate pour une majorité d'entre nous?

(1215)

Le président:

M. Reid est le suivant, ensuite ce sera M. Graham.

M. Scott Reid:

Sommes-nous encore dans une situation où l'adoption d'un amendement empêcherait que l'on débatte l'autre?

Le président:

Oui, on ne pourrait pas débattre l'amendement NDP-10.

M. Scott Reid:

On ne pourrait pas débattre NDP-10.

Le président:

Est-ce que vous savez de quoi il s'agit?

M. Scott Reid:

J'aimerais que M. Christopherson nous explique ce que c'est.

M. David Christopherson:

Il fait passer l'amende de 1 000 à 5 000 $. L'amendement d'Elizabeth se fonderait sur la formule Kingsley, qui veut que la somme corresponde au double de ce qui a été reçu. Ce sont là les deux options.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Puis-je demander aux témoins si le fait d'utiliser l'expression « le double de la somme » veut dire...

Le président:

Cela a déjà été demandé.

M. Scott Reid:

Je me demande, est-ce que cela fait référence à la somme qui a été reçue si le nom de la personne n'a pas été inscrit sur la liste? Est-ce qu'il s'agit de la somme entière reçue lors de l'activité ou est-ce que cela peut changer d'une situation à l'autre?

Vous voyez où je veux en venir. Il y a deux interprétations différentes. J'essaie juste de comprendre la vôtre.

Mme Madeleine Dupuis:

Puis-je vous demander de répéter, s'il vous plaît?

M. Scott Reid:

Disons que vous organisez une activité dont le chef du parti est la vedette. C'est fait correctement, mais on n'inscrit pas le nom du participant Jean Beaulieu. Est-ce que la pénalité pour la contribution de 400 $ de Jean Beaulieu, disons, est de 800 $ ou est-ce que tout ce qui a été amassé durant l'activité se trouve confisqué? On pourrait faire face à ce genre d'infraction.

Un autre genre d'infraction possible est que vous avez l'intention d'avoir la vedette A, mais la vedette B s'amène ou un autre gros imprévu survient. On a peut-être oublié d'inscrire l'activité et voilà qu'on récolte 10 000 $. Vous voyez où je veux en venir? Il y a deux façons de... C'est l'essence de ma question.

Mme Madeleine Dupuis:

C'est une très bonne question. Malheureusement, ce n'est pas clair, je ne pourrais vous dire laquelle de ces options s'appliquerait dans l'état de rédaction actuelle, car on lit: « obtenus en commettant l'infraction ». Ce n'est pas tout à fait clair. Cela dépendrait de la façon dont Élections Canada interprète cette disposition.

Le président:

Pourrions-nous passer directement à Mme May pour lui demander de clarifier cela?

Mme Elizabeth May:

Merci.

Sans vouloir manquer de respect envers la conseillère, je ne crois pas que cela manque de clarté. Cela serait, comme le laisse entendre Jean-Pierre Kingsley dans son témoignage, selon la somme collectée en commettant l'infraction. On ne parle pas de l'événement en entier.

Le président:

Comment quantifiez-vous la somme collectée si une personne différente se présente?

Mme Elizabeth May:

Scott a posé une question sur le fait de ne pas inscrire le nom d'une personne sur la liste. Si l'infraction fait porter le doute sur l'activité en entier, alors il s'agirait de doubler la somme qui a été amassée lors de cette activité. S'il s'agit d'une infraction spécifique liée à une personne en particulier, il s'agirait du montant dont cette personne serait responsable.

Un député: Comment calculeriez-vous cela?

Mme Elizabeth May: Il faudrait l'évaluer en fonction du montant de la contribution.

Le président:

Vous avez la parole, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends ce qu'elle tente de faire. Je ne suis pas d'accord, mais si l'on voit plus loin, s'il y a accusation en vertu de cette loi, cette personne est accusée en vertu de la Loi électorale, ce qui constitue une sanction beaucoup plus importante que n'importe quelle somme d'argent, car dans les grands titres, on pourra lire: « Le député ou le ministre Untel est accusé pour infraction en vertu de la Loi électorale. » C'est une sanction beaucoup plus importante de toutes les façons. C'est une sanction politique et non une sanction financière.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Cela s'applique déjà sans égard à....

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela s'appliquerait à cette loi également. Si vous enfreignez la loi et que vous êtes condamné, vous écopez d'une peine supplémentaire, celle de faire les grands titres de l'actualité.

Le président:

Nous allons revenir à M. Hoback.

M. Randy Hoback:

En ce qui a trait à l'amendement du Parti vert, le fait de ne pas avoir de chiffre exact me pose problème, car le calcul est compliqué. Ces 1 000 $ sont peut-être excessifs, mais deux fois la somme, si on regarde ce que ça donne... Si un bénévole qui organise une activité de financement pour moi fait une erreur et amasse 10 000 $ et que d'un seul coup, mon association de circonscription doit faire un chèque de 20 000 $...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

... et organiser une activité de financement pour les payer...

M. Randy Hoback:

Oui, exactement. À mes yeux, cela semble un peu excessif et pas très pratique, mais s'il s'agit d'une somme adéquate, alors cela tombe sous le sens et on paie l'amende.

Je pense également que notre collègue David a soulevé un argument valable. Il y a la perception du public et la stigmatisation que cela impose.

(1220)

Le président:

À vous, madame Sahota, ensuite ce sera Mme Tassi.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Une fois de plus, je voudrais quelques explications de la part des conseillers. Donc, la loi exigerait initialement que la personne qui a commis l'infraction se voie confisquer tout l'argent amassé durant l'activité de financement, puis paie une amende de 1 000 $ par surcroît. Est-ce exact?

Mme Madeleine Dupuis:

Si elle est condamnée, c'est exact. Elle paierait alors l'amende. Le retour des contributions se ferait une fois qu'il aurait été constaté que l'activité de financement ne s'était pas déroulée selon les règles.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Si l'activité de financement enfreint la règle, alors il y a confiscation de tout l'argent collecté...

Mme Madeleine Dupuis:

Alors il faut rembourser les contributions.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

... et pas seulement pour la personne dont le nom n'a pas été publié. Il n'y a pas que cette portion en jeu.

Mme Madeleine Dupuis:

C'est tout l'argent collecté.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Si on ajoute cela en plus, cela voudrait dire que si mon association de circonscription amassait environ 30 000 $ lors d'une activité de financement, mais qu'on avait oublié d'inscrire une ou plusieurs personnes ou quelque chose du genre et qu'on considérait cela comme une infraction, je me ferais confisquer les 30 000 $, et en plus de cela, l'association de circonscription devrait payer 60 000 $. Est-ce que c'est ce que cet amendement permettrait?

Mme Madeleine Dupuis:

Oui.

Le président:

À votre tour, madame Tassi.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

C'était ma question.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

C'étaient là quelques-unes de mes préoccupations quand j'ai commencé à réfléchir à ce sujet, mais comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, je ne suis pas particulièrement attaché à la somme de 5 000 $. J'espère qu'une majorité d'entre nous s'entendra pour dire que 1 000 $, c'est un peu bas. Peut-on s'entendre sur une somme plus élevée?

Le président:

Doit-on poursuivre le débat sur l'amendement PV-3?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal.])

David, est-ce que vous voulez...

M. David Christopherson:

Je n'ai pas besoin de faire un discours. J'ai tout entendu. Si vous ne pouvez pas appuyer les 5 000 $, j'espère que nous pourrons nous rallier autour d'un sous-amendement. J'en resterai là, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Est-ce qu'il y a débat sur le fait de faire passer le montant de l'amende de 1 000 à 5 000 $?

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, je suis en faveur. Il y a un problème évident à imposer une amende de 1 000 $ pour un événement dont le coût d'entrée est de plus de 1 000 $.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il faut en rembourser la totalité.

M. Scott Reid:

Je pense toujours que 5 000 $ est une somme plus raisonnable. On l'a augmenté à 5 000 $, si je ne m'abuse. C'est bien cela?

Cela semble raisonnable. Cela laisse place au jugement.

Le président:

Désolé, c'est « jusqu'à »?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

[Inaudible]

Ah non. Vous le changez pour 5 000 $. Désolée.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il est dit « une amende maximale de 5 000 $ », ce qui signifie donc « jusqu'à concurrence de ».

Le président:

Nous devrions peut-être demander aux fonctionnaires.

Il s'agit d'une « amende maximale de 5 000 $ », mais qui décide du montant de l'amende en question?

Mme Madeleine Dupuis:

Ce serait le juge.

Le président:

Un juge?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Ainsi, le montant pourrait-il descendre jusqu'à 10 $? Est-ce possible?

M. David Christopherson:

La décision revient au juge.

M. Scott Reid:

Ce n'est pas déraisonnable. S'il s'agit d'une omission purement administrative, le contrevenant sera pris, en fait, mais une amende supplémentaire ne lui sera pas imposée.

M. David Christopherson:

Il fera toutefois la une des médias.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Et on lui retirera son financement.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je voudrais faire écho à ce qu'a dit M. Graham. Nous devons nous faire une idée d'ensemble de ce qui se produit quand la loi est enfreinte.

Si vous avez amassé des fonds de 10 000 $ par une activité de financement, vous remettez cette somme et vous faites maintenant face à une accusation en vertu de la Loi sur les élections et à une condamnation assortie d'un prix politique appréciable. J'estime qu'une amende de 1 000 $ en soi, sans devoir en plus perdre les fonds amassés, n'est carrément pas suffisant, car si on amasse 30 000 $ avec une dépense commerciale de 1 000 $, mais si on remet 30 000 $ ou 10 000 $ par association de circonscription et qu'on est condamné en vertu de la Loi sur les élections, la peine est, à mon avis, politiquement suffisante et elle a un fort effet de dissuasion général.

(1225)

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres interventions?

M. David Christopherson:

Dois-je en déduire que le gouvernement n'est pas intéressé à des sommes entre 1 000 $ et 5 000 $ et qu'il s'en tiendra à 1 000 $?

M. Chris Bittle:

Je vais parler en mon nom. Je vote en faveur de laisser le montant de l'amende à 1 000 $.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous êtes un secrétaire parlementaire influent et je m'attends donc à ce que tous vos disciples vous emboîtent le pas.

Le président:

Madame May, êtes-vous inscrite pour prendre la parole?

Mme Elizabeth May:

Je voulais simplement que nous en parlions. Je voulais vérifier si le montant était porté à 5 000 $.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

On parle actuellement d'une « amende maximale de 1 000 $ »; l'idée est la même, mais le seuil est un peu plus élevé.

Le président:

Quelqu'un a-t-il quelque chose à ajouter?

M. David Christopherson:

Pouvons-nous tenir un vote par appel nominal?

Le président:

Nous tiendrons un vote par appel nominal sur le NDP-10.

(L'amendement est rejeté par 5 voix contre 4).

Le président: L'article 11 est-il adopté?

M. David Christopherson:

Avec dissidence.

(L'article 11 est adopté avec dissidence)

Le président:

Il n'y a aucun amendement proposé pour les articles 12 à 15. Sont-ils tous adoptés?

M. David Christopherson:

Avec dissidence.

(Les articles 12 à 15 inclusivement sont adoptés avec dissidence)

Le président:

Le titre est-il adopté?

Des députés: Oui.

Le président: Le projet de loi est-il adopté?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je souhaite un vote par appel nominal.

Le président:

Nous allons tenir un vote par appel nominal sur l'adoption du projet de loi complet.

Le greffier:

Nous allons voter par appel nominal.

Le projet de loi modifié est-il adopté?

Le président:

Merci.

(La motion est adoptée par 5 voix contre 4)

Le président: Dois-je faire rapport à la Chambre du projet de loi modifié?

Des députés: Oui.

Le président: Le Comité demande-t-il la réimpression du projet de loi?

M. Scott Reid:

Non.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président:

Vous êtes tous en faveur?

Des députés: Oui.

Le président: D'accord, nous allons le faire réimprimer.

Merci. C'était très avisé.

David, ne partez pas tout de suite.

Pour la prochaine réunion, nous avons la possibilité d'aborder deux questions sur lesquelles nous nous étions entendus.

La première porte sur le Règlement ou d'autres changements pour subvenir aux besoins des députées et députés ayant des bébés ou des enfants en très bas âge.

L'autre porte...

(1230)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'invoque le Règlement. Pouvons-nous permettre aux fonctionnaires de partir? Merci.

Le président:

Oui. Merci beaucoup.

L'autre question porte sur l'approbation du rapport sur le code de conduite sexuelle. Comme vous le savez, nous avions certaines modifications depuis... puisque cela s'était fait à huis clos, nous devrions peut-être nous réunir à nouveau à huis clos pour quelques minutes.

Est-ce que nous pourrions rester quelques minutes de plus le temps de décider de ce qui se fera à la prochaine réunion?

Que les personnes ne devant pas se trouver ici pendant le huis clos s'en aillent.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on October 19, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.