header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-10-17 PROC 73

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. Welcome to the 73rd meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. The meeting is being held in public. Today we are continuing our study of Bill C-50, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act with respect to political financing.

Our witnesses today during the first hour are Professor Eric Montigny, department of political science, University of Laval; and Dr. Leslie Seidle, research director, Institute for Research on Public Policy.

Thank you both for being here. You'll each have up to 10 minutes for opening statements and then we'll have questions related to Bill C-50. With all your knowledge, if you're asked a question on something else, it's up to you whether you wish to answer.

Thank you, and we'll start with Mr. Montigny. [Translation]

Mr. Eric Montigny (Professor, Department of Political Science, Université Laval, As an Individual):

Good morning.

I thank the Committee for inviting me to speak today.

The last time I appeared was during consultations on electoral reform and the voting system. I hope that your work will reach a more satisfactory conclusion this time.

First of all, I would say that making a contribution to a party remains a fundamental democratic exercise, a fundamental democratic right even. In a political system, giving money to a party is as much a type of political expression as it is activism. This is the first thing that we should keep in mind. It is also a way to support a cause, a political stream and, generally speaking, democracy.

Contributing to a political party is also a means for political parties and elected officials to stay in touch with civil society. It is also a way to energize a party’s militant grassroots or to aim to do so.

As such, it is important to think about it and to question amendments to the political financing provisions of the Canada Election Act. I would add that it is critical to examine the oversight role that the State must play when it comes to political financing. My remarks and my analysis of Bill C-50 address those issues.

The rules of political financing are at the core of a democratic regime. We must be aware of the fact that Bill C-50 can impact the balance of political forces and the arrival of new players in a partisan system. That is the case when the rules of political financing are directly or indirectly concerned.

The State has a definite responsibility regarding transparency and equity among voters. That is the oversight role that it must play when it comes to political parties and their financing.

Over the years, Canada has managed to develop a model that differs from the one in the United States and which gives central stage to the voter. It has been a fundamental principle of the Canada Elections Act for a few years.

After further analysis of Bill C-50, we find that it does not question the principles of transparency and voter primacy, but upholds them. It will, actually, increase transparency, but it will not solve the structural problems raised in the political debate, including those related to equity and trust, despite its objectives.

Generally speaking, what are the goals of Bill C-50? First of all, it aims at fighting a certain type of cynicism in response, of course, to critics raised regarding access to elected officials based on political contributions. It seeks to avoid situations in which contributing to a political party is perceived as a way for the richest members of society to get a privileged access to politicians.

In what way does Bill C-50 meet these objectives? First of all, we must recall that, like most bills on election regulations, this one stems from a media frenzy. The party-managed registry of financing activities that will be created as a result of this bill will most likely end up being managed by the Chief Electoral Officer.

One of the important consequences of this bill is that, once it’s passed, it will lead to a registry of lobbyists logic. It is a structural effect that must be debated and given some thought. In other words, the bill will create a dynamic similar to that of a registry of lobbyists.

In a democratic financing system, the origin of donations must, of course, be made public. Bill C-50 goes further when it asks that financing activities be published in a registry, five days in advance, followed by the names of participants. It is a political or transparency dynamic more similar to the prior disclosure of influence activities than to activist activities.

(1105)



Similarly, the bill could have adverse effects on political dynamics. Initially, such a process will be much more difficult to handle for smaller parties than for the strongly institutionalized ones that enjoy a well-established partisan bureaucracy to manage accountability. That is the first thing.

Moreover, the bill will increase political parties’ risks of breaches, penalties, and blame given the multiplicity of their financing activities. It could also deter certain activists from contributing to political parties; at least, that is what I fear. It confirms the perception that it is suspicious to make a contribution to a political party while, in reality, as I was saying from the outset, contributing to a political party is an exercise in democracy and activism. Even though, in its current form, the bill includes exemptions during an election period, the political dynamics could lead to these exemptions being called into question.

Let’s come back to the bill’s objectives. In order to reduce cynicism and to show that the perception that donors get access to elected officials in exchange for contributions is false, I believe that we must think more about lowering contribution thresholds. We must lower the annual contribution thresholds to a political party. We must also think about reintroducing a type of State allowance.

As for the other aspect concerning the oversight of nomination contests and leadership races, the bill responds to the Chief Electoral Officer’s recommendations to account for all expenditures. No one is better positioned than him to establish the appropriate legal terminology to achieve these objectives.

As far as I’m concerned, the questions arising from the analysis of the bill centre around two elements. Why not extend its provisions to include the election of all national party officers? We know that there are campaigns to elect committee chairs and different national executive positions within a party, which are, ultimately, prestigious positions.

Why not also review anonymous donations? We know that Canadian legislation is much more tolerant than that of other jurisdictions, for instance Quebec.

In conclusion, your committee’s work is essential to democracy. The study of political party financing goes beyond a bill to encompass the balance of political forces both in a Parliament and in civil society. By changing the rules of financing, we intervene in what constitutes the sinews of war in politics: funding.

It is important to assess both the positive and potentially negative impacts of amendments. I’m afraid that Bill C-50 will change the perception of what constitutes a political donation — which, in my opinion, must be associated with political activism rather than a gesture of influence — by adapting or integrating a dynamic specific to the registry of lobbyists.

Thank you for listening to me.

(1110)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[English]

Dr. Leslie Seidle, you have 10 minutes for opening comments before we go to a round of questioning. [Translation]

Dr. Leslie Seidle (Research Director, Institute for Research on Public Policy, As an Individual):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, for inviting me to take part in your study of Bill C-50.[English]

My presentation will be in two parts. First, I will make some general observations about the purpose of the bill, intended to situate it in the context of the ongoing development of the regulation of political finance under the Elections Act, and then I will have a few comments about certain provisions of the bill.

Canada's regulatory framework for election and political finance is considered, with justification, to be one of the most progressive in the world. It is based on a number of principles, one of which is transparency. As with other parts of the Canada Elections Act, the means to further that principle have evolved over time. Often this has occurred in response to scandal or to concerns about the potential for financially well-endowed interests to exercise undue influence over the federal, political, and legislative processes. We can think, for example, about the Pacific scandal of 1872 as well as the Rivard affair and related controversies about irregular party funding during the Pearson government in the mid-1960s.

In response to the first, the Pacific scandal, Parliament introduced a requirement in the 1874 Dominion Elections Act that candidates report on their election spending. However, there were no sanctions or an effective enforcement body, and the provision became a dead letter.

In response to the controversies of the 1960s and the pressures on political parties for financing election campaigns, the Pearson government appointed the committee on election expenses in 1964. It's often referred to as the Barbeau committee. Significant parts of that report were enacted in the groundbreaking Election Expenses Act of 1974.

Over time, two developments have occurred to strengthen transparency in federal political finance. First, the reporting requirements have been extended beyond parties and candidates that were covered by this 1974 statute to other entities—constituency associations, leadership contestants, nomination contestants, and third parties. I might add that this extension follows from some of the recommendations of the Royal Commission on Electoral Report and Party Financing. I was the senior research coordinator for that commission, so I am slightly biased. But sometimes it takes quite a while for the work of royal commissions to actually be implemented, and this is an example where the extended reporting that the Lortie Report recommended actually came into place some ten years later.

The second development is that some of the requirements that were instituted in the seventies have become more demanding. For example, since 2004, political parties must report on their contributions at the end of every three-month period rather than annually.

Bill C-50 fits within the pattern of developments I just sketched. First, if passed, it will extend reporting requirements, with some exceptions, to those attending most fundraising events sponsored by parties represented in the House of Commons as well as events sponsored by their leadership and nomination contestants, providing they meet certain criteria.

The bill also responds to concerns about the potential influence of people who attend fundraising events in addition to those who make political contributions. For those who do contribute, the identity is reported under the already existing requirements.

Particular concern has been expressed about the attendance of non-Canadian business leaders at certain fundraisers. I don't need to go into any more detail about that; you're aware of what I'm talking about. In light of the ban on foreign contributions to federal political entities, which I am sure most Canadians support, I share that concern. I share a concern about the attendance of foreign business leaders, and indeed, foreign interests from different sectors that happen to be business leaders who have been mentioned in some of the commentary about fundraising.

I would underline, to sum up, that political finance reporting requirements are intended not only to allow the public, the media, and others to have reasonably timely access to relevant information but also to serve a broader purpose. My colleague has referred to that as well.

(1115)



The Lortie report included the following observation: “Full disclosure of information on financial contributions and expenditures is an integral component of an electoral system that inspires public confidence.” The Minister of Democratic Institutions also drew this link when she spoke on a second reading last June 8. She stated, “Canadians have a right to know even more than they do now about political fundraising events...so that [they] can continue to have confidence in our democracy.”

I should add that what the bill will intend to do, and what the Canada Elections Act does already, needs to be situated in a broader context. We can't put all the freight on the shoulders of the Canada Elections Act. We have lobbyist registration; we have ethical codes of conduct; and we have officers of Parliament who are charged with implementing the statutes and the regulations under them, and you're hearing from two of them later today, including my former colleague Mary Dawson.

Turning to the provisions of Bill C-50, I have three brief comments. First of all, there have been questions about whether the reporting requirements should also apply to political parties in addition to the party in government. In response I would say that first of all, it's entirely possible that an opposition party becomes a governing party. That's a fundamental part of our system, and it happens all the time. In the meantime, its leaders and MPs participate in the legislative process. It is therefore legitimate to apply similar rules to the fundraising activities of opposition parties. Moreover, the political finance regulatory scheme, as set down in the 1970s and modified since, is not based on a distinction between the governing and other political parties. Rather, it requires political parties, whether they're represented in the House or not, to apply to register providing they meet certain criteria. Once they do so, the same rules, whether they're on reporting, spending, or contributions, apply to all the registered parties. There isn't a distinction between whether you're in government or sitting on the opposition side, or indeed whether you're inside or outside the House, providing you're registered.

Secondly, Bill C-50 provides that a party or other entity must publish information about a fundraiser on its website at least five days before the event takes place. This is too short. Such events are planned weeks, if not months, before they are held, and in my view the five-day period should be lengthened. If the announcement needs to be modified, for example if a minister has been invited to come and he or she cannot come at the last minute, the notice on the website can be modified. Indeed, the bill already specifically covers updates.

Finally, along with Jean-Pierre Kingsley, with whom I worked a little over 10 years ago, I find the sanction of a $1,000 fine for non-compliance too weak. The level of the sanction should send a message that the new requirements must be treated seriously.

The second part of the bill covers leadership and nomination contest expenses. As I understand it, these amendments flow from an interpretation note the Chief Electoral Officer issued in August 2015 and from his report after the election of that year. Beyond saying that it is important to align the text of the Canada Elections Act with Parliament's intent, I don't have any specific comments on that part of the bill.

(1120)

[Translation]

I will be happy to answer your questions and comments.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Seidle.[English]

We have a seven-minute round, and that includes the questions and answers. Our first questioner will be Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thank you so much. I'd like to thank the witnesses for appearing today.

I'd like to start with Monsieur Montigny. I'm wondering if you could expand your comments on why this would be detrimental to smaller parties. I know there are limitations within the legislation on smaller parties, but please expand on why, and share your thoughts on that. [Translation]

Mr. Eric Montigny:

As my colleague said, the opposition parties are actually trying to exercise power. But the burden on all the parties in terms of accountability or the number of fundraisers is quite significant. Time will tell, but the burden of the political parties may be very high.

In this context, smaller political parties, the ones with fewer resources or the least capacity for functional permanence, may have a greater burden in terms of the resources that must be allocated to accountability.

Nobody can be against transparency or electricity. That's for sure. However, and since we were talking about transparency, the bill aims to shed light on the funding of political parties.

My concern is that we are entering a dynamic where it will never be enough. We will always ask for more accountability. And the risk that organizers or activists who are acting in good faith will make mistakes will increase. I want to caution the committee about this. [English]

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I appreciate your comments, but is there the appropriate balance in this legislation? With respect, the legislation applies only to parties that have members in the House; then we're talking about only one individual member within the House who has to report.

I can understand the argument of the slippery slope, but isn't the balance achieved for other parties, if it's—? [Translation]

Mr. Eric Montigny:

There are inequalities or iniquities in terms of resources even in the parties represented in the House. It's normal in a political system. Not all parties, even if they are represented in the House, have the same degree of institutionalization, the same budgets or the same partisan bureaucracy to account for obligations.

My concern is rooted in a theory that was developed by Richard Katz and Peter Mair in the mid-1990s. It's the cartel party model.

When I analyze a bill, I wonder whether the parties represented in the House and the dominant parties in the National Assembly are introducing mechanisms in the electoral legislation that prevent new players from emerging or that make it more difficult and complicated for the development of parties that are minor now, but may become major in the future.

I hope my answer is adequate. [English]

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you.

The acting Chief Electoral Officer indicated that he thought the bill struck the right balance in terms of which fundraising events were captured. This includes limiting which parties it applies to and instituting a minimum ticket price of $200.

Do these limits seem reasonable? That question is to both witnesses.

(1125)

Dr. Leslie Seidle:

I don't have any reason to disagree with his assessment. He has a lot of experience and has good people working for him, some of whom are my former colleagues.

I might add, in response to my colleague, and disagreeing somewhat, that I think the bigger hurdle for a political party is meeting the registration requirements. They've become considerably more supple over time as the result of a Supreme Court decision. It used to be that you had to field 50 candidates in order to have your registration come into effect at a general election.

If you're able to meet the requirements for reporting under the law once you become registered, it doesn't seem to me that adding this additional reporting requirement—bearing in mind that these are small parties that are not likely to be having a fundraising event every week or so—is something we should be overly concerned about. I think the potential benefit outweighs the potential discouragement to the further advancement of that party.

Mr. Eric Montigny:

We have two different opinions. You have to decide.

The Chair:

You have a minute and a half.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

In terms of the major political parties that are represented here, and the main opposition leaders present at these events that are captured, do you think it's in the interest of the public that for those individuals their fundraising activities be captured? I’m speaking, for example, of the Leader of the Opposition and the leader of the NDP.

Dr. Leslie Seidle:

I addressed that in my comments. I think it is entirely reasonable. I don't see why you would target only the governing party.

Let's say you were in a minority situation, which we were for almost a decade. Parties go in and out of government every 18 months or so. What they do in opposition—the people they speak with and so on—can make a difference when they get into power. I might say, although no one has raised it yet, that some people ask what kind of business can you actually do at a fundraiser when people are standing around with lukewarm glasses of white wine and maybe nibbling on some cheese that is handed around or maybe sitting on a table. There are limits to the kind of business you can do. However, you can have a quiet word with somebody and it can make a difference. We're a small country, and the connections that are established, even just the visibility of someone handing over his or her business card, for example, can make a difference.

When there are foreign business interests that want to develop whether old folks residences or other projects in Canada, it is quite legitimate that Canadians should know about this. [Translation]

Mr. Eric Montigny:

This time, I agree with my colleague.

We are talking about relationships of influence, and that's where the perception of a lobbyist registry comes into play. I repeat: if we want to solve the problem at the source, we have to think about lowering contribution thresholds. I'm not saying that it should be $100, as is the case in Quebec, which is quite low.

We need to think about access from the perspective of fairness: who has the means to participate in fundraising activities as citizens? The fairness principle is fundamental in an electoral legislation, at both the federal and provincial levels, as in Quebec. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll now go to Mr. Nater. [Translation]

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Montigny, you said you were concerned that the bill would not apply during an election campaign. Could you give us the reason for that concern?

Mr. Eric Montigny:

Absolutely.

First, it's a matter of consistency. I see Bill C-50 as a first step. Clearly, people are always asking for more transparency. My concern is that the media or the general public will ask what we have to hide during an election period that we don't hide the rest of the time. People will wonder why there are two systems, one during the election campaign and another the rest of the time. Inevitably, elected officials will be asked why there are two different systems.

Of course, we could say that the pace is more frenetic during an election campaign because more events take place. The reports can be produced later; there are other obligations. Pressure will be strong on elected officials to apply the same provision as outside an election period, for the sake of consistency.

I'm trying to see two steps ahead. To use a very Quebec image, I think that Bill C-50 puts your hand in the wringer. Questions will inevitably be raised about the application of the same principles in an election campaign. We will then move to a registry like a lobbyists registry, the principle of which is to regulate relationships of influence.

I'm talking about activism today and preserving the activism link associated with campaign donations.

Does that answer your question?

(1130)

[English]

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you very much.

Dr. Seidle, you mentioned that you agree with Mr. Kingsley that the $1,000 fine isn't appropriate, that it's too low. Do you have a number in mind, or do you have a suggestion of what that should look like in terms of the fine?

Dr. Leslie Seidle:

I don't want to tread in a field where I'm not trained, which is law. I would simply say that I think it should be higher. It should remain a fine. It shouldn't be moved into criminal offences under the Canada Elections Act.

It seems to me, as with the five-day notice, that it's almost sending a signal that we have to do this stuff, but let's not make it more difficult than necessary. This is different from election expenses. This is different from reporting on contributions. On the other hand, it's not unrelated to contributions. If it's meant to be a serious step forward, then this should be communicated in the terms of the bill.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you.

You mentioned the five-day notice. We've had some discussion around this table with other witnesses about a situation in which five days' notice might be given or an event is long planned, but there's no specific speaker or attendee that would fit the bill. Then in a period of one or two days in advance of the event, the notice is amended to include the Prime Minister or a minister.

Do you have any thoughts on that provision? In a sense, it's getting around the five-day notice period by just confirming a special guest close to the date. Do you have any thoughts or concerns about that?

Dr. Leslie Seidle:

You could do that with a longer notice. Let's say you have a 15- or 30-day notice. You can amend it. In fact, the bill is quite specific. I was surprised that it got into that level of detail, but the bill provides for updates. It didn't need to do that, because anybody who's organizing an event will, of course, update the notice. People are going to websites all the time for their information. They're not waiting to get letters in the mail and all that sort of thing. Notices are going up on Facebook.

I don't think the length of the notice should be tied to the fact that senior political people often have very unpredictable schedules. That can be accommodated.

Mr. John Nater:

So you're saying that, even if the Prime Minister or a minister isn't attending, the notice should nonetheless be given publicly, even if there isn't a guarantee that there is a designated office-holder attending?

Dr. Leslie Seidle:

Yes.

Mr. John Nater:

Very good.

Another point you raised was about the reporting requirements with some exemptions. One of those exemptions is for minors. We have had the discussion around this table on where you draw the line in terms of minors. My three-year-old daughter probably doesn't need to be reported, but a 16- or 17-year-old high school student active within the party should perhaps be reported.

Do you have any thoughts on whether there should be a differentiation made or a blanket prohibition of anyone under the age of 18 being reported?

(1135)

Dr. Leslie Seidle:

Well, the age of 18 is a reasonable one. Perhaps it might be lowered a bit. I wouldn't, however, go as far as Mr. Kingsley did. I think he talked about reporting on the presence of seven-year-olds. I may be wrong. I may have got that number wrong, but I know it was a single digit. I wouldn't go any lower than 16.

Mr. John Nater:

This is very quickly for either of you.

Mr. Montigny, you mentioned this perhaps leading into a type of lobbyist registry. Do you see as a potential cost or resource challenge for Elections Canada developing an entire apparatus to deal with a registry beyond perhaps what's envisioned in Bill C-50? [Translation]

Mr. Eric Montigny:

If he hasn't already, the Chief Electoral Officer will soon ask to manage the registry himself. We're putting in place an infrastructure that may seem lessened right now, but in the future, it will become increasingly important and increasingly bureaucratized within Elections Canada. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Nater.

We'll go on to Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you, Chair.

I'd like to thank you both for your attendance today. We appreciate it.

I'd like to follow up on the five days, because it has been the focus, as Mr. Nater said, of a fair bit of discussion here. One of the things that Mr. Kingsley just kind of threw out there and I grabbed immediately, as I thought it solved one of our problems, was this issue of the notice of who's going to be there in five days. I think it was Mr. Nater who raised the possible concern that wink-wink, nudge-nudge, certain people could know who's going to be there suddenly at the last minute, and therefore the intent of the bill would be thwarted.

Mr. Kingsley threw out the suggestion, which I'd like your response to, that if you're not named on that notice effective at least five days before the event—by the way, that's also too soon, but let's just use that for now—then you can't show up. I liked it because it would immediately prevent any kind of wink-wink, nudge-nudge, and would thwart that go-around in terms of having somebody show up, supposedly as a surprise but not really as a surprise to everyone.

I'd like to hear your thoughts on just going a step further and saying that if you're one of the listed people and you're not on that list five days before, you can't go to that event.

Dr. Leslie Seidle:

I give Mr. Kingsley points for creativity on that one. On the other hand, it seems to me to be an example of...well, to put it bluntly, interference in internal political party affairs. Yes, the act already regulates lots of party affairs, but....

Then there would be easy ways of getting around it. Minister X is on the program as coming to the fundraiser. Then that person falls ill two or three days before the event. It's only reasonable that he or she be replaced by somebody else. Surely you would not bar that person from substituting for the minister who was already on the program. That would be way, way too intrusive. As to the kinds of sanctions you would have for that in the statute, I think you'd be getting into some very tricky areas.

Mr. David Christopherson:

We've run into an area where I completely disagree with your thinking—totally. Yes, it interferes, but everything we're doing here interferes in the internal business of parties. That's the whole idea. You're not supposed to have free rein to do whatever you want with whatever money you want. So I have to tell you that I disagree. I think if somebody falls ill, that's unfortunate, but a lot of unfortunate things happen. I have fundraisers in my riding. I guarantee you that my leader doesn't suddenly show up if I get ill; it's just too bad, so sad.

Remember what the offset here is. The government, through this bill, is trying to dampen access for cash. I won't get into a debate. I'll give you an opportunity to respond, if you wish, but I just want to say that I completely disagree. I think the whole idea is to interfere in the internal business of parties to ensure that their actions are not against the public interest.

I'll give you a chance to answer, if you want.

(1140)

Dr. Leslie Seidle:

We can leave it at that. I would put it on the record, though, that the point I was making was about interfering more than necessary, or interfering in an unreasonable way. But I would reiterate my point about the practicality of it, which is, I think, the more important one.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Sure.

Yes, Mr. Montigny, please jump in. [Translation]

Mr. Eric Montigny:

It's a big debate, which is raised by the exchange I just heard, whether political parties are increasingly becoming public organizations or if they are remaining private organizations.

That being said, as I said, an electoral change like the one we have before us today moves in the direction of creating a registry to regulate relationships of influence, much more than to monitor contributions associated with activism. [English]

Mr. David Christopherson:

Does this tie into your thinking about how this might end up, in your view, like the lobbying...?

You know what? I found that very interesting; I know you answered one question, but I'd appreciate you just expanding on it a little more. I'm not quite getting the slippery slope of concern that I think you're suggesting we may be getting onto. I want to understand your point, because it seems to be an important one to you. Would you please expand on it and help me understand it better? [Translation]

Mr. Eric Montigny:

The primary purpose of the Elections Act is to ensure the transparency of funding contributions, and to fundamentally support a cause based on its ideas and values, and to engage in a democratic debate related to our own values within a political party. This is the essence of a political contribution. It's a democratic right.

In my opinion, this bill prevents relationships of undue influence, which are more like lobbying. In this case, it is a question of meeting with politicians to put forward a project, and to use the political contribution to do so.

This bill applies the same reasoning as that used to regulate lobbying, but this time it will apply to political parties. It will have to be evaluated a few years after its adoption, but I am afraid that political fundraising events will be turned into influence communications events, rather than activism events. That's my central concern, because the perspective of the relationship that political parties have with their activists are being changed, as is the relationship in terms of influence communications framework.

So we're applying a registry logic that will become more and more complex over time, because we will always want more transparency. It seems to me that we are on a slippery slope that can ultimately transform the relationship that political parties have with their activists.

Does that answer your question? [English]

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, thank you. It would affect it in that they would shy away from being active, because it would give them a label. That would be your concern. [Translation]

Mr. Eric Montigny:

We've seen a drop in individual contributions in Quebec. This is less so at the federal level, but in Quebec it's now very inappropriate to contribute to a political party. So there is a negative connotation to political donations and, ultimately, it undermines democracy. If it's no longer appropriate to give money and contribute to a political party based on its values, convictions and activism, it undermines the link the party must maintain with civil society or with its activists. [English]

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you.

We've had submissions from Democracy Watch. Duff spent a fair bit of time focusing on the contribution threshold. It was his opinion that lowering that threshold—he pointed to Quebec as an example, and I think you said that might be a bit low, but I'll give you a chance to comment on that—would solve an awful lot of these problems.

You have that experience in Quebec. Could you just expand on how you think it would be so much better for our electoral system if we lowered that threshold, and again, where you think it will have an impact and why? [Translation]

Mr. Eric Montigny:

The Quebec legislation is recent. It was passed in 2012.

That said, the chair I co-lead on democracy and parliamentary institutions is currently conducting a study among the various political parties on the impact of the legislation. We are comparing the federal government to the Quebec government. There are two very contradictory aspects that arise at the same time. First, at the federal level, allocation to political parties based on the number of votes received was abolished, while Quebec went in the opposite direction. Currently, the funding of political parties in Quebec is 80% dependent on public funds, government funds. It's the opposite of what existed prior to the 2012 reform. This is a very important change, and we want to measure the impact of this situation on activism.

It's a question of balance. The fairness principle is at the heart of both the federal and Quebec legislation, as well as primacy of the voter and transparency. These are central principles. At a cost of $1,500, despite the tax credit, can we consider that all our citizens have access to fundraising activities? The question is valid. Not all of our citizens can afford it. I think we have to find a balance.

The preliminary results of the research we're conducting in Quebec show that $100 is still very little. There can be a balance, without going to extremes. However, the fundamental test is knowing whether the average voter can attend an event like this. Otherwise, it really becomes a question of “paying for access” if the price to attend an event is too steep or the majority of voters.

(1145)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you very much, gentlemen.

The Chair:

Now we'll go to Mr. Graham for seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Montigny, I have several questions for you. Earlier, you talked about including more people in opposition parties, but not in smaller parties. When should a party be more open?

Mr. Eric Montigny:

Thank you for the question.

I'll come back to the principle of cartel parties, or the cartelisation of parties, which can be found in the bills on the reform of the Elections Act. Well-established parties will put in place measures that either favour them or make it easier for them to meet these obligations under the act because they are highly institutionalized and well-established. They have significant funding, which is stable every year.

My fear—in the dynamic of the bill that will ultimately have to be assessed—about the accountability plan is that it is too important. There are political parties, for example, that are not covered by the bill, but I can give you the example of Quebec where, with contributions of only $100, it is difficult to collect individual contributions to cover audit costs.

So we must be aware that, when the burden of accountability is added to the institutional capacity of new parties or emerging parties, we need to be able to respond.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

A party isn't recognized until it has a seat in Parliament.

It seems to me that when a party has at least one seat, it should have the ability to report on attendance at a partisan event.

When a party doesn't have a seat, we can't know who attends the events. I understand your philosophical idea, but I hear things.

Mr. Eric Montigny:

I don't want to get into specific situations, but the smaller parties represented in the National Assembly, which are not caucuses, are much less institutionalized than the political parties that form the caucuses in the House. As a result, the administrative burden will be much greater for parties that are not highly institutionalized, even if they are represented in the House, than for parties that, for example, hold departmental party or first opposition party functions. [English]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Seidle, I'll go to you for a few moments. You mentioned that the system in Canada is one of the most progressive in the world for finance rules. Can you draw some comparisons to other countries and who's doing it better or worse than we are? Do you have thoughts on that?

Dr. Leslie Seidle:

I'll mention just two. Very briefly, two countries have a lot of influence on Canadian political culture.

The U.S. has essentially no spending limits at all on anything. The only spending limit that applies is when a presidential candidate agrees to accept public funding. Increasingly, over the latest campaigns, they've declined; even the Democratic candidates have declined. With the Supreme Court's decision on Citizens United about five or six years ago, the limits on contributions are even weaker than they used to be as are the limits on the reporting by what are called political action committees.

The U.S. is in no way—in no way—a valid point of reference for Canada in this area. Call me undecided.

In the U.K., only since 2000 have there been limits on party spending. Candidates were limited in 1883. But there are no contribution limits, so there are still regular donations—and I'm not making this up—of as much as one million pounds to political parties, including to the Labour Party. It's interesting that often some of these donors magically find themselves sitting on the cross-bench of the House of Lords or sometimes on the party benches of the House of Lords.

Historically, Britain has been somewhat of a reference point because, when the Barbeau committee was looking at spending limits in the 1960s, it could look to Britain where there were candidate limits and agency—the official agent concept was started in the U.K. in 1883. Britain has evolved, but there are still areas where the equity that's meant to be in a political finance regime is not present.

(1150)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You also talked a bit about which parties are affected. Any opposition party that's already in the House is affected. Do you find that appropriate, or do you believe newer parties should be affected, or should fewer parties be affected? Should anybody besides the leader and leadership candidates be affected in opposition parties, in your view?

Either of you can answer that.

Dr. Leslie Seidle:

I don't have any difficulty with the list of those who are within the umbrella in the statute as it now stands. It seems to me that the criterion of representation in the House is a reasonable one. It could have been another one. It could have been any registered party, but the drafters decided to move it up a notch, and not cover all the parties that are on the registry at Elections Canada. [Translation]

Mr. Eric Montigny:

I would add that compensation mechanisms are needed to take into account the specific reality of each party, depending on its resources, in order to meet the obligations prescribed by law. [English]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can I give the last few moments of my time to Ms. Tassi, if I have any?

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Scott Reid):

Sure. You have about a minute and a quarter.

Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Thank you.

Mr. Montigny, when you first started with your comments, you made the point that contributing to a political party is a democratic right. You know that previously we had the testimony of the co-founder of Democracy Watch, and that that has come up with respect to the hundred-dollar limit.

Can you expand on the importance of exercising this democratic right and why you feel that making a contribution is a democratic right? [Translation]

Mr. Eric Montigny:

There are many ways to contribute to public life. We can do this by offering our time, volunteering, becoming a candidate or being elected. We can also contribute by making a donation. It's a way of expressing a political position within a democracy. I would say that political parties also have a connection with their activists who are contributors.

Who is a political party accountable to? The electorate, obviously, if elected, but it is accountable, first and foremost, to its members and the laws governing it. When members don't provide the political financing, or provide less of it, it's as if the power we give to members, activists, is much less present in the distribution of a political party's internal power.

I would say that it is part of the anchoring of a political party in society. I'm not talking about large donations; I'm talking about commitment, in different forms, of activists in a healthy party life. If we cut this link or make it more difficult, I'm afraid that some political parties will no longer be representatives of civil society in government or parliamentary institutions, but will be more like representatives of the government in civil society. So I think there is a major link between them.

At the individual level, contributing to a political party and expressing one's opinion financially is a democratic right; it's not just about giving time or volunteering.

(1155)

[English]

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

And are you satisfied with the limits that we have, in terms of the $1,550? Do you think that limit is an appropriate limit? [Translation]

Mr. Eric Montigny:

I'm going to come back to the question I raised earlier.

The contribution limit in Quebec is $100; it's very low. The question we have to ask ourselves to find a fair balance is this: how does the limit respect a principle of fairness in our electoral laws with regard to voter primacy? Can average citizens in a riding easily attend a fundraising event when the cost is $1,500, despite the fact that they can get refunds or tax credits?

The question answers itself: a threshold of $1,500 is still high. [English]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Scott Reid):

Professor Seidle.

Dr. Leslie Seidle:

I would make just a quick comment on this debate about $100 versus $1,550, which I think it is at the moment. The fact that there's a ceiling doesn't mean that anyone who wants to contribute to a political party has to get near that ceiling. They can give $100 or $200. The tax credit at the lower levels is so generous that giving a $400 or $500 contribution is actually quite feasible for people who are middle class. Lots of people do it.

I don't agree with Duff Conacher, who says that you should put the limits down to $100. Political parties need money. Candidates need money. Perhaps the upper limit is too high but, and I repeat, it doesn't force anybody to dig into their bank account to contribute at that level.

This is just a final word on Duff Conacher's testimony. He mentioned at a couple of points that he finds the current regime—he wasn't referring only to the $100 contribution limit—unethical and undemocratic. I don't feel that he demonstrated that in his presentation. I know he likes to make strong statements, and he has done a lot of good work to promote the development of our democracy. But when you make statements like that, you should be able to prove them. I don't believe that the proof is there.

We have a very healthy political finance regime. People come from all over the world to meet with Elections Canada, to learn about it. People read about it, and so on. It is cited, just as our Charter of Rights is cited, and our immigration system is often cited. I go abroad a lot and attend a lot of conferences.

We can always improve. That's what you're doing here today. I think we should also be fair about what we have achieved in this area and not say that it is unethical and undemocratic. That's going way too far. [Translation]

Mr. Eric Montigny:

I want to add something very quickly about what was just said.

Indeed, the tax credit can help to reimburse the expense, but the very spirit and very reason why we were invited to appear is to discuss access in exchange for contributions. When the price of access to an event is set at the limit of contributions, or near the limit of contributions, that's when it becomes difficult for people to access politicians who are featured during a fundraising event.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Scott Reid):

Thank you. Professor Montigny, you had the last word.[English]

We're going to suspend momentarily so we can have the next witnesses take the stand.

Thank you to both of our witnesses very much.

I will now cede the chair to our chairman.

We'll just suspend for a moment.

(1200)

(1200)

The Chair:

Just before we go to the witnesses, I want to remind the committee members that we have an extra-long meeting today with an extra half-hour for witnesses at one o'clock for the Elections Ontario person. If people could try to get their amendments in by five o'clock today, then they can be distributed to committee members for Thursday's clause-by-clause.

Welcome back to the 73rd meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. We are studying Bill C-50, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act (political financing). We are pleased to have with us Mary Dawson, Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner. She is accompanied by Martine Richard, general counsel. We are also joined by Karen Shepherd, the Commissioner of Lobbying. She is accompanied by Bruce Bergen, senior counsel.

As I say to all the witnesses, you are here and prepared for Bill C-50. If someone asks you a question about something else, it's up to you whether you answer. You don't have to answer that.

First of all, we have opening statements.

Ms. Dawson, you have the floor for any opening statement you would like to make. [Translation]

Ms. Mary Dawson (Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner):

Mr. Chair and committee members, thank you for inviting me to appear before you today as part of the committee's study on Bill C-50, An Act to amend the Canada Elections Act (political financing). With me today is Martine Richard, general counsel.[English]

Bill C-50 amends the Canada Elections Act to create an advertising and reporting regime for political fundraising events attended by ministers, party leaders, or leadership contestants where the cost to participate is more than $200. The aim is to increase transparency about who is attending such events. I support the direction of this proposed legislation. As I've said on previous occasions, transparency is important for any kind of regime that touches on conflict of interest.

Bill C-50 does not amend or directly affect the regimes that I administer: the Conflict of Interest Act and the Conflict of Interest Code for Members of the House of Commons. It does, however, apply to some individuals who are subject to those regimes.

Ministers, including the Prime Minister, are reporting public office holders under the Conflict of Interest Act. Leadership contestants and party leaders who are sitting MPs would also be subject to one or both of these conflict-of-interest regimes. I welcome the move to make all party leaders and leadership contestants—and not just ministers—subject to the new advertising and reporting regime. I note, however, that Bill C-50 does not cover parliamentary secretaries, who are subject to the Conflict of Interest Act, as reporting public office holders. The committee may wish to consider that omission.

It appears that the impetus for Bill C-50 was the high level of media attention and public concern about several so-called cash-for-access or pay-to-play fundraisers that have taken place in the last two years. These are events in which a relatively small number of attendees, in return for the price of admission, gain the opportunity to meet a featured minister or party leader. The fundraisers prompted a great many calls to my office and several requests for investigations. The level of public interest in fundraisers involving federal politicians is particularly high at present; however, concerns about political fundraisers were also raised much earlier during my mandate as commissioner. The issue of political fundraising came up in three of my examination reports under the act: The Raitt Report in May 2010, The Dykstra Report in September 2010, and The Glover Report in November 2014. I also addressed the matter in my submission to the parliamentary committee that conducted the five-year review of the act which concluded in 2014.

The Conflict of Interest Act contains only one provision, section 16, that directly addresses participation in fundraising activities. Section 16 of the act reads: “No public office holder shall personally solicit funds from any person or organization if it would place the public office holder in a conflict of interest.” There's no specific mention of political fundraising in the Conflict of Interest Code for Members of the House of Commons.

This provision does not distinguish between political and charitable fundraising. Two elements must exist to establish a contravention of section 16: first, a public office holder must have personally solicited funds from a person or organization or have asked somebody else to do so; and second, it must be established that the personal solicitation would place the public office holder in a conflict of interest.

I should mention as well that one other paragraph of the act relates to political fundraising, and that's paragraph 11(2)(a), which establishes an exception to the gift rule to allow for gifts that are permitted under the Canada Elections Act. As you will recall, the gift rule prohibits public office holders and their family members from accepting a gift or other advantage that might reasonably to be seen to have been given to influence the public office holders in the exercise of a public power, duty, or function.

Other sections of the act, while not specifically about fundraising, could be triggered, but this could occur only at a later date, when a person who made a donation to attend a fundraiser seeks a particular outcome from a minister or a member of ministerial staff.

(1205)



This would not arise when the fundraiser takes place or when the stakeholder makes the required donation. For example, section 6 prohibits public office holders from making an official decision or participating in making a decision if they know or should reasonably know that, in doing so, they would be in a conflict of interest.

Under section 7, the issue is not who a public office holder may speak with at a fundraising event, but whether that person is given preferential treatment after the fact. Section 7 is problematic, however, because it's so limited in scope. It does not prohibit all preferential treatment, only preferential treatment based on the identity of the person who makes the intervention. I have always wondered why it couldn't just be preferential treatment.

Sections 8 and 9 prohibit public office holders from using insider information to improperly further or seek to improperly further a donor's private interests, and from seeking to influence a decision in order to do that.

On several occasions I have recommended strengthening the fundraising provision of the act, for example, by putting in place a more stringent rule for ministers and parliamentary secretaries. I even went so far as to say in my 2012-2013 annual report that I could support an absolute prohibition on ministers and parliamentary secretaries attending fundraising events, if the government wanted to go that far.

In The Glover Report, I recommended amending the act to include a contravention for ministers or parliamentary secretaries who knew or should have known that funds were being solicited by their staff in circumstances that would place them in a conflict of interest and who failed to take appropriate action. I've also referred on several occasions to the Prime Minister's accountability document, which has since been updated and renamed Open and Accountable Government. Some of its provisions could be added to the act.

I have suggested as well that the House of Commons consider implementing a separate code of conduct to address the political conduct of members and their staff, including political fundraising.

As amendments to the regimes that I administer are not the issue currently before the committee, I mention these recommendations only as a context and to establish my long-standing general position that fundraising rules should be tightened.

(1210)

[Translation]

The amendments to the Canada Elections Act proposed by Bill C-50 promote transparency with respect to fundraising activities.

I think it is a positive measure that would benefit our electoral process. It will also help to apply the Conflict of Interest Act more effectively. The easier access to the names and addresses of participants in these fundraising activities could be useful to the office if it has to investigate an allegation that a participant in such an activity obtained an advantage from a minister.

That ends my opening remarks. I will be pleased to answer your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Dawson.

Ms. Shepherd, the floor is yours.

Ms. Karen Shepherd (Commissioner of Lobbying, Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying):

Good afternoon, Mr. Chair and members of the committee.

I am pleased to be here today to participate in your study of Bill C-50, An Act to amend the Canada Elections Act (political financing).

I am accompanied by Bruce Bergen, senior counsel.

As Commissioner of Lobbying, my role is to administer the Lobbying Act, which makes lobbying activities transparent, and to develop and enforce the Lobbyists' Code of Conduct, which sets out standards of behaviour for lobbyists. Together, the act and the code ensure that Canadians have confidence in the integrity of decisions taken by their government.

Lobbying is a legitimate activity.[English]

Having been involved in the making of public policy for many years, I know that exposure to a range of viewpoints is essential to effective policy-making and better decision-making by governments. However, it is important that when lobbyists communicate with public office holders, they do so transparently and with high ethical standards.

My mandate, as outlined in the act, is threefold: maintain the Registry of Lobbyists, which contains and makes public the information disclosed by lobbyists; develop and implement educational programs to foster public awareness of the requirements of the Lobbying Act and the Lobbyists' Code of Conduct; and ensure compliance with the act and the code.

The Lobbyists' Code of Conduct complements the Lobbying Act in enhancing public confidence in government decision-making.

Following a two-year consultation process, a new Lobbyists' Code of Conduct came into force in December 2015. The new code addresses the issue of conflict of interest in more detail to reflect a 2009 Federal Court of Appeal decision that included the concept of apparent conflicts of interest. These new and simplified rules help lobbyists avoid placing public office holders in a real or apparent conflict of interest, specifically when they share close relationships with public office holders whom they have engaged in political activities, and when it comes to the provision of gifts to public office holders.

(1215)

[Translation]

Given the committee's current study, I would like to discuss rule 9 of the code that deals with political activities.

Some political activities could create a sense of obligation. While we live in a democratic country where both political activities and lobbying are legitimate, lobbyists must ensure that no real or apparent conflict of interest is created when these two activities intersect.[English]

The code explicitly prohibits lobbyists from lobbying members of Parliament and ministers when they have carried out political activities that could reasonably be seen to create a sense of obligation. These activities include organizing a fundraising campaign or event, writing speeches, preparing candidates for debates, and serving on the executive of an electoral district association. The rule extends to a prohibition on lobbying public office holders who work in a minister's or MP's office. By contrast, political activities such as making contributions under the Canada Elections Act, putting a sign on a lawn, being a member of an electoral district association, or attending fundraising events do not create the sense of obligation that would result in the appearance of a conflict of interest.

When the code was published, I released guidance to help lobbyists understand how I intend to apply the rules relating to conflict of interest. My guidance encourages lobbyists to ask themselves the following question when considering political activities: would a reasonable person look at my political activities and consider that they created a sense of obligation on the part of any individual seeking or holding a public office? If the answer is “yes”', then any related lobbying activities risk creating a conflict of interest for that individual and should not be undertaken. [Translation]

In summary, while I do not regulate political activities, I believe that legislation such as the Lobbying Act, the Canada Elections Act, the Conflict of Interest Act, and the codes which exist for lobbyists and members of Parliament contribute to the confidence Canadians can have in the integrity of the government's decisions.

Mr. Chair, this concludes my remarks. I am now pleased to answer any questions you or the committee members may have.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We will go to Mr. Di Iorio.

Mr. Di Iorio, you have the floor for seven minutes.

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio (Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

My question is for Ms. Dawson.

Ms. Dawson, as commissioner, do you make decisions when complaints are made to you?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Pardon? I didn't understand the question.

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

As commissioner, when a complaint is made to your office, you make a decision. Is that correct?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

I will respond to complaints if they are valid. So I respond to the person who made the complaint. If I believe there is a real problem, I conduct an investigation. [English]

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

I will ask my questions in English for the sake of brevity.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Okay.

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

When you refer to reports, are those actually decisions you had to render?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Sorry, when I refer to reports—

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

In your document, when you refer to reports, are those decisions that you rendered?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Yes. I'm not sure where I referred to it, but they're reports of either an examination or an inquiry or an annual report.

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

They are reports. You called them reports. That is the title you give them.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Yes.

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

Are those reports subject to appeal?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

They are potentially subject to judicial review on certain limited grounds, like due process.

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

Yes, so it's much more complicated than—

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Yes, you go to the Federal Court and it's a judicial review.

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

Is your office audited? Are your administrative practices, so your managerial practices, the way MPs are treated, the time to respond and everything, audited?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

We report on that, but it's not specifically audited. We have people auditing our financial management and that sort of thing.

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

Are you, as commissioner, supervised by anybody?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Do I supervise what?

(1220)

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

No, are you, as the commissioner, supervised by anybody?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Parliament.

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

Parliament. When you refer here to potential conflicts of interest, I'd like to know how you see the conflict of interest when somebody makes a donation to any of the members of Parliament here. For instance, some are not even in government, so where would the conflict of interest or the potential apparent conflict of interest be?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

I alluded to that. I have to go by the rules in my legislation, and there is no rule in the members' code. There is a rule in the act, which says that a minister is not allowed to personally solicit funds, and so I've always said it's a very limited rule in the act.

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

Who is not personally—

Ms. Mary Dawson:

The minister cannot, nor can the parliamentary secretary—a public office holder generally—solicit, personally, funds if doing so would put him or her in a conflict of interest.

Okay, that's the only rule I have.

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

Again, it doesn't answer the question, because the answer is “if” it would put him in a conflict of interest. Conflict is not assumed. It would have to be demonstrated.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Yes, that's right. There is no rule against—

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

It has to be one interest on one side and another interest on the other side, and they have to be opposing interests. You can't serve both. That's when there is a conflict.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

That's right. The conflict would be in the minister—no, I'm sorry. There is no conflict rule on that. Let me just think. I'm sorry, I've confused myself.

It's in section 16, which says no public officer shall personally solicit funds from a person if that would place the public office holder in a conflict of interest. So that would mean if he was looking for something from the person from whom he was soliciting funds.

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

Exactly.

The witness who testified before you referred to the situation in Quebec and said that in Quebec the simple fact of soliciting funds is poorly perceived. The population reacts very negatively to that.

Surely you will agree with me that this doesn't serve democracy well, that poor perception.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

No. You're right, that's why I've gone so far on occasion as to say you might want to put a rule that says ministers and parliamentary secretaries per se should not solicit funds.

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

Again, I would have thought the opposite, because this is democracy in play, and our model of democracy is one in which individuals get up and decide to go into public service. They decide to set aside their careers, to ask their families to make sacrifices, to not see their friends, and to say, I will devote myself to the public service of my country, but I need resources because I need to be known, and I'm competing with other individuals who also want to be known and want to attract attention, and I need to raise funds.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Right.

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

Where is any attention paid to that basic function of democracy?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

That's the converse argument, and it's a matter of finding a balance there. I don't advocate that they not be allowed to fund; I just say that's one way one could go. The fact of the matter is the old system that used to exist was that parties were funded to some extent. That doesn't exist any more, so there is a greater need for fundraising, and I hear your point.

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

You would agree with me that approaching an individual, a fellow citizen, and asking them whether they believe in the cause and the principles that I want to defend in the institution that represents our democracy, and, do whether they believe it so strongly that they're willing to materially support me in that, because I'm going to need material resources—

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Yes, well, the only problem is that if there's some kind of a thing that.... As I said in my introductory remarks, the problem under my act and my regime arises after the fact, usually. If you've gone somewhere and received funding directly from somebody, and they come to your office two months later and say, “Listen, I need a grant”, for something or other, that's where the problems arise. They happen with my act after the fact, but there's nothing inherently evil about soliciting funds for your political party.

(1225)

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

You agree with me, but you have individuals who come in and say that they're going to be preaching on Sunday, and they are going to mention your name and say that you're the holiest person in this country and then a thousand persons will be convinced to vote for you. That's not reported, and then they come and ask for a grant the next week.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Well, it's a matter of degree, but that's not covered in my act at the moment, so I haven't had to worry about it.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

My point is this. By adding all of these ad hoc requests, such as those that you've outlined, aren't we suffocating the access for everybody, for every regular citizen? Now we have staff and we can deal with these complex reports, but if we can't deal with this.... If somebody wants to run as an independent, what are his chances?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Well, I don't know what his chances are. Really, I'm not an expert in politics, frankly, and—

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

I'm frankly surprised to hear that. Your boss is Parliament.

The Chair:

Okay.

The time is up for this round. We'll now go to Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

I appreciate both of you taking the time to be here today. I have a couple of different questions. I'll start, though, with this. When we look at this legislation, how we arrived here, and why we're here, it all boils down to this: we have a Prime Minister who essentially was attending these events for which there was a cash-for-access type of set-up.

You mentioned, in your opening remarks, I believe, Ms. Dawson, that you've had a number of complaints about those fundraisers, so maybe I'll start this way: do you know how many complaints you've had about those activities?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Oh, gosh, I don't know. It's not a number in the thousands or anything, but I do get letters from people from time to time, or calls.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It's not in the thousands, but has it been dozens or...?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Over the last five or 10 years, you mean?

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm saying in the last couple of years.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

In the last couple of years? Oh, I don't know...maybe 20.

Mr. Blake Richards:

About 20 different complaints or in that neighbourhood? Okay. That gives us a pretty good idea.

Obviously the reason you would have received so many complaints is that this is something that I think has been pretty prevalent. This Prime Minister has put himself in these positions.

My sense is that had he followed the provisions that he has in his own “Open and Accountable Government” document, we probably wouldn't have been in a position where we would see those kinds of situations; you wouldn't have received the number of complaints you've received, and therefore, maybe, for this legislation, which is their way of trying to put themselves out of the heat they got into over that, we wouldn't even be having this conversation today.

I want to quote from that “Open and Accountable Government” document. It says: Ministers and Parliamentary Secretaries must avoid conflict of interest, the appearance of conflict of interest and situations that have the potential to involve conflicts of interest.

It also says: Ministers and Parliamentary Secretaries must ensure that political fundraising activities or considerations do not affect, or appear to affect, the exercise of their official duties or the access of individuals or organizations to government. There should be no preferential access to government, or appearance of preferential access, accorded to individuals or organizations because they have made financial contributions to politicians and political parties. There should be no singling out, or appearance of singling out, of individuals or organizations as targets of political fundraising because they have official dealings with Ministers and Parliamentary Secretaries, or their staff or departments.

I don't think the bill we have before us really does anything to prevent these types of cash-for-access fundraisers by either the Prime Minister or his cabinet ministers, but had the Prime Minister and his ministers followed the advice in their own document, “Open and Accountable Government”, would you say that we probably wouldn't be in the position where this legislation would be brought forward today, and you probably wouldn't have received the number of complaints you received? Would you say that's a fair statement?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

I'm not here to cast stones at anybody. What I am concerned about is applying my own act.

I have certainly made the suggestion that there are some aspects of the accountability guide that could go into my act, and then it would be enforced by my office. But I do not comment on other people's enforcement.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Fair enough, but from the comments you've made, obviously you're indicating that you feel that if you were able to enforce it, that would prevent some of these kinds of situations. I guess that gives us the answer to that question: that had they followed those guidelines, that would probably have prevented those kinds of things.

I'd like to ask another question that's been raised a number of times at this committee. I don't know whether or not you follow this at all, but originally my colleague Mr. Nater raised it. It's this idea of the five-day notice period. Essentially what we have now is a situation in which, with this legislation, it would be possible for the Prime Minister to decide, let's say 12 hours or a few hours before the event, that he's going to attend, even though it has been advertised otherwise. Would you say that is something that might be a kind of wink-wink situation in which everyone knows he's attending but it's not actually advertised, so therefore it limits the ability for him to be accountable? Would you say it would be best that after that notice period it's not possible for the Prime Minister or a minister or any other public office holder who is under this to just suddenly show up at the event? Should that be prevented? What are your thoughts on that?

Maybe you both have thoughts on that; I don't know.

(1230)

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Frankly, I can't comment on the policy of this proposed legislation. I think this proposed legislation is going a long way to cover some of the issues. I'm a great believer in transparency and in making things public.

Really, with respect to the details of exactly what ought to be in here, I don't think I'm here to comment on that, per se.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. I thought that's what we were discussing.

Do you have any comments, Ms. Shepherd, or thoughts on that?

Ms. Karen Shepherd:

No, I would agree with Commissioner Dawson in that I think the bill has done something in terms of improving transparency by, as I understand it, having the attendees who purchase a ticket, if it's over $200, be listed.

I have one thing for the committee's consideration. I've noticed that this focuses on the Prime Minister and ministers attending these regulated fundraising events, but it doesn't cover them during the election period. Maybe something for consideration is the fact that the Prime Minister and the ministers maintain their status during an election period, so if there is some reason the committee has thought of for having those types of events regulated, then maybe that's something for consideration.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. Thank you for that.

With regard to the idea I spoke to already—cash for access—under the act you are responsible for now, is that something that is supposed to be regulated, so that you shouldn't be seeing cash-for-access types of fundraisers?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

It's only regulated if there is a conflict of interest situation.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It is if there is a conflict of interest. Okay.

The Chair:

That's your time.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That's really time?

The Chair:

You're having fun.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, both, for your attendance today. I appreciate it.

In addition to having a debate about the minutiae of the bill, one of the things that have cropped up during these hearings is whether or not we're just tinkering around the edges and making any real change versus making a realistic, dramatic change. We've had people come in and make the case that we're not even dealing with the real issue. One of the real issues we ought to be looking at is the contribution threshold itself. That's come up a number of times.

As someone who is a fan of what former Prime Minister Chrétien did in terms of bringing in the public election financing—which I thought, next to keeping us out of Iraq, was his best move as a prime minister—I was heartbroken in the last Parliament when we saw it completely removed. I leave that for you to comment on as I'm asking you to paint a picture of the larger issue. But on the contribution of $1,550, is that part of our problem or not, in your opinion? There have been those who have come in and said that what we should be doing federally is more like what they're doing in Quebec. It's down around $100, and it makes it easier for everybody to pay, and then a lot of these other issues go away. That's the argument. There are others who say, “No, up to $1,550 for a middle-class person is a reasonable amount”, and then we have to bring in all these checks and balances.

What are your thoughts on those two approaches to this? It keeps coming up as we're going through this.

Thank you.

(1235)

Ms. Mary Dawson:

I don't think Canada is doing too badly in comparison with other jurisdictions in having $1,500. The various limits are all over the board. It struck me that $1,500 wasn't terrible. It doesn't trouble me. I reiterate that it's too bad there isn't a general funding of the various parties, but there it is.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Ms. Shepherd.

Ms. Karen Shepherd:

I don't have an opinion either in terms of the amount. I think that is up to Parliament to decide. My concern is with regulating the lobbyists.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's fair enough. I wanted to give you an equal opportunity to make a comment.

The issue of covering parliamentary secretaries has come up before, and you have commented on that, Ms. Dawson. It has also come up, though, especially for those of us who have been ministers and understand what the decision-making process is that you go through. In that regard, your parliamentary secretaries have great influence, but also your chiefs of staff have incredible influence. Senior policy advisers have, again, up to or perhaps exceeding that level of influence. None of that is mentioned here.

Ms. Dawson, you mentioned you would like to see parliamentary secretaries included. Would you be good enough to comment on that a little further? Do you also think it advisable for us to take a look at expanding that to chiefs of staff and senior policy advisers, etc.?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

I mused about actually adding the senior policy advisers into that group when I mentioned parliamentary secretaries, but there is a logical problem there. They are part of the political process, but they are not the politician who is getting elected, so I'm not sure they are sufficiently close to it.

I recognize, though, that those people are probably more heavily lobbied in some cases than are ministers or parliamentary secretaries themselves. We need to have very good rules generally around stakeholders going to those people. I'm not sure it should be done through the Elections Act. However, I did kind of muse about those people, and wondered whether I should say anything about them.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you.

Ms. Shepherd

Ms. Karen Shepherd:

I have nothing.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Again, I just want to make sure you always have an opportunity.

How's my time, Mr. Chair?

The Chair:

You have almost three minutes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

The five days—and again to Mr. Nater, who raised this—in and of itself has raised a couple of issues. One is that there's nothing that prohibits anyone who's not on that list five days before from suddenly showing up. The whole idea is to be transparent about things, and one of the concerns raised was that even though you're not on the list, you could still show up, and the word could be put out that the Minister of Finance is coming or the Prime Minister is going to swing by—wink wink, nudge nudge—and you want to make sure you get down there.

We're getting into the minutiae of the bill, and I'll accept it if you say that I'm getting too far into the weeds and that it's not my domain. I get that. However, this is where we are, and this is what we're dealing with.

We can argue that the five days is too long, and that will come up again, but one of the solutions that's been suggested is that if you're not on that list five days before, you just plain can't go to the event. It's been brought up that somebody could get sick three days before, and it would make sense that you could substitute for them.

Well, let me tell you, in the world of power politics there is a world of difference—and no offence to anyone—between having booked the minister of culture who is now sick, and, by the way, the Minister of Finance can make it.

What are your thoughts on that?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

I don't know. I think you're right. You're into the technical details. There's a loophole there. The question is how far you go to fill a loophole. I can't say any more.

Mr. David Christopherson:

We sort of have to stay at 30,000 feet to make sure you are relevant to our discussion.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

I haven't studied this bill in great detail. I have been quite busy lately. I have focused on how my act relates to it. Certainly, it's an excellent direction that it's going in.

(1240)

Mr. David Christopherson:

Do you see this as a big deal or a little deal? You say it's going in the right direction. Is it a substantive step? Is it a baby step? How would you characterize the bill itself in terms of the issues you are concerned with, and how it meets some of those concerns?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

It goes quite a good way, I think, because it puts things in the public domain. It allows me to have access to some information if I'm dealing with some kind of a problem. I use the lobbying register a lot for that purpose as well. There are interfaces in all of these public reports, so I think it's a good initiative.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay. Good.

Thanks. [Translation]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Christopherson.

Ms. Sahota, you have the floor. [English]

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

I'll carry on from what you were speaking about.

You mentioned in your introduction and again just now that your main role is to make sure that everyone is following the Conflict of Interest Act. You were saying that Bill C-50 is a small piece of legislation. There are a whole bunch of different regulations and other things that the minister is hoping to bring forward as well.

How much does this small piece of legislation, which is trying to create a little bit more transparency, actually help you to do your job in the administration of the Conflict of Interest Act?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Where this comes up for me more often is after the fact. It's not whether they attended the fundraiser or not. If somebody comes in looking for something from them two months later, that's when it's very useful for me to know what their connection is with that person and whether that person has given them money. My main fundraising provision is quite deficient basically. It's the relationship between the minister or whoever and the person who's provided funding when that person is looking for special treatment of one sort or another.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

That's probably a large portion of the types of complaints and allegations you investigate when you look at what is being traded and where the conflict exists. Now you can put together the two pieces and find out if there truly was some interaction that may have led to that.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

That's right. It's one check to see what the relationship is with that person.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It's a good step forward, then?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

That's right.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

Previously, the witnesses who were before us mentioned—and you mentioned—that this act could potentially cover other people. Chiefs of staff were mentioned, and PSs were just mentioned by you. Our previous witness mentioned that covering the leaders of opposition parties is a good idea because, especially when we're in minority governments, we're often having a swing back and forth every 18 months, and you don't know who is going to hold power in the very near future.

Do you think it should extend to critics, the shadow cabinet, as well? How far should this go?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

I think it's probably gone where it should go.

I like the leaders idea, because it makes some sort of a fair balance between the two sides, so to speak.

I don't know how far down it should go.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

You gave some testimony in which you said you had thought about the idea of it applying to all PSs, ministers, and maybe all parliamentarians—not doing these types of events. I heard that, but then you kind of said, “Well, I'm not sure about that thought; it's just something that's crossed my mind.”

I think back to the testimony we had just prior to yours. Because of how we function in our democracy—the way it is set up, practically speaking—parties do need to raise funds. It's not just parties; it's us as individual members. Parliamentary secretaries and ministers, when I think about it, are responsible for their own ridings, not just for their political cabinet portfolios. They're responsible for their own ridings, and they have to raise funds for their riding associations in order to even become an MP. You can't be in cabinet if you're not an MP, right?

Going to that fundamental level, I feel that at some point we're trying to solve some problems. As the previous witness said before that, there may be some perverse consequences that we may end up facing if we take this too far. How are they supposed to do their civic duty, to take leadership and run in a campaign, if they're a cabinet minister, but they can't raise funds in their own riding for their own riding association?

(1245)

Ms. Mary Dawson:

That's a traditional problem, because the ministers have two roles.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

How do we create balance? How do we make sure that they can become an MP again and thus be a cabinet minister regardless of—

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Under my legislation, I have to look at the distinction sometimes as to whether they're acting as a member or as a minister. That makes a difference in some of the decisions I have to make.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

As far as this legislation goes with regard to listing the people in attendance, you're more easily able to connect the dots as to whether this is a constituent who really has nothing to do with the minister's portfolio whatsoever and is just doing a small fundraiser for his or her own riding or a lobbyist or someone with a great interest in the minister's portfolio. Do you agree?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

It all comes down to the facts that you're faced with in a particular situation.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

A couple of meetings ago a suggestion was made that this should also apply to people under 18. The witness went so far as to suggest that minors who were seven or eight years old should be listed as having been brought to a political party. I think that could inhibit the ability of a parent to perhaps be civically active and attend a fundraiser if they have parental duties at the same time and perhaps need to take their children with them to one of the events. They may hesitate in the future to go to that event because they don't want their children, who have no real desire to be there or no political motivation to be there, listed on these lists. Do you think 18 is the right age for this legislation to hit, or do you think it should be older or younger?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Eighteen is quite a common cut-off. I think that's as good a cut-off as any.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

Do I have any more minutes?

The Chair:

You have ten seconds.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Quickly, you mentioned that there had been various complaints in the last two years. How many complaints were there in the previous administration, if you have some kind of idea, because I see that you've listed various reports here that you had to undertake because of conflict of interest rules broken by previous ministers, and you had to go through full investigations. Where there not numerous complaints at that time as well?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

When I said 20, I was probably overspeaking the amount. More often, we'd get letters that weren't actual complaints; they were just griping. That was more common than an actual request of any kind. We either get requests to investigate something, or if there's nothing to investigate under the act—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

And this happens throughout many administrations?

The Chair:

That's time. Thank you.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

It got more attention of late, but as I said, I've had cases involving these kinds of issues since way back.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll now go to Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to both of the commissioners for joining us this afternoon.

I'll begin by thanking both of you for your service in your positions. I know, Ms. Dawson, you're over a decade in your position, and, Ms. Shepherd, over eight years. I want to thank you for that. I know you've both accepted multiple reappointments on a temporary basis. I thank you as well for that.

With both your terms coming to an end, has either of you been consulted on the process for your replacements?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

No, I haven't.

Ms. Karen Shepherd:

I'm aware that PCO is running the process, but it's in their hands.

Mr. John Nater:

There's been no consultation with either of you on the process. Okay, thank you.

Have those reappointments for shorter periods of time affected your ability to undertake studies within both of your jurisdictions, given that you don't know exactly how long your terms may extend, with regard to ongoing studies you may be undertaking?

(1250)

Ms. Mary Dawson:

No, I go on as usual.

Ms. Karen Shepherd:

It's the same answer. The fact is, there is a director of investigations, a high degree of professional staff, and legal counsel sitting with me. Things will continue after I'm gone. No, it hasn't stopped anything.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you.

The Open and Accountable Government document has been cited a couple of times, the Prime Minister's document. You made mention, Ms. Dawson, that you don't enforce that. You don't have the jurisdiction to enforce that.

If Parliament were to call on you to enforce that, would your office be in the position to undertake that?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

We probably would. There may be some parts of it that don't belong in an act like mine, but there are certainly significant sections in there that could go into my act.

I was delighted to see that guide. It came out as a result of one of my reports, I think, in which I said there were some gaps. At least there was an accountability guide established, so some of those rules in there are.... A very important one, for example, is about monitoring what your staff is doing, the issue that you can't set something up directly but have your staff do it. There shouldn't be those sorts of gaps.

So there are parts of it that could go into my act; that is what I've said.

Mr. John Nater:

The issue of staff is certainly a topic that's come up a number of times. I know Mr. Christopherson has made mention of that as well, and I think it's worthwhile.

I want to ask Ms. Shepherd a question as well.

One of our previous witnesses expressed concerns that this type of legislation would almost create a duplicate lobbyist registry, or a registry similar to a lobbyist registry, in the sense that Elections Canada is now going to be keeping a registry of basically any participants in political fundraisers.

Coming from the lobbyist side of things, do you see some concerns with that type of direction that may happen at Elections Canada, about having almost a second registry for political participants at events?

Ms. Karen Shepherd:

To be honest, I'm not sure about the duplication of the list. What I'm aware of, when I look at the particulars of this bill, is the fact that anyone who purchased a ticket for which the fee was $200 would be listed. At least, from my point of view, it would be another tool that my investigators would use in looking at whether the act or the code had been breached.

Mr. John Nater:

I should point out that, even though neither of your jurisdictions—for lack of a better word—is directly touched by this legislation, it would be something you would make use of in conducting an investigation, whether from a conflict of interest or a lobbyist standpoint. It is an information tool.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Yes, it's useful.

Ms. Karen Shepherd:

It would be useful.

The Chair:

You have finished.

Mr. John Nater:

Yes.

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota, I understand you're going to share with Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes.

I just want to go back into the last bit, and then I'll hand it over to my colleague here.

Because your presentation at the beginning looked at these specific reports, I was wondering if you could shed some more light. I'm not that familiar with the Raitt, Dykstra, and Glover reports. How do those relate to where we should be going with this legislation?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

I think none of those reports fit within section 16, so all three of them were found not to have contravened.

With respect to the questions that were raised, the staff had done some things in one of them that the minister didn't know about, so she wasn't personally involved and she hadn't directed them to do the things, so she wasn't caught—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Are you talking about the taking of gifts?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

No, it had to do with fundraising.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

All three of those had to do with fundraising.

In another one, it was alleged that somebody had been given by Rogers the use of its facilities to have a party but, in fact, they had paid the normal going price. Quite often, when you look into these investigations, you find there's a rationale behind them.

What was the third one?

(1255)

Ms. Karen Shepherd:

It was Glover.

Ms. Mary Dawson:

With that one, again her staff had organized something. It was awful. They had the whole heritage community in Winnipeg being invited to a thing. She had been invited to go to this house and hadn't been told who had been invited. That was her riding association that did that, so there are other people who can organize things.

If there was a rule, for example, in my act that said, “You have to watch what your guys are doing", it might have made a difference. That's all.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay. I'm going to pass it over to my colleague, because she has a few questions to ask as well.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you.

Ms. Shepherd, I have two questions for you.

First off, in all these things, you're trying to find the balance, so you want to try to make sure that what you're coming through with is fair and reasonable and, at the same time, improving the current situation, right? Do you feel that Bill C-50 hits the right balance in terms of opening up events to media and allowing lobbyists to attend by ensuring that their names are recorded? In terms of the requirements, as they apply to lobbyists, do you feel the legislation is fair and has the right balance?

Ms. Karen Shepherd:

I'm not regulating the political activities. I'm regulating whether.... As per the lobbyist code of conduct, which has a rule for lobbyists, as I said it in my opening remarks, I would be encouraging lobbyists to always ask themselves whether performing political activities will create a sense of obligation if they later lobby a particular individual.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay. I know the answer to this question, but I want the answer on the record. Under media questioning, Andrew Scheer stated that, unlike the Prime Minister, he's not a public office holder. I would just like you to confirm today that all MPs, including Mr. Scheer, are designated public office holders. Can you confirm that?

Ms. Karen Shepherd:

Every elected official in both Houses of Parliament is a public office holder.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you.

Ms. Karen Shepherd:

In fact, they're designated public office holders.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you.

Ms. Dawson, you have a great amount of experience in this area. I'm wondering about the $200 amount, anything over $200. We know we've done that so it lines up with respect to disclosing under the Canada Elections Act, but do you think that the just over $200 amount is the right amount for Bill C-50? Do you think we got that amount right in terms of the requirement?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Again, you know, it's a standard amount that's used. You may or may not have noticed in the code that we have the gift reporting, for example, down from $500 to $200. It seems to be a standard amount that's quite broadly accepted.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

So you're satisfied with that.

With respect to transparency, you have said that you believe that this will help increase transparency and will also assist you with respect to your overseeing and implementing the Conflict of Interest Act. Then you also said that it would be helpful now so that when a conflict of interest allegation comes up, you'd now, through this legislation, have the ability to go back and access lists.

What would you do if you didn't have that list? What sort of groundwork would you have to do if the list were not there for you?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

I would check the lobbying registry. The group that I look after is a lot broader than lobbying. They are all stakeholders. You don't have to be lobbyists to be caught by these kinds of rules. I would just do what I could to find out. I use whatever is available. The people who register under my act, the people who are disclosing information, disclose lots of information to me, too, but sometimes I won't know about something.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I don't think it's an understatement to say that this legislation would help you significantly in terms of the research that you would have to do, because you'd have one place where you could go to find out who was there, and that would help you tremendously in terms of your investigation and the resources that you currently have to use to do that due diligence. Is that correct?

Ms. Mary Dawson:

Yes, and I wouldn't have access in some cases. I wouldn't be able to find a way of finding out. It would be a standard tool that we would use.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you for coming. We know you both have great experience. We also appreciate your public service for the last many years. I think it's been exemplary. We'll just suspend for a couple of minutes while our next witness comes.

(1255)

(1300)

The Chair:

Once again, welcome back to the 73rd meeting of the Standing Committee of Procedure and House Affairs on our study of Bill C-50, an Act to amend the Canada Elections Act (political financing).

We are pleased to have with us Greg Essensa, Chief Electoral Officer of Ontario.

Thank you for being here. You are probably our witness in most demand, so we are delighted that we could finally get you here. There are lots of questions about the good work that's been done in Ontario. I think we're all looking forward to hearing from you. You have some time for opening comments, if you'd like, and then we'll go around to some questions.

Mr. Greg Essensa (Chief Electoral Officer, Elections Ontario):

I would like to begin by thanking the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs for inviting me to provide my observations on Bill C-50, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act with respect to political financing. I welcome the chance to offer my insights and advice on the electoral process to you. When I provide comments to a committee of the House of Commons, I am very aware that I am addressing Canada's lawmakers.

Today, I would like to briefly address these topics: one, creating a fair and level playing field; two, Ontario's election finance system; and three, the provisions of this bill.

The first observation I'd like to make is on the importance of maintaining a fair and level playing field. All political actors require financial resources, and money is an essential element in politics. Chief electoral officers of Canada, from the past and present, speak of the special role parties play in the democratic process. They also speak of the need to strike the right balance in creating a funding formula that sustains parties but does not unfairly enrich them or, conversely, leave them beholden to any one contribution source.

The concept of the level playing field is central to our democracy. It is also a unifying principle of election administration; it ties together the voting process and the campaign process. This is how it ties them together. Election outcomes are supposed to reflect the genuine will of the people. Political finance rules are supposed to ensure that parties have equal opportunity to raise and spend funds to advance their message and win votes. Electoral outcomes should not be distorted because of unequal opportunities to influence the electorate.

Academics and judges have written about this at length. As an election administrator, I see that it boils down to one fundamental proposition: All who enter the electoral arena should be treated equally. The debate, then, becomes what rules are rational, necessary, and practical to have in place. In other words, we need to strike the right balance between transparency and participation in the electoral process.

I would now like to provide some insight into Ontario's election finance regime.

Last year, while Ontario was undergoing significant electoral reform, I was asked and agreed to serve as an adviser to the Standing Committee on General Government. As the Chief Electoral Officer, I am an independent officer of the Legislative Assembly. My mandate includes overseeing the registration and financial reporting requirements of all parties and candidates, not just those represented in the Legislative Assembly. You might say that I am the referee, and I referee the rules of the political game in provincial elections. I saw my role as helping ensure there was a level playing field on which all compete.

Ontario took an extensive process in consulting the public. Throughout my time as an adviser, I had the opportunity to travel the province and listen to deputants speak about the relationship between money and politics. I also appeared three times in front of the committee to provide my thoughts on the provisions in the bill.

In following the debate on the bill prior to the consultation process, it was evident that there was a strong desire to reform campaign finances and to put an end to what was termed “cash for access”. Ontario made significant reforms to contribution limits.

The first was a ban on corporate and trade union donations. Only individuals who are residents of Ontario can now make contributions to political parties, constituency associations, candidate campaigns, leadership contestants, and nomination contestants.

The second significant change was the amount an individual could contribute annually to political parties. Prior to the amendments, individuals could contribute up to $9,975 annually, and up to an additional $9,975 for each campaign period. This meant that, in a year when we had two by-elections, contributors were able to contribute up to $29,925 to a party.

Under the bill now, the contribution limit is $1,200 annually to a political party, $1,200 annually to constituency associations and nomination contestants, and $1,200 annually to a leadership contestant, totalling an annual contribution limit of $3,600. No extra amount over the annual limit is allowed, regardless of the number of campaigns.

The next area I would like to address is annual allowances.

Earlier in my remarks, I observed the need to strike the right balance in creating a funding formula that sustains parties but does not unfairly enrich them or leave them beholden to any one contribution source. To that end, Ontario introduced a unique system by providing quarterly allowances to support the activities of political parties and constituency associations. Funding formulas have been developed to determine how much each party or constituency association receives.

(1305)



While I strongly believe that private and public funding support to political parties is essential, I do not advocate for one model over another, but believe that a funding formula that balances public and private funding is an important component of our democratic system.

Another significant amendment was to fundraising events themselves. Similar to the provisions in Bill C-50, Ontario introduced similar reporting requirements for fundraising events. Parties are also required to inform the public on their website at least seven days in advance that a fundraising event is being held.

Attendance at fundraising events, though, has been significantly reformed in Ontario. Many political actors are now prohibited from attending fundraising events. These range from leaders of registered parties, MPPs, to staff members in the leader's office. As you can see, Ontario has taken a strong approach to amending the election finance system.

What I will put forward for the consideration of this committee, when you are reviewing and amending provisions related to election finance laws, concerns the risk of unintended consequences. Let me give you an example.

While Ontario was amending its fundraising requirements, prohibiting party leaders, MPPs, and nomination contestants from attending fundraising events, they did not make any exceptions for events such as annual general meetings, policy conferences, and similar events. I believe the new fundraising requirements were originally intended to restrict attendance at large fundraising dinners and other such events. However, because of the wording of the act, I believe an unintended consequence of the attendance restrictions applied to party meetings like annual general meetings, for which delegate fees included a contribution portion. I thus wrote to all three party leaders recommending that the Election Finances Act be amended at the earliest opportunity to specifically exempt such events.

I do not believe the attendance provisions were meant to restrict leaders and MPPs from attending events where party policy and party platforms were being debated and decided upon. Generally, I was supportive of most of these changes and found this level of reform appropriate.

I will now turn my attention to the provisions of Bill C-50. In reviewing the provisions of this bill and other bills related to elections, I always ask myself whether the changes protect the integrity of the electoral process, preserves fairness, and promotes transparency.

I have reviewed this bill closely and offer the following observations. The provisions in Bill C-50 are not as strict as those of Ontario's current election finance system. Yet, there are many positive aspects of this bill. I do believe this bill achieves greater transparency by making fundraising events public and adding requirements to report to the Chief Electoral Officer.

I would suggest that the committee, in deliberating these provisions, apply the principle of consistency when regulating political actors. The way the legislation is written, many of these fundraising provisions apply only to leaders, interim leaders, or leadership contestants. I believe it would be an oversight to not give consideration to, for example, members of Parliament or high-ranking political staffers, such as chiefs of staff, when it comes to attendance at fundraising events. Many of them have a level of influence that is important to recognize. Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley also raised this when he presented to you on this bill, and I concur with his rationale.

As the committee continues to debate this legislation and additional changes to election finances, I once again remind you to closely examine all provisions of the bill to ensure that unintended consequences do not arise.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the committee for inviting me to speak and offer my perspectives as Chief Electoral Officer of Ontario. I applaud the work this committee is doing on electoral reform and I would be happy to answer any questions you might have.

(1310)

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll go for the first round to Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you for your presentation and for being here today. We look forward to the responses that you're going to give us and the insights, because you come with a great background and experience, having gone through this in Ontario.

I like how you talked about making sure there's a level playing field and you referred to yourself as a referee, because I think that's appropriate. The key, really, is the balance or the transparency and participation. Do you think Bill C-50 gets it right in that regard?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

I think there are many elements of the bill and provisions that provide much greater transparency, which I'm very supportive of. Having events being publicized five days in advance, I think, provides greater transparency. Reporting who has attended those events to the Chief Electoral Officer and having that information publicized, again promotes greater transparency.

The one area that I would suggest for consideration to enhance the bill would be to provide those same requirements during the electoral event period. That is when Canadians are truly turning their minds toward who they are wishing to choose as their elected representative. I think that for true transparency in the electoral system and our democracy, those types of events during the electoral process should be promoted as well and identified to Elections Canada so it can make the events transparent with regard to when they occurred and who attended.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

You're not the first to say that. I note that point with interest.

I suppose when you're looking at a minister, for example, as was mentioned in the previous testimony that was given, essentially they're still in that office although we're in an election. I think the idea there is that in fact they're not carrying out that work. That's why during that period it's suspended. However, we will take note of that input and evidence.

From what I understand, you're going so far as to say that you believe Ontario got it right in applying it to all MPs. Are you suggesting, then, that consideration be given to it being not only fundraising events that have ministers but also fundraising events that hit the $200 mark, or over $200, with any MP? Am I hearing that correctly?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

That would be my testimony, my recommendation. I would base this on some statistical facts that I brought for the committee's consideration.

We have just completed the third quarter of 2017, and we've now done a review of the first three quarters of 2016 versus 2017 from a fundraising perspective. In quarter one, the political parties in the House were down 80% from 2016 to 2017. In quarter two, they were down 30%. In quarter three, they were up 18%. Clearly there is a trend that the political parties, in the machinations of how the political operatives are working, have found a way to reform their fundraising tactics and events such that they still enrich them to the same degree. Yes, it has taken some time. It has taken the first two quarters. However, they certainly now are above or on par with where they were for the third quarter of 2016.

(1315)

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

It's not really a matter of trying to circumvent the rules or to work a way around the rules so that you get back to a certain level. Really what we're trying to achieve here is having things open and transparent, so if you are at an event and you have access to someone who's in a position, such as a minister, that is recorded.

You don't think it's going beyond. You think it is actually....

My concern is not so much that the end game is that MPs are able to figure out how to get back to those levels. My goal would be what is more appropriate in striking the balance to ensure that you have transparency and that you have participation, not that you're creating work to go beyond where you need to be going.

Mr. Greg Essensa:

From my perspective, Ontario has created the right balance. We need to go through a complete electoral cycle to do a complete assessment of that, but I sat on the committee and travelled the province and listened to the concerns that Ontarians raised throughout the deliberations, and there was a greater than average number of deputants who came forward with great concerns about cash for access and were looking for the political body to address those concerns.

We still need to do some further research. After the 2018 electoral cycle and going through one cycle with these reforms, there will be an opportunity for me to report back to the legislative assembly on any other recommendations I might see, based on the outcome of the last three years.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Mr. Chair, how much time do I have?

The Chair:

You have just under two minutes.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay. I'll pass the floor to Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I have a question. In terms of what my colleague Ms. Tassi just said about circumventing the rules, I'm thinking that people have access to me as an MP all the time. I make sure that I go back to my riding as much as possible, throughout our riding weeks, and on most Fridays, and anyone who wants an appointment with me can have one. I rarely say no to anybody. Who's to say they can't write me up a cheque after having an hour-long discussion with me about whatever issue and then donate later on?

Isn't the purpose of these financing and fundraising rules to connect the dots and to figure out who might be gaining advantages from giving donations, rather than just the fact that you can't be in a room with an MP, period, or an MPP in this case, or a minister? To make maybe the Ethics Commissioner's job simpler and to be able to connect those dots, you're not necessarily doing that by just preventing MPs from showing up at these events. What you want to catch is whether there is anything inappropriate happening.

Fundraising, in and of itself, is not a bad activity.

Mr. Greg Essensa:

I would not disagree with your last statement. I have been a big believer and I articulated three times before the committee in Ontario that I am a big supporter of a balance between private and public funding. I would by no means suggest that we should eliminate the opportunity for political parties, candidates, or political actors to raise funds by those means, but there needs to be a balance.

With respect to your transparency comments, I would suggest that although the political arena has been fraught with some implications of improprieties, I don't believe they are actually there. Among the general populace, what I heard consistently across the province is that there is a perception of there being cash for access events at which wealthy donors get the opportunity to engage with parliamentarians, political actors, and operatives, and that their interests are being far more pushed forward because of that undue influence, because of the money they can bring to the table.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Sahota.

Mr. Nater.

(1320)

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Mr. Essensa, for joining us this afternoon. It's always intriguing to hear from different jurisdictions. I appreciate this.

I want to follow up about the process that was undertaken by the provincial legislature. I was intrigued by the role you played. It sounded as though you were actively involved in the drafting of the legislation and as an expert adviser to the committee on general government.

Was it a conscious decision by the provincial government that the Chief Electoral Officer would be engaged throughout the process of drafting this legislation?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

I was approached by the Attorney General to consider whether I would sit on the committee. I established a set of parameters under which I would consider it, as an adviser. As an independent officer of the legislature, I was there simply to advise the committee on what deputants had put forward and on how those things might be operationalized or what administrative role Elections Ontario might play with regard to some of those suggestions.

I was not involved necessarily in the drafting of the legislation. I was consulted during the deliberation process again, appearing a couple of times to provide insight and recommendations.

It was a conscious decision on my part, because as I indicated in my comments to the committee, I saw Ontario as being at a watershed moment at which we had the opportunity to reform the political financing regime in Ontario in a significant manner, which had not been undertaken, quite honestly, in 40 years. I felt it was time to see that.

Mr. John Nater:

You commented briefly on public and private funding for political actors. One challenge, I think—and I would like you to shed some light on it—concerns how public funding is made available to individual riding associations through Ontario's regime.

Mr. Greg Essensa:

Ontario undertook a unique process—my understanding is it's the only process in the country—whereby every quarter constituency associations divvy up $6,250 based on the previous election's results. If party A received 40% of the vote, it will receive 40% of the funding. There was also a provision that required those constituency associations to be in compliance with Elections Ontario for the four previous years.

I can tell you that this has created greater transparency in Ontario. One of the challenges I have as the Chief Electoral Officer—and I'm sure many of you have encountered this—is that when a particular political party has had a long stretch of success in a riding, the other constituency associations are oftentimes challenged to get their required reporting in to electoral management bodies.

In Ontario, the case was no different. This requirement, though, for providing the funding has provided greater transparency, because many if not all of those constituency associations have worked devilishly hard to make sure they're in compliance now. There is thus in fact greater transparency in that regard.

Mr. John Nater:

Currently, ministers, the premier, and MPPs are all forbidden from attending fundraising activities. That ban currently doesn't apply, if I understand correctly, to nominated candidates, and I understand that the legislature is considering amendments to include nominated candidates as well.

Is this something that you support also, to include nominated candidates; for example, to include a PC candidate in a Conservative stronghold such as Hamilton Centre in the act, yet not include someone such as the chief of staff to the Minister of Finance. Is that something you support?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

I do support that, because, as the provision is worded in our act, candidates can be nominated by their party but are not considered registered candidates until they register with Elections Ontario. There is thus a gap period. This means that you can be the nominated candidate and attend these fundraising events because you have not been the “registered candidate”. I therefore support the proposed amendment in that regard.

Mr. John Nater:

You support keeping the exclusion for chiefs of staff?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

That's correct.

Mr. John Nater:

What's your reasoning on that?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

I'm sorry?

Mr. John Nater:

Why don't you support including the chief of staff to the Minister of Finance, for example?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

Oh, chiefs of staff to ministers, yes, I do support that; for non-ministers, I don't.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you.

Could you maybe shed some light on some of the activities that were happening that led to the creation of this legislation? What was going on in Ontario at the time that caused the legislature to go ahead with this type of financing?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

I believe the genesis of this was really several media articles that dominated the newspapers in Toronto and other parts of Ontario, which identified the current government as having what were deemed cash for access events. There would be private dinners with substantive amounts of money to gain entry. There might be only 20 or 30 people, and the dinners might be with perhaps the Minister of Finance, the Premier, or other influential individuals. There were a number of articles throughout Ontario during that time frame last spring, March and April, and the government at that point deemed it necessary to address that, which resulted in the creation of Bill 2 and the committee travelling the province to hear from Ontarians.

(1325)

Mr. John Nater:

If my memory is correct, there seems to have been also an unofficial quota—or perhaps an official quota—from the Premier's office to each minister to raise a certain amount. Are you familiar with that?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

I'm only familiar with it through what was reported in the newspapers.

Mr. John Nater:

Going forward, there would still be nothing preventing the party leadership from encouraging each riding association, each fundraising wing, to raise money, just with the provision that ministers couldn't directly attend but their surrogates could, right?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

There's nothing in the act that would prevent that.

Mr. John Nater:

You mentioned the seven-day notice required provincially. Federally, a five-day notice is proposed. So I have two questions on that. One is whether you think that's reasonable. Second—and those on this side have raised this multiple times—in a situation in which a long-standing event is organized but at the outset there is no attendance of a designated office-holder, no attendance necessarily of a prime minister or of a minister, and there might be a wink-wink, nudge-nudge, but then that person is added a day or two or a matter of hours before the event is actually held, and perhaps there was general knowledge that the person would be there. Do you see that as a loophole, or do you see some way that the act ought to be changed to address that?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

I would suggest that the last part might be difficult to enforce and difficult to actually adopt from a practical standpoint. I believe that someone as busy as the Prime Minister or the Premier of Ontario or any other large jurisdiction may in fact, because of the nature of their schedules, have last-minute alterations that allow them to attend such events. I think it would be difficult to enforce from an electoral management body perspective, and I'm not necessarily sure of the public nature of best practice for having that in place.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Our last questioner is Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks very much, Mr. Chair. It's always a blast from the past to be talking about Ontario, where I spent 13 happy years.

Thank you so much for coming. Obviously, Ontario often provides a lot of guidance on these issues, being the largest province in the Confederation.

I just want to revisit your comment about public financing and how you believe there should be a balance. Do you think Ontario has the right balance? Could I have your thoughts on that and any thoughts on the federal..., which would have to be.... I don't think I'm being unfair when I characterize it as being.... Well, I'll just leave it at that, and you can comment on the federal side of things as you see fit.

Mr. Greg Essensa:

As I stated many times in my appearances in Ontario and I have stated here, I am a believer in a balance between public and private financing. There are many models, and prior to my appearance here, I reviewed the models of some of the other individuals who appeared here. Mr. Conacher was one, and he advocated for the Quebec model.

I am aware of other jurisdictions, based on my 32 years in the electoral business. New York City has a matching grants program. There are another couple of jurisdictions in the United States that have matching grants programs. I don't advocate for one over the other, from a public policy perspective. I do advocate very strongly, though, that no public financing model should unduly enrich the political parties and/or candidates. At best, it should be revenue neutral, from my perspective.

Mr. David Christopherson:

How would you approach that?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

That is based on the fact that, for a number of years, electoral management bodies, Elections Ontario and Elections Canada, have a great number of historical records and information based on fundraising activities and on the amounts that both candidates and political parties have raised over the years and have spent. We have all kinds of statistics to show what the average political party has spent on a campaign in Ontario over the last 10 to 15 years. There can be some fairly easy analysis done on that to ensure that, whatever model you put in place, it does not unduly enrich political actors.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It's interesting. Just to be fair-minded, in the past regime, most of the political parties were within the boundaries you are suggesting, with the exception of one significant party. I'm not going to name it, but the story goes that basically they didn't have to do any fundraising because that just covered everything they needed, and I would suspect that it starts to enter into the domain that you're suggesting is an unfair enrichment. This is what I meant by my first question.

Let's just say, for the sake of argument, that there is one party that benefits for a whole host of reasons, and yet it works fine on balance for everyone else. How do you go about trying to get a system that would be fair for everyone when the dynamic of one party is such that it's just going to be almost impossible? Do you kind of live with that?

I'm asking because, in my opinion, you could say that the regime we had federally before was fair-minded for most of the players—it struck that balance that you've talked of and most of us feel comfortable with—but not that one. You are never really going to find a regime that would bring that in in the same way just because of the dynamics of the party and the way they approached federalism.

Have you any further thoughts? Do you still live with it if you say that we have 80% of the players covered, and the 20% we'll just have to live with? Is there a mitigating factor I'm not thinking of? Could I just have your thoughts, sir?

(1330)

Mr. Greg Essensa:

I would recommend to the committee that, in addition to the provisions that are currently in the bill, political financing is something that I as Chief Electoral Officer believe should be reviewed on a consistent basis, and there should be a committee to examine, as you just suggested, whether there is a public financing regime that is unduly enriching one political party.

There should be some analysis done after every election. Unfortunately, at times in this country, as I've noted looking at various jurisdictions, we tend to take a very long-term approach to electoral reform, and it can be campaign finance reform. As I indicated, in Ontario it had been many decades since we had significant reform. I think that is a mistake.

We should have a more regularized process enshrined in the statute whereby we would have an analysis done after every election, every five years, no different from what we do with other components of our society. We have the census every 10 years. It is automatic. For electoral reform, we should have something similar at both the federal and provincial levels.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I hope I'm not putting words in your mouth, but that would prevent things from getting worse, bad, terrible, horrible, with public scandals, and then wholesale change again. Rather than that, we could do it on a regular basis to stay on top of the thing.

Mr. Greg Essensa:

As I indicated in my opening comments, the law of unintended consequences is something we have seen in Ontario. I have already written once to the legislature about that based on the reforms they put in place at the end of 2016. I suspect I will write again after our 2018 general election, after what I have seen.

Quite honestly, the electoral process is at the heart of our democracy. It is something that parliamentarians should look at on a regular basis.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you.

As I've grown to expect, the contribution of the public service in Ontario is fantastic, and you showed that again today. Thanks so much.

Thanks, Chair. I'm good.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Thank you very much for coming.

I have two quick things for the committee. When we're doing clause-by-clause, I assume it's okay if we have the officials here, as is normal, in case we have any questions.

Second, could each party bring their suggestions for our study on parent-friendly, women with babies..., for the end of Thursday's meeting so we can—

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Chair, parents with babies are parents of any gender.

The Chair:

I mean parents of any gender. We'll start planning at the next meeting.

Thank you. It was a good meeting, everyone. Thanks.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Bienvenue à la 73e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Pour cette séance publique, nous allons poursuivre notre étude du projet de loi C-50, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada en ce qui concerne le financement politique.

Pendant la première heure, nous allons entendre Eric Montigny, professeur au Département de science politique de l'Université Laval, et Leslie Seidle, directeur de recherche à l'Institut de recherche en politiques publiques.

Merci à vous deux d'être ici. Vous aurez chacun 10 minutes pour faire votre déclaration liminaire, puis nous aurons des questions concernant le projet de loi C-50. Étant donné vos vastes connaissances, si on vous pose une question sur un autre sujet, c'est à vous de décider si vous souhaitez y répondre.

Merci, nous allons commencer avec M. Montigny. [Français]

M. Eric Montigny (professeur, Département de science politique, Université Laval, à titre personnel):

Bonjour.

Je remercie le Comité de m'avoir invité à témoigner.

Ma dernière comparution a eu lieu dans le cadre d'une consultation sur la réforme électorale et le mode de scrutin. J'espère que cette fois-ci les travaux seront plus concluants.

En guise de première remarque, je dirais que la contribution à un parti demeure un exercice démocratique fondamental, voire un droit démocratique fondamental. Dans un système politique, donner de l'argent à un parti est une forme d'expression politique au même titre que le militantisme. C'est le premier élément qu'il faut garder à l'esprit. C'est aussi une façon de soutenir une cause, un courant politique et, de façon générale, de soutenir la démocratie.

La contribution à un parti politique est aussi un moyen pour les partis politiques et les élus de conserver un lien avec la société civile. C'est aussi une façon de dynamiser la base militante d'un parti politique ou d'avoir des objectifs à cet égard.

Il n'est donc pas banal de réfléchir à cela et de se questionner sur les modifications à la Loi électorale du Canada en matière de financement politique. J'ajouterais qu'il est fondamental de se questionner sur le rôle d'encadrement que l'État doit jouer en matière de financement politique. Mes commentaires et mon analyse du projet de loi C-50 vont dans ce sens.

Les règles de financement des partis sont à la base d'un régime démocratique. Nous devons être conscients que le projet de loi C-50 peut avoir des effets sur l'équilibre des forces politiques et sur l'entrée de nouveaux joueurs au sein d'un système partisan. C'est le cas lorsqu'on touche, de près ou de loin, aux règles de financement politique.

L'État a un rôle certain en matière de responsabilité quant à la transparence et à l'équité entre les électeurs. C'est le rôle que doit jouer l'État en matière d'encadrement des partis politiques et de leur financement.

Au fil des ans, le Canada a su mettre au point un modèle distinct de celui utilisé aux États-Unis. Au coeur de ce modèle, on trouve la primauté de l'électeur. C'est un principe fondamental de la Loi électorale du Canada depuis quelques années.

Si on analyse de façon plus détaillée le projet de loi C-50, on constate qu'il respecte les principes de transparence et de primauté de l'électeur; il ne remet pas en question ces principes. Dans les faits, il va accroître la transparence, mais il ne réglera pas les problèmes structurels qui ont été soulevés dans le débat politique, dont ceux liés à l'équité et à la confiance, qu'il vise pourtant à régler.

De façon générale, quels objectifs le projet de loi C-50 vise-t-il? D'abord, il vise à lutter contre une certaine forme de cynisme, bien entendu en réaction à des critiques soulevées quant à l'accès aux élus en fonction de contributions politiques. Il vise à éviter que la contribution à un parti politique soit perçue comme un accès privilégié à un politicien et que seule une partie de la population plus fortunée ait cet accès.

En quoi le projet de loi C-50 répond-il à ces objectifs? D'abord, il faut se rappeler que, comme la plupart des projets de loi en matière de réglementation électorale, celui-ci découle d'une polémique médiatique. La création d'un registre des activités de financement géré par les partis qui découlera de ce projet de loi sera sans doute, à terme, géré par le directeur général des élections.

L'une des conséquences importantes de ce projet de loi dès son adoption est qu'il mènera à une logique de registre des lobbyistes. C'est un effet structurel qui doit être débattu et auquel il faut réfléchir. Autrement dit, le projet de loi va créer une dynamique qui s'apparente à un registre des lobbyistes.

Dans un système de financement démocratique, la provenance des dons, bien sûr, doit être publique. Le projet de loi C-50 va plus loin lorsqu'il demande de publier dans un registre, cinq jours à l'avance, les activités de financement et, par la suite, les participants. C'est une dynamique politique ou une dynamique de transparence qui s'apparente davantage à la divulgation préalable des activités d'influence qu'à des activités de militantisme.

(1105)



Dans la même veine, le projet de loi pourrait avoir des effets pervers sur la dynamique politique. Dans un premier temps, un tel processus sera beaucoup plus difficile à gérer pour les plus petits partis que pour les partis fortement institutionnalisés, qui disposent d'une bureaucratie partisane bien établie pour gérer la reddition de comptes. C'est le premier élément.

De plus, le projet de loi va accroître les risques d'infraction, de pénalité et de blâme pour les partis politiques, compte tenu de la multiplicité de leurs activités de financement. Il risquera aussi de décourager certains militants de contribuer à des partis politiques. C'est du moins ma crainte. Cela vient confirmer la perception que c'est suspect de contribuer à un parti politique, alors que dans les faits, comme je le rappelais d'entrée de jeu, contribuer à un parti politique est un exercice démocratique et de militantisme. Même si, dans sa forme actuelle, le projet de loi prévoit des exclusions en période électorale, la dynamique politique risque de faire en sorte que ces exclusions seront remises en question.

Revenons aux objectifs du projet de loi. Si on veut réduire le cynisme et démontrer que la perception de l'accès aux élus en échange de contributions est erronée, je crois qu'il faut réfléchir davantage à l'abaissement des seuils de contribution. Il faut réduire les seuils de contribution annuelle à un parti politique. Il faut aussi réfléchir au rétablissement d'une forme d'allocation étatique.

Concernant l'autre aspect qui porte sur l'encadrement des courses à l'investiture et à la direction, le projet de loi donne suite à des recommandations du directeur général des élections de comptabiliser l'ensemble des dépenses. C'est lui qui est le mieux placé pour établir la terminologie juridique appropriée en vue d'atteindre ces objectifs.

En ce qui me concerne, le questionnement qui découle de l'analyse du projet de loi porte sur deux éléments. Pourquoi ne pas étendre ses dispositions à l'élection de tous les officiers nationaux d'un parti? On sait qu'il y a des campagnes à l'élection à la présidence et à différents postes d'exécutifs nationaux d'un parti, qui sont somme toute des postes prestigieux.

Pourquoi ne pas revoir aussi les dons anonymes? On sait que la loi canadienne est beaucoup plus tolérante que celle d'autres instances, notamment du Québec.

En conclusion, votre comité réalise un travail essentiel pour la démocratie. Lorsqu'on étudie les questions de financement des partis politiques, on fait plus qu'étudier un projet de loi. On étudie l'équilibre des forces politiques dans un Parlement, mais aussi dans la société civile. Modifier les règles de financement, c'est intervenir dans ce qui constitue le nerf de la guerre en politique, soit le financement.

Il importe d'évaluer les effets positifs tout comme les effets potentiellement négatifs des modifications. Je crains que le projet de loi C-50 ne transforme la perception de ce qu'est un don politique qui, à mon avis, doit être associé à du militantisme politique et non à un geste d'influence, en adaptant ou en intégrant une dynamique propre au registre des lobbyistes.

Je vous remercie de m'avoir écouté.

(1110)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Traduction]

Monsieur Leslie Seidle, vous avez 10 minutes pour votre déclaration préliminaire avant que nous entamions une série de questions. [Français]

M. Leslie Seidle (directeur de recherche, Institut de recherche en politiques publiques, à titre personnel):

Monsieur le président, merci de m'avoir invité à participer à votre examen du projet de loi C-50.[Traduction]

Ma présentation comportera deux volets. D'abord, je vais formuler quelques observations générales sur l'objet du projet de loi, qui visent notamment à situer les modifications dans le contexte de l'évolution de la réglementation du financement politique aux termes de la Loi électorale du Canada, puis je formulerai quelques commentaires sur certaines dispositions du projet de loi.

Le cadre de réglementation du Canada pour les élections et le financement politique est considéré, à juste titre, comme l'un des plus progressistes au monde. Il repose sur un certain nombre de principes, dont la transparence. Comme c'est le cas pour d'autres parties de la Loi électorale du Canada, les moyens de faire progresser les principes pertinents ont évolué au fil du temps. Les avancées se sont produites en réaction à un scandale, ou à tout le moins en réponse à des craintes quant au risque que des intérêts bien nantis exercent une influence indue sur le processus politique et législatif fédéral. Nous pouvons penser, par exemple, au scandale du Pacifique de 1872, de même qu'à l'affaire Rivard et à la polémique connexe quant à l'irrégularité du financement du parti sous le gouvernement Pearson, au milieu des années 1960.

En réponse au premier cas, le scandale du Pacifique, le Parlement a introduit une exigence au titre de la Loi des élections fédérales de 1874 selon laquelle les candidats étaient tenus de déclarer leurs réponses électorales. Toutefois, faute de sanctions ou d'organe d'application, la disposition est restée lettre morte.

En réponse aux polémiques des années 1960 et de la pression exercée sur les partis politiques en matière de financement des campagnes électorales, le gouvernement Pearson a constitué le Comité des dépenses électorales en 1964. On le désigne souvent comme la Commission Barbeau. Des portions importantes du rapport ont été mises en application dans la révolutionnaire Loi sur les dépenses d'élection de 1974.

Au fil du temps, deux choses se sont produites pour renforcer la transparence du financement politique à l'échelon fédéral. D'abord, les obligations en matière de production de rapports ont été étendues au-delà des partis et des candidats pour couvrir d'autres entités — associations de circonscription, candidats à la direction, candidats à l'investiture et tierces parties. J'ajouterais que cette expansion découle de certaines recommandations de la Commission royale sur la réforme électorale et le financement des partis. J'étais coordinateur principal de la recherche pour la Commission, alors je ne suis pas tout à fait impartial. Mais parfois, il faut beaucoup de temps avant que les travaux des commissions royales soient réellement mis en oeuvre, et le présent exemple en est un où il a fallu une dizaine d'années avant que les obligations étendues en matière de production de rapports recommandés dans le rapport Lortie entrent en vigueur.

Puis, certaines obligations instaurées dans les années 1970 sont devenues plus contraignantes. Par exemple, depuis 2004, les partis politiques doivent déclarer les contributions qu'ils reçoivent tous les trois mois, plutôt qu'une fois par année.

Le projet de loi C-50 s'inscrit tout à fait dans l'optique que je viens de décrire. Premièrement, s'il est adopté, il étendra les obligations de production de rapports, à quelques exceptions près, aux personnes qui assistent à la plupart des activités de financement parrainées par les partis représentés à la Chambre des communes, de même que par leur direction et par les candidats à l'investiture, pourvu qu'ils répondent à certains critères.

Le projet de loi répond à des préoccupations concernant l'influence potentielle de personnes qui assistent à des activités de financement, mais qui ne font pas de contribution politique. Bien entendu, l'identité des personnes qui versent des contributions est déclarée par l'entremise des exigences actuelles.

Certains s'inquiètent plus particulièrement de la présence de chefs d'entreprises non canadiennes à certaines activités de financement. Je n'ai pas besoin d'entrer dans les détails; vous savez de quoi je parle. Je partage cette inquiétude étant donné que les contributions étrangères aux entités politiques fédérales sont interdites, ce que presque tous les Canadiens appuient, j'en suis persuadé. Je m'inquiète de la présence de chefs d'entreprises étrangers et, en effet, des intérêts étrangers venant de différents secteurs qui se trouvent à être des chefs d'entreprises qui ont été mentionnés dans certains des commentaires au sujet des campagnes de financement.

Pour résumer, j'insisterais sur le fait que les exigences politiques en matière de production de rapports financiers visent non seulement à permettre au public, aux médias et à d'autres d'accéder en temps opportun à des renseignements pertinents, mais visent aussi un objectif plus vaste. Mon collègue y a fait référence également.

(1115)



Le rapport Lortie comporte l'observation suivante: « La confiance du public dans l'intégrité du système électoral passe par la divulgation complète des dépenses et des dons électoraux. » La ministre des Institutions démocratiques a elle aussi fait ce lien lors de son discours en deuxième lecture le 8 juin 2017: « Les Canadiens ont le droit d'en savoir plus sur les activités de financement politique [...] de façon à maintenir [leur] confiance envers notre démocratie. »

J'ajouterais que ce que le projet de loi vise à faire, et ce que la Loi électorale du Canada fait déjà, doivent être situés dans un contexte plus large. Nous ne pouvons pas tout imputer à la Loi électorale du Canada. Nous avons des règles relatives à l'enregistrement des lobbyistes; nous avons un code d'éthique; et nous avons des agents du Parlement qui sont chargés d'appliquer les lois et les règlements d'application, et deux d'entre eux témoigneront devant vous aujourd'hui, y compris mon ancienne collègue Mary Dawson.

J'aimerais maintenant formuler trois brefs commentaires sur les dispositions du projet de loi C-50. Avant tout, certains se demandent pourquoi les obligations de production de rapports devraient s'appliquer aux partis politiques qui ne forment pas le gouvernement. En guise de réponse, je dirais que, tout d'abord, il est tout à fait possible qu'un parti de l'opposition devienne le parti au pouvoir. Il s'agit d'un aspect fondamental de notre système, et cela arrive tout le temps. Entretemps, son chef et les députés qui en font partie participent au processus législatif. Il est donc légitime d'appliquer des règles semblables pour les activités de financement des partis de l'opposition. De plus, le système de réglementation du financement politique, tel qu'il a été établi en 1970 et modifié depuis, ne repose pas sur une distinction entre le parti au pouvoir et les autres partis politiques. Il énonce plutôt les conditions à respecter pour que les partis politiques, qu'ils représentent la Chambre ou non, soient reconnus, pourvu qu'ils respectent certains critères. Lorsque c'est fait, les mêmes obligations s'appliquent à tous les partis reconnus, que ce soit en matière de production de rapports, de dépenses ou de contribution. Que vous fassiez partie du gouvernement ou que vous siégiez du côté de l'opposition ou même que vous soyez à l'intérieur ou à l'extérieur de la Chambre, il n'y a aucune distinction, pourvu que vous soyez enregistrés.

Ensuite, le projet de loi C-50 prévoit que le parti ou l'autre entité doit publier sur son site Web de l'information sur une activité de financement au moins cinq jours avant la tenue de l'événement. Selon moi, cette période est trop courte. La planification de ces événements se fait des semaines, voire des mois, à l'avance. J'estime qu'il faut prolonger la période. Si des modifications doivent être apportées à l'annonce, par exemple, si on invite un ou une ministre, et qu'il ou elle ne peut pas venir à la dernière minute, il est possible de modifier le site Web. De fait, le projet de loi prévoit même les mises à jour.

Enfin, tout comme Jean-Pierre Kingsley, avec qui j'ai travaillé durant un peu plus de 10 ans, j'estime que l'amende de 1 000 $ en cas de non-respect est insuffisante. Le niveau de la sanction devrait envoyer un message clair: les nouvelles obligations doivent être prises au sérieux.

La deuxième partie du projet de loi porte sur les dépenses de campagnes à la direction et les dépenses de campagnes d'investiture. D'après ce que je comprends, ces modifications résultent d'une note d'interprétation publiée par le directeur général des élections en août 2015 et d'une recommandation contenue dans son rapport publié après les élections générales de 2015. Je n'ai pas de commentaire particulier à formuler sur cette partie du projet de loi. Je me contenterai de dire qu'il est important que le libellé reflète l'intention de la Loi.

(1120)

[Français]

C'est avec plaisir que je répondrai à vos questions et à vos commentaires.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Seidle.[Traduction]

Vous disposez de sept minutes, et cela inclut les questions et les réponses. Le premier intervenant sera M. Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup. J'aimerais remercier les témoins qui comparaissent aujourd'hui.

Je vais commencer par m'adresser à M. Montigny. J'aimerais savoir si vous pouvez en dire un peu plus quant à la raison pour laquelle le projet de loi nuirait aux petits partis. Je sais que le projet de loi comporte des restrictions quant aux petits partis, mais j'aimerais que vous expliquiez pourquoi et que vous nous fassiez part de votre opinion sur le sujet. [Français]

M. Eric Montigny:

Comme le disait mon collègue, les partis de l'opposition visent effectivement à exercer le pouvoir. Cependant, la charge qui est imposée à tous les partis en matière de reddition de comptes ou de nombre d'activités de financement est assez importante. On pourra le voir à l'usage, mais le fardeau des partis politiques risque d'être très élevé.

Dans ce contexte, les plus petits partis politiques, ceux qui ont moins de ressources ou ceux qui sont les moins dotés en matière de permanence fonctionnelle risquent d'avoir un fardeau plus important relativement aux ressources qui doivent être allouées à la reddition de comptes.

Personne ne peut être contre la transparence ou contre l'électricité. C'est certain. Cela étant dit, et puisqu'on parlait de transparence, le projet de loi vise à faire la lumière sur le financement des partis politiques.

Ma préoccupation, c'est qu'on entre dans une dynamique où ce ne sera jamais assez. On va toujours demander plus de reddition de comptes. De plus, le risque que les organisateurs ou les militants qui sont de bonne foi commettent des erreurs s'accentuera. Je mets le Comité en garde à cet égard. [Traduction]

M. Chris Bittle:

Je vous remercie de vos commentaires, mais y a-t-il un équilibre approprié dans ce projet de loi? Sauf le respect que je vous dois, le projet de loi ne s'applique qu'aux partis qui sont représentés par des députés à la Chambre; puis nous parlons d'un seul député à la Chambre qui doit produire des rapports.

Je peux comprendre l'argument de la pente glissante, mais l'équilibre n'est pas atteint pour les autres partis si... [Français]

M. Eric Montigny:

Même dans les partis représentés à la Chambre, il y a des inégalités ou des iniquités sur le plan des ressources. C'est normal dans un système politique. Les partis n'ont pas tous, même s'ils sont représentés à la Chambre, le même degré d'institutionnalisation, les mêmes budgets ni la même bureaucratie partisane pour rendre compte des obligations.

Ma préoccupation est ancrée dans une théorie qui a été mise au point par Richard Katz et Peter Mair au milieu des années 1990. Il s'agit du modèle du parti cartel.

Quand j'analyse un projet de loi, je me demande si les partis représentés à la Chambre et les partis dominants à l'Assemblée nationale introduisent, dans les législations électorales, des mécanismes qui empêchent les nouveaux joueurs d'émerger ou de rendre plus difficile et plus complexe le développement de partis qui sont mineurs actuellement, mais qui pourraient devenir majeurs à l'avenir.

J'espère que ma réponse est adéquate. [Traduction]

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci.

Le directeur général des élections par intérim a dit que le projet de loi assurait le juste équilibre en ce qui a trait aux activités de financement qui ont été visées. Il s'agit notamment de restreindre les partis auxquels cela s'applique et d'établir le prix minimal du billet à 200 $.

Ces limites semblent-elles raisonnables? La question s'adresse aux deux témoins.

(1125)

M. Leslie Seidle:

Je n'ai aucune raison de contester son commentaire. Il a beaucoup d'expérience, et il travaille avec des personnes compétentes, dont certaines sont d'anciens collègues.

J'ajouterais, pour répondre à mon collègue et le contredire plus ou moins, que je pense que le plus grand obstacle que doit surmonter un parti politique est le respect des exigences en matière d'enregistrement. Avec le temps, elles sont devenues considérablement plus souples en raison d'une décision de la Cour suprême. Auparavant, vous deviez présenter 50 candidats pour que votre enregistrement entre en vigueur à l'occasion d'une élection générale.

Si vous êtes capable de satisfaire aux exigences en matière de production de rapports prévus par la loi une fois que vous êtes enregistré, je ne pense pas que l'ajout de cette obligation supplémentaire en matière de production de rapports — si on garde à l'esprit que ce sont de petits partis qui n'organisent probablement pas d'activités de financement toutes les semaines ou à peu près  — soit quelque chose dont nous devrions nous inquiéter outre mesure. Je pense que l'avantage potentiel compense la possibilité de dissuader ce parti de faire de la promotion.

M. Eric Montigny:

Nous avons deux opinions différentes. Vous devez faire un choix.

Le président:

Vous avez une minute et demie.

M. Chris Bittle:

En ce qui concerne les principaux partis politiques qui sont représentés ici, et les principaux chefs de l'opposition présents à ces activités qui ont été visées, croyez-vous qu'il est dans l'intérêt du public que les activités de financement de ces personnes soient assujetties aux dispositions? Je parle du chef de l'opposition et du chef du NPD, par exemple.

M. Leslie Seidle:

J'ai répondu à la question dans mes commentaires. Je pense que c'est entièrement raisonnable. Je ne vois pas pourquoi on ciblerait uniquement le parti au pouvoir.

Disons que vous êtes en situation minoritaire, ce qui était notre cas pendant près de 10 ans. Les partis entrent au gouvernement et en sortent environ tous les 18 mois. Ce qui se fait à l'opposition — les personnes avec qui ils parlent et ainsi de suite — peut avoir une incidence lorsqu'ils prennent le pouvoir. J'ajouterais, même si personne n'en a encore parlé que certains se demandent quel type d'affaires on peut réellement brasser lors d'une activité de financement alors que les gens restent plantés là avec leur verre de vin blanc tiède et qu'ils grignotent peut-être du fromage sur un plateau ou encore qu'ils sont assis à une table. Il y a des limites quant au type d'affaires que vous pouvez traiter. Toutefois, vous pouvez discuter discrètement avec quelqu'un, et cela peut avoir une incidence. Nous sommes un petit pays, et les liens qui s'établissent... le simple fait que quelqu'un remette sa carte professionnelle, par exemple, peut changer les choses.

Lorsque des entreprises étrangères souhaitent mettre sur pied des résidences pour personnes âgées ou réaliser d'autres projets au Canada, il est très légitime que les Canadiens en soient informés. [Français]

M. Eric Montigny:

Cette fois-ci, je suis d'accord avec mon collègue.

Nous parlons de relations d'influence, et c'est là que la perception d'un registre de lobbyistes entre en jeu. Je le répète: si nous voulons régler le problème à la source, il faut réfléchir à l'abaissement des seuils de contribution. Je ne dis pas ici qu'il faudrait fixer ce seuil à 100 $, comme ce qui existe au Québec et qui est assez bas.

Il faut réfléchir à l'accès sous l'angle de l'équité: qui a les moyens de participer à des activités de financement comme citoyens? Le principe d'équité est fondamental dans une loi électorale, tant au niveau fédéral que provincial, comme au Québec. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant entendre M. Nater. [Français]

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Montigny, vous avez dit être préoccupé du fait que le projet de loi ne s'appliquerait pas pendant une campagne électorale. Pouvez-vous nous donner la raison de cette préoccupation?

M. Eric Montigny:

Tout à fait.

C'est d'abord une question de cohérence. Je vois le projet de loi C-50 comme une première étape. C'est clair, les gens demandent toujours davantage de transparence. Mon inquiétude, c'est que les médias ou la population en général va demander ce qu'on a à cacher en période électorale qu'on ne cache pas le reste du temps. On va se demander pourquoi il y a deux systèmes, un en campagne électorale et un autre le reste du temps. Inévitablement, on va demander aux élus pourquoi il y a deux régimes différents.

Bien sûr, on pourrait dire qu'en campagne électorale le rythme est plus effréné parce que plus d'activités ont lieu. Les rapports pourront être produits plus tard, il y a d'autres obligations. La pression sera forte sur les élus pour appliquer, dans un but de cohérence, la même disposition que celle prévue hors période électorale.

J'essaie de voir deux coups d'avance. Pour employer une image très québécoise, je pense que le projet de loi C-50 vous met la main dans le tordeur. Inévitablement, il va soulever des questions sur l'application des mêmes principes en campagne électorale. On se dirigera alors vers un registre comparable à un registre des lobbyistes, dont le principe est d'encadrer les relations d'influence.

Je vous parle aujourd'hui de militantisme et de préserver le lien de militantisme qui est associé à un don électoral.

Est-ce que cela répond à votre question?

(1130)

[Traduction]

M. John Nater:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Seidle, vous avez dit être d'accord avec la déclaration de M. Kingsley selon laquelle l'amende de 1 000 $ est insuffisante, que ce n'est pas assez. Aviez-vous un montant en tête, ou avez-vous une idée de ce à quoi devrait ressembler l'amende?

M. Leslie Seidle:

Je ne veux pas aborder un domaine pour lequel je ne suis pas formé, soit le droit. Je dirais simplement qu'elle devrait être plus élevée. Cela doit rester une amende. Il ne faut pas l'assimiler à une infraction criminelle en vertu de la Loi électorale du Canada.

Comme pour le préavis de cinq jours, il me semble que cela envoie le message selon lequel nous devons faire ce genre de choses, mais nous ne voulons pas les rendre plus difficiles que nécessaire. La situation est différente en ce qui concerne les dépenses électorales. C'est différent de la production de rapports au sujet des contributions. En revanche, ce n'est pas sans rapport avec les contributions. Si l'intention est de faire un grand pas en avant, cela doit être indiqué dans les dispositions du projet de loi.

M. John Nater:

Merci.

Vous avez parlé du préavis de cinq jours. Nous avons discuté avec d'autres témoins ici des cas où le préavis de cinq jours pouvait être donné ou de ceux où des événements sont prévus depuis longtemps, mais aucun intervenant ni participant ne serait assujetti aux dispositions du projet de loi. Puis un jour ou deux avant l'activité, l'avis est modifié pour y inclure la présence du premier ministre ou d'un ministre.

Avez-vous des commentaires au sujet de cette disposition? Dans un sens, on contourne la période d'avis de cinq jours simplement en confirmant la présence d'un invité spécial près de la date de l'activité. Avez-vous des réflexions ou des préoccupations à cet égard?

M. Leslie Seidle:

La même chose pourrait se faire avec un préavis plus long. Disons que vous avez un avis de 15 ou 30 jours. Vous pouvez le modifier. De fait, le projet de loi est assez spécifique. J'étais surpris de voir qu'il abordait ce genre de détails, mais le projet de loi prévoit des mises à jour. Ce n'était pas nécessaire, puisque quiconque organise une activité va, bien évidemment, mettre à jour l'avis. Les gens vont constamment sur les sites Web pour obtenir des renseignements. Ils n'attendent pas d'obtenir des lettres par la poste ni ce genre de choses. Les avis sont publiés sur Facebook.

Je ne pense pas que la période de préavis devrait être liée au fait que les politiciens de haut rang ont souvent des horaires très imprévisibles. On peut s'adapter.

M. John Nater:

Donc, ce que vous dites, c'est que même si le premier ministre ou un ministre n'assiste pas à l'événement, l'avis devrait néanmoins être rendu public, même si rien ne garantit la présence d'un titulaire de charge désigné?

M. Leslie Seidle:

Oui.

M. John Nater:

Très bien.

Un autre point que vous avez soulevé concernait les obligations en matière de production de rapports assorties de certaines exceptions. L'une de ces exceptions vise les mineurs. Nous avons discuté autour de cette table afin de déterminer où tracer la ligne en ce qui a trait aux mineurs. Ma fille âgée de trois ans n'a probablement pas besoin de produire de rapport, mais un étudiant âgé de 16 ou 17 ans qui est actif au sein du parti devrait peut-être le faire.

Avez-vous des réflexions quant à la question de savoir s'il devrait y avoir une distinction ou une interdiction générale de production de rapports pour les personnes de moins de 18 ans?

(1135)

M. Leslie Seidle:

Bien, 18 ans est un âge raisonnable. Peut-être qu'on pourrait réduire un peu l'âge. Toutefois, je n'irais pas aussi loin que M. Kingsley. Je pense qu'il parlait de produire des rapports au sujet de la présence d'un enfant de sept ans. J'ai peut-être tort. Peut-être que je me trompe en ce qui concerne l'âge, mais c'était moins de 10 ans. Je n'irais pas plus bas que 16 ans.

M. John Nater:

Voici une petite question pour vous deux.

Monsieur Montigny, vous avez mentionné que cela pourrait possiblement mener à un type de registre des lobbyistes. Pensez-vous que cela pourrait grever les fonds ou les ressources d'Élections Canada au moment de mettre sur pied un mécanisme complet pour gérer un registre qui dépasserait peut-être ce qui est prévu dans le projet de loi C-50? [Français]

M. Eric Montigny:

Sous peu, si ce n'est déjà fait, le directeur général des élections va demander de gérer lui-même le registre. On met en place une infrastructure qui peut paraître réduite au moment où on se parle, mais à l'avenir, ce sera appelé à devenir de plus en plus important et de plus en plus bureaucratisé au sein d'Élections Canada. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Nater.

Nous allons maintenant écouter M. Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais vous remercier tous les deux de votre présence. Nous l'apprécions.

J'aimerais reprendre avec la période de cinq jours, puisque nous en avons beaucoup discuté, comme l'a dit M. Nater. L'un des points qu'a soulevés M. Kingsley et qui a capté immédiatement mon attention, car je pense qu'il permettrait de résoudre l'un de nos problèmes, c'était la question de la période de cinq jours pour l'avis concernant les présences. Je pense que c'est M. Nater qui a soulevé un problème éventuel selon lequel, soit dit entre nous, certaines personnes pourraient savoir à l'avance qui se présentera à la toute dernière minute, de sorte que l'intention du projet de loi serait contrecarrée.

J'aimerais connaître votre point de vue au sujet de la suggestion qu'a lancée M. Kingsley, soit que, si votre nom n'apparaît pas sur l'avis au moins cinq jours avant l'activité — soit dit en passant, c'est encore trop tôt, mais prenons cela comme exemple pour le moment —, vous ne pouvez pas vous présenter. J'aime l'idée, puisque cela permettrait d'éviter, sans tarder, tout type de connivence, et viendrait contrecarrer les projets de ceux qui se plaisent à recevoir quelqu'un, apparemment par surprise, alors qu'en réalité, ce n'est pas une surprise pour tout le monde.

J'aimerais entendre vos réflexions juste pour aller un peu plus loin et dire que si vous faites partie des personnes qui figurent sur une liste et que votre nom n'apparaît pas sur cette liste cinq jours avant l'événement, vous ne pouvez pas y aller.

M. Leslie Seidle:

J'accorde à M. Kingsley des points pour la créativité pour cette suggestion. Par ailleurs, à mes yeux, cela ressemble à un exemple de... bien, pour parler franchement, d'interférence dans les affaires internes d'un parti politique. Oui, la Loi régit déjà une grande partie des affaires politiques, mais...

Ainsi, il y aurait des moyens faciles de la contourner. Le ministre X est inscrit au programme et doit venir à la collecte de fonds. Puis cette personne tombe malade deux ou trois jours avant l'activité. Il est tout à fait raisonnable qu'on remplace cette personne par quelqu'un d'autre. Vous n'allez certainement pas interdire à cette personne de remplacer le ministre dont le nom figurait déjà sur le programme. Cette pratique serait beaucoup trop envahissante. Quant aux types de sanctions qui pourraient être imposées à cet égard au titre de la loi, je pense que vous abordez des questions très délicates.

M. David Christopherson:

Nous abordons une question à l'égard de laquelle je suis complètement en désaccord avec votre façon de penser, totalement. Oui, cela peut interférer avec les affaires internes des partis, mais tout ce que nous faisons a cette incidence. C'est cela, l'idée. Vous n'êtes pas censé avoir la liberté de faire ce que vous voulez avec l'argent que vous voulez. Je dois donc vous dire que je ne suis pas d'accord. Je pense que si quelqu'un tombe malade, c'est malheureux, mais beaucoup d'événements fâcheux se produisent. Il y a des collectes de fonds dans ma circonscription. Je peux vous assurer que mon chef ne se présentera pas à l'improviste si je tombe malade; c'est tout simplement dommage, c'est malheureux.

Rappelez-vous quelles sont les retombées. Le gouvernement, grâce à ce projet de loi, tente de diminuer l'accès à l'argent. Je ne vais pas lancer un débat. Je vais vous donner la possibilité de répondre, si vous le souhaitez, mais j'aimerais simplement dire que je suis totalement en désaccord. Je pense que l'idée, c'est d'interférer dans les affaires internes des partis pour nous assurer que leurs actions ne vont pas à l'encontre de l'intérêt public.

Je vous donne la chance de répondre, si vous voulez.

(1140)

M. Leslie Seidle:

Nous pouvons en rester là. Pour le compte rendu, je dirais que le point que j'essayais de faire valoir concernait l'interférence outre mesure, ou une interférence déraisonnable. Je rappelle mon argument quant à l'aspect pratique de la chose, qui est, je crois, la chose la plus importante.

M. David Christopherson:

Bien sûr.

Oui, monsieur Montigny, vous pouvez intervenir. [Français]

M. Eric Montigny:

C'est un grand débat, qui est soulevé par l'échange que je viens d'entendre, de savoir si les partis politiques deviennent de plus en plus des organisations publiques ou si elles demeurent des organisations privées.

Cela étant dit, comme je le disais, une modification électorale comme celle que nous avons devant nous aujourd'hui va dans le sens de la création d'un registre pour encadrer les relations d'influence, beaucoup plus que pour encadrer des contributions associées à du militantisme. [Traduction]

M. David Christopherson:

Cela est-il lié à votre opinion quant à la façon dont cela risque de se terminer, à votre avis, comme le lobbying...?

Vous savez quoi? Je trouve cela très intéressant; je sais que vous avez répondu à une question, mais j'aimerais que vous en disiez un peu plus. Je ne saisis pas bien pourquoi vous dites que nous nous engageons sur une pente glissante. J'aimerais comprendre votre point de vue, car il me semble que c'est important pour vous. Pourriez-vous nous en dire davantage et m'aider à mieux comprendre? [Français]

M. Eric Montigny:

L'objectif principal de la Loi électorale est de s'assurer de la transparence des contributions en matière de financement, et qu'elles soient faites, dans le fond, pour appuyer une cause en fonction de ses idées et de ses valeurs et pour s'engager dans un débat démocratique lié à nos propres valeurs au sein d'une formation politique. C'est l'essence même d'une contribution politique. C'est un droit démocratique.

À mon avis, ce projet de loi prévient des relations d'influence indues, lesquelles s'apparentent davantage à du lobbyisme. Dans ce cas, il s'agit donc de rencontrer des politiciens pour faire valoir un projet et de passer par la contribution politique pour le faire.

Ce projet de loi applique le même raisonnement que celui visant à encadrer le lobbyisme. Toutefois, cette fois-ci, il va s'appliquer aux partis politiques. Il faudra en faire l'évaluation quelques années après son adoption, mais je crains que l'on transforme des activités de financement politique en activités d'encadrement de communications d'influence, plutôt qu'en événements de nature militante. C'est ma préoccupation centrale parce qu'on change la perspective de la relation qu'ont les partis politiques avec leurs militants, mais aussi de la relation en matière d'encadrement de communications d'influence.

On applique donc une logique de registre qui va devenir de plus en plus complexe avec le temps, parce qu'on va toujours vouloir davantage de transparence. Il me semble qu'on s'aventure sur une pente qui peut être glissante et qui peut transformer, au bout du compte, la relation que les partis politiques entretiennent avec leurs militants.

Cela répond-il à votre question? [Traduction]

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, merci. L'incidence serait telle qu'ils hésiteraient à être actifs, puisque cela pourrait leur valoir une étiquette. C'est ce qui vous préoccupe. [Français]

M. Eric Montigny:

Au Québec, on a vu un déclin des contributions individuelles. Au palier fédéral, c'est moins le cas, mais, au Québec, c'est maintenant très mal vu de contribuer à la caisse d'un parti politique. Il y a donc une connotation négative aux dons politiques et cela mine finalement la démocratie. S'il n'est plus bien vu de donner de l'argent et de contribuer à un parti politique sur la base de ses valeurs, de ses convictions et de son militantisme, cela mine le lien que le parti politique doit entretenir avec la société civile ou avec ses militants. [Traduction]

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

Nous avons reçu des mémoires de Démocratie en surveillance. Duff a passé beaucoup de temps à s'intéresser au seuil de contribution. Selon lui, le fait d'abaisser ce seuil — il a donné le Québec en exemple, et je pense que vous avez dit que c'était peut-être peu bas, mais je vais vous donner la possibilité de formuler des commentaires à cet égard — permettrait de résoudre une grande partie de ces problèmes.

Vous l'avez vécu au Québec. Pourriez-vous nous expliquer pourquoi vous pensez que ce serait bien mieux pour notre système électoral que nous abaissions ce seuil et, encore une fois, quelles seront les conséquences à votre avis et pourquoi? [Français]

M. Eric Montigny:

La loi québécoise est récente. Elle a été adoptée en 2012.

Cela étant dit, à la Chaire que je codirige sur la démocratie et les institutions parlementaires, nous menons en ce moment une étude auprès des différents partis politiques sur l'incidence de la loi. Nous comparons le gouvernement fédéral à celui du Québec. Il y a deux éléments très contradictoires qui surgissent en même temps. D'abord, au niveau fédéral, on a aboli l'allocation aux partis politiques relativement au nombre de suffrages obtenus, alors que, au Québec, on est allé dans le sens inverse. Actuellement, le financement des partis politiques au Québec dépend donc à 80 % de fonds publics, de fonds étatiques. C'est l'inverse de ce qui existait avant la réforme de 2012. C''est un changement très important que nous voulons mesurer, soit l'effet de cette situation sur le militantisme.

Il s'agit d'une question d'équilibre. Le principe d'équité est au coeur des deux lois, tant fédérale que québécoise, ainsi que la primauté de l'électeur et la transparence. Ce sont des principes centraux. Au coût de 1 500 $, malgré le crédit d'impôt, peut-on considérer que tous nos concitoyens ont accès aux activités de financement? La question se pose. Ce ne sont pas tous nos citoyens qui peuvent se le permettre. Je crois qu'il faut trouver un équilibre.

Les résultats préliminaires de la recherche que nous menons au Québec montrent que 100 $ est quand même peu. Sans qu'il y ait des excès, il peut donc y avoir un équilibre. Toutefois, le critère fondamental est de savoir si un électeur moyen peut assister à un événement comme celui-là. Sinon, cela devient vraiment une question de « payer pour accéder » s'il est hors de prix pour la majorité des électeurs de participer à une activité.

(1145)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci beaucoup, messieurs.

Le président:

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Graham pendant sept minutes. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Montigny, j'ai plusieurs questions à vous poser. Plus tôt, vous avez parlé d'inclure plus de gens dans les partis d'opposition, mais non dans les petits partis. À quel moment un parti devrait-il être plus ouvert?

M. Eric Montigny:

Merci de la question.

Je reviens sur le principe des partis cartels, ou de la cartellisation des partis, qu'on peut trouver dans les projets de loi sur la réforme de la Loi électorale. Les partis qui sont bien établis vont mettre en place des mesures qui soit les favorisent, soit font en sorte qu'il est plus facile pour eux de répondre à ces obligations prescrites par la Loi parce qu'ils sont fortement institutionnalisés et bien établis. Ils disposent d'un financement important, qui est stable annuellement.

Ma crainte — dans la dynamique du projet de loi qu'il faudra évaluer au bout du compte —, concernant le plan de la reddition de comptes, est qu'elle soit trop importante. Il y a des partis politiques, par exemple, qui ne sont pas couverts par le projet de loi, mais je peux vous donner l'exemple du Québec où, avec des contributions de seulement 100 $, on peine à amasser des contributions d'individus pour couvrir les frais liés aux vérifications.

Il faut donc être conscient que, lorsqu'on ajoute des fardeaux de reddition de comptes à la capacité institutionnelle de nouveaux partis ou de partis émergents, il faut être en mesure d'y répondre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Un parti n'est pas reconnu tant qu'il n'a pas un siège au Parlement.

Il me semble que lorsqu'un parti a au moins un siège, il devrait avoir la capacité de produire un rapport au sujet des présences à un événement partisan.

Lorsqu'un parti n'a pas de siège, on ne peut pas savoir qui participe aux événements. Je comprends votre idée philosophique, mais j'entends dire des choses.

M. Eric Montigny:

Je ne veux pas tomber dans des cas de figure précis, mais les plus petits partis qui sont représentés à l'Assemblée nationale, qui ne sont pas des groupes parlementaires, sont beaucoup moins institutionnalisés que des partis politiques qui forment les groupes parlementaires à la Chambre. Le fardeau, en ce qui touche l'administration, sera donc beaucoup plus important pour des partis qui ne sont pas fortement institutionnalisés, même s'ils sont représentés à la Chambre, que pour des partis qui occupent, par exemple, des fonctions de partis ministériels ou de partis de première opposition. [Traduction]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Seidle, je vais m'adresser à vous pendant quelques instants. Vous avez dit que le système au Canada était l'un des plus progressistes au monde en matière de règles de financement. Pouvez-vous faire quelques comparaisons avec d'autres pays et dire qui réussit mieux ou moins bien que nous? Avez-vous des commentaires à cet égard?

M. Leslie Seidle:

Je vais en citer deux seulement. En quelques mots, deux pays ont beaucoup d'influence sur la culture politique canadienne.

Les États-Unis n'ont pratiquement pas de limites de dépenses sur quoi que ce soit. La seule limite de dépenses qui s'applique vise les candidats à la présidence qui acceptent de recevoir du financement public. Au cours des dernières campagnes, on a vu de plus en plus de candidats refuser le financement public; même les candidats démocrates ont refusé. Avec l'arrêt Citizens United rendu par la Cour suprême il y a cinq ou six ans, les limites de contribution sont encore plus basses qu'elles l'étaient, tout comme les limites en matière de production de rapports imposées par ce qu'on appelle les comités d'action politique.

Les États-Unis ne sont absolument pas — d'aucune manière — un point de référence valide pour le Canada dans ce domaine. Je suis indécis.

Au Royaume-Uni, depuis l'an 2000 seulement, il y a des limites quant aux dépenses des partis. Les candidats se sont vu imposer des limites en 1883. Mais il n'y a aucune limite de contribution, il y a donc encore des dons réguliers — et je n'exagère pas — pouvant atteindre jusqu'à un million de livres aux partis politiques, y compris le Parti travailliste. Il est intéressant de voir que, souvent, ces donneurs sont comme par magie des membres indépendants de la Chambre des lords ou que ce sont parfois des membres de partis de la Chambre des lords.

Par le passé, la Grande-Bretagne était en quelque sorte un point de référence puisque, quand la Commission Barbeau s'est penchée sur les limites de dépenses dans les années 1960, elle pouvait regarder du côté de la Grande-Bretagne où il y avait des limites imposées au candidat et un organisme... le concept d'agent officiel a commencé au Royaume-Uni en 1883. La Grande-Bretagne a évolué, mais il y a tout de même des secteurs où l'équité censée caractériser le régime de financement politique n'est pas présente.

(1150)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez aussi parlé un peu des partis qui sont touchés. Tout parti de l'opposition déjà à la Chambre est touché. Trouvez-vous cela approprié? Croyez-vous plutôt que les nouveaux partis devraient être touchés ou est-ce qu'il devrait y avoir moins de partis touchés? Selon vous, d'autres personnes que le chef et les candidats à la direction devraient-ils être touchés dans les partis de l'opposition?

L'un ou l'autre d'entre vous peut répondre à la question.

M. Leslie Seidle:

Je n'ai aucun problème avec la liste de ceux qui sont visés par la loi telle qu'elle est rédigée à l'heure actuelle. Il me semble que le critère de la représentation à la Chambre est raisonnable. Il aurait pu s'agir d'un autre critère. Il aurait pu s'agir de tout parti enregistré, mais les rédacteurs ont décidé de passer au stade suivant et de ne pas couvrir tous les partis enregistrés auprès d'Élections Canada. [Français]

M. Eric Montigny:

J'ajouterais qu'il faut des mécanismes de compensation pour tenir compte de la réalité particulière de chacun des partis, en fonction de ses ressources, en vue de répondre aux obligations prescrites par la loi. [Traduction]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Puis-je partager les dernières minutes de mon temps avec Mme Tassi, s'il me reste du temps?

Le vice-président (M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC)):

Bien sûr. Il vous reste environ une minute et quart.

Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Merci.

Monsieur Montigny, lorsque vous avez commencé à présenter vos commentaires, vous avez fait valoir que la contribution à un parti politique est un droit démocratique. Vous savez que, précédemment, le cofondateur de Démocratie en surveillance a témoigné, et que le sujet a été soulevé lorsqu'il était question de la limite de 100 $.

Pouvez-vous nous en dire plus au sujet de l'importance d'exercer ce droit démocratique et nous dire pourquoi vous pensez que le fait de verser une contribution est un droit démocratique? [Français]

M. Eric Montigny:

Il y a plusieurs façons de contribuer à la vie publique. Nous pouvons le faire en offrant de notre temps, en s'engageant bénévolement, en devenant candidat ou en étant élu. Nous pouvons également contribuer en faisant un don. C'est une façon d'exprimer une position politique au sein d'une démocratie. Je dirais que les partis politiques jouissent aussi d'un lien avec leur militants qui sont des contributeurs.

À qui un parti politique est-il redevable? Il l'est évidemment à l'électorat s'il est élu, mais il est redevable, d'abord et avant tout, à ses membres et aux lois qui l'encadrent. Lorsque le financement politique ne provient pas, ou provient moins, de ses membres, c'est comme si le pouvoir que nous accordons aux membres, aux militants, est beaucoup moins présent dans la distribution du pouvoir interne d'un parti politique.

Je dirais que cela fait partie de l'ancrage d'un parti politique dans la société. Je ne parle pas de gros montants de dons, je parle d'engagement, sous différentes formes, des militants dans une vie partisane en santé. Si nous coupons ce lien ou que nous le rendons plus difficile, j'ai bien peur que certains partis politiques ne soient plus des représentants de la société civile au sein du gouvernement ou des institutions parlementaires, mais davantage des représentants de l'État auprès de la société civile. Il y a donc un lien important entre eux, selon moi.

Sur le plan individuel, le fait de contribuer à un parti politique et d'exprimer son opinion de manière financière constitue un droit démocratique; il ne s'agit pas seulement de donner de son temps ou de faire du bénévolat.

(1155)

[Traduction]

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Êtes-vous satisfait des limites que nous imposons, en ce qui a trait aux 1 550 $? Croyez-vous que cette limite est appropriée? [Français]

M. Eric Montigny:

Je reviens à l'interrogation que j'ai soulevée un peu plut tôt.

Au Québec, la limite de contribution est de 100 $; c'est très bas. La question que nous devons nous poser pour trouver un juste équilibre est la suivante: en quoi la limite respecte-t-elle un principe d'équité visé par nos lois électorales en matière de primauté de l'électeur? Les citoyens moyens d'une circonscription peuvent-ils facilement assister à une activité de financement lorsque le coût de celle-ci est de 1 500 $, malgré le fait qu'ils peuvent obtenir des remboursements et des crédits d'impôt?

Poser la question, c'est y répondre: un plafond de 1 500 $ est quand même élevé. [Traduction]

Le vice-président (M. Scott Reid):

Monsieur Seidle.

M. Leslie Seidle:

J'aimerais simplement faire un petit commentaire quant au débat opposant la limite de 100 $ à celle de 1 550 $, soit celle qui s'applique à l'heure actuelle. Le fait qu'il y ait un plafond ne veut pas dire que quiconque voulant contribuer à un parti politique doit se rapprocher de ce plafond. Une personne peut donner 100 $ ou 200 $. Le crédit d'impôt pour les dons les plus modestes est si généreux, que même des gens de la classe moyenne peuvent se permettre de verser une contribution de 400 ou 500 $. Beaucoup de gens le font.

Je ne suis pas d'accord avec Duff Conacher, qui dit que la limite devrait être ramenée à 100 $. Les partis politiques ont besoin d'argent. Les candidats ont besoin d'argent. Peut-être que la limite supérieure est trop élevée, mais, et je le répète, cela ne force personne à vider son compte bancaire pour verser une contribution de ce montant.

J'aimerais faire un dernier commentaire au sujet du témoignage de Duff Conacher. Il a mentionné à quelques reprises qu'il considère que le régime actuel — et il ne faisait pas seulement allusion à la limite de contribution de 100 $ — est contraire à l'éthique et à la démocratie. Je ne pense pas qu'il l'a démontré durant son exposé. Je sais qu'il aime s'exprimer fermement, et il a fait de l'excellent travail pour promouvoir l'évolution de notre démocratie. Mais lorsque vous faites de telles déclarations, vous devriez être en mesure de les étayer. Je ne pense pas que la preuve soit là.

Notre régime de financement politique est très sain. Les gens viennent des quatre coins du monde pour rencontrer les représentants d'Élections Canada, pour en apprendre plus à ce sujet. Les gens lisent sur le sujet et ainsi de suite. On le cite, au même titre que notre Charte des droits, et notre système d'immigration est souvent cité. Je vais fréquemment à l'étranger et j'assiste à bon nombre de conférences.

Nous pouvons toujours améliorer les choses. C'est ce que vous faites ici aujourd'hui. Je pense que nous devrions également être justes à propos de ce que nous avons réalisé à cet égard et ne pas dire que c'est contraire à l'éthique et à la démocratie. Cela va beaucoup trop loin. [Français]

M. Eric Montigny:

Je veux ajouter quelque chose, très rapidement, au sujet de ce qui vient d'être dit.

En effet, le crédit d'impôt peut aider à rembourser la dépense, mais l'esprit même et l'origine même du motif pour lequel nous avons été invités à comparaître, c'est de discuter de l'accès en échange de contributions. Lorsque le prix d'accès à un événement est fixé à la limite des contributions, ou près de la limite des contributions, c'est à ce moment que cela devient difficile pour des gens d'accéder à des politiciens qui sont mis en vedette lors d'une activité de financement.

Le vice-président (M. Scott Reid):

Je vous remercie. Professeur Montigny, vous avez eu le dernier mot.[Traduction]

Nous allons suspendre la séance pour un moment, afin que d'autres témoins défilent à la barre.

Merci à nos deux témoins.

Je vais maintenant céder le fauteuil à notre président.

Nous allons suspendre la séance un instant.

(1200)

(1200)

Le président:

Juste avant d'entendre les témoins, j'aimerais rappeler aux membres du Comité que la séance d'aujourd'hui est allongée de 30 minutes; nous entendrons un intervenant d'Élections Ontario à 13 heures. Si les gens pouvaient essayer de remettre leurs amendements au plus tard à 17 heures aujourd'hui, nous pourrions ainsi les distribuer aux membres du Comité en vue de l'étude article par article de jeudi.

Bienvenue à nouveau à la 73e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Nous étudions le projet de loi C-50, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada (financement politique). Nous sommes heureux d'avoir parmi nous Mary Dawson, commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique. Elle est accompagnée de Me Martine Richard, avocate principale. Nous accueillons également Karen Shepherd, commissaire au lobbying. Elle est accompagnée de Me Bruce Bergen, avocat-conseil.

Comme je l'ai dit à tous les témoins, vous êtes ici pour parler du projet de loi C-50. Si quelqu'un vous pose une question à propos d'un autre sujet, c'est à vous de décider si vous souhaitez répondre. Vous n'êtes pas obligés de le faire.

Nous allons d'abord écouter les déclarations préliminaires.

Madame Dawson, vous avez la parole. [Français]

Mme Mary Dawson (commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique, Commissariat aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique):

Monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité, je vous remercie de m'avoir invitée à comparaître devant vous aujourd'hui dans le cadre de l'étude du Comité sur le projet de loi C-50, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada relativement au financement politique. Je suis accompagnée de Mme Martine Richard, avocate principale.[Traduction]

Le projet de loi C-50 modifie Ia Loi électorale du Canada dans le but de créer un régime concernant la publicité et la production de rapports sur les activités de financement politique auxquelles assistent des ministres, des chefs de parti ou des candidats à la direction et pour lesquelles les frais de participation excèdent 200 $. L'objectif consiste à accroître la transparence quant aux personnes qui participent à de telles activités. J'appuie dans ses grandes lignes l'esprit de ce projet de loi. Je continue d'affirmer, comme je l'ai déjà fait, que la transparence est une considération importante dans tout régime qui touche aux conflits d'intérêts.

Le projet de loi C-50 ne modifie pas et ne vise pas directement les régimes qui relèvent de ma responsabilité, c'est-à-dire la Loi sur les conflits d'intérêts dans le cas des titulaires de charge publique et le Code régissant les conflits d'intérêts des députés. Il s'applique toutefois à certaines des personnes qui sont assujetties à ces régimes.

Les ministres, y compris le premier ministre, sont des titulaires de charge publique principaux en vertu de la Loi sur les conflits d'intérêts. Les candidats à la direction et les chefs de parti qui sont des députés en fonction sont eux aussi assujettis à l'un de ces régimes qui encadrent les conflits d'intérêts, voire aux deux. J'applaudis la décision d'assujettir tous les chefs de parti et candidats à la direction, et non pas uniquement les ministres, au nouveau régime concernant la publicité et la production de rapports. Je note, toutefois, que le projet de loi C-50 ne s'applique pas aux secrétaires parlementaires, qui sont pourtant assujettis à la Loi sur les conflits d'intérêts en qualité de titulaires de charge publique principaux. Le Comité voudra peut-être se pencher sur cette omission.

Il semble que le grand intérêt des médias et du public pour les activités de financement payantes, celles qui donnent droit à un accès privilégié à des personnalités politiques en vue, organisées ces deux dernières années, soit à l'origine du projet de loi C-50. Je parle ici des activités qui offrent a un nombre relativement restreint de participants, moyennant un prix d'entrée, la possibilité de rencontrer un ministre vedette ou un chef de parti. Le Commissariat a reçu beaucoup d'appels et plusieurs demandes d'enquête à propos de ces activités de financement. L'intérêt du public pour de telles activités impliquant des politiciens fédéraux est particulièrement élevé ces derniers temps. Ceci dit, certaines préoccupations au sujet des activités de financement politique ont également été soulevées beaucoup plus tôt dans mon mandat à titre de commissaire. En fait, la question du financement politique a été abordée dans trois de mes rapports d'enquête publics en vertu de la Loi, à savoir le rapport Raitt en mai 2010, le rapport Dykstra en septembre 2010 et le rapport Glover en novembre 2014. J'ai également soulevé la question dans mon mémoire au comité parlementaire chargé de l'examen quinquennal de la loi qui s'est conclu en 2014.

Dans la Loi sur les conflits d'intérêts, une seule disposition, l'article 16, traite directement de la participation à des activités de financement. Selon l'article 16 de la Loi, « il est interdit à tout titulaire de charge publique de solliciter personnellement des fonds d'une personne ou d'un organisme si l'exercice d'une telle activité plaçait le titulaire en situation de conflit d'intérêts ». Le Code régissant les conflits d'intérêts des députés de la Chambre des communes, pour sa part, est muet sur la question des activités de financement politique.

Cette disposition ne fait pas de distinction entre les activités de financement politique et caritatif. Pour qu'il y ait contravention à l'article 16, on doit être en présence de deux éléments. Premièrement, le titulaire de charge publique doit avoir sollicité personnellement des fonds auprès d'une personne ou d'un organisme ou avoir demandé à quelqu'un d'autre de le faire. Deuxièmement, il doit être établi que cette sollicitation plaçait le titulaire de charge publique en conflit d'intérêts.

Je dois mentionner également qu'une autre disposition de la Loi est liée au financement politique. Il s'agit de l'alinéa 11(2)a), qui prévoit une exception à la règle visant les cadeaux concernant ceux qui sont permis par la Loi électorale du Canada. Vous vous rappellerez que la règle visant les cadeaux interdit à tout titulaire de charge publique et à tout membre de sa famille d'accepter un cadeau ou un autre avantage qui pourrait raisonnablement donner à penser qu'il a été donné pour influencer le titulaire de charge publique dans l'exercice de ses fonctions officielles.

Des contraventions à d'autres dispositions de la Loi qui ne portent pas spécifiquement sur les activités de financement pourraient survenir, mais ultérieurement, lorsqu'une personne qui a fait une contribution financière cherche à faire pencher en sa faveur un ministre ou un membre de son personnel.

(1205)



Ces dispositions n'auraient aucune application durant le déroulement de l'activité de financement ou au moment où est versée la contribution demandée. Par exemple, l'article 6 interdit à tout titulaire de charge publique de prendre une décision officielle ou de participer à la prise d'une telle décision s'il sait ou devait raisonnablement savoir que, en prenant cette décision, il se trouverait en situation de conflit d'intérêts.

Aux termes de l'article 7, la question est de savoir non pas à qui un titulaire de charge publique peut s'adresser lors d'une activité de financement, mais si cette personne reçoit par la suite un traitement de faveur. L'article 7 pose problème, toutefois, en raison de sa portée très limitée. Il interdit non pas toutes les formes de traitement de faveur, mais uniquement les traitements de faveur accordés en fonction de l'identité de la personne qui intervient. Je me suis toujours demandé pourquoi il n’interdisait pas simplement toutes les formes de traitement de faveur.

Les articles 8 et 9 interdisent aux titulaires de charge publique de favoriser ou de chercher à favoriser de façon irrégulière les intérêts personnels d'un donateur, soit en utilisant des renseignements d'initiés, soit en tentant d'influencer une décision.

J'ai recommandé à plusieurs reprises que l'on resserre la disposition de la Loi visant la sollicitation de fonds, par exemple en instaurant des règles plus rigoureuses pour les ministres et les secrétaires parlementaires. Je suis même allée jusqu'à dire dans mon rapport annuel de 2012-2013 que je serais disposée à appuyer l'interdiction absolue pour les ministres et les secrétaires parlementaires de participer à des activités de financement si le gouvernement souhaitait aller aussi loin.

Dans le rapport Glover, j'ai recommandé que la loi soit modifiée de manière à inclure une contravention dans le cas de ministres ou de secrétaires parlementaires qui savaient ou auraient dû savoir que des fonds étaient sollicités par d'autres dans des circonstances qui les plaçaient en situation de conflit d'intérêts et qui n'ont pas pris les mesures appropriées. Je me suis aussi appuyée à plusieurs reprises sur le document du premier ministre sur la responsabilité gouvernementale, intitulé dans sa dernière version Pour un gouvernement ouvert et responsable. Certains des énoncés qui s'y trouvent pourraient être intégrés à la loi.

J'ai aussi suggéré que la Chambre des communes envisage de mettre en place un code de conduite distinct quant aux activités politiques des députés et des membres de leur personnel, notamment en ce qui a trait aux activités de financement.

Étant consciente que le Comité n'est pas actuellement saisi de la modification des régimes dont j'ai la responsabilité, je mentionne ces recommandations uniquement pour faire une mise en contexte et pour souligner que je suis depuis longtemps favorable de façon générale à un resserrement des règles qui encadrent les activités de financement.

(1210)

[Français]

Les modifications à la Loi électorale du Canada que propose le projet de loi C-50 favorisent la transparence en ce qui concerne les activités de financement.

À mon sens, il s'agit d'une mesure positive qui serait avantageuse pour notre processus électoral. Elle permettrait également d'appliquer avec plus d'efficacité la Loi sur les conflits d'intérêts. L'accès facilité aux noms et adresses des participants à ces activités de financement pourrait s'avérer utile au Commissariat si celui-ci doit enquêter sur une allégation selon laquelle un participant à une telle activité aurait obtenu un avantage de la part d'un ministre.

Cela met fin à ma déclaration d'ouverture. Je serai heureuse de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci, madame Dawson.

Madame Shepherd, la parole est à vous.

Mme Karen Shepherd (commissaire au lobbying, Commissariat au lobbying):

Monsieur le président et membres du comité, bonjour.

Je suis heureuse d'être ici aujourd'hui pour participer à votre étude du projet de loi C-50, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada relativement au financement politique.

Je suis accompagnée de M. Bruce Bergen, avocat-conseil.

En ma qualité de commissaire au lobbying, mon rôle est de faire appliquer la Loi sur le lobbying, qui assure la transparence des activités de lobbying, et de mettre au point et d'appliquer le Code de déontologie des lobbyistes, qui définit les normes de comportement applicables aux lobbyistes. Ensemble, cette loi et ce code font en sorte que les Canadiens peuvent avoir confiance en l'intégrité des décisions prises par le gouvernement.

Le lobbying est une activité légitime.[Traduction]

Je participe à l’élaboration des politiques publiques depuis de nombreuses années, et à ce titre, je sais que l'exposition à un éventail de points de vue est essentielle pour assurer l’élaboration de politiques efficace et une meilleure prise de décisions par les gouvernements. Toutefois, il est important que lorsque les lobbyistes communiquent avec les titulaires d'une charge publique, qu'ils le fassent de façon transparente et conforme à des normes éthiques élevées.

Mon mandat, tel que défini dans la loi, comporte trois volets: gérer le Registre des lobbyistes, qui contient et rend publics les renseignements déclarés par les lobbyistes; élaborer et mettre en oeuvre des programmes éducatifs pour sensibiliser le public aux exigences de la Loi sur le lobbying et du Code de déontologie des lobbyistes; assurer la conformité avec la Loi et le Code.

Le Code de déontologie des lobbyistes complète la Loi sur le lobbying au chapitre du renforcement de la confiance du public à l'égard du processus décisionnel du gouvernement.

Après un processus de consultation de deux ans, un nouveau Code de déontologie des lobbyistes est entré en vigueur en décembre 2015. Le nouveau code traite plus en détail de la problématique du conflit d'intérêts afin qu'il cadre avec la décision rendue par la Cour d'appel fédérale en 2009, qui incorporait le concept de conflits d'intérêts apparents. Ces nouvelles règles simplifiées permettent aux lobbyistes d'éviter de placer les titulaires d'une charge publique dans une situation de conflit d'intérêts réel ou apparent, en particulier lorsqu'ils entretiennent d'étroites relations avec les titulaires d'une charge publique, lorsqu'ils prennent part à des activités politiques et lorsqu'il est question d'offrir des cadeaux à des titulaires d'une charge publique.

(1215)

[Français]

Compte tenu de l'étude que mène actuellement le Comité, j'aimerais aborder la règle 9 du Code qui porte sur les activités politiques.

Certaines activités politiques pourraient créer un sentiment d'obligation. Même si nous vivons dans un pays démocratique où les activités politiques et les activités de lobbying sont légitimes, les lobbyistes doivent veiller à ce qu'il n'existe aucun conflit d'intérêts réel ni apparent lorsque de telles activités se combinent.[Traduction]

Le Code interdit expressément aux lobbyistes d'exercer des activités de lobbying auprès de députés et de ministres lorsqu'ils mènent des activités politiques qui pourraient vraisemblablement donner l'impression de créer un sentiment d'obligation. Parmi ces activités figurent l’organisation d'une campagne ou d'une activité de collecte de fonds, la rédaction de discours, la préparation de candidats à des débats et le travail effectué au sein du conseil d'administration d'une association de circonscription. La règle interdit d'exercer des activités de lobbying auprès de titulaires d'une charge publique qui travaillent dans le cabinet d'un ministre ou d'un député. Par contre, des activités politiques telles que verser des contributions en vertu de la Loi électorale du Canada, poser une affiche sur un terrain, agir à titre de membre d'une association de circonscription ou assister à des activités de collecte de fonds ne créent pas de sentiment d'obligation qui pourrait donner lieu à une apparence de conflit d'intérêts.

Lorsque le Code a été publié, j'ai diffusé une directive pour aider les lobbyistes à comprendre comment j'ai l'intention d'appliquer les règles relatives aux conflits d'intérêts. La directive encourage les lobbyistes à se poser la question suivante lorsqu'ils envisagent de se livrer à des activités politiques: « Est-ce qu'une personne raisonnable qui examine mes activités politiques aurait l’impression qu'un sentiment d'obligation a été créé chez tout titulaire d'une charge publique ou chez toute personne cherchant à obtenir un tel mandat? » Si la réponse est oui, toute activité de lobbying connexe risque de placer cette personne en situation de conflit d'intérêts et ne devrait donc pas être entreprise.[Français]

Bref, bien que je ne réglemente pas les activités politiques, je crois que des lois comme la Loi sur le lobbying, la Loi électorale du Canada, la Loi sur les conflits d'intérêts et les codes qui existent à l'intention des lobbyistes et des députés contribuent à la confiance que peuvent avoir les Canadiens envers l'intégrité des décisions gouvernementales.

Monsieur le président, cela met fin à mon allocution. C'est avec plaisir que je répondrai à vos questions et à celles des membres du Comité.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Di Iorio.

Monsieur Di Iorio, vous avez la parole pour sept minutes.

M. Nicola Di Iorio (Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Ma question s'adresse à Mme Dawson.

Madame Dawson, en tant que commissaire, rendez-vous des décisions quand des plaintes sont déposées auprès de vous?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Pardon? Je n'ai pas compris la question.

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

En tant que commissaire, quand une plainte est déposée auprès de votre bureau, vous rendez une décision. Est-ce exact?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Je vais répondre aux plaintes si elles sont valides. Je réponds alors à la personne qui a porté plainte. Si je crois qu'il y a un vrai problème, je mène une enquête. [Traduction]

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Je vais poser mes questions dans ma langue par souci de concision.

Mme Mary Dawson:

D'accord.

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Lorsque vous parlez de rapports, s'agit-il en réalité de décisions que vous avez dû rendre?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Je suis désolée, lorsque j'ai parlé de rapports...

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Dans votre document, lorsque vous parlez de rapports, s'agit-il de décisions que vous avez dû rendre?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Oui. Je ne suis pas certaine du moment où j'en ai parlé, mais ce sont des rapports relatifs à un examen ou une enquête ou il s'agit d'un rapport annuel.

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Ce sont des rapports. Vous avez parlé de rapports. C'est le terme que vous avez utilisé.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Oui.

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Est-ce que ces rapports peuvent faire l'objet d'un appel?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Ils peuvent faire l'objet d'un contrôle judiciaire selon certains motifs limités, comme l'application régulière de la loi.

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Oui, c'est beaucoup plus compliqué que...

Mme Mary Dawson:

Oui, vous allez devant la Cour fédérale, et c'est un contrôle judiciaire.

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Est-ce que votre bureau fait l'objet de vérifications? Vérifie-t-on vos pratiques administratives, vos pratiques de gestion, la façon dont les députés sont traités, le délai de réponse et des choses du genre?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Nous faisons rapport sur ces aspects, mais ils ne sont pas précisément vérifiés. Des gens vérifient notre gestion financière et ce type de choses.

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Êtes-vous, en tant que commissaire, supervisée par quiconque?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Qu'est-ce que je supervise?

(1220)

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Non, êtes-vous, en tant que commissaire, supervisée par quiconque?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Le Parlement.

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Le Parlement. Lorsque vous parlez ici de conflits d'intérêts potentiels, j'aimerais savoir ce que vous pensez du conflit d'intérêts d'une personne qui fait un don à un député, ici. Par exemple, certains députés ne font même pas partie du gouvernement, alors où serait le conflit d'intérêts ou l'apparence de conflit d'intérêts?

Mme Mary Dawson:

J'en ai fait allusion. Je dois respecter les règles prévues par la loi, et il n'existe aucune règle dans le Code des députés. Une règle dans la loi précise qu'un ministre n'a pas le droit de solliciter personnellement des fonds, alors j'ai toujours dit qu'il s'agissait d'une règle très limitée de la loi.

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Il n'est pas personnellement...

Mme Mary Dawson:

Le ministre ne peut pas ni le secrétaire parlementaire — généralement le titulaire d'une charge publique — solliciter, personnellement, des fonds si cela l'expose à un conflit d'intérêts.

D'accord, c'est la seule règle que nous avons.

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Encore une fois, cela ne répond pas à la question parce que la réponse est « si » cette sollicitation place la personne en conflit d'intérêts. On ne présume pas qu'il y a un conflit. Il faudrait qu'il soit démontré.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Oui, c'est exact. Il n'existe aucune règle contre...

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Il doit y avoir un intérêt de part et d'autre, et il doit y avoir des intérêts qui s'opposent. On ne peut pas servir les deux. C'est à ce moment qu'il y a un conflit.

Mme Mary Dawson:

C'est exact. Le conflit serait du côté du ministre... non, je suis désolée. Il n'y a aucune règle concernant les conflits. Laissez-moi réfléchir. Je suis désolée, je me suis mêlée moi-même.

L'article 16 prévoit qu'il est interdit à tout titulaire de charge publique de solliciter personnellement des fonds d'une personne si l'exercice d'une telle activité plaçait le titulaire en situation de conflit d'intérêts. Cela signifierait donc que la personne veut obtenir quelque chose d'une personne à qui elle sollicite des fonds.

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Exactement.

Le témoin qui a témoigné avant vous a parlé de la situation au Québec et il a dit que le simple fait de solliciter des fonds est mal vu, ici. La population réagit de manière négative à cette activité.

Vous allez certainement convenir avec moi que cela ne sert pas bien notre démocratie et qu'il s'agit d'une mauvaise perception.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Oui, vous avez raison. C'est la raison pour laquelle j'ai même dit qu'on devrait peut-être adopter une règle qui prévoit que seuls les ministres et les secrétaires parlementaires ne devraient pas solliciter de fonds.

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Encore une fois, j'aurais pensé le contraire parce qu'il s'agit d'un fondement de la démocratie, et notre modèle démocratique permet aux personnes de décider de travailler dans la fonction publique. Elles décident de mettre de côté leur carrière, demandent à leur famille de faire des sacrifices, savent qu'elles n'auront plus le temps de voir leurs amis et disent qu'elles vont consacrer leur vie à la fonction publique de leur pays. Pour ce faire, elles ont besoin de ressources parce qu'elles doivent être connues et concurrencer d'autres personnes qui désirent également être connues et attirer l'attention; elles ont besoin de fonds.

Mme Mary Dawson:

D'accord.

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

À quel moment porte-t-on attention à la fonction essentielle de la démocratie?

Mme Mary Dawson:

C'est l'argument contraire, et il s'agit de trouver un équilibre ici. Je ne dis pas qu'on ne devrait pas avoir le droit de se trouver du financement; je dis seulement que c'est une façon de procéder. Le fait est que l'ancien système consistait à financer les partis dans une certaine mesure. Ce système n'existe plus, alors le besoin de financement est plus grand, et je comprends ce que vous dites.

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Conviendriez-vous avec moi qu'aborder une personne, un concitoyen, pour lui demander si elle croit fermement à la cause et aux principes que je veux défendre dans l'institution qui représente notre démocratie et si elle est prête à soutenir concrètement ma démarche parce que je vais avoir besoin de ressources matérielles...

Mme Mary Dawson:

Oui, eh bien, le seul problème, c'est qu'il existe une certaine chose qui... Comme je l'ai dit dans ma déclaration préliminaire, le problème relativement à la loi et au régime se pose habituellement après coup. Si vous êtes allé à un endroit et que vous avez reçu du financement directement d'une personne et que celle-ci vient ensuite dans votre bureau deux mois plus tard et vous dit « écoutez, j'ai besoin d'une subvention », pour une chose ou une autre, c'est là que surviennent les problèmes. Ils se posent après, malgré la loi, mais le fait de solliciter des fonds pour votre parti politique n'a rien de mauvais en soi.

(1225)

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Vous êtes d'accord avec moi, mais des personnes disent qu'elles vont faire un sermon dimanche, mentionner votre nom et dire que vous êtes un véritable saint; ensuite 1 000 personnes seront convaincues de voter pour vous. Cela n'est pas signalé, et ces personnes viennent ensuite vous voir et vous demandent une subvention la semaine suivante.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Eh bien, c'est une question de degré, mais la loi ne couvre pas cet aspect pour le moment, alors je n'ai pas eu à m'en faire à cet égard.

Des voix: Ah, ah!

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Mon argument est le suivant. En ajoutant toutes ces demandes ponctuelles, comme celles que vous avez décrites, ne limitons-nous pas l'accès à tous, à chaque citoyen ordinaire? Nous avons maintenant du personnel et pouvons nous occuper de ces rapports complexes, mais si nous ne pouvons pas nous occuper de cet aspect... Si quelqu'un veut se présenter comme candidat indépendant, quelles sont ses chances?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Je ne connais pas ses chances. Je ne suis vraiment pas une experte en politique, honnêtement, et...

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

En toute franchise, je suis surpris d'entendre cela. Votre patron est le Parlement.

Le président:

D'accord.

Le temps de la série de questions est écoulé. Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Richards.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'apprécie le fait que vous avez pris tous les deux le temps d'être ici aujourd'hui. J'ai quelques questions différentes. Je vais commencer, cependant, par ce qui suit. Lorsque nous avons examiné le projet de loi, la façon dont nous en sommes arrivés ici et la raison pour laquelle nous sommes ici, tout cela se résume à ce qui suit: nous avons un premier ministre qui assistait essentiellement à ces événements pour lesquels il y avait un type d'accès privilégié en échange de dons.

Vous avez mentionné, dans votre déclaration préliminaire, je crois, madame Dawson, que vous avez reçu un certain nombre de plaintes concernant ces collectes de fonds, alors je vais peut-être commencer ainsi: savez-vous combien de plaintes vous avez reçues concernant ces activités?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Oh, mon Dieu, je ne sais pas. Ce n'est pas des milliers, mais je reçois tout le temps des lettres ou des appels de gens.

M. Blake Richards:

Ce n'est pas des milliers, mais est-ce des dizaines ou...?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Au cours des 5 ou 10 dernières années, vous voulez dire?

M. Blake Richards:

Je dis au cours des deux ou trois dernières années.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Au cours des deux ou trois dernières années? Oh, je ne sais pas... peut-être 20.

M. Blake Richards:

Environ 20 plaintes différentes ou dans ces eaux-là? D'accord. Cela nous donne une assez bonne idée.

Évidemment, la raison pour laquelle vous auriez reçu de si nombreuses plaintes, c'est que c'est quelque chose, à mon avis, qui est assez courant. Le premier ministre s'est lui-même placé dans ces positions.

J'ai l'impression que, s'il avait suivi les dispositions qui figurent dans son propre document « Pour un gouvernement ouvert et responsable », nous ne serions probablement pas dans une position où nous verrions ces types de situations; vous n'auriez pas reçu le nombre de plaintes que vous avez reçues et, par conséquent, peut-être, pour ce qui est du projet de loi, qui est la façon des libéraux d'essayer de se sortir d'un mauvais pas, nous ne tiendrions même pas cette conversation aujourd'hui.

Je veux citer un extrait du document « Pour un gouvernement ouvert et responsable ». Il précise ce qui suit: Les ministres et les secrétaires parlementaires doivent éviter tout conflit d’intérêts, toute apparence de conflit d’intérêts et toute situation pouvant donner lieu à un conflit d’intérêts.

Il indique également ce qui suit: Les ministres et les secrétaires parlementaires doivent s’assurer que les activités de financement politique ou autres éléments liés au financement politique n’ont pas, ou ne semblent pas avoir, d’incidence sur l’exercice de leurs fonctions officielles ou sur l’accès de particuliers ou d’organismes au gouvernement. Il ne doit y avoir aucun accès préférentiel au gouvernement, ou apparence d’accès préférentiel, accordé à des particuliers ou à des organismes en raison des contributions financières qu’ils auraient versées aux politiciens ou aux partis politiques. Aucun particulier ou organisme ne doit être visé, ou sembler être visé, par une collecte partisane parce qu’ils traitent officiellement avec des ministres et des secrétaires parlementaires, ou avec leur personnel ou leur ministère.

Je ne crois pas que le projet de loi que nous avons devant nous fasse vraiment quelque chose pour empêcher ces types de collectes de fonds auxquelles il y a un accès privilégié en échange de dons, soit par le premier ministre soit par les ministres du Cabinet, mais si le premier ministre et ses ministres avaient suivi le conseil de leur propre document « Pour un gouvernement ouvert et responsable », diriez-vous que nous ne serions probablement pas dans la position où nous devons déposer aujourd'hui ce projet de loi et que vous ne recevriez pas le nombre de plaintes que vous avez reçues? Diriez-vous que c'est une observation assez juste?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Je ne suis pas là pour jeter la pierre à qui que ce soit. Ce dont je me soucie, c'est de l'application de ma propre loi.

J'ai certes laissé entendre que certains aspects des lignes directrices sur la responsabilité pourraient être intégrés dans ma loi, puis mon bureau les ferait appliquer. Toutefois, je ne formule pas de commentaire sur les activités d'application de la loi d'autres instances.

M. Blake Richards:

Très bien, mais, d'après les commentaires que vous avez formulés, manifestement, vous affirmez avoir l'impression que, si vous étiez en mesure de faire appliquer les dispositions, cela empêcherait certaines de ces situations de se produire. Je suppose que cela nous donne la réponse à cette question: s'ils avaient suivi ces lignes directrices, cela aurait probablement empêché ce genre de choses.

Je voudrais poser une autre question qui a été soulevée un certain nombre de fois au sein du Comité. Je ne sais pas si vous suivez ces discussions, mais, au départ, c'est mon collègue, M. Nater qui a soulevé la question. Il s'agit de l'idée de la période de préavis de cinq jours. Essentiellement, nous sommes maintenant dans une situation où, sous le régime du projet de loi, il serait possible pour le premier ministre de décider, disons, 12 heures ou quelques heures avant l'événement, qu'il va y assister, même si une autre décision avait été annoncée. Diriez-vous que cela pourrait créer des situations où chacun se fait un clin d'oeil en sachant pertinemment qu'il va y assister, mais que ce n'est pas annoncé, ce qui limite la responsabilité que peut assumer le premier ministre? Diriez-vous qu'il serait mieux qu'après cette période de préavis, il ne soit pas possible pour le premier ministre, pour un ministre ou pour tout autre titulaire d'une charge publique qui est soumis à ces dispositions de simplement se présenter soudainement à l'événement? Ces situations devraient-elles être prévenues? Quelles sont vos réflexions à ce sujet?

Peut-être que vous en avez tous les deux; je ne sais pas.

(1230)

Mme Mary Dawson:

Honnêtement, je ne peux pas commenter l'aspect stratégique du projet de loi proposé. Je pense qu'il contribue grandement à aborder certains des problèmes. Je crois fermement à la transparence et au fait de rendre les choses publiques.

Vraiment, en ce qui a trait aux détails de ce que devrait contenir le projet de loi exactement, je ne pense pas être là pour formuler des commentaires à ce sujet, en tant que tel.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Je pensais que c'était de cela que nous discutions.

Avez-vous des commentaires à formuler, madame Shepherd, ou des réflexions à ce sujet?

Mme Karen Shepherd:

Non, je souscrirais à l'opinion de la commissaire Dawson, c'est-à-dire que je pense que le projet de loi contribue à améliorer la transparence, selon mon interprétation, en faisant figurer sur une liste le nom des participants qui achètent un billet, si le prix est supérieur à 200 $.

J'ai un élément à soumettre à l'attention du Comité. J'ai remarqué que le projet de loi porte principalement sur la participation du premier ministre et de ministres à ces activités de financement réglementées, mais il ne s'applique pas à eux durant la période électorale. Le fait que le premier ministre et les ministres maintiennent leur statut durant une période électorale pourrait être quelque chose à prendre en considération, alors, si le Comité a pensé à une raison de faire réglementer ces types d'événements, c'est peut-être quelque chose à prendre en considération.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Merci de cette réponse.

En ce qui concerne l'idée que j'ai déjà évoquée — l'accès au comptant —, au titre de la loi dont vous êtes maintenant responsable, s'agit-il de quelque chose qui est censé être réglementé, de sorte qu'il ne devrait pas y avoir d'activités de financement donnant un accès privilégié en échange d'une somme d'argent?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Ce n'est réglementé que dans les situations de conflit d'intérêts.

M. Blake Richards:

C'est s'il y a un conflit d'intérêts. D'accord.

Le président:

Votre temps est écoulé.

M. Blake Richards:

Vraiment?

Le président:

Vous vous amusez bien.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à vous deux de votre présence aujourd'hui. Je vous en suis reconnaissant.

En plus de tenir un débat au sujet des menus détails du projet de loi, on s'est demandé, durant ces audiences, si nous ne faisons que des retouches mineures au lieu de produire un changement réaliste et marqué. Des gens ont comparu et ont plaidé que nous ne traitions même pas du vrai problème. L'un des vrais problèmes sur lequel nous devrions nous pencher, c'est le seuil de contribution en tant que tel. Ce problème a été soulevé à un certain nombre d'occasions.

En tant que personne qui admire ce qu'a fait l'ancien premier ministre Chrétien pour ce qui est d'instituer le financement public des partis — ce qui, selon moi, en plus du fait de ne pas envoyer de troupes en Irak, a été sa meilleure décision en tant que premier ministre —, j'ai eu le cœur brisé, durant la dernière législature, quand nous avons vu cette mesure être complètement retirée. Je veux vous laisser formuler un commentaire et je vous demanderais de brosser un portrait du problème dans son ensemble. Toutefois, concernant la contribution de 1 550 $, fait-elle partie de notre problème ou pas, à votre avis? Il y a eu des personnes qui se sont présentées et ont affirmé que, ce que nous devrions être en train de faire, à l'échelon fédéral, ressemble davantage à ce qui se fait au Québec. La somme est d'environ 100 $, et il est ainsi plus facile pour tout le monde de payer, puis beaucoup de ces autres problèmes disparaissent. Voilà l'argument. D'autres personnes disent: « Non, une somme pouvant s'élever jusqu'à 1 550 $ pour une personne de la classe moyenne est raisonnable », puis nous devons établir tous ces freins et contrepoids.

Quelles sont vos réflexions au sujet de ces deux approches? La question n'arrête pas d'être soulevée dans le cadre de notre étude du projet de loi.

Merci.

(1235)

Mme Mary Dawson:

Je ne pense pas que le Canada se porte très mal comparativement à d'autres pays avec son plafond de 1 500 $. Les diverses limites varient grandement. Le fait que les 1 500 $ n'étaient pas mal m'a frappée. Ce seuil ne me perturbe pas. Je répète qu'il est dommage qu'il n'y ait pas de financement général des divers partis, mais voilà.

M. David Christopherson:

Madame Shepherd.

Mme Karen Shepherd:

Je n'ai pas d'opinion, moi non plus, en ce qui concerne la somme. Je pense que c'est au Parlement de décider. Ma préoccupation tient à la réglementation des lobbyistes.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est très bien. Je voulais vous donner une chance égale de formuler un commentaire.

La question d'inclure les secrétaires parlementaires a déjà été soulevée, et vous avez formulé un commentaire à ce sujet, madame Dawson. Cependant, la question se pose plus particulièrement pour ceux d'entre nous qui ont été ministres et qui comprennent la nature du processus décisionnel qu'il faut suivre. À cet égard, vos secrétaires parlementaires ont une grande influence, mais c'est aussi le cas de vos chefs de cabinet... Ils ont une influence incroyable. Encore une fois, les conseillers principaux en matière de politiques peuvent avoir une influence égale ou peut-être même supérieure. Rien de cela n'est mentionné dans le projet de loi.

Madame Dawson, vous avez mentionné que vous voudriez que les secrétaires parlementaires soient inclus. Auriez-vous la bonté de formuler un commentaire un peu plus détaillé à ce sujet? Pensez-vous également qu'il soit souhaitable pour nous d'étudier la possibilité d'étendre ces dispositions aux chefs de cabinet et aux conseillers principaux en matière de politiques, etc.?

Mme Mary Dawson:

J'ai songé à l'ajout des conseillers principaux en matière de politiques à ce groupe, quand j'ai mentionné les secrétaires parlementaires, mais il y a un problème logique. Ils font partie du processus politique, mais il ne s'agit pas de politiciens qui se font élire, alors je ne suis pas certaine qu'ils s'en rapprochent suffisamment.

Je reconnais toutefois que ces personnes sont probablement plus fortement sollicitées par des lobbyistes, dans certains cas, que les ministres ou les secrétaires parlementaires eux-mêmes. Nous devons établir de très bonnes règles, en général, relativement aux intervenants qui s'adressent à ces personnes. Je ne sais pas si cela devrait être fait par le truchement de la loi électorale. Toutefois, j'ai en quelque sorte songé à ces personnes, et je me demandais si je devais en parler.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

Madame Shepherd.

Mme Karen Shepherd:

Je n'ai rien à ajouter.

M. David Christopherson:

Encore une fois, je veux seulement m'assurer que vous avez toujours l'occasion de parler.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Il vous reste presque trois minutes.

M. David Christopherson:

Les cinq jours — et, encore une fois, je m'adresse à M. Nater, qui a soulevé cette question — en soi ont soulevé deux ou trois problèmes. Le premier tient au fait que rien n'interdit à quiconque qui ne figure pas sur cette liste cinq jours auparavant de se présenter à l'improviste. Ce qu'on veut, c'est accroître la transparence, et l'une des préoccupations soulevées tenait au fait que, même si vous ne figurez pas sur la liste, vous pourriez tout de même vous présenter, et selon la rumeur, comme en fait foi le clin d'oeil de connivence, le ministre des Finances sera présent et le premier ministre fera une apparition, et vous voudrez vous assurer d'assister à l'événement.

Nous entrons dans les menus détails du projet de loi, et je l'accepterai si vous me dites que je vais trop loin et que je m'avance dans un domaine qui n'est pas le mien. Je comprends cela. Toutefois, c'est là que nous en sommes, et c'est le sujet que nous traitons.

Nous pouvons faire valoir que la période de cinq jours est trop longue, et cette question sera encore soulevée, mais, l'une des solutions qui ont été proposées, c'est que, si vous ne figurez pas sur cette liste cinq jours avant l'événement, vous ne pouvez tout simplement pas vous y rendre. Il a été mentionné qu'une personne pourrait tomber malade trois jours avant et qu'il serait logique que l'on puisse la remplacer.

Eh bien, laissez-moi vous dire que, dans le monde de la politique de puissance, il y a toute une différence — sans vouloir offenser qui que ce soit — entre le fait d'avoir prévu une rencontre avec le ministre de la Culture, qui est tombé malade, puis finir par rencontrer le ministre des Finances, car lui, ô surprise, peut s'y rendre.

Quelles sont vos réflexions à ce sujet?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Je ne sais pas. Je pense que vous avez raison. Vous êtes dans les détails techniques. Il y a là une faille. La question est de savoir jusqu'où vous irez pour corriger la faille. Je ne pourrais plus le dire.

M. David Christopherson:

Nous devons en quelque sorte rester à 30 000 pieds pour nous assurer que vous êtes pertinente par rapport à notre discussion.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Je n'ai pas étudié le projet de loi en grand détail. J'ai été très occupée, ces derniers temps. Je me concentre sur la façon dont ma loi s'y rattache. Certes, il s'en va dans une excellente direction.

(1240)

M. David Christopherson:

Considérez-vous que le projet de loi a beaucoup ou peu d'importance? Vous affirmez qu'il va dans la bonne direction. S'agit-il d'une étape importante? S'agit-il d'un petit premier pas? Comment qualifieriez-vous le projet de loi en tant que tel, du point de vue des problèmes qui vous préoccupent et de la façon dont il dissipe certaines de ces préoccupations?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Il va assez loin, selon moi, parce qu'il met certaines choses dans le domaine public. Il me permet d'avoir accès à certaines informations si je fais face à un genre de problème. J'utilise beaucoup le registre des lobbyistes à cette fin également. Il y a des interfaces dans l'ensemble de ces rapports publics, alors je pense que c'est une bonne initiative.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord. Bien.

Merci. [Français]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Christopherson.

Madame Sahota, la parole est à vous. [Traduction]

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Je vais poursuivre sur le sujet dont vous parliez.

Vous avez mentionné dans votre introduction, et vous venez tout juste de le faire encore, que votre rôle principal consiste à vous assurer que tout le monde respecte la Loi sur les conflits d'intérêts. Vous affirmez que le projet de loi C-50 est un petit texte de loi. La ministre espère également présenter tout un tas de dispositions réglementaires diverses et d'autres choses également.

Dans quelle mesure ce petit texte de loi, qui tente de créer un peu plus de transparence, vous aidera-t-il à faire votre travail d'appliquer la Loi sur les conflits d'intérêts?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Pour moi, cette situation se présente le plus souvent après coup. Il ne s'agit pas de savoir si la personne a participé ou non à l'activité de financement. Si quelqu'un arrive et souhaite obtenir quelque chose de sa part deux mois plus tard, c'est là qu'il est très utile pour moi de savoir quel est son lien avec certaines personnes et si elle lui a donné de l'argent. Essentiellement, ma principale disposition sur le financement est très lacunaire. Il s'agit du lien entre le ministre ou qui que ce soit et la personne qui fournit le financement, quand cette personne souhaite obtenir un traitement spécial quelconque.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il s'agit probablement d'une grande part des plaintes et des allégations sur lesquelles vous enquêtez lorsque vous examinez ce qui a été échangé et là où se trouve le conflit. Maintenant, vous pouvez emboîter les deux pièces et découvrir s'il y a vraiment eu une certaine interaction qui aurait pu mener à cela.

Mme Mary Dawson:

C'est exact. Il s'agit d'une vérification pour voir quelle est la relation avec la personne en question.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'est un bon pas en avant, alors?

Mme Mary Dawson:

C'est exact.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

Auparavant, les témoins qui ont comparu devant nous ont mentionné — tout comme vous — que le projet de loi pourrait peut-être s'appliquer à d'autres personnes. Les chefs de cabinet ont été mentionnés, et vous venez tout juste de parler des secrétaires parlementaires. Notre témoin précédent a affirmé que ce serait une bonne idée d'inclure les chefs des partis d'opposition parce que, surtout lorsque nous avons un gouvernement minoritaire, nous alternons souvent entre deux partis tous les 18 mois, et on ne sait pas qui va être au pouvoir dans un avenir très rapproché.

Pensez-vous que le projet de loi devrait s'étendre aux porte-paroles, au Cabinet fantôme, également? Jusqu'où devrait-il aller?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Je pense qu'il est probablement allé jusqu'où il devait aller.

L'idée des chefs me plaît, car elle établit un genre d'équilibre entre les deux côtés, pour ainsi dire.

Je ne sais pas jusqu'où il devrait aller.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

Vous avez affirmé que vous aviez songé à l'idée que le projet de loi s'applique à tous les secrétaires parlementaires, aux ministres et peut-être à tous les parlementaires, qui ne pourraient plus participer à ces types d'événements. J'ai entendu cela, mais, ensuite, vous avez ajouté: « Eh bien, je n'en suis pas certaine; c'est seulement quelque chose qui m'a traversé l'esprit. »

Je me rappelle le témoignage que nous avons entendu juste avant le vôtre. En raison de la façon dont nous fonctionnons dans notre démocratie — la façon dont elle est organisée, sur le plan pratique —, les partis ont besoin de recueillir des fonds. Ce n'est pas que les partis; c'est nous, en tant que députés. Quand on y pense, les secrétaires parlementaires et les ministres sont responsables de leur propre circonscription, pas seulement du portefeuille de leur cabinet politique. Ils sont responsables de leur propre circonscription, et ils doivent recueillir des fonds pour les associations de leur circonscription, simplement dans le but de devenir députés. On ne peut pas être membre du Cabinet si on n'est pas député, n'est-ce pas?

Si nous allons à cet échelon fondamental, j'ai l'impression qu'à un certain moment, nous tentons de régler des problèmes. Comme l'a affirmé le témoin précédent, nous pourrions nous retrouver face à des conséquences perverses, si nous poussons le projet de loi trop loin. Comment ces personnes sont-elles censées faire leur devoir civique, assumer le rôle de chef d'une campagne et la diriger, si elles sont ministres, mais qu'elles ne peuvent pas recueillir de fonds dans leur propre circonscription, pour leur propre association de circonscription?

(1245)

Mme Mary Dawson:

Il s'agit d'un problème qu'on rencontre souvent, car les ministres jouent deux rôles.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Comment pouvons-nous établir l'équilibre? Comment pouvons-nous nous assurer que ces personnes peuvent redevenir députés et ainsi être ministres, sans égard à...

Mme Mary Dawson:

Sous le régime de ma loi, je dois parfois déterminer si la personne agit à titre de député ou de ministre. Cela change la donne en ce qui a trait à certaines des décisions que je dois prendre.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

En ce qui concerne le projet de loi, pour ce qui est de dresser la liste des participants, vous pourriez plus facilement déterminer s'il s'agit d'un électeur qui n'a vraiment rien à voir avec le portefeuille du ministre et qui ne fait que tenir une petite activité de financement pour sa propre circonscription, ou bien d'un lobbyiste ou d'une personne qui s'intéresse beaucoup au portefeuille du ministre. Êtes-vous d'accord?

Mme Mary Dawson:

On en revient aux faits qui sont présentés dans une situation particulière.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il y a deux ou trois séances, quelqu'un a laissé entendre que le projet de loi devrait également s'appliquer aux personnes âgées de moins de 18 ans. Le témoin est allé jusqu'à affirmer que les mineurs qui avaient 7 ou 8 ans devraient figurer sur la liste comme ayant été amenés à l'événement d'un parti politique. Je pense que cette option nuirait à la capacité d'un parent d'être actif sur le plan civique et de participer à une activité de financement s'il a des obligations parentales en même temps et qu'il doit peut-être emmener ses enfants à l'un des événements. La personne pourrait hésiter, dans l'avenir, à se rendre à cet événement parce qu'elle ne veut pas que ses enfants, qui ne souhaitent pas vraiment être là ou qui n'ont aucune motivation politique pour y être, figurent sur ces listes. Pensez-vous que 18 ans soit le bon âge pour l'application du projet de loi, ou bien que l'âge devrait être supérieur ou inférieur?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Dix-huit ans est un âge limite assez fréquent. Je pense qu'il est aussi bon qu'un autre.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

Me reste-t-il des minutes?

Le président:

Vous avez 10 secondes.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Rapidement, vous avez mentionné que diverses plaintes avaient été déposées au cours des deux dernières années. Combien de plaintes y a-t-il eu sous le gouvernement précédent, si vous en avez la moindre idée, car je constate que vous avez établi une liste de divers rapports que vous avez dû rédiger parce que des règles relatives aux conflits d'intérêts avaient été enfreintes par des ministres précédents, et vous avez dû procéder à des enquêtes complètes. N'y avait-il pas de nombreuses plaintes à cette époque également?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Quand j'ai dit 20, j'exagérais probablement le nombre. Souvent, nous recevions des lettres qui n'étaient pas de vraies plaintes; ce n'était que de la rouspétance. Ces lettres étaient plus fréquentes que les vraies demandes de tout type. Nous recevons des demandes pour que nous enquêtions sur quelque chose, ou bien, s'il n'y a rien sur quoi enquêter au titre de la loi...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Et ces situations se produisent sous de nombreux gouvernements?

Le président:

Le temps est écoulé. Merci.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Elles ont suscité plus d'attention dernièrement, mais, comme je l'ai dit, j'ai des cas concernant ces types de problèmes depuis longtemps.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Nater.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les deux commissaires de s'être jointes à nous cet après-midi.

Je vais commencer par vous remercier toutes les deux de votre service. Madame Dawson, je sais que vous occupez votre poste depuis plus d'une décennie, et, madame Shepherd, depuis plus de huit ans. Je veux vous en remercier. Je sais que vous avez toutes les deux accepté une multitude de renouvellements de mandat temporaires. Je vous en remercie également.

Comme vous arrivez toutes les deux à la fin de votre mandat, vous a-t-on consultées en ce qui concerne le processus de remplacement?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Non.

Mme Karen Shepherd:

Je sais que le BCP dirige le processus, mais c'est entre ses mains.

M. John Nater:

Aucune de vous deux n'a été consultée relativement au processus. D'accord, merci.

Ces renouvellements de mandat pour des périodes plus courtes ont-ils miné votre capacité d'entreprendre des études dans les limites de vos compétences, étant donné que vous ne savez pas exactement jusqu'à quand votre mandat pourrait être prolongé, en ce qui concerne les études continues que vous pourriez mener?

(1250)

Mme Mary Dawson:

Non, je poursuis comme à l'habitude.

Mme Karen Shepherd:

C'est la même réponse. Le fait est qu'un directeur des enquêtes et un grand nombre de professionnels et de conseillers juridiques siègent avec moi. Les choses se poursuivront après mon départ. Non, cette situation n'a rien interrompu.

M. John Nater:

Merci.

Le document Pour un gouvernement ouvert et responsable a été cité à deux ou trois occasions. Il s'agit du document du premier ministre. Madame Dawson, vous avez mentionné que vous ne faites pas appliquer ce document. Vous n'avez pas la compétence nécessaire pour le faire.

Si le Parlement vous demandait de le faire appliquer, votre commissariat serait-il en position d'entreprendre cette initiative?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Probablement. Peut-être que certaines de ses parties n'ont pas leur place dans une loi comme la mienne, mais ce document contient certainement des sections importantes qui pourraient être incluses dans ma loi.

J'ai été ravie de voir ces lignes directrices. Elles ont été publiées en conséquence de l'un de mes rapports — je pense —, dans lequel j'affirmais qu'il y avait certaines lacunes. Au moins, des lignes directrices sur la responsabilité ont été établies, alors, certaines des règles qu'il contient sont... Par exemple, une règle très importante concerne la surveillance de ce que font les membres de votre personnel: lorsque vous ne pouvez pas organiser quelque chose directement, mais que vous demandez à votre personnel de le faire. Ce genre de lacune ne devrait pas exister.

Alors, certaines parties du document pourraient être intégrées dans ma loi; voilà ce que j'ai dit.

M. John Nater:

La question du personnel a certainement été soulevée à un certain nombre d'occasions. Je sais que M. Christopherson l'a mentionné également, et je pense qu'elle vaut la peine d'être abordée.

Je veux aussi poser une question à Mme Shepherd.

L'un de nos témoins précédents nous a fait part de ses préoccupations à l'égard de la possibilité que ce type de projet de loi crée presque un double du registre des lobbyistes, ou bien un registre semblable à celui des lobbyistes, c'est-à-dire qu'Élections Canada va maintenant tenir un registre d'essentiellement tous les participants à des activités de financement politique.

Dans l'optique d'un lobbyiste... êtes-vous préoccupée par la possibilité qu'une telle orientation soit adoptée à Élections Canada et qu'on crée pratiquement un deuxième registre des participants issus du monde politique?

Mme Karen Shepherd:

Pour être honnête, je ne suis pas certaine au sujet de la reproduction de la liste. Ce que je sais, quand je regarde les particularités du projet de loi, c'est que quiconque aura acheté un billet dont le prix était de 200 $ figurera sur la liste. De mon point de vue, il s'agira au moins d'un autre outil que mes enquêteurs utiliseront pour vérifier si la loi ou le code ont été enfreints.

M. John Nater:

Je signalerais que, même si aucune de vos compétences — à défaut d'un meilleur terme — n'est directement touchée par le projet de loi, il s'agirait de quelque chose qui vous serait utile dans la conduite d'une enquête, que ce soit du point de vue d'un conflit d'intérêts ou d'un lobbyiste. Il s'agit d'un outil d'information.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Oui, c'est utile.

Mme Karen Shepherd:

En effet.

Le président:

Vous avez terminé.

M. John Nater:

Oui.

Le président:

Madame Sahota, je crois savoir que vous allez partager votre temps de parole avec Mme Tassi.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui.

Je veux seulement revenir sur la dernière partie, puis je vais céder la parole à ma collègue ici présente.

Comme, au début, votre exposé portait sur ces rapports particuliers, je me demandais si vous pourriez faire un peu plus la lumière sur eux. Je ne connais pas très bien les rapports Raitt, Dykstra et Glover. En quoi sont-ils liés à l'orientation que nous devrions prendre au moyen du projet de loi?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Je pense qu'aucune de ces affaires n'était visée à l'article 16, alors on a conclu dans les trois cas qu'aucune infraction n'avait été commise.

En ce qui concerne les questions qui ont été soulevées, dans l'un des cas, les employés avaient fait des choses dont la ministre n'était pas au courant; elle n'était donc pas personnellement impliquée, et elle ne leur avait pas donné l'ordre de faire les choses, alors elle n'a pas été prise...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Parlez-vous de l'acceptation de cadeaux?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Non, c'était lié aux activités de financement.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Les trois rapports étaient liés à des activités de financement.

Dans un autre cas, il avait été allégué qu'une personne avait reçu de Rogers le droit d'utiliser ses installations pour tenir une fête, mais, en fait, la personne avait payé le prix d'accès normal. Très souvent, quand on regarde ces enquêtes, on découvre qu'une justification les sous-tend.

Quel était le troisième?

(1255)

Mme Karen Shepherd:

C'était le rapport Glover.

Mme Mary Dawson:

Dans ce cas, encore une fois, les employés de la ministre avaient organisé quelque chose. C'était horrible. Ils avaient fait inviter tout le milieu du patrimoine de Winnipeg à un événement. La ministre avait été invitée à se rendre à une maison, mais personne ne lui avait dit qui avait été invité. C'est son association de circonscription qui avait organisé cet événement, alors il y a d'autres personnes qui peuvent organiser des choses.

Si ma loi contenait une règle qui dirait, par exemple: « Vous devez surveiller ce que font vos gens », cela aurait pu changer les choses. C'est tout.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord. Je vais laisser la parole à ma collègue, qui a aussi quelques questions à poser.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci.

Madame Shepherd, j'ai deux questions pour vous.

Premièrement, dans tout cela, vous essayez de trouver le juste équilibre et de vous assurer que ce que vous proposez est juste et raisonnable et, en même temps, vous cherchez à améliorer la situation actuelle, n'est-ce pas? Estimez-vous que le projet de loi C-50 établit un juste équilibre en permettant aux médias d'assister aux divers événements et en permettant aux lobbyistes d'y assister, tant que leur présence est notée? En ce qui concerne les exigences qui s'appliquent aux lobbyistes, estimez-vous que le projet de loi est équitable et qu'il établit un juste équilibre?

Mme Karen Shepherd:

Je ne réglemente pas les activités politiques. Ce que je réglemente... Conformément au code de déontologie des lobbyistes, qui prévoit un règlement pour les lobbyistes, comme je l'ai dit dans ma déclaration préliminaire, j'encouragerais les lobbyistes à toujours se demander si leur participation à des activités politiques pourrait créer un sentiment d'obligation advenant que, plus tard, ils fassent du lobbyisme auprès d'une personne en particulier.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'accord. Je connais la réponse à cette question, mais j'aimerais que cette réponse figure au compte rendu. À une question des médias, Andrew Scheer a répondu que, contrairement au premier ministre, il n'était pas titulaire d'une charge publique. J'aimerais seulement que vous nous confirmiez ici aujourd'hui que tous les députés, y compris M. Sheer, sont titulaires d'une charge publique désignée. Pouvez-vous le confirmer?

Mme Karen Shepherd:

Tous les représentants à l'une des deux chambres du Parlement sont titulaires d'une charge publique.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci.

Mme Karen Shepherd:

En fait, ils sont titulaires d'une charge publique désignée.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci.

Madame Dawson, vous avez une immense expérience dans ce domaine. Je me posais une question au sujet du seuil de 200 $. Nous avons fait cela sciemment, pour harmoniser le montant avec celui qui a trait aux déclarations en vertu de la Loi électorale du Canada; à votre avis, est-ce que ce seuil de 200 $ est adéquat en ce qui concerne le projet de loi C-50? Pensez-vous qu'il s'agit d'un montant adéquat, au regard de cette exigence?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Encore une fois, vous savez, on utilise un montant standard. Je ne sais pas si vous l'avez remarqué, mais il y a dans le code des dispositions sur la déclaration des cadeaux, par exemple, et le montant a été ramené de 500 $ à 200 $. Il me semble que c'est un montant standard assez largement accepté.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Donc, cela vous convient.

En ce qui concerne la transparence, vous avez dit qu'à votre avis, les changements proposés seront favorables tout en vous aidant dans vos tâches de supervision et de mise en oeuvre de la Loi sur les conflits d'intérêts. Vous avez dit également que les nouvelles règles seront maintenant utiles et que, lorsqu'une allégation de conflit d'intérêts surviendra, vous pourrez désormais, grâce à cette loi, obtenir les listes de manière rétroactive et les consulter.

Que devriez-vous faire si vous n'aviez pas cette liste? Quelle sorte de travail préparatoire auriez-vous à faire si vous n'aviez pas accès à cette liste?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Je pourrais consulter le registre des lobbyistes. Le groupe dont je m'occupe est bien plus large que le groupe des lobbyistes. Ce sont tous des intervenants. Il n'est pas nécessaire d'être un lobbyiste pour être assujetti à des règles de ce genre. Je ferais tout simplement tout mon possible pour trouver ce que je cherche. J'utilise tout ce qui peut l'être. Les gens qui s'enregistrent en vertu de ma loi, les gens qui divulguent de l'information, me communiquent beaucoup d'information, eux aussi, mais il arrive que je ne sois pas au courant de tout.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Je ne crois pas exagérer en disant que ce projet de loi vous aiderait beaucoup dans les recherches que vous avez à faire, étant donné que vous n'auriez à aller qu'à un seul endroit pour savoir quelles personnes étaient présentes, ce qui vous aiderait énormément au moment de mener votre enquête et de gérer les ressources dont vous disposez actuellement pour assurer la diligence voulue. Est-ce bien cela?

Mme Mary Dawson:

Oui, et dans certains cas, je n'y aurais même pas accès. Je n'aurais même pas le moyen de me renseigner. Ce serait un outil standard, et nous l'utiliserions.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci de vous être présentées. Vous avez toutes deux une très grande expérience, nous le savons. Nous savons également que vous travaillez dans la fonction publique depuis de nombreuses années. Je crois que vous avez fait un travail exemplaire. Nous allons suspendre la séance pendant quelques minutes pour accueillir notre prochain témoin.

(1255)

(1300)

Le président:

Encore une fois, bienvenue à la 73e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, qui mène une étude sur le projet de loi C-50, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada (financement politique).

Nous avons le plaisir d'accueillir Greg Essensa, directeur général des élections de l'Ontario.

Merci de vous être présenté. Vous êtes probablement notre témoin le plus attendu, et nous sommes ravis de pouvoir enfin vous recevoir. Nous avons plein de questions sur le bon travail qui se fait en Ontario. Je crois que nous avons tous bien hâte de vous entendre. Vous avez du temps pour votre déclaration préliminaire, si vous le voulez bien, puis nous vous poserons tour à tour quelques questions.

M. Greg Essensa (directeur général des élections, Élections Ontario):

J'aimerais pour commencer remercier le Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre de m'avoir invité à vous présenter mes observations concernant le projet de loi C-50, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada, portant sur le financement politique. Je suis content d'avoir l'occasion de vous présenter mes commentaires et mes conseils sur le processus électoral. Quand je formule des commentaires devant un comité de la Chambre des communes, je sais très bien qu'en fait, je m'adresse aux législateurs du Canada.

Aujourd'hui, j'aimerais parler brièvement des sujets suivants: premièrement, la création de règles du jeu équitables; deuxièmement, le système de financement électoral de l'Ontario; et troisièmement, les dispositions du projet de loi à l'étude.

Ma première observation concerne l'importance d'assurer des règles du jeu équitables. Tous les acteurs politiques ont besoin de ressources financières, et l'argent est un aspect essentiel, en politique. Les directeurs généraux des élections du Canada, ceux d'hier et ceux d'aujourd'hui, mentionnent le rôle particulier que jouent les partis dans le processus démocratique. Ils parlent aussi de la nécessité d'atteindre un juste équilibre pour créer une formule de financement qui permet aux partis d'exister, sans les enrichir injustement ou encore, à l'inverse, en faire les obligés d'une source de contribution quelconque.

La notion de règles du jeu équitables est essentielle, dans notre démocratie. C'est aussi un principe unificateur de l'administration des élections; cette notion relie le processus du scrutin et le processus de la campagne. Voici en quoi ces processus sont reliés. Le résultat d'une élection est censé refléter la volonté réelle du peuple. Les règles du financement politique sont censées faire en sorte que les parties ont des chances égales de recueillir et de dépenser de l'argent afin de faire connaître leur message et de gagner des votes. Le résultat d'une élection ne devrait pas être différent parce qu'un parti a eu plus de chances qu'un autre d'influencer l'électorat.

Les universitaires et les juges ont beaucoup écrit sur le sujet. En tant qu'administrateur électoral, je crois que cela se résume à une proposition fondamentale: toute personne qui entre dans l'arène électorale doit être traitée comme toute autre. Il convient alors de déterminer quelles règles rationnelles, nécessaires et pratiques il faut adopter. Autrement dit, nous devons réaliser l'équilibre entre la transparence et la participation, dans le processus électoral.

J'aimerais maintenant faire un survol du régime des finances électorales de l'Ontario.

L'an dernier, l'Ontario a modifié en profondeur son système électoral. On m'a demandé de servir de conseiller au Comité permanent des affaires gouvernementales, ce que j'ai fait. En tant que directeur général des élections, je suis un fonctionnaire indépendant de l'assemblée législative. Mon mandat consiste entre autres à contrôler les exigences en matière d'enregistrement et de rapports financiers que doivent respecter tous les partis et tous les candidats, non pas seulement ceux qui font partie de l'assemblée législative. Vous pourriez dire que je suis un arbitre et qu'à ce titre, je fais respecter les règles du jeu politique dans le cadre des élections provinciales. Je crois que mon rôle consiste à faire en sorte que les règles du jeu s'appliquent de la même manière à tous les compétiteurs.

L'Ontario a lancé un grand processus de consultation du public. Pendant que j'étais conseiller, j'ai eu l'occasion de parcourir la province et d'entendre des témoins parler des liens entre l'argent et la politique. J'ai moi-même comparu trois fois devant le Comité pour lui faire part de mes réflexions sur les dispositions du projet de loi.

Je me suis intéressé aux discussions touchant le projet de loi avant que le processus de consultation ne commence, et il m'est apparu évident qu'il y avait une ferme volonté de réformer le régime de financement des campagnes pour mettre fin à ce que l'on appelait « l'accès au comptant ». L'Ontario a apporté d'importants changements à ses limites de contribution.

La première mesure a consisté à interdire les dons des sociétés et des syndicats. Désormais seuls les particuliers qui résident en Ontario peuvent contribuer à des partis politiques, à des associations de circonscription ou à des campagnes de candidats, de candidats à la direction d'un parti et de candidats à l'investiture.

Le deuxième changement important touchait le montant maximal de la contribution annuelle d'un particulier à un parti politique. Avant les modifications, un particulier pouvait verser chaque année une contribution allant jusqu'à 9 975 $ et faire une contribution supplémentaire de 9 975 $ pendant une campagne. Cela veut dire que, les années où nous avons eu deux élections partielles, les particuliers ont pu verser à un parti une contribution qui a pu atteindre 29 925 $.

Selon le projet de loi actuel, la limite de contribution à un parti politique serait fixée à 1 200 $ par année; ce serait le même montant pour les contributions à une association de circonscription ou à la campagne d'un candidat à l'investiture, ainsi que pour les contributions à la campagne d'un candidat à la direction d'un parti, ce qui porte à 3 600 $ la limite des contributions annuelles totales. Aucun dépassement de cette limite annuelle ne serait permis, peu importe le nombre de campagnes.

J'aimerais maintenant vous parler des allocations annuelles.

Au début de ma déclaration préliminaire, j'ai souligné qu'il fallait atteindre un juste équilibre pour créer une formule de financement qui permet aux partis d'exister sans les enrichir injustement ou encore, à l'inverse, en faire les obligés d'une source de financement quelconque. C'est dans ce but que l'Ontario a proposé un système unique consistant à verser des allocations trimestrielles à l'appui des activités des partis politiques ou des associations de circonscription. Des formules de financement ont été élaborées pour qu'on puisse déterminer combien recevra chaque parti ou chaque association de circonscription.

(1305)



Même si je crois sincèrement que le soutien financier de source privée ou publique est essentiel aux partis politiques, je ne suis pas partisan d'un modèle plutôt que d'un autre; je crois plutôt qu'une formule de financement qui tient compte de façon équilibrée des sources publiques et privées est un élément important de notre système démocratique.

Une autre modification importante concernait les activités de financement proprement dites. L'Ontario a adopté des exigences en matière de déclaration similaires à celles prévues dans les dispositions du projet de loi C-50 pour ce qui concerne les activités de financement. De plus, les partis sont tenus d'annoncer publiquement sur leur site Web, sept jours à l'avance, qu'ils tiendront une activité de financement.

La participation à des activités de financement, cependant, a fait l'objet d'importantes modifications, en Ontario. De nombreux acteurs politiques ne sont maintenant plus autorisés à assister aux activités de financement. Il s'agit des chefs d'un parti enregistré, des députés et des membres du personnel du bureau du chef de parti. Comme vous le voyez, l'Ontario a adopté une approche ferme au moment de modifier son régime de financement des élections.

Ce que j'aimerais vous soumettre, lorsque le Comité examinera et modifiera les dispositions touchant les lois sur le financement électoral, c'est le risque qu'il y ait des conséquences inattendues. Permettez-moi de vous donner un exemple.

Pendant que l'Ontario modifiait ses exigences en matière de financement, en empêchant les chefs de parti, les députés et les candidats à l'investiture de participer à des activités de financement, elle n'a pas prévu d'exceptions pour les événements comme les assemblées générales annuelles, les congrès d'orientation et d'autres activités du même ordre. Je crois que les nouvelles exigences en matière de financement visaient au départ à restreindre la participation à de grands dîners-bénéfice et à des activités du même genre. Toutefois, étant donné le libellé de la loi, les restrictions relatives à la participation ont eu je crois comme conséquence inattendue de s'appliquer à des réunions de parti, par exemple les assemblées générales annuelles, pour lesquelles les droits d'inscription des délégués comprennent une part de contribution. J'ai donc écrit aux trois chefs de parti pour leur recommander de modifier dès que possible la Loi sur le financement des élections afin d'y intégrer une exemption spécifique pour de tels événements.

Je ne crois pas que les dispositions sur la participation visaient à empêcher les chefs de parti et les députés de participer à des événements où les politiques et les programmes de leur parti font l'objet d'un débat et sont arrêtés. De manière générale, j'étais en faveur de la plupart des changements et je trouvais que l'ampleur des modifications était appropriée.

Je vais maintenant parler des dispositions du projet de loi C-50. Quand je dois examiner les dispositions d'un projet de loi, celui-ci ou un autre touchant le système électoral, je me demande toujours si les changements visent à protéger l'intégrité du processus électoral, à en préserver le caractère équitable et à promouvoir la transparence.

J'ai examiné le projet de loi dans ses moindres détails, et j'ai fait les observations suivantes. Les dispositions du projet de loi C-50 ne sont pas aussi strictes que celles que prévoit le système actuel de financement des élections de l'Ontario. Pourtant, il compte de nombreux éléments positifs. Je crois sincèrement qu'il assurera une plus grande transparence, puisqu'il rend les activités de financement publiques et qu'il ajoute des exigences de déclaration au directeur général des élections.

Je suggérerais aux membres du Comité, lorsqu'ils délibéreront sur ces dispositions, d'appliquer le principe d'uniformité lorsqu'il s'agit de régir des acteurs politiques. La façon dont le projet de loi est rédigé laisse croire que de nombreuses dispositions en matière de financement s'appliquent uniquement aux chefs de parti, aux chefs intérimaires ou aux candidats à la direction d'un parti. Je crois qu'on a oublié de tenir compte, par exemple, des députés ou des membres importants du personnel politique, par exemple les chefs de cabinet, au moment de réglementer la présence à des activités de financement. Ils sont nombreux, dans ce groupe, à exercer une influence qu'il est important de reconnaître. M. Jean-Pierre Kingsley a soulevé cette question lorsqu'il est venu témoigner devant vous au sujet de ce projet de loi, et je partage ses justifications.

Votre comité va continuer à discuter de ce projet de loi et des modifications supplémentaires du mode de financement politique, et je vous rappelle encore une fois d'examiner de très près toutes les dispositions du projet de loi pour vous assurer qu'il n'y aura pas de conséquences inattendues.

J'aimerais profiter de l'occasion pour remercier le Comité de m'avoir invité à prendre la parole et à faire part de mon point de vue en tant que directeur général des élections de l'Ontario. Je vous félicite du travail que vous faites pour modifier le système électoral et je répondrais avec plaisir à vos questions.

(1310)

Le président:

Merci.

Pour la première série de questions, nous commençons par Mme Tassi.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci de votre déclaration et merci de votre présence aujourd'hui. Nous avons bien hâte d'entendre les réponses que vous allez nous donner ainsi que vos commentaires, puisque vous avez acquis une expérience formidable quand vous avez effectué le même processus, en Ontario.

J'ai bien aimé ce que vous avez dit au sujet de l'établissement de règles du jeu identiques pour tout le monde et aussi quand vous vous êtes comparé à un arbitre; je trouve la comparaison appropriée. La solution, en réalité, c'est l'équilibre ou la transparence et la participation. Pensez-vous que le projet de loi C-50 atteint sa cible, quant à cet aspect?

M. Greg Essensa:

Je crois qu'il y a de nombreux éléments dans le projet de loi et les dispositions qui assurent une bien plus grande transparence, et je les appuie sans réserve. Selon moi, le fait d'annoncer publiquement la tenue d'un événement cinq jours à l'avance assure une plus grande transparence. Je crois aussi que le fait de communiquer au directeur général des élections la liste des personnes présentes et de publier cette liste favorise encore une fois une transparence accrue.

S'il y a une chose que je vous suggérerais d'examiner pour améliorer le projet de loi, ce serait d'imposer les mêmes exigences pendant les périodes électorales. C'est à ce moment-là que les Canadiens commencent vraiment à réfléchir et à se demander qui ils voudraient choisir et élire pour les représenter. Je crois que si l'on veut une réelle transparence du système électoral et de notre démocratie, il faut faire connaître les activités de ce type qui ont lieu en période électorale et fournir les renseignements demandés à Élections Canada de façon à assurer la transparence de toutes ces activités en faisant savoir à quel moment elles auront lieu et qui y aura participé.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Vous n'êtes pas le premier à le dire. J'en prends note avec intérêt.

J'imagine que quand vous pensez à un ministre, par exemple, comme le témoin précédent l'a mentionné, essentiellement, le ministre est encore en fonction, même si l'on se trouve en période électorale. Je crois que ce que l'on veut dire, c'est qu'il n'agira pas à ce titre. C'est pour cette raison que les règles sont suspendues pendant cette période. Toutefois, nous allons tenir compte de ces commentaires et des données probantes.

Si j'ai bien compris, vous allez jusqu'à affirmer qu'à votre avis, l'Ontario a eu raison d'appliquer ces exigences à tous les députés. Suggérez-vous qu'il faudrait envisager d'imposer cette exigence non seulement aux activités de financement auxquelles les ministres participent, mais aussi aux activités de financement exigeant une contribution de 200 $ ou plus auxquelles un député quelconque peut participer? Est-ce que j'ai bien compris?

M. Greg Essensa:

C'est ce que je dirais, ce que je recommanderais. Je m'appuie pour dire cela sur des données statistiques, et j'ai apporté un document pour que le Comité l'examine.

Le troisième trimestre de 2017 vient tout juste de prendre fin, et nous avons examiné les trois premiers trimestres de 2016 par rapport à ceux de 2017, en nous intéressant aux campagnes de financement. Au premier trimestre, les partis politiques représentés à la Chambre avaient amassé 80 % moins d'argent en 2017 qu'en 2016. Au deuxième trimestre, ils en avaient amassé 30 % de moins. Au troisième trimestre, ils en avaient amassé 18 % de plus. La tendance est nette: les partis politiques, grâce aux manoeuvres de leurs agents, ont trouvé le moyen de renouveler leurs tactiques et activités de financement et de continuer ainsi à s'enrichir au même rythme. Oui, ça leur a pris un peu de temps. Ça leur a pris les deux premiers trimestres. Cependant, les partis ont les caisses au moins aussi pleines, sinon mieux garnies, qu'au troisième trimestre de 2016.

(1315)

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Il ne s'agit pas d'essayer de contourner le règlement ou de s'y soustraire dans le but de regarnir ses coffres. Ce que nous cherchons, en réalité, c'est de faire en sorte que tout se passe de façon ouverte et transparente, c'est-à-dire qu'une personne qui participe à un événement donné et peut y rencontrer quelqu'un qui occupe un poste important, un ministre, par exemple, sera enregistrée.

Vous ne pensez pas que cela aille plus loin. Vous pensez que c'est, en réalité...

Ce qui me préoccupe, ce n'est pas tellement qu'au bout du compte, les députés trouveront le moyen de regarnir leurs coffres. Mon objectif, ce serait de trouver ce qu'il convient de faire pour atteindre cet équilibre qui permet d'assurer à la fois la transparence et la participation, et je ne voudrais pas être plus catholique que le pape.

M. Greg Essensa:

À mon avis, l'Ontario a atteint le juste équilibre. Nous devons attendre la fin d'un cycle électoral complet pour en faire une évaluation exhaustive, mais j'ai siégé au Comité, j'ai parcouru la province et j'ai écouté toutes les préoccupations soulevées par les Ontariens pendant les consultations; le nombre de témoins qui se disaient fort préoccupés par l'accès au comptant et qui demandaient aux politiciens de régler le problème était plus élevé que la moyenne.

Il nous reste encore des recherches à mener. À la fin du cycle électoral, en 2018, et une fois que nous aurons fait l'expérience des modifications pendant tout un cycle, je pourrai présenter à l'assemblée législative toute autre recommandation qui me paraîtrait utile, en me fondant sur les résultats des trois années précédentes.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Monsieur le président, combien de temps nous reste-t-il?

Le président:

Il vous reste un peu moins de deux minutes.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'accord. Je vais céder la parole à Mme Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'ai une question. Pour en revenir à ce que ma collègue Mme Tassi vient de dire au sujet de ceux qui contournent les règles, je me disais que les gens peuvent me rencontrer en tout temps, puisque je suis leur députée. J'essaie de retourner le plus souvent possible dans ma circonscription, j'y suis toutes les semaines de congé parlementaire et la plupart des vendredis, et tous ceux qui veulent prendre rendez-vous avec moi en obtiendront un. Je dis rarement non à qui que ce soit. Et si quelqu'un vient discuter avec moi durant une heure, peu importe le sujet, qu'est-ce qu'il l'empêche de me faire un chèque et de faire un don par la suite?

Est-ce que le but de ces règles en matière de financement et d'activités de financement n'est pas justement que l'on puisse comprendre ce qui se passe et savoir qui pourrait tirer avantage des dons qu'il verse plutôt que de tout simplement interdire à une personne de se trouver dans la même pièce qu'un député, tout simplement, ou en l'occurrence un député provincial, voire un ministre? Pour faciliter la tâche de la commissaire à l'éthique et arriver à comprendre la situation, il ne faut pas nécessairement interdire tout bonnement aux députés de participer à ces activités. Ce que l'on veut savoir, c'est tout ce qui peut être inapproprié.

Les activités de financement ne sont pas mauvaises en soi.

M. Greg Essensa:

Je ne suis pas contre votre dernière affirmation. J'ai déclaré trois fois devant le comité ontarien que j'étais on ne peut plus en faveur d'un équilibre entre le financement privé et le financement public, et je suis fermement convaincu que cela s'impose. Je ne veux surtout pas dire par là que nous devrions interdire aux partis politiques, aux candidats ou aux acteurs politiques de recueillir de l'argent de cette manière, mais il faut respecter un certain équilibre.

En ce qui concerne vos commentaires sur la transparence, je dirais que, même si la sphère politique fait toujours l'objet de quelques insinuations d'irrégularités, je ne crois pas qu'il faut y accorder foi. Les gens du public, dans toute la province, n'ont cessé de me dire qu'ils avaient l'impression que de riches donateurs pouvaient participer à des activités d'accès au comptant où ils pouvaient discuter avec des parlementaires, des acteurs et des agents politiques et faire prévaloir leurs intérêts beaucoup mieux, en raison de cette influence indue, parce qu'ils pouvaient mettre de l'argent sur la table.

Le président:

Merci, madame Sahota.

Monsieur Nater.

(1320)

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur Essensa, de vous être joint à nous cet après-midi. C'est toujours intéressant d'entendre ce qui se passe dans d'autres administrations. Je l'apprécie.

J'aimerais revenir sur le processus mis en oeuvre par l'assemblée législative provinciale. J'aimerais savoir quel rôle exactement vous avez joué. Il m'a semblé que vous avez participé activement à l'ébauche de la loi et que vous avez agi en tant qu'expert-conseil pour le Comité des affaires gouvernementales.

Est-ce que le gouvernement provincial a décidé de manière délibérée de faire participer le directeur général des élections au processus d'élaboration de cette loi?

M. Greg Essensa:

C'est le procureur général qui m'a demandé si j'aimerais siéger à ce comité. J'ai déterminé un ensemble de paramètres selon lesquels je le ferais en tant que conseiller. Puisque je suis un fonctionnaire indépendant de l'assemblée législative, je me suis contenté de conseiller le comité en ce qui a trait aux commentaires et propositions des témoins et à la façon dont on pouvait mettre ces choses en oeuvre ou au rôle administratif que pourrait jouer Élections Ontario relativement à certaines de ces suggestions.

Je n'ai pas participé à proprement parler à la rédaction du texte de loi. On m'a demandé des conseils pendant le processus des délibérations et j'ai été appelé à témoigner à quelques reprises pour faire part de mes réflexions et recommandations.

C'était une décision délibérée, de mon côté, puisque, comme je l'ai dit devant le Comité, l'Ontario me semblait à ce moment-là arrivé à un tournant décisif, et nous avions l'occasion de revoir de fond en comble le régime de financement politique de l'Ontario, un exercice qui, honnêtement, n'avait pas été fait depuis 40 ans. J'estimais que le moment était venu.

M. John Nater:

Vous avez rapidement parlé du financement public et privé en ce qui a trait aux acteurs politiques. Un des problèmes, à mon avis — et j'aimerais que vous fassiez la lumière sur ce sujet —, concerne la façon dont les associations de circonscription peuvent avoir accès au financement public, conformément au régime qui a cours en Ontario.

M. Greg Essensa:

L'Ontario a mis en oeuvre un processus unique — si je ne me trompe pas, il est unique au pays — selon lequel toutes les associations de circonscription se partagent chaque trimestre une somme de 6 250 $ en fonction des résultats obtenus aux élections précédentes. Si le parti A a obtenu 40 % des votes, il recevra 40 % de cette somme. Mais une disposition prévoyait que ces associations de circonscription devaient avoir été jugées conformes par Élections Ontario pendant les quatre années précédentes.

Je puis vous dire que cette disposition a grandement amélioré la transparence en Ontario. L'un des problèmes auxquels je fais face, en tant que directeur général des élections — et je suis certain que vous êtes nombreux à faire face au même problème —, c'est que, lorsqu'un parti politique donné remporte depuis longtemps une circonscription particulière, les autres associations de cette circonscription ont souvent de la difficulté à rendre des comptes comme il se doit aux organismes électoraux concernés.

La situation n'était pas différente en Ontario. Mais cette exigence, liée au financement, a permis d'assurer une plus grande transparence, et, en effet, la plupart sinon la totalité des associations de circonscription ont fait des pieds et des mains pour s'assurer d'être désormais conformes. Et il y a à ce chapitre, dans les faits, une meilleure transparence.

M. John Nater:

À l'heure actuelle, il est interdit aux ministres, au premier ministre et aux députés de participer à des activités de financement. Mais cette interdiction ne s'étend pas, si j'ai bien compris, aux candidats désignés, et je crois comprendre que l'assemblée législative envisage de modifier son règlement pour que cette interdiction s'applique à eux aussi.

Appuyez-vous cette mesure, consistant à étendre l'interdiction aux candidats désignés, ce qui reviendrait par exemple à étendre la mesure au candidat conservateur d'un bastion de ce parti, par exemple Hamilton-Centre, mais pas, disons, au chef de cabinet du ministre des Finances? Est-ce que vous êtes en faveur de cette mesure?

M. Greg Essensa:

Oui, je suis en faveur, puisque la disposition telle qu'elle est énoncée dans notre loi prévoit que les candidats désignés par un parti ne sont pas considérés comme des candidats inscrits tant qu'ils ne se sont pas inscrits auprès du bureau d'Élections Ontario. Il y a donc une période de flottement. Cela veut dire que les candidats désignés par leur parti peuvent participer aux activités de financement parce qu'ils ne sont pas encore des « candidats inscrits ». C'est pourquoi je suis en faveur de cette modification.

M. John Nater:

Vous êtes d'accord pour dire que les chefs de cabinet devraient être exclus?

M. Greg Essensa:

C'est exact.

M. John Nater:

Quel est votre raisonnement?

M. Greg Essensa:

Je m'excuse?

M. John Nater:

Pourquoi ne voulez-vous pas que cette mesure s'étende par exemple au chef de cabinet du ministre des Finances?

M. Greg Essensa:

Oh! Les chefs de cabinet des ministres, oui, je suis d'accord. Je ne suis pas d'accord quand il ne s'agit pas de ministres.

M. John Nater:

Merci.

Pourriez-vous nous éclairer sur les activités qui ont mené à l'adoption de cette loi? Que se passait-il en Ontario à ce moment-là, qui a amené l'assemblée législative à imposer ce régime de financement?

M. Greg Essensa:

Je crois que tout a commencé parce qu'il y a eu vraiment beaucoup d'articles dans les journaux de Toronto et d'autres régions de l'Ontario selon lesquels le gouvernement en place organisait des événements qu'on disait être d'accès au comptant. Il y aurait eu des dîners privés pour lesquels les invités avaient versé des sommes d'argent substantielles. Ces dîners réunissaient peut-être 20 ou 30 personnes, et ces personnes pouvaient rencontrer par exemple le ministre des Finances, le premier ministre ou d'autres gens influents. Un certain nombre d'articles a donc paru un peu partout en Ontario, au printemps dernier, en mars et avril, et le gouvernement a alors jugé nécessaire de régler le problème, ce qui a débouché sur l'élaboration du projet de loi 2 et la création d'un comité qui a parcouru la province pour entendre les Ontariens.

(1325)

M. John Nater:

Si ma mémoire ne me fait pas défaut, il semble que le cabinet du premier ministre fixait officieusement — mais c'est peut-être officiellement — le montant d'argent que chaque ministre devait recueillir. Êtes-vous au courant?

M. Greg Essensa:

Je ne suis au courant que de ce qu'ont publié les journaux.

M. John Nater:

Maintenant, cependant, rien n'empêcherait la direction d'un parti d'encourager chaque association de circonscription, les personnes responsables de la collecte de fonds de ces associations, à recueillir de l'argent, et il n'y a qu'une disposition selon laquelle les ministres ne peuvent pas assister en personne à ces activités, mais leurs délégués le peuvent, c'est bien ça?

M. Greg Essensa:

Rien dans la loi ne l'empêcherait.

M. John Nater:

Vous avez parlé d'un préavis de sept jours exigé dans la province. À l'échelle fédérale, on propose un préavis de cinq jours. J'ai donc deux questions à ce sujet. Premièrement, j'aimerais savoir si vous estimez que c'est raisonnable. Deuxièmement — et mes collègues ont soulevé la question à de nombreuses reprises —, disons qu'un événement est organisé depuis longtemps, mais qu'au départ, on n'annonçait pas la présence d'un titulaire de charge publique désignée, d'un premier ministre ou d'un ministre, et, à grand renfort de clins d'oeil et de coups de coude, cet invité est ajouté un jour ou deux, voire quelques heures avant le début de l'événement, et la plupart des gens savaient que l'invité serait présent. Pensez-vous que c'est une faille qui exige qu'on modifie la loi d'une façon ou d'une autre?

M. Greg Essensa:

Je dirais que la dernière partie de votre scénario serait difficile à contrôler, qu'il serait difficile de trouver une manière pratique d'appliquer la loi. J'imagine qu'une personne aussi occupée que le premier ministre ou le premier ministre de l'Ontario ou d'une autre grande administration peut très bien, étant donné la nature de son agenda, avoir des changements de dernière minute qui lui permet d'assister à de telles activités. Je crois qu'il serait difficile d'appliquer la loi, pour un organisme électoral, et je ne suis pas non plus certain que la mise en oeuvre d'une pratique exemplaire servirait les intérêts du public.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La dernière question sera posée par M. Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président. J'éprouve toujours une grande nostalgie quand on parle de l'Ontario, car j'y ai passé 13 belles années.

Merci beaucoup de vous être présenté. De toute évidence, l'Ontario, puisqu'elle est la plus grande province de notre Confédération, nous donne souvent une bonne orientation dans ce type de dossier.

J'aimerais revenir sur vos commentaires touchant le financement public et sur votre conviction qu'il faut réaliser l'équilibre. Pensez-vous que l'Ontario a atteint un juste équilibre? J'aimerais connaître vos réflexions sur ce sujet et aussi vos réflexions sur le gouvernement fédéral... il faudrait que ce soit... je ne crois pas être injuste lorsque je dis que c'est... je crois bien que je vais en rester là; j'aimerais savoir comment vous considérez les choses du côté du gouvernement fédéral.

M. Greg Essensa:

Comme je l'ai déclaré à de nombreuses reprises, à titre de témoin en Ontario et ici, je crois qu'il faut un équilibre entre le financement public et le financement privé. Il existe de nombreux modèles, et avant de me présenter ici, j'ai passé en revue les modèles présentés par quelques-uns des autres témoins. Par M. Conacher, par exemple, qui a défendu le modèle québécois.

Je connais d'autres administrations; cela fait 32 ans que je travaille dans le monde des élections. La Ville de New York a créé un programme de subventions paritaires. Quelques autres États américains ont créé de tels programmes. Je ne dis pas que l'un est meilleur que l'autre, du point de vue des politiques publiques. Je dis cependant haut et fort qu'aucun modèle de financement public ne devrait servir à enrichir indûment un parti politique ou un candidat. Au mieux, le modèle choisi ne devrait pas avoir d'incidence sur les recettes, à mon avis.

M. David Christopherson:

Comment envisagez-vous cela?

M. Greg Essensa:

Je me fonde sur le fait que, depuis un certain nombre d'années, les organismes électoraux, Élections Ontario et Élections Canada, ont réuni un nombre élevé de dossiers et de renseignements historiques touchant les activités de financement et les montants que les candidats et les partis politiques ont recueillis et dépensés au fil des ans. Nous avons en mains toutes sortes de données statistiques révélant quelles sommes les partis politiques ont dépensées en moyenne pendant une campagne, en Ontario, au cours des 10 à 15 dernières années. Il serait assez facile d'effectuer quelques analyses pour s'assurer que, peu importe le modèle en place, il ne sert pas à enrichir indûment les acteurs politiques.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est intéressant. Mais, objectivement, sous le dernier régime, la plupart des partis politiques respectaient les limites que vous avez mentionnées, à l'exception d'un seul grand parti. Je ne vais pas le nommer, mais on raconte qu'en fait, il ne lui était même pas nécessaire de tenir des activités de financement, parce qu'il avait accès à tout ce dont il avait besoin, et je crois que nous entrons ici dans le domaine de ce qui constitue, selon ce que vous dites, un enrichissement indu. C'est ce que je voulais dire, avec ma première question.

Disons par exemple, aux fins de la discussion, qu'un parti donné tire avantage de la situation, pour une foule de raisons, même si pour tous les autres, en somme, les choses vont bien. Comment allez-vous vous y prendre pour mettre en place un système qui serait juste pour tout le monde alors que la dynamique de ce parti est telle que ce sera quasiment impossible? Est-ce que vous allez tolérer ça?

Si je pose la question, c'est que, à mon avis, on peut dire que le régime fédéral qui était en place était équitable pour la plupart des joueurs — il permettait d'arriver à l'équilibre dont vous parlez et il convenait à la plupart d'entre nous —, sauf pour celui-là. Vous ne pourrez jamais trouver un régime qui permet cela, de cette manière, tout simplement en raison de la dynamique de ce parti et de la façon dont il envisage le fédéralisme.

Avez-vous d'autres réflexions à nous soumettre? Est-ce que vous allez tolérer ça, sachant que 80 % des joueurs sont couverts et que, pour ce qui est des 20 % restants, nous allons devoir tolérer ça? Y a-t-il un facteur d'atténuation auquel je n'ai pas pensé? Pourrais-je savoir ce que vous en pensez, monsieur?

(1330)

M. Greg Essensa:

En tant que directeur général des élections, je recommanderais à votre comité, en plus des dispositions qui sont déjà incluses dans le projet de loi, de prévoir un examen continu du financement politique, ainsi que la création d'un comité qui se demanderait, comme vous venez de le suggérer, si un régime de financement public n'est pas en train d'enrichir indûment un parti politique donné.

Il faudrait effectuer quelques analyses après chaque élection. Malheureusement, il arrive que, dans notre pays, et je l'ai remarqué en regardant diverses administrations, nous avons tendance à adopter une approche à très long terme quand il s'agit de réforme électorale, et la réforme peut viser le financement des campagnes. Comme je l'ai indiqué, l'Ontario a attendu plusieurs décennies avant de procéder à une réforme digne de ce nom. Je crois que c'était une erreur.

Nous devrions mettre en oeuvre un processus plus strict, l'inscrire dans nos lois, et procéder à une analyse après chaque élection, tous les cinq ans, comme nous le faisons pour d'autres éléments de notre société. Un recensement est fait tous les 10 ans. C'est automatique. Quand il s'agit de la réforme électorale, nous devrions procéder de même à l'échelon fédéral comme aux échelons provinciaux.

M. David Christopherson:

J'espère que je ne vous fais pas dire ce que vous n'avez pas dit, mais ce serait une façon d'empêcher que la situation empire, se détériore, s'envenime, tourne au tragique, qu'il y ait des scandales publics, puis que l'on cherche ensuite à tout changer à la fois. Au contraire, nous pourrions agir de manière régulière et dominer la situation.

M. Greg Essensa:

Comme je le disais dans ma déclaration préliminaire, l'Ontario n'a pas échappé à la loi des conséquences inattendues. J'ai déjà écrit une fois à l'Assemblée législative, à ce sujet, en me fondant sur les réformes adoptées à la fin de 2016. Je crois que je vais lui écrire encore une fois après l'élection générale de 2018, une fois que j'aurai vu comment elle se passe.

Honnêtement, le processus électoral est au coeur de notre démocratie. C'est une chose que les parlementaires devraient examiner régulièrement.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

Comme je m'y attendais, la contribution de la fonction publique de l'Ontario est fantastique, et vous l'avez prouvé encore une fois aujourd'hui. Merci beaucoup.

Merci, monsieur le président. J'ai terminé.

Le président:

Merci.

Merci beaucoup d'être venu.

J'ai deux petites choses à dire aux membres du Comité. Premièrement, quand nous faisons l'étude article par article, j'imagine que nous pouvons le faire en présence des fonctionnaires, puisque, normalement, nous pourrions avoir des questions à poser.

Deuxièmement, j'aimerais que chaque parti présente ses suggestions à propos de notre étude touchant les jeunes enfants, les femmes et leurs bébés d'ici la fin de la réunion de jeudi, pour que nous puissions...

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Monsieur le président, les parents qui ont de jeunes enfants sont des deux sexes.

Le président:

Je voulais dire les parents des deux sexes. Nous allons commencer la planification à la prochaine réunion.

Merci. Grâce à vous, la réunion a été fructueuse. Merci.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on October 17, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.