header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-12-05 PROC 83

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1150)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

I call the meeting to order.

Good morning. Welcome to the 83rd meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. Today's meeting is being televised.

I'll ask members if they could stay until 1:15 or so to try to get as much done as possible, because we've lost some time due to the votes.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

I can't.

The Chair:

You guys can't either?

We're normally scheduled to go until 1:10, though, because of the extra five minutes, so we'll go to 1:10. In the last five minutes, we'll do a little bit of committee business.

As we continue our study of the creation of an independent commissioner responsible for leaders’ debates, we are pleased to be joined by Catherine Cano, president and general manager, Cable Public Affairs Channel, and Peter Van Dusen, executive producer. We're delighted to have you here—I know you're both very busy—and we look forward to your input on this interesting topic. Something came up, so the Globe and Mail person couldn't be here. You'll get more time, which should be great.

You could make some opening comments.

Ms. Catherine Cano (President and General Manager, Cable Public Affairs Channel (CPAC)):

Thank you very much.[Translation]

Good morning, Mr. Chair and members of the committee.

I want to say how much we appreciate your invitation and the opportunity to participate in the committee’s discussions on democracy and the best way to handle leaders’ debates during federal elections. This is complex, but extremely important, work.

Joining me today is CPAC’s director of information, Peter Van Dusen. Our opening remarks will be brief.[English]

Let me first say that the work this committee has undertaken is important and the subject matter is very complex. Most democracies have the same debates over the debates and struggle with many of the same issues we have here in Canada. We're not alone in trying to figure out what is best for our country and for our people. To complicate things further, the ways citizens are consuming and accessing information are changing and expanding at each election cycle, adding new opportunities and also new challenges.

We have followed the first few meetings of this committee with great interest and have been heartened to hear that this committee, and indeed all parliamentarians, hold CPAC, the Cable Public Affairs Channel, and its role in high regard. Perhaps I can begin there.

For the last 25 years—and by the way, this is our anniversary year—CPAC has built and fiercely maintained a reputation for independence, balance, fairness, and political impartiality. It's not just a slogan for us; it's our mission statement. We believe that Canadians have come to count on us, knowing that we have only one interest in mind—theirs.

Through our coverage of Parliament, politics, and public affairs; election campaigns and conventions; and our digital initiatives to engage Canadians, especially young people, to better understand their democratic institutions, we are the window on the democracy we have and the builders of the democracy we want. [Translation]

Mr. Peter Van Dusen (Executive Producer, Cable Public Affairs Channel (CPAC)):

Our role is never as important as at election time, bringing us to the committee’s topic of study: the proposal to create a commission or an independent commissioner responsible for overseeing leaders’ debates during federal election campaigns.

I would like to take a moment to tell you about the role CPAC played during the last federal election, in 2015.[English]

We offered to carry any and all debates at which the party leaders agreed to appear. We did not organize any debates. We became the carrier for others. There were five debates in all. We felt it was fundamentally important to the democratic process for CPAC to make these debates available to Canadians everywhere, even if they were not the traditional consortium-sponsored debates.

We didn't set the rules and we didn't decide the format—we left that to the debate organizers—but we made sure that all Canadians had access to the debates. We put the interests of Canadians first.

To be clear, CPAC was not then, and never has been, a member of the consortium of mainstream broadcasters, although we have always purchased access to the debates from the consortium and carried them on all CPAC platforms.

We also understand that leaders' debates aren't the only defining moments of campaigns. That's why we believe we have the most extensive national coverage of grassroots campaigns of any media outlet in the country. We provide half-hour riding profiles of the key election races unfolding across the country, almost 70 races in the last election alone.

What role would CPAC be prepared to play in future elections as it relates to leaders' debates? Our answer is simple: just let us know how we can help.

However, please consider a few things. As we've stated, we place our reputation for fairness, independence, and impartiality above all else. We feel that organizing debates and deciding who's in and who's out could easily jeopardize those hard-won attributes and threaten that reputation. Fights over the rules and invitations are in part why the consortium model collapsed.

CPAC prefers to occupy the neutral ground and then deliver the content once the rules have been established—in this case, through the proposal before the committee being adopted by the commission or commissioner and those rules being set in that way, or through some other mechanism that may come from this process.

(1155)

Ms. Catherine Cano:

As always, we would be interested in bringing the debates to all Canadians once the rules are established and approved by all involved. We also would like to point out that CPAC works on a weekly and mostly daily basis in partnership with all media organizations, including members of the consortium.

We value this collaborative approach. We strongly believe, especially at election time, that what matters most is giving Canadians all the information they need and want to understand the issues at stake and to know the leaders who are seeking their trust.

We welcome working with all to ensure election debates are distributed as widely as possible on all platforms.[Translation]

In conclusion, we are very proud of the work we do to provide Canadians with direct access to their democracy, democratic process, and democratic institutions. We would happily consider options to build on that role to the benefit of Canadians.

Thank you for listening. We would be pleased to answer any questions you may have. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll have time for one round, one slot of seven minutes for each party. If you want to share that, it's up to you.

Mr. Graham is first.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you for being here. It's nice to see you again, Ms. Cano.

Mr. Van Dusen, I've been watching you for some 16 years on CPAC, since you've been there. It's nice to meet you in person.

Mr. Peter Van Dusen:

Thanks very much.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

One thing you said in your opening comments struck me. You said you have purchased the debates from the networks. What did that cost? What's the deal?

Mr. Peter Van Dusen:

To be specific, are you talking about purchasing the consortium debates or all the debates we've carried in the last election?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I mean the consortium debates.

Mr. Peter Van Dusen:

Okay.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's the consortium debates. I'm curious how they handled that, because we didn't know about the purchased part.

Mr. Peter Van Dusen:

Right.

There's typically a fee that all broadcasters pay to be part of the consortium debate. I'm not sure that's public information or if people give out that fee. It's part of a business arrangement, so I'm not sure I'm at liberty to say what that is today.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

All right.

Would CPAC be interested or willing to host debates directly? Is that something that you'd want to do?

Ms. Catherine Cano:

That's a good question. You're talking about being a host broadcaster, as with the Olympics or something like that.

I think we're open to ways in which we could contribute. It depends what it is and what we're talking about.

What we don't want to do is decide who's in and who's out. We don't want to be in that space. As for contributing in other ways, it will really depend on what the committee comes up with at the end of the day—what will be recommended, what the role will be, how the roles will be decided, and all that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

If there is a commission or commissioner, do you think it is reasonable or unreasonable that the main broadcaster be required to carry debates—at least one debate in each language, for example? Is that a good idea, a bad idea, or do you have no opinion?

Ms. Catherine Cano:

I think it is up to this committee to decide. I don't think it's CPAC's role to determine that.

I can tell you one thing: as far as we are concerned, we certainly feel that it's important for citizens to have access to as much information as possible during an election. Debates are important, so we will carry as many as we can. I'm hoping that the solution will help to favour Canadians' understanding of the choice they have in front of them. We certainly would do that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Understood.

You've broadcast most or all of the debates that have happened over the last few elections. Can you give us a sense of audience numbers from election to election?

Ms. Catherine Cano:

I think those are public. The numbers we had for 2015—I don't have the ones before that—were aggregated numbers of all the people broadcasting, which included CPAC and a couple of others. There were five debates. If you cumulate the reach of all of them, it's a bit under 10 million, but we're talking about the reach.

(1200)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If it was, say, two million per debate, it might be the same two million over and over again.

Ms. Catherine Cano:

It could be. There's no way to know—or maybe there is a way to know, but we don't know if it's the same people who have been watching all the debates.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You don't have the numbers in front of you, but in ballpark figures, do you remember what it was like when the consortium had their debates? Was it a much higher number than that?

Ms. Catherine Cano:

You know what? I don't know for sure. I know there's a number that's been going around of about 14 million for the one debate—or maybe the two, including the French one. You should double-check that with them. I wouldn't want you to take my word for it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you think the commission is an important thing to have? Is it necessary?

Ms. Catherine Cano:

Again, that's a good question.

For CPAC, it's not our role to decide on election policy. I think you'll have a chance to meet and hear from experts on democracy, and you'll have more of those people. I'm sure you will have many options in front of you.

One of the things we were talking about that we think is needed—and maybe it could help in your thinking as you're going through this process—is what we call a “3P” approach. What's important to have for this democracy to work is predictability, participation, and partnership.

What we mean by predictability is that voters have expectations. They need to know that there are going to be debates, who's going to carry them, when they're going to be, and where are they going to be. I think it would be helpful if we could have those things decided.

The participation part is about who will set the rules to decide who participates in the debate or who is invited to the debate, and what the criteria are and why. I think that if there is clarity on that aspect, it's going to be extraordinarily helpful.

The third thing we were thinking of is partnership. What's the best way to ensure or engage co-operation among all of the media organizations so that, as widely as possible, the debates are seen by all Canadians?

For us, making sure those three aspects are dealt with will be helpful to ensuring that those debates are fair and neutral.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you think there's any role for either CPAC, on your own, or a commission or commissioner in local debates, as opposed to national leaders' debates, in terms of advising or carrying them or any aspect of it?

Mr. Peter Van Dusen:

Let me answer that in two ways.

The biggest challenge for us is working on trying to figure out what's needed to ensure the three Ps that Catherine talked about. How do we ensure that if we're going to have debates, we know when they are, who's attending, and who's going to carry them?

I think you'll have to figure out what the “it” is before organizations like CPAC can decide what kind of role we can play in the “it” and what role we're prepared to play.

We're a small operation, to be frank, but we like to think we punch above our weight in a lot of areas. One of those areas is on the local side. If there are local debates, we would happily entertain that idea.

As I mentioned, we were in 70 ridings in the last election campaign, profiling ridings we thought would have an important outcome on the election result. Some of that coverage of the riding profile included local debates, with candidates getting together on a Tuesday night at a hall somewhere in the riding. It may have been in some of your ridings. I don't have the list in front of me. There's a good chance we've been to some of your ridings at some point. We're open to that.

As we said in our opening remarks, we understand that campaigns are about more than leaders' debates. We understand the process. We understand that people don't vote for prime ministers in this country, but for parties, and the leader of that party becomes the prime minister if that party wins the election. There's a great deal of importance in what happens at the local level. We get that. That's why we're at the local level a lot during campaigns.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

They vote for people. Thank you very much for that.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Let's go on to Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to our witnesses for joining us today. It's great to have you.

First of all, I want to thank you for airing debates in the last election campaign. We had the witnesses here last week from the major broadcasters who opted to air Coronation Street and reruns of the The Big Bang Theory instead, so I appreciate your airing those in the public interest.

One of the concerns they expressed was the journalistic standards of the debates and the production values. You obviously aired the debates. Were there any concerns on your end about journalistic standards or production values?

(1205)

Mr. Peter Van Dusen:

This is always a bit of a tricky question. I was principally involved in that decision-making, and my thinking was that these were all reputable organizations trying something new. They're all known for good journalism, so we took the position that it would be in the greater interest of democracy to show people what is available. Having not organized them and not passed judgment on who is able to do what, it was more important, in our case, to give Canadians an opportunity to see debates in some form.

To my mind you can't answer questions of how good the journalism is until you see the product, so we made a decision. Look, this is Maclean's and this is the Globe; let's see what they have on offer, because right now it's all that's on offer. Therefore, let's show it to Canadians and let's perform what I would call an aerial view of the importance of what's happening in the campaign and make sure that we put the democratic process above important questions about the quality of production and quality of journalism and leave that for viewers to decide after we've aired the debate.

Mr. John Nater:

Just clearing up a little on the variety of debates, do you see it as a positive in election campaigns to have different styles and different types of debates, rather than just one English and one French, and having a different variety, perhaps even on different subject matter?

Ms. Catherine Cano:

Yes, I would think so. It could work. It depends on the length of the campaign as well. I think one of the considerations is whether that is for you, but yes, I think we were happy with the different format, and it gives different ways to go at questions and themes, for sure.

Mr. John Nater:

Switching gears a little, CPAC has a great iPad app that I'm a big fan of. It's great to use to follow along when I'm not physically in the House or physically at a TV.

If you don't have the viewership numbers today, could you provide to the committee what your online viewership was for those five debates during the last campaign, and in CPAC's airing in general, what you've seen over time in the increase of online and digital viewership over the past few years?

Ms. Catherine Cano:

It's a very good question. I do not have the numbers for the last election. I don't know if we have them. I wasn't there at the time, but I will look into it and I will forward any information I have.

The number of people going on our website and app has grown extraordinarily in the last couple of years for sure, so there is an audience in a digital space.

Mr. John Nater:

I'm going to ask one more question and then I'll throw it to Kevin Waugh for the last minute or so.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. John Nater:

We heard some leeriness from Elections Canada about becoming too involved with the negotiations on decision-making. It seemed to echo somewhat your comments that you don't necessarily want to get into the weeds and get into decision-making that could jeopardize your impartiality. Would you suggest to the committee that our recommendations be very specific in how a debate ought to be conducted and who should participate, or would you rather see a commission or commissioner given latitude to make those decisions outside your decision-making power?

Ms. Catherine Cano:

Again, I think your work will be a great opportunity to hear all the views and options in front of you. It's hard to know the best thing now. With a body, is it appropriate to enforce predictability on all stakeholders, as we talked about? What kind of power and enforcement would that have? Is there any other way to go at it?

I think you have a chance to hear great experts on that point, and we are looking forward to seeing the options. It's a bit difficult to know at this point, but I think those are probably the questions you should ask.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Kevin Waugh, welcome to the committee. You have two minutes.

Mr. Kevin Waugh (Saskatoon—Grasswood, CPC):

Thank you. Two minutes is lots.

The basic cable fee includes CPAC, as you know, across this country. You are the political channel, as it's turned out, in this country. I know there are different views about the production costs and pooled resources, but I would like to see the commissioner...and I've talked to you about this, Catherine. CPAC is the political channel. You have the experience, 24-7, and I think it's important that CPAC lead this for the next debate.

We are seeing a meltdown with CTV, CBC, and Global-Corus. It's important. I've talked to you about this a number of times. This is your time to move into what Canadians want to see. You're on the basic channels. We pay a fee. Every household in this country pays a fee to CPAC. This is your time, I feel, to structure this with the commission, to come forward for 2019.

What are your thoughts on that?

(1210)

Ms. Catherine Cano:

Well, first of all, thank you very much for your vote of confidence. We're really proud of what the channel is accomplishing and its reputation over 25 years. I've been with it for not even two years, so it's the work of all my team that I'm praising.

It is a good question. We want to help as much as we can. We don't know what kinds of rules, what kind of body or entity, or what kinds of recommendations the committee will make, so it's a bit difficult for us to actually commit to something that is unknown. We're happy to be part of the process. If there are even more questions afterwards, we're looking forward to answering them. We want to be part of it, but we have to be mindful that the strength of CPAC actually comes from its impartiality. We're going to look at being able to preserve those things.

Our preference is to be helpful once we know what the rules are and what the committee actually comes up with.

Mr. Kevin Waugh:

The key with CPAC is that you are impartial.

If I can, Mr. Chair—

The Chair:

No, sorry. Your time's up.

Mr. Kevin Waugh:

We'll talk to you later. Thanks.

The Chair:

The last intervenor is Mr. Garrison. Welcome to the committee.

Mr. Randall Garrison (Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke, NDP):

Thanks very much, Mr. Chair. I was here at the beginning of this debate, but I've been in and out.

I want to start by also echoing thanks to CPAC. I know that in my riding you have fans, a lot of fans, a surprising number. I think sometimes we underestimate the access that CPAC provides. Sometimes people focus on the overall viewership, but I know that when an issue in my riding is important locally, people use CPAC. Even if they don't watch regularly, they know to go there to get informed.

The other thing you do, which I think is very valuable, is that during elections, you provide the 70 riding profiles you mentioned. I was just trying to remember. I've run four times, only twice successfully, and I don't blame you for that.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Peter Van Dusen:

Thank you for that.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

You've done riding profiles, I think, all four times in my riding.

Mr. Peter Van Dusen:

It's always been an important riding. It's a contested riding.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

It has been.

The other thing that's important about that is that it's sometimes difficult in British Columbia to get a sense of what's happening in the rest of the country. I think those riding profiles are very, very useful to voters in my riding who want to see what's happening elsewhere in the country. I am just encouraging CPAC to keep that up, because I think it's an important service that sometimes people don't think about.

I guess I'd give you a warning on local debates. Sometimes local debates are a little less than high standard in their organization and their journalism. In my riding we usually have about eight, and we have long debates about who can participate, who can't participate, which candidates are in, and which candidates are out. We even had one incident in which a registered party removed their candidate from the set just before the broadcast was to begin. I think you should exercise a lot of caution about local debates.

To get back to the main topic here, I appreciate the openness you've expressed to doing whatever makes things more accessible to Canadians. I think that's the reputation you have, and you're upholding that today. My question really is about how we maximize the ability to view. I don't favour a fine or disqualification for not doing leaders' debates, but how do we really make them accessible? It's one thing to say they're broadcast, but how do we make them more accessible in terms of format and those kinds of things? I'm not saying you should set it, but do you have ideas on how the debates could be more accessible to the public? I know a lot of people may tune in for a couple of minutes and then feel that they're not for them.

Mr. Peter Van Dusen:

We're into new territory. With the last election and the collapse of the consortium model, we're into new territory. It's a blank canvas.

The idea of how to make them more accessible I think comes back to the third “p” that we talked about, the partnership idea. I'll be really interested to see what comes forward from the committee and then the minister's consultations.

Backtracking slightly on Mr. Waugh's question and the idea of “lead it”, I'm back to what is “it”? Until we have a better idea of what “it” is, it's hard to know what role we can play in leading or participating in anything, but we're open to it.

Specifically to your question, you open up partnerships. If you start from a default position that the rules have changed, and the primary concern of office-holders across the country and of organizations such as ours is broader access to democracy, then if that's the default position, we need as many people as possible to be able to see these debates.

Then the question becomes how we do it. If we open up the partnership idea—that nobody owns the debate, nobody owns the night that the debate is on, nobody owns access to the debate, and that these debates are to be made available to all Canadians on any platforms—then the question begins to answer itself. If everybody in these particular spaces now knows that there are no restrictions on getting access to the debate, they will find a way to get it to their particular market of people, and everybody will be better served.

(1215)

Mr. Randall Garrison:

We did see—and I guess I'm thinking back to 2011 and the consortium debates—some ideas of asking voters to submit questions and trying to involve and engage voters more in the actual process of the debate.

I wonder if you as a journalist have any opinions on whether engaging the public is helpful or not.

Mr. Peter Van Dusen:

I would go back to what I said. If the debate is available to everybody, people can do what they want with it. “Watch our debate because we're featuring this kind of input. Watch this debate because we're featuring that kind of input. We're providing this accessibility, this kind of approach to how we cover it.” I mean, there are lots of options as to where this can go.

Some people may say, “If it's carried on one channel, we're not really interested in the viewer question thing.” However, we're doing this other model, but we're taking the feed of the debate and treating it differently. We maybe have a debate—we've talked about this a bit—in which we don't challenge the answers for veracity during the debate, but we provide a 90-minute post-debate show that's going to fact-check everything that was said.

Those are different models that people can bring. If everybody has access to a debate, then they can decide how they want to treat it in their own coverage.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

I guess in essence what you're saying is that more debates than one, and more models than one will—

Mr. Peter Van Dusen:

It could be numbers of debates, but available to any outlet that wants them. As long as they take the substance of the debate, they can treat it differently in terms of their audience and how they want to encourage participation.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

In terms of who would actually make these decisions, do you have any opinions about a commission versus a commissioner? Do you think that one person can be expected to manage this process and be seen as neutral, or would it be better to have a committee of people—CPAC—deliver an opinion on that?

Ms. Catherine Cano:

Not really. I think we will let the committee come up with the—

Mr. Randall Garrison:

You're not going to help us out on that.

Ms. Catherine Cano:

Well, it's difficult to know. It's complex. You have a difficult task in figuring this out, and who this person or this group would report to. There are a lot of questions you have to ask and get answers for.

You know, I think experts on democracy, the people who have been there.... I'm sure you're looking at other countries as well. Other places in the world and how they do that might be some inspiration.

Mr. Peter Van Dusen:

We're not here to weigh in on what model you come down on.

The idea is that if you can find predictability and determine participation and figure out a way to encourage partnership—I don't know whether that requires an office-holder or a different kind of approach—and you can answer those kinds of concerns for us and others, that will serve the process.

The Chair:

Thank you for coming.

As you can see, we all enjoy CPAC very much. We respect the way you do business, so we appreciate your being here today.

Mr. Peter Van Dusen:

Thank you.

Ms. Catherine Cano:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

We're going to suspend while we get the next panel up.

(1215)

(1220)

The Chair:

We'll reconvene meeting number 83 of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

If you remember, at the last meeting I asked you for any final input on witnesses for the rest of the study. We'll do any changes to the proposed schedule at the end of this meeting.

This afternoon's witnesses are Diane Bergeron, vice-president, engagement and international affairs, and Thomas Simpson, manager, operations and government affairs at the Canadian National Institute for the Blind. They have passed out a handout.

As well, we have Frank Folino, president of the Canadian Association for the Deaf, so you can see sign language here. You can tell us if we're going too fast at any time for the sign language.

We also have James Hicks, national coordinator for the Council of Canadians with Disabilities.

You'll each have a chance to give an opening statement, and then there will be questions from each party. There will be a seven-minute round of questions for the person, and that includes both your answer and the question, so just keep that in mind when you're providing your answers.

We'll start with the Canadian National Institute for the Blind. Perhaps you would like to make some opening comments.

(1225)

Ms. Diane Bergeron (Vice-President, Engagement and International Affairs, Canadian National Institute for the Blind):

Thank you very much.

I'd like to first thank the committee for inviting us to come today. I'm Diane Bergeron, and with me is Thomas Simpson.

CNIB has been around for almost a hundred years. We were founded in 1918 to serve veterans coming back from World War I who came back war-blinded and also to serve people who were blinded through the Halifax explosion. We provide services and skills training to individuals who are blind and partially sighted to help them navigate in their environment and be safe in their external and internal environments, and we provide charitable programs, such as peer supports and camps for kids and so on.

We do some advocacy work and we help to educate the public on the needs of people who are blind or partially sighted. The 2012 StatsCan report indicated that almost three-quarters of a million people in Canada identify as having sight loss. That's a lot of people who will be voting in the next election.

I'd like you to imagine that the handout we provided you just before the session started is all the information that you're going to need to determine who the next prime minister of Canada is. This is your document. You can read it, you can learn, and that is the only form of information that you will have to ensure that you make an informed decision when you are choosing who you will vote for in your next election. Understandably, unless anybody here has learned Braille in the past little while, you probably are looking at that document and wondering how in God's name you are going to do that. That is what people who are blind or partially sighted in Canada deal with in every election.

We are often invited to go to debates or to listen to debates on TV, and things are shown—images, documents. We get people coming to our door, doing door knocking, and they hand us documentation that is not accessible to us. We go to websites to look at party platforms. They're not accessible to screen readers and other devices for people who are blind or partially sighted.

It is impossible for me to do what I have a right to do in this country, which is vote for the people who I want to represent me in the political arena. It is also an obligation, but it's impossible for me to do that as a person who's totally blind, and to do it as an informed decision, if all I have to access is a minor amount of information. I have the right as a Canadian to access the electoral process the same as everybody else. Unfortunately, that access is not always provided.

In order to ensure we do have the ability to make an informed choice, we have some recommendations. I'm going to ask Thomas to go through them with you.

Mr. Thomas Simpson (Manager, Operations and Government Affairs, Canadian National Institute for the Blind):

Thank you, Diane.

CNIB supports the creation of an independent commission or commissioner for the leadership debates during an election as long as the following points are included to ensure that accessibility is provided for Canadians who are blind or partially sighted.

If a leadership debate is broadcast on television, it must include descriptive audio. If visual aids are used, either by a party leader or moderators, it must be described to those who are watching. This includes names put onto a screen or a PowerPoint presentation if one is used. It's recommended by CNIB that the committee should connect with Accessible Media Incorporated, or AMI, a not-for-profit company that entertains, informs, and empowers Canadians who are blind or partially sighted or have hearing impairments. It runs three broadcast services: AMI-tv and AMI-audio, both in English, and AMI-télé in French. AMI-tv broadcasts a selection of general entertainment programming with accommodations for those who are visually or hearing impaired, with audio descriptions and closed captioning available. AMI is an expert in incorporating accessibility on television and should be consulted to make leadership debates accessible for Canadians to the greatest possible extent.

Similarly, the use of ASL and LSQ—American Sign Language andlangue des signes québécoise—is necessary for Canadians who are deaf and deaf-blind. In order to get the greatest number of people to tune in to leadership debates, it should be marketed and advertised in an effective manner. This means not only in conventional print: it should be spread through as many means as possible, such as TV, radio, or ads before YouTube videos.

This brings me to leadership debates online. If future leadership debates can be streamed online, websites to view those debates should be accessible. This means they can be accessed with an assistive device and will be easily navigable. Any website that hosts future leadership debates must be tested by people with various sight disabilities to ensure the best accessibility. For example, any videos or question submission boxes must be tested for use by a screen reader or a screen magnifier. Any website should also have good colour contrast.

We thank the procedure and house affairs committee for inviting CNIB to testify, and we welcome any questions you may have.

(1230)

The Chair:

Thank you very much. We appreciate that.

Maintenant we have Frank Folino, president of the Canadian Association of the Deaf.

Mr. Frank Folino (President, Canadian Association of the Deaf) [Interpretation]:

Thank you, Mr. Chairman, for inviting me to appear before this committee as part of your study of a proposal to create an independent commission or commissioners to organize political party leaders' debates during the federal election campaigns.

My name is Frank Folino, and I'm president of the Canadian Association of the Deaf-Association des Sourds du Canada. The CAD-ASC is a national information research and community action organization of deaf people in Canada. Founded in 1940, CAD-ASC provides consultation and information on deaf issues to the public, business, media, educators, governments, and others. We also conduct research and collect data.

CAD-ASC promotes and protects the rights, needs, and concerns of deaf people who use American sign language, ASL, and langue des signes québécoise, LSQ.

CAD-ASC is affiliated with the World Federation of the Deaf and is a United Nations-accredited non-governmental organization on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

Sign language is recognized seven times within five different articles through the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which Canada ratified in March 2010. It refers to our rights, outlined in the convention, to address the articles that relate directly to signed languages.

In Canada, deaf people use ASL and LSQ to reflect that we embrace diversity, inclusiveness, and core values, and that we are committed to maintaining an inclusive environment in Canadian society. Many countries have legally recognized signed languages. Such recognition in Canada would ensure the removal of barriers and provide equal access, which is an important step towards becoming an inclusive and accessible Canada as we integrate into both English and French societies.

Too often accessibility issues have been an afterthought in federal political party leaders' debates. It is clear that there are accessibility issues that are barriers for deaf and hard of hearing people. They could not participate in the process of a national debate, whether televised or on social media platforms. In previous federal political party leaders' debates, there was lack of sign language interpretation and closed captioning in social media platforms throughout the televised debates.

To make future political party leaders' debates accessible for deaf people who require access to information, we would like to see sign language interpretation in ASL for English debates and in LSQ for French debates. This would include picture-in-picture onscreen, and closed captioning in English and French. We as deaf people can participate and be privy to what's happening during the debate to have a good understanding of the different platforms that candidates have. If interpreting services are not provided throughout, we don't fully understand what people are talking about.

Obviously the language during the debate is elevated and sophisticated, and without having access to ASL or LSQ during those debates, we don't know for whom we are voting, so when we get to the polls on election day, we're not making a truly informed choice. That's another good example of how we are not really included in society as deaf people in the way that other Canadians and other citizens are.

We don't have true access in our own language. We do have it in French and English, but of course those are the languages that are predominant among other people. We're looking to gain not only access to interpreters, but access to information. Oftentimes we're faced with information that is in English or French, so we would like to ensure that the federal leaders' debates during future election campaigns provide services to make the information accessible not only in English and French but in signed languages as well, so that we can truly access the information in our language.

This demonstrates how an independent commission or commissioners can take a positive approach to include deaf people by way of making their information accessible when it comes to organizing the leaders' debates during future election campaigns. The creation of an independent commission or commissioner will provide the opportunity to address these accessibility issues to ensure an inclusive and accessible Canada. It's important that an accessibility lens is being implemented, which is described in the quote below:



An Accessibility Lens is a tool for identifying and clarifying issues affecting persons with disabilities used by policy and program developers and analysts to access and address the impact of all initiatives (policies, programs or decisions) on persons with disabilities. It is also a resource in creating policies and programs reflective of the rights and needs of persons with disabilities.

(1235)



We would like to see the establishment of an accessibility advisory committee, with lists of experts to advise the independent commission or commissioners to ensure that the implementation of access services is being planned well in advance.

The accessibility lens in organizing political party leaders' debates during federal election campaigns will have to ensure that accessibility will be a forethought, not an afterthought. This will address the barriers we face, because they are significant for us. Sign language interpretation during the political leaders' debates allows us to participate through sign language, which is important to our community.

An inclusive and accessible Canada will impact over a million deaf, deaf-blind, and hard of hearing Canadians who want to be involved in the decision-making process during the elections, which they have every right to fully participate in, through access to information in sign language so they are able to make their own choice to elect political candidates democratically.

I would be pleased to answer your questions regarding accessibility issues and organizing future leaders' debates during future election campaigns. I trust the committee will be able to address these important accessibility issues for our democracy.

Merci.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Next is Mr. James Hicks, national coordinator of the Council of Canadians with Disabilities.

Mr. James Hicks (National Coordinator, Council of Canadians with Disabilities):

Hello, everyone. My name is James Hicks, and I'm with the Council of Canadians with Disabilities.

We also want to thank you for allowing us to come and talk about what we feel are some of the issues around elections and people's understanding of leaders' debates.

Just so that you know something about CCD, we're a national human rights organization “of” people with various disabilities, not “for”. It's an important distinction. We're working for an accessible and inclusive Canada.

CCD is delighted that the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs is conducting a study about appointing an independent commissioner to organize televised leaders' debates during federal election campaigns. We have, for a number of years, submitted questions to the leaders that we hoped would be included, and they never have been, not once.

Before I start talking about what should happen, what I'd like to talk to you about is the obligations Canada has to make sure that these things happen. Canada has signed on to the Convention on the Rights of Persons With Disabilities. It's been in place for a number of years now. Article 29 is on participation in political and public life, and states: States Parties shall guarantee to persons with disabilities political rights and the opportunity to enjoy them on an equal basis with others, and shall undertake: To ensure that persons with disabilities can effectively and fully participate in political and public life on an equal basis with others, directly or through freely chosen representatives, including the right and opportunity for persons with disabilities to vote and be elected, inter alia, by: Ensuring that voting procedures, facilities and materials are appropriate, accessible and easy to understand... Protecting the right of persons with disabilities to vote by secret ballot...

—and get assistance from they people they choose, not somebody else— Guaranteeing the free expression of the will of persons with disabilities as electors and to this end, where necessary, at their request, allowing assistance in voting... To promote actively an environment in which persons with disabilities can effectively and fully participate in the conduct of public affairs, without discrimination and on an equal basis with others, and encourage their participation in public affairs, including: Participation in non-governmental organizations and associations... Forming and joining organizations of persons with disabilities to represent persons with disabilities at international, national, regional and local levels.

In addition, the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms guarantees equality before and under the law to people with disabilities. The Canadian Human Rights Act guarantees to people with disabilities that they will not experience discrimination in the federal jurisdiction with respect to the provision of goods and services. This includes the right to vote and the right to be a part of the whole voting process, which includes the debates. If those things are not there, it will not come true.

I could talk a lot about some of the things that people have already talked about. I was going to bring up ASL and LSQ interpretation, and I was also going to bring up audio narration during the debates' key visual elements to make sure that people are aware of the non-verbal communication that takes place during a debate. I was going to mention the use of plain language for people who aren't necessarily grasping the language well, and closed captioning so that people who are hard of hearing have access to the debates' information. I'll note that accessibility accommodations should be available in all locations and platforms to ensure participation of citizens with disabilities in the audience and participation of potential candidates who may have disabilities.

In addition, I'd like to talk about how you may become compliant.

If it is determined that an independent commissioner is to be tasked with organizing televised leaders' debates, then he or she will need to ensure full participation is spelled out in whatever legislation authorizes the establishment of the commissioner. There's an obligation to organize debates that are fully accessible to Canadians with disabilities and inclusive of the concerns of people with disabilities so that this component of Canadian elections meets the expectations set out in article 29 of the CRPD.

To ensure that the format of the debates is truly inclusive and accessible, the legislation should require the commissioner, in advance of planning a debate, to consult with the representative organizations of people with disabilities concerning the accessibility and inclusion measures that are needed to ensure compliance with article 29.

Legislation should require that the commissioner establish an advisory committee consisting of individuals appointed by the self-representative organizations of people with disabilities, who will advise on debate questions that are inclusive of the concerns of Canadians with disabilities.

The commissioner should undertake a post-debate evaluation of the accessibility and inclusiveness of the debate, and the commissioner should report to Parliament about the measures that were taken to ensure the accessibility and inclusiveness of the debate and the outcome of the post-debate evaluation.

(1240)



Thank you for your consideration of the issues of Canadians with disabilities. Only when Canada truly ensures full political participation by Canadians, regardless of ability, will Canada be able to call itself an inclusive country.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you all for your presentations, and also for the work you do every day. We really appreciate it. Canada really appreciates it.

Now we'll go to our seven-minute round, which includes both questions and answers.

Go ahead, Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thank you so much.

Thank you, everyone, for your presentations. They provide an excellent perspective.

I'll start with you, Ms. Bergeron. Thank you for your comments, and also for giving me some perspective in terms of the next time I go door to door. It's not necessarily just one campaign but 338 campaigns, times all the various parties, so I appreciate that insight.

Specifically on the debate coverage, you mentioned descriptive audio. There have been some public service announcements and commercials about it. Can you describe a bit how that works and where individuals access that service? How would it work for a debate?

Ms. Diane Bergeron:

Yes, absolutely.

To start, just so you know, the document we handed out earlier is actually not the information you need in the next federal election, but our briefing note, which we will provide to you in English and French afterwards. We didn't want to give it to you in advance, for obvious reasons.

Descriptive video is really a narration that is overdubbed on top of any kind of visual. It doesn't interfere with people speaking, but if somebody is using a video or a picture or if they are using a lot of gestures or signals, that can be fully described. People will say, for instance, this speaker is doing this gesture, or they're showing a picture that shows this image. If it's a video, they will describe what's in the video. That's how it works.

AMI does a lot of this work on their channel. All of their programming has descriptive video. There's other descriptive video on programs on TV as well.

(1245)

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you.

You also mentioned screen readers. Can you describe a bit how websites aren't accessible to screen readers?

Ms. Diane Bergeron:

A screen reader is a synthesizer that reads, in an electronic voice, what's on the screen to a person who is blind or partially sighted. If the website meets the WCAG standards, WCAG 3 or WCAG 2.0—I'm sorry, I don't know all the numbers in there—the website can be accessible with that. If there are some images there or some videos that are not described, or if they're set up so that the screen reader can't read what's on the screen or sometimes if there's imaging or programming in the background, it stops the voice synthesizer from working. It doesn't allow us to access.

There is also the fact that it's very difficult if you don't have proper colour contrast. I know that a lot of parties like to stick to their colours on the website, and that's understandable. However, sometimes that's not the best contrast for someone with low sight.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Okay.

Mr. Folino, you mentioned ASL and closed captioning. Is it important that they exist together, or would one be acceptable? Is it necessary that they both be there for full accessibility?

Mr. Frank Folino (Interpretation):

The answer is that you require both. Closed captioning is primarily for the hard of hearing community, and anyone with intellectual disabilities can watch the closed captioning. It benefits everyone. Sign language, ASL and LSQ, needs to be there simultaneously as well.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I'll go back to my time as a lawyer. When I would read transcripts, it would be very difficult to figure out, when lawyers would talk over each other, what was being said. In a debate format, that often happens. How does ASL or closed captioning deal with that situation, if they can?

Mr. Frank Folino (Interpretation):

The interpreters can regulate conversation. For example, if you look at the Quebec election platform a few years ago, it was televised, and it had four sign language interpreters simultaneously working, one representing each party. They were neutral, obviously. The interpreters would just interpret the conversation happening back and forth, and it was quite effective. It's available on YouTube if you want to see a sample. That seemed to work very well.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I have two minutes. I think this is a question that I've opened up, and I apologize for the lack of time.

Do existing social media platforms do a good job with regard to accessibility issues? How can they be used for a debate, or how can it be improved?

Mr. James Hicks:

I can try to answer some of that anyway.

I think it depends on what social media platform you're using. If you use one that's primarily visual, my guess is that it does not include any text in the background that people with visual impairments would be able to use. If you're talking about text-based media like Twitter, that probably would not be a problem. People would be able to access it fairly well. I think maybe other people can talk about what it is for them.

It really depends. It's like television. There are certain channels that provide what's needed for people who can't see what's on the screen to understand it. Most of them don't. It's the same with social media. Most of the stuff doesn't.

Mr. Frank Folino (Interpretation):

I want to clarify. When there is a televised national debate, and there's closed captioning, audio descriptive narratives, and sign language interpreters on the screen, make sure that it's also provided on social media platforms, on Twitter and elsewhere, because sometimes an individual may be out, but the election debate happens that evening, and that individual doesn't only want to have the limited choice of watching it on TV. That individual may want to have that accessibility provided on his or her mobile device in accessing other platforms, so you need to ensure that all of those outlets are accessible.

(1250)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Bittle.

Now we'll go on to Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

I guess the question I have will be to all of you. However, I'll ask it slightly differently to each of you, so give me a second, and then I'll let you all respond.

Mr. Folino and Mr. Hicks, you both in your opening statements mentioned some very specific examples of concerns with past debates. It wasn't clear in both cases whether that has been something that has been consistently a problem. Have there been debates in the past in which some of those issues have been addressed or been dealt with so that you or your members were able to properly access debates?

Ms. Bergeron and Mr. Simpson, can you give me some more specifics on some of the concerns that you have specifically seen in debates in the past? Again, have those been consistent issues, or have you seen debates in which some of those things have been addressed?

Mr. Frank Folino (Interpretation):

Picture-in-picture sign language interpretation has never happened in a political debate. I think it just has to happen once for it to become precedent.

Mr. James Hicks:

From the perspective of CCD, number one, as we said, is that we have for years sent in questions about disability. They have never been included. There has not been a question about disability on any leaders' debate ever, and it would be nice to see that happen.

I think it's really important that you not look at disability as a separate issue, because it applies to everybody. For instance, if there was a question on violence against women, it should include reference to the concerns of women and girls with disabilities and deaf women and girls in a meaningful way, because they have their own issues around those things.

It's a matter of recognizing that the issues are not always the same, but they need to be addressed. It's a matter of helping people to understand that. If a commissioner is appointed, that commissioner needs to spend time or have an advisory committee from the disability community to understand what questions he or she needs to ask and what supports need to be put in place so that everything is actually made accessible for folks.

Ms. Diane Bergeron:

I would love to answer your question.

The problem is that because the debates are not always accessible, I have no idea what has been missed. I have no idea if a video or an image has been put up in the background or what expressions and body language people are using. I can sometimes infer what a person is expressing based on the debate, but it's not always there, and I often miss that visual piece. I would really like to say that this is what was missed, but I'm never going to be able to tell you, because I don't know. I know there have been things; I just don't know what they are.

We agree with the concept of making sure that the commissioner consults with people with disabilities. We know our needs and we can help to give them that information and we can help them to better understand what types of accommodation need to be in place and also make sure they understand the importance of doing that.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Can I follow up on that, Ms. Bergeron? I can appreciate that you wouldn't know what had been missed. Are you aware of times when you felt the debate was produced in a way that you were getting all the information you needed from the debate, or has that never occurred that you're aware of?

Ms. Diane Bergeron:

It has never occurred. I can hear what the person is saying, but if all we needed was to hear what people are saying, why would we need visuals? It is important to remember visuals are there for a reason.

I don't know when it has, and I've never had it happen. I've been to several debates in my community, and I've never once been provided information in Braille or in an electronic format that I could take home and read.

(1255)

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you.

In addressing these issues, it sounds as if you're all comfortable with the idea of a commission, but would you see that as the only way of being able to address these issues? Could it perhaps be required of the folks who are producing the debates—whether it be a consortium or whether it be the model from the last election when various people chose to have debates—to consult, determine what the needs are, and address them without the need for a commission, or could perhaps the folks who are producing the debates choose to do that without the need for a commission ?

What would be your thoughts on that? Is that the only way you could see this being addressed, or are there other ways we could address some of these issues?

Ms. Diane Bergeron:

It's not necessarily the only way. I think it's probably the best way, because somebody would be responsible. Either a commissioner or a committee would be in charge of making sure it was in place.

If it wasn't the way the committee would go, I would recommend that you look at making sure there are very good regulations and structures that make sure all the things that all three of us have talked about are done appropriately and in consultation with the community of people who need accommodation.

Do you have anything to add?

Mr. James Hicks:

You're talking about the leaders' debates, but all kinds of things go on during elections that the same rules apply to, so if debates are going on in other places, it may be necessary to look at an exemption of any costs related to adaptation so that people with disabilities can participate in regular debates in other things. There's a whole bunch of stuff.

Lots of things we've talked about need to be looked at from a broader perspective. If you just talk about the leaders' debates, then it leaves out an awful lot of activity around political life and around the decisions people make. We're not just making decisions about the leaders. It's really important to look at it from an overall perspective. If we can get it right for the leaders, then what sorts of things do we have to put in place for parties to be able to get it right no matter where they are? That may include some regulations around spending money and all those sorts of things. You need to begin to look at those things.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Go ahead, Mr. Folino.

Mr. Frank Folino (Interpretation):

I would just like to add to the recent comments by my colleagues. It's important to have an independent consortium commission or commissioner to consult with and include disability advisory groups, so that regardless of the jurisdiction, the requirements are provided everywhere.

For people with disabilities, we want to involve experts in the discussion about accommodations so that everyone can work together to provide ongoing advice to the commissioner, or the potential committee. Then they will know what they have to provide during the leaders' debates, and we will be able to provide the appropriate feedback. That will include all of the issues for people with disabilities, and we're certainly there to help and assist in providing a better and more accessible election debate. We want to remove every kind of barrier.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll now go to Mr. Garrison.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair. I thank the witnesses for being here today.

I particularly want to thank CNIB for the Braille handout , because I will never look at my election materials the same way again after today. That was a very effective way of reaching me as a politician, so I thank you for that.

I've tried to listen carefully to things you were saying, and I've heard three or four very good ideas. I'm going to tell you what I've heard, and I'm going to ask you to tell me what I've missed and what I've left out from that.

One of the things that was common was that this committee should build a requirement to be fully accessible into the leadership debate arrangements from the beginning. The second is that there should be an advisory committee for people with disabilities, and not just a commitment at the beginning, but ongoing consultation as the debates get developed. A third thing is that multiple platforms for the debates would help make them more accessible, and funding should be available to make sure the accessibility can be accommodated.

Those are the main things I heard from you today. I know that's not everything you had to say, but we need to get the committee to focus on the things that need to be there. I'm going to ask each one of the four of you here today, starting with Mr. Folino and working back across the table, to tell me if those capture what you're trying to say, as well as what I've missed.

(1300)

Mr. Frank Folino (Interpretation):

What you've documented is appropriate. I would agree with what you've encapsulated. Thank you.

Mr. James Hicks:

You've done a really good job at summarizing everything and pulling out the salient points.

Ms. Diane Bergeron:

I agree with the other two speakers about the key points.

There's also the fact of making sure not just that the debate is accessible, but also that the marketing or advertising is accessible, because people need to know when the debate is going to be happening, how the debate is going to be happening, and on what platforms it's going to be happening. If you build it, we will come. If you don't tell us it's built, we will assume it's the same as always: we won't know where to go or how to get there, and we'll assume we're not going to be accommodated.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

Thank you very much for that.

Mr. Simpson, would you comment?

Mr. Thomas Simpson:

Ditto.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

It has really been very useful to have you here. I've heard from people with disabilities in my riding who say they hear nice words and see nodding, and then later they have to come back and make the same presentation. I hope on the part of this committee that this doesn't happen, but I know that's too often the experience of people with disabilities. Everyone says the nice things and nods the right way, and then nothing actually happens.

I see a lot of nodding around the table, and I hope the committee will take your testimony today very seriously and build it in.

Ms. Diane Bergeron:

Descriptive video would have told me that very well. Thank you.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

That's what I was trying to be, descriptive video.

Ms. Diane Bergeron:

Yes, well done. You're hired.

Mr. Randall Garrison:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We very much appreciate your coming. It's a very new perspective, as some of you said, that hasn't been covered sufficiently in the past, and now we have no excuse for not making sure it's covered in the future, from your excellent testimony.

Thank you very much.

Committee, we have to take a couple of minutes to go in camera for committee business.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1150)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte.

Bonjour. Bienvenue à la 83e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. La séance d'aujourd'hui est télévisée.

Je vais demander aux membres s'ils pourraient rester jusqu'à plus ou moins 13 h 15 afin que nous puissions tenter d'en faire le plus possible, car nous avons perdu du temps en raison des votes.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Je ne peux pas.

Le président:

Vous ne pouvez pas non plus?

Normalement, l'horaire de notre séance va jusqu'à 13 h 10, toutefois, en raison des cinq minutes supplémentaires, alors nous allons nous rendre à 13 h 10. Durant les cinq dernières minutes, nous procéderons à quelques travaux du Comité.

Comme nous poursuivons notre étude de la création d'un commissaire indépendant chargé des débats des chefs, nous sommes heureux que Catherine Cano, présidente et directrice générale, et Peter Van Dusen, chef de production, de la Chaîne d'affaires publiques par câble, se joignent à nous. Nous sommes ravis de votre présence — je sais que vous êtes tous les deux très occupés —, et nous avons hâte d'obtenir vos commentaires sur ce sujet intéressant. Il y a eu un imprévu, alors le représentant du Globe and Mail n'a pas pu se présenter. Vous disposerez de plus de temps, ce qui devrait être formidable.

Vous pourriez faire une déclaration préliminaire.

Mme Catherine Cano (présidente et directrice générale, Chaîne d'affaires publiques par câble (CPAC)):

Merci beaucoup.[Français]

Bonjour, monsieur le président et membres du Comité.

Je vous remercie infiniment de votre invitation et de nous offrir la chance de participer et de contribuer à votre réflexion sur la démocratie et sur la meilleure façon de gérer les débats des chefs lors des élections fédérales. Cette discussion est complexe, mais elle est très importante.

Je suis accompagnée aujourd'hui du directeur de l'information de CPAC, M. Peter Van Dusen. Nos commentaires seront brefs.[Traduction]

Laissez-moi d'abord affirmer que le travail qu'a entrepris le Comité est important et que le sujet est très complexe. La plupart des démocraties tiennent les mêmes discussions au sujet des débats et sont aux prises avec les mêmes problèmes que nous, ici, au Canada. Nous ne sommes pas les seuls à tenter de découvrir ce qui est le mieux pour notre pays et notre population. Pour compliquer les choses encore plus, les façons dont les citoyens consomment l'information et y accèdent changent et se diversifient à chaque cycle électoral, ce qui ajoute de nouvelles possibilités ainsi que de nouveaux défis.

Nous avons suivi les quelques premières séances du Comité avec un grand intérêt et été ravis d'entendre que le Comité et, effectivement, tous les parlementaires tiennent la CPAC — la Chaîne d'affaires publiques par câble — et son rôle en haute estime. Je peux peut-être commencer par là.

Au cours de son existence — et, soit dit en passant, c'est l'année de notre 25e anniversaire —, la CPAC s'est forgé et a maintenu vigoureusement une réputation d'indépendance, d'équilibre, d'équité et d'impartialité politique. Pour nous, ce n'est pas qu'un slogan; c'est notre énoncé de mission. Nous croyons que les Canadiens en sont venus à compter sur nous, sachant que nous n'avons qu'un intérêt en tête: le leur.

Grâce à notre couverture des travaux parlementaires, de la politique, des affaires publiques, des campagnes électorales et des congrès, ainsi qu'à nos initiatives numériques visant à mobiliser les Canadiens, surtout les jeunes, afin qu'ils comprennent mieux leurs institutions démocratiques, nous offrons une fenêtre sur notre démocratie et nous contribuons à bâtir la démocratie que nous voulons. [Français]

M. Peter Van Dusen (directeur de l'information, Chaîne d'affaires publiques par câble (CPAC)):

Notre rôle n'est jamais été aussi important qu'en temps d'élection. Cela nous amène à aborder le sujet à l'étude de votre comité: la proposition de créer une commission ou de nommer un commissaire indépendant responsable de superviser les débats des chefs pendant les campagnes électorales fédérales.

Permettez-moi de prendre un moment pour parler du rôle de CPAC lors de la dernière campagne électorale, en 2015.[Traduction]

Nous avons offert de diffuser tous les débats auxquels les chefs de parti ont accepté de participer. Nous n'en avons organisé aucun. Nous sommes devenus le diffuseur des autres. En tout, cinq débats ont été tenus. Nous estimions qu'il était fondamentalement important pour le processus démocratique que la CPAC rende ces débats accessibles aux Canadiens de partout, et ce, même s'il ne s'agissait pas de débats traditionnels commandités par le consortium.

Nous n'avons pas établi les règles ni décidé du format — nous avons laissé les organisateurs des débats s'en charger —, mais nous nous sommes assurés que tous les Canadiens avaient accès aux débats. Nous avons fait passer les intérêts des Canadiens en premier.

Je tiens à préciser que la CPAC n'a jamais été membre du consortium des chaînes grand public, même si nous avons toujours acheté l'accès aux débats au consortium afin de les diffuser sur toutes nos plateformes.

Nous savons également que les débats des chefs ne sont pas les seuls moments déterminants des campagnes. Voilà pourquoi nous croyons avoir la plus importante couverture nationale des campagnes populaires de tout média au pays. Nous présentons des profils d'une demi-heure sur les circonscriptions où se déroulent les courses électorales clés partout au pays. Il y en a eu près de 70 durant les dernières élections seulement.

Quel rôle la CPAC serait-elle prête à jouer à l'occasion d'élections à venir en ce qui a trait aux débats des chefs? Notre réponse est simple: dites-nous simplement comment nous pouvons contribuer.

Toutefois, veuillez tenir compte de quelques éléments. Comme nous l'avons déclaré, nous plaçons notre réputation d'organisme équitable, indépendant et impartial au-dessus de tout le reste. Nous estimons que le fait d'organiser des débats et de décider qui peut ou non y participer pourrait facilement mettre en péril ces caractéristiques durement acquises et menacer cette réputation. Les luttes concernant les règles et les invitations font partie des raisons pour lesquelles le modèle du consortium s'est effondré.

La CPAC préfère occuper le terrain neutre, puis livrer le contenu une fois que les règles ont été établies. Dans ce cas-ci, cela se ferait par l'adoption de la proposition présentée au Comité par la commission ou le commissaire — les règles seraient donc établies ainsi —, ou bien par le truchement d'un autre mécanisme qui pourrait découler de ce processus.

(1155)

Mme Catherine Cano:

Comme toujours, nous souhaiterions diffuser les débats à l'intention de tous les Canadiens, une fois que les règles auront été établies et approuvées par toutes les personnes concernées. Nous voudrions également souligner le fait que la CPAC travaille chaque semaine — et souvent chaque jour — en partenariat avec toutes les organisations médiatiques, y compris les membres du consortium.

Nous accordons de la valeur à cette approche collaborative. Nous croyons fermement, surtout en période d'élections, que ce qui compte le plus, c'est de donner aux Canadiens toute l'information dont ils ont besoin et qu'ils veulent pour comprendre les enjeux et connaître les chefs qui cherchent à gagner leur confiance.

Nous sommes heureux de travailler avec tous les intervenants pour nous assurer que les débats électoraux sont diffusés à la plus grande échelle possible, sur toutes les plateformes.[Français]

En conclusion, nous sommes fiers du rôle que nous jouons en offrant aux Canadiens un accès direct à leur démocratie, au processus et aux institutions. Nous serions très heureux de considérer des avenues possibles qui nous permettraient de bonifier ce rôle et qui seraient bénéfiques pour les Canadiens.

Je vous remercie infiniment. C'est avec plaisir que nous répondrons à vos questions. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons avoir le temps pour une série de questions. Chaque parti aura une période de sept minutes. Si vous voulez la partager, c'est votre choix.

M. Graham est le premier intervenant.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci de votre présence. Je suis heureux de vous revoir, madame Cano.

Monsieur Van Dusen, je vous regarde depuis environ 16 ans sur la CPAC, depuis que vous y êtes. Je suis heureux de vous rencontrer en personne.

M. Peter Van Dusen:

Merci beaucoup.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Une chose que vous avez dite dans votre déclaration préliminaire m'a frappé. Vous avez affirmé avoir acheté les débats des réseaux. Combien cela a-t-il coûté? Qu'en est-il au juste?

M. Peter Van Dusen:

Pour préciser, parlez-vous de l'achat des débats du consortium ou bien de tous les débats que nous avons diffusés lors des dernières élections?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je parle des débats du consortium.

M. Peter Van Dusen:

D'accord.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce sont les débats du consortium. Je suis curieux de savoir comment on a réalisé cette transaction, car nous ne savions pas que ces débats avaient été achetés.

M. Peter Van Dusen:

D'accord.

Habituellement, tous les radiodiffuseurs paient un droit pour pouvoir diffuser le débat du consortium. Je ne suis pas certain que cette information soit publique ou que les gens communiquent ces frais. Cela fait partie d'une entente commerciale, alors je ne suis pas certain de pouvoir dire de quoi il s'agit aujourd'hui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien.

La CPAC serait-elle intéressée ou disposée à tenir des débats directement? Est-ce que quelque chose que vous voudriez faire?

Mme Catherine Cano:

C'est une bonne question. Vous parlez du fait d'être un diffuseur-hôte, comme dans le cas des Jeux olympiques ou de quelque chose de ce genre.

Je pense que nous sommes ouverts aux manières dont nous pouvons apporter une contribution. Cela dépend de ce dont il s'agit et de ce dont il est question.

Ce que nous ne voulons pas faire, c'est décider qui peut ou non participer. Nous ne voulons pas prendre ces décisions. Quant au fait de contribuer par d'autres moyens, cela dépendra vraiment de ce que présentera le Comité au bout du compte... de ce qui sera recommandé, de ce que seront les rôles, de la façon d'en décider, et de tout cela.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

S'il y a une commission ou un commissaire, pensez-vous qu'il serait raisonnable ou déraisonnable que le principal radiodiffuseur soit tenu de diffuser des débats, par exemple au moins un dans chaque langue? Est-ce une bonne idée, une mauvaise idée, ou bien n'avez-vous aucune opinion?

Mme Catherine Cano:

Je pense qu'il incombe au Comité de prendre la décision. Selon moi, cette question ne relève pas de la CPAC.

Je peux vous dire une chose: en ce qui nous concerne, nous estimons certainement qu'il est important pour les citoyens d'avoir accès à la plus grande quantité d'information possible durant les élections. Les débats sont importants, alors nous en diffuserons le plus grand nombre possible. J'espère que la solution contribuera à favoriser la compréhension qu'ont les Canadiens du choix qui s'offre à eux. Nous le ferions certainement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai compris.

Vous avez diffusé la plupart ou l'ensemble des débats qui ont eu lieu au cours des quelques dernières élections. Pouvez-vous nous donner une idée du nombre de personnes qui regardent les débats, d'une campagne électorale à une autre?

Mme Catherine Cano:

Je pense que ces chiffres sont publics. Ceux que nous avions pour 2015 — je n'ai pas ceux des élections qui ont eu lieu avant cette année-là — englobaient toutes les chaînes qui diffusaient les débats, y compris la CPAC et deux ou trois autres chaînes. Cinq débats ont été tenus. Si on cumule l'auditoire de tous ces débats, c'est un peu moins de 10 millions, mais c'est un auditoire cumulé.

(1200)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si c'était, disons, 2 millions par débat, ce pourrait être les mêmes 2 millions encore et encore.

Mme Catherine Cano:

Ce pourrait être le cas. Il n'y a aucun moyen de savoir... Ou bien peut-être qu'il y en a un, mais nous ne savons pas si ce sont les mêmes personnes qui ont regardé tous les débats.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous n'avez pas les chiffres sous les yeux, mais, en chiffres approximatifs, vous rappelez-vous à combien s'élevait l'auditoire quand le consortium tenait ses débats? Était-il beaucoup plus élevé que cela?

Mme Catherine Cano:

Vous savez quoi? Je n'en suis pas certaine. Je sais que le chiffre d'environ 14 millions pour un débat — ou peut-être les deux, y compris celui en français — circule. Vous devriez effectuer une double vérification auprès du consortium. Je ne voudrais pas que vous me croyiez sur parole.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pensez-vous que la commission soit un élément important à établir? Est-elle nécessaire?

Mme Catherine Cano:

Encore une fois, c'est une bonne question.

Le rôle de la CPAC ne consiste pas à prendre des décisions concernant la politique électorale. Je pense que vous aurez l'occasion de rencontrer des experts en matière de démocratie et d'entendre leur témoignage et que vous accueillerez davantage de ces personnes. Je suis certaine que de nombreux choix s'offriront à vous.

L'une des choses dont nous parlions et qui, selon nous, est nécessaire — et peut-être qu'elle pourrait vous aider dans vos réflexions, tout au long du processus —, c'est ce qu'on appelle une approche de « PPP ». Ce qu'il importe d'établir, pour que notre démocratie fonctionne, c'est la prévisibilité, la participation et les partenariats.

La prévisibilité concerne les attentes des électeurs. Ils doivent savoir que des débats auront lieu et connaître le diffuseur et le moment et l'endroit du débat. Je pense que ce serait utile, si nous pouvions nous organiser pour que ces choses soient décidées.

Le volet de la participation touche l'établissement des règles qui permettront de décider qui participera ou qui sera invité au débat, et quels seront les critères et pourquoi. Je pense que, si des précisions sont apportées à cet égard, ce sera extraordinairement utile.

Le troisième élément auquel nous songions, ce sont les partenariats. Quelle est la meilleure façon d'assurer ou d'amorcer la collaboration entre toutes les organisations médiatiques afin que, dans la plus grande mesure possible, les débats soient vus par tous les Canadiens?

À nos yeux, si nous tenons compte de ces trois aspects, cela nous aidera à veiller à ce que ces débats soient justes et neutres.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pensez-vous que la CPAC — de façon indépendante —, ou bien une commission ou un commissaire, a un rôle à jouer dans les débats locaux — par opposition aux débats des chefs nationaux — pour ce qui est de les annoncer ou de les diffuser ou de tout autre aspect?

M. Peter Van Dusen:

Laissez-moi répondre de deux manières.

Le plus grand défi que nous avons à relever consiste à tenter de déterminer ce dont nous avons besoin pour établir les PPP dont Catherine a parlé. Comment pouvons-nous nous assurer que, si nous tenons des débats, nous saurons quand ils auront lieu, qui y participera et qui va les diffuser?

Je pense qu'il faut déterminer de quoi il s'agit avant que des organisations comme la CPAC puissent décider quel genre de rôle elles peuvent jouer là-dedans et quel rôle elles sont prêtes à jouer.

Nous sommes une petite organisation, pour être honnête, mais nous nous plaisons à penser que nous jouons dans la cour des grands dans beaucoup de domaines, dont l'un est l'échelon local. Si des débats se tiennent à cet échelon, nous serions heureux d'envisager cette idée.

Comme je l'ai mentionné, lors de la dernière campagne électorale, nous avons visité 70 circonscriptions dans le but d'établir le profil de celles qui, nous le pensions, allaient avoir une incidence importante sur le résultat des élections. Dans le cadre de ces reportages, nous présentions des débats locaux auxquels prenaient part des candidats réunis un mardi soir dans une salle de la circonscription. Je suis peut-être allé dans certaines de vos circonscriptions. Je n'ai pas la liste sous les yeux. Il est fort probable que nous y soyons allés à un certain moment. Nous sommes ouverts à cette idée.

Comme nous l'avons affirmé dans notre déclaration préliminaire, nous savons que les campagnes ne reposent pas que sur les débats des chefs. Nous comprenons le processus. Nous savons qu'au pays, les gens votent non pas pour un premier ministre, mais pour un parti, et que le chef du parti qui remporte les élections devient le premier ministre. Ce qui se passe à l'échelon local a vraiment beaucoup d'importance. Nous comprenons cela. Voilà pourquoi nous œuvrons beaucoup à l'échelon local durant les campagnes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ils votent pour des gens. Merci beaucoup de cette réponse.

Le président:

Merci.

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Passons à M. Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie nos témoins de s'être joints à nous aujourd'hui. C'est formidable que de vous accueillir.

Tout d'abord, je veux vous remercier d'avoir diffusé les débats lors de la dernière campagne électorale. La semaine dernière, nous avons accueilli des témoins des grands diffuseurs qui ont plutôt choisi de diffuser Coronation Street et des reprises de l'émission The Big Bang Theory, alors je vous suis reconnaissant d'avoir diffusé ces débats dans l'intérêt du public.

L'une des craintes dont ils nous ont fait part concernait les normes journalistiques s'appliquant aux débats et les valeurs de production. Vous avez manifestement diffusé les débats. De votre point de vue, y avait-il des préoccupations liées aux normes journalistiques ou aux valeurs de production?

(1205)

M. Peter Van Dusen:

C'est toujours une question un peu délicate. J'ai été l'un des principaux participants à ce processus décisionnel, et je me disais que c'étaient toutes des organisations réputées qui essayaient quelque chose de nouveau. Elles sont toutes connues pour leur bon journalisme, alors nous avons adopté la position selon laquelle il serait dans l'intérêt supérieur de la démocratie de montrer aux gens ce qui s'offre à eux. Comme nous n'avons pas organisé les débats et n'avons pas porté de jugement sur les capacités de chacun, il était plus important, dans notre cas, de donner aux Canadiens la possibilité de voir les débats d'une façon ou d'une autre.

À mon sens, on ne peut pas répondre à des questions concernant la qualité du journalisme avant d'avoir vu le produit, alors nous avons pris une décision. Regardez, voici Maclean's, et voici le Globe; voyons ce qu'ils ont à offrir, car, actuellement, c'est tout ce qui est offert. Par conséquent, montrons-le aux Canadiens et effectuons ce que j'appellerais un survol des événements importants de la campagne et assurons-nous que nous plaçons le processus démocratique au-dessus des questions importantes touchant la qualité de la production et du journalisme, et laissons les téléspectateurs décider après que nous aurons diffusé le débat.

M. John Nater:

Simplement pour tirer un peu au clair la question de la diversité des débats: considérez-vous qu'il soit positif, dans le cadre des campagnes électorales, de tenir des débats de style et de type différents, au lieu de seulement un anglais et un en français, et d'avoir une certaine variété, et peut-être même d'aborder différents sujets?

Mme Catherine Cano:

Oui, je suis de cet avis. Cela pourrait fonctionner, tout dépendant de la durée de la campagne également. Je pense qu'il faudrait entre autres déterminer si cela nous convient, mais, oui, je pense que nous étions heureux d'offrir différents formats, et cela donne d'autres moyens d'aborder les questions et les thèmes, c'est certain.

M. John Nater:

Pour changer un peu de sujet, la CPAC a une excellente application pour iPad dont je suis un grand adepte. Il est formidable de l'utiliser pour suivre les débats lorsque je ne suis pas présent à la Chambre ou devant la télévision.

Si vous n'avez pas le nombre de téléspectateurs aujourd'hui, pourriez-vous fournir au Comité le nombre de personnes qui ont visionné en ligne les cinq débats tenus durant la dernière campagne électorale, et aussi en ce qui concerne les diffusions sur la CPAC, en général; quelle augmentation des visionnements en ligne et numériques avez-vous observée au cours des dernières années?

Mme Catherine Cano:

C'est une très bonne question. Je ne dispose pas des chiffres pour les dernières élections. Je ne sais pas si nous les avons. Je n'étais pas là à l'époque, mais je vais vérifier, et je vous transmettrai tous les renseignements dont je dispose.

Il est certain que le nombre de personnes qui visitent notre site Web et qui utilisent notre application a augmenté de façon extraordinaire au cours des deux ou trois dernières années, alors il y a un public pour le contenu numérique.

M. John Nater:

Je vais poser une question de plus, puis je vais céder la parole à Kevin Waugh, pour la dernière minute, plus ou moins.

Le président:

Oui.

M. John Nater:

Nous avons entendu les responsables d'Élections Canada hésiter à l'idée de participer de façon trop importante aux négociations relatives au processus décisionnel. Vous semblez dire un peu la même chose quand vous affirmez que vous ne voulez pas nécessairement entrer dans les détails et participer à un processus décisionnel qui pourrait mettre en péril votre impartialité. Proposeriez-vous au Comité de formuler des recommandations très précises quant à la façon dont un débat devrait être tenu et aux personnes qui devraient y participer, ou bien préféreriez-vous qu'une commission ou un commissaire bénéficie de la marge de manœuvre nécessaire pour prendre ces décisions qui échappent à votre pouvoir décisionnel?

Mme Catherine Cano:

Encore une fois, je pense que vos travaux constitueront une excellente occasion d'entendre tous les points de vue et tous les choix qui s'offrent à vous. Il est difficile de savoir ce qui est le mieux maintenant. Dans le cas d'un organisme, convient-il qu'il puisse faire appliquer la prévisibilité à l'égard de tous les intervenants, comme nous en avons parlé? De quel genre de pouvoir exécutoire devrait jouir cet organisme? Y a-t-il d'autres façons de nous y prendre?

Je pense que vous avez la possibilité d'entendre le témoignage de grands experts en la matière, et nous avons hâte de voir les options. Il est un peu difficile de le savoir, pour l'instant, mais je pense que ce sont probablement les questions que vous devriez poser.

M. John Nater:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Kevin Waugh, bienvenue au Comité. Vous disposez de deux minutes.

M. Kevin Waugh (Saskatoon—Grasswood, PCC):

Merci. Deux minutes, c'est beaucoup.

Les forfaits de câblodistribution de base comprennent la CPAC, comme vous le savez, partout au pays. Il se trouve que vous êtes la chaîne politique du pays. Je sais que les points de vue divergent au sujet des coûts liés à la production et des ressources regroupées, mais je voudrais voir le commissaire... et je vous en ai parlé, Catherine. La CPAC est la chaîne politique. Vous avez l'expérience nécessaire, 24 heures sur 24, 7 jours sur 7, et je pense qu'il importe que votre chaîne assure la direction en vue du prochain débat.

Nous observons une crise dans le cas de CTV, de la SRC et de Global-Corus. C'est important. Je vous en ai parlé à un certain nombre d'occasions. Le temps est venu pour vous de diffuser ce que les Canadiens veulent voir. Vous faites partie des chaînes de base. Nous payons des frais. Toutes les maisonnées du pays paient des frais à la CPAC. J'ai l'impression que le moment est maintenant venu pour vous de structurer cette diffusion avec la commission, de prendre les rênes en vue de 2019.

Quelles sont vos réflexions à ce sujet?

(1210)

Mme Catherine Cano:

Eh bien, tout d'abord, merci beaucoup pour votre vote de confiance. Nous sommes vraiment fiers de ce qu'accomplit la chaîne et de la réputation qu'elle maintient depuis 25 ans. J'y travaille depuis moins de deux ans, alors c'est du travail de toute mon équipe que je fais l'éloge.

C'est une bonne question. Nous voulons apporter la plus grande contribution possible. Nous ne savons pas quel genre de règles et quel genre d'organisme ou d'entité le comité établira ni quel genre de recommandations il formulera, alors il est un peu difficile pour nous de nous engager à l'égard de quelque chose qui est inconnu. Nous sommes heureux de faire partie du processus. Si encore plus de questions sont posées par la suite, nous avons hâte d'y répondre. Je veux faire partie du processus, mais nous devons être conscients du fait que la force de la CPAC provient de son impartialité. Nous allons chercher à être en mesure de préserver ces caractéristiques.

Nous préférons être utiles une fois que nous saurons quelles sont les règles et ce que présentera le Comité.

M. Kevin Waugh:

La clé, en ce qui concerne la CPAC, c'est qu'elle est impartiale.

Si je le puis, monsieur le président...

Le président:

Non, désolé. Votre temps est écoulé.

M. Kevin Waugh:

Nous vous parlerons plus tard. Merci.

Le président:

Le dernier intervenant est M. Garrison. Bienvenue au Comité.

M. Randall Garrison (Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke, NPD):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président. J'étais là au début du débat, mais j'ai fait des allées et venues.

Je veux commencer par remercier la CPAC, moi aussi. Je sais que, dans ma circonscription, vous avez des admirateurs, beaucoup d'admirateurs, un nombre surprenant. Je pense que nous sous-estimons parfois l'accès qu'offre la CPAC. Les gens se concentrent parfois sur le nombre total de téléspectateurs, mais je sais que, dans ma circonscription, lorsqu'un enjeu est important à l'échelon local, les gens utilisent la CPAC. Même s'ils ne regardent pas la chaîne régulièrement, ils savent qu'ils peuvent la syntoniser afin d'obtenir de l'information.

L'autre chose que vous faites, qui, selon moi, est très précieuse, c'est que, durant les élections, vous présentez les 70 profils de circonscription que vous avez mentionnés. J'essayais simplement de m'en souvenir. Je me suis présenté quatre fois; je n'ai été élu que deux fois, et je ne vous blâme pas pour ce résultat.

Des voix: Ah, ah!

M. Peter Van Dusen:

Je vous en remercie.

M. Randall Garrison:

Vous avez établi le profil de ma circonscription les quatre fois, je pense.

M. Peter Van Dusen:

Elle a toujours été une circonscription importante. La lutte y est serrée.

M. Randall Garrison:

Elle l'est.

L'autre élément qui est important à ce sujet, c'est qu'il est parfois difficile, en Colombie-Britannique, d'avoir une idée de ce qui se passe dans le reste du pays. Je pense que ces profils sont très, très utiles pour les électeurs de ma circonscription, qui veulent voir ce qui se passe ailleurs au pays. Je ne fais qu'encourager la CPAC à conserver cette pratique, car je pense qu'il s'agit d'un service important auquel les gens ne pensent parfois pas.

Je suppose que je vous donnerais un avertissement concernant les débats locaux. Il arrive que ces débats respectent une norme un peu moins élevée du point de leur organisation et de leur journalisme. Dans ma circonscription, nous en tenons habituellement environ huit, et nous tenons de longs débats au sujet de qui peut ou non participer, quels candidats sont inclus ou exclus. Il est même survenu un incident où un parti enregistré a retiré son candidat du plateau juste avant la diffusion. Je pense que vous devriez faire preuve d'une grande prudence à l'égard des débats locaux.

Pour revenir au sujet principal, j'apprécie l'ouverture dont vous avez fait preuve pour ce qui est de faire ce qu'il faut pour rendre les choses plus accessibles aux Canadiens. Je pense que c'est votre réputation et que vous la confirmez aujourd'hui. Ma question concerne en réalité la façon dont nous pouvons maximiser la capacité de visionnement. Je ne suis pas favorable à l'imposition d'une amende ou d'une sanction à ceux qui ne tiennent pas de débats des chefs, mais comment pouvons-nous les rendre accessibles? C'est une chose que d'affirmer qu'ils sont diffusés, mais comment pouvons-nous les rendre plus accessibles du point de vue de la forme et de ce genre de choses? Je ne dis pas que vous devriez les organiser, mais avez-vous des idées quant aux façons dont les débats pourraient être plus accessibles au public? Je sais que beaucoup de gens pourraient les regarder pendant deux ou trois minutes, puis avoir l'impression qu'ils ne s'adressent pas à eux.

M. Peter Van Dusen:

Nous entrons en terrain inconnu. Avec la dernière élection et l'effondrement du modèle du consortium, nous sommes en territoire inconnu. C'est une toile blanche.

À mon avis, l'idée de rendre plus accessibles les débats des chefs revient au troisième « p » dont nous avons parlé, celui du partenariat. Je serai très intéressé de voir ce qui ressort du Comité et ensuite des consultations du ministre.

Revenons un peu en arrière sur la question de M. Waugh et l'idée de « mener cela », je reviens à qu'est-ce que « cela »? Tant que nous n'aurons pas une meilleure idée de ce qu'est « cela », il sera difficile de savoir quel rôle nous pouvons jouer pour mener quelque chose ou y participer, mais nous sommes ouverts à l'idée.

En ce qui concerne plus particulièrement votre question, il faut établir des partenariats. Si nous partons du principe que les règles ont changé et que la préoccupation principale des titulaires d'une charge de partout au pays et des organisations comme la nôtre est un accès plus large à la démocratie, alors nous devons nous assurer que le plus de personnes possible puissent voir ces débats.

Il y a donc lieu de se demander comment y arriver. Si nous optons pour l'idée du partenariat — que personne ne possède le débat, la soirée au cours de laquelle il se tient ni son accès et que ces débats doivent être accessibles à tous les Canadiens sur toutes les plateformes —, alors poser la question, c'est y répondre. Si tout le monde dans ces espaces particuliers sait maintenant qu'aucune restriction sur l'accès ne s'applique au débat, on trouvera une façon de diffuser le débat pour son groupe particulier de personnes, et tous seront mieux servis.

(1215)

M. Randall Garrison:

Certaines idées — et j'imagine que je reviens à 2011 et aux débats organisés en consortium — consistaient à demander aux électeurs de soumettre des questions et à essayer de faire participer et de mobiliser davantage les électeurs dans le cadre du processus de débat.

Je me demande si vous, en tant que journaliste, pensez qu'il est utile de mobiliser le public.

M. Peter Van Dusen:

Je reviendrais à ce que j'ai dit. Si le débat est accessible à tous, les gens peuvent en faire ce qu'ils veulent. « Regardez notre débat parce que nous y présentons ce type d'information. Regardez le débat parce que nous présentons cet autre type d'information. Nous assurons cette accessibilité et ce type d'approche sur la façon dont nous couvrons le débat. » Il existe nombre d'options que nous pouvons choisir.

Certaines personnes diront peut-être: « S'il n'y a qu'une seule chaîne qui présente le débat, nous ne sommes pas vraiment intéressés à la question des téléspectateurs. » Toutefois, nous utilisons cet autre modèle, mais nous prenons la façon de mener le débat et la traitons différemment. Nous pouvons peut-être tenir un débat — nous en avons parlé un peu — au cours duquel nous ne vérifions pas la véracité des réponses, mais nous présentons une émission de 90 minutes à la suite du débat au cours de laquelle nous vérifierons tous les faits qui ont été énoncés.

Ce sont des modèles différents que les gens peuvent offrir. Si tout le monde a accès à un débat, alors on peut décider de l'angle utilisé au cours de sa couverture.

M. Randall Garrison:

J'imagine que ce que, essentiellement, vous dites, c'est que plusieurs débats et que plusieurs modèles...

M. Peter Van Dusen:

Il pourrait s'agir d'un certain nombre de débats accessibles sur toutes les plateformes intéressées. Du moment qu'on présente l'essentiel du débat, on peut le traiter différemment en ce qui concerne le public et la façon dont on encourage la participation.

M. Randall Garrison:

Pour ce qui est des personnes qui prendraient ces décisions, que pensez-vous d'une commission par rapport à un commissaire? Pensez-vous que l'on peut s'attendre à ce qu'une personne puisse gérer ce processus et être perçue comme neutre ou serait-il préférable d'avoir un comité de personnes — CPAC — qui se penche là-dessus?

Mme Catherine Cano:

Pas vraiment. Je crois que nous laisserons le Comité trouver...

M. Randall Garrison:

Vous n'allez pas nous aider là-dessus.

Mme Catherine Cano:

Eh bien, c'est difficile de savoir. C'est complexe. Vous avez la tâche difficile de trouver une solution et d'établir de qui cette personne ou ce groupe relèverait. Il y a beaucoup de questions que vous devez poser pour obtenir des réponses.

Vous savez, je crois que les experts de la démocratie, les gens qui sont passés par là... je suis certaine que vous examinez également ce qui se passe dans d'autres pays. La façon dont on procède ailleurs dans le monde peut être source d'inspiration.

M. Peter Van Dusen:

Nous ne sommes pas ici pour nous prononcer sur le modèle vers lequel vous penchez.

Ce qui servira le processus, c'est l'idée de trouver ce qui est prévisible, de déterminer la participation et de trouver une façon d'encourager les partenariats — je ne sais pas si cela exige un titulaire de charge ou un type différent d'approche —, et vous pouvez répondre à ces types de préoccupations pour nous et pour d'autres.

Le président:

Merci de votre présence.

Comme vous pouvez voir, nous aimons beaucoup CPAC. Nous respectons votre façon de mener vos activités, alors nous apprécions le fait que vous soyez ici aujourd'hui.

M. Peter Van Dusen:

Merci.

Mme Catherine Cano:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Nous allons suspendre la séance pour permettre à notre prochain groupe de s'installer.

(1215)

(1220)

Le président:

Nous allons reprendre la séance no 83 du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Si vous vous souvenez bien, au cours de la dernière séance, je vous ai demandé vos derniers commentaires sur les témoins pour le reste de l'étude. Nous procéderons aux modifications de l'annexe proposée à la fin de la séance.

Nous recevons cet après-midi Diane Bergeron, vice-présidente, Mobilisation et Affaires internationales, et Thomas Simpson, gestionnaire, Opérations et affaires gouvernementales à l'Institut national canadien pour les aveugles. Ils ont distribué un document.

Nous accueillons également Frank Folino, président de l'Association des Sourds du Canada, alors vous pouvez voir le langage gestuel ici. Vous pouvez en tout temps nous dire si nous allons trop vite pour les interprètes gestuels.

Nous avons également James Hicks, coordonnateur national pour le Conseil des Canadiens avec déficiences.

Vous aurez tous l'occasion de faire votre exposé, et ensuite chaque parti posera des questions. Il y aura une série de questions de sept minutes par personne, et cela comprend la question et votre réponse, alors n'oubliez pas d'en tenir compte pendant vos réponses.

Nous allons commencer par les représentants de l'Institut national canadien pour les aveugles. Vous voulez peut-être faire une déclaration préliminaire.

(1225)

Mme Diane Bergeron (vice-présidente, Mobilisation et affaires internationales, Institut national canadien pour les aveugles):

Merci beaucoup.

J'aimerais d'abord remercier le Comité de nous avoir invités ici aujourd'hui. Je m'appelle Diane Bergeron et je suis accompagnée de Thomas Simpson.

L'INCA existe depuis presque 100 ans. On l'a fondé en 1918 pour aider les anciens combattants après la Première Guerre mondiale qui sont revenus aveugles ainsi que les personnes qui sont devenues aveugles à la suite de l'explosion de Halifax. Nous offrons des services et de la formation axée sur les compétences aux personnes qui sont aveugles et celles qui sont atteintes de cécité partielle en vue de les aider à se déplacer dans leur environnement et d'assurer leur sécurité dans leurs environnements externes et internes. Nous offrons également des programmes de bienfaisance comme du soutien par les pairs, des camps destinés aux enfants et ainsi de suite.

Nous travaillons à la défense des droits et aidons à sensibiliser le public aux besoins des personnes aveugles ou atteintes de cécité partielle. Le rapport de 2012 de Statistique Canada indiquait que près de 750 000 personnes au Canada ont affirmé avoir une perte de vision. C'est beaucoup de gens qui voteront à la prochaine élection.

J'aimerais que vous imaginiez que le document que nous vous avons distribué juste avant le début de la séance contient la seule information dont vous avez besoin pour déterminer le prochain premier ministre du Canada. C'est votre document. Vous pouvez le lire et l'apprendre, et c'est la seule forme d'information que vous aurez pour prendre une décision éclairée au moment de choisir le candidat pour qui vous voterez à la prochaine élection. Naturellement, à moins que vous ayez appris le système Braille par le passé, vous regardez probablement le document et vous demandez, au nom du ciel, ce que vous en ferez. C'est ce que les gens aveugles ou atteints de cécité partielle vivent au Canada à toutes les élections.

On nous invite souvent à assister aux débats ou à les écouter à la télévision, et on montre des images et des documents. Des gens viennent cogner à notre porte et nous donnent des documents auxquels nous n'avons pas accès. Nous allons sur les sites Web pour consulter le programme des partis. Ils ne sont pas compatibles avec les lecteurs d'écrans ni d'autres dispositifs destinés aux personnes aveugles et celles atteintes de cécité partielle.

Il m'est impossible de faire ce que j'ai le droit de faire dans notre pays: voter pour les personnes qui vont me représenter dans l'arène politique. C'est également une obligation, mais il est impossible pour moi de faire cela et de prendre une décision éclairée, en tant que personne complètement aveugle, si je n'ai accès qu'à une petite quantité d'information. J'ai le droit, en tant que Canadienne, d'accéder au processus électoral comme tout le monde. Malheureusement, l'accès n'est pas toujours prévu.

Afin de nous assurer d'avoir la capacité de faire un choix éclairé, nous avons certaines recommandations. Je vais demander à Thomas de vous les formuler.

M. Thomas Simpson (gestionnaire, Opérations et affaires gouvernementales, Institut national canadien pour les aveugles):

Merci, Diane.

L'INCA appuie la création d'une commission indépendante ou d'un commissaire indépendant chargé des débats des chefs tenus au cours d'une élection, du moment qu'on intègre les points suivants afin d'assurer l'accessibilité aux Canadiens aveugles ou atteints de cécité partielle.

Si on présente un débat des chefs à la télévision, il doit être assorti d'une description sonore. Si un chef de parti ou des modérateurs utilisent des aides visuelles, on doit le décrire aux téléspectateurs. Cela comprend les noms qui apparaissent à l'écran ou une présentation PowerPoint. L'INCA recommande que le Comité communique avec Accessibilité Média Inc., ou AMI, un organisme sans but lucratif qui divertit et informe et qui donne des outils aux Canadiens aveugles ou atteints de cécité partielle ou de déficiences auditives. L'entreprise gère trois services de télédiffusion: AMI-tv et AMI-audio, tous deux en anglais, et AMI-télé en français. AMI-tv télédiffuse une sélection de programmes de divertissement général assortis de mesures d'adaptation pour les personnes atteintes de déficience visuelle ou auditive avec des descriptions sonores et du sous-titrage codé. AMI est un expert pour prévoir l'accessibilité de la télévision, et on devrait le consulter pour rendre accessibles les débats des chefs au plus grand nombre de Canadiens possible.

De même, l'utilisation de l'ASL et de la LSQ — l'American Sign Language et la langue des signes québécoise — est nécessaire pour les Canadiens qui sont sourds et ceux qui sont sourds et aveugles. Si l'on veut que le plus grand nombre de personnes possible suivent les débats des chefs, on devrait les mettre en marché et les publiciser d'une manière efficace. Cela signifie qu'il ne faut pas seulement le faire dans les médias imprimés conventionnels. On devrait les annoncer de toutes les manières possibles: à la télévision, à la radio ou au moyen de publicités avant des vidéos sur YouTube.

Cela m'amène à la présentation en ligne des débats des chefs. Si on peut diffuser en ligne les débats des chefs futurs, on devra s'assurer que les sites Web qui les présenteront soient accessibles. Cela signifie qu'on doit pouvoir consulter facilement ces sites Web au moyen de dispositifs d'assistance. Des personnes ayant diverses limitations visuelles doivent essayer au préalable tout site Web qui diffusera de futurs débats des chefs afin d'assurer la meilleure accessibilité possible. Par exemple, on doit essayer des vidéos ou des cases de suggestions de questions à des fins d'utilisation par un lecteur d'écran ou un logiciel de grossissement de texte à l'écran. Tous les sites Web devraient avoir un bon contraste de couleurs.

Nous remercions le Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre d'avoir invité l'INCA à témoigner et nous répondrons avec plaisir à vos questions.

(1230)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Nous apprécions cela.

Nous avons maintenant Frank Folino, président de l'Association des Sourds du Canada.

M. Frank Folino (président, Association des Sourds du Canada) (Traduction de l'interprétation):

Merci, monsieur le président, de m'avoir invité à témoigner devant le Comité dans le cadre de votre étude de la proposition de créer une commission indépendante ou un commissaire indépendant chargé d'organiser les débats des chefs tenus au cours des campagnes électorales fédérales.

Je m'appelle Frank Folino et je suis président de l'Association des Sourds du Canada. La CAD-ASC est une organisation nationale de recherche, d'information et d'action communautaire pour les personnes sourdes au Canada. Fondée en 1940, la CAD-ASC offre des services de consultation et de l'information sur des questions relatives à la surdité au public, aux entreprises, aux médias, aux éducateurs, aux gouvernements et à d'autres. Nous réalisons également des recherches et recueillons des données.

La CAD-ASC fait valoir et protège les droits, les besoins et les préoccupations des personnes sourdes qui utilisent l'American Sign Language, l'ASL, et la langue des signes québécoise, la LSQ.

La CAD-ASC est affiliée à la Fédération mondiale des sourds et est un organisme non gouvernemental accrédité auprès des Nations unies conformément à la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées.

Le langage gestuel est reconnu sept fois dans cinq articles différents de la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées des Nations unies, convention que le Canada a ratifiée en mars 2010. On y mentionne nos droits, décrits dans la Convention, d'aborder les articles qui concernent directement les langages gestuels.

Au Canada, les personnes sourdes utilisent l'ASL et la LSQ pour montrer que nous prônons la diversité, le caractère inclusif et les valeurs fondamentales et que nous sommes déterminés à maintenir un environnement inclusif dans la société canadienne. Nombre de pays ont reconnu par la loi les langages gestuels. Une telle reconnaissance au Canada assurerait l'élimination d'obstacles et fournirait un accès égal, ce qui représente une étape importante pour devenir un pays inclusif et accessible dans le cadre de notre intégration aux sociétés anglaise et française.

Les problèmes d'accessibilité se sont retrouvés trop souvent au second plan des débats des chefs fédéraux. Il est clair qu'il existe des problèmes d'accessibilité qui représentent des obstacles pour les personnes sourdes et malentendantes. Elles ne peuvent pas participer au processus d'un débat national, que ce soit à la télévision ou sur des plateformes de médias sociaux. Lors des débats des chefs fédéraux télévisés antérieurs, il n'y avait pas d'interprétation gestuelle ni de sous-titrage codé sur les plateformes de médias sociaux.

Pour rendre accessibles les débats des chefs futurs aux personnes sourdes qui ont besoin d'accéder à l'information, nous aimerions qu'on offre l'interprétation gestuelle en ASL pour les débats en anglais et en LSQ pour les débats en français. Cela comprendrait une incrustation d'images à l'écran et du sous-titrage en anglais et en français. Les personnes sourdes peuvent participer au débat et avoir connaissance de ce qui s'y passe afin de bien comprendre les différents programmes qu'offrent les candidats. Si on ne nous fournit pas de services d'interprétation au cours du débat, nous ne comprendrons pas pleinement ce dont les gens parlent.

Évidemment, la langue utilisée au cours des débats est soutenue et compliquée et, sans avoir accès à l'ASL ou à la LSQ, nous ne pouvons pas savoir pour qui nous allons voter. Le jour de l'élection, nous ne pouvons pas faire un choix vraiment éclairé. C'est un autre bon exemple de la façon dont nous sommes en quelque sorte exclues de la société en tant que personnes sourdes, contrairement aux autres Canadiens et aux autres citoyens.

Nous n'avons pas un véritable accès dans notre propre langage. Nous l'avons en français et en anglais, mais ces langues sont bien sûr prédominantes chez d'autres personnes. Nous cherchons non seulement à obtenir l'accès à des interprètes, mais également l'accès à l'information. Souvent, nous sommes aux prises avec de l'information qui est en anglais ou en français. Nous aimerions donc nous assurer que, au cours des débats des chefs fédéraux tenus dans le cadre des campagnes électorales futures, on nous offre des services afin de rendre accessible l'information non seulement en anglais et en français, mais également dans les langages gestuels.

Cela démontre la façon dont une commission indépendante ou un commissaire indépendant peut adopter une approche positive visant à intégrer les personnes sourdes en leur rendant accessible l'information lorsque viendra le temps d'organiser les débats des chefs au cours des campagnes électorales futures. La création d'une commission indépendante ou d'un commissaire indépendant donnera l'occasion de résoudre ces problèmes d'accessibilité en vue d'assurer un Canada inclusif et accessible. Il importe de mettre en oeuvre une optique de l'accessibilité, décrite dans la citation suivante:



Une optique de l'accessibilité est un outil servant à relever et à préciser les problèmes qui touchent les personnes handicapées, utilisé par les concepteurs et les analystes de politiques et de programmes afin de tenir compte des incidences de toutes les initiatives (politiques, programmes ou décisions) sur les personnes handicapées et de prendre des mesures connexes. C'est également une ressource pour élaborer des politiques et des programmes qui reflètent les droits et les besoins des personnes handicapées.

(1235)



Nous aimerions voir la mise sur pied d'un comité consultatif sur l'accessibilité composé d'experts pour conseiller la commission indépendante ou le commissaire indépendant afin que la mise en oeuvre des services d'accès soit comme prévue, bien à l'avance.

Dans le cadre de l'optique de l'accessibilité, dans l'organisation des débats des chefs tenus au cours de campagnes électorales fédérales, il faudra s'assurer que l'accessibilité figure au premier plan, non pas au second. Cela éliminera les obstacles importants auxquels nous faisons face. L'interprétation en langage gestuel, pendant les débats des chefs, nous permet de participer, ce qui est important pour notre communauté.

Un Canada inclusif et accessible aura une incidence sur plus d'un million de Canadiens sourds, sourds et aveugles et malentendants qui désirent participer au processus décisionnel électoral, ce dont ils ont pleinement le droit. Grâce au langage gestuel, ils auront accès à l'information qui leur permettra de décider à qui ils accorderont leur vote, afin que les candidats soient élus de manière démocratique.

Je serais heureux de répondre à vos questions concernant les problèmes d'accessibilité et l'organisation de débats des chefs futurs au cours des prochaines campagnes électorales. J'espère que le Comité sera en mesure de résoudre ces problèmes importants en matière d'accessibilité pour notre démocratie.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

C'est maintenant le tour de M. James Hicks, coordonnateur national du Conseil des Canadiens avec déficiences.

M. James Hicks (coordonnateur national, Conseil des Canadiens avec déficiences):

Bonjour à tous. Je m'appelle James Hicks et je représente le Conseil des Canadiens avec déficiences.

Nous voulons également vous remercier de nous avoir invités pour que nous puissions parler de certains des problèmes qui, à notre avis, se posent relativement aux élections et à la compréhension qu'ont les gens des débats des chefs.

Le CCD est une organisation nationale de défense des droits de la personne formée « par » des handicapés, non pas « pour » les personnes handicapées. C'est une distinction importante. Nous travaillons pour un Canada accessible et inclusif.

Le CCD est heureux que le Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre réalise une étude sur la nomination d'un commissaire indépendant pour organiser les débats des chefs télévisés au cours des campagnes électorales fédérales. Pendant un certain nombre d'années, nous avons soumis des questions aux chefs dans l'espoir qu'ils y répondent, mais ce n'est jamais arrivé, pas une seule fois.

Avant de parler de ce qui devrait se passer, j'aimerais aborder avec vous les obligations du Canada pour s'assurer que ces choses se produisent. Le Canada a signé la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées. Elle est en place depuis un certain nombre d'années maintenant. L'article 29 porte sur la participation à la vie politique et publique et il prévoit ce qui suit: Les États Parties garantissent aux personnes handicapées la jouissance des droits politiques et la possibilité de les exercer sur la base de l’égalité avec les autres, et s’engagent: À faire en sorte que les personnes handicapées puissent effectivement et pleinement participer à la vie politique et à la vie publique sur la base de l’égalité avec les autres, que ce soit directement ou par l’intermédiaire de représentants librement choisis, notamment qu’elles aient le droit et la possibilité de voter et d’être élues, et pour cela les États Parties, entre autres mesures: Veillent à ce que les procédures, équipements et matériels électoraux soient appropriés, accessibles et faciles à comprendre […] Protègent le droit qu’ont les personnes handicapées de voter à bulletin secret […]

— et se faire assister d'une personne de leur choix, de personne d'autre — Garantissent la libre expression de la volonté des personnes handicapées en tant qu’électeurs et à cette fin si nécessaire, et à leur demande, les autorisent à se faire assister […] pour voter; À promouvoir activement un environnement dans lequel les personnes handicapées peuvent effectivement et pleinement participer à la conduite des affaires publiques, sans discrimination et sur la base de l’égalité avec les autres, et à encourager leur participation aux affaires publiques, notamment par le biais: De leur participation aux organisations non gouvernementales […] De la constitution d’organisations de personnes handicapées pour les représenter aux niveaux international, national, régional et local et de l’adhésion à ces organisations.

En outre, la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés garantit l'égalité des personnes handicapées devant la loi. La Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne assure aux personnes handicapées qu'elles ne feront pas l'objet de discrimination au sein de l'administration fédérale pour ce qui est de la prestation de biens et de services. Cela comprend le droit de vote et le droit de faire partie de l'ensemble du processus électoral, ce qui comprend les débats. Si on ne respecte pas ces dispositions, rien ne se concrétisera.

Je pourrais parler longuement des choses que les gens ont déjà abordées. Je voulais parler de l'interprétation en ASL et en LSQ et également la narration sonore des éléments visuels importants des débats pour s'assurer que les gens prennent connaissance de la communication non verbale qui a lieu au cours d'un débat. J'allais mentionner l'utilisation d'un langage clair pour les personnes qui ne comprennent pas nécessairement bien le langage et le sous-titrage codé destinés aux malentendants afin que ceux-ci aient accès à l'information diffusée au cours des débats. Je soulignerai que les mesures d'adaptation en matière d'accessibilité devraient être accessibles dans tous les endroits et sur toutes les plateformes en vue d'assurer la participation des citoyens handicapés qui font partie du public et la participation de candidats potentiels qui pourraient être handicapés.

En outre, j'aimerais parler de la façon dont vous pourrez vous conformer aux règles.

Si on détermine qu'un commissaire indépendant sera chargé de l'organisation des débats des chefs télévisés, alors il devra s'assurer qu'on définisse la participation entière dans la loi qui autorise la mise en place du commissaire. Il existe une obligation d'organiser des débats qui sont pleinement accessibles aux Canadiens handicapés et qui tiennent compte des préoccupations des gens handicapés afin que cette composante des élections canadiennes respecte les attentes énoncées dans l'article 29 de la CDPH.

Pour s'assurer que le modèle des débats soit vraiment inclusif et accessible, la loi devrait exiger du commissaire, avant la planification d'un débat, qu'il consulte les organisations représentatives de personnes handicapées à propos des mesures d'accessibilité et d'inclusion nécessaires conformément à l'article 29.

La loi devrait exiger que le commissaire établisse un comité consultatif formé de personnes nommées par des organisations représentatives de personnes handicapées, lesquelles donneront des conseils sur les questions posées au cours du débat qui tiennent compte des préoccupations des Canadiens handicapés.

Le commissaire devrait réaliser après le débat une évaluation de l'accessibilité et du caractère inclusif du débat, et il devrait faire rapport au gouvernement des mesures qui ont été prises à cet égard et du résultat de l'évaluation réalisée après le débat.

(1240)



Merci de prendre en considération les questions relatives aux Canadiens handicapés. Ce n'est que lorsque le Canada assurera vraiment la pleine participation politique des Canadiens, peu importe leur capacité, qu'il sera en mesure de dire qu'il est un pays inclusif.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci à tous de vos exposés et également du travail que vous faites tous les jours. Nous l'apprécions vraiment. Le Canada l'apprécie beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant entamer notre série de questions de sept minutes, laquelle comprend les questions et les réponses.

Allez-y, monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Merci à tous de vos exposés. Ils ont apporté un excellent point de vue.

Je vais commencer par vous, madame Bergeron. Merci de vos commentaires et aussi de votre point de vue, dont je tiendrai compte la prochaine fois que je ferai du porte-à-porte. Il ne s'agit pas nécessairement d'une seule campagne, mais de 338 campagnes, multipliées par tous les différents partis, alors j'apprécie cette observation.

Vous avez mentionné la description sonore, particulièrement au sujet de la couverture des débats. Des messages d'intérêt public et des publicités ont porté là-dessus. Pouvez-vous décrire un peu comment cela fonctionne et où les personnes peuvent avoir accès à ce service? De quelle façon cela fonctionnerait-il pour un débat?

Mme Diane Bergeron:

Oui, absolument.

Pour commencer, à titre d'information, le document que nous avons remis plus tôt est non pas l'information dont vous aurez besoin durant la prochaine élection fédérale, mais bien notre mémoire, qui vous sera fourni en anglais et en français plus tard. Nous ne voulions pas vous le fournir à l'avance pour des raisons évidentes.

La vidéo descriptive est en fait une narration qui accompagne un document visuel. Elle n'interfère pas avec les interlocuteurs, mais si quelqu'un utilise une vidéo ou une image, qu'elle gesticule beaucoup ou qu'elle fait des signes, le tout sera décrit. On dira, par exemple, l'interlocuteur fait tel geste ou montre telle image. S'il s'agit d'une vidéo, on décrira le contenu de la vidéo. Cela fonctionne ainsi.

AMI offre ce service sur sa chaîne. Toutes ses émissions sont accompagnées d'une vidéo descriptive. D'autres émissions de télévision sont également accompagnées d'une vidéo descriptive.

(1245)

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci.

Vous avez également parlé de lecteurs sonores d'écran. Pouvez-vous nous expliquer pourquoi les sites Web ne sont pas accessibles aux lecteurs sonores d'écran?

Mme Diane Bergeron:

Un lecteur sonore d'écran est un synthétiseur qui lit d'une voix électronique le contenu de l'écran à la personne aveugle ou ayant une vision partielle. Si le site Web répond aux normes WCAG, WCAG 3 ou WCAG 2.0 — je suis désolée, mais je ne connais pas tous les chiffres —, le contenu du site Web peut être accessible au lecteur. Si le site Web contient des images ou des vidéos non décrites, qu'elles sont configurées d'une manière qui empêche le lecteur de lire le contenu de l'écran ou qu'il y a des images ou des programmes en arrière-plan, le synthétiseur cesse de fonctionner, et nous n'y avons pas accès.

Il y a aussi le fait que la lecture peut être très difficile si le contraste de couleurs n'est pas approprié. Je sais que beaucoup de partis tiennent à leurs couleurs sur le site Web, et je le comprends. Cependant, le contraste n'est pas toujours le bon pour une personne vivant avec une perte de vision.

M. Chris Bittle:

D'accord.

Monsieur Folino, vous avez parlé de l'ASL et du sous-titrage codé. Est-il important qu'ils coexistent ou serait-il acceptable d'en avoir un seul? Est-il nécessaire d'utiliser les deux pour assurer une accessibilité universelle?

M. Frank Folino (Traduction de l'interprétation):

La réponse est qu'il faut les deux. Le sous-titrage codé vise principalement les personnes malentendantes et les personnes atteintes d'un handicap intellectuel. Tout le monde peut en bénéficier. Le langage des signes, l'ASL et le LSQ doivent également être affichés en simultané.

M. Chris Bittle:

J'ai déjà été avocat. Je lisais les transcriptions lorsque j'avais de la difficulté à comprendre ce qui se disait en raison des avocats qui parlaient en même temps. Cela est également fréquent durant les débats. Comment l'ASL ou le sous-titrage codé peuvent-ils nous aider dans une telle situation?

M. Frank Folino (Traduction de l'interprétation):

Les interprètes peuvent éclaircir la conversation. Par exemple, il y a quelques années, les débats électoraux du Québec étaient télévisés, et quatre interprètes en langage des signes travaillaient simultanément, soit un interprète par parti. Ils étaient neutres, évidemment. Les interprètes transmettaient simplement la conversation, et l'exercice s'est avéré très efficace. Vous trouverez cela sur YouTube, si vous voulez le voir. Cela semble avoir très bien fonctionné.

M. Chris Bittle:

Il me reste deux minutes. Je crois que c'est une question que j'ai lancée, et je suis désolé pour le manque de temps.

Les réseaux sociaux font-ils un bon travail sur le plan de l'accessibilité? Comment peut-on les utiliser pour un débat ou comment peut-on les améliorer?

M. James Hicks:

Je vais tenter de répondre du moins à une partie de la question.

Je crois que cela dépend du réseau social que vous utilisez. Si vous utilisez une plateforme essentiellement visuelle, je suppose que le texte qu'elle peut contenir sera peu utile aux personnes ayant des limitations visuelles. Si vous parlez d'un réseau social textuel comme Twitter, il n'y aurait probablement pas de problème. Les personnes pourraient accéder au contenu assez facilement. Peut-être que d'autres témoins peuvent parler de leur propre expérience.

Cela dépend. C'est comme la télévision. Certaines chaînes offrent un service aux personnes qui ne peuvent pas voir le contenu de l'écran. La plupart ne le font pas, et c'est la même chose avec les réseaux sociaux.

M. Frank Folino (Traduction de l'interprétation):

Je veux apporter une précision. Lorsqu'il y a un débat national télévisé avec sous-titrage codé, description sonore et interprètes en langage des signes à l'écran, assurez-vous de fournir également ces services sur les réseaux sociaux, Twitter et ailleurs, car au moment du débat, une personne en déplacement ne veut pas être contrainte de le regarder à la télévision. Cette personne aimerait aussi y avoir accès par d'autres plateformes, sur son téléphone mobile, et c'est pourquoi vous devez vous assurer que toutes les voies de communication soient accessibles.

(1250)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Bittle.

Écoutons maintenant M. Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je crois que ma question s'adresse à vous tous. Cependant, je vais formuler ma question différemment pour chacun, alors donnez-moi quelques instants, et je vous laisserai répondre ensuite.

Monsieur Folino et monsieur Hicks, vous avez donné dans vos mots d'ouverture des exemples très précis de problèmes liés aux anciens débats. Dans les deux cas, il n'est pas clair s'il s'agit de problèmes récurrents. Est-ce que certains de ces problèmes ont été réglés dans le cadre d'autres débats, que vous ou vos membres avez pu suivre de manière appropriée?

Madame Bergeron et monsieur Simpson, pouvez-vous me donner des exemples plus précis de problèmes que vous avez observés dans les débats antérieurs? Encore une fois, s'agit-il de problèmes récurrents ou certains d'entre eux ont-ils été réglés depuis?

M. Frank Folino (Traduction de l'interprétation):

Il n'y a jamais eu d'interprétation en langage des signes en incrustation pour un débat politique. Je crois qu'il faudrait qu'il y en ait un pour créer un précédent.

M. James Hicks:

Du point de vue du CCD, le plus grand problème, comme nous l'avons déjà mentionné, c'est que nous envoyons des questions sur les handicaps depuis des années, et elles n'ont jamais été intégrées aux débats. Aucune question sur les handicaps n'a été posée durant un débat des chefs, et ce serait bien que la tendance change.

Je crois qu'il est très important de voir les handicaps non pas comme un problème distinct, mais comme une question qui touche l'ensemble de la population. À titre d'exemple, s'il y avait une question sur la violence à l'endroit des femmes, celle-ci devrait englober les préoccupations des femmes et filles malentendantes ou handicapées, car leur réalité n'est pas tout à fait la même.

L'important est de reconnaître que les problèmes ne sont pas toujours les mêmes et qu'ils doivent tous être abordés. Il faut aider les gens à comprendre cela. Si un commissaire est nommé, celui-ci devra mettre sur pied un comité consultatif composé d'intervenants auprès de personnes handicapées afin qu'il puisse savoir quelles questions poser et quelles mesures mettre en place pour que tout soit accessible à tous.

Mme Diane Bergeron:

Je serais ravie de répondre à votre question.

Le problème est que, puisque les débats ne sont pas toujours accessibles, je ne sais pas du tout ce que j'ai manqué. Je ne sais pas si une vidéo ou une image a été placée en arrière-plan, et le langage corporel et les expressions des interlocuteurs m'échappent. Je peux parfois déduire ce qu'une personne exprime en fonction du débat, mais ce n'est pas toujours le cas, et il me manque souvent cet aspect visuel. J'aimerais vraiment pouvoir vous dire que telle ou telle chose m'a échappé, mais je ne pourrai jamais vous le confirmer, parce que je ne le sais pas. Je sais qu'il y a eu des choses, mais je ne sais pas lesquelles.

Nous sommes d'accord avec l'idée de veiller à ce que le commissaire consulte les personnes handicapées. Nous connaissons nos besoins, nous pouvons lui fournir l'information et nous pouvons l'aider à mieux comprendre les mesures d'adaptation à mettre en place et l'importance de le faire.

M. Blake Richards:

Est-ce que je peux ajouter quelque chose, madame Bergeron? Je suis conscient du fait que vous ne pouvez pas savoir ce qui vous a échappé. Y a-t-il eu des moments où vous aviez l'impression que le débat était présenté d'une manière qui vous permettait d'obtenir toute l'information dont vous aviez besoin ou cela ne s'est-il jamais produit, selon vous?

Mme Diane Bergeron:

Cela ne s'est jamais produit. Je peux entendre ce que la personne dit, mais s'il suffisait d'entendre ce que la personne a à dire, pourquoi aurions-nous besoin d'aides visuelles? Il ne faut pas oublier que les aides visuelles ont une raison d'être.

Je ne sais pas si cela s'est déjà produit et je n'en ai pas été témoin. J'ai assisté à plusieurs débats dans ma collectivité, et l'on ne m'a jamais fourni de l'information en braille ou dans un format électronique que j'aurais pu lire chez moi.

(1255)

M. Blake Richards:

Merci.

En ce qui a trait à ces enjeux, il semble que vous soyez tous d'accord avec l'idée d'une commission, mais croyez-vous que ce soit la seule façon d'aborder ces enjeux? Pourrait-on par exemple demander à ceux qui présentent les débats — que ce soit un consortium ou le modèle de la dernière élection durant laquelle certains ont choisi de mener des débats — de mener des consultations, de déterminer les besoins et d'y répondre sans créer de commission ou serait-il possible que ceux qui présentent les débats choisissent d'agir ainsi sans la création d'une commission?

Qu'en pensez-vous? Est-ce le seul moyen d'arriver à un résultat ou y a-t-il d'autres solutions qui nous permettraient de régler certains problèmes?

Mme Diane Bergeron:

Ce n'est pas nécessairement l'unique solution. Je crois que c'est probablement la meilleure solution, car il y aurait un responsable, soit un commissaire ou un comité qui veillerait à ce que les mesures soient prises.

Si le Comité prenait une autre direction, je vous recommanderais de vous assurer qu'une bonne réglementation et une bonne structure sont en place pour que tout ce que les trois d'entre nous avons dit soit réalisé en consultation avec les personnes qui ont besoin de mesures d'adaptation.

Avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter?

M. James Hicks:

Vous parlez des débats des chefs, mais il se passe durant les élections toutes sortes de choses auxquelles les mêmes règles s'appliquent. Par conséquent, si d'autres débats ont lieu, il pourrait être nécessaire d'envisager une exemption des coûts affectés à l'adaptation afin que les personnes handicapées puissent y participer également; les situations sont innombrables.

Bon nombre de points que nous avons soulevés doivent être abordés de manière plus large. Si l'on ne s'en tient qu'aux débats des chefs, on exclut du même coup énormément d'activités liées à la politique et au processus décisionnel. Nos décisions ne touchent pas seulement les chefs. Il est très important de voir la situation dans son ensemble. Si nous réussissons à régler la situation avec les chefs, quelles mesures devrons-nous mettre en place pour faire de même avec les partis, peu importe où ils se trouvent? Il faudra peut-être réglementer l'affectation de ressources financières entre autres. Vous devez commencer à vous pencher sur cette question.

Le président:

Merci.

Allez-y, monsieur Folino.

M. Frank Folino (Traduction de l'interprétation):

J'aimerais simplement ajouter un point aux derniers commentaires de mes collègues. Il est important d'avoir une commission indépendante ou un commissaire indépendant que l'on pourra consulter et qui inclura des groupes consultatifs pour les personnes handicapées afin que les exigences soient les mêmes partout, peu importe l'administration.

Afin d'aider les personnes handicapées, il faut que des experts puissent participer aux discussions sur les mesures d'adaptation afin que l'on puisse travailler ensemble et conseiller de manière continue le commissaire ou le comité. Ainsi, les mesures à prendre en vue des prochains débats des chefs seront connues, et nous pourrons formuler une rétroaction appropriée. Cela englobera tous les enjeux visant les personnes handicapées, et notre but est de contribuer à la tenue d'un débat électoral amélioré et plus accessible. Nous voulons éliminer tous les types d'obstacles.

Le président:

Merci.

Écoutons maintenant M. Garrison.

M. Randall Garrison:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président. Je tiens à remercier les témoins d'être avec nous aujourd'hui.

Je tiens particulièrement à remercier l'INCA pour le document en braille, car je ne considérerai plus jamais mon matériel électoral de la même façon. C'était une façon très efficace de m'atteindre en tant que politicien, et je vous en remercie.

Je vous ai écouté le plus attentivement possible, et j'ai entendu trois ou quatre excellentes idées. Je vais vous dire ce que j'ai entendu et je vais vous demander de me dire ce qui m'a échappé et ce que j'ai laissé de côté en conséquence.

Tout le monde s'entend pour dire que le Comité devrait exiger que le débat des chefs soit accessible à tous dès le début. Le deuxième point commun est qu'il faudrait mettre sur pied un comité consultatif pour les personnes handicapées qui se traduirait non pas par un simple engagement préliminaire, mais par une consultation continue au fur et à mesure des débats. Le troisième point est que les débats seraient plus accessibles s'ils étaient diffusés sur de multiples plateformes et que des fonds devraient être prévus pour que l'accessibilité devienne réalité.

Ce sont les principaux éléments que j'ai entendus aujourd'hui. Je sais que ce n'est pas complet, mais nous devons nous assurer que le Comité se penchera sur les mesures à prendre. Je vais demander à vous quatre de me dire si j'ai bien saisi vos témoignages et ce que j'ai raté. Je vais commencer avec M. Folino et suivre ensuite l'ordre à la table.

(1300)

M. Frank Folino (Traduction de l'interprétation):

Ce que vous avez retenu est approprié. Je suis d'accord avec vous. Merci.

M. James Hicks:

Vous avez très bien résumé le tout et retenu les points saillants.

Mme Diane Bergeron:

Je suis d'accord avec les deux autres témoins pour ce qui est des points saillants.

Outre l'accessibilité du débat, il faut également s'assurer que les produits de marketing ou de publicité sont accessibles, car les gens doivent savoir quand le débat aura lieu, comment il se déroulera et sur quelles plateformes il sera diffusé. Si vous mettez le tout en place, nous serons là. Si vous ne nous tenez pas au courant, nous présumerons que la situation n'a pas changé; nous ne saurons pas où aller ni comment nous y rendre et nous présumerons que nous n'y aurons pas accès.

M. Randall Garrison:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Simpson, avez-vous un commentaire?

M. Thomas Simpson:

Même chose.

M. Randall Garrison:

Vos témoignages nous sont très utiles. Les personnes handicapées de ma circonscription me disent qu'elles entendent de belles paroles et des acquiescements et qu'elles doivent toujours revenir et répéter les mêmes choses. J'espère au nom du Comité que cela ne se produira pas, mais je sais que c'est malheureusement la réalité des personnes handicapées. Tout le monde dit les bonnes choses et semble être prêt à tout faire, mais rien ne change dans la réalité.

Je vois beaucoup de gens hocher la tête autour de la table, et j'espère que le Comité prendra vos témoignages au sérieux et les intégrera au processus.

Mme Diane Bergeron:

Une vidéo descriptive m'aurait très bien communiqué cela. Merci.

M. Randall Garrison:

J'essayais justement de procéder comme une vidéo descriptive.

Mme Diane Bergeron:

Eh bien, bravo! Vous êtes engagé.

M. Randall Garrison:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous vous remercions chaleureusement de votre présence. Vous apportez une nouvelle perspective qui n'a pas été abordée suffisamment par le passé, et vos excellents témoignages nous prouvent que nous n'avons aucune excuse pour ne pas prendre les mesures qui s'imposent.

Merci beaucoup.

Mesdames et messieurs, membres du Comité, nous allons prendre quelques minutes pour discuter des affaires du Comité à huis clos.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on December 05, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.