header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-11-09 PROC 78

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

I call the meeting to order.

I apologize for being late. My bill was before Parliament, and I thought it was about to be passed, but they keep on talking.

I welcome the witnesses to our 78th meeting. I'm sorry for keeping you waiting.

Our business is supplementary estimates, vote 1b under the House of Commons and vote 1b under the Parliamentary Protective Service.

We're pleased to have the Hon. Geoff Regan, Speaker of the House. Joining the Speaker from the House of Commons are Charles Robert, Clerk of the House; Michel Patrice, deputy clerk, administration; and Daniel Paquette, chief financial officer.

From the Parliamentary Protective Service, we are joined by chief superintendent Jane MacLatchy, director, and Robert Graham, administration and personnel officer.

With that, I will now turn the floor over to you, Mr. Speaker, for an opening statement on both sets of estimates. Thank you.

Hon. Geoff Regan (Speaker of the House of Commons):

Good afternoon, Mr. Chairman.

I'm sure I'll pay for that.

The Chair:

If the Speaker had been faster, I would have got my bill through.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Oh, oh!

Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman and members of the committee. It's a pleasure to be back before you in my role as Speaker of the House of Commons to present to you our supplementary estimates (B) for the fiscal year 2017-18.[Translation]

As you know, this appearance is an opportunity for the House of Commons to present the approved additional funding for previously planned initiatives, each of which is designed to maintain and enhance the administration's support to members of Parliament and to the institution itself.

You may have gotten a sneak peek of what I am about to present to you when the Board of Internal Economy reviewed and approved the estimates last month, at its first public meeting.[English]

I'm here today to add some details and answer your questions. I'll also present, as you mentioned, Mr. Chairman, the supplementary estimates (B) for the Parliamentary Protective Service, or PPS. As you may have noticed, I'm joined by our House administration's executive management team and the leadership of the PPS.

I will begin this morning's presentation by highlighting the key elements of the 2017-18 supplementary estimates (B) for the House of Commons. These total $35 million in additional funding and bring the House of Commons' estimates to $511 million for the fiscal year.

For a more detailed breakdown of numbers, I would draw your attention to the handout that we've provided to the committee to help facilitate our discussions.[Translation]

As you can see, there are 10 line items included in our 2017-2018 supplementary estimates (B). I will address each of these in the order in which they appear. This will be followed by a presentation of the supplementary estimates for PPS.

As you will note, most of the line items—eight of them, to be precise—fall under the broad category of voted appropriations. The remaining two items represent statutory appropriations.

(1110)

[English]

To begin, our first line item confirms that temporary funding in the amount of $15.4 million has been sought for what is technically known as the operating budget carry-forward.

The board's carry-forward policy allows members, House officers, and the House administration to carry forward unspent funds from one fiscal year to the next, up to a maximum of 5% of their operating budgets in their main estimates. This practice follows that of the Government of Canada and gives members, House officers, and the administration more flexibility in planning and carrying out their work. The House of Commons carry-forward has been approved by the Board of Internal Economy, and further to a Treasury Board directive, is reflected in our supplementary estimates.

The next line item relates to security enhancements to the West Block that are needed as part of the long-term vision and plan. As you may know, Public Services and Procurement Canada, the lead partner in this ambitious, multi-year plan, recently confirmed that the restoration of West Block is scheduled for completion next year. Once ready, that heritage building will serve as our new temporary home.

I can't go into further detail about the $5.3 million that is required to enhance overall security at West Block without going in camera, as I'm sure colleagues will understand. However, I do want to take this opportunity to confirm that we are doing the required due diligence on security matters and that a detailed plan has been approved by the board.

In addition, we have sought $4.4 million in 2017-18 to fund economic increases for House administration employees. This increase reflects the results of the negotiations with four of our bargaining units. The total sought includes both temporary funding for retroactive payments and funding for permanent, ongoing labour costs.

The next item represents a $2.7 million investment in the overarching digital strategy to modernize the delivery of parliamentary information to better support the work of members of Parliament, their staff, and the administration, as well as to maintain the solutions and systems that underpin the strategy. The planning, development, and launch of our digital strategy this past spring marked a significant step forward—one of many to come—in making the House a leader in the sharing of parliamentary information.[Translation]

I should mention that the strategy also includes efforts to evolve our intranet for members to transform it into a one-stop source for important information that members expect from the House of Commons.

You may recall that this past May, when I last appeared before this committee to present our main estimates, I spoke to you about the work of our parliamentary committees and associations.[English]

I mentioned to you then that there was a growing demand for Canadian parliamentarians to meet with citizens from across the country as well as internationally to help better shape our country's policies and actions, both at home and around the world.

Accordingly, an additional $1.7 million for fiscal year 2017-18 was included in the supplementary estimates (B) to support the activities of our committees and to support the 15th Plenary Assembly of ParlAmericas. This conference, which is to be hosted by Canada, is scheduled for September 2018 in beautiful Victoria, British Columbia.

The next line item in the handout—funding in the amount of $1.4 million—was sought in 2017-18 to usher in two changes to the way we do business.

The first will see the budget structures for the House officers and national caucuses modernized to allow for a more effective management of their operations. That change came into effect on April 1, 2017.

The second extends the proactive disclosure of expenditures from members to all House officers and national caucus research offices. I'm happy to confirm that our first House officers expenditures report will be published in June 2018. The latter represents the latest step taken by the board to increase the public's understanding of its role and of the expenditures of the House of Commons. The opening of the board's meetings to the public, which I mentioned earlier in this presentation, is another notable example.

(1115)

[Translation]

I would direct your attention now to the next line item, which deals with the House administration's continued efforts to modernize our food services to members and others, and deliver these in the most efficient way possible.

We have sought $1 million in funding to provide a more client-focused experience and to prepare for the move of our parliamentary dining room to the West Block, including related upgrades to our food production facility.[English]

The changes that will be introduced include a new breakfast service at the parliamentary dining room, a new catering kitchen team for final preparations and plating, revised menus to appeal to changing palates and accommodate off-site preparation, year-round service in two cafeterias in the parliamentary precinct, and a core complement of employees, including new hires, to respond to the increasing demand for service.

The last item you will find in the voted appropriations section of the handout relates to $835,000 sought for pay and benefits services in 2017-18. Given the challenges, this funding will ensure a more reasonable workload for employees who provide this service, as well as help better meet the needs of members and other clients.

Ten new positions are being funded on the pay and benefits team within the human resources services. The increase in our staffing complement will, among other things, provide for the establishment of a call centre to respond to pay and benefits questions, as well as a dedicated pension services expert to act as a go-to resource for members for pension-related matters.

There are two final items to address related to the House of Commons supplementary estimates (B). These fall under the category of statutory appropriations in the handout.

To begin, $1.6 million in funding was sought for the employee benefit plans in 2017-18, in accordance with a Treasury Board directive. In addition, a further $793,000 was required for the annual adjustment to members' sessional allowances and additional salaries as per the Parliament of Canada Act. This represents a 1.4% increase effective April 1, 2017.[Translation]

As you know, the adjustment is based on the average percentage increase in base-rate wages for each calendar year resulting from major settlements negotiated in the private sector in Canada.

This concludes my presentation of the supplementary estimates (B) for the House of Commons.[English]

Now I would like to turn, Mr. Chairman, to the Parliamentary Protective Service, which continues to build and strengthen its capacity to provide security services throughout the precinct.

Let me begin by providing an overview of the PPS's supplementary estimates (B) requests for 2017-18, which total $14.7 million. This includes a voted budget component of $14.2 million and a $489,000 statutory budget requirement for the employee benefit plan.

Following a determination that the PPS is responsible for the ownership, upgrade, use, and operation of physical security assets used to protect Parliament Hill, the project aiming to upgrade the video surveillance system and replace the vehicle screening facility crash barriers was transferred to PPS.

PPS is requesting temporary funding in the amount of $5.3 million for the 2017-18 fiscal year in order to proceed with the first stage of the video surveillance project, in line with the long-term vision and plan construction schedule.

This funding request includes $200,000 in this fiscal year to begin the work to replace the vehicle crash barrier system currently in place. The funding will help reduce the risk of vehicular attacks, a tactic that—as we all sadly know—has been recently used around the world with increasing frequency.

The PPS is also requesting temporary funding of $1.3 million for incremental costs related to this year's Canada Day events.

Permanent funding of $1.1 million is being requested to enable the PPS to permanently staff positions in information services, training, physical infrastructure and emergency planning, asset management, and major events planning.

Temporary funding of $909,000 is also needed to advance operational support projects, which include additional information management support and the inventory management system to help PPS move away from manual records, and to cover the cost of equipment and uniforms for new recruits.

(1120)

[Translation]

In addition to the operational support funding requests, PPS is seeking a permanent increase of $1.1 million to fund service level agreements established with the House administration for financial operations, the financial system, information services and human resources support.

PPS is requesting $1 million in temporary funding to proceed with retrofits and renovations to facilities at 180 Wellington Street and the Centre Block to make more efficient use of the space available. These projects have been planned and costed with the support of the House of Commons Real Property Group.[English]

In line with the economic increases implemented at the House of Commons and to honour agreements signed prior to its creation, the PPS is requesting funding for salary increases for its unrepresented employees and members of the security services employee association. The cost for the 2017-18 fiscal year will be $693,000, which would cover retroactive and current year increases.

Finally, the PPS is requesting access through the supplementary estimates (B) to the 5% carry-forward in the fiscal year 2016-17 in the amount of $2.8 million.

This concludes my presentation, Mr. Chairman. Thank you for your kind attention. My team and I are happy to answer any questions you may have. [Translation]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.[English]

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you. Welcome to your first PROC committee, I believe. It's a pleasure to have you here.

In the spring, we had some concerns about staffing shortages. I was wondering if you could give us an update on where we are with front-line officers in terms of new hires.

Chief Superintendent Jane MacLatchy (Director, Parliamentary Protective Service):

I'll apologize in advance. I'm getting over a cold, so there's a good chance I'll be coughing throughout this.

In terms of our new hires, we were successful in hiring a significant number of new constables as well as detection scanners over the last six months. I would defer to my administration and personnel officer for the specifics.

Mr. Robert Graham (Administration and Personnel Officer, Parliamentary Protective Service):

There's been a net increase of 35 detection specialists since October 2016, and a net increase of 36 constables for the SSEA divisions one and two that oversee the security of the House of Commons facilities.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do we need a lot more, or are you where you believe you need to be?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

Sir, we're in the process right now of kicking off what I'm calling a resource optimization review. We're having a look at the posture in its current state and making sure that we're right-sized. Once we finish that exercise, we will be in a better position to know how many more we need in terms of the LTVP, amongst other things, and the pressures we see in the future.

At the moment, my gut reaction is yes, we need some more. I want to put some rigour into how many before we come to this table.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate that.

One thing I've noticed around the Hill is that we have RCMP officers parked in different places around the Hill, and then PPS at the doors and in the buildings. Is the plan to remain that way, or are PPS officers, as we get more of them—the non-RCMP ones—going to be stationed at other points around the Hill over time?

(1125)

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

There is a concept right now that we're looking at. I spoke in terms of a resource optimization review, sir. Part of that will include what I want to call right-sizing and making sure we've got the right people doing the right jobs. We are contemplating it at this point, and we are moving forward on a potential reduction of the RCMP footprint on Parliament Hill and in the precinct and, obviously, an associated increase in PPS resources. Again, that work is still in its infancy. We're looking at that and the complexities of what that kind of project would entail.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate that.

I have one more question for PPS before I go to the House administration side. This is for both the Speaker and Ms. MacLatchy.

On October 26, 2017,The Globe and Mail reported on disciplinary action against members. There is some lack of clarity on where the orders came from. If you want to offer any clarity for the public record, now it could be a good opportunity to do so.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

The MOU between both Speakers and the PPS provides that the Speakers provide general policy direction for the PPS but that the day-to-day operation is in the hands of the director. I just want to say that I have great confidence in the director, and that isn't just because she's from Hubbards, Nova Scotia.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I did know that connection.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

It doesn't hurt.

I think you want to add to this.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

Yes, I would appreciate—thank you—the opportunity to add to that.

I will be speaking later on in this session in more depth on the labour relations issues. As per the governance model and the structure of PPS, I've ensured that both Speakers' offices are aware of the situation and of my intentions at all points of the process. The ultimate decision to render discipline to PPS employees rests with me, and I made that decision. That was my decision.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you. I appreciate hearing that.

For the House administration, I want to hear a little bit more about the transition from parl.gc.ca to ourcommons.gc.ca. I thought it was very interesting this spring when the web site was completely changed. I want to know how that went, and if you have any comments on that.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I'll ask Stéphan Aubé, who is our chief information officer, to come forward to answer that question, because he is our expert on this topic. He'll be appearing, of course, with the deputy clerk of procedure, André Gagnon.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We're going to have to add some more chairs, then. Thank you.

Mr. André Gagnon (Deputy Clerk, Procedure):

Thank you for the question, Mr. Graham.

The renewal came about, and certainly for us an important aspect was to make sure that we updated significant portions of the website. The Senate and the Library were also renewing their portions, so we took that opportunity to make it as modern as possible. As well, as indicated by the Speaker, in terms of the website and the House's presence on the Internet, we wanted to make the House of Commons become a leader in the sharing of parliamentary information .

That ambition permitted us to work a lot on social media. You've probably seen some movement on that front. We have also renewed the content and the approach regarding the website, with live coverage of all of the activities of the House and of some committees as well.

For instance, right now you can listen on ParlVu to all of the interventions from this committee live, and later on during the day and in the evening you can, if you want, listen to this meeting again.

Third, it was quite important for us as well, in the context of having this change in the web presence of the different institutions, to work on the third category, which is the intranet and the services provided to members of Parliament. I wouldn't say that this is short term, but more medium term. It's important for us.

As a new member in 2015, you probably noticed when we brought in the Source application that this was very useful for new members of Parliament. We want to bring that a step forward in making it more useful not only for new members of Parliament but also for members who are re-elected.

(1130)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I just want to say that I very much like the new site, so congratulations on that. Thank you.

My time is up.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Richards is next.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Thanks, Mr. Speaker, for being here.

You had noted in your opening remarks the item of $835,000 being sought for pay and benefits services. One of the things you mentioned was the 10 new positions being funded. I wonder if you could tell us if that spending is related to some of the complications due to the Phoenix pay fiasco.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I'll ask Dan Paquette, our chief financial officer, to respond.

Mr. Daniel G. Paquette (Chief Financial Officer, House of Commons):

The need for additional capacity there is due to a combination of things. One of them is with the continued increase in resources for members and House administration, we need to bring the number of pay advisers up to maintain a ratio to maintain the service.

There has also been an increase in inquiries relating to pension benefits, specifically for members, and there's a need for a subject matter expert on staff to do this. There is also the complexity brought on from the evolution of pay benefits, and making sure we have training capacity to keep them current.

The last element is, yes, there is an additional workload requirement for Phoenix that needs to be handled, and we did bring in a few people to help support that.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, and I wasn't surprised to hear that.

I want to get a sense as to how much of a problem there has been in that regard. Obviously, in relation to the issues with Phoenix, I've been far more concerned for the constituents who are federal employees who are having issues with it, as I'm sure most or all members of Parliament would agree. In my riding I have some with Parks Canada who have maybe waited a couple of years to even receive pay, so I'm certainly far more concerned about them.

However, we're here to talk about the House of Commons specifically today. There was an article recently in The Hill Times about some of the payroll issues on the Hill as related to Phoenix. I want to get a sense as to how you feel the Phoenix system has worked for the House of Commons. Would you be able to give us some sense as to how many payroll problems there have actually been in the House of Commons?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

If I may intervene just for a second, it's strictly not for me to comment because, of course, this is a topic that's raised in the House and I can't comment on those matters, but I do want to say that obviously I want to see all the employees of the House paid accurately and on time.

Mr. Michel Patrice (Deputy Clerk, Administration):

Obviously Phoenix has been a challenge for the House, but as we have retained a pay and benefits adviser, we've been able to monitor closely the issues that might arise with Phoenix, and our employees or members are not too adversely affected, as could happen in the rest.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, but there have obviously been impacts. I personally have had people make me aware of impacts they've had. Do you have some sense as to how many people have been affected or what impacts they've actually had?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

In terms of the actual members, we'll provide the information to the committee through the chair.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. When I ask about it, I'm talking about the total number, in terms of House of Commons employees, and I suppose members and their staff would be included in that.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Obviously, yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Could you provide us with that information?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, I appreciate that.

Mr. Speaker, the supplementary estimates also propose, I think you said, about $1.7 million for the committees and parliamentary associations in terms of an increase. Can you tell us a little more about what's being funded with that increase and how much spending was authorized for committees and associations in the main estimates this year? I don't have that in front of me. Do you happen to have that information?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I'm sure that one of the team here can tell me the answer to the second question, but you will recall my mentioning that we have seen an increase in committees meeting with the public and hearing from witnesses. The cost of more of those meetings and having more witnesses has changed things a bit and increased the cost for committees. There has been an increase in parliamentary associations doing their work and travelling to have the variety of meetings that they hold. Of course, we have more MPs now than we did before the last election, and that too has had an impact.

I'll go over to André Gagnon, who will first correct any errors I've made, no doubt, and complete the answer.

(1135)

Mr. André Gagnon:

I would like to correct the Speaker by saying that the Speaker never makes a mistake.

Mr. Richards, I didn't catch the last part of your question.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Just simply, how much spending was authorized for committees and associations in the main estimates this year?

Mr. André Gagnon:

This year, $1.7 million was added to what existed in terms of a fund that was provided.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, but I was asking what the existing funding was.

Mr. André Gagnon:

It was $2.3 million, getting to $4 million.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. Thank you.

I note that when you take a combination of the main and supplementary estimates for the House for this year, it's about a 5% increase over last year's spending, which is obviously well ahead of inflation. Actually, it brings the House of Commons' spending to over $500 million for the first time as well.

Could you tell me a little about what's behind that very fast growth in expenditures?

Mr. Daniel G. Paquette:

The big piece here is the additional 30 members added to the House and the impact of having the additional constituency offices and their staff, which makes up about $20 million worth of that amount of increase.

A lot of the money in the supplementary estimates is for technology projects. We have to keep up with modern technology and make sure we have the connectivity and the support for all MPs and their constituency offices. Our technology projects and the increase in number of MPs and constituency offices and their staff make up the mass of the trend.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Some MPs have had real problems with connectivity. Sometimes there is only one local service provider, one that charges an outrageous amount to serve the building where their office is, or what have you. That has been a job as well.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thanks, Mr. Speaker. I have a couple more questions, but I'm out of time. Maybe I'll get another chance.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Richards.

Now we'll go to Mr. Christopherson for seven minutes.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, Mr. Speaker, Clerk, and other guests.

Speaker, it won't come as a big shock to you that I'm probably going to focus most of my remarks and concerns on PPS. I don't want to let you down.

At the risk of sounding as if I'm bragging—because I'm not; I'm just laying out some bona fides—as a former solicitor general of Ontario, I was the civilian head of the OPP, so not only do I not have an angst about state police, I'm quite proud of them and proud of my previous affiliation with them. That said, I for one do not believe that the transition is going well at all. Again I want to underscore my belief that it is totally unacceptable for the Prime Minister to control the guns that are in Parliament.

Just as an aside, since it's my time, my good friend Raoul Gebert, who was a former chief of staff to Tom Mulcair, was bringing some guests from Germany, and they asked what we were doing and what I was going to focus on. They just about fell over when they found out that Parliament itself didn't control the guns that are in Parliament to protect Parliament.

Notwithstanding that I can't change that with one speech, I will keep making as many speeches as I can until I can reach critical mass and have it changed so that Parliament is in charge of its own security. However, we are where we are.

We're going to raise some issues in camera, so it's not my intent to play any games. Speaker, I think you know I don't do that. If you feel in any way that I'm getting too close to the confidential side of the negotiations, please jump in. I would urge you to do that. That's not my intent. However, I think it's fair game to ask the following questions.

The PPS are raising concerns with me about the new equipment being bought. The PPS side of things pays the bill, but the RCMP gets the equipment. I've even had vehicles pointed out to me, and people telling me they were bought with PPS money. The RCMP have that one, and that's the one PPS gets; it's an older vehicle.

This is what I'm told; I could be wrong. Weapons are being purchased that have the RCMP stamp on them, which in itself is fine, but if it's PPS money, their concern is that it's going to gravitate to the RCMP. They get shiny brand new weapons with the stamp and everything, and PPS is handed older brother's clothes.

I'm seeking some guidance, some edification, and ultimately some assurances with regard to this issue. I'll leave it there, Speaker, and ask you to comment and direct me to anybody with you who you feel is appropriate.

Thank you, Chair.

(1140)

Hon. Geoff Regan:

You will know, of course, that the law passed by Parliament provides that we have a combined body, which includes what used to be the House of Commons guards, the Senate guards, and the outside RCMP, who are all now under the direction of the Parliamentary Protective Service. Before I hand over the speaking role to Superintendent MacLatchy, I have been very pleased with and I deeply appreciate, as I know all members do, the excellent work of all those guards, all the members of the PPS, who provide us with security protection within the precinct.

I'll turn now to Superintendent MacLatchy.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker.

You were expressing concerns about equipment purchases, etc. Any equipment we are in the process of procuring is for PPS use. The RCMP provides us a service for one of our divisions. They're a service provider to us.

In a moment I will refer to Mr. Graham for specifics on the procurement, if he's aware.

The firearms we have purchased are for our mobile response team, to my understanding. The mobile response team is an integrated group we've stood up very recently that provides us with an enhanced tactical capability across the Hill. It's an integrated group that involves RCMP and PPS members. In fact, the majority of members on that team are PPS protective officers. Right now, we're on a pilot with 14 members, and I believe two or three of them are RCMP, while the rest are PPS. Whether they're stamped or not I'm not aware of, but I was going to refer to Mr. Graham on this one.

Mr. Robert Graham:

Because it was purchased from a Canadian company, the lead time for some of the equipment that was purchased by the PPS for PPS protective operations was many months away, so we leveraged an existing RCMP procurement mechanism. Some of that equipment has an RCMP label on it. It's used and operated by PPS personnel. When the vendor is able to provide unmarked equipment, we'll be exchanging that with the RCMP.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay. I would assume, then, that unless anybody feels to the contrary, you wouldn't have any concerns with forwarding that information to us, and then we can establish what the reality is.

Basically, I'm saying that I don't know enough to question any further. I've given you what I know. You've given me answers. I'm saying that if there is a response to that from people on the ground, I think the committee could expect that we'll hear that response from them.

I'll move along.

I do want to clarify one thing. I want to be very clear—

The Chair:

You have 10 seconds.

Mr. David Christopherson:

The Prime Minister controls the guns in this place. Everybody keeps talking about the rubric and the Speaker and everything. I've established, and I'm willing to do it again, publicly if necessary, with the RCMP, but at the end of the day, make no mistake that it is not the Speaker who gives the command in terms of the weapons that are in this place. At the end of the day, that command comes from the RCMP commissioner, and that RCMP commissioner is under the command of the Prime Minister. That's what's unacceptable.

Thanks.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Before we go to Mr. Simms, would the committee's indulgence allow Elizabeth May to ask a question?

Some. hon. members: Agreed.

Ms. Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, GP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you very much.

Mr. Christopherson's passion on this issue is the same as my own and that of one of our dear departed friends. I think if I knew anyone more angry at the changes that took place and how they were rushed through in the spring of 2015, it was the late Mauril Bélanger.

I happened to have been in the House that Friday morning when the proposal was put forward to consolidate forces and put them in the hands.... No matter how qualified and wonderful individual officers are—and there's no disrespect intended—this is wrong. Mauril knew it was wrong. I knew it was wrong. It was all pushed through.

Now, I agree very much with David Christopherson on this point. When I see the very same people who put their lives at risk, who were unarmed and defended this place on October 22, I do find it astonishing that we've never had a public inquiry into what went wrong, but I know one thing, which is that the guards inside this place were professional, courageous, and made no mistakes. Now they're the ones who don't have a contract.

I take from David's point that there must be something that happens in camera. I have no access to those discussions. I want to ask this question very directly, because it appears to me that the case right now.... I hate the fact that really good people are not getting the respect they deserve in negotiations. I think there's bad faith bargaining going on here, but from the ongoing disciplinary actions that I see, I'm concerned that we have less security on the Hill than we had before the change in the law because too many officers are spending too much time being disciplined. They're working very long hours, and I don't think we have as many guards on the Hill who have our interests at heart as I would like to see.

Is it the case that these disciplinary actions against the House of Commons security team, the non-RCMP House guards, are taking us below a threshold for having adequate security here on the Hill?

(1145)

Hon. Geoff Regan:

First of all, I know that my old friend Ms. May.... I'm not used to calling you “Ms. May”, because usually you call me Geoff and I call you Elizabeth.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

You can still call me Elizabeth, but I think have to call you Mr. Speaker.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

At any rate, you and Mr. Christopherson and all members of the committee know full well that the question of what the law is and what it should be is a question for Parliament to determine. Of course I have great respect for that, and as Speaker I cannot get involved in that kind of debate, but I'll hand over the rest of your question to Superintendent MacLatchy.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

Thanks for the question, Madam May.

There are a couple of pieces I think I need to address on your question that I'm hoping will be helpful.

In the first case—and as I said, I will go into this in more detail later on—our ability at this point to enter into collective bargaining with the three associations that are currently in place for PPS is very limited. The legal advice I have is based on the law that created PPS, the Parliament of Canada Act. Within a certain period of time after the creation of PPS the employer or any of the parties had the opportunity to go to the PSLREB, the labour board, and make application to ascertain the number of bargaining units that will be part of PPS.

That application was made in 2015. The legal advice that I have received is that I cannot enter into collective bargaining until the PSLREB makes that decision, so we have been seeking alternatives into what we can do in the meantime. I'm as frustrated as anybody else with the delays. We did have our first hearing—last week, in fact—with the PSLREB on exactly that. I am hopeful that it can be resolved in reasonably short order, but there are further hearings required. In the meantime, the legal advice I'm getting is that I cannot collectively bargain. We have therefore been actively seeking alternatives to collective bargaining, actively looking for potential means of solving specific issues outside of the collective bargaining world.

In terms of the members of the former House of Commons security services who are now PPS employees and those who were involved in the incident on October 22, 2014, absolutely I agree with you that these people are to be commended. They are professional. They are proud, and they have every right to be. I certainly wouldn't want to say anything that would lead anybody to believe that I have nothing but the greatest respect for what they did, and what they do every day to keep this place safe, but the other issue is that we have a dress and deportment policy that was created in consultation with all three associations. Any alteration to the uniform is in violation of that policy.

When this first started in June, prior to Canada Day, I had newly arrived at the end of May. I started in this position at the end of May and I was very open to looking for alternative solutions and, as such, was very flexible in terms of any discipline at the time. I didn't want to go there at the time. Since that time, we were able to provide the former House of Commons security services employees, who are currently represented by SSEA, with the economic increase that was part of an agreement before PPS was created in 2014. That was part of the action I took in June. We got them that economic increase. I got an agreement that the labour action would cease, and that's what happened. Everybody went back to uniform.

Subsequent to that, we signed what I'll call a labour peace agreement, a memorandum of understanding, with that association, basically saying that there will be no further pressure tactics on the part of the union and that they will adhere to the dress and deportment policy, and we agreed to go forward into mediation of specific grievances. We did that, and we absolutely did it in good faith. I categorically deny that we were there in bad faith.

Of course, I can't go into the specifics of the mediation. We came to the table and actively tried to find an agreement. We were not able to reach that agreement. Both parties were very far apart. The nature of mediation is that it does not always result in an agreement. It doesn't mean either party was there in bad faith, so I deny that.

(1150)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Your seven minutes are up.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

I didn't get any answer to my question.

The Chair:

You'll have to pursue it later.

Go ahead, Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

First of all, thank you for coming, Mr. Speaker. It's good to see you again, as always.

I have a specific question. I might be able to get to it. I think I will, but given what was said earlier by Mr. Christopherson as well as Ms. May, I feel compelled to weigh in on that as well.

Mr. Christopherson and I have been here for the same amount of time. We came here on the same day. The similarities do not end there. I've visited many parliaments in my capacity with the Canada-Europe Parliamentary Association, and I truly believe that for the operations and security of a parliament to be answerable to an executive is just not right. It doesn't make sense. To some it might, but to me it does not. I think that the responsibility belongs to Parliament. I say that as a single parliamentarian. I am not speaking as a representative of anybody around me, but as a single parliamentarian.

I thank them for their comments, and I truly believe and endorse what they're saying.

Under professional and special services in your handout there, I'm just trying to dig into it. You may have answered this already. In 2016-17, under supplementary estimates (B), the amount was $929,000. Now we've jumped up to just over $6 million. Can I ask what that pertains to?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

What does the line say beside the number?

Mr. Scott Simms:

This is from table 2 in the Library of Parliament brief under “professional and special services”. You probably don't have that. Last year, in 2016-17, it was just under $1 million. Now we're up to about $6.2 million—$6.3 million, really.

Does that pertain to extra members requiring extra security, and so on and so forth—you mentioned that—or is it part of something new as far as security is concerned?

Professional and special services is the line. This is under general expenditures, not PPS. If you look at the supplementary estimates (B), that's what I'm looking at.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I think Mr. Aubé will be able to respond to that in a moment.

Mr. Stéphan Aubé (Chief Information Officer, House of Commons):

Mr. Chair, there are two reasons for the majority of the costs that you're seeing.

First, we've entered into an agreement with one of our security partners, and we're purchasing a service for that. That's why it's classified there. The cost of that service is over $3 million. That service is a big reason for that increase.

Second, we launched a project over three years ago that has come to bear over the last two years, which is the renewal of the enterprise resource planning project—RERP on the Hill—for both financial systems and HR systems. A lot of these services are being purchased by external suppliers to help the House implement these two major initiatives.

(1155)

Mr. Scott Simms:

I see. This is all new.

Mr. Stéphan Aubé:

This is all new, sir.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Can you provide an update on how that's going? Do you anticipate that to be a higher number before the end of fiscal year?

Mr. Stéphan Aubé:

Part of it will be continuous, because of the agreement we spoke about. I wouldn't want to speak about that here, sir. It would require that we go in camera.

There is another one, which we're hoping will go down. We're planning to put the system into production over the next year and a half, sir.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Let's exclude that for a moment.

Do you anticipate any additional funding that would be required before the end of fiscal year?

It seems to me that in many cases things have increased to the point where it almost looks astonishing. Do you anticipate anything else in that realm to require a major increase in the next little while? I know I'm asking you to foresee the unforeseeable, but is there something on the horizon that you're looking at with caution?

Mr. Stéphan Aubé:

The current horizon is dictated by our strategic plan. There are no other major initiatives in the current strategic plan that would require an increase in that funding right now.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay, thank you.

Does anyone else want to ask a question? That's fine for me.

Filomena would like to go. I'll pass my questions to Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Thank you, and thank you all for being here this morning.

Superintendent MacLatchy, I'd like to follow up on something you said to help me better understand the process. The FPSLREB application was filed in 2015, and you can't bargain until that's decided. That's the law.

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

That's the legal advice we received, yes.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

That's the legal advice. Okay.

How long do those applications generally take? What is the holdup in getting that application resolved? What is the process?

C/Supt Jane MacLatchy:

On specifically how long they would normally take, I'm afraid I don't have an answer for you there. I'm not aware.

I do know that the expectation of my predecessors was that it would have been resolved much faster than it was. It took us this long to get our first hearing with the labour board, which we had last week. They're the ones who are responsible for scheduling. I don't know if Mr. Graham has anything further to say.

Mr. Robert Graham:

It's their decision as to which cases they hear on their docket. It's not within our control. Unfortunately, it's for reasons beyond our control, and we don't understand why they didn't hear us until last week. We have no foresight into how long it will take them to make a decision. We've scheduled further hearings based on the availability of our labour board and the four legal teams that are involved.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

An application was put in in 2015. The labour board determines what they hear based on what they think is a priority file or issue. Is that what your guess is, but you're not certain of it?

Mr. Robert Graham:

I can't comment on how they decide which cases to hear. All I know is it took two years to get our first meeting with the board.

The Chair:

Sorry, Ms. Tassi, your time is up.

Our last intervention is by Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Good. I had indicated earlier that I had a couple of additional questions.

Mr. Paquette, I think it was you who, in response to my question about the 5% increase from last year in the estimates, mentioned the new members being a part of that. The new members would have obviously been here for the previous year's budget as well, the 2016-17 budget, so that certainly accounts for why there was a two-year increase of about 20%, but I'm not sure it would make sense to argue it would account for the 5% increase over last year. I'm wondering if there's something else that's responsible there. I'll give you another chance to respond to that one, because it just doesn't seem like it quite fits for me.

(1200)

Mr. Daniel G. Paquette:

When we look at even just what we have here in the supplementary estimates (B), which is the big portion, the majority of the amount there is our carry-forward, the 5% over last year, which is basically unspent voted authorities from the previous year that are distributed after that, based on the rules we have, to MPs, House administration, or some of the strategic priorities.

Then we have some of the big projects we just talked about—

Mr. Blake Richards:

I don't mean to interrupt you, but I'm going to.

When you talk about that being the carry-forward amount, that's fine, but you're only asking for the carry-over because there's an intention to spend it on something. What is it? That's more of the concern—what it's being spent on, not what column in the accounting it came from.

Mr. Daniel G. Paquette:

Of the close to $15 million of carry-forward, $6.7 million of it was redistributed to the various MPs' budgets, based on the formula we have for the underspent from the previous year's authorities, for them to use in their current year's expenses.

There's $1.8 million going to various House administration service areas, again on that same formula of the underspending, to be spent on in-year events. The balance of $6.8 million was into some of the key projects. The majority of those are our new HR system that we are investing in, which Mr. Aubé just mentioned. We have our mobile work environment and IT security initiatives going on right now. That covers a big chunk of that $6 million.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I think it's also important to keep in mind—again, I can be corrected if I'm wrong—that in the first year of the new Parliament, the House did experience a bunch of new costs, some of which weren't anticipated, largely because of the 30 new members. You might have seen some of that in the supplementary estimates (B) last year, but it wouldn't have been in the main estimates last year. You would see an increase this year as a result of that.

Mr. Blake Richards:

How much of the new spending we're talking about here would be one-time expenditures, and how much of it is going to become ongoing annual spending?

Mr. Daniel G. Paquette:

For the supplementary estimates (B), the majority of it is one-time. That includes the carry-forward of the $15 million, and about 40% of the balance is one-time funding. It's just the in-year projects and initiatives.

Mr. Blake Richards:

The 40% is one-time.

Mr. Daniel G. Paquette:

Yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

The other 60% is stuff that will become ongoing annual spending.

Mr. Daniel G. Paquette:

Yes, because if you look at the list we have, the economic increases for employees.... We have the pay for the additional employees, who are obviously indeterminate, that we need to keep supporting.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thanks.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Richards.

Thank you, Mr. Speaker and all your staff, and Ms. MacLatchy.

We just have the routine motions. HOUSE OF COMMONS Vote 1b—Program expenditures..........$32,585,677

(Vote 1b agreed to on division) PARLIAMENTARY PROTECTIVE SERVICE Vote 1b—Program expenditures..........$14,245,794

(Vote 1b agreed to)

The Chair: Shall I report the votes of the supplementary estimates (B) to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: We'll suspend for a minute to go in camera, but we'll make it very quick because we have a lot of business to do.

(1200)

(1310)

The Chair:

Order.

Before we start, I would like to welcome our honorary guest, Alexandrine Latendresse, who was the vice-chair of this committee last Parliament. Welcome back.

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

The Chair: Good afternoon. Welcome back to the 78th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. For members' information, we are in public.

Pursuant to Standing Order 92(2), we are considering the second report of the Subcommittee on Private Members' Business, which was deposited with the clerk of the committee on Monday, November 6. The subcommittee recommended that Bill C-352, an act to amend the Canada Shipping Act, 2001, and to provide for the development of a national strategy on the abandonment of vessels, be designated non-votable.

Today we are happy to be joined by the bill's sponsor, Sheila Malcolmson, MP for Nanaimo—Ladysmith, who will explain why she believes the bill should be votable. Ms. Malcolmson would also like Mr. Julian to be part of this presentation, if that's okay with the committee.

Okay.

I'll start with you, Ms. Malcolmson.

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson (Nanaimo—Ladysmith, NDP):

Thank you, Chair, and thank you to the committee members for agreeing to hear my appeal.

I know you've had a long day already, and I really appreciate your hearing my argument that my private member's bill, Bill C-352, be deemed votable.

Because I've raised this issue 80 times in the House since being elected, I'm guessing that you already understand the imperative to act on this issue, so I'm not going to describe it. I would like to start our presentation by turning to New Democrat House leader Peter Julian. He'll be able to talk a little bit about the history of PMBs and some of the process part, then I will make the technical comparison, arguing that the government's bill and my bill are not in conflict. [Translation]

Mr. Peter Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby, NDP):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

I also want to thank you, Ms. Malcolmson. We are very happy to have an opportunity to speak with you today about why Bill C-352 should be votable in the House of Commons.

Since your committee is in charge of all the prerogatives of Parliament, the decision you have to make is important.[English]

There are three main arguments I would like to put forward at the beginning.

First off, as you will see, Bill C-352 is in fact quite a different piece of legislation from the government bill, Bill C-64, and therefore should not be considered the same question as Bill C-64, which is currently on the Order Paper.

Second, the subcommittee was incorrect in applying the criteria to Bill C-352 because it was similar to Bill C-64 at the same meeting where it applied different criteria, it seemed, to Bill C-364, which was declared votable, despite being on the same subject and amending the same Canada Elections Act as Bill C-50 and Bill C-33. There's an inconsistency there.

Third, allowing the subcommittee decision to stand is allowing the government to violate the separation of private members' business and to let it do through the back door what the rules were designed to forbid through the front door: to deny individual members their right to vote on their preferred item of private members' business.

As we all know, government bills are subject to party discipline. Private members' bills have been the exception to this, and in our bible, which is O'Brien and Bosc, House of Commons Procedure and Practice, it is clear that these rules were developed over decades, leading to a system based on the following fundamental characteristics: each member should have “at least one opportunity per Parliament to have an item of Private Members' Business debated” and voted upon, and “each item in the Order of Precedence would be votable, unless the sponsor opted to make it non-votable.”

The basic premise for PMBs is that government business is fundamentally different from private members' business. This premise was put in place to protect individual initiatives from members against the power of majority governments, including the power to try to knock off a bill.

Now, to emphasize the differences, the House has many rules built in to reflect the separation of government and private members' business. Amendments to private members' motions can only be moved with the consent of the sponsor. PMB recorded divisions, as we know, are done row by row in the chamber, and not by party. The lottery is designed to exclude ministers and parliamentary secretaries from PMBs, and if the committee makes a decision and it is appealed, the appeal is done by secret ballot on the floor of the House of Commons. The only other time this arises is when we elect a Speaker at the beginning of Parliament.

I would like to pass the microphone back now to Ms. Malcolmson, who will explain why Bill C-352 is so different from Bill C-64.

(1315)

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

Thank you, Peter.

There were two bills, Bill C-352 and its predecessor, which I tabled as Bill C-219 in February 2016, just a month after we had been sworn in. Then I reintroduced a new version of it in April 2017: Bill C-352. It's very skinny. The government's bill, tabled 10 days ago, Bill C-64, is much more hefty. That's my first point of comparison.

I will show you how these two bills are not redundant and how they are not contradictory. I urge you to deem my private member's bill votable.

There are a number of points of comparison.

With regard to national strategy, Bill C-64 is not a national strategy. The word does not appear once in the legislation. The government's briefing notes make that clear as well. It's not a national strategy; my bill is all about developing a national strategy.

The next comparison is with regard to royal recommendation. Bill C-64 requires the appropriation of public revenue and, as such, has received a royal recommendation. My bill does not.

With regard to penalties, in Bill C-64 there's a compliance and enforcement regime that is extensive. It creates a whole new set of violations and penalties for abandonment of vessels. My bill does none of these things. Arguably, my bill would make it easier to actually enforce those penalties in Bill C-64.

Another related point of comparison is enforcement tools. In Bill C-64, there is a whole suite of tools for enforcement provided to the Minister of Transport, a number of fines. My bill does none of these things.

With regard to enforcement officers and the justice system, they're also very different. Bill C-64 creates powers for enforcement officers, for the Transportation Appeal Tribunal, for the justice of the peace, for the Attorney General. Bill C-352 does none of these.

With regard to receiver of wreck, my bill designates the Canadian Coast Guard as the receiver of wreck. This was the same in Jean Crowder's bill in the previous Parliament, which a number of members of the government supported at that time. In the government's bill, that's not the approach. Bill C-64 keeps it as a multi-jurisdictional approach and keeps the receiver of wreck within the umbrella of the Minister of Transport, so again they are different approaches, not duplicative.

With regard to consultation, in my bill the Minister of Transport would consult with stakeholders and coastal people to discuss the development of a strategy. That's not envisioned in Bill C-64.

With regard to international conventions, Bill C-64, the government's bill, would implement the Nairobi International Convention on the Removal of Wrecks. My bill requires the government to assess the benefits of acceding to that convention. Again, they're compatible, not duplicative or in conflict.

A vessel turn-in program is something that coastal communities have been requesting for more than a decade. On the model of the cash-for-clunkers program, this would be a way to deal with the backlog of abandoned vessels. Bill C-352 has that as one of its key elements. This bill has been endorsed by the Union of BC Municipalities and, across the country, by at least 50 different coastal organizations and harbour authorities. That is not a part of Bill C-64. Again, they're completely different. Bill C-64 does not legislate that.

In order to deal with the backlog of abandoned vessels, my bill has a number of measures that would legislate to address the backlog of what Transport Canada says might be thousands of abandoned vessels. Bill C-64 does not have measures to deal with the backlog, so again they're not in conflict, not contradictory, but arguably compatible.

A fund for vessel disposal modelled on what Washington state implemented 15 years ago is not addressed in Bill C-64, and the transport minister's briefing notes make that very clear. A fee associated with vessel registration going into a pool to deal with emergency removals is not something that is in Bill C-64. It is in my bill.

Amendments to other acts are another point of difference. Bill C-64 amends other acts, including the Navigation Protection Act, the Oceans Act, the Canada National Marine Conservation Areas Act, the Crown Liability and Proceedings Act, the Customs Act, and the Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada Act. My bill does none of these things.

(1320)



Turning to review mechanisms in Bill C-64, there's a review proposed on the fifth anniversary of the day the bill comes into force. That would be to the committee of the Senate, the House of Commons, and/or of both Houses of Parliament. My bill only requires the transport minister to prepare and table a report to Parliament.

There are many more points of comparison. I haven't run through them all. I just hope that is sufficient to convince you that these two bills are distinctly different. They're not contradictory; they're arguably compatible. They have the same big-picture aim, but the House can absolutely hear both of them, and I sincerely believe the minister's bill would do better with mine in place.

I urge you to reject and overturn the subcommittee's ruling and I urge you to rule that my abandoned vessel private member's bill C-352 be deemed votable.

I'll turn it back to my colleague, Peter Julian.

Mr. Peter Julian:

Thank you very much, Ms. Malcolmson.

Just to wrap up, as you've heard, these two bills do very different things in different ways, and therefore should not be seen as the same question in the PMB criteria.

As I mentioned earlier, I question the decision of the subcommittee based on another decision they made in the same meeting, approving Bill C-364 from the member from Terrebonne, concerning election finances. This bill, like Bill C-33 and Bill C-50, amends the Elections Act. All these bills have an impact on election financing rules. If simply being on the same subject makes Bill C-352 not votable because it shares a topic with Bill C-64, why is Bill C-364 votable though it shares a topic with Bill C-33 and Bill C-50?

In this situation, the bill that came first was Bill C-352. It was tabled on April 13 of this year and it was placed in the private members' order of precedence on October 25 of this year. Bill C-64 was introduced in the House on October 30, almost a week after Bill C-352 was placed in the order of precedence. That's why I submit that the government is using procedural rules to do through the back door what they cannot do through the front door. To protect the intent of Parliament, the prerogatives of Parliament, and the rights of an individual member to a votable item in private members' business, you should overturn the decision of the subcommittee and make Bill C-352 votable.

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

Thank you, Chair, for your consideration and to the committee for your attention.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

I'll just give about three minutes to each party for any questions or comments, starting with Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I would like to thank you for coming here today. I appreciate your passion on this subject matter, and the work you've done.

As chair of that committee, I'll just explain its decision. I think there were about 15 PMBs on the list that day, and the committee really deferred to the comments that were raised by the analyst.

I wonder if we have the analyst's comments. Can we read those comments? Of all the bills that were presented, that was the only one for which the analyst's comments were given, and those comments—which we're going to hear in a minute, along with other colleagues who were at the committee—were essentially the basis upon which the decision was made.

(1325)

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

Chair, if I could suggest, we've read the blues, so I understand the rationale. If the members choose to reserve the time for questions, I certainly welcome that.

Mr. Scott Simms:

It would be less about procedure and more about the subject matter itself. Being east coastal by nature and by birthright, it is something that we're struggling with in a major way. The thrust of your bill is something I deeply respect, by the way.

One issue, though, is about national strategy. You're saying Bill C-64 doesn't explicitly state it's a national strategy, correct? Do you feel that's not built into it? In other words, what makes Bill C-64 not comply with being a national strategy?

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

The words “national strategy” are not mentioned a single time within the bill. The words don't appear there, but they do appear in mine. The minister's briefing notes describe what the government is taking on as a national strategy, and this is mentioned within one of 15 items that the government is doing.

The government itself does not describe Bill C-64 as its national strategy. My bill calls on the government to adopt a national strategy. Arguably, I might say that the minister's been listening so well to me over the last year and a half that this might be one of his actions. He's just skipped over this part.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Well, good for you, if that's the case, but again, I don't see how Bill C-64 fails as a national strategy, even though it doesn't explicitly say it. We may have a difference on that one.

There are two other very interesting points. Your initiative, your bill, calls for an analysis of the Nairobi convention, which I've read, whereas Bill C-64 calls for a wholehearted acceptance of it. I think that's a valid point. You talked about the Washington state measures and the contributions therein, but the government also contributes, as well as the private sector. Is that correct?

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

In the Washington model, there's a fee associated with vessel registration that creates a pool of money to deal with emergency response. As well, some U.S. federal Superfund money for dealing with toxic sites was also put into that model.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Right. That's the government part of it.

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

That's part of it, but again, my legislation calls on the government to talk with stakeholders, provinces, and territories and to partly use the model of polluter pays, but then to also fix vessel registration so that you're able to get the user's money into the fund and be able to track down the responsible owner. The minister's bill does none of those things.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay, that was my question. That fundamental system that makes the Washington state model distinct is not captured in Bill C-64, in your opinion.

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

That's correct.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay, that's it. Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid is next.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Thank you.

Sheila, assuming your bill were deemed votable, when would it come up for debate?

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

December 6 is the first hour of debate.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay.

My understanding of the way the rules work is that if your item is deemed votable—I stand to be corrected, by the way, but I believe this is correct—and then the government moves its bill first, yours gets pushed off the agenda because it has been found to be on the same subject matter, and you don't get a chance to submit another item.

An obvious scenario that occurs to me is that the government could, between now and then, simply move the beginning of the debate on its bill. That would be the end of your bill, and you'd have no chance to go back and prepare another item, whereas if your item is deemed non-votable, you do have the chance to prepare another item of private members' business.

Have I understood that correctly? That probably should be directed to Peter rather than to Sheila, but I just wanted to ask if I got it right.

Mr. Peter Julian:

You are right on the result, less so in terms of the cause. If this committee chose to uphold the subcommittee decision and make this a non-votable item, the appeal would go to the floor of the House of Commons, and that's where the secret ballot comes in. Every member of Parliament has a secret ballot right to then vote on making the PMB votable. If that vote were then lost on the floor of the House of Commons, Ms. Malcolmson would not be able to replace her bill.

Stemming out of this decision, whether or not to appeal to the floor of the House of Commons determines whether or not there's an ability to put in a replacement bill.

(1330)

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have to ask the question. Being aware of this, you are in danger of finding yourself without any item at all. I'm assuming that's a risk you're prepared to take or you wouldn't be here, but I just wanted to ask the question overtly.

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

This is something I worked on as a local government representative for 10 years before I ran for election. It was something that I supported Jean Crowder on when she had her own private member's bill along the same lines in the previous Parliament. It was a significant election campaign item in my community, and my team has been working for almost two years to build us towards the point of this debate.

If we lose this appeal and if we also lose the secret ballot vote in the House of Commons, I still have the ability to have a one-hour debate on a non-votable item. I also take comfort in the fact that the minister has heard the call on both coasts, and there's lots in the minister's bill that would move us forward.

The minister's focus on penalties and criminalizing abandonment have a lot of parallels with your former colleague, John Weston, who tabled his own private member's bill in the dying days of the previous Parliament. Criminalization of the problem is not something I've ever heard coastal communities ask for; however, our community sees that we've had an impact.

It's still conceivable that I could pull another PMB out of the air, but this is certainly the issue that resonates most strongly with my community, and we've had a failure of federal action for over 15 years that I would like to be part of remedying.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. I wanted to ask that question just to be sure. You provided a very complete response, but I felt I had to ask the question just in case you had not thought it through as well as it turns out you have thought it through. Thank you for that.

I have one last thing here. Since I have a landlocked constituency, this is not a particularly important area for my constituents, but I am very concerned about the way we deal with private members' business. I want to make sure that we are very careful to preserve its integrity going into the future, and not see clever ways emerge at the hands of the government, be it the current government or a future government of which I might be a part, to shut down private members' business. I didn't like that sort of thing happening when my party was in government, and I don't like it now. I want to ask this question.

Again, this is for you, Sheila, but perhaps even more so for Peter: do you have any recommendations to suggest—you could give them either now or at a future point—with regard to the rules governing private members' business going into the future? The ones we have now are 15 years old. It may be time to give them a tweak in order to ensure that private members' items in parallel situations are better protected.

Mr. Peter Julian:

Thank you for the question.

I know you've been a very strong defender of private members' right to bring forward legislation.

I think there is a bit of a loophole here. The intent of having that clause was to ensure that private members would not try to piggyback on a government bill. The loophole that's created is that the government brings in afterward.... In this case, Ms. Malcolmson's bill goes on the order paper, in the order of precedence, and then suddenly there is a government bill on it. That's a loophole that allows the government to do by the back door what they can't do by the front door right now. The intent of private members' business was always to allow the integrity and the prerogative of each of us as private members.

The House administration and the analysts are obliged to follow what exists now, which is that loophole. I think we need to be more explicit that the intent was not to have government come in and try to push aside a private member's bill, but rather to ensure that the private member didn't jump in on top of a government bill. The intent was to keep those two items separate.

It's a bit of a loophole now. We have now seen what problems can develop from it. A positive decision to overturn the subcommittee decision today would send a good signal to the government. Ultimately, we need to perhaps make some changes to the standing order to make that even more explicit.

Clearly, the historical trend over the past few decades has been to give more power and ability to private members to have votable legislation. I think that's in every Canadian's interests.

(1335)

The Chair:

Okay.

We have to keep going here. We'll go to Mr. Christopherson quickly, and then I have one thing on committee business for our next meeting.

Go head, Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You mean my equal time now?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Good. Thank you very much.

Colleagues, as much as possible I'm not seeing this as an NDP colleague, but very much trying to see it as Mr. Reid does: this could be anybody, and it's a question of members' rights.

I came from 13 years at Queen's Park, the largest province in Confederation. We didn't have this. When I got here and found out this idea of votable, I was like, “What? You mean somebody else gets to decide whether what I want to do gets put to a vote?” In large part, that's why you come here: it's to make sure you're going to have an impact.

The whole concept blows me away, and in the nearly 14 years I've been here, this is the first time it has come to rear its ugly head in saying to a member that they can't have their bill come forward.

I ask colleagues to stand back and look at it that way and not necessarily as a government or an opposition member. The appeal procedure is there for a reason. Mr. Julian has gone out of his way to remind us that no one, including government, should be able to do through the back door what they're not entitled to do through the front door. It's a basic tenet of how we do our business here.

I don't fault the analysts. They did their job. Now we have an opportunity to do our job. We're not bound by any of that. There's an appeal process for a reason, and if we take that decision today, then Ms. Malcolmson will get her full rights. If we don't, it will go to the House, or at least she has that option, and the House could say they're going to give Ms. Malcolmson her rights. The fact that we had the analysts do their job is not meant to be the end of the line.

I urge colleagues as much as possible to not start going back down the ugly road of deciding whose issues deserve to be debated and voted on. Each of us should have that sovereign right. Few sovereign rights are left to individual members in this system. This is one that I think collectively we need to work hard to preserve.

To round out my comments, Mr. Julian, there was a comparable bill at the subcommittee, Bill C-364, from the member for Terrebonne, and apparently they made the right decision on that one. If you take the circumstances and apply that thinking, it should leave us with a different conclusion here, which is to allow the bill to be voted on.

I ask Mr. Julian to explain quickly what that argument is from his point of view.

Mr. Peter Julian:

Thank you very much, Mr. Christopherson.

As I mentioned in the presentation, Bill C-364 touches the same subject, amending the Election Act, as Bill C-50 and Bill C-33, so there's a bit of an inconsistency between two decisions with bills that have subjects that are similar to the subjects of government bills but are being treated in a different way.

As I said earlier, and I can't stress this enough, the intent of providing more scope for private members' business, as Mr. Christopherson said very eloquently just now, has always been to open the scope for each of us as a private member. It has nothing to do with whatever party we're affiliated with. It has much more to do with our rights as members.

This committee has always been the committee that has stood up for the prerogatives of members of Parliament. You have a very important role to play in that regard. This is, I think, a key circumstance, in that there's a bit of a loophole and that's why you're being asked in a sense to hear this appeal and make what I believe would be the right decision, which is to make Bill C-352 votable, because I think it meets all the tests. It certainly meets the intent as well of where we have evolved on private members' legislation, and you're the ones who can come to the defence of private members' legislation with this appeal that Ms. Malcolmson has brought to your attention.

(1340)

The Chair:

Thank you very much to the witnesses.

We'll consider this matter.

Mr. David Christopherson:

When do we make the decision, Chair?

The Chair:

That's my question. We could do it now or we could do it the first meeting back. We have committee business as the first thing on the agenda.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It would seem reasonable to ask what is preferable from her point of view.

The Chair:

What is your preference?

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

I appreciate the question, and through you, Mr. Chair, I would be very grateful for a fast decision. My bill comes up for debate. My time slot is December 6. Time is moving very quickly. Especially if I am to make alternative plans and develop another private member's bill, I would very much appreciate having the riding week ahead to do that work.

Mr. David Christopherson:

If government members want a little time to think through where they are going, I would rather get a positive answer in a couple of days than a negative one today.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Because we have a break week, it's a significant amount of time.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Oh, does that cause that big a problem? I'm asking...I guess it's Sheila.

All right. It looks like it's coming now. Okay.

The Chair:

Do you want to do it in public?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes.

The Chair:

Shall the report of the sub-committee be concurred in? We'll have a recorded vote.

Mr. David Christopherson:

We're past the time we had said, but we're not really adjourned until the majority of us say we are adjourned. Do we have time for a couple of comments?

That's not a good sign.

The Chair:

All right. Can we call the vote?

Shall the report of the sub-committee be concurred in?

(Motion agreed to: yeas 5; nays 3) [See Minutes of Proceedings])

Mr. Scott Reid:

What were you saying, Mr. Chair? I couldn't hear you. I couldn't hear you because there was some noise.

The Chair:

The sub-committee decision was upheld.

I have one other thing for the committee. In the second week when we come back, the Tuesday is already set, but the Thursday is not set. Thursday is a better day for your member to do the baby report, the report on kids. Could do that on the Thursday instead of the Tuesday, because she can't make the Tuesday? Is that okay?

That's okay. We would finalize that report at that time. Then one possibility is that it would only take an hour.

At the Tuesday meeting I know we will be determining the future witnesses for our report on the debates commissioner. This is just a suggestion from me. One suggestion for witnesses that came from the minister was to have the political parties. In the second hour on Thursday, to give the clerk time to get witnesses for that close to the Tuesday meeting, we would ask the parties to come as witnesses on the debates commission.

Any thoughts on that?

Mr. David Christopherson: What day is that?

The Chair: It's the Thursday, in the second hour. The first hour would be the report with your alternate.

(1345)

Mr. David Christopherson:

That one would be on the.... Yes, okay.

The Chair:

Is that okay?

My other question is more tricky. It's about the witnesses for the parties. I would assume we would have five parties, or how many?

Conservative, Liberal, NDP, Bloc, and Green are the ones that I would think would be interested, but it's up to the committee.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Is this for the debate commission?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It's funny you say that, because I was thinking something completely different. My thought was that the first thing we would do is ask our analyst to do an environmental scan, to take a look at other mature democracies that have created such an entity and what their thinking was and what they came up with, just to help us reinvent the wheel.

Quite frankly, I would like to be hearing from parliamentary experts too, not just the parties in terms of what they want.

The Chair:

No. We're going to hear from a whole pile of witnesses, because you're putting in your witness list.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Oh, that's just for the opening part.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I misunderstood. I'm sorry.

The Chair:

Yes. It's just because it's a time constraint. It's to get the first meeting going.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm fine with that.

The Chair:

How many parties? Is there anyone who objects to having the five parties present?

Mr. David Christopherson:

How many parties are there in the House, Chair?

The Chair:

Are there any suggestions on the number of parties that would come?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Obviously, there would be—

The Chair:

You know how many would want to.

Mr. David Christopherson:

—the three, and then there would be Ms. May for the Greens. I think there would be an argument about whether or not there's another independent or whether she represents the independents.

In the model that we used for the previous parliamentary review of the Chief Electoral Officer, we had a formula. Can you remember what that was? Whatever it was, it was deemed to be fair by everybody.

Go ahead, Andre.

Mr. Andre Barnes (Committee Researcher):

I stand to be corrected, but I believe the study was on the Board of Internal Economy and that part of the motion was to involve a rotating independent member. It was to be determined between the independents who was to show up for each meeting.

The Chair:

This is just a witness for one meeting that I'm talking about.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I know, but it matters a lot to those folks, and we need to be fair-minded.

Mr. Scott Reid:

As witnesses, you're asking whether we should have a witness from each of the three parties that have party status, as well as the Greens and the Bloc. I personally would say yes to that.

The Chair:

Is that okay with everyone?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Thank you very much for getting through a lot of stuff.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte.

Je m'excuse d'être en retard. Mon projet de loi était devant le Parlement, et je pensais qu'il était sur le point d'être adopté, mais les députés n'arrêtaient pas de parler.

Je souhaite la bienvenue aux témoins à notre 78e séance. Je suis désolé de vous avoir fait attendre.

Nos travaux portent sur le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses, crédit 1b sous la rubrique Chambre des communes et crédit 1b sous la rubrique Service de protection parlementaire.

Nous sommes heureux d'accueillir l'honorable Geoff Regan, Président de la Chambre des communes. Charles Robert, greffier de la Chambre; Michel Patrice, sous-greffier, Administration; et Daniel Paquette, dirigeant principal des finances, l'accompagnent.

Du Service de protection parlementaire, la surintendante principale Jane MacLatchy, directrice, et Robert Graham, officier responsable de l'administration et du personnel, se joignent à nous.

Sur ce, nous allons maintenant vous céder la parole, monsieur le Président, afin que vous prononciez une déclaration préliminaire portant sur les deux budgets des dépenses. Merci.

L'hon. Geoff Regan (président de la Chambre des communes):

Bonjour, monsieur le président.

Je suis certain que je paierai pour cela.

Le président:

Si le Président avait été plus rapide, j'aurais fait adopter mon projet de loi.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Ah, ah.

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président et mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité. Je suis ravi d'être de retour devant vous en ma qualité de Président de la Chambre des communes afin de vous présenter notre Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) pour l'exercice 2017-2018. [Français]

Comme vous le savez, ma comparution est une occasion pour la Chambre des communes de présenter le financement supplémentaire approuvé pour les initiatives préalablement établies dont l'objectif est de maintenir et de renforcer le soutien que l'Administration de la Chambre offre aux députés et à l'institution même.

Le Bureau de régie interne a examiné et approuvé le budget des dépenses, le mois dernier, lors de sa première réunion ouverte au public. Vous avez donc probablement eu un aperçu de ce que je suis sur le point de vous présenter.[Traduction]

Je suis là aujourd’hui pour préciser certains détails et répondre à vos questions. Je présenterai également — comme vous l’avez mentionné, monsieur le président — le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) du Service de protection parlementaire, ou SPP. Comme vous l’avez peut-être remarqué, l’équipe de la haute direction de l'Administration de la Chambre et les dirigeants du SPP m’accompagnent aujourd’hui.

Je commencerai mon exposé d’aujourd’hui en soulignant les principaux éléments du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) 2017-2018 de la Chambre des communes. Les fonds supplémentaires s’élèvent au total à 35 millions de dollars, ce qui porte le budget de la Chambre des communes à 511 millions de dollars pour l’exercice.

Si vous souhaitez obtenir une analyse détaillée des chiffres, j’attire votre attention sur le document que j’ai remis au Comité, afin de faciliter nos discussions.[Français]

Comme vous pouvez le voir, il y a 10 postes budgétaires dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) 2017-2018. Je les aborderai selon l'ordre dans lequel ils apparaissent. Une présentation du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses du SPP suivra.

Vous remarquerez que la majorité des postes budgétaires, plus précisément huit d'entre eux, se trouvent dans la vaste catégorie des crédits votés. Les deux autres postes sont des crédits législatifs.

(1110)

[Traduction]

Pour commencer, le premier poste budgétaire montre qu'un financement temporaire de 15,4 millions de dollars a été demandé pour ce qu'on appelle le report de fonds du budget de fonctionnement.

La politique du Bureau sur les reports de fonds permet aux députés, aux agents supérieurs de la Chambre et à l'Administration de la Chambre de reporter des fonds non dépensés de l'exercice précédent à l'exercice en cours, jusqu'à concurrence de 5 % de leur budget fonctionnel présenté dans le Budget principal des dépenses. Cette pratique est conforme à celle du gouvernement du Canada et elle offre aux députés, aux agents supérieurs de la Chambre et à l'Administration une souplesse accrue dans la planification et l'exécution de leur travail. Le Bureau de régie interne a approuvé le report de fonds de la Chambre des communes qui, à la suite d'une directive du Conseil du Trésor, a été porté au budget supplémentaire.

Le poste budgétaire suivant concerne l'amélioration de la sécurité de l'édifice de l'Ouest, une mesure nécessaire dans le cadre de la vision et du plan à long terme. Comme vous le savez probablement, Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada, le principal partenaire dans cet ambitieux plan pluriannuel, a récemment annoncé que la réhabilitation de l'édifice de l'Ouest devrait être terminée l'an prochain. Lorsqu'il sera prêt, cet édifice patrimonial sera notre nouvelle demeure temporaire.

Je ne peux pas donner plus de détails concernant les 5,3 millions de dollars nécessaires pour améliorer la sécurité générale de l'édifice de l'Ouest sans passer à huis clos. Je tiens cependant à profiter de l'occasion pour préciser que nous exerçons la diligence raisonnable requise pour toute question de sécurité et que le plan détaillé a été approuvé par le Bureau.

Nous avons également demandé 4,4 millions de dollars en 2017-2018 pour financer les augmentations économiques des employés de l'Administration de la Chambre. Cette augmentation reflète les conclusions des négociations avec quatre de nos unités de négociation. Le total demandé comprend le financement temporaire des paiements rétroactifs et le financement requis pour les coûts permanents de main-d’œuvre.

Le poste suivant représente un investissement de 2,7 millions de dollars dans une vaste stratégie numérique de modernisation de la transmission d'information parlementaire afin de mieux soutenir le travail des députés, de leur personnel et de l'Administration, ainsi qu'afin de maintenir les solutions et les systèmes à l'appui de la stratégie. La planification, l'élaboration et le lancement de notre stratégie numérique au printemps dernier marquent une avancée importante, parmi beaucoup d'autres à venir, vers notre objectif de faire de la Chambre un chef de file en matière de communication d'information parlementaire.[Français]

Je dois mentionner que la stratégie prévoit également l'évolution de l'intranet des députés, afin qu'il devienne un guichet unique pour l'information importante que les députés s'attendent à recevoir de la Chambre des communes.

Vous vous rappellerez peut-être que, en mai dernier, lors de ma dernière comparution devant ce comité afin de présenter le Budget principal des dépenses, je vous ai parlé du travail de nos comités et associations parlementaires.[Traduction]

Je vous avais alors mentionné que les citoyens canadiens et étrangers demandaient de plus en plus à nos parlementaires de pouvoir les rencontrer en vue de mieux façonner les politiques et les mesures prises, au pays et partout dans le monde.

Nous avons donc ajouté 1,7 million de dollars pour l'exercice 2017-2018 dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) afin de soutenir les activités de nos comités et de tenir la 15e Assemblée plénière de ParlAmericas. Cette assemblée, organisée par le Canada, est prévue en septembre 2018 dans la jolie ville de Victoria, en Colombie-Britannique.

Au poste budgétaire suivant, des fonds de 1,4 million de dollars ont été demandés en 2017-2018 pour qu'on puisse apporter deux changements à la façon dont nous menons nos activités.

D'abord, nous avons modernisé la structure budgétaire des agents supérieurs de la Chambre et des caucus nationaux afin d'accroître l'efficacité dans la gestion de leurs activités. Ce changement a été mis en oeuvre le 1er avril 2017.

Ensuite, nous ferons appliquer la divulgation proactive des dépenses des députés à tous les agents supérieurs de la Chambre et bureaux de recherche des caucus nationaux. Je suis heureux de confirmer que notre premier Rapport des dépenses des agents supérieurs de la Chambre sera publié en juin 2018. Ce dernier changement représente la dernière étape entreprise par le Bureau pour accroître la compréhension qu'a le public de son rôle et des dépenses de la Chambre des communes. L'ouverture des réunions du Bureau au public, mesure que j'ai mentionnée au début de mon exposé, en est un autre exemple notable.

(1115)

[Français]

J'attire maintenant votre attention sur le poste budgétaire suivant, qui touche les efforts continus que déploie l'Administration de la Chambre pour moderniser les services de restauration offerts, entre autres, aux députés, et veiller à ce que leur prestation soit la plus efficace possible.

Nous avons demandé un financement de 1 million de dollars pour offrir une expérience davantage axée sur le client et pour préparer le déménagement de la Salle à manger parlementaire dans l'édifice de l'Ouest, y compris pour les améliorations connexes aux installations de production alimentaire.[Traduction]

Parmi les changements qui seront apportés, mentionnons: le lancement d'un service de petit-déjeuner à la Salle à manger parlementaire; la mise sur pied d'une nouvelle équipe de traiteur chargée des préparations finales et de la mise en assiette; l'adaptation des menus aux goûts actuels et à la préparation des aliments dans une installation éloignée; l'offre de services toute l'année dans deux cafétérias de la Cité parlementaire; et la création d'un effectif de base, y compris l'embauche d'employés, afin de répondre à la demande de service croissante.

Le dernier poste que vous trouverez dans la section des crédits votés du document est une somme de 835 000 $ demandée pour les services de paie et d'avantages sociaux en 2017-2018. Compte tenu de la situation, le financement permettra d'assurer des charges de travail raisonnables pour les employés qui offrent ces services et de mieux répondre aux besoins des députés et d'autres clients.

Dix nouveaux postes seront financés au sein de l'équipe de la Paie et avantages sociaux des Services en ressources humaines. L'accroissement de notre bassin de personnel permettra notamment de mettre sur pied un centre d'appels pour répondre aux questions liées à la paie et aux avantages sociaux, et de nommer un spécialiste des services de pension, qui sera la ressource privilégiée vers qui les députés pourront se tourner lorsqu'ils auront des questions liées à la pension.

Il reste deux postes du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) de la Chambre des communes à aborder. Dans le document, ils se trouvent dans la catégorie des crédits législatifs.

Pour commencer, des fonds de 1,6 million de dollars ont été demandés pour les régimes d'avantages sociaux des employés en 2017-2018, conformément à la directive du Conseil du Trésor. De plus, une somme supplémentaire de 793 000 $ a été demandée pour le rajustement annuel des indemnités de session et des rémunérations supplémentaires des députés en vertu de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada. II s'agit d'une hausse de 1,4 %, entrée en vigueur le 1er avril 2017.[Français]

Comme vous le savez, le rajustement est établi en fonction de l'indice en pourcentage de la moyenne des rajustements des taux des salaires de base pour une année civile au Canada, selon les principales ententes conclues par la voie de négociations dans le secteur privé.

Voilà qui met fin à ma présentation sur le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) de la Chambre des communes.[Traduction]

Monsieur le président, je voudrais maintenant passer au Service de protection parlementaire, qui continue à accroître et à renforcer sa capacité de fournir des services de sécurité dans l'ensemble de la cité.

Laissez-moi commencer par vous présenter un aperçu du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) 2017-2018, qui totalise 14,7 millions de dollars. Cette somme comprend 14,2 millions en crédits votés et 489 000 $ au titre des dépenses prévues par la loi pour le Régime de prestations aux employés.

Puisqu'il a été déterminé que le SPP est responsable de la propriété, de la mise à niveau, de l'utilisation et de l'exploitation des biens de sécurité physique servant à protéger la Colline du Parlement, le projet de mise à niveau du système de surveillance vidéo et de remplacement des barrières de sécurité au poste de contrôle des véhicules a été transféré au SPP.

Le SPP demande un financement temporaire de 5,3 millions de dollars pour l'exercice 2017-2018 pour la première étape du projet de surveillance vidéo, qui s'inscrit parfaitement dans le calendrier des travaux de la vision et du plan a long terme.

Cette demande de financement comprend la somme de 200 000 $ pour l'exercice en cours afin d'entreprendre les travaux de remplacement des barrières anti-intrusion par véhicule actuelles. Ce financement permettra de réduire le risque d'attaque en véhicule, une tactique de plus en plus employée ces derniers temps dans plusieurs endroits autour du monde.

Le SPP demande aussi un financement temporaire de 1,3 million de dollars pour des dépenses supplémentaires relatives aux événements liés à la fête du Canada.

Un financement permanent de 1,1 million de dollars est demandé pour permettre au SPP de doter, de façon permanente, des postes aux Services de l'information, à la formation, aux Services de l'infrastructure physique et de la planification d'urgence, à la Gestion des biens et à la Planification d'événements majeurs.

Le SPP demande un financement temporaire de 909 000 $ pour l'avancement des projets de soutien opérationnel, y compris l'ajout de services de soutien à la gestion de l'information, un système de gestion des stocks qui permettrait au SPP d'éliminer les inscriptions à la main, et du financement pour couvrir le coût de l'équipement et des uniformes pour les nouvelles recrues.

(1120)

[Français]

En plus de demander du financement pour le soutien opérationnel, le SPP réclame une hausse de 1,1 million de dollars pour financer les ententes sur les niveaux de service conclues avec l'Administration de la Chambre des communes pour le soutien des opérations financières, du système financier, des services de l'information et des ressources humaines.

Le SPP demande 1 million de dollars de financement temporaire pour des travaux de réfection et de rénovation aux installations du 180 rue Wellington et de l'édifice du Centre, afin d'optimiser l'espace disponible. La planification de ces projets et le calcul des coûts ont été faits avec l'aide du groupe des Biens immobiliers de la Chambre des communes. [Traduction]

Conformément aux augmentations économiques attribuées à la Chambre des communes et afin d'honorer les ententes signées avant sa création, le SPP réclame des fonds pour couvrir les augmentations de salaire de ses employés non syndiqués et des membres de l'Association des employés du Service de sécurité. Les coûts pour l'exercice 2017-2018 seront de 693 000 $ pour les paiements de rétroaction et les augmentations pour l'année en cours.

Enfin, le SPP, par l'entremise de ce Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B), demande accès au report de 5 % de l'exercice 2016-2017, qui représente une somme de 2,8 millions de dollars.

Voilà qui conclut mon exposé. Je vous remercie de votre gentille attention. Mon équipe et moi serons ravis de répondre à toutes vos questions. [Français]

Le président:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le Président.[Traduction]

Allez-y, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci. Bienvenue à votre première séance du comité de la procédure, je crois. Je suis ravi de vous accueillir.

Au printemps, nous avions des préoccupations au sujet de pénuries de personnel. Je me demandais si vous pouviez nous présenter un compte rendu de notre situation en ce qui a trait aux agents de première ligne du point de vue des nouvelles recrues.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy (directrice, Service de protection parlementaire):

Je vais m'excuser d'avance. Je me remets d'un rhume, alors, il est fort possible que je tousse tout au long de la séance.

En ce qui concerne nos nouvelles reçues, au cours des six derniers mois, nous avons réussi à embaucher un nombre important de nouveaux constables et spécialistes de la détection. Je cède la parole à mon officier responsable de l'administration et du personnel pour qu'il vous donne les détails.

M. Robert Graham (officier responsable de l’administration et du personnel, Service de protection parlementaire):

Il y a eu une augmentation nette de 35 spécialistes de la détection depuis octobre 2016, et une augmentation nette de 36 constables pour les divisions 1 et 2 de l'AESS, qui supervisent la sécurité des installations de la Chambre des communes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En avons-nous besoin de beaucoup plus, ou bien croyez-vous que l'effectif est adéquat?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Monsieur, nous sommes actuellement en train d'amorcer ce que j'appelle un examen de l'optimisation des ressources. Nous examinons la situation actuelle et nous assurons que notre taille est la bonne. Une fois que nous aurons terminé cet exercice, nous serons mieux placés pour savoir de combien de recrues de plus nous avons besoin en ce qui a trait à la vision et au plan à long terme, entre autres, et aux pressions que nous envisageons dans l'avenir.

Pour l'instant, je répondrais instinctivement par l'affirmative, que nous en avons besoin d'un peu plus, mais j'aimerais vous répondre de façon plus rigoureuse.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous en remercie.

Une chose que j'ai remarquée relativement à la Colline, c'est que des agents de la GRC sont stationnés à divers endroits, et que des agents du SPP sont situés aux portes et dans les immeubles. Est-il prévu que cette situation demeure ainsi, ou bien les agents du SPP, à mesure que nous en obtiendrons davantage — ceux qui ne travaillent pas pour la GRC —, vont-ils être stationnés à d'autres endroits de la Colline au fil du temps?

(1125)

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Nous sommes en train d'étudier un concept. J'ai parlé d'un examen de l'optimisation des ressources, monsieur. Une partie de cet examen comprendra ce que je veux appeler un rajustement, et nous allons nous assurer que nous affectons les bonnes personnes aux bons postes. Nous l'envisageons en ce moment, et nous nous dirigeons vers une réduction potentielle de la présence de la GRC sur la Colline du Parlement ainsi que dans la Cité et, bien entendu, vers un accroissement connexe au chapitre des ressources du SPP. Encore une fois, ces travaux en sont à leurs débuts. Nous étudions cette possibilité et les défis que poserait ce genre de projet.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends.

J'ai une question de plus à poser aux représentants du SPP, avant de passer du côté de l'Administration de la Chambre. Cette question s'adresse au Président et à Mme MacLatchy.

Le 26 octobre 2017, le Globe and Mail a publié un article sur des mesures disciplinaires prises contre des députés. Il n'est pas indiqué clairement d'où provenaient les ordres. Si vous voulez donner des précisions officielles, maintenant pourrait être une bonne occasion de le faire.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Le protocole d'entente conclu entre les deux Présidents et le SPP prévoit que les Présidents donnent des directives stratégiques générales au SPP, mais que les activités quotidiennes sont la responsabilité du directeur. Je veux seulement déclarer que j'ai grandement confiance en la directrice et que ce n'est pas seulement parce qu'elle vient de Hubbards, en Nouvelle-Écosse.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je connaissais ce lien.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Cela ne fait pas de mal.

Je pense que vous voulez ajouter des précisions à cette réponse.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Oui, j'aimerais — merci — avoir la possibilité d'ajouter des précisions à cette réponse.

Plus tard dans la séance, j'aborderai de façon plus approfondie les enjeux touchant les relations de travail. Conformément au modèle de gouvernance et à la structure du SPP, je me suis assurée que les bureaux des deux Présidents sont au courant de la situation et de mes intentions à toutes les étapes du processus. Il m'incombe de prendre la décision finale concernant la prise de mesures disciplinaires à l'égard d'employés du SPP, et j'ai pris cette décision. C'était moi.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. Je suis heureux de l'entendre.

Je m'adresse aux représentants de l'Administration de la Chambre: je veux vous entendre un peu nous parler de la transition du site parl.gc.ca au site noscommunes.gc.ca. J'ai trouvé que c'était très intéressant, ce printemps, quand le site Web a été modifié complètement. Je veux savoir comment ce changement s'est déroulé et si vous avez des commentaires à formuler à ce sujet.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je vais demander à Stéphan Aubé, qui est notre dirigeant principal de l'information, de se présenter pour répondre à cette question, car il est notre expert en la matière. Bien sûr, il comparaîtra avec le sous-greffier, Procédure, André Gagnon.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il va nous falloir ajouter des fauteuils, dans ce cas. Merci.

M. André Gagnon (sous-greffier, Procédure):

Merci d'avoir posé la question, monsieur Graham.

Le renouvellement a eu lieu, et il est certain qu'à nos yeux, un aspect important consistait à nous assurer que nous mettions à jour des parties importantes du site Web. Le Sénat et la Bibliothèque renouvelaient également leurs parties, alors nous avons saisi cette occasion de la moderniser le plus possible. En outre, comme l'a indiqué le Président, en ce qui concerne le site Web et la présence de la Chambre sur Internet, nous voulions faire en sorte que la Chambre des communes devienne un chef de file de la communication d'information parlementaire.

Cette ambition nous a permis de beaucoup travailler sur les médias sociaux. Vous avez probablement vu un certain mouvement à cet égard. Nous avons également renouvelé l'approche adoptée et le contenu du site Web en ajoutant une couverture en direct de toutes les activités de la Chambre et de certains comités également.

Par exemple, actuellement, on peut écouter sur ParlVu toutes les interventions du Comité en direct et, plus tard, durant la journée et dans la soirée, vous pourrez — si vous le voulez — écouter la séance encore une fois.

Ensuite, il était très important pour nous également — dans le contexte de ce changement au chapitre de la présence sur le Web des diverses institutions — de travailler sur la troisième catégorie, c'est-à-dire l'intranet et les services fournis aux députés. Je dirais que c'est un projet non pas à court terme, mais plutôt à moyen terme. C'est important pour nous.

En 2015, vous avez probablement remarqué, au moment où nous avons instauré l'application Source, qu'elle était très utile aux nouveaux députés. Nous voulons faire un pas en avant en la rendant plus utile non seulement pour les nouveaux députés, mais aussi pour ceux qui sont réélus.

(1130)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je veux seulement dire que j'aime beaucoup le nouveau site, alors je vous en félicite. Merci.

Mon temps est écoulé.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

M. Richard est le prochain intervenant.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le Président, je vous remercie de votre présence.

Dans votre déclaration préliminaire, vous avez souligné le poste de 835 000 $ demandé pour les services de paie et d'avantages sociaux. L'un des éléments que vous avez mentionnés, c'était le financement des 10 nouveaux postes. Je me demande si vous pourriez nous dire si ces dépenses sont liées à certaines des complications dues au fiasco du système de paye Phénix.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je vais demander à Dan Paquette, notre dirigeant principal des finances, de répondre.

M. Daniel G. Paquette (dirigeant principal des finances, Chambre des communes):

Le besoin de capacités supplémentaires est dû à une combinaison d'éléments. L'un d'entre eux est lié à l'augmentation continue du nombre de ressources destinées aux députés et à l'Administration de la Chambre: nous devons augmenter le nombre de conseillers en rémunération afin de maintenir un ratio qui nous permettra de conserver le service.

Il y a également eu une augmentation du nombre de demandes de renseignements relatives aux prestations de pension, plus précisément dans le cas des députés, et le personnel doit comprendre un expert en la matière chargé de répondre à ces demandes. Il y a aussi le défi posé par l'évolution des avantages sociaux, et le fait que nous devons nous assurer que nous disposons des capacités de formation nécessaires pour les tenir à jour.

Le dernier élément, c'est que, oui, il y a un besoin lié à la charge de travail supplémentaire que représente Phénix auquel il faut répondre, et nous avons embauché quelques personnes pour qu'elles contribuent à la prise en charge de ce système.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord, et je n'ai pas été surpris d'entendre cela.

Je veux me faire une idée de l'ampleur du problème qui se pose à cet égard. Manifestement, en ce qui concerne les problèmes liés à Phénix, j'ai été bien plus préoccupé pour les électeurs qui sont des employés fédéraux et à qui le système pose des problèmes, et je suis certain que la plupart ou l'ensemble des députés seraient d'accord avec moi. Dans ma circonscription, j'ai des employés de Parcs Canada qui ont attendu peut-être deux ou trois ans avant de même toucher leur paye, alors je suis certainement bien plus préoccupé à leur sujet.

Toutefois, nous sommes là aujourd'hui pour parler de la Chambre des communes précisément. Un article a récemment été publié dans le Hill Times au sujet de certains des problèmes liés à la paie sur la Colline, qui sont liés à Phénix. Je veux me faire une idée de comment vous estimez que ce système fonctionne pour la Chambre des communes. Seriez-vous en mesure de nous donner une certaine idée du nombre de problèmes de paie qu'il y a eus à la Chambre des communes?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Si je puis intervenir seulement pour une seconde, ce n'est strictement pas à moi de formuler un commentaire parce que, bien entendu, c'est un sujet qui est soulevé à la Chambre, et je ne peux pas commenter ces affaires, mais je veux dire qu'évidemment, je veux voir tous les employés de la Chambre être payés avec exactitude et en temps voulu.

M. Michel Patrice (sous-greffier, Administration):

Manifestement, Phénix pose un problème pour la Chambre, mais, comme nous avons retenu les services d'un conseiller en rémunération et en avantages sociaux, nous avons été en mesure de surveiller de près les problèmes qui pourraient survenir à cause de ce système, et nos employés ou députés ne subissent pas trop d'effets néfastes, comme ce pourrait être le cas du reste des employés fédéraux.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord, mais il y a évidemment eu des répercussions. Des gens m'ont informé personnellement des conséquences qu'ils ont subies. Avez-vous une certaine idée du nombre de personnes qui ont été touchées ou des conséquences qu'elles ont subies?

M. Michel Patrice:

En ce qui concerne les députés, nous allons fournir l'information au Comité par l'entremise du président.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Quand je pose la question, je veux parler du nombre total d'employés de la Chambre des communes, et je suppose que les députés et les membres de leur personnel sont inclus là-dedans.

M. Michel Patrice:

Évidemment, oui.

M. Blake Richards:

Pourriez-vous nous fournir cette information?

M. Michel Patrice:

Oui.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord, je vous en remercie.

Monsieur le Président, le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses propose également — je pense que c'est ce que vous avez dit — environ 1,7 million de dollars pour les comités et les associations parlementaires en guise d'augmentation. Pouvez-vous nous en dire un peu plus au sujet de ce qui est financé grâce à cette augmentation et préciser combien les comités et les associations peuvent dépenser selon le Budget principal des dépenses de l'exercice en cours? Je n'ai pas ces renseignements sous les yeux. Les auriez-vous, par hasard?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je suis certain que l'un des membres de l'équipe ici présents pourra me donner la réponse à la deuxième question, mais vous vous rappellerez que j'ai mentionné le fait que nous avions observé une augmentation du nombre de séances des comités tenues devant public et faisant intervenir des témoins. Le coût lié à cette augmentation et au fait d'accueillir un plus grand nombre de témoins a un peu changé les choses et fait augmenter le coût pour les comités. Un plus grand nombre d'associations parlementaires font leur travail et voyagent afin de se réunir pour les séances qu'elles tiennent. Bien entendu, nous avons plus de députés maintenant qu'avant les dernières élections, et cela aussi a eu une incidence.

Je vais céder la parole à André Gagnon, qui corrigera d'abord toutes les erreurs que j'ai sans doute faites et qui complétera la réponse.

(1135)

M. André Gagnon:

Je voudrais corriger le Président en affirmant qu'il ne commet jamais d'erreur.

Monsieur Richards, je n'ai pas compris la dernière partie de votre question.

M. Blake Richards:

Tout simplement, à combien s'élèvent les de dépenses qui ont été autorisées pour les comités et les associations dans le Budget principal des dépenses de l'exercice en cours?

M. André Gagnon:

Cette année, une somme de 1,7 million de dollars a été ajoutée aux fonds qui avaient été fournis.

M. Blake Richards:

Oui, mais je demandais quel était le financement actuel.

M. André Gagnon:

Il était de 2,3 millions de dollars et il est maintenant de 4 millions de dollars.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord. Merci.

Je remarque que, si on combine le Budget principal et le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses du présent exercice pour la Chambre, on constate une augmentation d'environ 5 % par rapport aux dépenses du dernier exercice, ce qui est évidemment bien supérieur à l'inflation. En fait, ces budgets portent les dépenses de la Chambre des communes à plus de 500 millions de dollars pour la première fois également.

Pourriez-vous m'en dire un peu plus au sujet de ce qui sous-tend cette croissance très rapide au chapitre des dépenses?

M. Daniel G. Paquette:

L'élément important, ce sont les 30 députés supplémentaires qui ont été ajoutés à la Chambre et les conséquences du fait d'avoir les bureaux de circonscription supplémentaires et leur personnel, qui comptent pour environ 20 millions de dollars de cette augmentation.

Beaucoup des fonds prévus dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses sont destinés à des projets de technologie. Nous devons suivre la cadence de la technologie moderne et nous assurer d'établir la connectivité et le soutien pour tous les députés et leurs bureaux de circonscription. Nos projets de technologie et l'augmentation du nombre de députés — et donc de bureaux de circonscription et de membres du personnel — expliquent en grande partie la tendance.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Certains députés ont eu de vrais problèmes avec la connectivité. Parfois, il n'y a qu'un seul fournisseur de services local, qui exige une somme faramineuse pour servir les immeubles où se trouve leur bureau, ou je ne sais quoi. C'est aussi du travail.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci, monsieur le Président. J'ai deux ou trois questions de plus à poser, mais mon temps est écoulé. Peut-être que j'aurai une autre occasion.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Richards.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Christopherson, qui aura la parole pendant sept minutes.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président, monsieur le Président de la Chambre, monsieur le greffier et autres invités.

Monsieur le Président, cela ne vous surprendra pas trop, la plupart de mes remarques et préoccupations vont probablement porter sur le SPP. Je ne veux pas vous décevoir.

Au risque de donner l'impression de me vanter — parce que je ne me vante pas, j'expose seulement quelques vérités —, en tant qu'ancien solliciteur général de l'Ontario, j'étais le chef civil de la Police provinciale de l'Ontario, alors non seulement je n'ai pas d'angoisse existentielle au sujet de la police d'État, mais je suis très fier d'elle et de mon affiliation antérieure avec elle. Cela dit, pour ma part, je ne crois pas que la transition se passe bien. Encore une fois, je tiens à souligner ma conviction qu'il est totalement inacceptable que le premier ministre contrôle les armes qui sont au Parlement.

En passant, puisque c'est mon temps de parole, mon bon ami Raoul Gebert, ancien chef de cabinet de Tom Mulcair, a amené des invités d'Allemagne, et ils ont demandé ce que nous faisions et sur quoi je me concentrerais. Ils ont été renversés lorsqu'ils ont découvert que le Parlement lui-même ne contrôlait pas les armes qui sont au Parlement pour protéger le Parlement.

Même si je ne peux pas changer cela par un seul discours, je continuerai à prononcer autant de discours que possible jusqu'à ce que je puisse atteindre la masse critique et faire changer les choses pour que le Parlement soit responsable de sa propre sécurité. Cependant, nous en sommes là où nous sommes.

Nous allons soulever quelques problèmes à huis clos, alors je vais jouer cartes sur table. Monsieur le Président, je pense que vous savez que c'est ce que je fais habituellement. Si vous estimez que je me rapproche trop du côté confidentiel des négociations, veuillez intervenir. Je vous exhorte à le faire. Ce n'est pas mon intention. Toutefois, je pense qu'il est juste de poser les questions suivantes.

Le SPP me fait part de ses inquiétudes concernant le nouvel équipement acheté. Le SPP paie la facture, mais c'est la GRC qui reçoit l'équipement. On a même attiré mon attention sur des véhicules, et des gens m'ont dit qu'ils avaient été achetés avec de l'argent du SPP. La GRC a celui-là, et c'est celui que le SPP reçoit; c'est un véhicule plus ancien.

C'est ce qu'on m'a dit. Je peux me tromper. On achète des armes sur lesquelles la GRC appose son estampille, ce qui est bien en soi, mais si c'est l'argent du SPP, on craint que cela soit dirigé vers la GRC. Ils obtiennent des armes flambant neuves avec l'estampille et tout, et le SPP se voit remettre des vêtements du frère aîné.

Je sollicite des conseils, des éclaircissements, et, au bout du compte, des assurances à ce sujet. Je vais en rester là, monsieur le Président, et vous demander de me faire part de vos commentaires et de m'aiguiller vers les personnes que vous jugez appropriées.

Merci, monsieur le président.

(1140)

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Vous savez, bien sûr, que la loi adoptée par le Parlement prévoit que nous avons un organisme mixte, qui comprend ce qui était auparavant les agents de sécurité de la Chambre des communes, les agents de sécurité du Sénat et les agents externes de la GRC, qui relèvent tous maintenant du Service de protection parlementaire. Avant de céder la parole à la surintendante MacLatchy, je suis ravi de l'excellent travail de tous ces agents de sécurité, de tous les membres du SPP, qui nous protègent et assurent notre sécurité dans l'enceinte; je suis très reconnaissant, et je sais que tous les membres le sont.

Je cède maintenant la parole à la surintendante MacLatchy.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le Président.

Vous avez exprimé des préoccupations au sujet de l'achat d'équipement, entre autres. L'équipement que nous sommes en train de nous procurer est destiné à l'usage du SPP. La GRC nous fournit un service pour l'une de nos divisions. L'organisme est un fournisseurs de services pour nous.

Dans un instant, je vais demander à M. Graham des précisions sur le marché, s'il est au courant.

Les armes à feu que nous avons achetées sont pour notre Équipe mobile d'intervention, à ma connaissance. L'Équipe mobile d'intervention est un groupe intégré que nous avons récemment mis sur pied et qui nous offre une meilleure capacité tactique à l'échelle de la Colline. C'est un groupe intégré auquel participent des membres de la GRC et du SPP. En fait, la plupart des membres de cette équipe sont des agents de protection du SPP. À l'heure actuelle, nous participons à un projet pilote avec 14 membres, et je crois que deux ou trois d'entre eux sont des membres de la GRC, tandis que les autres sont des agents du SPP. Quant à savoir si l'équipement est estampillé ou non, je ne le sais pas, mais je vais m'en remettre à M. Graham à ce sujet.

M. Robert Graham:

Étant donné que l'équipement a été acheté auprès d'une entreprise canadienne, le délai d'approvisionnement d'une partie de l'équipement que le SPP a acheté pour les activités de protection du SPP était de plusieurs mois; nous avons donc misé sur un mécanisme d'approvisionnement existant de la GRC. Une partie de cet équipement porte une étiquette de la GRC, et il est utilisé par le personnel du SPP. Lorsque le fournisseur sera en mesure de fournir de l'équipement non marqué, nous l'échangerons avec celui de la GRC.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord. Je suppose donc que, à moins que quelqu'un ne s'y oppose, vous ne serez pas préoccupé par le fait que cette information nous soit transmise, et nous pourrons ensuite établir la réalité des faits.

Essentiellement, je dis que je n'en sais pas assez pour poser d'autres questions. Je vous ai fait part de ce que je sais. Vous m'avez donné des réponses. Je dis que si les gens sur le terrain réagissent, je pense que le Comité pourrait s'attendre à ce que nous entendions cette réponse de la part de ses membres.

Je poursuis.

Je veux clarifier une chose. Je veux être très clair...

Le président:

Vous avez dix secondes.

M. David Christopherson:

Le premier ministre contrôle les armes à feu ici. Tout le monde parle sans cesse de la rubrique, du Président, et ainsi de suite. J'ai fait valoir mon point de vue, et je suis prêt à le faire de nouveau, publiquement si nécessaire, avec la GRC, mais au bout du compte, ne vous méprenez pas, ce n'est pas le Président qui donne l'ordre quant aux armes qui se trouvent ici. Finalement, cet ordre vient du commissaire de la GRC, et ce commissaire de la GRC est sous les ordres du premier ministre. C'est ce qui est inacceptable.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Avant de donner la parole à M. Simms, pourrait-on demander l'indulgence du Comité pour permettre à Elizabeth May de poser une question?

Des députés: D'accord.

Mme Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, PV):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci beaucoup.

La passion de M. Christopherson à l'égard de cette question est la même que la mienne et que celle de l'un de nos chers amis disparus. Je pense que si je connaissais quelqu'un de plus en colère contre les changements qui ont eu lieu et la façon dont ils ont été apportés avec précipitation au printemps de 2015, c'était le regretté Mauril Bélanger.

Je me trouvais à la Chambre ce vendredi matin lorsque la proposition a été présentée pour regrouper les forces et les confier... Peu importe la qualité et la compétence des agents — et je ne veux pas donner l'impression de manquer de respect —, c'est mal. Mauril savait que c'était mal. Je savais que c'était mal. Tout s'est fait de façon précipitée.

Maintenant, je suis tout à fait d'accord avec David Christopherson sur ce point. Quand je vois les mêmes personnes qui mettent leur vie en danger, qui n'étaient pas armées et qui ont défendu cet endroit le 22 octobre, je trouve étonnant que nous n'ayons jamais mené d'enquête publique sur ce qui s'est mal passé. Mais je sais une chose, c'est que les gardiens sur place à l'intérieur ont été professionnels, courageux et n'ont pas fait d'erreurs. À présent, ce sont eux qui sont sans contrat.

Je déduis de l'argument de David qu'il doit se passer quelque chose à huis clos. Je n'ai pas accès à ces discussions. Je veux poser cette question très directement, car il me semble que l'affaire en ce moment... Je déteste le fait que de très bonnes personnes n'obtiennent pas le respect qu'elles méritent dans les négociations. Je pense qu'il y a une négociation de mauvaise foi, mais vu les mesures disciplinaires en cours, je crains que nous ayons moins de sécurité sur la Colline qu'avant le changement de la loi parce que trop d'agents passent trop de temps à faire l'objet de mesures disciplinaires. Ils travaillent de très longues heures, et je ne pense pas que nous ayons sur la Colline autant d'agents de sécurité ayant nos intérêts à coeur que j'aimerais le voir.

Est-ce que ces mesures disciplinaires contre l'équipe de la sécurité de la Chambre des communes, les agents de sécurité de la Chambre, qui ne font pas partie de la GRC, nous amènent en dessous d'un certain seuil pour ce qui est d'assurer une sécurité adéquate sur la Colline?

(1145)

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Tout d'abord, je sais que ma vieille amie Mme May... Je n'ai pas l'habitude de vous appeler « Mme May », parce que vous m'appelez habituellement Geoff, et je vous appelle Elizabeth.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Vous pouvez toujours m'appeler Elizabeth, mais je crois devoir vous appeler monsieur le Président.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Quoi qu'il en soit, vous et M. Christopherson, ainsi que tous les membres du Comité, savez très bien que la question de savoir ce qu'est la loi et ce qu'elle devrait être est une question que le Parlement doit trancher. Bien sûr, j'ai beaucoup de respect pour cela, et en tant que Président, je ne peux pas participer à ce genre de débat, mais je transmets la suite de votre question à la surintendante MacLatchy.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Merci de poser la question, madame May.

Je pense que je dois aborder quelques éléments de votre question et j'espère que cela sera utile.

Dans le premier cas — et comme je l'ai dit, je l'expliquerai plus en détail ultérieurement —, en ce moment notre capacité d'entreprendre des négociations collectives avec les trois associations actuellement en place pour le SPP est très limitée. Le conseil juridique dont je dispose est fondé sur la loi qui a créé le SPP, la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada. Au cours d'une certaine période après la création du SPP, l'employeur ou l'une des parties a eu la possibilité de s'adresser à la Commission des relations de travail et de l'emploi dans le secteur public fédéral et de demander des précisions sur le nombre d'unités de négociation qui feront partie du SPP.

Cette demande a été faite en 2015. Selon l'avis juridique que j'ai reçu, je ne peux pas entamer de négociations collectives avant que la Commission des relations de travail rende cette décision; alors, nous avons cherché des solutions de rechange à ce que nous pouvions faire entre-temps. Je suis aussi contrariée que n'importe qui d'autre par les retards. Nous avons eu notre première audience — la semaine dernière, en fait —, avec la Commission des relations de travail précisément à ce sujet. J'ai bon espoir que cela pourra être réglé dans un délai raisonnable, mais d'autres audiences sont nécessaires. En attendant, le conseil juridique que je reçois est que je ne peux pas négocier collectivement. Nous avons donc effectivement tenté de trouver des solutions de rechange à la négociation collective, cherchant activement des moyens éventuels de résoudre des problèmes spécifiques en dehors de la sphère de la négociation collective.

En ce qui concerne les membres des anciens services de sécurité de la Chambre des communes qui sont maintenant des employés de SPP et de ceux en cause dans l'incident du 22 octobre 2014, je suis absolument d'accord avec vous pour dire que ces gens méritent d'être félicités. Ce sont des professionnels. Ce sont des gens fiers, et ils ont parfaitement le droit de l'être. Je ne voudrais certainement pas dire quoi que ce soit qui inciterait une personne à croire que je n'ai pas le plus grand respect à l'égard de ce qu'ils ont fait et de ce qu'ils font tous les jours pour assurer la sécurité de cet endroit. Toutefois, l'autre problème est que nous avons une politique relative à la tenue et à la conduite professionnelles, qui a été créée en collaboration avec les trois associations. Toute modification de l'uniforme constitue une violation de cette politique.

Lorsque cela a commencé en juin, avant la Fête du Canada, je venais d'arriver à la fin du mois de mai. J'ai commencé à occuper ce poste à la fin de mai et j'étais très ouverte à l'idée de trouver des solutions de rechange et, à ce titre, je me suis montrée très flexible en ce qui concerne les mesures disciplinaires à l'époque. Ce n'est pas ce que je voulais à ce moment-là. Depuis, nous avons pu fournir aux anciens employés des services de sécurité de la Chambre des communes, qui sont actuellement représentés par l'AESS, l'augmentation économique qui faisait partie d'un accord intervenu avant la création du SPP en 2014. Cela faisait partie des mesures que j'ai prises en juin. Nous leur avons apporté cette augmentation économique. J'ai obtenu un accord selon lequel l'action syndicale cesserait, et c'est ce qui s'est passé. Tout le monde est retourné à l'uniforme.

Par la suite, nous avons signé ce que j'appellerais un accord de paix sociale, un protocole d'entente, avec cette association, en disant essentiellement qu'il n'y aura plus de mesures de pression de la part du syndicat et que les membres respecteront la politique relative à la tenue et à la conduite professionnelles, et nous avons convenu d'aller de l'avant avec la médiation des griefs spécifiques. Nous l'avons fait, et de bonne foi. Je nie catégoriquement que nous étions là de mauvaise foi.

Bien sûr, je ne peux pas entrer dans les détails de la médiation. Nous sommes venus à la table et avons activement tenté de trouver un accord. Nous n'avons pas été en mesure d'arriver à un accord. Les deux parties étaient très éloignées. De par sa nature, la médiation ne débouche pas toujours sur un accord. Cela ne veut pas dire que l'une ou l'autre des parties était de mauvaise foi, et je nie un tel sous-entendu.

(1150)

Le président:

Merci.

Vos sept minutes sont terminées.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Je n'ai même pas pu avoir de réponse à ma question.

Le président:

Vous vous reprendrez plus tard.

Allez-y, monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Pour commencer, je vous remercie d'être venu, monsieur le Président. C'est comme toujours un plaisir de vous revoir.

J'ai une question spécifique. Je vais peut-être y arriver. Je crois que je vais y arriver, mais, étant donné ce que M. Christopherson et Mme May ont dit plus tôt, je me sens obligé d'ajouter moi aussi mon grain de sel.

M. Christopherson travaille ici depuis aussi longtemps que moi. Nous sommes arrivés le même jour. Les similitudes ne s'arrêtent pas là. J'ai visité de nombreux parlements, en tant que membre de l'Association parlementaire Canada-Europe, et je crois sincèrement qu'il est tout simplement inapproprié que le fonctionnement et la sécurité d'un parlement soient la responsabilité d'un cadre. Cela n'a pas de bon sens. C'est peut-être approprié du point de vue de certains, mais ce ne l'est pas du mien. Je crois que cette responsabilité doit être assumée par le Parlement. Je le dis en tant que parlementaire. Je ne le dis au nom de personne d'autre; je le dis à titre de simple parlementaire.

Je les remercie de leurs commentaires; je crois sincèrement ce qu'ils ont dit et je suis d'accord avec eux.

Dans votre document, sous la rubrique Services professionnels et spéciaux, j'essaie de comprendre quelque chose. Vous avez peut-être déjà répondu à cette question. En 2016-2017, pour le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B), le montant inscrit était de 929 000 $. Aujourd'hui, il a fait un bond et est passé à un peu plus de 6 millions de dollars. Puis-je en connaître la raison?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Qu'est-il écrit à côté du chiffre, sur cette ligne?

M. Scott Simms:

C'est tiré du tableau 2 des notes d'information de la Bibliothèque du Parlement, sous la rubrique « Services professionnels et spéciaux ». Vous n'avez probablement pas cette page. L'an dernier, en 2016-2017, les dépenses étaient tout juste inférieures à 1 million de dollars. Aujourd'hui elles atteignent 6,2... 6,3 millions de dollars, en fait.

Est-ce que cela tient au fait qu'il y a davantage de députés qui exigent des mesures de sécurité supplémentaires, et ainsi de suite — vous en avez parlé —, ou est-ce que cela tient à quelque chose de nouveau dans le domaine de la sécurité?

C'est l'article « Services professionnels et spéciaux ». Il s'agit des dépenses générales, non pas des dépenses du Service de protection parlementaire. Regardez dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B), à la même page que moi.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je crois que M. Aubé sera prêt à répondre dans un instant.

M. Stéphan Aubé (dirigeant principal de l'information, Chambre des communes):

Monsieur le président, la plupart des coûts qui sont présentés ici tiennent à deux choses.

Premièrement, nous avons conclu une entente avec l'un de nos partenaires en matière de sécurité et nous achetons des services à ce titre. C'est pour cette raison que les chiffres sont enregistrés ici. Ce service coûte plus de 3 millions de dollars. Il explique une bonne partie de l'augmentation.

Deuxièmement, il y a plus de trois ans, nous avons mis en oeuvre un projet qui se déroule maintenant depuis deux ans, soit le projet de renouvellement des systèmes de planification des ressources qui vise les systèmes financiers et les systèmes des RH. Un bon volume de ces services sont achetés à des fournisseurs externes, pour aider la Chambre à mettre en oeuvre ces deux grandes initiatives.

(1155)

M. Scott Simms:

Je vois. Tout est nouveau.

M. Stéphan Aubé:

Tout est nouveau, monsieur.

M. Scott Simms:

Pourriez-vous nous mettre au courant de la façon dont les choses se déroulent? Prévoyez-vous que le chiffre sera encore plus élevé d'ici la fin de l'exercice?

M. Stéphan Aubé:

Ce projet est en partie continu, étant donné l'entente dont nous venons de parler. Je préfère ne pas en parler ici, monsieur. Il nous faudrait le faire à huis clos.

Il y a autre chose, que nous espérons voir diminuer. Nous prévoyons commencer la production de ce système d'ici un an et demi, monsieur.

M. Scott Simms:

N'en parlons pas pour l'instant.

Prévoyez-vous avoir besoin de financement supplémentaire d'ici la fin de l'exercice?

Il me semble que les augmentations sont dans bien des cas si fortes qu'elles sont presque renversantes. Prévoyez-vous que, dans ce domaine, d'autres augmentations majeures seront bientôt nécessaires? Je sais que je vous demande de voir ce qui n'est pas encore visible, mais y a-t-il quelque chose à l'horizon que vous observez avec attention?

M. Stéphan Aubé:

L'horizon actuel obéit à notre plan stratégique. Et le plan stratégique en vigueur ne prévoit aucune autre initiative majeure qui exigerait dès maintenant une augmentation du financement.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord, merci.

Est-ce que quelqu'un d'autre veut poser une question? Ça me convient.

Filomena aimerait dire quelque chose. Je vais laisser Mme Tassi poser mes questions.

Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Merci, et merci à vous tous d'être venus ici ce matin.

Madame MacLatchy, j'aimerais revenir sur quelque chose que vous avez dit, parce que je veux mieux comprendre le processus. La demande a été communiquée à la CRTESPF en 2015, et vous ne pouvez pas négocier tant que sa décision n'a pas été rendue. C'est la loi.

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

C'est le conseil juridique que j'ai reçu, oui.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

C'est le conseil juridique. D'accord.

Combien de temps est-ce que cela prend, en général, pour traiter ce type de demande? Qu'est-ce qui bloque le règlement de cette demande? Quel est le processus?

Surint. pr. Jane MacLatchy:

Sur la question de savoir combien de temps cela prend normalement, je crains de ne pas pouvoir vous répondre tout de suite. Je ne suis pas au courant.

Ce que je sais, c'est que mes prédécesseurs s'attendaient à ce que ce soit réglé bien plus vite que ça ne l'a été. Il a fallu attendre tout ce temps pour notre première audience devant la commission des relations de travail, qui a eu lieu la semaine dernière. C'est elle qui est responsable de la mise au rôle. Je ne sais pas si M. Graham voudrait ajouter quelque chose.

M. Robert Graham:

C'est elle qui décide quelles affaires elle va mettre au rôle. Nous n'avons aucun contrôle sur cela. Malheureusement, ses motifs sont indépendants de notre volonté, et nous ne comprenons pas pourquoi elle ne nous a pas convoqués avant la semaine dernière. Nous ne pouvons pas du tout prévoir combien de temps il lui faudra pour rendre sa décision. Nous avons fixé la date d'autres audiences en tenant compte de la disponibilité de notre commission du travail et des quatre équipes juridiques concernées.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

La demande a été présentée en 2015. La commission du travail fixe ses audiences en fonction de la priorité qu'elle reconnaît à chaque dossier ou chaque enjeu. C'est ainsi que vous voyez les choses, même sans en être certains?

M. Robert Graham:

Je ne peux rien dire quant à la façon dont elle choisit les affaires qu'elle entendra. Tout ce que je sais, c'est que nous avons attendu deux ans notre première rencontre avec la commission.

Le président:

Je m'excuse, madame Tassi, votre temps est écoulé.

La dernière intervention sera celle de M. Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Bien. J'avais indiqué plus tôt qu'il me restait deux ou trois autres questions.

Monsieur Paquette, je crois bien que c'est vous qui aviez répondu à ma question au sujet de l'augmentation de 5 % par rapport à l'année précédente qui figure dans le budget supplémentaire des dépenses; vous avez dit que cela concernait en partie les nouveaux députés. Les nouveaux députés, de toute évidence, étaient déjà présents quand le budget de l'année précédente a été établi, le budget de 2016-2017, ce qui explique certainement pourquoi il y a eu sur deux ans une augmentation d'environ 20 %, mais je ne suis pas certain qu'il soit justifié de prétendre que cela expliquerait l'augmentation de 5 % par rapport à l'année dernière. Je me demande s'il n'y a pas quelque chose d'autre en cause ici. Je vais vous donner une autre chance de répondre à la question, parce qu'il me semble tout simplement que ça ne correspond pas.

(1200)

M. Daniel G. Paquette:

Si nous prenons seulement ce qui figure ici, dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B), qui est la plus grande part, la plus grande partie du montant représente le report de fonds, les 5 % par rapport à l'année précédente, c'est-à-dire essentiellement les crédits votés l'an dernier qui n'ont pas été dépensés et qui sont répartis par la suite, conformément à nos règles, aux députés, à l'administration de la Chambre ou à certaines de nos priorités stratégiques.

Nous avons ensuite quelques-uns des grands projets dont nous venons tout juste de parler...

M. Blake Richards:

Je n'avais pas l'intention de vous interrompre, mais je vais le faire.

Quand vous dites qu'il s'agit des fonds reportés, c'est très bien, mais si vous demandez le report de fonds, c'est que vous avez l'intention de dépenser cet argent quelque part. De quoi s'agit-il? Cela me préoccupe davantage; pour quoi cette somme va-t-elle être dépensée, non pas de quelle colonne comptable elle sera tirée.

M. Daniel G. Paquette:

Nous avons près de 15 millions de dollars de fonds reportés, et sur cette somme, 6,7 millions de dollars ont été répartis sur les budgets des députés, conformément à la formule que nous utilisons pour les fonds non utilisés des crédits des années précédentes, et ils pourront utiliser la somme pour leurs dépenses de l'année en cours.

Il y a un montant de 1,8 million de dollars qui sera réparti entre les différents secteurs de service de l'administration de la Chambre, selon la même formule que celle s'appliquant aux fonds non utilisés, et il servira pour les événements de l'année en cours. Le solde, 6,8 millions de dollars, devait servir à certains projets clés. Il s'agit surtout de notre nouveau système des RH, dans lequel nous avons investi et dont M. Aubé vient tout juste de parler. Nous avons les initiatives sur l'environnement de travail mobile et la sécurité des TI, qui sont actuellement en cours. Ces initiatives accaparent une bonne partie de ces 6 millions de dollars.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je crois qu'il est important de ne pas perdre de vue — encore une fois — n'hésitez pas à me corriger si je me trompe — que, pendant la première année de la nouvelle législature, la Chambre a eu à faire face à toutes sortes de nouveaux coûts, dont certains n'avaient pas été prévus, en raison surtout de l'arrivée de 30 nouveaux députés. Vous l'avez peut-être vu dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) de l'an dernier, mais il n'en aurait pas été question dans le budget principal, l'an dernier. C'est pour cette raison que vous constatez une augmentation cette année-ci.

M. Blake Richards:

Sur ces nouvelles dépenses dont nous parlons, combien représenteraient des dépenses ponctuelles et combien deviendront des dépenses annuelles continues?

M. Daniel G. Paquette:

En ce qui concerne le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B), il s'agira surtout de dépenses ponctuelles. Cela comprend les fonds reportés de 15 millions de dollars, et le reste représente à 40 % un financement ponctuel. Cela concerne tout simplement les projets et initiatives qui seront réalisés en cours d'année.

M. Blake Richards:

Un financement ponctuel, pour 40 %.

M. Daniel G. Paquette:

Oui.

M. Blake Richards:

L'autre part de 60 % sera consacrée à des dépenses qui deviendront des dépenses annuelles continues.

M. Daniel G. Paquette:

Oui, regardez la liste que nous avons établie, les augmentations économiques pour les employés... il y a le salaire des employés supplémentaires, qui ont bien sûr un poste à durée indéterminée, et nous devons continuer à les payer.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Richards.

Merci, monsieur le Président et merci à tout votre personnel et à Mme MacLatchy.

Il nous reste les motions de routine. CHAMBRE DES COMMUNES Crédit 1b — Dépenses de programme... 32 585 677 $

(Le crédit 1b est adopté avec dissidence.) SERVICE DE PROTECTION PARLEMENTAIRE Crédit 1b — Dépenses de programme... 14 245 794 $

(Le crédit 1b est adopté.)

Le président: Dois-je faire rapport des crédits du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) à la Chambre?

Des députés: Oui.

Le président: Nous allons suspendre la séance pendant un instant pour nous réunir à huis clos, mais nous allons faire très vite parce que nous avons beaucoup d'affaires à régler.

(1200)

(1310)

Le président:

Reprenons.

Avant de commencer, j'aimerais souhaiter la bienvenue à notre invitée d'honneur, Alexandrine Latendresse, qui était vice-présidente de notre comité pendant la dernière législature. Heureux que vous soyez de retour parmi nous.

Des députés: Bravo!

Le président: Bonjour. Je vous souhaite de nouveau la bienvenue à la 78e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure des affaires de la Chambre. Je tiens à dire aux députés que la séance est publique.

Conformément au paragraphe 92(2) du Règlement, nous étudions le Rapport du Sous-comité des affaires émanant des députés, qui a été remis au greffier du Comité le lundi 6 novembre. Le Sous-comité a recommandé que le projet de loi C-352, Loi modifiant la Loi de 2001 sur la marine marchande du Canada et prévoyant l'élaboration d'une stratégie nationale sur l'abandon de bâtiments soit désigné non votable.

Nous avons le plaisir aujourd'hui d'accueillir la marraine du projet de loi, Sheila Malcolmson, députée de Nanaimo—Ladysmith, qui est venue nous expliquer pourquoi à son avis le projet de loi devrait être votable. Mme Malcolmson aimerait que M. Julian puisse participer à son exposé, si les membres du Comité sont d'accord.

D'accord.

Je vous donne la parole en premier, madame Malcolmson.

Mme Sheila Malcolmson (Nanaimo—Ladysmith, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci aux membres du Comité d'avoir accepté d'écouter mes arguments.

Je sais que vous avez eu une longue journée, et c'est pourquoi je vous suis très reconnaissante de m'écouter quand je vais expliquer pourquoi je crois que mon projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire, le projet de loi C-352, devrait pouvoir faire l'objet d'un vote.

Puisque j'ai déjà soulevé la question 80 fois devant la Chambre depuis que j'ai été élue, je tiens pour acquis que vous comprenez pourquoi il est impératif d'agir, et c'est pourquoi je ne vais pas m'éterniser là-dessus. J'aimerais commencer notre exposé en cédant la parole au leader parlementaire du NPD, M. Peter Julian. Il pourra vous expliquer brièvement l'histoire des projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire ainsi que certaines dates du processus. Ensuite, je vais confronter les deux projets de loi sur le plan technique afin de prouver que le projet de loi du gouvernement et mon projet de loi ne sont pas incompatibles. [Français]

M. Peter Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby, NPD):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je veux aussi vous remercier, madame Malcolmson. Nous sommes très heureux d'avoir la chance de vous parler aujourd'hui de la raison pour laquelle le projet de loi C-352 devrait être votable à la Chambre des communes.

Étant donné que votre comité est celui qui s'occupe de toutes les prérogatives au Parlement, la décision que vous prendre est importante.[Traduction]

D'emblée, il y a trois principaux arguments que j'aimerais faire valoir.

Premièrement, comme vous le constaterez, le projet de loi C-352 est bien différent du projet de loi du gouvernement, le projet de loi C-64. Pour cette raison, il ne devrait pas faire l'objet de la même question que le projet de loi C-64, qui figure présentement au Feuilleton.

Deuxièmement, le sous-comité a erré quant aux critères qu'il a utilisés pour déclarer que le projet de loi C-352 était similaire au projet de loi C-64. Au cours de la même séance, il semble avoir appliqué des critères différents au projet de loi C-364, qui peut faire l'objet d'un vote, même s'il concerne le même sujet et vise à modifier la Loi électorale du Canada au même titre que le projet de loi C-50 et le projet de loi C-33. Il y a une incohérence à ce chapitre.

Troisièmement, en soutenant la décision du sous-comité, vous permettez au gouvernement d'empiéter sur les initiatives parlementaires qui devraient être distinctes; vous lui permettez de faire officieusement ce qu'il lui est interdit, selon les règles, de faire officiellement, c'est-à-dire empêcher les députés de voter en faveur des initiatives parlementaires qu'ils soutiennent.

Comme nous le savons tous, les députés sont soumis à la discipline du parti en ce qui concerne les projets de loi émanant du gouvernement. Les projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire sont l'exception, et dans notre bible, La procédure et les usages de la Chambre des communes d'O'Brien et Bosc, il est clair que notre système, dont les règles ont été élaborées au fil de décennies, repose sur les caractéristiques fondamentales suivantes: chaque député admissible doit pouvoir « au moins une fois par législature, faire débattre une mesure émanant d'un député à la Chambre des communes » et faire qu'elle soit soumise aux voix. Aussi, « toute affaire figurant dans l'ordre de priorités serait votable, sauf si le parrain demande qu'elle ne le soit pas ».

Avec les initiatives parlementaires, on part du principe que les projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire sont fondamentalement différents des projets de loi émanant du gouvernement. Ce principe de base a été mis en place pour protéger les initiatives parlementaires présentées par les députés contre le pouvoir des gouvernements majoritaires, y compris les pouvoirs de réprimer un projet de loi.

Les différences entre les deux sont mises en relief par les nombreuses règles adoptées par la Chambre pour refléter la distinction entre les initiatives gouvernementales et les initiatives parlementaires. Par exemple, on peut seulement modifier une motion émanant d'un député si le parrain y consent. Le vote par appel nominal pour une initiative parlementaire, comme vous le savez, se fait rangée par rangée à la Chambre, et non parti par parti. Le système de tirage a été conçu de façon à ce que les ministres et les secrétaires parlementaires ne puissent pas proposer d'initiative parlementaire, et lorsqu'un comité prend une décision qui est ensuite portée en appel, l'appel fait l'objet d'un vote secret à la Chambre des communes. La seule autre situation où cela se produit, c'est lorsque nous devons élire un Président au début de la législature.

Je vais à présent redonner la parole à Mme Malcolmson, pour qu'elle nous explique en quoi le projet de loi C-352 est très différent du projet de loi C-64.

(1315)

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

Merci, Peter.

Avant le projet de loi C-352, il y a eu son prédécesseur, le projet de loi C-219, que j'ai présenté en février 2016, à peine un mois après notre assermentation. J'ai ensuite présenté une nouvelle version du projet de loi en avril 2017, le projet de loi C-352. Ce n'est pas un gros document. Le projet de loi du gouvernement, présenté il y a 10 jours, le projet de loi C-64, est beaucoup plus gros. Voilà la première différence.

Je vais vous expliquer en quoi ces deux projets de loi ne sont ni redondants ni contradictoires, et je vous prierais de décider que mon projet de loi peut faire l'objet d'un vote.

Il y a plusieurs différences entre les deux.

Le projet de loi C-64 n'est pas une stratégie nationale. L'expression n'apparaît nulle part dans le texte de loi. Les notes d'information du gouvernement l'indiquent aussi clairement. Ce n'est pas une stratégie nationale; à l'opposé, mon projet de loi a pour objet l'élaboration d'une stratégie nationale.

La prochaine différence tient à la recommandation royale. Le projet de loi C-64 suppose une affectation de deniers publics, et, conséquemment, a obtenu une recommandation royale. Ce n'est pas le cas de mon projet de loi.

En ce qui concerne les sanctions, le projet de loi C-64 prévoit un régime de conformité et d'application de la loi assez étendu. Il prévoit une toute nouvelle gamme de violations et de sanctions relativement à l'abandon de bâtiments. Mon projet de loi ne prévoit rien de tout cela. J'irais même jusqu'à dire que mon projet de loi rendrait plus facile d'infliger les sanctions prévues au projet de loi C-64.

Une autre différence concerne les mécanismes d'application de la loi. Dans le projet de loi C-64, il y a tout un éventail de mécanismes dont peut se servir le ministre des Transports pour faire appliquer la loi, soit des amendes. Mon projet de loi, non.

Il existe aussi un grand fossé en ce qui concerne les agents responsables de faire appliquer la loi et le système judiciaire. Le projet de loi C-64 confère différents pouvoirs aux agents d'exécution de la loi, au Tribunal d'appel des transports du Canada, au juge de paix et à la procureur générale. Il n'y a rien de tel dans le projet de loi C-352.

Dans mon projet de loi, le receveur d'épaves est la Garde côtière canadienne. C'était aussi le cas dans le projet de loi de Jean Crowder au cours de la dernière législature, un projet de loi qui était soutenu par un certain nombre de députés de l'époque. Le projet de loi du gouvernement ne suit pas la même approche. Le projet de loi C-64 prend une approche plurigouvernementale et prévoit que le receveur d'épaves demeure la responsabilité du ministre des Transports. Encore une fois, il s'agit de deux approches différentes. Il n'y a pas de redondance.

Pour ce qui est des consultations, mon projet de loi prévoit que le ministre des Transports doit consulter les intervenants et les gens de la garde côtière pour discuter de l'élaboration d'une stratégie. Cela ne fait pas partie du projet de loi C-64.

Relativement aux conventions à l'international, le projet de loi C-64, le projet de loi émanant du gouvernement, prévoit mettre en oeuvre la Convention internationale de Nairobi sur l'enlèvement des épaves. Dans mon projet de loi, le gouvernement doit d'abord évaluer les avantages d'adhérer à cette convention. À nouveau, les projets de loi sont compatibles; il n'y a pas de redondance ni d'incohérence.

Les collectivités côtières demandent depuis plus d'une décennie qu'on mette en oeuvre un programme de dépôt pour les bâtiments. Ce serait une bonne idée de reprendre le modèle pour un programme de prime à la casse de façon à aider à vider l'arriéré des bâtiments abandonnés, et c'est justement l'un des principaux éléments du projet de loi C-352. Le projet de loi est soutenu par l'Union des municipalités de la Colombie-Britannique, et d'un bout à l'autre du pays, par au moins 50 organisations côtières et autorités portuaires. Le projet de loi C-64 ne prévoit rien de tel. Je me répète, mais les deux projets de loi sont complètement différents. Le projet de loi C-64 ne légifère aucunement là-dessus.

Mon projet de loi comprend un certain nombre de mesures législatives en réaction à l'arriéré des bâtiments abandonnés, qui, selon Transports Canada, pourraient comprendre des milliers de bâtiments abandonnés. Le projet de loi C-64 ne comprend aucune mesure pour vider l'arriéré. À nouveau, les projets de loi n'entrent pas en conflit, ne sont pas incohérents, et on peut aller jusqu'à dire qu'ils sont compatibles.

Le projet de loi C-64 ne dit rien à propos de la création d'un fonds pour couvrir les frais de disposition des bâtiments qui reprend le modèle mis en oeuvre il y a 15 ans par l'État de Washington. Cela ressort très clairement des notes d'information du ministre des Transports. Le projet de loi C-64 ne prévoit rien au sujet de l'imposition de droits pour l'immatriculation des bâtiments qui entrent dans la zone pour un enlèvement d'urgence. Mon projet de loi, si.

Une autre différence tient aux amendements visant d'autres lois. Le projet de loi C-64 prévoit des amendements à d'autres lois, y compris la Loi sur la protection de la navigation, la Loi sur les océans, la Loi sur les aires marines nationales de conservation du Canada, la Loi sur la responsabilité civile de l'État et le contentieux administratif, la Loi sur les douanes et la Loi sur le Tribunal d'appel des transports du Canada. Mon projet de loi ne comprend rien dans ce sens.

(1320)



Abordons maintenant les mécanismes d'examen du projet de loi C-64. On propose de réaliser un examen le jour du cinquième anniversaire de l'entrée en vigueur du projet de loi. L'examen serait mené par le comité du Sénat, le comité de la Chambre des communes et/par un comité mixte. Dans mon projet de loi, le ministre des Transports n'a qu'à présenter un rapport au Parlement.

Les deux projets de loi divergent sur un grand nombre de points. Je n'ai pas le temps de vous les décrire un à un. J'espère simplement que cela suffira à vous convaincre que les deux projets de loi sont profondément différents. Il n'y a pas de contradiction, et ils sont vraisemblablement compatibles. Globalement, leurs objectifs sont similaires, mais la Chambre peut certainement recevoir les deux, et je crois sincèrement que le projet de loi du ministre serait avantagé par le mien.

Je vous demande fortement de rejeter et d'annuler la décision du sous-comité, et je vous implore de conclure que mon projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire sur l'abandon de bâtiments, le projet de loi C-352, peut faire l'objet d'un vote.

Sur ce, je cède à nouveau la parole à mon collègue, Peter Julian.

M. Peter Julian:

Merci beaucoup, madame Malcolmson.

En résumé, comme nous vous l'avons expliqué, ces deux projets de loi ont des visées et des mécanismes très différents. On ne devrait donc pas pouvoir dire qu'ils portent sur une affaire déjà soumise à la Chambre, conformément aux critères applicables aux projets de loi émanant des députés.

Comme je l'ai mentionné plus tôt, je remets en question la décision du sous-comité parce qu'elle manque de cohérence avec une autre décision prise au cours de la même séance. Le sous-comité a approuvé le projet de loi C-364, émanant du député de Terrebonne à propos du financement des élections. Ce projet de loi, comme le projet de loi C-33 et le projet de loi C-50, modifie la Loi électorale. Tous ces projets de loi ont un impact sur les règles de financement des élections. Si le simple fait d'avoir le même objet que le projet de loi C-64 rend le projet de loi C-352 non votable, alors pourquoi le projet de loi C-364 est-il votable alors qu'il a le même objet que le projet de loi C-33 et le projet de loi C-50?

Dans le cas qui nous occupe, le projet de loi C-352 a été déposé en premier. Il a été déposé le 13 avril de l'année en cours, et il a été inscrit dans l'ordre de priorité des affaires émanant des députés le 25 octobre de cette année. Le projet de loi C-64 a été présenté à la Chambre le 30 octobre, près d'une semaine après que le projet de loi C-352 a été inscrit à l'ordre de priorité. Voilà pourquoi je dis que le gouvernement se sert des règles de procédure pour faire officieusement ce qu'il ne peut pas faire officiellement. Afin de protéger l'intention du Parlement, les prérogatives du Parlement et les droits des députés de voter sur une initiative parlementaire, vous devriez annuler la décision du sous-comité et conclure que le projet de loi C-352 est votable.

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

Merci, monsieur le président, de votre attention, et merci également au Comité.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je vais accorder environ trois minutes à chaque parti pour poser des questions ou émettre des commentaires. Nous allons commencer avec Mme Tassi.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Je veux vous remercier d'être venus ici aujourd'hui. Je tiens à vous remercier de la passion que vous exprimez pour cette initiative et du travail que vous avez accompli.

En ma qualité de présidente du sous-comité, j'aimerais seulement expliquer notre décision. Je crois qu'il y avait environ 15 affaires émanant des députés sur la liste ce jour-là, et notre comité s'est essentiellement fié aux commentaires émis par notre analyste.

Avons-nous les commentaires de l'analyste? Pouvons-nous les lire? Parmi tous les projets de loi qui ont été présentés, l'analyste a émis des commentaires sur celui-là seulement, et nous avons essentiellement pris la décision à la lumière de ces commentaires. Vous allez pouvoir les entendre dans une minute, ainsi que les interventions de nos collègues qui siégeaient au comité.

(1325)

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

Monsieur le président, si vous me permettez d'intervenir, nous avons déjà lu les bleus, et je comprends la logique. Je préférerais grandement que les députés utilisent le temps pour poser des questions.

M. Scott Simms:

La procédure est de moindre importance ici; c'est surtout le sujet abordé lui-même qui est en question. Je suis né et j'ai grandi sur la côte Est, et c'est quelque chose qui nous pose beaucoup de problèmes. J'ai un énorme respect pour l'objectif principal de votre projet de loi, en passant.

J'ai tout de même une question, à propos de la stratégie nationale. Vous dites que le projet de loi C-64 ne mentionne pas explicitement qu'il s'agit d'une stratégie nationale, c'est bien ça? Ne croyez-vous pas que ça l'est, intrinsèquement? En d'autres mots, en quoi le projet de loi C-64 n'est-il pas une stratégie nationale?

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

Les mots « stratégie nationale » ne sont pas mentionnés une seule fois dans le projet de loi. Ils n'y apparaissent pas, mais ils apparaissent dans le mien. Les notes d'information du ministre décrivent ce que le gouvernement adopte comme stratégie nationale, et c'est mentionné dans l'un des 15 points que le gouvernement étudie.

Le gouvernement lui-même ne décrit pas le projet de loi C-64 comme sa stratégie nationale. Mon projet de loi invite le gouvernement à adopter une stratégie nationale. Je pourrais sans doute dire que le ministre m'a si bien écoutée au cours de la dernière année et demie que cela pourrait bien être une de ses actions. Il a simplement passé par-dessus cette partie.

M. Scott Simms:

Eh bien, si c'est le cas, c'est une bonne chose pour vous; mais de nouveau, je ne vois pas comment le projet de loi C-64 échoue en tant que stratégie nationale, même s'il ne dit pas ces mots de façon explicite. Nous avons peut-être un différend sur cette question.

Il y a deux autres points très intéressants. Votre initiative, votre projet de loi, demande une analyse de la Convention de Nairobi, que j'ai lue, tandis que le projet de loi C-64 prévoit son acceptation entière. Je pense que c'est un point valide. Vous avez parlé des mesures prises par l'État de Washington et des contributions qui s'y trouvent, mais le gouvernement et le secteur privé contribuent également. Est-ce exact?

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

Dans le modèle de Washington, il y a des droits associés à l'immatriculation des bâtiments qui créent une réserve de fonds permettant d'intervenir en situation d'urgence. De plus, une partie du Superfund fédéral américain consacrée à gérer des sites toxiques a aussi été intégrée à ce modèle.

M. Scott Simms:

Très bien. Voilà pour la partie gouvernementale.

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

C'en est une partie, mais, de nouveau, mon projet de loi exige du gouvernement qu'il parle avec les intervenants, les provinces et les territoires et qu'il utilise, en partie, le modèle du pollueur-payeur; mais ensuite, qu'il règle aussi la question de l'immatriculation des bâtiments pour que vous puissiez verser l'argent des utilisateurs dans le fonds et retracer le propriétaire responsable. Le projet de loi du ministre ne fait aucune de ces choses.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord, c'était ma question. Ce système fondamental qui distingue le modèle de l'État de Washington n'est pas saisi dans le projet de loi C-64, à votre avis.

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

C'est exact.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord, c'est tout. Merci.

Le président:

M. Reid est le prochain.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Merci.

Sheila, si on suppose que votre projet de loi sera réputé votable, quand pourra-t-il faire l'objet d'un débat?

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

Le 6 décembre est la première heure du débat.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

Selon ce que je comprends du fonctionnement des règles, si votre affaire est réputée votable — corrigez-moi si je me trompe, en passant, mais je crois que c'est exact — et que le gouvernement déplace ensuite son projet de loi en tête de l'ordre du jour, le vôtre sera supprimé de l'ordre du jour parce qu'on aura conclu qu'il porte sur le même sujet, et vous n'aurez pas d'autre occasion de présenter une autre affaire.

Un scénario évident qui me vient à l'esprit, c'est que le gouvernement pourrait, d'ici là, simplement déplacer le début du débat sur son projet de loi. Cela annoncerait la fin de votre projet de loi, et vous n'auriez aucune chance de retourner et de préparer une autre motion, tandis que si votre motion est réputée comme ne pouvant faire l'objet d'un vote, vous avez l'occasion de préparer une autre initiative parlementaire.

Ai-je bien compris cela? Je devrais probablement poser la question à Peter plutôt qu'à Sheila, mais je voulais simplement demander si j'avais bien compris.

M. Peter Julian:

Vous avez raison par rapport au résultat, mais moins par rapport à la cause. Si le présent Comité choisissait de maintenir la décision du Sous-comité et de désigner cette affaire comme ne pouvant faire l'objet d'un vote, l'appel serait déposé à la Chambre des communes, et c'est là que se fait le scrutin secret. Chaque député a le droit, au moyen d'un scrutin secret, de voter pour que le projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire puisse faire l'objet d'un vote. Si le vote était ensuite perdu à la Chambre des communes, Mme Malcolmson ne serait pas en mesure de remplacer son projet de loi.

Par suite de cette décision, le fait ou non de faire appel à la Chambre des communes détermine la capacité ou non de déposer un projet de loi de remplacement.

(1330)

M. Scott Reid:

Je dois poser la question. Vous êtes consciente de cela; vous vous exposez au risque de vous retrouver sans aucune motion. Je présume que c'est un risque que vous êtes prête à prendre ou vous ne seriez pas ici, mais je tenais simplement à poser la question ouvertement.

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

C'est quelque chose sur quoi j'ai travaillé en tant que représentante des administrations locales pendant 10 ans avant de me présenter aux élections. C'est une chose pour laquelle j'ai appuyé Jean Crowder, lorsqu'elle a proposé, dans la même veine, son propre projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire, au cours de la législature précédente. C'était un élément important de la campagne électorale dans ma collectivité, et mon équipe a travaillé pendant presque deux ans pour nous amener vers le sujet de ce débat.

Si nous perdons cet appel — et aussi le vote par scrutin secret à la Chambre des communes — j'aurai toujours la capacité de tenir un débat d'une heure sur une motion ne pouvant faire l'objet d'un vote. Je suis aussi rassurée par le fait que le ministre a entendu l'appel sur les deux côtes et qu'il y a beaucoup de choses dans le projet de loi du ministre qui nous feraient aller de l'avant.

L'intérêt que le ministre porte à l'imposition de sanctions et à la criminalisation de l'abandon ressemble beaucoup à celui de votre ancien collègue, John Weston, qui a déposé son propre projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire dans les derniers jours de la législature précédente. La criminalisation du problème n'est pas quelque chose que j'ai déjà entendu les collectivités côtières demander; toutefois, notre collectivité voit que nous avons eu une incidence.

Il est encore concevable que je présente, sans préavis, un autre projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire, mais c'est certainement la question qui attire le plus l'attention de ma collectivité, et j'aimerais contribuer à remédier à l'incapacité du gouvernement fédéral d'agir, et ce, depuis plus de 15 ans.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. Je voulais poser cette question juste pour être sûr. Vous avez fourni une réponse très détaillée, mais j'ai eu l'impression que je devais poser la question, juste au cas où vous n'y auriez pas réfléchi aussi bien que ce qui s'est avéré. Merci de votre réponse.

Une dernière chose. Puisque j'ai une circonscription enclavée, ce n'est pas un sujet particulièrement important pour mes électeurs, mais je me préoccupe beaucoup de la façon dont nous traitons des affaires émanant des députés. Je veux m'assurer que nous prenons bien soin de préserver leur intégrité dans l'avenir et que nous ne voyons pas émerger, de la part du gouvernement, que ce soit le gouvernement actuel ou un gouvernement futur dont je pourrais faire partie, des moyens astucieux d'étouffer les affaires émanant des députés. Je n'aimais pas quand ce genre de chose se produisait quand mon parti était au gouvernement, et je n'aime pas cela maintenant. Je veux poser cette question.

De nouveau, ma question s'adresse à vous, Sheila, mais peut-être encore plus à Peter: avez-vous des recommandations à suggérer — vous pourriez les fournir maintenant ou plus tard — en ce qui concerne les règles gouvernant les affaires émanant des députés pour l'avenir? Celles que nous avons maintenant datent d'il y a 15 ans. Il serait peut-être temps de les modifier pour qu'on s'assure que les motions des députés dans des situations parallèles soient mieux protégées.

M. Peter Julian:

Merci de poser la question.

Je sais que vous avez défendu très fermement le droit des députés de proposer des projets de loi.

Je pense qu'il y a ici une certaine échappatoire. Cet article visait à ce qu'on s'assure que les députés n'essaient pas de revenir sur un projet de loi émanant du gouvernement. L'échappatoire qui est créée, c'est que le gouvernement propose par la suite... Dans ce cas, le projet de loi de Mme Malcolmson est inscrit au Feuilleton, dans l'ordre de priorité, puis il y a soudainement un projet de loi émanant du gouvernement par rapport à celui-ci. C'est une échappatoire qui permet au gouvernement de faire par la porte arrière ce qu'il ne peut faire, en ce moment, par la porte avant. L'intention des affaires émanant des députés a toujours été de conférer une certaine intégrité et prérogative à chacun d'entre nous, en tant que députés.

L'Administration de la Chambre et les analystes sont obligés de suivre la procédure actuelle, c'est-à-dire cette échappatoire. Je pense que nous devons être plus explicites pour dire que l'intention n'était pas que le gouvernement s'immisce et essaie d'écarter un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire; plutôt, on souhaitait que le député ne se prévale pas d'un projet de loi émanant du gouvernement. L'intention était de garder ces deux éléments distincts.

En ce moment, c'est une sorte d'échappatoire. Nous avons maintenant vu quels problèmes peuvent en découler. Une décision favorable pour qu'on renverse aujourd'hui la décision du Sous-comité enverrait un bon signal au gouvernement. Au final, nous devons peut-être apporter quelques modifications au Règlement afin que cela soit encore plus explicite.

Clairement, la tendance historique au cours des dernières décennies a été de conférer plus de pouvoir et de capacité aux députés afin qu'ils soient en mesure de proposer des projets de loi pouvant faire l'objet d'un vote. Je pense que c'est dans l'intérêt de chaque Canadien.

(1335)

Le président:

D'accord.

Nous allons devoir poursuivre. Nous passons rapidement à M. Christopherson, puis je veux parler d'un élément des travaux du Comité concernant notre prochaine réunion.

Allez-y, monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous voulez dire que j'ai le même temps maintenant?

Le président:

Oui.

M. David Christopherson:

Bien. Merci beaucoup.

Chers collègues, dans la mesure du possible, je ne vois pas cela en tant que collègue du NPD, mais j'essaie beaucoup de le voir comme M. Reid le voit: ce pourrait être n'importe qui, et il s'agit des droits des députés.

J'ai passé 13 ans à Queen's Park, dans la plus grande province de la Confédération. Nous n'avions pas cela. Lorsque je suis arrivé ici et que j'ai pris connaissance de cette idée des motions votables, je me suis dit: « Quoi? Vous voulez dire que quelqu'un d'autre peut décider si ce que je veux faire fera l'objet d'un vote? » En grande partie, c'est la raison pour laquelle vous venez ici: c'est pour vous assurer que vous allez avoir une incidence.

Le concept entier me renverse complètement, et, pendant les 14 ans ou presque que j'ai été ici, c'est la première fois qu'il fait surface, et qu'on dit à un député que celui-ci ne peut proposer son projet de loi.

Je demande à mes collègues de prendre du recul et d'examiner la chose sous cet angle-là, et non pas nécessairement comme un député du gouvernement ou de l'opposition. La procédure d'appel existe pour une raison. M. Julian s'est donné beaucoup de mal pour nous rappeler que personne, pas même le gouvernement, ne devrait être en mesure de passer par la porte arrière lorsqu'il n'a pas le droit de passer par la porte avant. C'est un principe fondamental qui régit la façon dont nous faisons nos affaires ici.

Je ne blâme pas les analystes. Ils ont fait leur travail. Maintenant, nous avons l'occasion de faire le nôtre. Nous ne sommes liés par aucune de ces choses. C'est un processus d'appel pour une raison, et, si nous prenons cette décision aujourd'hui, Mme Malcolmson obtiendra ses droits complets. Si nous ne le faisons pas, cela ira à la Chambre, ou, à tout le moins, elle a cette option, et la Chambre pourrait dire qu'elle va accorder à Mme Malcolmson ses droits. Ce n'est pas parce que les analystes ont fait leur travail que cela s'achève.

Je presse mes collègues autant que possible de ne pas retourner sur le sale chemin qui consiste à décider quelles questions méritent d'être débattues et de faire l'objet d'un vote. Chacun d'entre nous devrait avoir ce droit souverain. Il reste de rares droits souverains aux députés dans ce système. À mon avis, c'en est un pour lequel nous devons, collectivement, travailler fort en vue de le préserver.

Pour compléter mes commentaires, monsieur Julian, je précise qu'un projet de loi comparable a été présenté au Sous-comité, le projet de loi C-364, du député de Terrebonne, et on a apparemment pris la bonne décision à son sujet. Si vous tenez compte de la situation et appliquez ce raisonnement, la conclusion devrait être différente, soit d'autoriser que le projet de loi fasse l'objet d'un vote.

Je demande à M. Julian d'expliquer rapidement son argument selon son point de vue.

M. Peter Julian:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Christopherson.

Comme je l'ai mentionné dans l'exposé, le projet de loi C-364 effleure le même sujet, c'est-à-dire la modification de la Loi électorale, que les projets de loi C-50 et C-33, et il y a donc une certaine incohérence entre deux décisions sur des projets de loi qui ont des sujets semblables à ceux des projets de loi émanant du gouvernement, mais qui sont traités de façon différente.

Comme je l'ai dit plus tôt — et je ne peux insister assez là-dessus —, l'intention sous-tendant le fait de donner une plus grande portée aux affaires émanant des députés, comme vient de le dire de façon éloquente M. Christopherson, a toujours été d'élargir la portée pour chacun d'entre nous, en tant que députés. Cela n'a rien à voir avec le parti auquel nous sommes affiliés. Cela a beaucoup plus à voir avec nos droits en tant que députés.

Le présent comité a toujours défendu les prérogatives des députés. Vous avez à cet égard un rôle très important à jouer. À mon avis, c'est une circonstance clé, parce qu'il y a, en quelque sorte, une échappatoire, et c'est pourquoi on vous demande d'entendre cet appel et de prendre ce qui serait la bonne décision, c'est-à-dire de permettre que le projet de loi C-352 soit soumis aux voix, parce qu'il satisferait à l'ensemble des critères. Il respecte aussi assurément l'intention de notre évolution au chapitre des projets de loi de députés, et vous êtes ceux qui peuvent se porter à la défense des projets de loi des députés, avec l'appel que Mme Malcolmson vous a présenté.

(1340)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup aux témoins.

Nous allons nous pencher sur cette question.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, quand prenons-nous la décision?

Le président:

C'est ma question. Nous pourrions le faire maintenant ou durant notre première réunion, au retour. Les travaux du Comité sont la première chose à l'ordre du jour.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

M. Scott Reid:

Il me semblerait raisonnable de demander ce qui est préférable selon son point de vue.

Le président:

Que préférez-vous?

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

Je vous remercie de poser la question, et par votre entremise, monsieur le président, je serais très reconnaissante d'obtenir une décision rapide. Mon projet de loi sera bientôt à l'étude. Ma plage horaire pour le débat est le 6 décembre. Le temps passe très vite. Particulièrement, si je dois faire d'autres plans et élaborer le projet de loi d'un autre député, je serais très reconnaissante de pouvoir profiter de la semaine d'intersession pour faire ce travail.

M. David Christopherson:

Si les députés souhaitent avoir un peu de temps pour réfléchir à la direction qu'ils prendront, je préférerais recevoir une réponse favorable dans quelques jours plutôt qu'une réponse défavorable aujourd'hui.

M. Scott Reid:

Puisque nous avons une semaine de relâche, c'est une période importante.

M. David Christopherson:

Oh, cela cause-t-il un si grand problème? Je pose la question... J'imagine que c'est Sheila.

Très bien. On dirait que cela vient maintenant. D'accord.

Le président:

Voulez-vous le faire en public?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

Le président:

Le rapport du Sous-comité devrait-il être adopté? Nous aurons un vote par appel nominal.

M. David Christopherson:

Nous avons dépassé le temps prévu, mais la séance ne sera pas vraiment levée jusqu'à ce que la majorité d'entre nous ait dit qu'elle l'est. Ai-je le temps de formuler quelques commentaires?

Ce n'est pas bon signe.

Le président:

Très bien. Puis-je demander le vote?

Le rapport du Sous-comité devrait-il être adopté?

(La motion est adoptée par 5 voix contre 3. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

M. Scott Reid:

Qu'étiez-vous en train de dire, monsieur le président? Je n'ai pas pu vous entendre. Je n'ai pas pu vous entendre parce qu'il y avait du bruit.

Le président:

La décision du Sous-comité a été confirmée.

J'ai une autre chose pour le Comité. Durant la deuxième semaine à notre retour, les travaux du mardi sont déjà prévus, mais pas ceux du jeudi. Le jeudi est une meilleure journée pour que votre députée présente le rapport sur les bébés, sur les enfants. Pourriez-vous le faire le jeudi plutôt que le mardi, parce qu'elle ne peut pas le mardi? Cela vous va?

C'est d'accord. Nous pourrions parachever le rapport à ce moment-là. Il est possible que cela ne prenne qu'une heure.

Après la réunion du mardi, je sais que nous allons déterminer les témoins futurs pour notre rapport sur le commissaire chargé d'organiser les débats. Ce n'est qu'une suggestion de ma part. Une suggestion pour les témoins faite par le ministre, c'était de recevoir les partis politiques. Au cours de la deuxième heure, jeudi, pour permettre au greffier d'inviter des témoins en si peu de temps avant la réunion du mardi, nous demanderions aux partis de comparaître en tant que témoins à la commission sur les débats.

Qu'est-ce que vous en pensez?

M. Davis Christopherson: De quel jour parlons-nous?

Le président: Du jeudi, au cours de la deuxième heure. La première heure serait réservée au rapport avec votre remplaçante.

(1345)

M. David Christopherson:

Celui-là serait le... oui, d'accord.

Le président:

Cela vous va?

Mon autre question est plus délicate. Elle concerne les témoins pour les partis. Je présume que nous aurions cinq partis, ou combien en aurions-nous?

Les conservateurs, les libéraux, le NPD, le Bloc et le Parti vert sont ceux qui seraient intéressés, à mon avis, mais la décision revient au Comité.

M. David Christopherson:

Cela concerne-t-il la commission sur les débats?

Le président:

Oui.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est drôle de vous l'entendre dire, parce que je pensais à quelque chose de complètement différent. Je pensais que, la première chose que nous ferions, ce serait de demander à notre analyste d'effectuer une analyse de l'environnement, d'examiner d'autres démocraties matures qui ont créé une telle entité et de savoir quelle était leur réflexion et ce qu'elles avaient découvert, juste pour nous aider à réinventer la roue.

Bien franchement, j'aimerais également entendre des experts parlementaires, pas seulement les partis nous expliquer ce qu'ils veulent.

Le président:

Non. Nous allons entendre le témoignage de toute une foule de témoins, parce que vous déposez votre liste de témoins.

M. David Christopherson:

Oh, c'est simplement pour la partie d'ouverture.

Le président:

Oui.

M. David Christopherson:

J'avais mal compris. Je m'en excuse.

Le président:

Oui. C'est juste parce qu'il s'agit d'une contrainte de temps. C'est pour que la première réunion puisse commencer.

M. David Christopherson:

Cela me convient.

Le président:

Combien y a-t-il de partis? Y a-t-il quelqu'un qui s'oppose à ce que les cinq partis soient présents?

M. David Christopherson:

Combien y a-t-il de partis à la Chambre, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Y a-t-il des suggestions par rapport au nombre de partis qui viendraient?

M. David Christopherson:

Évidemment, il y aurait...

Le président:

Vous savez combien voudraient venir.

M. David Christopherson:

... les trois, puis il y aurait Mme May pour le Parti vert. Je pense qu'il y aurait un débat par rapport au fait de savoir s'il y a ou non un autre parti indépendant ou si elle représente les indépendants.

Dans le modèle que nous avons utilisé pour l'examen parlementaire précédent du directeur général des élections, nous avions une formule. Pouvez-vous vous la rappeler? Peu importe ce qu'elle était, elle a été jugée juste par tout le monde.

Allez-y, Andre.

M. Andre Barnes (attaché de recherche auprès du comité):

Corrigez-moi si je me trompe, mais je crois que l'étude portait sur le Bureau de régie interne et que cette partie de la motion visait la participation d'un membre indépendant par rotation. Cela devait être décidé entre les indépendants qui devaient se présenter pour chaque réunion.

Le président:

Ce dont je parle, c'est seulement d'un témoin pour une réunion.

M. David Christopherson:

Je le sais, mais cela compte beaucoup pour ces personnes, et nous devons être justes.

M. Scott Reid:

En tant que témoins, vous demandez si nous devrions avoir un témoin de chacun des trois partis qui ont qualité de parti, ainsi que du Parti vert et du Bloc. Personnellement, j'acquiescerais à cela.

Le président:

Tout le monde est d'accord?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: Merci beaucoup d'avoir réglé beaucoup de choses.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on November 09, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.