header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-06-08 PROC 64

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning, everyone. Welcome to the 64th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. The first hour of the meeting will be televised.

Today we are continuing our study of the Chief Electoral Officer’s report entitled “An Electoral Framework for the 21st Century: Recommendations from the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada Following the 42nd General Election”, with a specific focus on recommendations B12, publishing false statements to affect election results, and B27, foreigners inducing electors to vote or refrain from voting. If people want to raise other items with the commissioner while we have him here, or if he wants to raise items, I'm sure that's fine.

In order to assist us in our deliberations, we are joined today by Yves Côté, the Commissioner of Canada Elections, and Marc Chénier, general counsel and senior director of the Office of the Commissioner of Canada Elections.

Welcome, and thank you for coming here. This will be very helpful.

The commissioner has distributed his remarks to all of you, so you have them in writing.

I will now turn the floor over to the commissioner for his opening statement. [Translation]

Mr. Yves Côté (Commissioner of Canada Elections, Office of the Commissioner of Canada Elections):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I would like to thank the committee for its invitation to appear today to assist with your examination of the Chief Electoral Officer's report on the last general election.

As you said, I am joined by Marc Chénier, general counsel for our group and senior director of legal services in our office.

Before I turn to the issues of interest that you mentioned a few minutes ago, Mr. Chair, I would mention that there are several additional recommendations contained in the CEO's report on which the committee has not yet reported that have a direct bearing on the mandate of my office.[English]

There are three: the power to apply to a court to compel testimony, the authority for the commissioner to lay charges, and the ability for contract investigators within our office to obtain production orders under the Criminal Code. These recommendations are extremely important for our office, and I dearly hope the committee will support them.

Let me now turn to the two specific issues that were identified as being of interest to the committee. They have to do with the publication of false statements about the personal conduct or character of a candidate and the prohibition on foreigners inducing electors to vote or refrain from voting. Both of these sections raise, although admittedly in different ways, issues related to fundamental democratic values. Chief among them is freedom of expression, which, as the Supreme Court has repeatedly stated, is probably at its highest in the electoral and democratic context. It is therefore essential for Parliament to proceed extremely carefully in this area.[Translation]

The objective of any amendment should be clearly identified: what is it that should be prohibited or regulated, and why? And—this is extremely important—the means chosen to achieve this objective should be as minimally intrusive as possible. Otherwise there will be a risk that the courts will interfere and find that you as members of Parliament have overreached.

The vague and general language in these provisions also creates false expectations and a perception that these provisions are not enforced as they should be. As a result, it can lead to an erosion of Canadians' trust in our electoral system.[English]

Recommendation B12 is with regard to false statements. Section 91 of the act is one example of where this problem exists. The language contained in the provision is extremely broad, and does not provide an adequate degree of clarity as to the type of false statements that are prohibited. While the public believes it is applicable to a wide variety of scenarios, from an enforcement standpoint, the circumstances in which it can be applied are actually quite limited. The reason for this is that historically, the courts have set a very high standard on the concept of falsehood. For example, judges have ruled that in order for a false statement to be captured by provisions of this nature, it must falsely impute a high degree of “moral turpitude”, to use the expression they have used, or criminality.

In addition, as it stands now, only false statements about candidates or prospective candidates are caught by section 91. As the role of political parties and party leaders has grown considerably since the section was adopted in 1908—more than 100 years ago—it may be time to consider whether the scope of the provision should be broadened to include false statements made with respect to these other key players.

(1110)

[Translation]

A final point.

At present, when a violation of section 91 occurs and a conviction is entered, the appropriate sentence is imposed on the accused. Nothing else follows. An issue for consideration is whether other consequences should flow from a contravention of the provision. For example, should a violation of section 91 be identified as an illegal act or corrupt practice? This could provide a basis for challenging the results of an election, in cases where the false statements may have seriously impacted on the results. This is currently the case for a contravention of section 92, which prohibits the making of a false statement about the withdrawal of a candidate.

Failing such changes to section 91, I think this section should probably be repealed.

Whether section 91 is repealed or not, I would suggest that amendments to paragraph 482(b) should be considered in order to clarify its intent. This is a provision of broad application that is intended to fill any gaps in the act's offence provision concerning deceitful conduct. While it makes it an offence to use “any pretence or contrivance” to induce voters to vote in a certain way, the aim could be to prohibit, for example, attempts to influence electors using means that are fundamentally opposed to our recognized democratic values or that undermine the processes laid out in our electoral legislation.[English]

The challenge in drafting such a provision, and this is a major challenge, will be to ensure that it does not capture typical forms of political expression and debate, which often include exaggeration and what is often referred to as political spin. The prohibition ultimately should not stifle debate or unduly limit political expression. Rather, it should aim to protect our democratic values, including transparency and accessibility. For example, it should target fake news in cases where the intent was clearly to confuse electors and undermine their ability to cast an informed vote.

Let me now turn to recommendation B27. The breadth of this provision related to inducement by foreigners also creates a number of enforcement challenges. As the members of this committee will likely recall—in fact, will no doubt recall—there were a number of examples of non-Canadians who, during the last campaign, expressed views or opinions, either through social media, in editorial comments, or during interviews.

We received at the office a number of complaints in relation to these types of incidents. Many believed that anyone who is not Canadian and not residing in Canada is prohibited from expressing support for a party or a candidate. Although a very literal reading of the provision could lead to that conclusion, it is hard to imagine that, in this day and age, in 2017, Parliament would want to make illegal the expression of an opinion by a foreigner; hence the need, in my view, to consider tightening and refining the wording of the provision.[Translation]

Considering the act's focus on maintaining a level playing field, the focus should probably include elements that prohibit foreigners from incurring significant expenses to oppose or promote a candidate or party. These could include, for example, incurring expenses to pay employees to work in a call centre or to organize door-to-door canvassing during a campaign.

The CEO also recommended—in recommendation C49—that it would be useful to review the wording of the provision to make it clear that it applies to “attempts to influence electors.” The use of “induce” in the English version of the act causes confusion about what is captured by the prohibition. The reason for this is that it implies that, for an offence to have been committed, the attempt to influence had to have been successful. This gives rise to an almost impossible burden of proof for the prosecution, as you can appreciate.

Finally, I wish to briefly mention one last area of potential reform regarding third parties.

In Canada, third parties are only regulated with respect to their election advertising activities.

(1115)



Provided they act independently from a candidate or party, they may incur limitless amounts of expenses when carrying out activities such as polling, voter contact services, promotional events, and so forth. They can also use whatever sources of funding, including foreign funds, to finance these non-election advertising activities.[English]

The level of third party engagement in Canada's electoral process will likely continue to grow in the years to come. For that reason, Parliament should consider whether there is a need to re-examine the third party regime with a view to maintaining a level playing field for all participants.

In conclusion, Mr. Chair, I'd like to thank the committee for its support of a number of important recommendations concerning our office. In particular, I was extremely pleased to see that the committee had agreed with a recommendation that a regime of administrative monetary penalties be adopted. This recommendation, coupled with the ability to negotiate broader terms and conditions included in compliance agreements, will allow my office the much-needed flexibility it requires to carry out its compliance and enforcement mandate more efficiently. It would also—and I think this is a very important point—facilitate the quick and efficient resolution of a number of matters in a transparent manner, eliminating the need to take some of them to court. As criminal courts across the country are dealing with the aftermath of the decision of the Supreme Court in Jordan, this is, I would submit, a highly relevant consideration.[Translation]

In closing, Mr. Chair, although I will endeavour to provide fulsome answers to your questions, I would like to remind the members of this committee that I will not be able to discuss the details of any particular matter that is or may have been the subject of a complaint to, or an investigation by my office.

I will be pleased to take your questions. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much. That was very helpful and you're totally correct: we're looking at having some penalties in the act, throughout the act possibly, that are not criminal. So that's a very good thing.

Just so you know, recommendations A33 and A34, which you mentioned at the beginning, the committee has dealt with already, but you have brought to our attention one that we hadn't noticed, C45, the ability of contract investigators to obtain production orders. While you're here, perhaps you could briefly introduce that recommendation for us, from your knowledge, and share any comments you want to make about it. We'll have the three recommendations to deal with after you've left: the two you outlined in great detail plus we might as well deal with C45 if you have any comments on it, because it is related to you. We haven't got to section C yet in our deliberations.

Mr. Yves Côté:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Recommendation C45 is what I would describe as a rather technical amendment and that's essentially why it finds itself in chapter C of the recommendations. It has to do with the fact that we have on staff at the office a certain number of contractual investigators, people who are not employees of the public service, and as the law currently stands, they are not in a position to apply for things such as production orders under the Criminal Code, because these instruments, production orders, which, for example, we use to force a bank to give us information about financial transactions, can only be applied for before a judge by public servants.

As I said, we have a number of investigators who are contractual employees, and currently they are not covered by the Criminal Code. What it would require is simply a very small amendment to make sure that contractual employees may apply for both search warrants and production orders. Search warrants are currently already covered, but when these new provisions on production orders were introduced, I think somebody forgot to make sure that contractual investigators could also have the ability to apply for them. That's why I say it's a rather technical amendment, and I don't think it should pose any significant problems.

(1120)

The Chair:

Thank you. That's very helpful.

We will start the seven-minute round—seven minutes include both the questions and the answers—with Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Thank you for your intervention, Mr. Côté.

Very quickly, this is a crude example. Today there is an election in the United Kingdom. The polls are open currently. I truly hope, although they won't win government, that the Liberal Democrats will win more seats. I've just said it publicly. If this were the other way around, would I be breaking—

Mr. Yves Côté:

You understand that I will not comment on that.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I'm sorry. What's that?

Mr. Yves Côté:

You will understand that I will not comment on that.

Mr. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

Nor will the rest of us.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Oh, okay. I was just wondering if I would be breaking the law if it were the other way around.

I guess what I'm trying to say is, if I'm making a comment about their election the way I just did, and if a British member of Parliament did the same thing to me, would it be against the law as it is now? I'm just looking for interpretation.

Mr. Yves Côté:

I don't think you would be committing an offence when we have the law as it is now.

I think that for any investigation, or any way in which this matter would be dealt with, we would look at the guarantee of freedom of expression that certainly the charter extends to everyone. Before we decided to move ahead with enforcement action, we would be quite conscious of the need to bear that in mind. That's one point that we would certainly consider.

On the other hand, I don't think you would be breaking our law if you did that—or if he did that or she did that.

Mr. Scott Simms:

All right. That's fine.

David. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

Thank you for being here. We are very pleased to hear your testimony.

My question is about investigations. If you receive a complaint about electoral fraud, for instance, how do you proceed? Where will the problems arise, specifically with regard to recommendations A33, A34, and C45 and the commissioner's decisions?

Mr. Yves Côté:

If we receive a complaint about electoral fraud, we assume it is something major and relatively big. We begin with a preliminary review of the allegations and facts brought to our attention. If we confirm that there are sufficient grounds to proceed and launch an investigation, we would open a formal investigation and would then talk to the people we believe might have been involved.

The reason for recommendation A33 is that, in certain circumstances—and I have experienced this in the past four or five years since I have been in my position—we ask persons to appear because we strongly suspect and, in some cases, know with certainty that they are aware of certain things and have information. For their own reasons, they refuse to cooperate. They say they do not want to tell us anything.

You as members of Parliament are in a position to properly assess what I am going to say. In politics, loyalty to the party and the team is often considered a fundamental value. For these people, it is very difficult to cooperate and give information that could help us move forward with our investigation.

If, for example, after contacting all the individuals to whom we wanted to ask questions, no one wanted to cooperate, a provision such as the one suggested in recommendation A33 could be useful. We could go before a judge, an independent party, and explain what is going on, what the allegations are, how serious they are, and the fact that, unfortunately, we cannot convince anyone to talk. We would then ask the judge to issue an order compelling a particular person to talk to us.

There would of course be guarantees attached to this process if the judge agreed to issue the order. To begin, it would be clear that nothing said by the person compelled to speak to us could be used against them. The person would have the right to legal representation. The meeting would be private and not public.

It should be noted that such guarantees do not mean that we would use this power left and right to conduct investigations into all kinds of minor matters. It would be for circumstances that could seriously affect public confidence in the electoral system. Citizens need to be reassured that an investigation was conducted in order to obtain the information we need to move on to the next steps.

That is my opinion on recommendation A33. In five or six provinces in Canada, the commissioner or person in an equivalent position currently has this power. I am including officials from the office of the chief electoral officer of Quebec.

This is already the case federally since the head of the competition bureau has this power and may, under certain circumstances, ask a Federal Court judge to issue an order to compel someone to testify.

This is the main point I wanted to make with regard to recommendation A33.

(1125)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

At a practical level, your office is separate from that of the CEO. You have changed buildings and you have less contact with the CEO.

What are the real effects of this change?

Mr. Yves Côté:

As you said earlier, since Bill C-23 was passed, we have been an entity within the office of the director of public prosecutions. Officially and legally, we have been removed from the CEO's organization.

In my opinion, things are going quite well on the whole. They are going very well in fact. For the CEO and for us, however, it is difficult for technical reasons to share information more quickly, since we are now officially part of two different government institutions. Certain rules apply, which makes things a little more difficult.

That said, you probably know that the government has introduced Bill C-33 and that, if it is passed in its current form, it would return us to the CEO's office.

I would also note, importantly, that since we arrived at the office of the director of public prosecutions, this office has provide exemplary service and support in all respects, as was the case when we were part of Elections Canada.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you very much. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thank you.

Mr. Commissioner, thanks for being here. I have a couple of questions for you today.

First, in regard to recommendation B27, which deals with section 331 of the Canada Elections Act, that prohibits anyone who doesn't reside in Canada or who is not a Canadian citizen or permanent resident from inducing electors—this is actually taken right from it—“to vote or refrain from voting or vote or refrain from voting for a particular candidate”. The recommendation states that you receive many complaints under this section, but indicates that overly broad wording leads to difficulty in the rule being enforced.

If many people are filing complaints, then there clearly must be some significant issues here, some real issues. I always think of the saying, where there's smoke there's fire. Can you give us an idea of how many complaints you typically receive, particularly with those last couple of elections?

Also, can you provide some suggestions on how to strengthen that section that will give you the ability to better ensure the integrity of our voting system?

Mr. Yves Côté:

Mr. Chair, the question as put mentioned that usually where there's smoke there's fire. I have to say that sometimes where there's smoke there's only smoke. I say this because, when you look at section 331, as I said in my opening remarks, you can think that it applies to all kinds of various things.

One thing brought to our attention a number of times in the course of the last general election were the comments or editorials in the media, especially in the U.S. but also sometimes outside the U.S., and also pieces published in national Canadian newspapers but authored by non-Canadians residing outside of Canada. Many people thought this was objectionable and should not happen.

In my point of view, I don't think the intent of section 331, which was adopted, by the way, as I said, a long time ago, was to capture this kind of thing.

(1130)

Mr. Blake Richards:

Sorry, I hate to interrupt you, but I have a limited amount of time.

What I was trying to get a sense of is the number of complaints you receive. You've indicated that you see some of those as smoke only being smoke, but there are likely to be some where fire is in existence. I'm trying to get a sense of how many complaints you typically receive. Maybe you could give me an idea of the numbers or percentages that you think would be legitimate complaints and, I guess, how we could look at strengthening those sections.

Mr. Yves Côté:

The numbers we have now suggest we had 14 complaints in the course of the last general election having to do with possible infringements of section 331. A number of those were disposed of fairly quickly. I made reference to that in my last annual report. They had to to with a national political party doing business with somebody from outside the country, allegedly trying to get some strategic advice in terms of how a campaign should be run. We took the position publicly, as I said in my report, to the effect that this was not something caught by section 331.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Let me move to the other question that I had for you.

When you were at the Senate legal and constitutional affairs committee in April, you indicated that you had a number of complaints about third parties. I don't know if we're talking about the same subject matter that you just indicated here or not, but I'm wondering if you can indicate whether that's become an issue, that third parties are so significantly involved there may be unfair electoral outcomes as a result.

You also stated today, and I believe at the Senate committee as well, that Parliament should consider whether there is a need to re-examine the third party regime with a view to maintaining a level playing field for all participants. You also have indicated that, when third parties are able to receive foreign funding and use that foreign funding during the election period, provided they receive the funds prior to six months before the election is called, it means that, really, third parties can use unlimited foreign funding and there's really no restriction on the amounts they can use, outside of election advertising. You said today that you believe we should look at the other expenses, like polling, voter contact services, promotional events, and these types of things.

I wonder if you could expand on that and give us an idea of any other suggestions you have that we could use to strengthen the third party financing regime to ensure that there is that level playing field you're talking about, that it is maintained in relation to foreign funding, and specifically fleshing out this idea of the other types of expenditures that are completely unlimited at this point. Do you think we need to go beyond that six-month period, so there can't just be someone at six months and a day, especially with a fixed election date, which obviously drops a bunch of money in and is able to significantly influence a Canadian election?

Mr. Yves Côté:

Mr. Chair, I would start by quoting a judge of the Supreme Court of Canada in the Harper decision, going back to 2004, and that was Mr. Justice Bastarache writing for the majority. What he said was this: “For spending limits to be fully effective, they must apply to all possible election expenses...”. The regime that we have for third parties was passed more than 15 years ago, and yet we very well know it only applies to what is referred to as “election advertising” as defined in the act. That is pretty narrow and pretty limited, and that is the production, if you will, of advertising material and the purchase of the means necessary to transmit such materials. All kinds of other things are simply not covered at this point in time.

As I said at the Senate committee, we have received a fairly significant number of complaints, way more than we had for the previous general election. People complained that third parties in this last election did all kinds of things that had, they allege, an impact on the electoral results, and that this was not fair. What I said at the Senate committee, and what I said this morning here, is that I think that 15 or 17 years after the regime was adopted, the time has come for Parliament and for you, members of Parliament, to think about this. If we really have in mind to maintain a level playing field, should more be done with a view to addressing the role that third parties have played and, I would assume, are probably likely to play in the next general election? To me, the question as to whether or not we still have a level playing field is really an open question, and I would urge you to consider that very, very carefully.

(1135)

The Chair:

Thank you, Commissioner.

We'll now go to Mr. Stewart. Welcome to the committee, Mr. Stewart.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart (Burnaby South, NDP):

Thank you very much for having me today.

Thank you for the testimony.

I had a question about the foreign influence and how we regulate that. I was speaking with an Internet advertising firm, and they said they have an ability to do something called geofencing, which is taking a geographic area and buying all the social media and all the online ad presence in one particular geographic area, for example, an electoral district. That's very useful for us, because we know during our election that perhaps we could spend some of our advertising saturating our own local area with election pledges and those types of things.

However, my concern is that this technique can also be used by non-Canadians. We just had an election in British Columbia, which was very close. The balance of power hangs on one seat. You could see somebody seeing that coming and deciding to buy all the social media and all the online presence within that one particular electoral district and try to push it toward one party or another.

Say, a Chinese company decides they want to do that, and they flood this particular electoral district with hundreds of thousands of dollars of online advertising. What is the recourse under the current law? Obviously that's foreign money coming into our electoral system, but because it's through an online presence, how would you approach laying charges or even investigating that situation?

Mr. Yves Côté:

As you said, this would raise very complicated and very difficult issues. For the purpose of simplicity, I will assume there has been no co-operation with a Canadian party or player, so we have a Chinese company on its own doing that. First, it becomes very difficult to investigate, as you suggested. Second, even assuming you could get the information you needed to proceed with a charge, I would think the only thing you could contemplate doing, based on the wording of the legislation as it is now, would be essentially to lay a charge in Canada. If the company has some presence in Canada now or at some point in time, you could take them to court and perhaps do something with respect to their assets if they were convicted. However, if they operate only outside of Canada—in China, in the example you use—it is extremely difficult to enforce the legislation in circumstances like this.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Say, it's an online newspaper that has column ads, and that's what they're buying. Could you change legislation so that you actually go after the website on which these are hosted, which would be hosted within Canada?

Mr. Yves Côté:

Assuming there is this real Canadian connection in the example you gave, depending on the facts of the case, you could possibly investigate and lay charges against the Canadian outfit or enterprise that did that on the basis that they became party to the offence committed by the Chinese company, again, using your example. So assuming you could show that they counselled, abetted the commission of the offence, then technically, legally, there are those steps that could be taken.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Does the act as it stands facilitate that? We've just had all kinds of testimony in the United States about how Russia is apparently influencing their elections. We've heard this has now spread to the U.K. and to the Brexit referendum. Most of that would be through online spending. Some of it would be through other means, like hacking and those types of things, but a lot of it could be through advertising.

Do you think improvements could be made in the act to help you stop what I think would be a new threat coming in the coming years?

(1140)

Mr. Yves Côté:

Yes, there are improvements that could be brought to the legislation to make it easier to do that. At the same time, when you keep in mind that very often for us Canadians the companies or the Internet players involved, if you will, are outside Canada, whether it be Google or Facebook, all kinds of issues also arise in trying to get to these companies in a legal way to make them co-operate or cease what they have been doing.

On that point, Mr. Chair, I would mention that in Germany very recently, in the last couple of months, the government has taken steps to implement a system that would subject companies like Facebook and Google to pay huge fines—and I think the maximum is 45 million euros—if they fail, when required to do so, to take fake news off their networks. That's one way the Germans have apparently found to address the issue. It is a very complicated issue.

You may know that this morning the Senate committee, before which Marc and I appeared a few months ago, just issued its report, which I only could glance at because it only came out a few minutes before we came here. They did a lot of thinking around those issues, and they formulated some recommendations that you may find useful and interesting.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Okay, thank you.

I have another question about false statements. Could you perhaps give us examples of false statements? Could you, say, give an actual statement that was claimed to be false but that you did not consider false and did not investigate, and an example of a statement that was considered false? Do you have those at hand?

Mr. Yves Côté:

I have a couple of examples that I can share with the committee.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

That would be great.

Mr. Yves Côté:

One is a case going back to the 2000 general election involving somebody by the name of Shannon Jones. In the course of an electoral campaign, she stated that the outgoing MP, who was running again, had, as I think she put it, one of the worst attendance records in Parliament at only 53%, and she was saying something like, “Well, if anybody showed up for work only 50% of the time, they would be fired.”

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

I won't test that.

Mr. Yves Côté:

She was charged with an offence under the provision at play here, and the judge found that this was not sufficient to justify or to warrant a conviction under the provision. The judge said that the provision should be used where the candidate is alleged to be, and I'm quoting from the judge's reasons, “a thief, a criminal, a felon, or that some type of moral turpitude was involved.”

Also, I think there are some cases.... By the way, I think that six or seven provinces have essentially the same provision as we have here and the wording is almost exactly the same, about the personal conduct or character of the individual.

In another case, which comes out of Manitoba, the person said the candidate who was running against her was “a liar, a thief, a drug peddler.” The judge in that case found that this was sufficient to...and, in fact, she pleaded guilty and she received a fairly significant fine.

The point I would make on this is that I think there is a need, because many people in Canada think, when they look at this provision, that any time a false statement is made about a candidate, let's say, that is enough to trigger this, and the courts are not there at all. They understand that freedom of expression in the political realm is pretty broad, and, as I said in my remarks, political spin, insinuation, and exaggeration are part of the way, for better or for worse, that electoral campaigns are run in this country and in many other countries. Courts recognize that and will be careful before they intervene.

That said, when somebody crosses the line and impugns somebody by way of, as I said, criminal conduct or fraud or anything like that, then the courts would be more open to perhaps considering issuing a verdict of guilt.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

But you're requesting just eliminating that power from your purview.

Mr. Yves Côté:

No, I'm not suggesting that.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Okay.

Mr. Yves Côté:

I think what I said in my opening remarks is that I think there is a role to be played by that provision, and I think the challenge for you MPs and for Parliament is to find a way to refine it, to make it better adjusted to the reality so that it's easier for us to apply and also so that citizens, when they look at the provision, understand that it is not any and all false statements that are caught by the provision.

(1145)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll now go to Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you.

Thank you for being here today, Commissioner.

My questions will be based on recommendation B12.

I am a bit confused by your statement. I know you want more clarity in the provision and if it's not there, then you'd like it repealed, but in your written remarks, in the first paragraph regarding recommendation B12, you stated that “the provision is extremely broad.” That's what I understand it to be, but then I was a little confused when the third paragraph said “it may be time to consider whether the scope of the provision should be broadened to include false statements made with respect to these key players.”

I'm just a little confused. I do think that false news, fake news, and a whole bunch of things need to be addressed in today's world. We are seeing a lot of problems in election campaigns around the world, but we already have a problem with provisions being too broad, so I don't know whether adding more things will in fact broaden or make it even harder to implement.

I'm just confused. Could you clarify? I think I'm of the position that I would like to strengthen it, especially given the current climate. I think that false statements about personal character are really important to me as a woman, because I do believe that women candidates oftentimes have their character called into question more than male candidates do, so I am a little concerned about that.

If you would answer that question, then I'll have a follow-up question.

Mr. Yves Côté:

Yes.

It's probably my not expressing myself clearly enough, so I'll try to clarify what I meant when I said that perhaps there would be an issue in whether it should be broadened.

Section 91 as it reads now applies only to candidates or prospective candidates, and yet people could make some very damaging comments about, for example, a political party or a senior organizer in a political party that, by nature of these words, could have a very detrimental effect on the outcome of an election.

The question I am putting to you is, when this was passed in 1908 perhaps we didn't have the same kind of involvement by senior officials of parties, or parties, so that issue, to me, is an open issue in whether you'd like to broaden it. That's why I am saying this.

In terms of narrowing it, I am suggesting looking at the way that courts and judges have applied that provision in various court cases. You find they are looking for something that's pretty narrow. For example, one of the judges said that if you make a comment about the way somebody carried out their official duties, a lot of leeway will be given to people making those kinds of statements, but if you impugn or attack somebody's personal reputation, that's something else. That's why I'm saying to you that false statements.... You may wish to add words to clarify so that courts have an indication of what Parliament would like them to do, or would like the legislation to say.

As I said at the outset, we are in the realm of freedom of expression, so it is extremely important for any new legislation—if you decide to open it up and change it—to bear that in mind. The court will give lots of leeway to people expressing themselves in the course of a political debate, so you have to make sure that your objectives clearly outline and define, and that the means you use are as narrow as possible to achieve the goal.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Of course, and I'm sure you have these occurrences where people allege false statements in political debate, but I think most of us around the table here can agree that if you're debating an opponent and you're talking about the way their party voted or what they had implemented, that is political spin at times and can be seen in different perspectives.

For example, in the last election my Conservative opponent, Mr. Gill, sent out letters to each household in my riding implying that I had supported a private member's bill and introduced it in the House, but I had never been a member prior to running; I was a new candidate. That was definitely a false statement, but previously there was another member with the same first name as mine, so by eliminating the last name and sending out a letter to each household, it could be stated that somebody with that first name had done this, but it was done during my election campaign, implying that I had introduced this bill.

That's where things become murky and it's a false statement, but I had never thought of making a complaint about that necessarily because I think there are ways to address that, through media, through responding to allegations like that.

It's the personal character that really bothers me, and as we want to encourage more women to run, I feel we should not send a message that as an elected body, we don't care if these types of things happen in a campaign. We should be sending the message that yes, on the books we have something, but it isn't enforceable and I want to help you make it enforceable.

How do we make this an illegal act or a corrupt practice? You said that it doesn't go that far.

(1150)

Mr. Yves Côté:

That would be easy enough. There are provisions in the act that set out illegal acts or corrupt practices. That's section 502.

If you decide to go that route, it would be a question of adding a paragraph to one of those two sections to make it clear that from now on this would be that.

At the same time I think it's important for me to highlight for the committee, Mr. Chair, that if consideration is given to going in that direction, I would urge you to think very carefully, because if you do that, it could open up the possibility to challenge the results of an election. I think one of the things you would want to avoid, or at least consider seriously, is to avoid having a multiplicity of challenges after an election if somebody says a false statement was made about their character and now they'd like to challenge the result of the election.

I would urge you to think very carefully where you would set the bar in how such a challenge could be launched, and then give guidance to the court, to the judge, as precisely as possible on how they should decide whether or not the results of the election should be quashed.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay. I don't have enough time now, but I would love to have more input on how we can make it enforceable but maybe not take it that far, so that we don't have this occurring time and time again.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Sahota.

Before we go to Mr. Richards, I want to reiterate something the witness said. It's sort of serendipitous that while we're talking about recommendation B27 on section 331 of the act, the prohibition on foreigners inducing electors to vote, this morning the Senate tabled its report, “Controlling Foreign Influence in Canadian Elections”.

Mr. Richards, you're on.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That was a great segue for me, because I wanted to mention that as well and ask the commissioner about it.

The Senate put out this report. I don't know if you've seen it yet. It just came out. In “Controlling Foreign Influence in Canadian Elections”, they made a number of recommendations in order to ensure that foreign funding isn't playing a direct or indirect role in Canadian elections.

There are things like prohibiting influence by foreign entities, modernizing the regulation of third parties' involvement, increasing penalties, and removing the six-month limitation on that requirement to report contributions. Then, of course, they're also asking that Elections Canada be required to perform random audits of third parties' election advertising expenses and the contributions they receive that may be used during an election period. Those are some of the recommendations they made.

You've indicated to us, obviously, that you think we need to look at third party financing and consider modernizing and updating that. You indicated in a response to me earlier that in order for provisions to be effective, they must apply to all possible election expenses. I'm looking for your suggestions on what the committee can do, because I firmly agree with you that we should be looking at this. This is an issue that needs to be dealt with. I would assume that when you say it must apply to all possible election expenses, you're indicating that the provision that it's only for advertising expenses is not broad enough, and that you believe we need to expand that further. I'd love to hear your thoughts on that.

In particular, I'd also like to hear your thoughts on the six-month limitation. With the fixed election dates, as I mentioned earlier, in terms of it being six months before the writ is dropped, everyone knows that if they want to get that money in, they can do it six months plus a day before then, and nobody knows. Nobody is the wiser. As a result, there could be very significant foreign funding that could seriously influence our election.

I'd love to hear your thoughts on those two things.

(1155)

Mr. Yves Côté:

I'll say three things.

One is that we got the Senate report literally half an hour before we came here, so I merely flipped through the pages and cannot comment in any way on its contents.

Yes, it seems to me that there are things such as the organization of rallies by third parties, for example. Currently, the position that we and Elections Canada have taken is that this is not political or electoral advertising. Therefore, as it stands right now, a third party may conceivably expend a huge sum of money in organizing rallies, maybe in various cities across the country, and maybe spending many thousands of dollars. Because it is not technically electoral advertising, this is not regulated in any way.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Could it be for things such as paying for door-to-door canvassers as well?

Mr. Yves Côté:

Yes, exactly. Totally. Or having—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Are you saying that broadening this would be helpful?

Mr. Yves Côté:

—people working the phones and trying to get people to vote one way or the other.... Quite clearly, this is currently an open field and people are free to do a number of things.

On the six-month rule, I really think this should be looked at very closely and perhaps have steps taken to eliminate it totally or to make it in such a way where much more is caught and regulated than is the case now—no question.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, I appreciate that. I firmly agree with that as well.

In order to ensure that more of it is caught, there's this idea of performing random audits of third parties' election expenses. Would that be helpful in ensuring that more of it is caught?

Mr. Yves Côté:

Well, assuming that the legislation, the new regulatory framework, is such that many more things have to be reported and also that there are some limitations, spot audits certainly would be a good way of getting the information that perhaps is needed to uncover or discover illegal actions on the part of some of these third parties.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you, I appreciate that.

Do you have any other suggestions if we're going to look at that, and I firmly believe we should, on things we could do to modernize that? For example, should we increase penalties, or are there other things we could do to make sure more of this is being caught and to ensure we're keeping foreign influence out of the elections? If you don't have any suggestions you can give us verbally today, would you endeavour to provide us something in writing that would be helpful?

Mr. Yves Côté:

Yes, we could provide you with additional ideas. One suggestion I would make is not necessarily to have more severe penalties, because I think the penalties provided for are quite severe. For me, the real challenge, the real objective Parliament should pursue, is to identify what it wants to do in terms of how it wants to limit third parties in what they would be allowed to do or partially allowed to do.

Yes, Mr. Justice Bastarache said what I said a few minutes ago, but at the same time, the courts, as you probably know, have invalidated third party spending on a number of occasions in the past. It's a very delicate area in which to go, and you really have to be careful how, once your objective has been identified, you go about accomplishing it.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you. I appreciate your suggestions and thoughts.

The Chair:

Thank you, Blake.

We just have a couple of minutes left for the last questioner, Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Commissioner and Mr. Chénier, I want to thank you both for appearing today.

I want to follow up on some of the comments from my fellow colleagues about a particular recommendation, B27, inducements by non-residents. I want to deal with a very specific example in my mind, and I want to get your thoughts about it.

I have within my riding a fairly large number of schools that provide services for foreign students, international students, who come to Canada often in order to complete secondary school and prepare potentially for continuing their education in Canada at a post-secondary level.

One of the things that often comes up, and it certainly happened in my election, is they're interested in participating in the Canadian political process. One of the requirements they have, for example, is to get enough volunteer hours, which is a requirement for graduation. In Ontario, they need 40 hours. They often come banging on my door saying that they would like to help me in my election and asking if they get any volunteer hours. These are essentially non-resident international students.

Do they breach the act under the current provision of section 331 by participating in a Canadian election?

(1200)

Mr. Yves Côté:

Section 331 states, “No person who does not reside in Canada”, so presumably—

Mr. Arnold Chan:

These are non-residents, so they're here on a temporary basis. They're residing in Canada but they're not.... They're temporary residents so they're non-residents. They don't have status in the sense of being a Canadian resident. Technically, are they fine because they have this temporary status?

Mr. Yves Côté:

If they are studying here, a good argument can be made that in fact they are residing, even if only temporarily, in Canada.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Again, I was just concerned about that particular.... I know the current recommendation is the repeal of the section, and I agree that the most difficult part related to this normally is enforcement, particularly for those who reside wherever they reside. If you're blogging about the Canadian election and you're living in Burma, it's hard to actually have any kind of a.... You can say that, yes, they are intending to influence our election, but there's no real practical enforcement mechanism.

I'm sensitive to the issues that Blake and others have raised with respect to foreign influences, but in the world of social media, I just don't know how we effectively, other than as it relates to actual resources like monetary, have any kind of regulatory control over this type of activity in this day and age.

Mr. Yves Côté:

It poses a very serious challenge; there's no question about that. Many countries around the world are trying to grapple with this, not only in the electoral context but in other contexts. It is certainly not a simple issue.

By the way, Mr. Chair, I think Mr. Chan said that my recommendation was to abolish section 331. That is not my recommendation. My recommendation is that you should look at it with a view to perhaps refining and—

Mr. Arnold Chan:

—if possible—

Mr. Yves Côté:

Yes.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

—and if you can't, then repeal.

The Chair:

Commissioner, just before we finish, do you have any closing comments you'd like to make?

Mr. Yves Côté:

If I may, and perhaps this comes out of the blue for members of this committee, we get a lot of complaints about missing tag lines on political signs during the campaign. Sometimes the tag lines are not missing; it's only that they are printed in a slightly off colour that makes it very difficult to read. By way of perhaps trying to address this issue, sometimes we have to actually use magnifiers to see that it is there, and once we see it's there, we have to drop the investigation. If there were a way for you to recommend or to propose an amendment that would say that the tag lines have to be reasonably visible, that would remove a big headache for a number of us.

That's a very small point, but as a parting comment, that's a request I would make.

The Chair:

That's the line on the election signs that says it's authorized by the official agent of a party.

Mr. Yves Côté:

Yes.

The Chair:

Thank you very much for coming. That was very helpful input on the recommendations that we're going to deal with now.

Mr. Yves Côté:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

We'll suspend for a couple of minutes while we prepare to go in camera.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour, mesdames et messieurs. Bienvenue à la 64e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. La première heure de cette réunion sera télévisée.

Nous poursuivons notre étude du rapport du directeur général des élections intitulé « Un régime électoral pour le 21e siècle : Recommandations du directeur général des élections du Canada à la suite de la 42e élection générale ». Nous nous concentrerons sur les recommandations B12, « Publication de fausses déclarations pour influencer les résultats d’une élection», et B27, « Étrangers incitant des électeurs à voter ou à s’abstenir de voter ». Si nos collègues ou le commissaire désirent soulever d'autres points, je suis sûr que nous pourrons les accommoder.

Nous avons avec nous aujourd'hui pour éclairer nos délibérations M. Yves Côté, commissaire aux élections fédérales et M. Marc Chénier, avocat général et directeur principal du Bureau du commissaire aux élections fédérales.

Bienvenue, et merci d'être venus. Vous nous aiderez beaucoup.

Le commissaire vous a distribué une copie de son allocution pour que vous l'ayez sous les yeux.

Je vais maintenant passer la parole au commissaire, qui va nous présenter sa déclaration préliminaire. [Français]

M. Yves Côté (commissaire aux élections fédérales, Bureau du commissaire aux élections fédérales):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je tiens à remercier les membres du Comité de m'avoir invité aujourd'hui à participer à l'examen du rapport du directeur général des élections, ou DGE, sur les dernières élections générales.

Comme vous l'avez mentionné, je suis accompagné de Marc Chénier, avocat général au sein de notre groupe et directeur principal des Services juridiques.

Avant d'aborder les questions d'intérêt que vous avez annoncées il y a deux minutes, monsieur le président, je tiens à souligner que le rapport du DGE renferme plusieurs autres recommandations sur lesquelles le Comité ne s'est pas encore prononcé, qui portent directement sur le mandat confié à mon Bureau.[Traduction]

Il y en a trois: le pouvoir de demander l’ordonnance d’un tribunal afin de contraindre une personne à témoigner, le pouvoir du commissaire de déposer une accusation et le pouvoir, à tout enquêteur recruté par le commissaire, d'obtenir des ordonnances de communication en vertu du Code criminel. Ces recommandations sont extrêmement importantes pour notre bureau. J'espère de tout coeur que le Comité les appuiera.

Je vais commencer par traiter des deux questions qui intéressent particulièrement le Comité. Elles portent sur la publication de fausses déclarations concernant la réputation ou la conduite personnelle d’un candidat et sur l'interdiction à des étrangers d'inciter des électeurs à voter ou à s’abstenir de voter. Ces deux sections touchent, bien que de façons différentes, les valeurs fondamentales de la démocratie. La valeur principale d'une démocratie est la liberté d'expression qui, comme le répète continuellement la Cour suprême, a plus de poids que jamais dans le contexte électoral et démocratique. Le Parlement devra donc se prononcer avec une extrême prudence à ce sujet. [Français]

Le but de toute modification devrait être clairement défini: qu'est-ce qui devrait être interdit ou réglementé, et pourquoi? De plus — ceci est extrêmement important —, les moyens choisis pour atteindre cet objectif doivent être les moins intrusifs possible. Autrement, les tribunaux pourraient intervenir et juger que le législateur, vous les députés, a outrepassé sa compétence.

De plus, le libellé vague et général de ces dispositions suscite de fausses attentes et crée la perception que leur application n'est pas suffisante, ce qui risque de miner la confiance des citoyens en notre système électoral.[Traduction]

La recommandation B12 porte sur les fausses déclarations. L'article 91 de la Loi illustre ce problème, car son libellé est extrêmement vague. Il n'indique pas clairement quels types de fausses déclarations sont interdits. Le public pense que cet article s'applique à des situations très diverses, mais en réalité, son application est très limitée. En effet, les tribunaux ont toujours jugé les fausses déclarations en les mesurant à des critères très sévères. Par exemple, les juges déclarent que pour qu'un article de ce genre s'applique à une fausse déclaration, celle-ci doit exprimer une profonde « turpitude morale » — c'est le terme qu'ils utilisent pour désigner la criminalité.

De plus, le libellé actuel de l'article 91 ne s'applique qu'aux fausses déclarations prononcées sur des candidats réels ou potentiels. Comme depuis l'adoption de cet article en 1908 — il y a plus de 100 ans —, le rôle des partis politiques et de leurs chefs s'est considérablement étendu, il serait grand temps d'étendre la portée de cet article pour y inclure les fausses déclarations lancées contre ces acteurs importants.

(1110)

[Français]

J'aimerais soulever un dernier point.

À l'heure actuelle, lorsqu'il y a une contravention à l'article 91 de la Loi électorale du Canada et qu'une condamnation est inscrite, la peine appropriée est infligée à l'accusé par la cour. Il n'y a aucune autre conséquence. On pourrait se demander si d'autres conséquences devraient découler d'une contravention à cette disposition. Par exemple, est-ce qu'une contravention à l'article 91 devrait être considérée comme un acte illégal ou une manoeuvre frauduleuse? Cela pourrait permettre de contester le résultat d'une élection où les fausses déclarations auraient eu une incidence importante sur les résultats. Il est intéressant de noter que c'est actuellement le cas d'une contravention à l'article 92, qui interdit les fausses déclarations au sujet du désistement d'un candidat.

En l'absence de modifications à l'article 91, j'estime que cette disposition devrait être abrogée.

Que l'article 91 soit abrogé ou non, je propose que vous considériez d'apporter des modifications à l'alinéa 482b) pour en préciser l'objet. Il s'agit d'une disposition de large application qui vise à combler de possibles lacunes concernant des comportements malhonnêtes qui ne sont pas traités ailleurs dans la Loi. Cette disposition prévoit que commet une infraction quiconque incite « par quelque prétexte ou ruse » une autre personne à voter ou à s'abstenir de voter pour un candidat donné. Or, l'objectif de la disposition pourrait être clarifié de manière à interdire, par exemple, les tentatives d'influencer les électeurs en recourant à des moyens qui font violence à nos valeurs démocratiques reconnues ou qui entravent les processus énoncés dans notre législation électorale.[Traduction]

La rédaction de cette disposition sera extrêmement délicate. Il faudra veiller à ce qu'elle n'interdise pas des formes typiques d'expression ou de débat politique, qui comportent souvent des exagérations ou ce qu'on appelle des tactiques politiques. Cette interdiction ne doit surtout pas étouffer les débats ou limiter l'expression des politiciens sans juste cause. Elle devrait viser à protéger nos valeurs démocratiques, notamment la transparence et l'accessibilité. Elle devrait par exemple cibler les fausses nouvelles qui visent clairement à mettre le doute dans l'esprit des électeurs et à miner leur capacité de voter en toute connaissance de cause.

Je vais maintenant passer à la recommandation B27. Il sera tout aussi difficile de préciser l'application de cette disposition sur l'incitation provenant de personnes étrangères. Comme les membres du Comité s'en souviendront probablement — en fait je suis sûr qu'ils s'en souviennent —, pendant la dernière campagne électorale, de nombreux non-Canadiens ont exprimé leurs points de vue ou leurs opinions dans les médias sociaux, dans des éditoriaux, et pendant des entrevues.

Notre bureau a reçu plusieurs plaintes dénonçant des incidents de ce genre. Bien des gens pensent que quiconque n'est pas Canadien ou ne réside pas au Canada n'a pas le droit d'exprimer son soutien pour un parti ou pour un candidat. Bien qu'en interprétant cette disposition d'une façon très littérale on pourrait tirer cette conclusion, il est difficile d'imaginer qu'à notre époque, en 2017, le Parlement accepterait de promulguer une loi pour interdire qu'un étranger exprime son opinion. C'est pourquoi je pense qu'il sera nécessaire de mieux préciser ce libellé.[Français]

Comme la Loi vise principalement à assurer l'égalité des chances, on devrait vraisemblablement y inclure des dispositions qui interdisent aux étrangers d'engager des dépenses importantes pour s'opposer à l'élection d'un candidat ou d'un parti ou encore pour promouvoir son élection. Ces dispositions pourraient interdire aux étrangers, par exemple, d'engager des dépenses pour payer les employés d'un centre d'appels ou pour organiser des activités de porte-à-porte durant une campagne.

Le DGE a également recommandé — dans la recommandation C49 — de modifier le libellé de la disposition afin d'indiquer clairement qu'il s'applique aux « tentatives d'influencer un électeur ». Dans la version anglaise de la Loi, l'utilisation du mot « induce » porte à confusion quant à la portée de l'interdiction. En effet, ce terme donne à penser que pour qu'une infraction soit commise, la tentative d'influencer doit avoir été fructueuse. Cela soulève, et vous le comprendrez, un fardeau de preuve dont le poursuivant ne pourra pratiquement pas s'acquitter.

Enfin, j'aimerais brièvement soulever un dernier élément qui mériterait d'être examiné, soit celui de la participation des tiers dans le processus électoral.

Au Canada, seules les activités de publicité électorale des tiers sont réglementées par la Loi.

(1115)



Dans la mesure où les tiers agissent indépendamment d'un candidat ou d'un parti, ils peuvent engager des dépenses illimitées lorsqu'ils se prêtent à des activités comme des sondages électoraux, des services d'appels aux électeurs, ou d'autres formes de promotion. Ils peuvent également utiliser n'importe quelle source de financement, dont des capitaux étrangers, pour financer des activités qui ne sont pas de la publicité électorale.[Traduction]

L'intensité de la participation de tiers au processus électoral du Canada augmentera très probablement au cours des années à venir. Le Parlement devrait donc envisager de réviser le niveau de participation permise de manière à égaliser les chances de tous les participants.

En conclusion, monsieur le président, je tiens à remercier le Comité d'avoir appuyé plusieurs recommandations qui concernent notre bureau. J'ai été particulièrement heureux que le Comité ait appuyé notre recommandation visant à créer un régime de sanctions administratives pécuniaires. Avec sa capacité de négocier les conditions des ententes de conformité, notre bureau disposera ainsi de la souplesse dont il a un urgent besoin pour remplir plus efficacement son mandat d'application des règlements. Plus important encore, ce régime facilitera et accélérera la résolution de plusieurs problèmes d'une manière transparente sans avoir recours aux tribunaux. Comme les cours pénales du pays se concentrent sur les façons de s'adapter à l'arrêt Jordan de la Cour suprême, je crois que cette recommandation vient à point.[Français]

Pour conclure, monsieur le président, bien que je m'efforcerai de donner des réponses aussi exhaustives que possible à vos questions, j'aimerais rappeler aux membres du Comité que je ne serai pas en mesure de discuter des particularités de toute question qui fait ou qui a fait l'objet d'une plainte auprès de mon Bureau, ou qui fait ou qui a fait l'objet d'une enquête par mon Bureau.

C'est maintenant avec plaisir que je répondrai à vos questions. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Votre aide nous est précieuse. En outre, vous avez tout à fait raison: comme nous envisageons d'ajouter à la Loi — un peu partout dans la Loi, en fait — des pénalités qui ne seront pas d'ordre criminel, la création de ce régime sera une bonne chose.

Sachez que le Comité a déjà débattu des recommandations A33 et A34 que vous avez mentionnées au début de votre allocution. Toutefois, vous avez attiré notre attention sur la recommandation C45, que nous n'avions pas remarquée, et qui donnerait le pouvoir à tout enquêteur recruté par le commissaire d'obtenir des ordonnances de communication. Puisque vous êtes avec nous, vous pourriez peut-être brièvement nous expliquer cette recommandation et y ajouter vos observations. Après votre départ, nous étudierons donc trois recommandations: les deux que vous nous avez décrites en grands détails, et la C45 que vous allez commenter, puisqu'elle vous concerne. Dans le cours de nos débats, nous ne sommes pas encore arrivés à la section C.

M. Yves Côté:

Merci, monsieur le président.

La recommandation C45 est un amendement assez technique, c'est pourquoi il se trouve au chapitre C des recommandations. Notre bureau engage plusieurs enquêteurs sous contrat. Ils ne sont pas fonctionnaires, donc la loi ne leur permet pas de faire certaines requêtes comme des demandes d'ordonnance de communication en vertu du Code criminel. Ces ordonnances nous permettent par exemple d'obliger une banque à nous fournir des renseignements sur des transactions financières. Toutefois, seuls des fonctionnaires peuvent en faire la demande à un juge.

Comme je vous le disais, nous engageons plusieurs enquêteurs sous contrat, mais à l'heure actuelle ils ne relèvent pas du Code criminel. Il ne faudrait apporter qu'une petite modification pour permettre aux employés contractuels de faire la demande d'ordonnances de perquisition et saisie et de communication. Les mandats de perquisition sont déjà prévus dans le Code, mais quand on y a inséré les nouvelles dispositions sur les ordonnances de communication, je crois que quelqu'un a oublié de permettre aux enquêteurs contractuels d'en faire la demande. Il s'agit donc d'une modification plutôt technique qui ne devrait pas susciter d'opposition.

(1120)

Le président:

Merci. Vous nous aidez beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à des rondes de questions et réponses de sept minutes. Commençons par M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Merci pour ces explications, monsieur Côté.

Voici un bref exemple un peu simplet. L'Angleterre tient ses élections aujourd'hui. Les bureaux de vote sont ouverts. J'espère sincèrement que les démocrates libéraux gagneront plus de sièges, même s'ils n'accèdent pas au pouvoir. Je viens de déclarer cela publiquement. Si je me trouvais de l'autre côté de l'océan à parler ainsi du Canada, est-ce que j'enfreindrais...

M. Yves Côté:

Vous comprendrez que je ne peux pas commenter là-dessus.

M. Scott Simms:

Excusez-moi. Qu'avez-vous dit?

M. Yves Côté:

Vous comprendrez que je ne peux pas commenter là-dessus.

M. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

Aucun de nous ne commentera là-dessus.

M. Scott Simms:

Bon, d'accord. Je me demandais simplement si j'aurais enfreint la loi en disant ces choses en Angleterre au sujet du Canada.

J'essaie de demander si, en faisant une observation au sujet de l'élection britannique comme je viens de le faire, et si un député du Parlement britannique me faisait la même observation sur le Canada, nous agirions contre la loi actuelle? Je demande simplement une interprétation.

M. Yves Côté:

Je ne crois pas que vous enfreindriez la Loi telle qu'elle est libellée à l'heure actuelle.

Je crois que si nous enquêtions sur un incident semblable, nous considérerions avant tout la garantie de liberté d'expression que la Charte accorde à tout le monde. Avant de décider d'appliquer une mesure disciplinaire, nous serions très conscients de ce droit. Ce serait un critère extrêmement important.

D'un autre côté, je ne pense pas que vous violeriez la Loi en faisant cela — ou si il ou elle le faisait.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord. Je comprends.

David. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Je vous remercie d'être parmi nous. Nous sommes vraiment heureux d'entendre votre témoignage.

Ma question porte sur les enquêtes. Si vous recevez, par exemple, une plainte concernant une fraude électorale, quel processus suivez-vous? Où y aura-t-il des problèmes, surtout si on pense aux recommandations A33, A34 et C45 et aux décisions du commissaire?

M. Yves Côté:

Si nous recevons une plainte concernant une fraude électorale, nous présumons que c'est quelque chose de majeur et de relativement gros. Nous commencerons par faire un examen préliminaire des allégations et des faits portés à notre attention. Si nous confirmions qu'il y avait vraiment matière à aller de l'avant et à lancer une enquête, nous ouvririons une enquête formelle et une des choses que nous ferions serait de parler aux personnes qui auraient pu être impliquées, selon nous.

La raison pour laquelle nous faisons la recommandation A33 est que, dans certaines circonstances — et j'ai vécu cela au cours des quatre ou cinq dernières années, depuis que je suis en poste —, nous demandons à des personnes de comparaître parce que nous soupçonnons fortement et, dans certains cas, nous savons avec certitude qu'elles sont au courant de certaines choses et qu'elles ont de l'information. Pour des raisons qui leur appartiennent, elles refusent de collaborer. Elles nous disent ne pas avoir envie de dire quoi que ce soit.

Vous êtes vous-mêmes en mesure, en tant que députés, de bien évaluer ce que je vais dire. Souvent, dans le monde politique, on considère que la loyauté envers le parti et l'équipe est une valeur fondamentale. Pour ces personnes, collaborer et donner de l'information qui pourrait nous permettre de faire avancer notre enquête devient extrêmement difficile.

S'il arrivait, par exemple, qu'après avoir contacté toutes les personnes à qui nous voulions poser des questions, personne n'acceptait de collaborer avec nous, une disposition comme celle prévue à la recommandation A33 pourrait devenir utile. Nous pourrions aller devant un juge, une personne indépendante, et lui dire ce qui se passe, quelles sont les allégations, à quel point elles sont sérieuses et le fait que, malheureusement, nous ne pouvons convaincre personne de nous parler. Nous demandons alors au juge de donner une ordonnance forçant monsieur ou madame X à nous parler.

Évidemment, des garanties seraient rattachées à cette démarche si le juge acceptait de donner l'ordonnance. Il serait alors évident, d'entrée jeu, que ce que la personne forcée de nous parler aurait dit ne pourrait jamais être utilisé contre elle. La personne aurait le droit d'être représentée par un avocat. La rencontre se déroulerait de façon privée et non publique.

Il est important de savoir que ce genre de garanties ne nous amènera pas à utiliser ce pouvoir à droite et à gauche pour faire des enquêtes sur toutes sortes de choses mineures. Ce serait dans des circonstances où la confiance du public à l'endroit du système électoral pourrait être profondément affectée. Il est nécessaire de rassurer les citoyens sur le fait qu'une enquête a été effectuée dans le but d'obtenir de l'information dont nous avions besoin pour passer aux étapes suivantes.

Voilà mon avis à propos de la recommandation A33. La situation existe d'ailleurs dans cinq ou six provinces au pays, où le commissaire, ou la personne occupant un poste équivalent, possède actuellement ce pouvoir. J'inclus les gens du bureau du Directeur général des élections du Québec.

Au fédéral, cela existe déjà parce que le directeur du Bureau de la concurrence dispose de ce pouvoir et peut, dans certaines circonstances, demander à un juge de la Cour fédérale pour obtenir une ordonnance pour forcer quelqu'un à témoigner.

C'est le point principal que je fais valoir à l'égard de la recommandation A33.

(1125)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Sur le plan pratique, votre bureau a été séparé de celui du DGE. Vous avez changé d'édifice et vos communications avec le DGE ont diminué.

Quels sont les effets réels de ce changement?

M. Yves Côté:

Comme vous l'avez mentionné plus tôt, depuis l'adoption du projet de loi C-23, nous sommes une entité au sein du Bureau du directeur des poursuites pénales. Officiellement et légalement, nous avons été retirés de l'organisation du directeur général des élections.

À mon avis, les choses vont relativement bien en général. En fait, elles vont très bien. Pour le directeur général des élections et pour nous, il est cependant difficile, pour des raisons d'ordre technique, d'échanger de l'information plus rapidement, étant donné que nous faisons maintenant partie officiellement de deux institutions gouvernementales différentes. Certaines règles s'appliquent, ce qui rend les choses un peu plus difficiles.

Cela dit, vous savez probablement que le projet de loi C-33 a été déposé par le gouvernement et que, s'il était adopté dans sa forme actuelle, cela aurait pour effet de nous ramener au sein du Bureau du directeur général des élections.

J'en profite pour mentionner, parce qu'il est important de le faire, que depuis notre arrivée au Bureau du directeur des poursuites pénales, ce dernier nous fournit un service et un appui exemplaires à tous égards, comme c'était le cas lorsque nous étions au sein d'Élections Canada.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci beaucoup. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci.

Monsieur le commissaire, je vous remercie d'être venu. J'ai deux ou trois questions à vous poser aujourd'hui.

D'abord, j'ai une question sur la recommandation B27, tirée de l'article 331 de la Loi électorale du Canada qui interdit à quiconque ne réside pas au Canada ou n'est pas citoyen canadien ou résident permanent d'inciter des électeurs — et l'on cite directement le texte de la Loi — « à voter ou à s’abstenir de voter ou à voter ou à s’abstenir de voter pour un candidat donné ». Cette recommandation souligne que vous recevez de nombreuses plaintes liées à cet article, mais que le libellé est si vague que vous avez de la peine à appliquer cette règle.

Si de nombreuses personnes se plaignent, il doit certainement y avoir des problèmes graves et très réels. Cela me fait penser à l'expression « il n'y a pas de fumée sans feu ». Pourriez-vous nous donner une idée du nombre de plaintes que vous recevez généralement, surtout au cours de ces deux ou trois dernières élections?

Pourriez-vous aussi nous suggérer des moyens de renforcer cet article afin que vous puissiez veiller à l'intégrité de notre système électoral?

M. Yves Côté:

Monsieur le président, la formulation de cette question suggère que là où il y a de la fumée, il y a du feu. Je tiens à souligner qu'il arrive parfois qu'il n'y ait que de la fumée. Je souligne ceci parce l'article 331, comme je l'ai dit dans mon allocution, laisse penser qu'il s'applique à toutes sortes de choses.

Au cours de la dernière élection, on nous a souvent signalé des commentaires et des éditoriaux — particulièrement aux États-Unis, mais dans d'autres pays aussi —, publiés dans des journaux canadiens distribués dans tout le Canada, mais rédigés par des non-Canadiens résidant hors du Canada. Bien des gens soulignaient que cela ne devrait pas être permis.

À mon avis, je ne pense pas que l'intention de l'article 331 quand il a été adopté — comme je l'ai dit, il y a très longtemps — prévoyait ce genre de choses.

(1130)

M. Blake Richards:

Excusez-moi de vous interrompre, mais mon temps de parole est limité.

J'essayais de me faire une idée du nombre de plaintes que vous avez reçues. Vous nous avez dit que certaines d'entre elles ne dégageaient que de la fumée sans feu, mais vous en avez probablement reçu certaines sous lesquelles un feu couvait. J'essaie de me faire une idée du nombre de plaintes que vous recevez en général. Vous pourriez peut-être nous donner une moyenne ou un pourcentage de plaintes qui étaient légitimes à votre avis, et nous suggérer une façon de resserrer l'application de cet article.

M. Yves Côté:

Selon les chiffres que nous avons à l'heure actuelle, nous avons reçu, au cours de la dernière campagne électorale, 14 plaintes qui frisaient la violation de l'article 331. Nous avons réglé plusieurs d'entre elles assez rapidement. J'en parle d'ailleurs dans mon dernier rapport annuel. Leurs auteurs accusaient un parti politique national de traiter avec une personne de l'étranger pour, supposément, suggérer de bonnes stratégies sur la façon de mener la campagne. Nous avons publié notre position, comme je l'explique dans mon rapport, en affirmant que ce n'était pas une violation de l'article 331.

M. Blake Richards:

Je vais passer à l'autre question que je voulais vous poser.

Quand vous avez témoigné devant le Comité permanent des affaires juridiques et constitutionnelles du Sénat en avril, vous avez dit que vous aviez reçu plusieurs plaintes sur des tiers. Je ne sais pas s'il s'agissait des mêmes références que ce que vous nous dites aujourd'hui, mais pourriez-vous nous dire si cela devenait problématique? Est-ce que les tiers s'ingèrent tellement profondément qu'ils risquent de fausser le résultat du scrutin?

Vous nous avez aussi dit aujourd'hui — et je crois que vous avez dit la même chose à ce comité sénatorial — que le Parlement devrait envisager de réviser le système des tiers afin d'assurer l'égalité de tous les participants. Vous avez ajouté que quand des tiers reçoivent de l'étranger des fonds qu'ils utiliseront pendant la campagne électorale, s'ils reçoivent ces fonds avant la période de six mois précédant le déclenchement de l'élection, ces tiers peuvent y injecter des sommes illimitées. Il n'y a aucune restriction sur les montants qu'ils peuvent utiliser à d'autres fins que celle de la publicité électorale. Vous nous avez dit aujourd'hui que nous devrions examiner les autres dépenses comme les sondages, les services de communication avec les électeurs, les événements promotionnels et autres.

Pourriez-vous nous donner plus de détails à ce sujet et nous suggérer d'autres moyens de resserrer le régime de financement de l'étranger par des tiers afin de garantir l'équité dont vous parliez? Pourriez-vous particulièrement nous parler du fait que d'autres types de dépenses ne sont pas restreintes à l'heure actuelle? Pensez-vous que nous devrions étendre la période de six mois pour éviter que quelqu'un, à six mois moins un jour du déclenchement de l'élection — surtout dans le cas des élections prévues à une date fixe — injecte une grosse somme d'argent et réussisse ainsi à influencer les élections au Canada?

M. Yves Côté:

Monsieur le président, permettez-moi d'abord de citer le juge de la Cour suprême qui a prononcé l'arrêt Harper en 2004, M. le juge Bastarache, qui a rédigé ce qui suit au nom de la majorité: « Afin que le régime de plafonnement des dépenses soit pleinement efficace, les limitations doivent s'appliquer à toutes les dépenses électorales possibles... ». Le régime établi pour les tiers a été adopté il y a plus de 15 ans, et pourtant nous savons parfaitement qu'il ne s'applique qu'à ce que la Loi nomme la « publicité électorale ». Cette notion est très étroite et limitée. Elle couvre la production de matériel promotionnel et l'achat des moyens de diffuser ce matériel. À l'heure actuelle, cette notion exclut toutes sortes d'autres choses.

Comme je l'ai dit au comité sénatorial, nous avons reçu un nombre considérable de plaintes, beaucoup plus que pendant la campagne précédente. Les gens se plaignaient du fait que des tiers agissaient de toutes sortes de manières qui, selon eux, influençaient le résultat du scrutin et que ces agissements étaient inéquitables. J'ai dit au comité sénatorial — et je l'ai aussi dit ici ce matin — que selon moi, après 15 ou 17 ans suivant l'adoption de ce régime, il est temps que le Parlement et vous-mêmes, les députés, le réexaminiez. Si nous désirons vraiment assurer l'égalité des participants, ne devrions-nous pas modifier le rôle que les tiers ont joué et, je suppose, qu'ils joueront pendant la prochaine campagne électorale? Je ne suis pas sûr du tout que l'égalité règne encore dans notre système. Je vous enjoins d'examiner cela avec une attention extrême.

(1135)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le commissaire.

Nous passons la parole à M. Stewart. Bienvenue au Comité, monsieur Stewart.

M. Kennedy Stewart (Burnaby-Sud, NPD):

Merci beaucoup de m'avoir invité.

Je vous remercie de votre témoignage.

J'avais une question au sujet de l'influence étrangère et de la façon de la réglementer. Je discutais avec les représentants d'une firme de publicité sur Internet et ils me disaient qu'ils ont la capacité de faire ce que l'on appelle du géoblocage, qui consiste à prendre une zone géographique et à acheter toute la présence sur les médias sociaux et toute la présence publicitaire en ligne dans une zone géographique donnée, par exemple, une circonscription. Pour nous, cette pratique est très utile, parce que nous savons que pendant notre campagne nous pourrions peut-être consacrer une partie de notre publicité à saturer notre zone locale de promesses électorales et de choses du genre.

Par contre, mon inquiétude est que cette technique peut également être utilisée par des non-Canadiens. Il vient d'y avoir une élection en Colombie-Britannique, qui était très serrée. La balance du pouvoir ne tient qu'à un siège. Il se pourrait qu'une personne voie venir cette situation et décide d'acheter toute la présence sur les médias sociaux et toute la présence en ligne dans la circonscription en question et essaie de favoriser un parti ou un autre.

Disons qu'une entreprise chinoise décide qu'elle veut faire cela. Elle inonde la circonscription en question pour des centaines de milliers de dollars de publicité en ligne. Quel est le recours en vertu de la loi actuelle? De toute évidence, il s'agit d'argent étranger qui s'en vient dans notre système électoral, mais parce que cela se fait en ligne, comment vous y prendriez-vous pour déposer des accusations ou même pour faire enquête sur cette situation?

M. Yves Côté:

Comme vous l'avez dit, cela soulèverait des questions très compliquées et très difficiles. Par souci de simplicité, je supposerai qu'il n'y a eu aucune collaboration de la part d'un parti ou d'un intervenant canadien, de sorte que nous avons une société chinoise qui fait cela de sa propre initiative. Premièrement, il devient très difficile de mener une enquête, comme vous l'avez laissé entendre. Deuxièmement, même en supposant que vous pourriez obtenir l'information dont vous avez besoin pour déposer une accusation, je pense que la seule chose que vous pourriez envisager, compte tenu du libellé actuel de la Loi, serait essentiellement de déposer une accusation au Canada. Si l'entreprise a une présence au Canada en ce moment ou plus tard, vous pourriez la poursuivre devant les tribunaux et peut-être agir au niveau de ses actifs si elle est reconnue coupable. Par contre, si elle est en exploitation uniquement ailleurs qu'au Canada — en Chine, dans l'exemple que vous utilisez —, il serait extrêmement difficile de faire appliquer la Loi dans une telle situation.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Disons qu'il s'agit d'un journal en ligne qui offre de la publicité dans ses colonnes, et que c'est ce que cette société achète. Pourriez-vous modifier la Loi de façon à pouvoir effectivement poursuivre le site Web sur lequel cette publicité est présentée, site qui serait hébergé au Canada?

M. Yves Côté:

En supposant qu'il existe une véritable connexion canadienne dans l'exemple que vous avez donné, selon les faits de l'affaire, vous pourriez vraisemblablement mener une enquête et déposer des accusations contre l'organisation ou entreprise canadienne qui a fait cela puisqu'elle est devenue partie à une infraction commise par la société chinoise, encore une fois, en utilisant votre exemple. Donc, en supposant que vous pourriez démontrer qu'elle a conseillé, encouragé la perpétration de l'infraction, alors, sur un plan technique, juridique, ce sont là des mesures qui pourraient être prises.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Est-ce que la Loi, dans son libellé actuel, facilite cela? Nous venons d'entendre toutes sortes de témoignages aux États-Unis au sujet de la façon dont la Russie influe apparemment sur leurs élections. Nous avons entendu que cela s'est maintenant répandu au Royaume-Uni et au référendum sur le Brexit. La plus grande partie de cela se ferait sous la forme de dépenses en ligne. Une partie se ferait par d'autres mécanismes, comme le piratage ou ce genre de choses, mais la majeure partie se ferait sous la forme de publicité.

Pensez-vous que l'on pourrait améliorer la Loi afin de vous aider de mettre un frein à ce qui, je pense, pourrait constituer une menace dans les années à venir?

(1140)

M. Yves Côté:

Oui, des améliorations pourraient être apportées à la Loi afin qu'il soit plus facile de faire cela. En même temps, si l'on considère que très souvent pour nous, les Canadiens, les entreprises ou les intervenants sur Internet concernés, si vous voulez, se trouvent à l'extérieur du Canada, qu'il s'agisse de Google ou de Facebook, toutes sortes de problèmes surviennent à essayer de prendre des mesures juridiques à l'endroit de ces entreprises pour les amener à collaborer ou à cesser de faire ce qu'elles font.

À cet égard, monsieur le président, je dirais qu'en Allemagne, tout récemment, au cours des derniers mois, le gouvernement a pris des mesures pour mettre en oeuvre un système qui assujettirait des sociétés comme Facebook et Google à des amendes considérables — et je pense que l'amende maximale est de 45 millions d'euros —, si elles ne réussissent pas, lorsqu'elles sont tenues de le faire, à éliminer les fausses nouvelles de leurs réseaux. Il semble que les Allemands aient choisi cette façon de faire pour régler le problème. La question est très compliquée.

Vous savez peut-être que ce matin, le comité sénatorial devant lequel Marc et moi-même avons comparu il y a quelques mois vient de publier son rapport, que je n'ai pu que feuilleter, parce qu'il a été publié seulement quelques minutes avant notre comparution devant votre comité. Les membres de ce comité ont énormément réfléchi à ces problèmes, et ils ont formulé des recommandations que vous pourriez trouver utiles et intéressantes.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

D'accord, merci.

J'ai une autre question au sujet des fausses déclarations. Pourriez-vous nous donner des exemples de fausses déclarations? Pourriez-vous, disons, donner une déclaration réelle que l'on disait fausse, mais que vous n'avez pas jugée fausse et à l'égard de laquelle vous n'avez pas mené d'enquête, et un exemple d'une déclaration qui était jugée fausse? Avez-vous de tels exemples?

M. Yves Côté:

J'ai quelques exemples dont je peux faire part à votre comité.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Ce serait fantastique.

M. Yves Côté:

Mon premier exemple remonte à l'élection générale de 2000 et il concerne une personne du nom de Shannon Jones. Pendant une campagne électorale, elle a déclaré que le député sortant, qui était de nouveau candidat, présentait, je pense que c'est ainsi qu'elle l'a dit, un des pires dossiers de présence au Parlement, seulement 53 %, et elle disait quelque chose comme, « Eh bien, si quelqu'un se présentait à son travail seulement 50 % du temps, il serait congédié. »

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Je ne l'essaierai pas.

M. Yves Côté:

Elle a été accusée d'avoir commis une infraction en vertu de la disposition dont il est question ici, et le juge a conclu que cela ne suffisait pas pour justifier une condamnation en vertu de la disposition. Le juge a dit que l'on devrait recourir à la disposition lorsque la candidate ou le candidat est supposé être, et je cite les motifs du juge, « un voleur, un criminel, ou lorsque ce genre de turpitude morale était en cause ».

Je pense aussi qu'il y a des affaires... En passant, je pense que six ou sept provinces ont essentiellement la même disposition que nous et que le libellé est presque identique, au sujet de la réputation ou de la conduite personnelle de la personne.

Dans une autre affaire, qui s'est déroulée au Manitoba, la personne a dit que son adversaire était « un menteur, un voleur, un trafiquant de drogues ». Dans ce cas, le juge a conclu que cela suffisait à... et, de fait, elle a plaidé coupable et a dû payer une amende assez importante.

À ce sujet, je dirais que je pense qu'il est nécessaire, parce que beaucoup de Canadiens le pensent, lorsqu'ils examinent cette disposition, chaque fois qu'une fausse déclaration est faite au sujet d'un candidat ou d'une candidate, disons, que cela suffit à déclencher ce mécanisme, et qu'il n'est absolument pas question des tribunaux. Ils comprennent que la liberté d'expression dans le monde politique est passablement vaste, et, comme je l'ai dit dans mes propos liminaires, des manipulations partisanes, des insinuations et des exagérations font partie de la façon, pour le meilleur ou pour le pire, dont les campagnes électorales sont menées ici et dans bien d'autres pays. Les tribunaux le reconnaissent et feront preuve de prudence avant d'intervenir.

Cela dit, lorsqu'une personne franchit la ligne et accuse quelqu'un, comme je l'ai dit, de conduite criminelle ou de fraude ou de quelque chose du genre, alors les tribunaux seraient plus ouverts à peut-être envisager un verdict de culpabilité.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Mais vous demandez simplement d'éliminer ce pouvoir de votre domaine de compétence.

M. Yves Côté:

Non, ce n'est pas ce que je propose.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

D'accord.

M. Yves Côté:

Je pense que ce que j'ai dit dans mes remarques liminaires, c'est que je pense qu'il y a un rôle pour cette disposition, et je pense que le défi pour vous, les députés et le Parlement, est de trouver une façon de la peaufiner, de la rendre mieux adaptée à la réalité afin qu'il soit plus facile pour nous de la mettre en application et aussi pour que les citoyens, lorsqu'ils examinent la disposition, comprennent que cette dernière ne vise pas n'importe laquelle de ces fausses déclarations.

(1145)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci.

Merci d'être venu aujourd'hui, monsieur le commissaire.

Mes questions se fonderont sur la recommandation B12.

Je suis un peu confuse par votre déclaration. Je sais que vous voulez que la disposition soit plus claire et que si ce n'est pas le cas, vous voulez alors qu'elle soit abrogée, mais dans vos remarques écrites, dans le premier paragraphe concernant la recommandation B12, vous avez dit que « la formulation de cette disposition est très générale ». C'est ce que je crois comprendre qu'elle doit être, mais j'ai ressenti un peu de confusion en lisant, au troisième paragraphe, « il est peut-être temps d'élargir sa portée, de manière à englober les fausses déclarations concernant ces principaux intervenants ».

Je suis un peu confuse. Je pense vraiment que les fausses nouvelles et toutes ces choses doivent être réglées dans le monde d'aujourd'hui. Nous voyons énormément de problèmes dans les campagnes électorales un peu partout dans le monde, mais nous avons déjà un problème avec les dispositions qui sont trop générales, de sorte que je ne sais pas si en ajoutant d'autres éléments, cela élargira effectivement la portée de la disposition ou la rendra encore plus difficile à mettre en oeuvre.

Je suis confuse. Pourriez-vous clarifier? Quant à moi, je pense qu'elle devrait être renforcée, en particulier en raison du climat actuel. Je pense que les fausses déclarations concernant la réputation personnelle sont vraiment importantes pour moi, en tant que femme, parce que je crois que l'on remet plus souvent en question la réputation des candidates qu'on ne le fait pour les candidats. Cela me préoccupe donc un peu.

Si vous vouliez répondre à cette question, j'aurai une question de suivi.

M. Yves Côté:

Oui.

Je ne me suis probablement pas exprimé de façon assez claire. Je vais donc essayer de clarifier ce que je voulais dire lorsque j'ai dit qu'il y aurait peut-être un problème quant à savoir si on devrait en élargir la portée.

L'article 91, dans son libellé actuel, s'applique uniquement aux candidats ou aux candidats éventuels, et pourtant des personnes pourraient formuler des commentaires très préjudiciables au sujet, par exemple, d'un parti politique ou d'un organisateur en chef d'un parti politique qui, de par la nature même de ces mots, pourraient avoir une incidence très dommageable sur le résultat d'une élection.

La question que je vous pose est la suivante. Lorsque cette disposition a été adoptée en 1908, nous n'avions peut-être pas la même implication de la part des dirigeants de parti, ou des partis, de sorte que ce problème, pour moi, est une question ouverte à savoir si vous aimeriez ou non que la disposition soit élargie. Voilà la raison pour laquelle je dis cela.

Pour ce qui est de la diminuer, je suggère de regarder de quelle façon les tribunaux et les juges ont appliqué cette disposition dans diverses affaires judiciaires. Vous vous rendez compte qu'ils cherchent quelque chose de passablement étroit. Par exemple, un des juges a dit que si vous faites un commentaire sur la façon dont une personne s'est acquittée de ses fonctions officielles, on serait très indulgent envers les personnes qui font ce genre de déclaration. Par contre, si vous attaquez la réputation d'une personne, ce n'est plus la même chose. Voilà pourquoi je vous dis que les fausses déclarations... Vous souhaitez peut-être ajouter des mots à des fins de clarification pour que les tribunaux aient une idée de ce que le Parlement aimerait qu'ils fassent, ou aimerait que la Loi dispose.

Comme je l'ai dit dès le départ, nous sommes à l'ère de la liberté d'expression de sorte qu'il est extrêmement important pour une nouvelle loi — si vous décidez de l'ouvrir et de la modifier — d'en tenir compte. Le tribunal accordera toute la latitude voulue aux personnes qui s'expriment dans le cadre d'un débat politique. Vous devez donc vous assurer que vos objectifs décrivent et définissent clairement l'objectif, et que les mécanismes que vous utilisez sont aussi étroits que possible pour l'atteindre.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Bien entendu, et je suis certaine que vous avez ces situations lorsque des gens font de fausses déclarations lors d'un débat politique, mais je pense que la plupart d'entre nous autour de la table peuvent s'entendre pour dire que si vous débattez avec un adversaire et que vous parlez de la façon dont son parti a voté ou sur ce qu'il a mis en oeuvre, il s'agit de manipulations partisanes à l'occasion qui peuvent être perçues de différentes façons.

Par exemple, lors de la dernière élection, mon adversaire conservateur, M. Gill, a envoyé des lettres à chaque ménage de ma circonscription. Dans ces lettres, il laissait entendre que j'avais appuyé un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire et que je l'avais présenté à la Chambre, mais je n'avais jamais été une députée auparavant; j'étais une nouvelle candidate. De toute évidence, il s'agissait d'une fausse déclaration, mais auparavant, il y avait eu une autre députée qui avait le même prénom que moi, de sorte qu'en éliminant le nom de famille et en envoyant une lettre à chaque ménage, on pouvait affirmer qu'une personne ayant ce prénom avait effectivement fait cela, mais il l'a fait pendant ma campagne électorale, ce qui laissait sous-entendre que j'avais déposé ce projet de loi.

C'est ici que les choses deviennent nébuleuses et il s'agit d'une fausse déclaration, mais je n'avais jamais songé à déposer une plainte à ce sujet, parce que je pense qu'il y a des façons de régler cela, par les médias, en réagissant à des allégations comme celle-là.

C'est l'aspect de la réputation personnelle qui me dérange vraiment, et comme nous voulons encourager plus de femmes à se présenter en politique, j'estime que nous ne devrions pas envoyer un message qui veut que, en tant qu'organe élu, cela ne nous dérange pas si de telles choses surviennent pendant une campagne. Nous devrions envoyer le message que oui, officiellement nous avons quelque chose, mais que c'est impossible à appliquer et je veux vous aider à faire en sorte que l'on puisse l'appliquer.

Comment nous y prenons-nous pour en faire un acte illégal ou une manoeuvre frauduleuse? Vous avez dit qu'elle ne va pas jusque-là.

(1150)

M. Yves Côté:

Ce serait assez facile. La Loi comporte des dispositions qui énoncent les actes illégaux ou les pratiques frauduleuses. Il s'agit de l'article 502.

Si vous décidez d'adopter cette façon de faire, il suffirait d'ajouter un paragraphe à l'un de ces deux articles pour indiquer clairement que dorénavant, il en serait ainsi.

En même temps, je pense qu'il est important de souligner à l'intention du Comité, monsieur le président, que si l'on envisage d'emprunter cette voie, je vous exhorterais à y réfléchir très attentivement, parce que si vous faites cela, il pourrait alors être possible de contester les résultats d'une élection. Je pense que l'une des choses que vous souhaiteriez éviter, ou du moins examiner très attentivement, c'est d'éviter d'avoir une multiplicité de contestations après une élection si une personne dit qu'une fausse déclaration a été faite à son sujet et qu'elle veut maintenant contester le résultat de l'élection.

Je vous inciterais à penser très sérieusement à l'endroit où vous mettriez la barre pour pouvoir lancer une telle contestation, puis à donner une orientation aux tribunaux, aux juges, le plus précisément possible sur comment ils devraient décider si les résultats de l'élection doivent être annulés ou non.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord. Je ne dispose pas de suffisamment de temps maintenant, mais j'aimerais avoir plus de renseignements sur la façon pour nous de rendre cette disposition applicable, mais peut-être ne pas aller aussi loin, de sorte que cette situation ne se répète pas indéfiniment.

Le président:

Merci, madame Sahota.

Avant de passer à M. Richards, je tiens à réitérer ce que le témoin a dit. Il est quand même extraordinaire que pendant que nous parlons de la recommandation B27 au sujet de l'article 331 de la Loi, l'interdiction aux étrangers d'inciter des électeurs à voter, ce matin, le Sénat a déposé son rapport « Contrôler l'influence étrangère sur les élections canadiennes ».

Monsieur Richards, vous avez la parole.

M. Blake Richards:

Voilà une excellente introduction pour moi, parce que je voulais aussi mentionner cela et demander au commissaire des précisions à ce sujet.

Le Sénat a publié son rapport. Je ne sais pas si vous l'avez vu. Il vient tout juste d'être publié. Dans Contrôler l'influence étrangère sur les élections canadiennes, on peut lire plusieurs recommandations visant à s'assurer que les fonds étrangers ne jouent aucun rôle direct ou indirect dans les élections canadiennes.

On y propose aussi d'interdire l'ingérence étrangère, de moderniser la réglementation de la participation de tiers, d'accroître les peines criminelles et de supprimer la limite de six mois appliquée à l'obligation de déclarer les contributions. Bien entendu, on demande aussi à Élections Canada de devoir faire des vérifications au hasard des dépenses de publicité électorale des tiers et des contributions qu'ils ont pu utiliser en période électorale. Voilà quelques-unes des recommandations faites dans ce rapport.

Bien entendu, vous nous avez indiqué que vous pensez que nous devons examiner le financement par des tiers et envisager de moderniser et de mettre à jour toute la réglementation. Dans une réponse à une de mes questions, vous avez indiqué plus tôt que pour que les dispositions soient efficaces, elles doivent s'appliquer à toutes les dépenses possibles liées à l'élection. J'aimerais connaître vos suggestions quant à ce que le Comité peut faire, parce que je suis tout à fait d'accord avec vous pour dire qu'il s'agit d'un aspect que nous devrions examiner. Ce problème doit être réglé. Je suppose que lorsque vous dites que cela doit s'appliquer à toutes les dépenses possibles liées à l'élection, vous indiquez que la disposition qui vise uniquement les dépenses en publicité n'est pas suffisamment large, et que vous croyez que nous devrions en élargir davantage la portée. J'aimerais connaître vos réflexions à ce sujet.

Plus particulièrement, j'aimerais connaître vos réflexions relativement à la limite de six mois. Comme je l'ai mentionné plus tôt, maintenant que les élections sont à date fixe, puisque l'on parle de six mois avant le dépôt du bref électoral, on sait très bien que si l'on veut obtenir cet argent, on peut le faire six mois plus un jour avant le dépôt du bref, et personne ne le sait. Personne ne s'en apercevra. En conséquence, il pourrait y avoir un très important financement étranger qui pourrait avoir une très grande incidence sur notre élection.

J'aimerais savoir ce que vous pensez de ces deux aspects.

(1155)

M. Yves Côté:

J'ai trois points à souligner.

Tout d'abord, le rapport du Sénat nous a été remis en fait 30 minutes avant que nous n'arrivions ici; j'ai donc eu à peine le temps de le survoler et je ne peux émettre aucun commentaire à propos du contenu.

Oui, il me semble que des tiers organisent des activités, des rassemblements par exemple. Pour l'instant, le Bureau et Élections Canada estiment qu'il ne s'agit pas de publicité politique ou électorale. Ainsi, dans l'état actuel des choses, un tiers peut tout à fait dépenser une somme importante pour organiser des rassemblements dans plusieurs villes au pays, y consacrer peut-être des milliers de dollars. En principe, ce n'est pas de la publicité électorale et ce n'est pas réglementé du tout.

M. Blake Richards:

Est-ce que cela inclut, par exemple, payer des solliciteurs pour faire du porte-à-porte?

M. Yves Côté:

Oui, exactement, tout à fait, ou avoir...

M. Blake Richards:

Vous dites qu'il y aurait lieu d'en élargir la portée?

M. Yves Côté:

... des personnes qui tentent par téléphone de convaincre les gens de voter de telle ou telle façon... Bien franchement, pour l'instant, c'est un champ libre et certaines activités sont permises.

J'estime qu'il faudrait absolument examiner de très près la question de la limite de six mois, voire la supprimer totalement ou faire en sorte d'aborder et de réglementer beaucoup plus d'activités que maintenant.

M. Blake Richards:

Oui, je le comprends et je suis tout à fait d'accord aussi.

Pour s'assurer que ce soit le cas, l'idée d'effectuer des audits aléatoires des dépenses de publicité électorale par des tiers a été soulevée. Serait-ce un moyen utile pour veiller à ce que plus d'activités soient prises en compte?

M. Yves Côté:

Bien, en supposant que le projet de loi, le nouveau cadre réglementaire, soit tel qu'il faut déclarer beaucoup plus d'activités et que certaines limites sont prévues, des audits ponctuels seraient certainement une bonne façon de rassembler l'information nécessaire afin de mettre au jour ou de dévoiler des activités illégales par des tiers.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci, je l'apprécie.

Si nous devons étudier ce scénario — et je crois fermement que nous le devrions —, avez-vous d'autres suggestions à faire pour moderniser l'approche? Devrions-nous, par exemple, hausser les pénalités ou veiller à prendre en compte davantage d'activités pour lutter contre l'ingérence étrangère dans les élections? Si vous n'avez rien à suggérer de vive voix aujourd'hui, pourriez-vous nous présenter quelque chose par écrit? Ce serait utile.

M. Yves Côté:

Oui, nous pourrions vous faire part d'autres idées. Je ne suggérerais pas nécessairement d'imposer des pénalités plus sévères, car je pense qu'elles le sont déjà assez. Le véritable défi, le véritable objectif pour le Parlement, c'est, à mon avis, de déterminer les mesures à prendre pour limiter les activités qui sont, en tout ou en partie, autorisées pour les tiers.

Effectivement, le juge Bastarache a dit ce que j'ai dit il y a quelques minutes, mais en même temps, les tribunaux, comme vous le savez probablement, ont invalidé les dépenses de tiers à quelques reprises dans le passé. C'est un sujet très délicat à aborder et, une fois votre objectif établi, vous devez vraiment avancer prudemment.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci. J'apprécie vos suggestions et vos idées.

Le président:

Merci, Blake.

Il reste quelques minutes pour le dernier député qui est M. Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Monsieur le commissaire et maître Chénier, je vous remercie tous les deux d'être ici aujourd'hui.

Je veux revenir sur certaines observations de mes collègues au sujet de la recommandation B27 qui concerne l'incitation par des étrangers. J'ai un exemple précis en tête et je veux que vous me disiez ce que vous en pensez.

Dans la circonscription que je représente, un assez grand nombre d'établissements scolaires offrent des services aux étrangers, des étudiants internationaux qui viennent souvent au Canada pour terminer leurs études secondaires et peut-être se préparer à les poursuivre au Canada au niveau postsecondaire.

Souvent, ils se montrent intéressés à participer au processus politique canadien, ce qui a été le cas pour mon élection. Pour obtenir leur diplôme, ils doivent, par exemple, accumuler suffisamment d'heures de bénévolat. En Ontario, on parle de 40 heures. Ils viennent cogner à ma porte pour dire qu'ils aimeraient m'aider et demander s'ils obtiennent ainsi des heures de bénévolat. Il s'agit essentiellement d'étudiants internationaux qui ne résident pas au Canada.

D'après les dispositions actuelles de l'article 331, est-ce qu'ils enfreignent la Loi en participant à une élection canadienne?

(1200)

M. Yves Côté:

L'article 331 précise « quiconque ne réside pas au Canada »; on peut donc présumer...

M. Arnold Chan:

Ce sont des non-résidents, ils sont donc ici de façon temporaire. Ils résident au Canada, mais ne sont pas... Ce sont des résidents temporaires, donc des non-résidents. Ils n'ont pas le statut de résident canadien. Sont-ils techniquement conformes parce qu'ils ont ce statut temporaire?

M. Yves Côté:

S'ils étudient ici, on peut clairement comprendre qu'en fait, ils résident, même si ce n'est que temporairement, au Canada.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je le répète, j'étais simplement préoccupé par cette situation particulière... Je sais qu'il est actuellement recommandé d'abroger l'article et que la partie la plus difficile, c'est habituellement, l'application des règles, en particulier pour ceux qui résident, peu importe où. Si une personne blogue au sujet de l'élection canadienne et qu'elle vit en Birmanie, il est difficile de se faire une quelconque... On peut toujours dire que ces gens-là essaient d'influer sur les élections, mais il n'y a aucun véritable mécanisme d'application des règles.

Les questions soulevées par Blake et d'autres intervenants concernant les influences étrangères m'interpellent, mais dans l'univers des médias sociaux, je ne vois tout simplement pas comment nous pouvons, de nos jours, exercer efficacement un quelconque contrôle réglementaire sur ce type d'activité, autre qu'au moyen de ressources réelles comme monétaires.

M. Yves Côté:

Il est certain que cette question représente tout un enjeu. Bien des pays y sont confrontés et pas seulement dans un contexte électoral. Ce n'est assurément pas une question simple.

En passant, monsieur le président, je pense que M. Chan a dit que j'avais recommandé d'abolir l'article 331. Ce n'est pas ce que j'ai recommandé; j'ai plutôt dit qu'il faudrait examiner la question dans le but de peut-être préciser les choses et...

M. Arnold Chan:

... si c'est possible...

M. Yves Côté:

Oui.

M. Arnold Chan:

... et si c'est impossible, eh bien, de l'abroger.

Le président:

Monsieur le commissaire, avant que nous terminions, avez-vous des observations finales à faire?

M. Yves Côté:

Si je le peux, et peut-être que cela survient à l'improviste pour les membres du Comité, nous recevons beaucoup de plaintes à propos de l'absence de titres d'appel sur les pancartes électorales pendant la campagne. Parfois, les titres y sont; ils sont simplement imprimés avec un écart de couleur et il est ainsi très difficile de les lire. Pour essayer de régler ce problème, nous devons parfois utiliser des loupes pour voir si les titres sont imprimés, et quand nous les voyons, nous mettons un terme à l'enquête. Si vous pouviez trouver une façon de recommander que les titres d'appel soient raisonnablement visibles ou de proposer un amendement à cette fin, certains d'entre nous s'en trouveraient fort aise.

C'est un point sans grande importance, mais comme dernier commentaire, c'est une demande que je vous présente.

Le président:

Il s'agit de la ligne sur les pancartes indiquant que c'est autorisé par l'agent officiel d'un parti.

M. Yves Côté:

Oui.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup de vous être joints à nous. Vos commentaires sur les recommandations que nous allons maintenant étudier sont très utiles.

M. Yves Côté:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Nous suspendrons les travaux pendant quelques minutes pendant que nous nous préparons à poursuivre à huis clos.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on June 08, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.