header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-05-05 PROC 19

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning.

This is meeting number 19 of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs in the 1st session of the 42nd Parliament. This meeting is held in public. Today we continue our hearings for our study of initiatives toward a family-friendly House of Commons.

For the first hour we welcome Clare Beckton, the executive director of the Centre for Women in Politics and Public Leadership at Carleton University, and David Prest, a long-time staff member with the Conservative Party on Parliament Hill, to make sure that we're inclusive of everyone involved with our decisions. In the second hour, we'll have Mr. François Arsenault, director of parliamentary proceedings at the National Assembly of Quebec.

We welcome Joël Lightbound to the committee. I'd also like to welcome a former city councillor from the city of Whitehorse, Ranj Pillai. He is right at the back, experiencing another order of government.

Just so that people know, from a discussion that we had recently, the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner's term ends this June. As we're making decisions on that file, there may be a new person.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

I appreciate your raising this.

To the best of my knowledge, she's an officer of Parliament, an agent of Parliament. When we went through the process of hiring the new Auditor General—there were so many fires going on at the time that we could only spend so much time on it—I was not very pleased with the process.

It is Parliament that decides who is hired for these positions, and it's only Parliament that can remove those people from their positions. Yet the government of the day completely owned the process; the opposition was not engaged. There was maybe a little bit of perfunctory consultation about what sorts of things we were looking for, but it didn't amount to a real consultation. By comparison, when we hired the Sergeant-at-Arms when I was at Queen's Park, because that person was hired by the provincial parliament, there was an all-party committee struck, and it was totally non-partisan all the way through.

What we do here federally, at least with the last big appointment.... The government did all of it. They did the consultation, they did the interviews, they did the selection, and then they offered up to Parliament a name, and it was vote yes, vote no. The process just didn't seem to me to be consistent with the notion that the person is an agent of Parliament. It's deliberately structured that way so that the government of the day can't order these particular people around, people such as our Privacy Commissioner, our Auditor General.... We have a number of them; I think there are 10 or 11, actually.

The process should support the notion that Parliament is doing the hiring, and yet the other process was not that way at all. It was rather like: “Oh, by the way, do you mind giving your thumbs up, yes or no?” If this process is going to kick in again, I would very much like us to engage, in some fashion. I don't even know where we'd begin, Mr. Chair. I just lay this in front of you. The new government seems to be interested in doing things differently. This is one opportunity by which we could right-side Parliament by giving Parliament back control of the whole process of hiring these agents and officers, which is then consistent with the notion that it's Parliament doing the hiring and that Parliament is the only one that can fire someone. The reason is that if the prime minister of the day, no matter who, is upset with an Auditor General's report, he can't fire them. It takes Parliament to do that.

I would ask that we engage early in this and look at doing things differently, consistent with the government's indication that they want to do it differently.

Thanks.

The Chair:

Now that we have some members here, I want to get on with the witnesses.

David, could you take that back to the House leader and talk with David about it?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Absolutely. We'll take it under advisement.

(1105)

Mr. David Christopherson:

I appreciate that. Thank you.

The Chair:

We will welcome our witnesses.

You have about five minutes, roughly, for your opening statements. Who would like to start?

Clare, why don't you go ahead?

Ms. Clare Beckton (Executive Director, Centre for Women in Politics and Public Leadership, Carleton University):

Thank you for inviting me to appear before you.

I'll just make a couple of short remarks, because I know you like to ask a lot of questions.

I'm pleased that the committee is looking at the issue of a friendlier Parliament that recognizes the need of members of Parliament to meet family responsibilities as well as their home responsibilities. Needless to say, that is not an easy challenge, as we know from many sectors.

Creating a more family-friendly environment requires mechanisms to support and ensure practices and actions that reflect gender equality. Currently about 26% of members of Parliament are women, which contributes to an environment that does not fully recognize gender equality. There is a need for leadership from political parties to continue to augment the number of women running for office, including being fair and not putting them in unwinnable ridings, which happens. Having more women, I must caution, does not automatically create equality, but it contributes to changing the culture.

I know the term has been “work-life balance” here. I always use the term “work-life integration”, as I believe that this striving is for a mythical balance that doesn't exist. I've never found it in my life, and it has never bothered me that I didn't. Instead, we need to look for ways that permit members of Parliament to serve their country as they wish while still having time for their families, which can include child care support that recognizes the needs of members of Parliament while in Ottawa.

Male members of Parliament need to be encouraged and supported as well as female members in meeting their family responsibilities.

Orientations for members and chairs of committees should include how to create a respectful environment and, for committee chairs, how to schedule to accommodate members' needs as well.

Also important is having an environment of respect that allows members and their staff to get work done without fear of harassment and disrespectful behaviour. House rules, education, and processes can assist in making this happen, along with modelling of the desired behaviour by party leaders.

For political participation to be equal, the environment and the House processes need to an ensure an equal voice for men and women and have peer processes for resolution of any complaints.

Efficiency of processes in the House is certainly one way of helping to reducing Parliament.... For example, reducing Parliament to sitting four days a week could be one option that might better reflect the need of out-of-Ottawa MPs to return to their ridings and families. Electronic voting, in the age of technology, can certainly assist, as it may allow someone to vote while still caring for a member of the family, if that is necessary. While eliminating evening sessions may not be possible, they can be reserved for urgent or emergency debates and votes, for example.

Being mindful of sittings on major school holidays is another thing that can be looked at.

These are just a few possibilities, and I welcome your questions this morning.

The Chair:

I would just comment that the holidays, unfortunately, are provincial, so they are not always the same.

Mr. Prest.

Mr. David Prest (As an Individual):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

Thanks for the invitation, committee.

Just by way background, I'm currently with the opposition House leader's office. I've worked for House leaders and whips for some 35 years, in government and in opposition. I have been a parent for 25 of those 35 years. I have six children and I still have young children at home, the youngest being eight years old, so I may qualify for this family-friendly discussion. Just don't ask me for advice about family planning.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Prest: I would first like to comment on the calendar and the number of days a year and days a week that the House sits. I will be advocating for the status quo. I lived through the open-calendar days when there was no end-time and no indication of how many days the House would sit and when it would sit. Our current fixed calendar is much more family-friendly than the open-ended calendar.

In examining the particulars, the House calendar needs to accommodate things such as the number of sitting days required to get done what business needs to be done, the number of days the government is available to be held to account by members of the House, and the number of days members can spend in their constituencies and be with family. It has been my observation that the current calendar strikes the right balance. Increasing one item while taking away from another may not get us where we want to go.

I have some suggestions, though minor ones.

Last year, before we adjourned for the summer, we settled the sitting days for January, February, March, and April 2016, instead of waiting for the fall, which is the usual practice. The committee might want to recommend an earlier decision on the calendar as the normal practice, as I'm already booking things for February and I'm not sure whether I'll be able to go now; I have to wait until the fall.

Also, when providing input to the Speaker in drafting the next calendar, I would avoid scheduling long periods of House time together, particularly the five-week blocks. When my in-laws were organizing a family reunion in Vermont for this July, on the question of how many days it should last I gave the same advice. People are enthusiastic at first, but after a few days somebody is going to cry. It's the same sort of thing here.

I have a comment with respect to the hours of the House. Most extra-curricular activities for children begin before the House adjourns on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays. I miss a lot of these activities when the House is sitting, and my kids are late a lot for soccer and baseball. When they get into competitive sports, they are penalized for that, so when the House is sitting, my kids are on the bench a lot. I think the committee could look at altering the hours of the House, perhaps starting earlier and ending earlier.

I like the fact that the whips are now scheduling votes following question period instead of in the evening, and the continued use of the application of the votes by the whips frees up more time for members and their staff. Consolidating votes on one particular day of the week would reduce the number of days the House sits late as a consequence of those votes' taking place after question period.

Finally, I asked my oldest daughter Wrenna what her thoughts would be about this study, and she addressed something I didn't think of, maybe because it had nothing to do with the rules of procedure. She suggested that we have more organized family-friendly events and cited the time I took her to a Christmas party organized for children of staff and MPs. It had quite an impression on her, and she obviously has fond memories of that experience. When I had my office on the second floor here in the Centre Block and I would head home on a Tuesday or a Wednesday, I would walk through a gauntlet of organized events and receptions on the way to the car. Every room and every corner of the Centre Block had a reception going on or some sort of event. Obviously we have people who are very good at organizing events, so perhaps it would not be too much of a bother to organize more family-friendly events, perhaps one per season.

(1110)

The Chair:

That's a very interesting idea.

We'll go to questioning now and start with Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Thank you very much to both of the witnesses.

My question is for Ms. Beckton. I heard you say “work-life integration”, and I'm interested to know a bit more about that. One of the things that has come up in our study is that it isn't so much work-life balance; it really is just trying to find ways to work more efficiently, to modernize the House procedures in such ways that we are able to do more in less time and therefore that we have a resulting work-life balance. But it really is more about that efficiency and integration.

Can you elaborate on that?

Ms. Clare Beckton:

The reason I prefer “work-life integration” is that if people are always striving for a mythical balance, they often feel stressed because they're not achieving that balance. You're absolutely right that you need to look at how efficient the process of Parliament is and how it helps members meet their responsibilities.

If people are passionate about what they're doing and they really care, they're not always concerned that they spend an extra hour here one day and less here the next. I think that's part of what we mean by work-life integration. It's not always possible—in fact it's rarely possible—in the kind of roles that MPs play or the kind of roles that I've played over the years to have that perfect balance. It's more whether we feel satisfied with what's going on or feel supported in being able to take on responsibilities.

That integration could work differently.

You've talked about family events. Sometimes you go to family events and you don't spend the time at the workplace, and that should be just fine, because that's the kind of thing we need when we're talking about “integration” and not necessarily “balance”. I agree with you.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Your work has been on women in public leadership and women in politics. There is a gendered component to talking about the hours of sitting, when we talk about caregiving responsibilities. While they affect, obviously, men and women both and there could be an age thing as well, when we heard from the IPU they told us that when listing barriers to politics, women were much more likely to talk about the hours of sitting and the caregiving responsibilities.

Can you talk a little about the differential impact and maybe the deterrent effect on women, particularly women with young families, of the hours and the work week?

Ms. Clare Beckton:

There is definitely a deterrent, because there is still an assumption in society that it is women's responsibility to do the caregiving. We know that this is changing with the younger generation, that more and more men are becoming engaged and really want to be spending time with their families and their children, but if you look at the percentage of time, it's still higher for women.

I think women tend to worry more about being in two places at the same time. I talk to women all the time who say, I feel guilty when I'm at work and I feel guilty when I'm at home, because I feel I'm not giving effectively to either one. There's also the notion—and still, even in recent times—that women will be asked about their family responsibilities, members of Parliament or otherwise, and men will not be. There is that media perception still of what women should be doing and what their role should be, and I think this inhibits women.

The other thing that I think inhibits women, and I've heard it many times, is “I don't want my private life put out there”, and so they will step back, and that's unfortunate, because I think it should not be the case.

(1115)

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Do you think, then, that addressing the efficiencies of the time we spend here and perhaps even compressing the work week would help in redressing the imbalance in our Parliament? We're number 48 in the world for the number of women in Parliament. Would this help to address that?

Ms. Clare Beckton:

It's one of the elements that would help address it. I think there's no substitute for leadership from the political parties whereby they put a real focus on how you encourage more women to run. We know that women usually don't put themselves forward: they need to be asked. Parties need to be out there recruiting, engaging, and asking women to run, because we need that diversity, and the House is better served.

What you say is one piece, but there is that broader piece of how you get them to run in the first place. It certainly would open the door for younger women, because you find that many women wait until their children are a little older before deciding to run, because they feel that they'll have a better opportunity to put their energies where they'd like them to be.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Picking up on what you said about the culture and about respect and modelling the desired behaviours, I've had young students coming to question period, young women, saying “I'll never run for Parliament” because they just don't like the very aggressive behaviour.

What do you think could be done about that?

Ms. Clare Beckton:

Well, I think that is the whole piece about respect: how you work to change question period so that it really becomes an opportunity to really genuinely ask questions. That is desirable; it's a good thing. You want to be able to challenge the leaders and the government, but you want to be able to do it in a way that is not for showmanship but is really aimed at getting the kinds of answers that people in the country want to hear. I think many people out there would look at Parliament in a different way, if this were the case.

Certainly, I have heard a number of women ask: why would I want to engage in that kind of fray? I don't feel comfortable doing it, it's not my style, and it's not how I want to do things. We run into that everywhere, because when women are perceived to be more aggressive, that is perceived to be bad, while if men are more aggressive, that's okay, that's what they do.

Rightly or wrongly, this is still there as a perception, and we hear it all the time, that there's that double standard. It's more often an unconscious bias than it is a conscious decision.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

If we were to compress the work week and deal with the number of hours and make it more efficient, or if we did something about maybe having the Speaker enforcing decorum in the House, would those changes encourage more women to run? Do you think we would see more women on the ballot as a result?

Ms. Clare Beckton:

I think those are certainly very positive steps that would help. When you're trying to sell to women the desirability of running for office, those things might help make the tipping point when you ask women to run or have women being encouraged. We're certainly out there always saying, put your hand up, step forward, do it, because we need women in these roles.

The Chair:

Just as a reminder to committee members, if you want to make sure that everyone gets a chance to ask questions, you're welcome to split your time.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

By happy coincidence, that is exactly what I was going to do with my colleague Mr. Schmale.

First of all, I want to thank David Prest for attending as a witness. David has unparalleled experience in our caucus, working up here through all kinds of different circumstances over three decades and, of course, in various stages of life: as a young parent and then as a parent of a growing family, and so on.

My first question, David, is for you. Regarding the family-friendly events, I agree with you. I have a sense that the reason these things tend to fall apart is that we get periodic tsunamis through here. Good ideas come along and become part of the culture, and then you get 200 new MPs out of the total number and many of the good ideas are just swept away and have to be rediscovered.

Thinking of what you suggested, I just jotted down possibilities for four possible events. One is doing it from when our year begins, which is September—that is, something in the autumn. I was thinking of maybe a Halloween party. We used to do one with the help of the Speaker—that's after the confectioners shut down theirs. Anybody who has kids who have been loaded up with candy knows that too much candy is not family-friendly, but there could be a Halloween party.

There could be a Christmas party that's child-oriented.

We tried one year doing something in February with the co-operation of the Speaker. February is the period when the blahs set in.

Finally, there could be something either on the lawn or maybe in the East Block courtyard—outdoors, anyway—in June.

Does that strike you as a reasonable number of things, or would you suggest different ones?

(1120)

Mr. David Prest:

I was thinking of the four seasons, and these suggestions would suit that notion.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The chair suggests possibly an Easter egg hunt.

These things have tended to be for MPs and their kids, but I gather you're thinking of something that could be for the kids of MPs and also the kids of staffers, where possible.

Mr. David Prest:

Yes, I think for staff too—or you can have it separate. Sometimes caucuses organize things for staff and MPs together.

I don't know how many members have families here in Ottawa. The Christmas one that I was thinking about was closer to the caucus Christmas parties, for which a lot of spouses are here and their families are here; they had a lot of MPs' families present. I guess that at other times of year it would be more difficult to bring them in here.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The other thing I want to say, not to our witnesses but to the committee members as a whole, is that I think there might be merit in our sending a letter to the House leaders of the various parties asking them to start discussing sometime this spring the sitting schedule for next year, rather than waiting. They can do what they want with it then, but that would put it on their agenda.

The Chair:

Is there anyone opposed to that?

We'll do it. You have to be listening.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That was all.

The Chair:

It's a good idea.

Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Reid, and Mr. Chair.

Thank you to our witnesses once again for your contributions. This is very informative indeed.

I want to pick up on one thing you mentioned about guilt: it's regardless of gender. When I'm at home I feel as though I need to be at work and when I'm at work that I need to be at home. I think it's everyone. Maybe women feel it more, but I know I get that feeling. I think it just goes with the job, but if we can find a way to lessen it, that would be great.

I want to mention, before I get on to my next point, the family-friendly events and bringing families here. This is something we talked about in a previous meeting: the use of travel points for some of our spouses who live out of province or out of driving distance, that type of thing.

I think we all supported disclosure, but I think we all came to an agreement that maybe we should or could look at ways to reduce the impulse of the public to then say, you're flying your spouse everywhere on the taxpayer's dime. I think that may help; I don't know. Nonetheless, in order to get them included, I think everyone has agreed, on every side of the aisle, that getting your spouse here and seeing how the place works and showing what you do is actually of benefit, because they can understand.

I don't know whether you want to comment on that before I get to the next part.

Mr. David Prest:

Using travel points, you mean?

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Either way.

Mr. David Prest:

I didn't want to suggest that because it would mean spending more money; but yes, they could. They could be organized in advance. I guess it would be cheaper if you could have advance bookings of these flights to get the family here. I think it would be worthwhile.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Ms. Beckton, do you find that getting families involved is a better thing? I would assume so.

Ms. Clare Beckton:

Yes, I think that giving families a better understanding of what their spouse or parent is doing on the Hill would certainly make it easier to understand when that spouse or parent is not always available. I think there have been a lot of marriage breakups, and part of that is from a lack of understanding of the pressures that are imposed on an MP when they come to Ottawa.

(1125)

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Sure.

You were talking about compressed work weeks. We had talked about this in previous meetings as well, and the unintended consequences for those MPs who had actually brought their families to Ottawa. I think it causes an issue for them if they are now leaving on a Thursday instead of a Friday, or what have you, however their situation works. I think that might cause another unintended consequence. I think that's something we have to keep an eye on as well.

Ms. Clare Beckton:

Yes. It's a matter of looking for that best solution that suits the majority of people but doesn't penalize others, which is very challenging at times.

Those are simply things that one looks at whether they work or not. It really depends. I think David has much more understanding of the parliamentary rules and procedures than I do, but certainly that is something that has been done in other areas.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

How much time do I have, Mr. Chair?

The Chair:

Twenty seconds.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I'll save that one for now.

Ms. Clare Beckton:

For the next round.

The Chair:

David could extend that into eight minutes.

Voices: Oh, Oh!

The Chair: Mr. Christopherson, you have seven minutes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Chair. After you've been here for a while, you can do anything with 20 seconds, trust me.

Mr. Jamie Schmale: I could have kept going.

Mr. David Christopherson: That's all right.

Thank you both very much for your attendance today.

The first thing I want to do is pick up on what Mr. Schmale said regarding guilt. I've been doing this for over 30 years. I remember a staff rep with the Auto Workers. We were at a retirement, and he was giving his good-bye speech, and said, “You know, everybody over the years has said to me”—meaning him—“'Oh, thank you for the sacrifice that you made for the union members, for the cause, to make the world a better place.'” He said: “You know, the truth of the matter is that it wasn't me who made the sacrifice. It was my family who made the sacrifice, because I was off doing what I enjoy doing; I was able to pursue my passions of speaking out on matters of injustice and fairness, so I was getting a return on what I was doing. But the wedding anniversary, the children's birthdays...”.

Do you want to talk about guilt? It's awful. But that's the truth of the matter: it's the family who pay the sacrifice, because quite frankly, many times you have a choice. It sounds awful, but this is the dilemma; this is what we're talking about, the real life of being an MP. We're still people, and that guilt, when you have to go to a major event—for whatever reason, you have to be there—but your partner is saying, “It's our daughter's birthday. How could you possibly make anything else a bigger priority?” There is such guilt.

I guess talking about it may be one way of dealing with it. I always thought that was a profound observation that Frank Marose made, that the sacrifice really wasn't his, although everyone was saying “Thank you for your sacrifice”, but that it was his family that made those sacrifices.

Second, Peter Stoffer, one of the most amazing parliamentarians to ever darken the doorways around here.... One of the things he was known for was the "All-party party”, which blew me away, because I have to tell you, if my whole reputation from this Hill back in Hamilton were that I was the organizer of a major party, I'd be in for one term. But Peter pulled it off. He was a one-off guy, and people loved Peter.

Maybe it's time to find somebody. There's a unique opportunity. We have a lot of rookies. There's a vacuum there to step into. He literally was all about pulling us all together.

Mr. Prest, everything you were talking about.... That was Peter. That's what Peter was about. The examples you were giving, I think, were mostly Peter: the Christmas one, the "All-party party”; then there used to be the “Hilloween”, which Mr. Reid has pointed to. I'm glad you raised that, and this is something we'll look at.

I want to comment again that I can't believe the difference it has made to have the votes after QP. How many evenings are not destroyed by that? And by saying this, I don't mean that we get to go back to our apartments; I mean that then we can finally go to the meetings we're supposed to be at and the receptions we want to get to, and yes, sometimes spend some social time with colleagues we don't really get to know all that well.

That was a simple thing, and I think it has made a huge difference.

While I have the floor, I want to mention the House and the tone with women. I've defended heckling as an important part of the culture of Parliament, but of course by that I mean one-offs that are like political cartoons, which are meant to be funny and biting and to make a point.

I experienced something yesterday, and I didn't rise to make a point of order, but I did make a point of going over and talking to the Speaker afterwards.... I sit right across from the Minister of International Trade. Now, the Minister of International Trade happens to be a woman, and she happens to be a small woman; she's petite. She sits right across from me, as David is here, and I have to tell you, the drowning noise coming from, I'll just say, “opposition benches”, was so loud that I could hardly hear her. That's not heckling. That's not an intelligent contribution. That's not an emotional response reflecting something that's of value to you that you had to speak out on. No, that's just plain rude and ignorant and unacceptable. Hopefully, when we talk about heckling, we can separate the difference between what is meant to be a pointed contribution to a debate, remembering that our debates replace fighting on the battlefield, so that there has to be some letting go, and just plain drowning someone out because you can, particularly—and I'm going to say it—just because you're a man and you have a bigger....

I have a big, loud voice. To use it for the sole purpose of shutting down a colleague is the antithesis of an intelligent, civilized, democratic debate, and I think we're going to see the Speaker continue to do what he can to stop that.

(1130)



I do have a question here.

Mr. Prest, you have the unique advantage of having been on both sides as a staff person. With all your experience, just give us your thoughts on the differing impacts on staff—and I've been on both sides, in different houses—from your perspective as this place affects staff, depending whether you're in government or in opposition.

Mr. David Prest:

When you're in government, you have to be here more often. I think there are later hours, but you also have more resources and more people to do things, and being in more than one place at the same time is less of a problem. When the House sits, you have to be here.

When you're in opposition it's not as crucial. I like it when the House goes on these autopilots; it frees up both sides. You can go home and not worry that something is going to happen and that you're going to have to rush back. Generally, when the House is sitting it's tough on both sides; it doesn't matter whether you're in opposition or government.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm sure my time has expired.

The Chair:

No, you have one minute.

Mr. David Christopherson:

No kidding? Woo-hoo! All right.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

You have 50 seconds now.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You're making me lose it.

Do you know what? I'll let it ride, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Okay.

David, could you come and take the chair? We'll go on to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Prest, you've been a staffer since 1981. Is that about right?

Mr. David Prest:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's the year I was born. It is very nice to meet you here. Thank you for that.

Your comment earlier was that you like the status quo. That's fine; it's a fair point. I'm just curious about how you see Fridays, whether as an advantage or a disadvantage. Should we leave them the way they are? Should we make them longer? Should we make them shorter? Should we make them “autopilot”? What ideas do you have for Fridays?

Mr. David Prest:

When it was first brought up, you'd get excited about having long weekends, but then, when you think about it in practice—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

—it's just more time in the riding.

Mr. David Prest:

I thought about how it applied to me and probably to most members with family in Ottawa. It would exacerbate my ability to get my kids on the soccer field on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays, for sure, because the House would have to sit longer.

My kids go to school. I don't think I would be given the Friday off anyway, but my kids are in school, so it wouldn't matter. I find that the House adjourning at 2:30 on Friday is good enough. That's the only day I pick up my kids from school, Fridays.

I think there are not many votes on Thursday evenings and none on Fridays, so the House is rather on autopilot, I guess, on Thursday afternoon and Fridays, as far as substantive business is concerned.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Well, it's a de facto autopilot; it's not a real autopilot on Thursdays. Would you want to see it as a full autopilot in the Standing Orders on Thursday afternoons and Fridays? Even both sides—

Mr. David Prest:

Not really. I think as a government you want some flexibility to do something on Thursday afternoon; you might need to do it. But the whips control the votes anyway. They can just defer it; both the opposition and the government whip have the same authority. I think it's taken care of that way. If you were going to have a vote, you'd have a vote on a dilatory motion to adjourn, which is not going to....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you think we should move all substantive votes in the Standing Orders to after question period?

Mr. David Prest:

I think you leave flexibility with the whips to do it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You'd rather leave it the way it is, so that basically you see motions to do it each time, instead of this being the default.

Mr. David Prest:

Or you could just have it as an option in the Standing Orders, so that a whip could trigger it. I think you would want to leave it open—again, speaking as a government hound—in case you need to have a vote in an afternoon or after question period to advance a bill for the next day. Then, the odd time you might have to have a vote on Thursday night. I would leave it flexible.

(1135)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You probably know the Standing Orders better than all of us combined, with the time you've been in the House leader's office. Is there anything you'd want to change or revise, if you had the chance, in the Standing Orders? Is there anything about which you would say, that's a really silly thing, and perhaps we should revisit it?

If there is ever a time or a place to do it, it's here.

Mr. David Prest:

Do you mean In relation to their being family-friendly or not?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I mean either family-friendly or just generally in the Standing Orders. You've been on both sides; you've seen how it works.

Thinking totally objectively, is there something there that nobody has talked about and about which you think “that's silly, and we should probably fix it”?

Mr. David Prest:

Well, not off the top of my head. I do have a list of things I would like to change, but it has nothing to do with family-friendly. It has to do with increasing the role of backbenchers—and the opposition, now that I'm in opposition. I change my view as I go from government to opposition.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'd be curious to hear your view of both before and after, then.

Mr. David Prest:

Pardon me?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'd be curious to hear your view on those matters before and after—when you're in government and when you're in opposition. I'd love to hear the ones that haven't changed.

Mr. David Prest:

Well, here's one. I'll give you an example: motions to instruct a committee giving it authority to divide a bill. They are moved by a private member, but when the debate is adjourned they become a government order. They're controlled by the government afterwards, so they just sit there.

It used to be like that for standing committees, when they would report to the House. You'd move concurrence, and once that motion was adjourned it became a government order. We changed the rules to address that, because it didn't make sense, if you had a report that was ordering documents from the government, that the government controlled when that was going to come to a vote. They used to talk about how powerful committees were, and actually they weren't.

Anyway, we made that change. We should have made that change also for other routine motions during routine proceedings, such as for a motion of instruction to a committee.

That's just one off the top of my head.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Taking it back to where we're supposed to be—family-friendly—what kind of changes do you see being needed on the simple things we've been talking about? I don't know whether you've been following our process for the last couple of months, but questions around day care, the bus system, parking, calendar sharing— all these kinds of things—have come up, which are technical questions and internal economy questions. I wonder whether you have feedback on those.

My personal pet peeve, as a former staffer—I was a staffer here for many years as well—is the fact that you can't share your calendar between an MP and a staff member on your BlackBerry in such a way that both can edit it. I'd like to take that a step further and allow, for example, my spouse to see my calendar, so that I'm not stuck using Google Calendar and going off the reservation to share it, so that they know where I am and we can actually plan things.

Mr. David Prest:

Is that a technical problem, or a...?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I was in tech before I was in politics, and I don't see it as a technical problem. I see it as a political problem; therefore, it has to go to Internal Economy to direct ITSD—the IT service desk—to do something about it, and they won't do it without that direction.

Is that a direction you would want to see?

Mr. David Prest:

I guess I don't grasp what the politics of it is. I suppose, if you were serious—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If there were no politics, it would be fixed by now.

Mr. David Prest:

I guess I'm not familiar with the issue. I really don't know.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What about the day care and the bus system and parking?

You have an immense amount of experience here, and I defer to that.

Mr. David Prest:

They had the day care here when I first started having a family, and I found it too expensive at that time, for one thing, and once my children were of school age it didn't make sense for them to be in downtown Ottawa; I'd rather have them close to their school and home. It didn't make sense to me, so I never really considered it. It may be different for MPs who live downtown; I don't know.

I'm not sure what you mean by the bus system. Do you mean the House of Commons buses?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, the House of Commons bus system, the House of Commons cafeterias—all these things—are geared to MPs and, quite frankly, they're useful to staffers as well. The service is considerably reduced in cafeterias and buses when we're gone, and the frequency of the buses has dropped over the last few years. When I started here, there were a lot more buses than there are now, as an example.

Do you have comments on that, or on things you'd see as improvements?

Mr. David Prest:

If the House isn't sitting, then it wouldn't bother me that there are not as many buses available, because I'm not rushing somewhere, as I would be when the House is sitting. I've never found that to be a problem with the buses.

For the cafeteria, it's the same thing. I've never found it to be a problem.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. David Christopherson):

Mr. Graham, you only have a couple of seconds left. You have enough time to say goodbye and thank you.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, go ahead. Everybody else gave their last 10 seconds.

Thank you, David.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. David Christopherson):

Very good.

Moving now to five-minute slots, Mr. Richards, you're up first, sir.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Mr. Prest, I have a few questions for you as well.

This has been covered a little bit already, but you made mention in your remarks of the votes being after QP, and I think you made it fairly clear that you believe there still needs to be some flexibility there. I don't disagree with you on that, but the fact that we've been having more votes after question period is something that I would say, from what I've seen, has been pretty nearly unanimously, or maybe even unanimously held as a positive thing,

I want to get your perspective as a staff member. You mentioned that one of the challenges you have is for your kids in extracurricular activities—sports and arts and things like that—and that it's difficult for you to get them there on time when the House is sitting.

Does having the votes after QP help? Obviously, that can reduce the length of time the House sits somewhat, sometimes, because we're eliminating at least the bells portion of a vote. Has that been something in which you've noticed a difference? Has it been helpful? Have you been able to see your kids get a little more time on the playing field and a little less time on the bench as a result?

(1140)

Mr. David Prest:

As a staffer, it really doesn't have much of an impact on me, but I noticed that it has a positive impact on members. I don't vote. Actually, sometimes in the evening when members are voting I don't really need to be there to watch them vote. When I was working for the whip, I did, but no, from a staff perspective, it doesn't matter.

Mr. Blake Richards:

It hasn't made too much impact, then. Okay.

You also talked a little about the sitting days and about how, if they were set a little earlier in the year, that would make sense. I can understand and appreciate that people are always looking to plan holidays or other family functions and such things. The earlier someone has that calendar, the more it makes planning a little easier.

You mentioned that last year we were able to do that before the House rose, so obviously it's possible for it to be done. Having worked in a whip's office, I assume you probably have some knowledge of how it is done. I wonder whether you see any problems that would arise in trying to set the calendar a little earlier in the year, or is it something you see as entirely possible without any real unintended consequence to doing it?

Mr. David Prest:

Because we did it last year, I see it as a possibility. There might be a case in which the provinces haven't established their break weeks, but with that type of change, with unanimous consent you can rejig it when you get closer to the date, if you wish, by one week or something. But to have to block out all those months just because of waiting for more information seems to be a little excessive.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You also talked a briefly about longer blocks of sitting weeks. You mentioned they are something you felt should be avoided.

I wonder if you might want to give us a sense of what you would see as optimal in terms of sitting weeks. I understand that one thing that is done is to try to plan a little bit around.... As the chair mentioned, the school calendars are set provincially, obviously, but I think there is an attempt made to try to make this work for as many people as possible across the country, so that our calendar is aligned with such things.

I know there needs to be some flexibility in respect to meeting those parameters, but could you maybe give us a sense of what you would see as optimal in terms of three weeks on, one week off, or whatever else it might be, and also give us a sense, from your experience over the years, of what you see as happening around here when we get longer blocks or blocks of a shorter period? Are there impacts on the way business flows from those as well?

Mr. David Prest:

I think that ideally, three weeks on, one week off works the best. When you get into the fourth or fifth week, often they are not productive at all: people are at each other, and nothing is moving forward. They are almost like a wasted week, I find, when you get into these fifth weeks, and it takes a toll on the morale of the MPs to be away from their families and in this sort of combative environment for that long a time. It's always good to have a break, to regroup, and then come back. The three-week sitting blocks are ideal.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. David Christopherson):

You're good for another three minutes.

Oh, I'm sorry; I apologize. It's a five-minute round, not a seven-minute round, so you have 15 seconds.

I get you all revved up and then shut you down.

Mr. Blake Richards: Gee, thanks, Mr. Chair.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. David Christopherson): Yes, I know. That's why I'm not the chair.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Blake Richards:

In that case, thank you both very much for being here. We appreciated your help today.

(1145)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. David Christopherson):

Thank you, and I'm sorry for the confusion.

Ms. Petitpas Taylor, you have the floor, ma'am.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Thank you, and you pronounced my name right. That's great.

First and foremost, I want to thank both Ms. Beckton and Mr. Prest for being here today. We appreciate your taking time to help us with this really important portfolio that we're looking at.

To start off, probably six years ago I was approached to run provincially in my province, and at the time my reality was very different from what it is now. Back then I was taking care of a mother who suffers from dementia, and I really wanted to be there and needed to be close to home, so I quickly made a decision that the timing was off.

At the time when I was approached to run, they had indicated that first of all they were looking for more women to run provincially and also wanted to make sure we had younger women run. That was one reason I had been asked, and also that I was involved in my community.

Fast forward six years and here I am now. My mother is still living—she's in an assisted facility—but when I reflect upon why I made the decision not to run, it's that there were some obstacles put in the way.

If I look now, I guess that as Canadians we want our Parliament to really reflect our Canadian population. I guess my question—to both of you, really and truly—is how do you think the status quo will encourage or discourage more women from running, or also getting more young people to run to ensure that we have a more inclusive Parliament here in Ottawa?

Ms. Clare Beckton:

Without reference to specific rules, I think the status quo around the culture of combativeness will continue to discourage younger women and women in general, and people from some of the different cultural backgrounds in which that is not the way they operate and not the way they're accustomed to operating. They're more used to a collaborative style. So I think that is one of the things that will continue to inhibit people.

You were talking a little bit earlier about day care. I think for a lot of young parents coming to the Hill, having something that was close might allow them to bring their younger children to be closer to them and their family if that was what was necessary. I've seen a few MPs, who are nursing mothers, trying to manage that in their schedule every day.

I think quite apart from the rules, the culture plays a big role in attracting younger women, and in fact all women, to come, as well as, I think, a certain number of younger men as well, because they're looking at things a little differently today.

Mr. David Prest:

I think we just need to keep moving towards a more family-friendly House, and that will encourage more women to run, because they are usually the ones who are looking after children. I can't think of any rule changes that would encourage.... I think we should just keep moving forward with this study and improving things around here for parents.

Ms. Clare Beckton:

You need EI changes that would provide a specific portion that men could take or they would lose it, as is happening in Quebec. That does really give men permission to take that, which right now is challenging. They find that in their environments it is very challenging to take up the parental leave.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

I have one other quick question. Would you both have any suggestions on how to improve decorum in the House?

Ms. Clare Beckton:

He's the rule guy, but I think the Speaker plays a very important role in decorum in the House and how that's enforced, and we heard that earlier today.

I think you also need to make sure you have policies around harassment and codes of conduct. The public service has always had codes of conduct and there are always rules around harassment. It's really important when you can draw that line between what constitutes acceptable behaviour and what might very well constitute harassment, because no one wants to work in an environment that is full of harassment. That applies not only to members but also to their staff and the kinds of things they have to put up with, whether it's workplace harassment or sexual harassment. That's a very important thing that does contribute towards decorum.

Mr. David Prest:

I was here when they used to slam their desktops in the House instead of applauding, and it was noisy and the public did not like it. All it took was, I think, the Conservatives, or Progressive Conservatives, stopping, and then everybody stopped. I think if there is guilt and shame, eventually it will change. It has to come from the members themselves and the public, and once you start changing then everybody will follow.

Ms. Clare Beckton:

The leaders and influencers can make a big difference by modelling the behaviour that they expect and they want in the House. That applies in any organization. When you see the top behaving in a certain way, that starts to send the message that this is the kind of behaviour they want.

(1150)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. David Christopherson):

You have about eight seconds.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Thank you.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. David Christopherson):

Moving on, we have a five-minute spot for Mr. Schmale.

You have the floor, sir.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Thank you very much.

My time last time ran short so I wasn't able to get on that, which was a good thing. I wasn't going to touch on that, but now I have another round.

Just to briefly focus on the heckling part, as I said before, whether you put 338 lawyers in a room or 338 real estate agents, if you are debating a very hot topic—and I've seen it in high school debates—I think you're going to get some tempers rising.

I do agree that there is a limit to heckling, but I also agree that it is a part of the atmosphere, especially when in opposition you ask a question and you believe the answer you get is totally off what you think it should be or it's a non-answer. I think maybe we have to have general question period reform before we get into removing the heckling altogether, but I do understand that being heckled, over and above an acceptable level, can be intimidating for some.

I know some provincial legislatures have taken steps to bring that down and get it under control, but again, I think it's a question of the level of sensitivity of some of the issues we're dealing with as well as the passion that's involved in some of these debates.

I don't know what the right answer is. I don't know who said it at the previous meeting, but I don't think that sitting as though we're in church is acceptable either.

Ms. Clare Beckton:

You can have a spirited debate without necessarily having heckling, and you see that in a lot of spheres. Lawyers do a good job of doing this by being respectful in the courtroom but still having a very significant debate with their esteemed colleague across the table.

I think spirited debate is great and everyone wants to see that and to see that passion. I think when you're demeaning other people as part of that process then it's not that kind of debate.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I don't know who was demeaning.

You might get a moan or a groan, and I've been here only a short time, but I haven't experienced name-calling or anything like that.

Ms. Clare Beckton:

That's good.

Mr. David Prest:

I think some heckling actually adds to a debate, and I think sometimes when there's some mild heckling, it aids a debater, but when it gets out of hand, how do you control that?

I have no suggestions for you except that it could be the Speaker, and as was said earlier, the leadership has to set the tone. There has to be a school for proper heckling or something, some training. I don't have any magic rule changes to suggest.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Just touching on the schedule quickly—how much more time do I have?

The Vice-Chair (Mr. David Christopherson):

You have two minutes.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

On the schedule, I agree that having an advance schedule is a good thing.

I know, David, you did touch on how having too many sitting weeks in a row could be problematic for people with families. As Mr. Richards said, I don't know if there's a magic number here, but personally that two-week constituency week was great. I got events in, and I got family time, and it was very good. I felt when I came back that I was in a better place and ready to tackle the issues here.

I do recognize personally that when there is one week on and one week off and one week on, it isn't comfortable and I feel as though I can never get settled and I am moving from one place to the next. I like the idea of getting a schedule that we can see in advance, which has somewhat of a pattern if possible, recognizing holidays and that sort of thing. I think that's important too. I like that idea.

I touched on this before, but I think having family-friendly events is very important. I think that is a way to get people involved and it leads to better happiness all around. When you have your spouse here, it's always a better thing too.

I don't know if you have any more tips on that you want to touch on now before I....

Mr. David Prest:

Just with regard to the calendar, the blocks, and the work weeks, the tolerance seems to be three weeks in which you can be productive, and after that it starts to wane. I think ideally, as I mentioned earlier, there should be three-week blocks.

As for the family-friendly events, my kids love coming up here to the Hill, and they come here often. I would just encourage more of that.

They think this place is already family-friendly when they come up here in fact. They ask me if they can go to work with me. I'll bring them to the library or introduce them to people, and they always seem to enjoy it. Sometimes I have to bring them here because the House is sitting late and I have some gaps in my day care, so I bring them here. It's always been a good experience.

(1155)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. David Christopherson):

Great. Thank you very much.

We have a three-minute slot left and I know, Ms. Sahota, that you were trying to get in there, so I'm going to give you that last three-minute spot before we wrap up.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you for being here, Ms. Beckton and Mr. Prest.

I heard both of you say that when you add more women to politics, you change the culture here. I've also heard it said the other way: why don't we just change the culture and perhaps then we'll be adding more women to Parliament? That's exactly what we're trying to do at this committee here today as we explore ways we can change the culture.

I haven't been hearing a whole lot of concrete ideas. I'm hearing a lot of let's keep the status quo, and it's fun for kids to come up here on the Hill sometimes, but I don't think that's necessarily what we are getting at. Whether we can have a fun event with kids...we should be having those, and I think that's a great idea and I bring my kids up here as well. But it's about getting representation and about making sure the people we have here, whether staff or politicians, end up staying here for the long run as well and not deciding to leave their jobs for particular reasons.

My question is more to you, Ms. Beckton. Could you elaborate a little bit more about what other barriers or challenges you see? You're saying we're at 26% right now. How can we do better? What things should we do? You talk to women every day. We have our own stories, but what are some stories you would like to share?

Ms. Clare Beckton:

I think one of the things that is important is that women need role models, particularly young women. It's important that they see members of Parliament who are women, see what they're doing, and see that they can behave authentically with who they are, and that they don't necessarily have to act like men. That makes it very hard. If you feel you have to be in there heckling and shouting, which is not your normal way of doing things, it can be very discouraging if you come into an environment where that's expected.

It's also about being able to authentically be who they are, speaking to young women, and being encouraging. I think men can encourage women by inviting them to come to the table, because women don't always come to the table on their own. This is something we can certainly work on. I think they need to feel that they have an environment of support. The women's caucuses are important. The cross-party caucuses can play a strong role in telling women when they come, “You will have support, you will not be alone here”, because it can be very lonely when you're trying to find your way into that space.

I think there is a culture around harassment, and we should make sure there is a safe environment and that you have a place where you can report harassment if it happens. You know that it has happened on the Hill. We know it's happened to MPs, and we know it's happened to members of their staff. That is not the kind of environment you want.

The whole environment around respect means that when you see people acting in a respectful manner that does encourage women to look.... Something I hear all the time is that “I don't want to be part of that kind of behaviour”, and “I don't want to have to be treated by the media the way I see the media often treating women”. Those are things that discourage women. There is a certain awareness of what it means to be an MP and what things you can contribute and how valuable that is to our country.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. David Christopherson):

Thank you so much. Our time has expired, but maybe that's an avenue. The last thing we need to do is to get more work. It's the first time I recall the whole idea of the media being mentioned. Maybe we should ask to see a delegation from the media to see if they have any thoughts on it. I'll leave that there.

Thank you both so much. We appreciate your attendance. You've been very helpful in terms of our studies. We will conclude, colleagues, this part of our meeting. I will suspend the meeting briefly while we reset for our videoconferencing guests.

Again to our guests, thank you so much for being here. We now stand suspended for a few moments.

(1155)

(1205)

The Chair:

Just before we start with our witness, we have a handout, but unfortunately it came in too late for us to translate the attached charts. Most of the handout has been translated, but the charts are still in French. Is there any objection to our distributing them? I'm sure that we all know what lundi, jeudi, and vendredi mean anyway.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's better to have half a thing than nothing.

The Chair:

There is no objection? Okay.

Just so the committee knows, so we don't have to take time later, we've asked the Clerk to come to our next meeting on Tuesday. Then in the second hour on Tuesday, we'll have the clerk from the Ontario assembly. Then at six o'clock Tuesday evening, we're having the Australian delegation.

You have to change the schedule in front of you. It's pretty important. Don't show up on Tuesday night, because it's been changed to a week later. You'll get a message anyway. Australia is on the 17th, not on the 10th. The schedule has Australia on the 10th, and it's actually on the 17th. On the 11th it is New Zealand, as you see, at six o'clock in the evening.

Then next Thursday, Elections Canada has invited us to an informal briefing.

Okay, I'd like to welcome François Arsenault. [Translation]

He is director of parliamentary proceedings at the National Assembly of Quebec.

Thank you for your participation today.

You may begin. You have five minutes.

Mr. François Arsenault (Director of Parliamentary Proceedings, National Assembly of Quebec):

Thank you.

Good morning, Mr. Chair, ladies and gentlemen of the committee. My name is François Arsenault. I am director of parliamentary proceedings at the National Assembly of Quebec. I wish to thank the committee for inviting me to speak with you. I hope that what I have to say will be useful to you in your work.

First of all, I should mention that, in 2009, the National Assembly adopted major parliamentary reforms involving several issues being studied by this committee. The objectives of the 2009 reform were to: spread out legislative work over time, balance constituency and Assembly work, limit extended sitting periods, avoid long winter and summer breaks, incorporate private members' business in the calendar, and make enough time available for the government's legislative agenda.

I will begin by talking about the sitting schedule and the parliamentary calendars.

The calendar in place since 2009 lengthened each parliamentary work period during the year while cutting the number of sitting hours per week and adding designated constituency weeks. In practical terms, Assembly sittings start and end earlier in the year. The number of hours for routine proceedings was significantly reduced. However, the government still has a lot of leeway for moving its legislative agenda forward, while a lot of time still goes unused.

As well, each sitting of the Assembly now begins with routine proceedings, since that is when the largest number of members are in the chamber, the Salon bleu. The Tuesday sitting, usually the first sitting of the week, starts in the afternoon so that members working in the regions can return to the Assembly.

Lastly, the number of sittings with extended hours was cut in half, from four to two weeks per work period, a total of four per year and, during this period, the Assembly and committees do not sit as late in the evening.

On page 3 of the document you have received, you will find a summary of the calendar that is in effect until June. One period of 16 weeks begins on the second Tuesday in February. The other period, 10 weeks long, begins on the third Tuesday in September. There are then extended sitting hours for a total of four weeks, two weeks following each regular session. The calendar also provides for work in electoral districts: three weeks during the session starting in February, one week during the session starting in September and one week following the end of period.

On page 4, you will find the calendar of Assembly work. By that, I mean the hours during which the Assembly sits. I will spare you a reading of all the hours listed there. I do apologize, however, for a small typo. This is an older version, with 9:30 a.m. indicated as the starting time, which is now 9:40 a.m. after an adjustment to the standing orders a few months ago. This is the calendar of both ordinary hours and extended hours.

Parliamentary committees are also included because, except for constituency weeks, committees may meet at any time during the schedule on page 5. You can also see that committees can meet on Monday afternoons and Friday mornings. Up to four committees can meet simultaneously. This number increases to five when the Assembly is not sitting.

I would now like to deal with voting procedure in the chamber or in committee.

Electronic voting or remote voting is not permitted in the National Assembly. Members must be present to exercise their right to vote. However, there is a way to avoid holding votes at less desirable times in the chamber, such as late at night. These are known as deferred divisions and they allow the government to defer any division until the routine proceedings on the next sitting day. Divisions may be deferred only upon request of the government house leader.

As for child care, there have already been discussions to consider opening a child care service within or near the Parliament building for parliamentarians and their staff. This was not pursued, in part because Parliament Hill is well served by several child care facilities and members did not want to open such an exclusive service while not all Quebeckers have access to subsidized child care.

As well, the vast majority of members do not have their primary residence in the Quebec City area, so parliamentary child care would not help make the assembly more family-friendly. Remember that the Assembly meets 26 weeks per year for an average of just under 80 sittings.

(1210)



Like the rest of the province, parliamentarians technically have access to parental leave, although so far this type of leave has never been used. Members hold a publicly elective office and are deemed to be exercising the duties of this office as long as they remain in office. A member's seat becomes vacant only under the circumstances outlined in sections 16 and 17 of an Act respecting the National Assembly, for example, in the case of resignation, electoral defeat or imprisonment.

Since the voters in the riding elect members for a maximum five-year term, the member's duties cannot be delegated to someone else. If a member took extended absence for parental leave, who would represent the constituents? Could a member's absence from a vote end up changing the outcome? Should members on parental leave be counted for a quorum? Who would sign official documents on their behalf? Who would have authority over their staff?

Section 35 of the Code of ethics and conduct of the members of the National Assembly states that members must “maintain a good attendance record in carrying out the duties of office”. They may not be “absent from sittings of the National Assembly for an unreasonable length of time without a valid reason”. How would the Ethics Commissioner view an extended absence for parental leave?

I want to comment briefly on technologies to improve work-family balance.

Of course, the National Assembly uses technology to allow parliamentarians to do their work efficiently, especially by providing them with various tools such as laptops, iPads and smartphones.

Another tool is the Greffier website. I see that my time is flying. I will just say that Greffier is an intranet site accessible to all parliamentarians, wherever they may be in the world. They can access various parliamentary documents, such as schedules, briefs submitted by groups for upcoming hearings, texts of bills and amendments. This all may be found on Greffier, in the Assembly or from home.

You will find attached a few statistics on the parliamentary work at the National Assembly that may be of interest to members of the committee.

Thank you.

Of course, I am available to answer your questions.

(1215)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

I would just point out with regard to your comment about replacing someone that in Sweden, ministers get a whole replacement person for their constituency work. I think it might be for parental leave too.

We'll start out with Mr. Graham, sharing with Mr. Lightbound, I think.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's correct, Mr. Chair. I'll be sharing with Mr. Lightbound.[Translation]

Thnak you, Mr. Arsenault. I very much appreciate the time you have devoted to us.

My question is a quick one; it deals with procedure in the National Assembly.

At federal level, four days are allocated for a bill to be debated, studied in committee and sent back to the House. How long do you allocate for a bill to be studied? Here, we can study it in a week, but you only sit for three days. I am curious to understand the difference.

Mr. François Arsenault:

Thank you for your question.

There is a major difference. The time allocated for each of the legislative stages is not calculated in days, but in individual speaking times for each of the members.

When the work schedule is established in the National Assembly, I would say that, in theory—it may be a little different in practice and I will explain to you why—it become difficult to predict, because there is no fixed length of time for the a bill to be passed in principle. For example, the standing orders do not say that it will take five hours, 10 hours or two days to go through the process of passing a bill in principle. Instead, it is done on the basis of the hours or minutes anticipated for each member.

In practice, of course, for most uncontested bills, the parliamentary leaders talk to each other and try to set an informal schedule that is not made public. For example, in setting the time need to pass a bill in principle, the official opposition may say that it will have three speakers and that they will speak for about an hour in total. Then the second opposition group says how long they will take, and so on. The standing orders themselves do not stipulate a specific duration, except when exceptional procedural motions are being discussed.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is each speech limited in time? Is each member limited to one speech per subject? Are there limits like that?

Mr. François Arsenault:

Yes. Each member can actually speak only once at each legislative stage. So, for example, at the passage in principle stage, each member may speak only once.

The standing orders set a maximum time per member, according to the debate. The speaking times are not always the same. The time can vary depending on whether we are at the passage in principle, the report stage or the final passage. Speaking times are longest when we are at the passage in principle stage.

In addition, speaking times vary with the function of the members. For example, the minister introducing the bill and the critics from the official opposition may speak longer than the other members.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I will let Mr. Lightbound continue.

Mr. Joël Lightbound (Louis-Hébert, Lib.):

Good afternoon, Mr. Arsenault. Thank you for being part of our session today.

All of us around this table share the same concern. We all want to have a parliament that better represents Canadians. Among other things, then, we want to attract more women.

As a result of the changes you introduced in 2009, have you observed a quantitative increase in the number of women elected to the National Assembly?

Qualitatively, have there been any comments about their experience with the work-life balance, and I would include men in that as well? How has it been received by the members?

(1220)

Mr. François Arsenault:

As for the participation of women, there are presently 36 women out of the 125 members, a little less than 29%. In 2012, 27% of the members were women. I do not have the 2009 figures with me, but essentially, we have seen no significant difference since the 2009 reform. There has not been a greater representation of women in the Quebec National Assembly. That’s point number one.

As for point number two, the impact of these rules on the work-life balance. As you can see in the media, that is currently making headlines in Quebec. Even before the events of this week, the subject kept coming back with parliamentarians. It did not solve all the previous problems. If you asked parliamentarians for their opinion about the current calendar that I showed you and what proposals they might have about it, you would probably get 125 different proposals from the 125 members. There really is no consensus on this issue.

Parliamentarians who live in and around Quebec City may see significant advantages in finishing work earlier and not sitting so late in the evening, because they can go home to their families. However, it is different for those from the regions and from outside the Quebec City area. If the National Assembly finishes its work at 6 p.m., it is impossible for a number of them to go home to their families. Some would therefore feel that, by contrast, the National Assembly should concentrate its calendar even more and sit for longer, over a much shorter period of time, so that they could go back to their constituencies.

Really, I would add that there are always discussions about Mondays and Fridays. When you looked at the national assembly’s calendar, you saw that it does not sit on Mondays unless there is a government motion. That is quite rare. In addition, it does not sit on Fridays except during the extended hours.

However, there is an impact on parliamentary committees. Some parliamentarians would prefer the National Assembly or the committees never to sit on Mondays and Fridays in order to make sure they could go back to their ridings and take care of their family obligations and their constituency work. [English]

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds.

Mr. Joël Lightbound:

Oh, 30 seconds. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

With your permission, I would like to continue for a few more seconds.

Briefly, do you wonder why no parental leave has been taken?

Mr. François Arsenault:

You would have to ask the parliamentarians.

One of the difficulties may be technical in nature. I am not an expert in this area, but the Québec parental insurance plan applies to everyone. If members wanted to take advantage of it, they would have to give up all the other benefits that they might be able to receive. That is not necessarily to their advantage.

Do not forget the reasons I listed in my presentation. Members taking a six-month absence to take care of their babies have no replacement system to fall back on. There are no substitute members to do their jobs. So what can they do?

Suppose we had a government with a slim majority, and we have had them in some years. If several government members took parental leave, the government might well lose votes in the National Assembly. That situation has not risen yet, however. We are not at that level, but there have certainly been discussions between the members of some parties and their whips to grant shorter leave. However, we have not yet seen a member officially use parental leave in Quebec.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Richards has the floor now. [English]

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you very much for being here with us today. I have a few questions for you as well.

First of all, I want to say that I appreciated your remarks with regard to parental leave for parliamentarians. You raised a series of questions, and I think one of the things we always have to be conscious of when we're talking about these kinds of reforms is the impact they will have on constituents. Constituents vote for someone to be their representative, and they believe that that's the person who would best represent the constituency. For someone to take parental leave would leave those constituents without a representative.

I've appreciated some of those questions you asked. Who would represent the constituents? Would that absence end up changing the outcome of a vote? There's a whole series of other questions, and I think those are important. It is important we remember that we're here to serve our constituents. It's a crucial thing.

I want to follow up in a couple of areas. In the exchange you just had with members from the government, I think I was understanding where you were going, but when you made your reforms, you made the decision—I think, if I'm understanding correctly—to go with more sitting weeks, but shorter weeks in those sittings. It sounded like that was currently being looked at, or reviewed, or there had been some discussion about it at least.

Could you elaborate a bit on why? One of the challenges for us in Ottawa to look at something like that would be the significant cost, particularly for people coming in from the west. If you have more weeks, but shorter weeks, that would increase the travel costs to taxpayers. I'm wondering if that is part of the reason you're looking at it. I know that the context is a bit different at the provincial level, but I'm wondering if that's one of the reasons why this is currently being reviewed, or if there are other reasons, and if you could elaborate on them.

(1225)

[Translation]

Mr. François Arsenault:

There are many reasons why these issues are being studied again. In terms of travel costs, Quebec’s territory is smaller than that of Canada as a whole, and, therefore, the issue is perhaps a little less important.

Furthermore, before the 2009 reform, the Quebec National Assembly began its work in mid-March and ended a little before Saint-Jean-Baptiste, towards the end of June. In the fall, it began its work in mid-October and adjourned around Christmas Eve, which parliamentarians complained about. They actually argued that, between the end of the Assembly’s proceedings and the Christmas holidays, they had very little time to do their work in their ridings. This is why the schedule was changed. We now begin our work in September and end in early December. The same principle applies to the spring period.

Another decision was made to introduce what the standing orders call constituency weeks during those periods of parliamentary work. Those are weeks of parliamentary recess during which the Assembly and the committees cannot sit. That is especially the case during the spring period, which is the longest. The parliamentary recess periods coincide with school breaks, often in March, and with Easter. There is already a statutory holiday on Monday of that week. In addition, there is another week, which is flexible and can be moved. This year, it is this week. Right now, we are in parliamentary recess. Last year, it was combined with the school break I mentioned. We finish the work earlier, but we start earlier too.

Another important fact is that the sitting hours are shorter, especially during the extended sitting periods. Previously, during those periods, the Assembly and the committees sat until midnight four days a week, but now the meetings are adjourned no later than 10:30 p.m. This is indicated in one of the appendices. In fact, they end at 10:30 p.m. only on some nights. Otherwise, they end earlier. It was agreed that 10:30 p.m. is late, but at least parliamentarians do not finish their day at midnight. Because of the long working hours and lack of rest, they found it difficult to do their job as parliamentarians and to balance work and family.

(1230)

[English]

Mr. Blake Richards:

You mentioned in your presentation that e-voting or remote voting is not permitted in the National Assembly. I personally believe there's something significant about—again, this goes back to making sure we're serving our constituents in the best possible way—members standing in their place and having their constituents seeing them standing and being counted, but I don't know if that's why that's the case in the National Assembly.

Is this something that was discussed when you were doing your reforms or just something that wasn't considered? If it was considered, for what reasons was it decided not to go with the idea of e-voting or remote voting? [Translation]

Mr. François Arsenault:

The issue of electronic voting was addressed during the discussions that led to the 2009 reform, but not in depth or very seriously.

There are two aspects to that.

First, we asked ourselves how we could ensure the validity of votes, from a legal standpoint, if parliamentarians voted from their various ridings rather than in Parliament itself. How can this be organized? How can we ensure the integrity of the process? That's an issue. I am not saying that it's impossible. I'm just telling you that it is an issue.

Then, it must be said that many parliamentarians feel a certain pride to be present in the House during the recorded votes, to rise before all their colleagues to vote in favour or against a motion.

However, the issue of electronic voting has not been studied in depth. The discussions about reforming it were not very extensive. [English]

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay. It sounds as though many members there felt, much as I do, that it's important to stand and be counted your place so their constituents could see and witness how you're voting on their behalf.

It appears that you're maybe indicating I'm out of time here, Mr. Chair? Okay.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

You have a good sense.[Translation]

The floor is yours, Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Mr. Arsenault.[English]

I appreciate your being with us.

My first question is based on testimony we heard from an earlier witness prior to your joining us. It was from a seasoned staff veteran who's been on both sides of the House, government and opposition. When asked what he thought the ideal length of time for the House to meet was, bearing in mind the needs of government and all the things that factor in, he said three weeks was about right. With anything less, we're maybe not as efficient; with anything longer, we're keeping people from their homes and families, and there is the mood and the tension as you get into fourth weeks and fifth weeks. Those of us who have served five weeks know exactly what that's about. It gets crazy.

Would you agree that three weeks is the right length of time, or is there another number that you think more reflects that balance? [Translation]

Mr. François Arsenault:

It is difficult for me to give you a clear answer mainly because I am not a parliamentarian. Common sense tells us that people should be more efficient and less impatient when they are less tired. It's human nature. People sometimes tend to forget that parliamentarians are human beings more than anything else. Break weeks can be beneficial.

As we can see in our current parliamentary calendar, in February, we resume work for a very short time before our first constituency week. All goes well. However, toward the end of the parliamentary session, in the final sprint of the somewhat extended sitting periods, there is more tension at times, probably because people are tired and the stress has accumulated. That said, parliamentarians would be in a better position to talk about it.

In your study, you need to determine how many weeks the government needs for its legislation. I always say the government, but there is clearly the opposition, which must also play its part. The issue of parliamentary control is also very important. You must determine how much time is needed and how Parliament can operate effectively. That is a very difficult thing to do, and it depends on the measures and bills that are challenged. Bills on which everyone agrees usually move forward quite well and quickly. However, when the opposition decides to fight tooth and nail against a bill, whether for ideological or other reasons, the government is happy to have those time slots to move the work forward.

In addition, even though the exceptional legislative procedure, like a gag order, is still an option, governments, at least Quebec's, are desperate to avoid using it. Having more time may help some bills to finally be passed, sometimes with opposition amendments, because the government wants to end the debate and reach some sort of consensus.

(1235)

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you.[English]

A quick glance at this suggests that your House still sits less than ours now, and yet your government doesn't use closure on a regular basis in order to meet its time frames. Usually the argument a government will put up is that it has to do that because it has a deadline to meet. Yet, your culture is that is doesn't use that as much, yet it sits for less time. You may not be able to answer this one, but what do you think of that disparity? Is there a more co-operative culture at the leadership level in your House that allows things that are not controversial to remain not controversial and to go through more smoothly? Why do you think that is? I'm not expecting a detailed answer, but just your thoughts on why we sit longer and why the government, regardless of political stripe, it seems, feels the need to shut down debate on a rather regular basis? [Translation]

Mr. François Arsenault:

It is very difficult for me to answer that question. I sort of follow what is happening in the House of Commons, but I am not there. Perhaps you would need to compare how many measures and bills are put forward at the federal level and in Quebec. Unfortunately, I cannot say much more about that. [English]

Mr. David Christopherson:

I sat in the Ontario legislature for 13 years, and a study might show it to be different, but I don't recall the number of bills going through the House being that much greater.

Thank you for your comments on that.

I want to move again, and I may need some assistance from our analysts here, so I'd ask that they be on standby. You mention on page 6 of your opening remarks that your code of ethics empowers the ethics commissioner to determine whether a member's absence violates the code under section 35, and I quote: “A member must maintain a good attendance record in carrying out the duties of office. He or she may not be absent from sittings of the National Assembly for an unreasonable length of time without a valid reason.”

Through you, Chair, to our analyst, I believe, and correct me if I'm wrong, that we have an actual number of days, and you are either okay within that number of days or if you cross that threshold, you're into another scenario. Can you help me out, please?

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

You have about five seconds left. I'll let the analyst respond to your question and then your time will be up.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Fair enough, Chair. Thank you.

Mr. Andre Barnes (Committee Researcher):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

It's set out in the Parliament of Canada Act that it's 21 days. There are specific reasons why you can be absent, including illness and a couple of others that I don't recall offhand.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It is interesting, though, that one allows a judgment by a third party, and the other one is very prescriptive.

Thank you, Chair, and Mr. Arsenault.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Now we have Ms. Sahota, who is going to share her time with Ms. Petitpas Taylor.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you for all your valuable insight into how the Quebec Assembly works. You mentioned that members wanted to be more present in their constituencies to serve their constituents and to do constituency work. Have the amendments that you've made in the assembly allowed the members to serve more time? Have you had feedback from the members? Have these amendments satisfied their constituents as a whole?

(1240)

[Translation]

Mr. François Arsenault:

I would say yes and no. Let me explain why.

The answer is yes because we think parliamentarians are happy to be able to finish the work earlier in the year. That gives them a little more time before Christmas and before the summer.

However, in reality, there is a lot of discontent, particularly with respect to the parliamentary committees. The committees may sit when the National Assembly is sitting, but they also meet a lot when the National Assembly is not sitting. When the National Assembly is not sitting, the parliamentary committees have more time to sit.

In Quebec, many parliamentary committees begin their work quite early in the year. As a result, that forces the members of the committees to be in the Assembly for very long periods of time. So that adds up to much more than 26 weeks. That may be a somewhat negative effect of the 2009 reform.

It is difficult to assess the situation. Does this have to do with the change in the calendar or the fact that committees sit more? It must be said that there has been an increase in public hearings held by parliamentary committees.

If we were to survey parliamentarians on how satisfied they are with the current calendar, we would not get a very high score. As I explained earlier, there are probably 125 different viewpoints among the parliamentarians. Which calendar should be used?

In some ways, things have improved, but not in others, especially in terms of the parliamentary committees. A lot of parliamentarians tell us that they spend too much time in Quebec City and that they don't have enough time to do their work in their ridings. However, other parliamentarians would probably tell you something different. It depends.

We are seeing that we need a lot of time for the committees that are sitting. That does not affect all 125 members, but it affects many of them. Take August for example, and that's my final comment. From mid-August to the end of August, parliamentary committees are starting to sit. Clearly, that's never very popular with parliamentarians for obvious reasons. If the parliamentary committees have long mandates and they sit from mid-August to the beginning of the National Assembly sittings in September, those members will not have a lot of time to work in their ridings. Clearly, that applies more to the members from outside the region. [English]

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Has there been feedback from the constituents, from the citizens of Quebec, on the changes that you've made? [Translation]

Mr. François Arsenault:

We have received no feedback from the public. I suppose the members must have have received feedback from their own constituents, that's pretty much a given, but we have received no opinion, favourable or unfavourable, from the public at large. [English]

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I find it difficult to explain to my constituents sometimes. Although I enjoy a lot of the work that I'm doing here in Ottawa, they like to see me there and they like to be able to share their concerns and problems. It is important to get back to your constituency.

I'm going to share my time with my colleague here. [Translation]

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Mr. Arsenault, thank you very much for your presentation. It will really help us develop good recommendations, particularly for work-life balance.

Could you tell us what prompted the changes in 2009?

(1245)

Mr. François Arsenault:

It was a series of circumstances. There have been small adjustments, but the last major reform of the calendar was in 1984. However, Parliament had changed quite a bit in the meantime. Parliamentarians had asked that a number of aspects in the standing orders be amended. Two government leaders at the time introduced reform proposals. The speaker of the Assembly himself introduced a plan to reform a host of issues.

A committee was formed in 2008, I think, to study those proposals. The reform took place in 2009. The calendar was one of the key issues discussed. That is still the case today. A technical committee made up of parliamentary leaders meets to discuss future reforms or adjustments to the standing orders. The parliamentary calendar is clearly still one of the items on the agenda.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

I suppose that you were in the Assembly in 2009 and you were there before the changes were made. You are still there now.

Could you tell us what you think has had most effect?

Mr. François Arsenault:

I was indeed in the Assembly before the 2009 reform. That said, it is always difficult to answer questions on effectiveness. How can we measure effectiveness? Is effectiveness when a bill is passed quickly? Some will say yes. Does effectiveness mean allowing the entire opposition to express its point of view, to bring about change through debate and the time spent debating, to introduce amendments that will make the government think more or put some water in its wine to amend the legislation? We have seen situations where the opposition proposed major amendments to bills. Initially, the government did not agree, but after hours or even days of deliberations, it decided to put some water in its wine to reach a consensus with the opposition. It is really hard to say what is effective and to define effectiveness. Some will say that spending many hours in committees or in the chamber is effective, while others say that it is completely ineffective.

It is important to keep in mind that the wisdom of parliamentarians and speakers lies in developing standing orders that strike a balance, allowing first the government to govern and pass the measures it introduces, and, second, the opposition to express the view that it thinks does justice to the people. We hear a lot about the fact that citizens may express their views to parliamentarians. The National Assembly has 125 members. This means that many people may want to express their views. Clearly, you have even more people. The idea is to find a balance, which is not easy.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you.

I will now give the floor to Mr. Schmale for five minutes. [English]

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I appreciate the discussion going on now. It seems that a lot of our questions and concerns clearly relate to the schedule and how we can make this work. I like some of your suggestions.

I would like to ask a quick question. On page 6, you mention parental leave for parliamentarians. You say, “so far this type of leave has never been used.” Is that to say that nobody has ever had a child while they were serving? I just want to see if there is a distinction there. [Translation]

Mr. François Arsenault:

That's an excellent question.

Some parliamentarians have had children, just like the general public. Actually, a member has become a father in the past few weeks.

Officially, no parental leave has been requested by parliamentarians. Would the whips allow it? Some members may be absent from the National Assembly for all sorts of reasons. It is rare for 100% of the members to be present in the National Assembly. Some have permission to be absent, whether to participate in parliamentary missions, to work in their ridings or to make ministerial or other announcements.

Do whips allow some members to be absent, for a relatively short time, from the National Assembly? They probably do. Clearly, that is not done at our level, but surely an exception may be made for some. However, to date we have not seen parliamentarians absent from the National Assembly for months because they became parents. That has happened before, but they were not officially on parental leave. It may be the case informally, but not officially.

(1250)

[English]

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I am surprised that wasn't brought up in your review of 2009. I would find that a very discouraging factor for some people getting into politics, if there is nothing.... I know we have that extended leave of 21 days, and I know we are talking about that in this forum.

Has there been any discussion or comments from male or female parliamentarians who are new parents? You just said you had a new father here, so I am wondering if any comments have come forward about ways to accommodate that. [Translation]

Mr. François Arsenault:

I know there are constant discussions among parliamentarians on this important issue of work-family balance. How can we attract more people to the National Assembly? People may actually be discouraged when they see the schedule or the impact on their families. Those discussions come up constantly. There is no solution for the time being, apart from what I have explained at the outset. Nothing can be done about it.

That said, it is an ongoing discussion. People are thinking about it and the solution is not simple. Parliamentary work is unique, for the reasons I mentioned. Earlier, some of your colleagues expressed it well, at least in terms of the constituency work. Would constituents agree to their representatives being absent for months? I don’t know.

There is also an impact on the operations of the National Assembly and the role of members.

It’s not simple, but it is the stage that the discussions have reached. [English]

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I definitely agree there is something to be said for standing in your place and voting on a particular issue, so I do get that point.

As for technology to improve the family work-life balance, I know we have been talking about this a lot. Something that continues to come up is the use of our parliamentary calendar. A lot of us, including me, use something that isn't in-house, the Google Calendar, so that all of our staff and our families can access where we will be and have an opportunity to input items that we should be at, a family birthday party, and those kinds of things.

We often talk about ways of fixing this or finding a solution, and sometimes we overthink things and kind of reinvent the wheel. I am just curious if there is a system that you use that allows, through your management platform, the opportunity for your MNAs to have their families or staff members access it without the secure ID cards that we have here. [Translation]

Mr. François Arsenault:

Access to the Greffier site is reserved for parliamentarians and their researchers and assistants, who have access to the site. In principle, family does not have access to the site for security reasons.

If I understood your question correctly, I would have to say that the Greffier site will not necessarily be the answer. In terms of the calendar, the Greffier site will simply show it. In fact, this isn't true. It can be part of a solution, in the sense that the schedules for hearings and the calendar of upcoming events can be easily found. I'm sticking my neck out a bit, but I know that the whips' offices have their own parallel calendar system to ensure that members are present both at the National Assembly and in parliamentary committee at various times. I think they probably make more use of this calendar from the office of the whip for each political party.

(1255)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Blake Richards):

Thank you.

We're now onto the second round, starting with Ms. Petitpas Taylor.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Thank you.

Me again, Mr. Arsenault.

I think you said at the very start of your presentation that 29% of Quebec MNAs are women. Did I understand that correctly?

Mr. François Arsenault:

Actually, 28% of MNAs are women.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

And as for minority groups—

Mr. François Arsenault:

No, you're right; it is 29%. I'm sorry.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Thank you.

Do you have statistics for minority groups as well?

Mr. François Arsenault:

Yes, we definitely have those statistics, but I don't have them with me. I could send them to the committee, though.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Excellent.

All that to say, we want to make sure that Parliament reflects Canada's population. And by that, we don't just mean women and minority groups, but the age of our MPs as well.

Could you tell us what the average age is of members who sit in the National Assembly of Quebec?

Mr. François Arsenault:

It's currently 53. I checked and found out that MNAs over age 50 currently make up about 70% of the parliamentary representation. In other words, 70% of MNAs are 50 or older. The average age is 53 years old. The 18-39 age group—young people—currently represent 10%, which isn't very high.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Do you think that if there were more young MNAs, family policies might be a little different?

Mr. François Arsenault:

Possibly. It's probably the same for you. In a parliament, when there are a lot of new members who, initially, don't have as developed a parliamentary culture, it is completely normal that they would question a lot of things. Needless to say, these new parliamentarians raise more questions than those who have been doing the job for 20 years, although parliamentarians who have 10, 15 or 20 years of experience also question certain procedures. In fact, society is changing, particularly with regard to the role of women, and Parliament is not impervious to this.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

My last question has to do with parental leave.

Would it be frowned upon if a member decided to take parental leave, or would the member be encouraged to take it?

Mr. François Arsenault:

That's a good question. I don't know. You would have to ask the parliamentarians or the population. I don't know how it might be perceived.

From a purely practical perspective, it raises one question: if a member takes six months of parental leave to take care of his or her child, who will take care of that member's riding? Indeed, it will be necessary to ensure that voters in that riding still have a voice and that the work in the riding is being done. I think this is true for all parliamentarians. None of them wants to see the voters abandoned or less well-served if they take leave.

It's difficult for me to provide a precise answer to the question. I imagine that the answer varies depending on who you ask.

(1300)

[English]

The Chair:

Just before we let you go, on parental leave, as I was saying earlier, from the research that we have done, we know that in Sweden members of Parliament do take parental leave and get replacement MPs to handle their ridings at that time. That's a very interesting concept. In fact, the ministers are not allowed to sit in the legislative assembly in Sweden. They each get a replacement, because they're supposed to be off doing other work. It's an interesting model.

I have one question before we let you go. We discussed security a bit. I often leave my office at two or three in the morning. If we have late-night sittings, staff have to leave late. Did you have any discussions about late-night security, for people leaving the assembly, such as staff or MNAs? [Translation]

Mr. François Arsenault:

Yes, a bit, but it's important to mention that the parking lots for people who drive are still fairly close to the National Assembly. They aren't necessarily on the National Assembly grounds, but they are still fairly close. Parliament Hill is very well covered by security camera systems. The area around Parliament is really very secure. Indeed, someone who leaves the premises at two in the morning, when the streets are deserted, may have some concerns, but as far as I know, no MNA or staff member has had any unfortunate incidents in the area. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

I think this has been very helpful to us. You have some new ideas, some new things for us to think about. We appreciate your taking this time. I know you're very busy. Thank you very much.

There's one thing for the committee before you leave. We were talking about kids a lot today, so what do you guys think about having a playground in front of Centre Block?

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour.

Ceci est la 19e réunion du Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre durant la première session de la 42e législature. Cette réunion est publique. Nous continuons nos audiences concernant l’étude des initiatives visant à favoriser une Chambre des communes propice à la vie de famille.

Durant la première heure, nous accueillerons Clare Beckton, directrice exécutive du Centre for Women in Politics and Public Leadership à l’Université Carleton, et David Prest, membre depuis longtemps du personnel du Parti conservateur sur la Colline parlementaire. Nous veillons ainsi à inclure tout le monde dans notre prise de décisions. La deuxième heure sera consacrée à M. François Arsenault, directeur de la procédure parlementaire à l’Assemblée nationale du Québec.

Nous avons aussi le plaisir d’accueillir aujourd’hui Joël Lightbound, et je souhaite enfin la bienvenue à un ex-conseiller municipal de Whitehorse, Ranj Pillai, qui est assis au fond de la salle et qui va suivre nos débats pour se familiariser avec les travaux d’un autre palier de gouvernement.

Pour votre information, je vous signale que nous avons appris, lors d’une récente discussion, que le mandat de la commissaire aux conflits d’intérêts et à l’éthique se terminera au mois de juin. Alors que nous prendrons des décisions sur ces questions, un nouveau commissaire aura peut-être été nommé.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Je suis heureux que vous ayez mentionné cette question.

À ma connaissance, cette personne est un agent du Parlement. Lorsque nous avons entamé la procédure de désignation du nouveau vérificateur général, nous étions saisis de tellement de questions pressantes en même temps que nous n’avons pu lui consacrer qu’un temps limité. Je n’avais pas beaucoup apprécié cette procédure.

C’est le Parlement seul qui doit choisir les titulaires de ces postes, et seul le Parlement peut les remplacer. Pourtant, à l’époque, le gouvernement avait pris le contrôle total de la procédure. L’opposition n’y avait pas participé. Il y avait peut-être eu un peu de consultation pour la forme, mais il ne s’agissait pas d’une vraie consultation. À titre de comparaison, lorsque nous avons engagé le sergent d’armes quand j’étais à Queen’s Park, parce que le recrutement de cette personne devait être fait par toute l’Assemblée législative, on avait mis sur pied un comité représentant tous les partis politiques et la procédure avait été totalement dénuée de toute partisanerie.

Ce que nous avons fait ici, au niveau fédéral, au moins dans le cas de la dernière grande nomination, a été totalement phagocyté par le gouvernement. Il a organisé la consultation, il a organisé les entrevues, il a procédé à la sélection et il a ensuite soumis un nom au Parlement qui n’a eu qu’à voter. À mon avis, cette procédure n’était pas du tout conforme à l’idée que cette personne est un agent du Parlement. Ces postes ont été délibérément conçus pour que le gouvernement ne puisse pas en contrôler les titulaires ni leur donner des ordres. Je parle ici de gens tels que la commissaire à la protection de la vie privée, le vérificateur général, et il y en a d’autres. Il y en a 10 ou 11, en fait.

Le processus devrait correspondre totalement à l’idée que c’est le Parlement, et lui seul, qui effectue les recrutements, alors que cela n’a pas du tout été le cas pour les dernières nominations. En fait, on nous a simplement demandé si nous acceptions de ratifier des candidats choisis ailleurs. S’il doit y avoir de nouvelles nominations, j’aimerais beaucoup que nous ayons la possibilité de participer au processus. Je ne sais pas vraiment comment faire pour m’en assurer et je m’en remets à vous, monsieur le président. Le nouveau gouvernement semble vouloir faire les choses différemment. Il aura donc, avec ces nominations, une occasion idéale d’agir en respectant totalement les prérogatives du Parlement et en lui laissant le contrôle complet du processus de recrutement de ses agents, ce qui serait conforme au principe voulant que c’est le Parlement seul qui fait le recrutement et le Parlement seul qui peut engager ou renvoyer ses agents. La raison en est que si le premier ministre, quel qu’il soit, n’est pas satisfait du rapport du vérificateur général, par exemple, il ne peut pas le renvoyer. Seul le Parlement peut le faire.

Je demande donc que nous participions dès le début à ce processus afin de nous assurer que les choses se feront différemment à l’avenir, comme le gouvernement a dit le souhaiter.

Merci.

Le président:

Comme nous avons maintenant plusieurs membres du Comité qui sont présents, je voudrais passer à l’audition des témoins.

David, pourriez-vous vous entretenir de cette question avec le leader en Chambre, et en parler à David?

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Absolument. Nous nous en occuperons.

(1105)

M. David Christopherson:

J’en suis très heureux. Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Nous allons maintenant accueillir nos témoins.

Vous aurez chacun cinq minutes environ pour faire votre déclaration. Qui veut commencer?

Voulez-vous commencer, Clare?

Mme Clare Beckton (directrice exécutive, Centre for Women in Politics and Public Leadership, Carleton University):

Je vous remercie de m’avoir invitée à m’adresser au Comité, monsieur le président.

Je n’ai que quelques remarques à faire, car je sais que vous aimez poser beaucoup de questions.

Je suis heureuse que le Comité se penche sur la question des mesures à prendre pour rendre le Parlement plus favorable à la vie de famille, c’est-à-dire pour permettre aux personnes qui y travaillent de mieux assumer leurs responsabilités familiales ainsi que professionnelles. Il va sans dire que ce n’est pas une question facile à régler et qui se pose dans de nombreux secteurs.

Instaurer un environnement plus favorable à la vie de famille exige qu’on mette en place des mécanismes de soutien et qu’on s’assure que les pratiques et actions reflètent l’égalité entre les sexes. À l’heure actuelle, environ 25 % des députés sont des femmes, ce qui contribue à maintenir un environnement dans lequel l’égalité entre les sexes n’est pas vraiment reconnue. Il faut que les partis politiques fassent preuve de leadership pour continuer à accroître le nombre de femmes candidates aux fonctions électives, en évitant de les confiner à des circonscriptions dans lesquelles elles n’auraient absolument aucune chance d’être élues, ce qui s’est déjà vu. Permettez-moi cependant de faire une mise en garde. Le fait d’avoir plus de femmes au Parlement n’est pas automatiquement un gage d’égalité, mais cela contribuera à changer la culture de l’institution.

Je vois qu’on parle ici d’équilibre entre le travail et la famille. Pour ma part, je préfère toujours parler « d’intégration travail-famille », car je crois que l’équilibre est un mythe qu’on ne peut pas atteindre. Je ne l’ai jamais trouvé dans ma vie personnelle et cela ne m’a jamais inquiétée. Ce qui est important, c’est plutôt de trouver le moyen de permettre aux élus du peuple de servir leur pays comme ils le souhaitent tout en ayant du temps à consacrer à leur famille, ce qui peut exiger l’accès à des services de garde d’enfants adaptés à leurs besoins durant leur présence à Ottawa.

Les hommes élus au Parlement ont besoin d’encouragement et de soutien, de même que les femmes députées, pour s’acquitter de leurs obligations familiales.

Durant l’initiation des nouveaux élus et des présidents de comités, on devrait leur montrer comment instaurer un environnement respectueux, et il faudrait montrer aux présidents de comités comment organiser les réunions en tenant compte des besoins de leurs membres.

Il est également important d’assurer un environnement permettant aux élus et au personnel de faire le travail qui doit se faire sans craindre de harcèlement ou de comportements irrespectueux. Cela peut être assuré par l’adoption de règles adéquates pour la Chambre, par des mesures d’éducation, par des processus idoines et en s’assurant que les chefs de partis donnent l’exemple des comportements souhaités.

Si l’on veut que la participation politique soit égale, il faut que l’environnement et les procédures de la Chambre donnent une voix égale aux hommes et aux femmes et qu’il y ait des procédures de résolution des plaintes par les pairs.

Rehausser l’efficience des processus de la Chambre est certainement une manière de réduire… Par exemple, limiter les séances à quatre jours par semaine pourrait être une solution pour mieux tenir compte des besoins des députés de l’extérieur d’Ottawa qui sont tenus de retourner régulièrement dans leur circonscription et qui veulent rester en contact avec leur famille. De même, adopter un système de vote électronique, à l’ère de la technologie, pourrait également être utile en permettant aux députés de participer aux votes tout en continuant de s’occuper de membres de leur famille si cela est nécessaire. Il ne serait peut-être pas possible d’éliminer les séances de soirée, mais on pourrait peut-être les réserver aux débats et aux votes exceptionnels et d’urgence, par exemple.

Une autre question à examiner est l’organisation des séances de travail durant les longs congés scolaires.

Voilà simplement quelques possibilités que je voulais mentionner avant de me préparer à répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Permettez-moi de dire un mot sur la question des congés scolaires. Il s’agit malheureusement de congés qui sont décidés par les provinces et qui ne tombent pas toujours aux mêmes périodes partout.

Monsieur Prest.

M. David Prest (à titre personnel):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie le Comité de m’avoir invité.

Pour votre information, je suis actuellement un employé du cabinet du leader en Chambre de l’opposition. J’ai travaillé pour les leaders en Chambre et les whips pendant quelque 35 ans, à la fois au gouvernement et dans l’opposition. J’ai été un parent pendant 25 de ces 35 ans. J’ai six enfants et j’ai encore de jeunes enfants à la maison, le plus jeune n’ayant que huit ans, ce qui veut dire que je suis directement intéressé par ce débat sur la vie familiale et le travail. Je vous demande simplement de ne pas me demander de conseils en planning familial.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Davis Prest: J’aimerais parler d’abord du calendrier parlementaire et du nombre de journées pendant lesquelles la Chambre siège chaque semaine et chaque année. Je suis en faveur du statu quo. J’ai connu l’époque du calendrier ouvert, lorsque la date de fin des travaux parlementaires n’était pas fixée à l’avance et qu’on ne savait pas à l’avance quels seraient les jours de séance de la Chambre. Le calendrier fixe actuel est plus favorable à la famille que le calendrier ouvert d’autrefois.

Si l’on examine le calendrier en détail, on voit qu’il faut prévoir suffisamment de jours pour que la Chambre puisse faire le travail qui lui incombe, et un nombre de journées suffisant durant desquelles le gouvernement doit être disponible pour rendre des comptes devant le Parlement. Il faut aussi prévoir un nombre de jours suffisant pour que les députés puissent aller dans leur circonscription et être avec leur famille. Mon expérience m’a montré que le calendrier parlementaire fixe actuel assure un bon équilibre à ce sujet. Augmenter un élément pour en réduire un autre ne serait peut-être pas la bonne solution.

J’aimerais faire quelques suggestions, qui sont cependant d’ordre mineur.

L’an dernier, avant l’ajournement des travaux pour l’été, nous avons fixé le nombre de jours de séance pour janvier, février, mars et avril 2016, au lieu d’attendre l’automne comme on le faisait d’habitude. Le Comité pourrait peut-être recommander que la détermination plus précoce du calendrier parlementaire devienne la règle, car j’ai déjà commencé à réserver certaines journées en février sans avoir la certitude qu’elles seront libres. Pour cela, je vais devoir attendre l’automne.

En outre, lors des discussions avec le président de la Chambre pour l’établissement du prochain calendrier, je crois qu’il faudrait éviter de prévoir de longues périodes de travail en Chambre, notamment des blocs de cinq semaines. Lorsque mes beaux-parents organisaient une réunion de famille au Vermont pour ce mois de juillet, je leur ai donné le même conseil quand ils m’ont demandé mon avis sur le nombre de jours que devrait durer la réunion. Au début, tout le monde est très enthousiaste mais, au bout de quelques jours, il y a inévitablement des pleurs. C’est la même chose ici.

Je voudrais faire une remarque au sujet des heures de séance de la Chambre. La plupart des activités parascolaires des enfants commencent avant que la Chambre termine ses travaux le lundi, le mardi, le mercredi et le jeudi. De ce fait, je rate beaucoup de ces activités lorsque la Chambre siège, et mes enfants arrivent souvent en retard aux matchs de soccer et de base-ball. Lorsqu’il s’agit de matchs de compétition, ils en sont pénalisés et doivent souvent passer beaucoup de temps sur le banc. Je crois que le Comité devrait envisager de modifier les horaires de la Chambre en lui faisant commencer ses travaux plus tôt le matin, pour qu’elle les finisse plus tôt le soir.

Je suis heureux que les whips organisent maintenant la tenue de votes immédiatement après la période des questions plutôt qu’en soirée, car cela donne plus de temps libre aux députés et à leur personnel. Regrouper les votes pendant une journée particulière de la semaine permettrait aussi de réduire le nombre de jours durant lesquels la Chambre doit siéger tard.

Finalement, j’ai demandé à ma fille aînée, Wrenna, ce qu’elle pense de l’étude que vous avez entreprise et elle m’a répondu une chose à laquelle je n’avais pas pensé, peut-être parce qu’elle n’avait rien à voir avec des questions de procédure. Elle a suggéré d’organiser un plus grand nombre d’activités favorables à la famille et elle m’a rappelé l’époque où je l’emmenais à la fête de Noël organisée pour les enfants du personnel parlementaire et pour les députés. Cela l’avait beaucoup impressionnée et elle en garde un excellent souvenir. Quand j’avais mon bureau au deuxième étage de l’édifice du Centre et que je rentrais chez moi le mardi ou le mercredi soir, je traversais inévitablement toute une série d’activités et de réceptions en allant retrouver ma voiture. Il y avait toujours une activité ou une autre dans chaque salle et dans chaque coin de l’édifice du Centre. Nous avons évidemment des personnes très compétentes pour organiser ce genre d’événements, et il ne serait peut-être pas très difficile d’organiser plus d’événements de cette nature à l’intention des familles, peut-être une fois par saison.

(1110)

Le président:

C’est une idée très intéressante.

Nous allons maintenant passer aux questions, en commençant avec Mme Vandenbeld.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Je remercie beaucoup les deux témoins.

Je m’adresse d’abord à Mme Beckton. Vous avez parlé « d’intégration travail-famille » et j’aimerais en savoir un peu plus sur ce concept. Depuis que nous avons entrepris cette étude, nous avons entendu parler d’équilibre entre le travail et la famille. Il s’agit simplement en réalité de trouver le moyen de travailler de manière plus efficace, et de moderniser les procédures de la Chambre de façon que nous puissions faire plus en moins de temps, ce qui devrait donner un meilleur équilibre entre le travail et la vie familiale. Il s’agit plus, en réalité, d’une question d’efficience accrue et d’intégration.

Pourriez-vous développer votre pensée à ce sujet ?

Mme Clare Beckton:

La raison pour laquelle je préfère parler « d’intégration travail-famille » est que, si les gens s’efforcent d’atteindre un équilibre mythique, ils se sentent souvent stressés parce qu’ils ne peuvent pas l’atteindre. Vous avez tout à fait raison de dire qu’il faut se demander dans quelle mesure le processus de travail du Parlement est efficient et comment il aide ses membres à s’acquitter de leurs responsabilités.

Les gens font généralement leur travail avec passion et y attachent beaucoup de prix. Cela ne les préoccupe pas particulièrement de travailler une heure de plus un jour ou une heure de moins le lendemain. Je pense que cela fait partie de ce que nous voulons dire quand nous parlons d’intégration travail-famille. Ce n’est pas toujours possible — en fait, c’est rarement possible — dans le genre de rôles que jouent les députés ou dans le genre de rôles que j’ai joués dans ma carrière, de trouver cet équilibre parfait. C’est plus une question de satisfaction dans ce que l’on fait ou de sentir que l’on a l’appui nécessaire pour assumer ses responsabilités.

Cette intégration fonctionnerait différemment.

Vous avez parlé d’événements familiaux. Parfois, on veut aller à un événement familial et on ne passe pas autant de temps au travail, ce qui devrait être tout à fait acceptable, car c’est le genre de chose dont on doit parler quand on parle d’intégration et pas nécessairement d’équilibre.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Vos recherches ont porté sur les femmes en leadership public et en politique. Il y a une différence entre les sexes quand on parle des heures de séance et des responsabilités envers les enfants. Bien que cela concerne évidemment autant les hommes que les femmes, et qu’il y a aussi une question d’âge qui entre en jeu, des représentants de l’Union interparlementaire nous ont dit, quand ils ont comparu, que, lorsqu’on dresse la liste des obstacles à l’action politique, les femmes sont beaucoup plus susceptibles de parler des heures de séance et des responsabilités envers les enfants.

Pourriez-vous nous parler un peu de cette différence et, peut-être, de l’effet dissuasif que les heures de séance et la semaine de travail peuvent avoir, en particulier sur les femmes ayant de jeunes enfants?

Mme Clare Beckton:

Il y a manifestement là un effet dissuasif, car on suppose toujours que ce sont les femmes qui ont la responsabilité de s’occuper des enfants. Nous savons que cela change peu à peu dans les jeunes générations et que de plus en plus de jeunes hommes tiennent à passer du temps avec leur famille et leurs enfants mais, quand on calcule le pourcentage de temps consacré aux enfants, on constate qu’il reste plus élevé pour les femmes.

Je pense que les femmes ont tendance à être plus préoccupées par l’idée de devoir être à deux endroits en même temps. Je parle souvent à des femmes qui me disent qu’elles ont un certain sentiment de culpabilité quand elles sont au travail et aussi quand elles sont à la maison, car elles ont le sentiment de ne pas pouvoir agir de manière efficace dans chaque cas. Il y a aussi l’idée, qui existe encore même à notre époque, qu’on interrogera les femmes sur leurs responsabilités familiales, qu’elles soient députées ou non, ce qui ne sera pas le cas pour les hommes. Il y a toujours dans les médias une certaine idée préconçue de ce que les femmes devraient faire et du rôle qu’elles devraient jouer, ce qui constitue une entrave à l’action politique des femmes, à mon avis.

L’autre chose qui constitue une entrave pour les femmes, et dont j’ai souvent entendu parler, est cette idée qu’elles ne veulent pas que leur vie privée soit étalée sur la place publique, ce qui a sur elles un effet dissuasif regrettable, je crois, parce que cela ne devrait pas être le cas.

(1115)

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Croyez-vous donc que rehausser l’efficience des travaux parlementaires et peut-être même comprimer la semaine de travail contribuerait à rétablir l’équilibre dans notre Parlement? Nous sommes au 48e rang dans le monde pour ce qui est du nombre de femmes au Parlement. Est-ce que cela contribuerait à redresser cette situation?

Mme Clare Beckton:

C’est l’une des choses qui permettraient de s’attaquer au problème, je crois. Je pense que rien ne saurait remplacer le leadership des partis politiques qui devraient très sérieusement encourager plus de femmes à poser leur candidature. Nous savons que les femmes ne posent généralement pas spontanément leur propre candidature. Elles doivent y être invitées. Les partis devraient donc faire plus sérieusement leur recrutement et demander à des femmes de se porter candidates, car nous avons besoin de cette diversité, qui serait bénéfique à la Chambre d’ailleurs.

Ce que vous dites n’est qu’une des pièces du casse-tête. Et il y a une pièce encore plus importante qui est reliée à la manière dont on les amène à se porter candidates. Il faudrait certainement ouvrir la porte aux jeunes femmes, car on constate que les femmes attendent souvent que leurs enfants soient un peu plus âgés avant de se décider à être candidates. En effet, elles pensent qu’elles auront alors plus le loisir de se consacrer aux choses qui comptent pour elles.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je voudrais revenir sur ce que vous disiez au sujet de la culture de l’institution et de la notion de respect, et du fait que les leaders doivent donner l’exemple des comportements souhaités. Quand j’ai fait venir de jeunes étudiantes à la période des questions, elles m’ont dit qu’elles ne seraient jamais candidates aux élections parce qu’elles n’aiment tout simplement pas le niveau d’agressivité qu’elles ont constaté.

Qu’est-ce qu’on pourrait faire à ce sujet, d’après vous?

Mme Clare Beckton:

Eh bien, je pense que cela participe de toute cette question du respect et de ce qu’il faut faire pour changer la période des questions afin qu’elle devienne une véritable occasion de poser des questions sérieuses. C’est tout à fait souhaitable, ce serait une bonne chose. Vous voulez avoir la possibilité d’interroger les chefs et les membres du gouvernement, mais vous voulez aussi avoir la possibilité de le faire d’une manière qui soit vraiment sérieuse, afin d’obtenir vraiment le genre de réponses qu’attendent les électeurs. Je pense que beaucoup de gens auraient une opinion différente du Parlement si c’était le cas.

J’ai souvent entendu des femmes me dire: « Pourquoi voudrais-je participer à ce genre de cirque? Je ne m’y sentirais pas à l’aise. Ce n’est pas mon style, ce n’est pas la manière dont je veux me comporter. » Nous rencontrons cela partout, parce que, lorsque des femmes sont perçues comme étant plus agressives, on dit que c’est mauvais. Par contre, si ce sont des hommes qui sont agressifs, c’est acceptable. Voilà la réalité.

À tort ou à raison, cette perception existe encore aujourd’hui, et nous en avons des exemples en permanence. C’est toujours la question du deux poids, deux mesures. C’est cependant souvent plus inconscient que conscient.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Si l’on décidait de comprimer la semaine de travail afin de changer les heures et de rendre les procédures plus efficientes, ou si l’on faisait quelque chose pour exiger plus de dignité de la part des députés à la Chambre, est-ce que cela encouragerait plus de femmes à présenter leur candidature, d’après vous? Croyez-vous qu’il y aurait alors plus de femmes candidates?

Mme Clare Beckton:

Je pense que ce seraient certainement des mesures très positives, qui seraient utiles. Si vous essayez de convaincre des femmes de se porter candidates, ces choses-là seraient peut-être efficaces pour les amener à se décider. Nous ne cessons de dire aux femmes d’être actives en politique, de présenter leur candidature et de se faire élire.

Le président:

Un petit rappel aux membres du Comité. Si vous voulez que chacun ait la possibilité de poser des questions, vous pouvez parfaitement vous partager votre temps de parole.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Quelle coïncidence! C’est justement ce que j’allais faire avec mon collègue, M. Schmale.

Je tiens à remercier David Prest d’être venu devant le Comité comme témoin. David a acquis une expérience incomparable au sein de notre caucus, puisqu’il a occupé ici toutes sortes de postes différents au cours de trois décennies, à différentes étapes de sa vie: d’abord comme jeune parent, puis comme parent d’une famille de plus en plus nombreuse.

C’est à vous que je m’adresse en premier, David. Je partage votre avis au sujet des activités organisées à l’intention des familles. J’ai l’impression que la raison pour laquelle on cesse de les organiser est que nous sommes périodiquement confrontés à des tsunamis, ici. Des gens proposent de bonnes idées, qui deviennent partie intégrante de la culture institutionnelle, puis vous avez 200 nouveaux députés qui arrivent d’un seul coup et beaucoup des bonnes idées antérieures sont tout simplement balayées. On doit alors les redécouvrir.

Pendant que vous faisiez votre suggestion, j’ai pris note de quelques événements possibles. Le premier se tiendrait au moment où commence notre année de travail, c’est-à-dire en septembre, à l’automne. Je songeais à une fête d’Halloween. Ça se faisait autrefois, avec l’aide du président de la Chambre. C’était après que les confiseurs ont mis fin à la leur. Tous ceux qui avaient des enfants partaient de la Colline parlementaire les bras chargés de confiseries, ce qui n’était sans doute pas souhaitable pour les enfants. Toutefois, il pourrait y avoir à nouveau une fête d’Halloween.

Il pourrait aussi y avoir une fête de Noël spécialement pour les enfants.

Une année, nous avons essayé d’organiser quelque chose en février avec la coopération du Président, parce que février est le moment où on commence à en avoir assez de l’hiver.

On pourrait aussi organiser quelque chose en juin, peut-être sur la pelouse devant l’édifice du Centre, ou dans la cour de l’édifice de l’Est, en plein air en tout cas.

Est-ce que ce sont là des possibilités qui vous paraissent raisonnables ou est-ce que vous en avez d’autres à suggérer?

(1120)

M. David Prest:

Je songeais à un événement par saison, et ce que vous proposez correspondrait parfaitement à cette idée.

M. Scott Reid:

Le président propose une chasse aux œufs de Pâques.

Ces activités avaient tendance à être organisées pour les députés et leurs enfants mais, si je comprends bien, vous songez aussi aux enfants des membres du personnel, si c’était possible.

M. David Prest:

Oui, pour le personnel aussi. Mais il pourrait s’agir d’activités séparées. Il arrive que les caucus organisent des choses pour le personnel et les députés ensemble.

Je ne sais pas combien de députés ont leur famille ici à Ottawa. La fête de Noël à laquelle je pensais se tenait pendant la même période que les fêtes de Noël des caucus, à l’occasion desquelles beaucoup de députés se trouvaient à Ottawa, avec des membres de leur famille. Je suppose qu’il serait plus difficile de faire venir les familles à Ottawa à d’autres moments.

M. Scott Reid:

Une autre chose que je veux ajouter, pas à l’intention des témoins mais à l’intention de tous les membres du Comité, est qu’il conviendrait peut-être d’adresser une lettre aux leaders en Chambre des différents partis pour leur demander de commencer à discuter ce printemps du calendrier de l’an prochain, au lieu d’attendre. Ils pourront en faire ce qu’ils veulent, mais ce serait au moins dans leur agenda.

Le président:

Quelqu’un s’oppose-t-il à cette proposition?

Nous allons le faire. Il faut savoir écouter.

M. Scott Reid:

C’est tout.

Le président:

C’est une bonne idée.

Monsieur Schmale.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Merci, monsieur Reid et monsieur le président.

Je remercie à nouveau les témoins de leur contribution. Ils nous ont donné beaucoup d’informations utiles.

Je voudrais revenir sur ce que vous avez dit au sujet de la culpabilité. C’est un phénomène qui touche les deux sexes. Moi aussi, quand je suis à la maison, je me dis que je devrais plutôt être au travail et, quand je suis au travail, je me dis que je devrais être à la maison. Il se peut que les femmes le ressentent plus fortement que les hommes mais je sais que, dans mon cas, c’est très présent. Je pense que c’est directement relié à notre fonction. Si l’on pouvait atténuer ce sentiment, je crois que ce serait utile.

Avant de passer à la question suivante, je voudrais revenir sur les événements organisés à l’intention des familles et sur l’idée de faire venir les familles ici. C’est une chose dont nous avons parlé lors d’une séance précédente: il s’agirait d’utiliser nos points de voyage pour nos conjoints ou conjointes qui habitent en dehors de la province ou qui ne pourraient pas venir ici en voiture.

Je pense que nous sommes tous en faveur de la divulgation des informations et que nous sommes parvenus à un accord sur l’idée d’atténuer la réaction négative du public si nous voulons faire venir nos conjoints ou conjointes aux frais du contribuable. Je pense que ce serait utile. Quoi qu’il en soit, je crois que tout le monde convient, quel que soit son parti, que ce serait une bonne chose de faire venir les conjoints ou conjointes à Ottawa pour voir comment fonctionne le Parlement et comment nous travaillons. Je crois que ce serait une très bonne idée pour que nos familles comprennent ce que nous faisons.

Je ne sais pas si vous voulez répondre à cela avant que je passe à la suite de mon intervention.

M. David Prest:

Vous voulez dire à propos des points de voyage?

M. Jamie Schmale:

Oui, l'un ou l'autre.

M. David Prest:

Je ne voulais pas laisser entendre que cela serait plus coûteux, mais c'est vrai, ce serait possible. On pourrait organiser ces voyages à l'avance. Je suppose que cela coûterait moins cher si l'on pouvait faire des réservations à l'avance pour faire venir les familles ici. Je pense que cela en vaudrait la peine.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Madame Beckton, croyez-vous que c'est une bonne chose de faire participer les familles? Je suppose que oui.

Mme Clare Beckton:

Oui, je pense que cela permet aux familles de mieux comprendre ce que leur conjoint ou leur parent fait sur la Colline. Cela permet de mieux comprendre pourquoi ce conjoint ou ce parent n'est pas toujours disponible. Beaucoup de ménages n'ont pas tenu le coup et je pense que c'est dû en partie au fait de ne pas comprendre les pressions qui sont imposées à un député lorsqu'il travaille à Ottawa.

(1125)

M. Jamie Schmale:

En effet.

Vous avez parlé des semaines de travail comprimées. On en avait déjà parlé à des réunions précédentes, ainsi que des conséquences inattendues pour les députés qui avaient fait venir leurs familles à Ottawa. Je pense que ça pose un problème pour eux lorsqu'ils doivent partir le jeudi plutôt que le vendredi, ou un autre jour, selon leur situation. Je pense que cela provoque une autre conséquence inattendue qui mérite d'être surveillée.

Mme Clare Beckton:

Tout à fait. Il faut considérer quelle est la meilleure solution qui correspond à la majorité, sans toutefois pénaliser les autres. Parfois, c'est très difficile de trouver le juste milieu.

Ce sont des détails sur lesquels on se penche, qu'ils fonctionnent ou non. Tout dépend. Je pense que David comprend beaucoup mieux que moi les règles et procédures parlementaires, mais ce sont des formules que l'on a appliquées dans d'autres secteurs.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Monsieur le président, combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Vingt secondes.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je vais les garder pour plus tard.

Mme Clare Beckton:

Pour le prochain tour.

Le président:

David pourrait faire durer ça huit minutes.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président: Monsieur Christopherson, vous avez la parole pendant sept minutes.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président. Quand on est ici depuis quelque temps, je peux vous assurer qu'on peut faire n'importe quoi en 20 secondes.

M. Jamie Schmale: J'aurais dû continuer.

M. David Christopherson: Ça va.

Merci à tous les deux d'être venus aujourd'hui.

Ma première remarque concerne le sentiment de culpabilité qu'a évoqué M. Schmale. Je connais ça depuis plus de 30 ans. Je me souviens d'un représentant du personnel des Travailleurs canadiens de l'automobile. C'était à une fête de départ à la retraite et il donnait son discours d'adieu. Voici ce qu'il avait dit: « Vous savez, au fil des ans, les gens m'ont souvent remercié pour les sacrifices que j'avais faits pour les travailleurs syndiqués, pour la cause, afin de leur offrir de meilleures conditions de travail. En vérité, ce n'est pas moi qui ai fait le sacrifice, c'est ma famille, parce que moi, je faisais ce que j'aimais; ma passion, c'était de parler des injustices et de l'équité, alors j'étais payé en retour pour ce que je faisais. Par contre, les anniversaires de mariage, les anniversaires des enfants... »

Le sentiment de culpabilité est une chose horrible. Mais la vérité, c'est que ce sont les familles qui font le sacrifice, parce que, franchement, souvent vous avez le choix. Cela paraît terrible, mais c'est ça le dilemme; cela fait partie de la vie quotidienne d'un député. Nous sommes des humains comme les autres, et ce sentiment de culpabilité se manifeste lorsque vous devez assister à un événement important — quelle que soit la raison, vous devez être présent —, mais votre conjointe vous rappelle que c'est l'anniversaire de votre fille et que vous devriez vous faire un devoir de le célébrer avec elle, que ça devrait être votre plus grande priorité. On se sent alors terriblement coupable.

Le fait d'en parler aide peut-être un peu. J'ai toujours pensé qu'elle était très profonde cette observation de Frank Marose, car ce n'est pas lui qui se sacrifiait, contrairement à ce que tout le monde pensait, mais plutôt sa famille.

Deuxièmement, Peter Stoffer, un des parlementaires les plus extraordinaires à avoir fréquenté les couloirs du Parlement... Il était réputé pour l'événement-bénéfice que l'on appelait « All-party party ». J'en étais très impressionné, parce que, je dois vous dire, si j'avais pour réputation, à Hamilton, d'être un organisateur d'événements sur la Colline, je ne tiendrais pas plus d'un mandat. Mais Peter organisait tout ça. C'était un gars unique et tout le monde aimait Peter.

Il est peut-être temps de trouver quelqu'un d'autre. C'est l'occasion où jamais. Il y a beaucoup de jeunes députés. C'est un créneau à prendre. Il n'y avait personne comme lui pour nous rassembler tous.

Monsieur Prest, tout ce dont vous avez parlé... C'était Peter. Peter était comme ça. Les exemples que vous avez donnés, je crois, se rapportaient surtout à Peter: la fête de Noël, le « Party de tous les partis »; il y avait aussi la fête de « Hilloween », dont M. Reid a parlé. Je suis content que vous en ayez parlé et nous allons y réfléchir.

J'aimerais dire de nouveau combien les choses se sont améliorées depuis qu'on a placé les votes après la période de questions. Combien de soirées avons-nous perdues à cause de cela? Et ne croyez pas que c'était parce que nous voulions retourner chez nous; nous devions ensuite aller aux réunions auxquelles nous étions censés participer et aux réceptions auxquelles nous voulions assister et, bien entendu, il nous arrivait aussi parfois de passer du temps avec des collègues que l'on n'a pas finalement l'occasion de connaître si bien.

C'était une chose simple qui a produit une énorme différence.

Puisque j'ai la parole, j'aimerais parler de la Chambre et de l'attitude envers les femmes. Je me suis porté à la défense du chahut à la Chambre, en affirmant que cela faisait partie de la culture parlementaire, mais, bien entendu, il ne faut pas que cela devienne systématique. Il faut plutôt qu'on utilise le chahut comme le font les caricaturistes politiques, pour exprimer un point de vue drôle et mordant.

Je vais vous raconter une expérience que j'ai vécue hier. Je ne me suis pas levé pour faire appel au Règlement, mais je me suis fait un point d'honneur d'en parler par la suite au Président... Je suis assis juste en face de la ministre du Commerce international, une femme qui est plutôt de petite taille. Elle est assise juste en face de moi, comme David ici, et je peux vous dire que le bruit assourdissant qui venait des « banquettes de l'opposition », disons-le comme ça, était si énorme qu'on pouvait à peine l'entendre. Ça, ce n'était pas du chahut. Ce n'était pas une contribution intelligente. Ce n'était pas une réaction émotive exprimant un point de vue valable que l'on veut faire entendre. Non, c'était tout simplement grossier, ignare et inacceptable. Quand on parle de chahut, il faut faire la distinction, d'une part, entre ce qui est censé être une contribution pertinente aux débats, puisqu'il faut se rappeler que nos débats remplacent les combats et qu'il faut parfois laisser sortir la vapeur, et, d'autre part, le simple fait de vouloir faire taire quelqu'un et — je vais le dire — tout simplement parce qu'on est un homme et qu'on a une plus grosse...

J'ai une grosse voix de stentor. Si je l'utilisais uniquement pour faire taire un collègue, j'irais à l'encontre de tout débat intelligent, civilisé, démocratique et je pense que le Président va continuer à faire tout ce qu'il peut pour faire arrêter cela.

(1130)



Voici ma question.

Monsieur Prest, vous avez le grand avantage d'avoir travaillé des deux côtés, comme membre du personnel. Compte tenu de votre expérience, dites-nous quelles sont les différences en matière d'impact sur le personnel — puisque vous avez été des deux côtés, dans les différentes chambres —, d'après vous, comment le personnel est-il touché selon qu'il travaille pour le gouvernement ou pour l'opposition?

M. David Prest:

Lorsque vous travaillez pour le gouvernement, vous devez être présent plus souvent. Je crois qu'on travaille plus tard, mais on a aussi plus de ressources et plus d'aide, si bien que c'est moins difficile d'être à plusieurs endroits à la fois. Quand la Chambre siège, vous devez être ici.

Quand on est dans l'opposition, ce n'est pas aussi important. J'aime quand la Chambre fonctionne sur le pilote automatique; on se sent plus libre de chaque côté. On peut rentrer chez soi sans craindre qu'il se passe quelque chose et que l'on doive retourner au Parlement. De manière générale, quand la Chambre siège, c'est difficile pour les deux côtés, aussi bien pour l'opposition que pour le gouvernement.

M. David Christopherson:

Je suis sûr que j'ai épuisé tout mon temps.

Le président:

Non, il vous reste une minute.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est vrai? Hourra! Je suis super content!

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président:

Maintenant, il ne vous reste plus que 50 secondes.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous faites exprès de me faire perdre du temps.

Savez-vous, monsieur le président, je pense que je vais laisser passer.

Le président:

Très bien.

David, pouvez-vous me remplacer? Nous allons donner la parole à M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Prest, vous êtes membre du personnel depuis 1981. C'est bien ça?

M. David Prest:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'était l'année de ma naissance. C'est un plaisir de vous rencontrer ici. Merci.

Vous avez dit un peu plus tôt que vous aimez le statu quo. C'est très bien; c'est un point de vue. J'aimerais savoir ce que vous pensez des vendredis. Est-ce un avantage ou un inconvénient? Est-ce qu'on ne devrait rien changer? Est-ce qu'on devrait les prolonger ou les raccourcir? Est-ce qu'il faudrait que la Chambre travaille en « pilote automatique » le vendredi? Que proposez-vous pour les vendredis?

M. David Prest:

Au début, quand on en a parlé, on était tout content d'avoir de longues fins de semaine, mais maintenant, quand on y pense, dans la pratique...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

... on passe plus de temps dans la circonscription.

M. David Prest:

Je pensais aux conséquences pour moi et sans doute pour la plupart des députés qui ont leur famille à Ottawa. Il serait plus difficile pour moi d'emmener mes enfants jouer au soccer le lundi, le mardi, le mercredi et le jeudi, c'est certain, puisque la Chambre devrait siéger plus tard.

Mes enfants vont à l'école. Je ne pense pas qu'on me donnerait le vendredi de congé, mais, de toute façon, mes enfants sont à l'école et cela ne changerait rien. Je trouve que c'est déjà bien que la Chambre suspende ses travaux à 14 h 30 le vendredi. C'est le seul jour où je peux aller chercher mes enfants à l'école.

Je pense qu'il n'y a pas beaucoup de votes les jeudis soirs et il n'y en a pas non plus les vendredis, aussi, la Chambre se met plutôt en pilote automatique le jeudi après-midi et le vendredi. Ce sont des jours où il n'y a pas de travaux de fond.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

De facto, la Chambre est en pilote automatique, mais ce n'est pas véritablement le cas les jeudis. Souhaiteriez-vous que le Règlement prévoie que la Chambre des communes se mette complètement en pilote automatique les jeudis après-midi et les vendredis? Même des deux côtés...

M. David Prest:

Pas vraiment. Je pense que le gouvernement veut garder la possibilité d'effectuer des travaux indispensables le jeudi après-midi. De toute façon, les votes relèvent des whips. Ils peuvent les reporter; le whip du gouvernement et celui de l'opposition ont le même pouvoir. C'est prévu comme cela. Si un vote était prévu, il y aurait un vote sur une motion dilatoire d'ajournement, ce qui ne va pas...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pensez-vous que nous devrions modifier le Règlement de la Chambre des communes afin de reporter tous les votes sur des questions de fond après la période des questions?

M. David Prest:

Je pense qu'il faut laisser aux whips la possibilité de le faire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous préféreriez ne rien changer et procéder chaque fois essentiellement à partir de motions plutôt que de prévoir cette procédure par défaut.

M. David Prest:

Ou encore, ce pourrait être une option dans le Règlement qu'un whip pourrait déclencher. Je pense qu'il faudrait que cette possibilité reste ouverte — je réagis, encore une fois, comme un chien de garde du gouvernement — au cas où on en aurait besoin pour voter un après-midi ou après la période des questions, afin d'avancer un projet de loi pour le lendemain. Il pourrait donc arriver que la Chambre soit appelée à voter le jeudi soir. Je laisserais cette possibilité ouverte.

(1135)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous connaissez probablement le Règlement de la Chambre mieux que nous tous réunis, après tout le temps que vous avez travaillé au bureau du leader parlementaire. Si vous en aviez la possibilité, est-ce qu'il y a quelque chose que vous aimeriez changer ou réviser dans le Règlement de la Chambre? Est-ce qu'il y a une disposition qui vous paraît vraiment absurde et que nous devrions peut-être revoir?

S'il y a un endroit et un moment où cela est possible, c'est ici et maintenant.

M. David Prest:

Voulez-vous parler d'une disposition en rapport avec les initiatives propices à la vie de famille ou d'autres dispositions?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Soit l'une soit l'autre. Soit les dispositions se rapportant à la vie de famille, soit les dispositions générales du Règlement de la Chambre. Vous avez travaillé des deux côtés; vous connaissez le fonctionnement.

De manière tout à fait objective, est-ce qu'il y a quelque chose qui vous paraît totalement absurde et que l'on devrait peut-être examiner, quelque chose dont personne n'a parlé?

M. David Prest:

Je ne vois rien comme ça, à brûle-pourpoint. J'ai une liste de choses que j'aimerais changer, mais cela ne concerne pas les initiatives visant à favoriser une Chambre des communes propice à la vie de famille. Je souhaiterais plutôt donner un rôle plus important aux députés d'arrière-ban — et à l'opposition, maintenant que je suis dans l'opposition. Je change de point de vue quand je passe du gouvernement à l'opposition.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Eh bien, alors, je serais curieux d'entendre votre point de vue avant et après.

M. David Prest:

Que voulez-vous dire?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je serais curieux de connaître votre point de vue à ce sujet avant et après — lorsque vous travailliez pour le gouvernement et maintenant que vous travaillez dans l'opposition. J'aimerais connaître les points de vue qui n'ont pas changé.

M. David Prest:

Eh bien, en voici un. Je vais vous donner un exemple: les motions d'instruction donnant pouvoir au comité de scinder un projet de loi. Elles sont proposées par un député, mais après la clôture du débat, elles deviennent une initiative ministérielle. Par la suite, elles sont contrôlées par le gouvernement et il ne se passe rien.

C'était la même chose dans les comités permanents, lorsqu'ils déposaient leur rapport à la Chambre. On proposait l'adoption du rapport du comité et une fois que le débat sur la motion était ajourné, elle devenait une initiative ministérielle. Nous avons changé les règles parce que ce n'était pas logique. En effet, si vous déposiez un rapport demandant des documents au gouvernement, celui-ci avait une latitude totale pour décider quand la motion serait mise aux voix. On disait que les comités étaient très puissants, mais en fait ils ne l'étaient pas.

En tout cas, nous avons fait ce changement. Nous aurions dû également faire des modifications au sujet des motions de régie interne pendant les affaires courantes ordinaires, telles que les motions d'instruction à un comité.

Voilà ce que je peux vous dire à brûle-pourpoint.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Revenons au sujet qui devrait nous préoccuper, soit les initiatives relatives à la vie de famille — quels sont les changements qui vous paraissent indispensables au sujet des choses toutes simples dont nous avons parlé? Je ne sais pas si vous avez suivi nos travaux depuis quelques mois, mais nous avons parlé de services de garderie et d'autobus, de stationnement, de diffusion du calendrier — toutes sortes de choses — qui sont des questions techniques relevant de la régie interne. Je me demande si vous avez des commentaires à faire à ce sujet.

En tant qu'ancien membre du personnel — j'ai été moi aussi membre du personnel ici pendant de nombreuses années —, ce qui me dérange le plus personnellement, c'est de ne pas pouvoir partager mon calendrier avec un député et un membre du personnel sur mon BlackBerry, de manière à permettre à chacun de modifier ce calendrier. Je voudrais même aller plus loin et permettre, par exemple, à ma conjointe de consulter mon calendrier, afin que je ne sois pas obligé d'utiliser le calendrier Google et de sortir de la zone pour le partager, afin que ces personnes-là sachent où je suis et qu'on puisse coordonner nos emplois du temps.

M. David Prest:

C'est un problème technique ou...?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avant de faire de la politique, j'étais dans le domaine technique et je ne pense pas que ce soit un problème technique. Je crois plutôt que c'est un problème politique; il faut donc que la régie interne s'adresse au Bureau de services de TI pour leur demander de régler le problème, parce qu'ils ne feront rien sans cette demande.

Est-ce une modification qui vous paraît souhaitable?

M. David Prest:

Je ne vois pas ce qu'il y a de politique là-dedans. Je suppose que si vous le vouliez vraiment...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

S'il n'y avait pas de volonté politique, ce serait déjà réglé.

M. David Prest:

J'avoue que cela me dépasse un peu. Je ne sais vraiment pas.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quel est votre point de vue sur les services de garde, le service d'autobus et le stationnement?

Vous avez une vaste expérience que je respecte beaucoup.

M. David Prest:

Quand j'ai eu mes enfants, il y avait une garderie, mais je trouvais que le tarif était trop cher à l'époque d'une part, et lorsque mes enfants sont allés à l'école, ce n'était pas très logique de les avoir au centre-ville d'Ottawa; je préférais qu'ils soient près de leur école et de la maison. Cela me paraissait plus logique et je n'ai donc jamais vraiment envisagé de les mettre à la garderie. C'est peut-être différent pour les députés qui vivent au centre-ville; je ne sais pas.

Je ne sais pas ce que vous entendez par service d'autobus. Est-ce qu'il s'agit du service d'autobus de la Chambre des communes?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, le service d'autobus de la Chambre des communes, les cafétérias de la Chambre des communes — tous ces services — qui sont destinés aux députés et dont bénéficient également les membres du personnel. Le service est considérablement réduit dans les cafétérias et les autobus sont aussi moins nombreux lorsque nous sommes partis. Les autobus sont beaucoup moins fréquents qu'il y a quelques années. Quand j'ai commencé ici, il y avait beaucoup plus de d'autobus que maintenant, par exemple.

Avez-vous des commentaires à formuler à ce sujet là ou au sujet de choses que vous aimeriez améliorer?

M. David Prest:

Lorsque la Chambre des communes ne siège pas, cela ne me dérange pas qu'il y ait moins d'autobus, parce que je n'ai pas à courir ici et là, comme lorsque la Chambre siège. Le service d'autobus ne m'a jamais posé problème.

Quant à la cafétéria, c'est la même chose. Je n'ai jamais noté aucun problème.

Le vice-président (M. David Christopherson):

Monsieur Graham, il ne vous reste que deux secondes. Vous avez juste le temps de dire au revoir et merci.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien, allez-y. Tout le monde a utilisé ses 10 dernières secondes.

Merci, David.

Le vice-président (M. David Christopherson):

Très bien.

Nous allons maintenant passer aux tours de cinq minutes. Monsieur Richards, vous allez commencer.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Monsieur Prest, j'ai moi aussi quelques questions pour vous.

On en a déjà parlé un peu, mais vous avez mentionné, dans vos remarques, la tenue des votes après la période de questions. Vous avez dit assez clairement, je crois, que selon vous, il faut augmenter la flexibilité. Je ne suis pas contre, mais le fait que les votes soient plus nombreux après la période de questions a été, d'après ce que j'ai pu observer, assez bien accueilli, ou même accueilli unanimement de façon positive.

J'aimerais connaître votre point de vue en tant que membre du personnel. Vous avez dit combien il est difficile pour vous de conduire vos enfants à leurs activités parascolaires — le sport, les arts et autres activités — lorsque la Chambre siège.

Est-ce que la tenue des votes après la période de questions vous arrange? Il est clair que cette formule permet de réduire la durée des séances de la Chambre puisqu'on élimine au moins la sonnerie pour appeler au vote. Avez-vous noté une différence à ce sujet? Est-ce que vous considérez que c'est une amélioration? Est-ce que vos enfants passent plus de temps sur le terrain de jeu et moins de temps sur le banc?

(1140)

M. David Prest:

En tant que membre du personnel, cela n'a pas une véritable incidence sur moi, mais j'ai noté que c'était un changement positif pour les députés. Moi, je ne vote pas. Et, en fait, parfois le soir, quand les députés votent, je n'ai pas vraiment besoin d'être là. Ce n'est pas comme lorsque je travaillais pour le whip. Du point de vue du personnel, cela n'a pas d'importance.

M. Blake Richards:

Donc, cela n'a pas une grande incidence. Très bien.

Il a également été question des jours de séance de la Chambre. On a dit qu'il paraîtrait logique de commencer un peu plus tôt dans l'année. Je peux comprendre que les gens veuillent pouvoir faire des projets de vacances et planifier leurs activités familiales et autres. Plus le calendrier est établi tôt, plus il est facile de planifier.

Vous avez signalé que l'an dernier, vous avez pu établir le calendrier avant l'ajournement estival. Il semble donc que ce soit possible. Ayant travaillé dans le bureau d'un whip, je suppose que vous savez comment on établit le calendrier. Je me demande si, selon vous, cela poserait problème que l'on établisse le calendrier un peu plus tôt au cours de l'année ou si cette façon de faire serait tout à fait possible, sans aucune conséquence indésirable?

M. David Prest:

Je pense que c'est tout à fait possible, puisque nous l'avons fait l'an dernier. Il y a peut-être eu un cas où les provinces n'avaient pas encore établi leur semaine de relâche, mais il est toujours possible de modifier ce type de chose, avec le consentement unanime, quand on approche de la date, en décalant d'une semaine, par exemple. Il me paraît un peu exagéré d'avoir à bloquer tout le calendrier pendant plusieurs mois parce qu'il manque quelques informations.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous avez également parlé brièvement de la possibilité de prolonger les périodes de travaux. Selon vous, ce serait à éviter.

J'aimerais vous demander de nous dire quelle serait, selon vous, la durée idéale des périodes de travaux de la Chambre. Je crois que l'on cherche notamment à coordonner... Comme le président l'a dit, les calendriers scolaires sont établis par les provinces, bien entendu, mais je pense que l'on s'efforce d'établir un calendrier qui corresponde au plus grand nombre de personnes possible dans les diverses régions du pays, afin que notre calendrier s'harmonise au mieux avec les autres.

Je sais qu'il faut une certaine flexibilité pour respecter ces paramètres, mais pouvez-vous nous dire quelle serait la formule qui vous paraîtrait idéale, par exemple, trois semaines, puis une semaine de relâche, ou toute autre combinaison? Dites-nous aussi, en vous appuyant sur votre longue expérience, ce qui se passe lorsque nous avons des périodes de travail plus longues ou plus courtes. Est-ce que la durée de la période des travaux a des incidences sur le déroulement des travaux lui-même?

M. David Prest:

Dans l'idéal, je pense qu'une période de trois semaines suivie d'une semaine de relâche est la meilleure formule. Quand on arrive à la quatrième ou à la cinquième semaine, les gens ne sont plus du tout aussi productifs: les gens s'affrontent et rien n'avance. Selon moi, les cinquièmes semaines, c'est presque du temps perdu et en plus, c'est difficile pour le moral des députés d'être séparés de leurs familles et de vivre pendant si longtemps dans un contexte de confrontation. C'est toujours bon de prendre une pause, de se ressourcer et de revenir en forme ensuite. Pour moi, les périodes de travaux de trois semaines, c'est l'idéal.

Le vice-président (M. David Christopherson):

Il vous reste encore trois minutes.

Oh, excusez-moi, je suis désolé. Ce sont des tours de cinq minutes et non pas de sept minutes. Il vous reste donc 15 secondes.

Je vous ai fait croire que vous aviez le temps et maintenant je vous cloue le bec.

M. Blake Richards: Merci, monsieur le président.

Le vice-président (M. David Christopherson): Oui je sais. C'est pour ça que je ne suis pas le président.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Blake Richards:

Dans ce cas, merci à tous les deux d'être venus aujourd'hui. Nous avons apprécié votre aide.

(1145)

Le vice-président (M. David Christopherson):

Merci beaucoup et désolé pour la confusion.

Madame Petitpas Taylor, c'est à vous, madame.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Merci. En plus, vous avez bien prononcé mon nom. C'est formidable.

Avant tout, je tiens à remercier Mme Beckton et M. Prest d'être venus témoigner aujourd'hui. Nous vous remercions d'avoir pris le temps de nous aider sur ce dossier très important que nous devons examiner.

Pour commencer, il y a six ans environ, on m'avait sollicitée pour me présenter sur la scène provinciale, mais à l'époque, je vivais une situation très différente. Je m'occupais alors de ma mère qui souffrait de démence et je voulais vraiment être présente auprès d'elle et il fallait que je reste dans les environs. Par conséquent, j'avais décidé que ce n'était pas le bon moment.

Les personnes qui m'avaient sollicitée m'avaient dit qu'elles étaient à la recherche de candidates, en particulier de jeunes femmes, pour se présenter sur la scène provinciale. C'est la raison pour laquelle on me l'avait demandé et aussi parce que j'étais engagée dans ma collectivité.

Six ans plus tard, je suis ici. Ma mère vit toujours — elle est placée dans un centre de vie avec services de soutien — mais si j'avais à l'époque pris la décision de ne pas me présenter, c'est que la voie n'était pas libre.

De nos jours, je pense que les Canadiennes et les Canadiens veulent que notre Parlement soit un reflet authentique de la population canadienne. La question que je vous pose à tous les deux est la suivante: Pensez-vous que le statu quo encouragera ou découragera les femmes à se lancer en politique ou incitera plus de jeunes à se présenter, afin que nous ayons un Parlement plus inclusif ici à Ottawa?

Mme Clare Beckton:

Sans aucune référence à des règles précises, je pense que l'atmosphère de combativité qui existe actuellement et qui sera maintenue si l'on garde le statu quo, continuera à décourager les jeunes femmes et les femmes en général, ainsi que les gens en provenance de milieux culturels différents qui n'ont pas l'habitude de fonctionner de cette manière. Ils sont plus habitués à un style de collaboration. Alors je crois que c'est un des éléments qui continuera à décourager les gens.

Un peu plus tôt, vous avez parlé des services de garde. Je pense que beaucoup de jeunes parents qui viennent sur la Colline apprécieraient d'avoir un service de garde à proximité pour qu'ils soient plus proches de leurs jeunes enfants et de leur famille, si cela était nécessaire. Je sais que certaines députées organisent leur emploi du temps quotidien pour pouvoir allaiter leur enfant.

Quel que soit le règlement, je pense que la culture ambiante joue un grand rôle pour attirer des jeunes femmes, et en fait toutes les femmes, ainsi qu'un certain nombre de jeunes hommes, car ceux-ci voient les choses un peu différemment de nos jours.

M. David Prest:

Je pense que nous devons continuer à adapter le Parlement aux besoins des familles et que cela encouragera un plus grand nombre de femmes à se présenter, parce que ce sont généralement les femmes qui s'occupent des enfants. Sur le plan du règlement, je ne vois pas quels sont les changements qui pourraient encourager... Je pense que nous devrions poursuivre cette étude et améliorer la situation ici pour les parents.

Mme Clare Beckton:

Il faudrait apporter des changements à l'assurance-emploi qui permettraient aux hommes de prendre un congé parental, comme c'est le cas au Québec. S'ils ne le prennent pas, ils le perdent. Cela inciterait vraiment les hommes à prendre ce congé alors qu'actuellement, c'est difficile. Il est très difficile dans leur milieu de travail, de prendre le congé parental.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

J'ai une autre question rapide. Avez-vous tous les deux quelque chose à suggérer pour améliorer le décorum à la Chambre?

Mme Clare Beckton:

Le Président de la Chambre est chargé de faire appliquer le règlement, mais il joue un rôle très important dans le décorum. C'est lui qui le fait respecter, comme nous l'avons vu un peu plus tôt aujourd'hui.

Il faut également s'assurer que l'on ait des politiques sur le harcèlement, ainsi que des codes de conduite. Dans la fonction publique, il y a toujours eu des codes de conduite et des règles concernant le harcèlement. Il est très important de pouvoir faire la distinction entre ce qui constitue un comportement acceptable et ce qui est du harcèlement, parce que personne ne veut travailler dans un environnement où règne le harcèlement. Cela s'applique non seulement aux députés, mais également à leur personnel et au type de comportement qu'ils doivent supporter, que ce soit du harcèlement au travail ou du harcèlement sexuel. Voilà un élément très important qui contribue au décorum.

M. David Prest:

J'étais ici lorsque les députés avaient pris l'habitude de faire claquer leurs pupitres à la Chambre, au lieu d'applaudir. C'était extrêmement bruyant et le public n'aimait pas cela. Il a suffi, je pense, que les députés conservateurs ou progressistes conservateurs mettent un terme à cette pratique pour que tout le monde l'abandonne. Selon moi, on finit par abandonner un comportement dont on a honte ou dont on se sent coupable. Il faut que le changement vienne des députés eux-mêmes et du public, mais il suffit de commencer à changer pour que tout le monde emboîte le pas.

Mme Clare Beckton:

Les leaders et les influenceurs peuvent vraiment jouer un grand rôle en donnant l'exemple du comportement qu'ils s'attendent à trouver à la Chambre. Cela vaut pour toutes les organisations. Quand les dirigeants se comportent d'une certaine manière, on comprend que c'est le comportement qu'ils souhaitent voir tout le monde adopter.

(1150)

Le vice-président (M. David Christopherson):

Il vous reste environ huit secondes.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Merci.

Le vice-président (M. David Christopherson):

Poursuivons avec M. Schmale pendant cinq minutes.

Vous avez la parole, monsieur.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Merci beaucoup.

La dernière fois, je n'ai pas eu le temps d'aborder cette question, ce qui était une bonne chose. Je n'avais pas l'intention d'en parler, mais maintenant, j'ai la parole de nouveau.

Parlons brièvement du chahut. Comme je l'ai dit auparavant, si vous placez 338 personnes dans une pièce, que ce soit des avocats ou des agents immobiliers, et que vous leur soumettez un sujet brûlant — je l'ai vu au cours des débats à l'école secondaire — il est certain que les esprits vont s'échauffer.

Je reconnais qu'il faut limiter le tapage, mais je comprends également que cela fait partie de l'atmosphère, surtout lorsque, étant dans l'opposition, on pose une question et la réponse que l'on nous donne n'est absolument pas celle que vous attendiez ou qu'elle élude complètement votre question. Je pense qu'il faudrait procéder à une réforme générale de la période des questions avant de chercher à éliminer complètement le chahut, mais je comprends que le fait d'être chahuté au-delà d'un niveau acceptable peut être intimidant pour certains.

Je sais que certaines assemblées législatives provinciales ont pris des mesures pour réduire le chahut et le baliser, mais, là encore, je pense que cela tient à la sensibilité des questions qui sont traitées ainsi qu'à la fougue qui anime certains de ces débats.

J'ignore quelle est la bonne réponse. Je ne sais pas qui a mentionné cela au cours de la séance précédente, mais je pense que ce ne serait pas mieux de rester assis sans rien dire, comme à l'église.

Mme Clare Beckton:

On peut voir dans de nombreux forums qu'il est possible d'avoir un débat animé sans nécessairement aller jusqu'au chahut. Les avocats, par exemple, peuvent se livrer à de très vifs débats avec leurs collègues sans pour autant manquer de respect au tribunal.

Je pense que les débats animés sont excellents et que tout le monde aime les discussions passionnées. Par contre, il y a dérapage lorsque le langage devient agressif envers les interlocuteurs.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je ne sais pas qui avait manifesté de l'agressivité.

Il arrive que les gens marmonnent et ronchonnent, mais je n'ai jamais entendu des insultes ou des choses du genre, bien que je ne sois pas ici depuis longtemps.

Mme Clare Beckton:

Tant mieux.

M. David Prest:

Je pense en fait qu'un certain degré de chahut est propice au débat et qu'en fait, cela aide la personne qui parle, mais lorsque le chahut devient incontrôlable, comment faire pour ramener le calme?

Je n'ai pas de suggestions à faire, si ce n'est que ce rôle devrait peut-être revenir au Président de la Chambre. Et, comme on l'a dit un peu plus tôt, ce sont les leaders qui doivent donner le ton. Il faudrait peut-être apprendre à chahuter correctement. Je n'ai pas de solution magique à vous proposer.

M. Jamie Schmale:

J'aimerais parler rapidement du calendrier — il me reste combien de temps?

Le vice-président (M. David Christopherson):

Il vous reste deux minutes.

M. Jamie Schmale:

À propos du calendrier, je pense que ce serait une bonne chose que le calendrier des travaux soit connu à l'avance.

Je sais, David, que vous avez dit que les trop longues périodes de travaux de suite pouvaient poser problème aux députés qui ont des familles. Comme l'a dit M. Richards, je ne sais pas s'il y a un nombre magique, mais personnellement, j'ai beaucoup aimé les deux semaines de travail que j'ai passées en circonscription. J'ai pris part à des événements, j'ai passé du temps dans ma famille et c'était très bien. Quand je suis revenu, je me sentais en pleine forme et j'étais prêt à me mettre au travail ici.

Personnellement, je n'aime pas lorsque les travaux sont trop morcelés, une semaine par-ci, une semaine par-là. J'ai l'impression que je ne peux jamais me fixer, que je suis toujours entre deux endroits. J'aime l'idée d'avoir un calendrier qui permet de prévoir les travaux à l'avance, un calendrier qui ait si possible un certain rythme, qui marque les jours fériés et les fêtes. Je pense que c'est important aussi. J'aime cette idée.

Comme je l'ai déjà dit, je pense qu'il est très important d'avoir des événements propices à la vie de famille. Cela favorise la communication et tout le monde est plus heureux. C'est toujours mieux aussi lorsque votre conjoint ou votre conjointe peut vous accompagner ici.

Je ne sais pas si vous avez d'autres conseils à nous donner à ce sujet-là avant que je...

M. David Prest:

Pour ce qui est du calendrier, des périodes de travail et des horaires hebdomadaires, il semble que l'on est productif pendant trois semaines et que par la suite, la productivité décline. Idéalement, comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, je pense qu'il faudrait établir des périodes de trois semaines.

Quant aux événements propices à la vie de famille, mes enfants adorent venir sur la Colline et ils viennent souvent. J'aimerais encourager ce genre de choses.

En fait, mes enfants trouvent déjà que le Parlement est très propice à la vie de famille. Ils me demandent s'ils peuvent venir travailler avec moi. Je les amène à la bibliothèque ou je les présente à des collègues. Ils ont toujours l'air d'aimer ça. Parfois, je dois amener mes enfants ici, lorsque la Chambre siège tard et que je n'ai pas de service de garde. C'est toujours une bonne expérience.

(1155)

Le vice-président (M. David Christopherson):

Très bien. Merci beaucoup.

Il nous reste un créneau de trois minutes et je sais que Mme Sahota souhaitait prendre la parole. Aussi, je vais vous donner ces trois minutes avant de terminer.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Madame Beckton et monsieur Prest, merci d'être venus.

Je vous ai tous les deux entendu dire que lorsqu'on fait entrer plus de femmes en politique, on contribue à faire charger la culture. J'ai aussi entendu dire le contraire: pourquoi ne pas changer la culture et attirer ainsi plus de femmes au Parlement? C'est exactement ce que nous essayons de faire aujourd'hui dans notre Comité puisque nous examinons les façons dont nous pouvons changer la culture.

Jusqu'à présent, je n'ai pas entendu beaucoup d'idées concrètes. Il y a beaucoup de gens qui sont en faveur du statu quo, disant que c'est amusant pour leurs enfants de venir de temps en temps sur la Colline parlementaire, mais je ne pense pas que ce soit nécessairement le sujet qui nous préoccupe. C'est très bien de faire participer nos enfants à des activités amusantes. Je pense que c'est une bonne idée et, moi aussi, je fais parfois venir mes enfants ici. Mais ce que nous voulons, c'est une meilleure représentation. Nous voulons que les femmes que nous avons ici, qu'elles soient membres du personnel ou en politique, restent à long terme et ne décident pas de quitter leur emploi pour des raisons particulières.

Ma question s'adresse surtout à vous, madame Beckton. Pouvez-vous nous dire quels sont les obstacles ou les défis que vous entrevoyez? Vous affirmez que nous sommes actuellement à 26 %. Comment augmenter ce pourcentage? Que pouvons-nous faire? Vous parlez à des femmes chaque jour. Nous connaissons notre propre histoire, mais quelles sont les autres histoires que vous aimeriez partager avec nous?

Mme Clare Beckton:

Ce qui est important, c'est que les femmes ont besoin de modèles, en particulier les jeunes femmes. Il est important qu'elles voient des femmes qui sont députées au Parlement, qu'elles voient comment elles se comportent, en restant elles-mêmes et sans nécessairement imiter les hommes. Cela rend les choses très difficiles. Si vous avez l'impression qu'il faut chahuter et crier ici, alors que ce n'est pas votre comportement naturel, cela peut être très décourageant d'intégrer un environnement où ce type de comportement est établi.

Les députées doivent demeurer authentiques, parler aux jeunes femmes et être encourageantes. Je pense que les hommes peuvent encourager les femmes en les invitant à s'asseoir à la table, parce que les femmes n'osent pas toujours le faire d'elles-mêmes. Voilà certainement un aspect sur lequel nous pouvons travailler. Je pense que les femmes ont besoin d'évoluer dans un milieu qui les soutient. Les caucus féminins sont importants. Les caucus interpartis jouent un rôle important dans le sens que les femmes s'y sentent bienvenues ou elles sentent qu'elles ont du soutien et qu'elles ne sont pas seules. En effet, les femmes peuvent se sentir très seules lorsqu'elles tentent de se faire une place.

Je pense que le harcèlement appartient à une certaine culture et que nous pouvons offrir aux femmes un environnement sûr et les encourager à dénoncer le harcèlement lorsqu'il se produit. Vous savez que cela est arrivé sur la Colline. Nous savons que cela est arrivé à des députées et à des membres de leur personnel. Ce n'est pas le type d'environnement que nous souhaitons.

Les femmes sont encouragées par un environnement respectueux où les gens se respectent mutuellement... Il y a toujours des femmes qui me disent: « Je ne veux pas appartenir à un groupe qui affiche un tel comportement » ou « Je vois comment les médias traitent souvent les femmes et je ne veux pas être traitée de cette manière ». Voilà des choses qui découragent les femmes. Il y a une certaine conscience du rôle du député, de sa contribution et de son utilité pour le pays.

Le vice-président (M. David Christopherson):

Merci beaucoup. Tout notre temps est écoulé, mais ce serait peut-être une avenue à explorer. La dernière chose que nous devons faire, c'est de demander plus de travail. C'est la première fois que j'entends quelqu'un mentionner les médias. Nous devrions peut-être faire venir une délégation des médias pour connaître leur point de vue à ce sujet. Je vais en rester là pour le moment.

Merci beaucoup à tous les deux. Nous avons apprécié votre participation et vos témoignages ont été utiles à notre étude. Chers collègues, nous concluons ici cette partie de notre séance. Je vais suspendre brièvement la réunion pendant que nous nous préparons à accueillir nos invités par vidéoconférence.

Encore une fois, je remercie nos invités d'être venus. La séance est maintenant suspendue pour quelques minutes.

(1155)

(1205)

Le président:

Avant d'écouter notre témoin, nous avons un document à distribuer, mais, malheureusement, ce document est arrivé trop tard pour nous permettre de traduire les tableaux annexes. La plupart du document a été traduit, mais les tableaux sont toujours en français. Est-ce qu'il y a objection à ce que nous distribuions ces tableaux quand même? De toute façon, je crois bien que nous connaissons tous les jours de la semaine en français.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est mieux que de n'avoir aucun document.

Le président:

Il n'y a pas d'objection? Très bien.

À titre d'information pour le Comité, pour que nous n'ayons pas à prendre du temps plus tard, nous avons demandé au greffier de venir à notre prochaine réunion mardi. Par conséquent, à la deuxième heure de notre réunion de mardi, nous aurons le greffier de l'Assemblée de l'Ontario. Puis, à 18 heures, mardi soir, nous aurons la délégation australienne.

Il faut modifier le calendrier que vous avez devant vous. C'est assez important. Ne vous présentez pas mardi soir, parce que la réunion a été repoussée d'une semaine. De toute façon, vous recevrez un message. Nous aurons la délégation australienne le 17, et non pas le 10. Le calendrier indique que l'Australie c'est le 10, mais en fait ce sera le 17. Le 11, c'est la Nouvelle-Zélande, comme vous pouvez le constater, à 18 heures.

Ensuite, jeudi prochain, Élections Canada nous a invités pour une séance d'information informelle.

Très bien, j'aimerais maintenant accueillir François Arsenault.[Français]

Il est directeur des travaux parlementaires à l'Assemblée nationale du Québec.

Merci de votre participation aujourd'hui.

Vous pouvez commencer. Vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. François Arsenault (directeur des travaux parlementaires, Assemblée nationale du Québec):

Merci.

Bonjour, monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité. Je m'appelle François Arsenault. Je suis directeur des travaux parlementaires à l'Assemblée nationale du Québec. Je tiens à remercier le Comité de m'avoir invité. J'espère que mon témoignage vous sera utile pour la suite de vos travaux.

D'entrée de jeu, il importe de mentionner que l'Assemblée nationale a adopté en 2009 une importante réforme parlementaire, qui a eu pour effet de toucher à plusieurs sujets qui sont à l'étude par ce comité. Les objectifs de la réforme de 2009 étaient notamment les suivants: étaler le travail législatif dans le temps, équilibrer le travail en circonscription et à l'Assemblée, limiter les périodes de travaux intensifs, éviter les longues périodes d'interruption d'hiver et d'été, intégrer les affaires des députés dans le calendrier et disposer du temps nécessaire pour le programme législatif du gouvernement.

Je vais commencer par parler de l'horaire des séances et des calendriers parlementaires.

Le calendrier en vigueur depuis 2009 a eu pour effet d'allonger chacune des périodes de travaux parlementaires pendant l'année, tout en réduisant les heures de séance par semaine et en ajoutant des semaines réglementaires de travail en circonscription. En résumé, l'Assemblée commence ses travaux plus tôt dans l'année et les termine plus tôt. Quant au nombre d'heures d'affaires du jour, il a été réduit considérablement. Toutefois, le gouvernement dispose encore d'une bonne marge de manoeuvre pour faire avancer le programme législatif, alors que beaucoup de temps disponible est encore inutilisé.

De plus, chaque séance de l'Assemblée débute maintenant par les affaires courantes, puisqu'il s'agit du moment où l'on retrouve le plus grand nombre de députés présents au Salon bleu. D'ailleurs, la séance du mardi, qui est habituellement la première séance de la semaine, débute en après-midi afin de donner davantage de temps aux députés qui travaillent en région pour revenir à l'Assemblée.

Finalement, les semaines de travaux intensifs ont été réduites de moitié, soit de quatre à deux semaines par période de travaux, pour un total de quatre par année, et l'Assemblée et les commissions siègent moins tard le soir pendant cette période.

À la page 3 du document qui vous a été transmis, il y a un résumé du calendrier qui est en vigueur jusqu'en juin. Il y a une période de 16 semaines commençant le deuxième mardi de février. L'autre période, d'une durée de 10 semaines, commence le troisième mardi de septembre. Ensuite, il y a des périodes de travaux intensifs pour un total de quatre semaines, qui sont deux semaines à la suite de chaque période de travaux. Également, il est prévu dans le calendrier des périodes de travail en circonscription: trois semaines pendant la période de travaux qui a débuté en février, donc la présente période de travaux, et une semaine pendant la période de travaux débutant en septembre et une semaine suivant cette période.

À la page 4 se trouve l'horaire des travaux de l'Assemblée. Je parle ici des heures pendant lesquelles l'Assemblée siège. Je vous fais grâce de la lecture de toutes les heures qui y figurent. Je tiens cependant à m'excuser pour une petite coquille. C'est l'ancienne version. Il est écrit 9 h 30 pour le début, or c'est maintenant 9 h 40, depuis l'adoption d'un ajustement réglementaire il y a quelques mois. C'est l'horaire régulier et l'horaire des travaux intensifs.

Les commissions ne sont pas en reste, car, à l'exception des périodes de travail en circonscription, les commissions peuvent se réunir en tout temps, selon l'horaire qui se trouve à la page 5. Vous pouvez aussi constater que les commissions peuvent se réunir le lundi après-midi et le vendredi matin. Il faut noter qu'un maximum de quatre commissions peuvent se réunir simultanément. Ce nombre augmente à cinq lorsque l'Assemblée ne siège pas.

Je vais maintenant aborder la procédure des votes à la Chambre ou en comité.

Le vote électronique ou à distance n'est pas permis à l'Assemblée nationale. Chaque député doit donc être présent pour pouvoir exercer son droit de vote. Il existe cependant un moyen d'éviter de procéder à un vote lors d'un moment moins propice, comme lorsque la Chambre siège tard le soir. Il s'agit du vote reporté, qui permet au gouvernement de reporter un vote par appel nominal à la période des affaires courantes de la séance suivante. Ce report de vote ne peut se faire qu'à la demande du leader du gouvernement.

En ce qui concerne les services de garde, il y a déjà eu des discussions afin d'examiner l'ouverture d'un service de garde dans l'enceinte du Parlement ou à proximité pour les parlementaires et leur personnel. Cette idée ne s'est pas concrétisée, en raison du fait que la Colline du Parlement est déjà bien desservie par plusieurs installations de services de garde. De plus, les députés ne souhaitaient pas ouvrir un tel service exclusif alors que ce n'est pas toute la population qui a accès à des places subventionnées en garderie.

Par ailleurs, une large majorité de députés n'ont pas leur résidence principale dans la région de Québec. Une garderie au Parlement ne réglerait donc pas entièrement les difficultés de conciliation travail-famille. Je vous rappelle que l'Assemblée se réunit en moyenne 26 semaines par année, pour environ 80 séances par année.

(1210)



Tout comme le reste de la population, les parlementaires ont droit en principe à des congés parentaux, bien que ce type de congé n'ait jamais été utilisé pour le moment. En effet, un député exerce une charge publique élective et tout député est réputé exercer cette charge tant qu'il demeure en fonction. Le siège d'un député devient vacant uniquement dans les circonstances prévues aux articles 16 et 17 de la Loi sur l'Assemblée nationale, par exemple dans le cas de démission, de défaite électorale ou d'emprisonnement.

Puisqu'il s'agit d'un mandat d'au plus cinq ans confié par les électeurs d'une circonscription, la charge de député ne peut être déléguée à quiconque. Or, dans le cas d'une absence prolongée d'un député pour un congé parental, qui représenterait les citoyens de la circonscription? L'absence du député lors d'un vote pourrait-elle avoir pour effet de changer l'issue de celui-ci? Les députés en congé parental devraient-ils être calculés dans le quorum? Qui signera les documents officiels pour les députés? Qui aura le lien d'autorité sur les employés du député?

L'article 35 du Code d'éthique et de déontologie des membres de l'Assemblée nationale prévoit que les députés doivent faire « preuve d'assiduité dans l'exercice de [leurs] fonctions » et qu'ils ne peuvent, « sans motif valable, faire défaut de siéger à l'Assemblée nationale durant une période déraisonnable ». Quel serait l'avis du commissaire à l'éthique advenant le cas d'une absence prolongée d'un député?

Je vais dire un petit mot sur les technologies favorisant la conciliation travail-famille.

L'Assemblée nationale utilise évidemment les technologies pour permettre aux parlementaires d'exercer efficacement leur travail, notamment en leur fournissant divers outils comme des ordinateurs portables, des tablettes numériques, des iPhone, et autres.

Un autre moyen est la mise en place du site du greffier. Je vois que le temps file. Je dirai simplement que le site du greffier est un site intranet accessible à l'ensemble des parlementaires partout où ils se trouvent dans le monde. Ils peuvent accéder à différents documents parlementaires comme des horaires, des mémoires des groupes transmis en audition, des textes de projets de loi ou des amendements. On peut retrouver tout cela dans le site du greffier, que ce soit à partir du Parlement ou de la maison.

J'ai mis en annexe quelques statistiques sur les travaux de l'Assemblée qui pourraient peut-être intéresser les membres du Comité.

Je vous remercie.

Je suis évidemment disponible pour répondre à vos questions.

(1215)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

À propos de votre commentaire concernant le remplacement des députés, j'aimerais vous signaler qu'en Suède, les ministres peuvent compter sur un substitut pour effectuer le travail dans leur circonscription. Je pense que ce système fonctionnerait aussi pour les congés parentaux.

Nous allons commencer par M. Graham qui partage son temps avec M. Lightbound, je pense.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est exact, monsieur le président. Je partage avec M. Lightbound.[Français]

Merci, monsieur Arsenault. J'apprécie beaucoup le temps que vous nous consacrez.

Ma question sera brève et elle porte sur la procédure à l'Assemblée nationale.

Au fédéral, on alloue quatre jours à un projet de loi émanant du gouvernement pour qu'il soit débattu, étudié en comité et renvoyé à la Chambre. Pour votre part, combien de temps allouez-vous à l'étude d'un projet de loi? Ici, nous pouvons l'étudier en une semaine, mais vous, vous ne siégez que trois jours. Je suis curieux de connaître la différence.

M. François Arsenault:

Merci de votre question.

Il y a une différence majeure. Le temps accordé à chacune des étapes législatives n'est pas calculé en jours, mais en temps de parole individuel pour chacun des députés.

Concernant l'établissement de l'horaire des travaux de l'Assemblée nationale, je dirais qu'en théorie — en pratique, cela peut être un peu différent et je vous expliquerai pourquoi —, cela devient difficile à prévoir, puisque ce n'est pas une durée fixe qui est prévue pour l'adoption du principe du projet de loi. Par exemple, il n'est pas prévu au règlement qu'il faudra cinq heures, dix heures ou deux jours pour passer à travers le processus d'adoption du principe d'un projet de loi. Ce sont plutôt des heures ou des minutes par député qui sont prévues.

Il est sûr qu'en pratique, dans le cas de la plupart des projets de loi qui ne sont pas contestés, souvent, les leaders parlementaires vont se parler pour essayer d'établir un horaire informel qui n'est pas public. Par exemple, pour déterminer l'adoption du principe d'un projet de loi donné, l'opposition officielle peut dire qu'elle aura trois intervenants et qu'ils parleront approximativement une heure en tout, puis le deuxième groupe d'opposition dit ce qu'il en est pour lui, et ainsi de suite. Le règlement lui-même ne prévoit pas de durée fixe, sauf lorsqu'on discute des motions de procédure d'exception.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Y a-t-il un temps limite pour chaque discours? Est-ce limité à une intervention par député par sujet? Y a-t-il de telles limites?

M. François Arsenault:

Oui. En fait, chacun des députés peut s'exprimer une seule fois à chacune des étapes législatives. Donc, à l'étape de l'adoption du principe, chacun des députés ne peut s'exprimer qu'une fois.

Le règlement prévoit une limite maximale de temps par parlementaire, selon les débats. Ce ne sont pas toujours les mêmes temps de parole. Les temps de parole varient selon qu'on en est à l'adoption du principe, à la prise en considération du rapport ou à l'adoption finale. C'est à l'adoption du principe que les temps de parole sont les plus élevés.

De plus, les temps de parole sont modulés selon la fonction des députés. Par exemple, le ministre qui présente le projet de loi et les porte-parole de l'opposition officielle ont plus de temps de parole que les autres députés.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je cède la parole à M. Lightbound, qui va continuer.

M. Joël Lightbound (Louis-Hébert, Lib.):

Bonjour, monsieur Arsenault. Je vous remercie de prendre part à notre séance d'aujourd'hui.

Nous tous autour de cette table partageons la même préoccupation. Nous souhaitons tous avoir un Parlement plus représentatif de la population. Nous voulons donc, entre autres, y attirer plus de femmes.

À la suite des changements que vous avez apportés depuis 2009, avez-vous observé, d'un point de vue quantitatif, une augmentation du nombre de femmes élues à l'Assemblée nationale?

Du point de vue qualitatif, leur expérience de la conciliation travail-famille — j'inclurais également les hommes là-dedans — a-t-elle suscité des commentaires? Quelle est la réception des parlementaires à cet égard?

(1220)

M. François Arsenault:

En ce qui concerne la présence des femmes, il y a actuellement 36 femmes sur 125 députés, ce qui fait un peu moins de 29 %. En 2012, 27 % des députés étaient des femmes. Je n'ai pas les chiffres de 2009 entre les mains, mais, essentiellement, on n'a pas vu de différence notable depuis la réforme de 2009. Il n'y a pas une plus grande représentation des femmes à l'Assemblée nationale du Québec. C'est une chose.

Qu'en est-il du deuxième élément, c'est-à-dire l'impact du règlement sur la conciliation travail-famille? Comme vous pouvez le voir dans les médias, c'est un sujet d'actualité au Québec. Même avant les événements de cette semaine, ce sujet revenait constamment auprès des parlementaires. Cela n'a pas réglé tous les problèmes passés. Si on demandait aux parlementaires leur avis sur le calendrier actuel que je vous ai exposé et quelles propositions ils souhaiteraient faire, on aurait probablement 125 propositions différentes puisqu'il y a 125 députés. Il n'y a pas vraiment d'unanimité sur la question.

Les parlementaires qui vivent dans la grande région de Québec peuvent voir de grands avantages à terminer les travaux plus tôt et à siéger moins tard le soir, puisqu'ils peuvent retourner chez eux voir leur famille. Cependant, c'est différent pour les parlementaires qui proviennent des régions et de l'extérieur de la région de Québec. Si l'Assemblée nationale termine ses travaux à 18 heures, il est impossible pour plusieurs d'entre eux de retourner dans leur famille. Certains seront d'avis que, au contraire, l'Assemblée nationale devrait concentrer encore davantage son calendrier et siéger de plus longues heures, mais sur une période de temps beaucoup plus courte, afin de leur permettre de retourner dans leurs circonscriptions.

En terminant, j'ajoute qu'il y a toujours des discussions sur les lundis et vendredis. Vous avez remarqué, en consultant le calendrier de l'Assemblée nationale, que celle-ci ne siège les lundis que sur motion du gouvernement. C'est assez rare. De plus, elle ne siège pas les vendredis, sauf en période de travaux intensifs.

Il y a cependant un impact sur les commissions parlementaires. Certains parlementaires souhaiteraient que l'Assemblée nationale ou les commissions ne siègent jamais les lundis et les vendredis, pour s'assurer de pouvoir retourner dans leurs circonscriptions et vaquer à leurs obligations familiales et au travail dans leurs comtés. [Traduction]

Le président:

Il vous reste 30 secondes.

M. Joël Lightbound:

Oh, 30 secondes. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avec votre permission, j'aimerais intervenir encore pendant quelques secondes.

Brièvement, vous demandez-vous pourquoi aucun congé parental n'a été pris?

M. François Arsenault:

Il faudrait poser la question aux parlementaires.

L'une des difficultés est peut-être d'ordre technique. Je ne suis pas un expert dans ce domaine, mais le Régime québécois d'assurance parentale s'applique à l'ensemble de la population. Si les députés voulaient s'en prévaloir, il faudrait qu'ils renoncent à tous les autres avantages et indemnités qu'ils pourraient recevoir. Ce n'est donc pas nécessairement avantageux pour eux.

Il ne faut pas oublier les raisons que j'ai évoquées lors de mon exposé. Un député qui s'absenterait pendant six mois pour s'occuper de son bébé ne bénéficierait pas d'un système de remplacement. Il n'y a pas de député substitut pour exercer ses fonctions. Que peut-on faire?

Dans l'hypothèse où nous aurions un gouvernement dont la majorité serait faible — nous avons vécu cela certaines années —, si plusieurs députés gouvernementaux prenaient un congé parental, le gouvernement serait susceptible de perdre des votes à l'Assemblée nationale. Cependant, cette situation n'est pas encore survenue. Ce n'est pas à notre niveau, mais il y a sûrement eu des discussions entre les membres de certaines formations et leurs whips pour permettre de courts congés. Néanmoins, on n'a pas encore vu de député se prévaloir officiellement d'un congé parental au Québec.

Le président:

Merci.

Je cède maintenant la parole à M. Richards. [Traduction]

M. Blake Richards:

Merci beaucoup d'être avec nous aujourd'hui. J'ai préparé quelques questions pour vous.

Tout d'abord, je tiens à vous dire que j'ai apprécié vos remarques concernant le congé parental pour les parlementaires. Vous avez soulevé une série de questions et je crois que nous devrions garder en mémoire les conséquences que ce type de réforme pourrait avoir sur les électeurs. Les électeurs votent pour la personne qui va les représenter et ils estiment que cette personne est la meilleure pour représenter la circonscription. Un député qui prendrait un congé parental laisserait ses électeurs sans représentant.

J'ai aimé certaines des questions que vous avez posées. Qui représenterait les électeurs? Est-ce que l'absence d'un député aurait une incidence sur les résultats d'un vote? Ces questions sont importantes et il y en a toute une série. Il est important de rappeler que nous sommes ici pour servir nos électeurs. C'est un élément crucial.

J'aimerais approfondir un certain nombre de points. Dans l'échange que vous avez eu avec les membres du gouvernement, je pense comprendre où vous vouliez en venir, mais lorsque vous avez fait vos réformes, vous avez pris la décision — je pense que j'ai bien compris — de prolonger la durée des périodes de travaux parlementaires, mais de réduire la durée des semaines. Il m'a semblé que ce changement était à l'étude ou tout au moins que vous en aviez parlé.

Pourriez-vous donner des précisions à ce sujet? Un des problèmes qui se poseraient à Ottawa dans le cas d'une pareille réforme, serait l'augmentation des coûts, en particulier pour les députés de l'Ouest. Si les périodes de travaux parlementaires sont plus longues, mais que les semaines sont plus courtes, cela entraînerait une augmentation des dépenses de déplacement, aux frais des contribuables. Est-ce pour cette raison-là que la réforme est à l'étude? Je sais que le contexte est un peu différent au niveau provincial, mais je me demande si c'est la raison pour laquelle cette réforme est actuellement à l'étude ou s'il y a d'autres raisons. Pouvez-vous nous donner des précisions à ce sujet?

(1225)

[Français]

M. François Arsenault:

Les raisons pour lesquelles ces questions sont de nouveau à l'étude sont multiples. Pour ce qui est des coûts de déplacement, le territoire du Québec est moins vaste que celui de l'ensemble du Canada, et, de ce fait, l'enjeu est peut-être un peu moins important.

Par ailleurs, avant la réforme de 2009, l'Assemblée nationale du Québec commençait ses travaux vers la mi-mars et les terminait un peu avant la Saint-Jean-Baptiste, soit vers la fin juin, et à l'automne, elle commençait ses travaux à la mi-octobre pour ne les terminer que vers la veille de Noël, ce dont les parlementaires se plaignaient. Ils faisaient effectivement valoir que, entre la fin des travaux de l'Assemblée et la fête de Noël, ils disposaient de très peu de temps pour faire leur travail dans leur circonscription. C'est pourquoi le calendrier a été modifié. Nous commençons maintenant nos travaux en septembre et les finissons au début de décembre. Le même principe s'applique pour la période du printemps.

Une autre décision a été prise, à savoir celle d'insérer dans ces périodes de travaux parlementaires ce que nous appelons dans le règlement les semaines de travail en circonscription. Il s'agit de semaines de relâche parlementaire au cours desquelles autant l'Assemblée que les commissions ne peuvent siéger. C'est particulièrement le cas pendant la période du printemps, qui est la plus longue. Les périodes de relâche parlementaire coïncident avec les périodes de relâche scolaire, qui sont souvent en mars, et avec la fête de Pâques. Il y a déjà un congé férié le lundi de cette semaine-là. En outre, il y a une autre semaine, qui est mobile, qu'on peut déplacer. Cette année, il s'agit de la présente semaine. En ce moment même, nous sommes en relâche parlementaire. L'année dernière, c'était jumelé à la relâche scolaire, dont je vous parlais. Nous terminons donc les travaux plus tôt, mais nous les commençons plus tôt également.

Autre fait important, les heures de séance sont moins nombreuses, surtout en session intensive. Auparavant, pendant cette période, l'Assemblée et les commissions siégeaient jusqu'à minuit, quatre jours par semaine, mais maintenant la séance est ajournée au plus tard à 22 h 30. C'est indiqué dans l'une des annexes. En fait, elle ne se termine à 22 h 30 que certains soirs. Sinon, c'est plus tôt. On s'entend pour dire que 22 h 30, c'est tard, mais au moins, les parlementaires ne terminent plus leur journée à minuit. En raison des longues heures de travail et du manque de repos, ils trouvaient difficile de bien faire leur travail de parlementaires et de concilier le travail et la famille.

(1230)

[Traduction]

M. Blake Richards:

Vous avez dit, dans votre présentation, que le vote électronique ou à distance n'est pas permis à l'Assemblée nationale. Je crois personnellement qu'il est important que les députés occupent leur siège à l'assemblée et que leurs électeurs puissent constater leur présence à la Chambre — parce que, là encore, je crois que nous devons faire tout notre possible pour servir au mieux nos électeurs — mais je ne sais pas si c'est la raison pour laquelle l'Assemblée nationale n'autorise pas ce type de vote.

Est-ce une question qui a été examinée lorsque vous avez fait vos réformes ou est-ce que ce n'était pas un élément jugé important? Si la question a été soulevée, pour quelle raison l'Assemblée nationale a-t-elle décidé de ne pas permettre le vote électronique ou à distance? [Français]

M. François Arsenault:

La question du vote électronique a été abordée lors des discussions qui ont mené à la réforme de 2009, mais pas de façon approfondie ou très sérieuse.

Il y a deux éléments liés à cela.

D'abord, nous nous sommes demandé de quelle manière nous pouvions nous assurer de la conformité des votes, du point de vue juridique, si les parlementaires ne votaient pas au Parlement lui-même, mais plutôt à partir de leurs différentes circonscriptions. Comment cela peut-il s'organiser? Comment peut-on garantir l'intégrité du processus? C'est un enjeu. Je ne vous dis pas que c'est impossible. Je vous dis simplement que c'est un enjeu.

Ensuite, il faut dire que bon nombre de parlementaires ressentent une certaine fierté d'être présents à la Chambre lors des votes par appel nominal, de se lever devant l'ensemble de leurs collègues pour voter en faveur d'une proposition ou contre celle-ci.

Cependant, la question du vote électronique n'a pas été étudiée en profondeur. Les discussions sur la réforme à ce sujet n'ont pas été très poussées. [Traduction]

M. Blake Richards:

Très bien, il semble que les députés étaient nombreux à penser, comme moi, qu'il est important d'être présent à la Chambre pour que leurs électeurs puissent constater comment ils votent en leur nom.

Est-ce que par hasard, monsieur le président, vous m'indiquez que j'ai utilisé tout mon temps? Très bien.

Je vous remercie beaucoup.

Le président:

Vous avez bien vu.[Français]

La parole est à vous, monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur Arsenault.[Traduction]

Je vous remercie d'être venu témoigner.

Ma première question découle du témoignage que nous avons entendu un plus tôt, avant que vous soyez en communication avec nous. Le témoin était un employé aguerri ayant servi des deux côtés de la Chambre, au sein du gouvernement et de l'opposition. Lorsqu'on lui a demandé quelle serait selon lui la durée idéale des travaux parlementaires, compte tenu des besoins du gouvernement et de tous les autres facteurs, il a dit qu'une période de trois semaines à peu près serait la meilleure. Une période plus courte ferait en sorte que les députés ne seraient pas aussi efficaces; une période plus longue éloignerait plus longtemps les députés de leur circonscription et de leur famille et aurait pour effet de changer l'humeur et d'augmenter la tension au cours de la quatrième et de la cinquième semaine. Ceux d'entre nous qui ont travaillé pendant cinq semaines d'affilée savent exactement de quoi il s'agit. Cela devient de la folie.

Croyez-vous qu'une période de trois semaines serait idéale ou pensez-vous qu'une autre durée offrirait un meilleur équilibre? [Français]

M. François Arsenault:

Il m'est difficile de répondre précisément à votre question, la raison principale étant que je ne suis pas un parlementaire. Le gros bon sens nous dit que les gens, du fait qu'ils sont moins fatigués, devraient être plus efficaces et moins impatients. C'est la nature humaine. La population a parfois tendance à oublier que les parlementaires sont avant tout des humains. Les périodes de pause peuvent donc faire du bien.

Comme on peut le voir dans notre actuel calendrier parlementaire, au mois de février, nous reprenons le travail pour une très courte période avant que la première semaine en circonscription arrive. Les choses se passent bien. Par contre, vers la fin des périodes de travaux parlementaires, lors des derniers sprints qui caractérisent les sessions un peu plus intensives, la tension est plus palpable, par moments, probablement parce que les gens souffrent de la fatigue et d'une accumulation de stress. Cela dit, les parlementaires seraient mieux placés pour en parler.

Dans le cadre de votre étude, vous devez déterminer le nombre de semaines dont le gouvernement a besoin pour légiférer. Je parle toujours du gouvernement, mais il y a évidemment l'opposition, qui doit elle aussi jouer son rôle. La question du contrôle parlementaire est aussi fort importante. Il faut déterminer combien de temps est nécessaire et comment le Parlement peut être efficace. C'est une question difficile, et cela dépend des mesures et des projets de loi qui sont contestés. Les projets de loi qui font l'unanimité progressent habituellement assez bien et plutôt rapidement. Cependant, quand l'opposition décide de se battre bec et ongles contre l'adoption d'un projet de loi, que ce soit pour des raisons idéologiques ou pour d'autres raisons, le gouvernement est heureux de disposer de ces plages horaires pour faire avancer le travail.

En outre, même si la procédure législative d'exception, l'équivalent du bâillon, existe toujours, les gouvernements, du moins celui du Québec, veulent à tout prix éviter d'avoir recours à ce mécanisme. Le fait de disposer de plus de temps peut faire en sorte que certains projets de loi finissent par être adoptés, parfois avec des amendements demandés par l'opposition, parce que le gouvernement veut mettre fin au débat et arriver à un genre de consensus.

(1235)

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.[Traduction]

Un coup d'oeil rapide montre que votre assemblée siège moins longtemps que la nôtre et pourtant, votre gouvernement n'utilise pas la procédure législative d'exception de manière régulière pour respecter son calendrier. Un gouvernement qui veut avoir recours au bâillon utilise généralement l'argument selon lequel il a un délai à respecter. Pourtant, vous ne semblez pas y avoir souvent recours, alors que votre assemblée siège moins longtemps. Vous ne pouvez pas répondre à cette question, mais que pensez-vous de cette disparité? Est-ce que les chefs de parti de votre assemblée sont plus enclins à collaborer sur les sujets qui ne sont pas controversés, afin que les travaux se déroulent de manière plus harmonieuse? Comment expliquez-vous cela? Je ne m'attends pas à avoir une réponse détaillée, mais j'aimerais savoir comment vous expliquez que notre gouvernement, quelle que soit sa couleur politique, semble-t-il, éprouve le besoin de mettre un terme au débat sur une base assez régulière, alors que nous siégeons plus longtemps? [Français]

M. François Arsenault:

Il m'est très difficile de répondre à cette question. Je suis un peu ce qui se passe à la Chambre des communes, mais je ne suis pas sur place. Il faudrait peut-être comparer le nombre de mesures et de projets de loi qui sont présentés respectivement au fédéral et au Québec. Je ne peux malheureusement pas m'avancer davantage à ce sujet. [Traduction]

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai siégé pendant 13 ans à l'Assemblée législative de l'Ontario, mais je ne crois pas que les projets de loi examinés par la Chambre soient beaucoup plus nombreux. Il faudrait étudier la question.

Je vous remercie pour vos commentaires à ce sujet.

Étant donné que je vais poursuivre, j'aurais peut-être besoin de l'assistance de nos analystes. J'aimerais donc qu'ils restent à disposition. Vous mentionnez, à la page 7 du texte de votre exposé, que le code d'éthique donne le pouvoir au commissaire à l'éthique de déterminer si l'absence d'un député contrevient au code en vertu de l'article 35 et je cite: « Le député fait preuve d'assiduité dans l'exercice de ses fonctions. Il ne peut, sans motif valable, faire défaut de siéger à l'Assemblée nationale durant une période déraisonnable ».

Monsieur le président, je vous demanderais de vérifier auprès de notre analyste s'il est exact que nous disposons d'un certain nombre de jours, mais que nous enclenchons un autre type de processus si nous allons au-delà. Pouvez-vous m'éclairer à ce sujet et rectifier si je fais erreur?

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Il vous reste cinq secondes. Je vais laisser l'analyste répondre à votre question, mais après, votre temps sera écoulé.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est bien, monsieur le président. Merci.

M. Andre Barnes (attaché de recherche auprès du comité):

Merci, monsieur le président.

La Loi sur le Parlement du Canada indique 21 jours. La loi précise également les raisons de l'absence, notamment la maladie et quelques autres raisons que je ne peux pas vous citer de mémoire.

M. David Christopherson:

Il est intéressant cependant de noter que cela fait appel au jugement d'une tierce partie et que la décision est très prescriptive.

Merci, monsieur le président et monsieur Arsenault.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Nous allons maintenant donner la parole à Mme Sahota qui partage son temps avec Mme Petitpas Taylor.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci beaucoup pour vos précieuses connaissances sur le fonctionnement de l'Assemblée nationale du Québec. Vous avez dit que les députés veulent être plus présents dans leurs circonscriptions pour servir leurs électeurs et pour veiller aux affaires de la circonscription. Est-ce que les changements que vous avez adoptés à l'assemblée permettent aux députés de travailler plus dans leurs circonscriptions? Avez-vous recueilli les commentaires des députés? Est-ce que ces modifications plaisent de manière générale aux électeurs?

(1240)

[Français]

M. François Arsenault:

Je vous répondrais par oui et par non. Je vais vous expliquer pourquoi.

La réponse est oui parce que, selon notre perception, les parlementaires sont contents de pouvoir terminer les travaux plus tôt dans l'année. Cela leur donne un peu plus de temps avant la fête de Noël ou au moment de l'ajournement des travaux pour l'été.

Par contre, en réalité, il y a quand même beaucoup d'insatisfaction, notamment en ce qui a trait aux commissions parlementaires. Celles-ci peuvent siéger lorsque l'Assemblée nationale siège, mais elles se réunissent aussi beaucoup lorsque l'Assemblée nationale ne siège pas. Quand celle-ci ne siège pas, les commissions parlementaires ont plus de temps pour siéger.

Au Québec, beaucoup de commissions parlementaires commencent leurs travaux assez tôt dans l'année. Par conséquent, cela oblige les membres de ces commissions à être présents au Parlement pendant de très longues périodes de temps. C'est donc beaucoup plus que 26 semaines. C'est peut-être un effet un peu pervers de la réforme de 2009.

L'analyse est difficile à faire. Est-ce lié au transfert du calendrier ou au fait que les commissions siègent plus? Il faut dire qu'il y a eu une augmentation des auditions publiques tenues par les commissions parlementaires.

Si on faisait un sondage auprès des parlementaires sur la satisfaction relativement au calendrier actuel, on n'obtiendrait pas un score très élevé. Comme je l'ai expliqué un peu plus tôt, il y a probablement 125 points de vue différents parmi les parlementaires. Quel calendrier faudrait-il avoir?

À certains égards, cela a amélioré les choses, mais pas à d'autres égards, notamment en ce qui touche les commissions parlementaires. Beaucoup de parlementaires nous disent qu'ils sont trop longtemps à Québec et qu'ils n'ont pas assez de temps pour faire leur travail dans leur circonscription. Cependant, d'autres parlementaires vous diraient probablement quelque chose de différent. Cela varie.

On constate qu'on doit consacrer beaucoup de temps aux commissions qui siègent. Cela ne touche pas tous les 125 députés, mais cela touche beaucoup d'entre eux. Prenons l'exemple du mois d'août — et je terminerai là-dessus. Dès la mi-août ou la fin août, des commissions parlementaires commencent à siéger. Évidemment, ce n'est jamais très populaire auprès des parlementaires, pour des raisons évidentes. Si ces commissions parlementaires ont de longs mandats, si elles siègent de la mi-août jusqu'au début des travaux de l'Assemblée nationale au mois de septembre, ces gens n'auront pas eu beaucoup de temps pour aller travailler dans leurs circonscriptions. Évidemment, cela s'applique davantage aux députés qui sont de l'extérieur de la région. [Traduction]

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Avez-vous reçu des rétroactions de la population, des citoyens québécois, au sujet des changements que vous avez apportés? [Français]

M. François Arsenault:

Nous n'avons pas reçu de rétroaction de la population. J'imagine que les députés en ont sûrement reçu eux-mêmes de leurs propres concitoyens, c'est pratiquement certain, mais nous n'avons pas reçu d'avis favorable ou défavorable de l'ensemble de la population. [Traduction]

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je trouve que c'est difficile parfois d'expliquer à mes électeurs. J'aime beaucoup le travail que je fais à Ottawa, mais mes électeurs aiment bien me voir dans la circonscription pour me faire part de leurs préoccupations et de leurs problèmes. C'est important de retourner dans sa circonscription.

Je vais partager mon temps avec ma collègue. [Français]

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Monsieur Arsenault, je vous remercie beaucoup de nous avoir livré votre présentation. Cela va nous aider grandement à élaborer de bonnes recommandations, notamment sur la conciliation travail-famille.

Pourriez-vous nous expliquer ce qui a précipité les changements en 2009?

(1245)

M. François Arsenault:

Il s'agit d'un ensemble de circonstances. Il y avait eu de petits ajustements, mais la dernière grande réforme du calendrier datait de 1984. Le Parlement avait tout de même passablement évolué entretemps. Des parlementaires avaient demandé que plusieurs éléments du règlement soient modifiés. Deux leaders du gouvernement de cette époque avaient déposé des projets de réforme. Le président de l'Assemblée avait lui-même déposé un projet de réforme portant sur un éventail de sujets.

Un comité a été mis sur pied — c'était en 2008, je pense — afin d'étudier ces propositions. La réforme a eu lieu en 2009. Le calendrier était l'un des éléments centraux de ces discussions. C'est le cas encore aujourd'hui. Un comité technique formé des leaders parlementaires se réunit pour discuter de futures réformes ou d'ajustements au règlement. Le calendrier parlementaire est évidemment l'un des sujets qui se retrouvent encore à l'ordre du jour.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Je suppose que vous étiez à l'Assemblée en 2009 et que vous y étiez avant que les changements ne soient apportés. Vous y êtes encore aujourd'hui.

Pourriez-vous nous dire ce qui, à votre avis, est le plus efficace?

M. François Arsenault:

J'étais en effet à l'Assemblée avant la réforme de 2009. Cela dit, il est toujours difficile de répondre à des questions qui portent sur l'efficacité. Comment peut-on calculer l'efficacité? L'efficacité, est-ce le fait de voir un projet de loi adopté rapidement? Certains diront que oui. L'efficacité, est-ce plutôt le fait de permettre à l'ensemble de l'opposition d'exprimer son point de vue, de susciter des changements au moyen des débats et du temps qu'on leur consacre, de présenter des amendements qui vont amener le gouvernement à réfléchir davantage ou à mettre de l'eau dans son vin pour apporter des modifications à des projets de loi? Nous avons vu des situations où l'opposition proposait des amendements importants à des projets de loi. Au départ, le gouvernement n'était pas d'accord, mais après des heures, voire des jours de débats, il décidait de mettre de l'eau dans son vin pour en arriver à un consensus avec l'opposition. Il est vraiment difficile de dire ce qui est efficace, de définir l'efficacité. Certains diront que le fait de passer un grand nombre d'heures dans des commissions ou à la Chambre est efficace, alors que d'autres diront que c'est totalement inefficace.

La grande sagesse des parlementaires et des présidents, il faut se le rappeler, fait que les règlements sont élaborés pour en arriver à un équilibre permettant, d'une part, au gouvernement de gouverner et d'adopter les mesures qu'il propose et, d'autre part, à l'opposition de faire valoir le point de vue qu'elle estime juste pour la population. On parle beaucoup du fait que les citoyens peuvent faire part de leur point de vue aux parlementaires. À l'Assemblée nationale, il y a 125 députés. C'est donc dire que beaucoup de gens peuvent vouloir exprimer leur point de vue. Évidemment, il y en a beaucoup plus chez vous. L'idée est de trouver un équilibre, ce qui n'est pas simple.

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci.

Je vais maintenant céder la parole à M. Schmale pour cinq minutes. [Traduction]

M. Jamie Schmale:

J'aime bien cette discussion. Il semble qu'une grande partie de nos questions et de nos préoccupations se rapportent au calendrier et à la façon dont nous faisons notre travail. J'aime bien certaines de vos suggestions.

J'aimerais vous poser une question rapide. À la page 6, vous parlez du congé parental pour les parlementaires et vous écrivez ceci: « ce type de congé n'a jamais été utilisé pour le moment ». Est-ce à dire qu'aucun député n'a eu un enfant pendant qu'il ou elle était en fonction? J'aimerais vérifier s'il y a une distinction à faire ici. [Français]

M. François Arsenault:

Votre question est excellente.

Quelques parlementaires ont eu des enfants, comme c'est le cas dans l'ensemble de la population. D'ailleurs, au cours des dernières semaines, un député est devenu papa.

Officiellement, aucun congé parental n'a été demandé par des parlementaires. Les whips le permettraient-ils? Certains députés peuvent être absents de l'Assemblée nationale pour toutes sortes de raisons. Il est rare que 100 % des députés soient présents à l'Assemblée nationale. Certains ont la permission de s'absenter, que ce soit pour participer à des missions parlementaires, pour faire du travail dans leurs circonscriptions ou pour des annonces ministérielles ou autres.

Les whips donnent-ils la permission à certains députés de s'absenter, de façon relativement courte, de l'Assemblée nationale? C'est probablement le cas. Évidemment, cela ne se fait pas à notre niveau, mais sûrement que quelques-uns peuvent bénéficier d'une exemption. Cependant, à ce jour, on n'a pas vu de parlementaires s'absenter de l'Assemblée nationale pendant des mois parce qu'ils étaient devenus papa ou maman. C'est déjà arrivé, mais ils n'étaient pas officiellement en congé parental. C'était peut-être le cas officieusement, mais pas officiellement.

(1250)

[Traduction]

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je suis étonné que cette question n'ait pas été abordée lors de votre examen de 2009. À mon avis, c'est un aspect très décourageant pour les gens qui veulent se lancer en politique si rien n'est prévu... Je sais que nous avons ce congé prolongé de 21 jours et je sais que nous en parlons dans le cadre du présent forum.

Avez-vous reçu des commentaires de la part de parlementaires, hommes ou femmes, qui sont de nouveaux parents? Vous avez dit que c'est déjà arrivé et je me demande si vous avez reçu des commentaires sur la marche à suivre dans de telles circonstances. [Français]

M. François Arsenault:

Je sais qu'il y a constamment des discussions parmi les parlementaires sur cette importante question de la conciliation travail-famille. De quelle façon peut-on attirer davantage de gens à l'Assemblée nationale? En effet, les gens peuvent être découragés de voir les horaires ou les conséquences sur leur famille. Ces discussions reviennent constamment. Il n'y a pas de solution pour l'instant, mis à part ce que je vous ai expliqué depuis le début. Il n'y a pas de remède à apporter à cet élément.

Cela étant dit, c'est une discussion constante. Les gens réfléchissent et la solution n'est pas simple. Le travail de parlementaire est unique, pour les raisons que j'ai mentionnées. Certains de vos collègues, un peu plus tôt, l'exprimaient bien, du moins en ce qui a trait au travail de circonscription. Les citoyens des circonscriptions accepteraient-ils que leurs parlementaires soient absents pour une période de plusieurs mois? Je ne le sais pas.

Il y a aussi un impact sur le fonctionnement de l'Assemblée nationale et sur le rôle de parlementaire.

Ce n'est pas simple, mais on est à ce stade de la réflexion. [Traduction]

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je comprends en effet qu'il est important pour un député de jouer son rôle et de voter. L'argument est pertinent.

Quant à la possibilité de faire appel à la technologie pour améliorer la conciliation travail-famille, je pense qu'on en a beaucoup parlé. Ce qui revient constamment, c'est l'utilisation de notre calendrier parlementaire. Beaucoup d'entre nous, y compris moi, utilisons le calendrier Google, qui n'est pas un document interne, afin que tout notre personnel et les membres de notre famille puissent savoir où nous sommes et aient la possibilité d'ajouter des événements auxquels nous devrions participer, par exemple une fête d'anniversaire en famille et ce genre de choses.

On se creuse souvent la tête pour trouver des solutions et parfois on pense trop et on réinvente la roue. Je serais curieux de savoir si vous utilisez un système à partir de votre plateforme de gestion, qui permet à vos députés de donner accès à leur famille ou à leur personnel, sans la carte de sécurité qui nous est imposée ici. [Français]

M. François Arsenault:

L'accès au site du greffier est réservé aux parlementaires et à leurs recherchistes ou adjoints. Ces derniers ont accès au site. La famille, en principe, n'a pas accès au site, pour des raisons de sécurité.

Si j'ai bien saisi votre question, je dois dire que le site du greffier ne sera pas nécessairement le remède à cet élément. En ce qui a trait au calendrier, le site du greffier va simplement en faire état. En fait, non, ce n'est pas vrai, il peut constituer en partie un remède, en ce sens qu'on peut trouver facilement les horaires des auditions et le calendrier de ce qui est prévu. Je m'avance un peu, mais je sais que les bureaux des whips ont leur propre système parallèle de calendrier pour s'assurer de la présence des députés autant à l'Assemblée nationale qu'en commission parlementaire, à différents moments. Je crois qu'ils utilisent probablement plus ce calendrier qui relève du bureau des whips de chacune des formations politiques.

(1255)

Le vice-président (M. Blake Richards):

Merci.

Nous entamons maintenant le dernier tour de table, en commençant par Mme Petitpas Taylor.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Merci.

Me voilà de nouveau, monsieur Arsenault.

Je pense que vous avez dit, au tout début de votre présentation, que 29 % des députés du Québec étaient des femmes. Ai-je bien compris?

M. François Arsenault:

En fait, 28 % des députés sont des femmes.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Pour ce qui est des groupes minoritaires...

M. François Arsenault:

Mais non, vous avez raison: il s'agit plutôt de 29 %. Excusez-moi.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Merci.

Pour ce qui est des groupes minoritaires, avez-vous aussi des statistiques?

M. François Arsenault:

Oui, nous disposons sûrement de ces statistiques, mais je ne les ai pas sous la main. Par contre, je pourrai les transmettre au Comité.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

C'est excellent.

Tout cela pour dire que nous voulons nous assurer que le Parlement reflète la population du Canada. À ce sujet, il est question non seulement des femmes et des groupes minoritaires, mais aussi de l'âge de nos députés.

Pouvez-vous nous dire quel est l'âge moyen des députés qui siègent à l'Assemblée nationale du Québec?

M. François Arsenault:

Elle est présentement de 53 ans. Une vérification que j'ai faite m'a permis d'apprendre que les députés de 50 ans et plus représentent actuellement environ 70 % de la députation. C'est donc dire que 70 % des députés ont plus de 50 ans. La moyenne d'âge est de 53 ans. La tranche d'âge des 18-39 ans, qui est celle des jeunes, représente présentement 10 %, ce qui est très peu élevé.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

À votre avis, s'il y avait plus de jeunes députés, les politiques familiales seraient-elles un peu différentes?

M. François Arsenault:

C'est possible. C'est probablement la même situation chez vous. Au sein d'un Parlement, lorsqu'il y a beaucoup de nouveaux députés qui, au départ, n'ont pas une culture parlementaire aussi développée, il est tout à fait normal que ceux-ci remettent beaucoup de choses en question. Il va de soi que ces nouveaux parlementaires soulèvent plus de questions que ceux qui font ce travail depuis 20 ans, bien que ceux qui ont 10, 15 ou 20 ans d'expérience remettent aussi en cause certaines mesures. En effet, la société change, notamment en ce qui a trait au rôle des femmes, et le Parlement n'est pas insensible à cette situation.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Ma dernière question concerne les congés parentaux.

Verrait-on d'un mauvais oeil qu'un député décide de prendre un congé parental ou, au contraire, l'encouragerait-on à le faire?

M. François Arsenault:

C'est une bonne question. Je ne le sais pas. Il faudrait le demander aux parlementaires ou à l'ensemble de la population. J'ignore de quelle façon cela pourrait être perçu.

D'un côté purement pratique, cela soulève une question: en effet, si un député prend un congé parental de six mois pour s'occuper de son enfant, qui va s'occuper de sa circonscription? Assurément, il faudra faire en sorte que les électeurs de cette circonscription aient quand même voix au chapitre et que le travail dans la circonscription se fasse. À mon avis, c'est vrai pour l'ensemble des parlementaires. Aucun d'entre eux ne veut, du fait qu'il prend congé, voir ses électeurs être abandonnés ou moins bien servis.

Il m'est difficile de répondre précisément à cette question. J'imagine que la réponse varie selon la personne à qui l'on pose la question.

(1300)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Avant de vous laisser partir, j'aimerais apporter une précision au sujet du congé parental dont j'ai parlé tout à l'heure. D'après la recherche que nous avons faite, nous savons que les députés suédois peuvent prendre un congé parental et se faire remplacer par un substitut qui se charge du travail dans la circonscription. C'est un concept très intéressant. En fait, les ministres suédois n'ont pas le droit de siéger à l'assemblée législative de Suède. Ils ont un député substitut parce qu'ils sont censés être détachés de leurs fonctions de député pour faire leur travail de ministre. C'est un modèle intéressant.

Avant de vous laisser partir, j'aimerais vous poser une question. Nous avons parlé un peu de la sécurité. Je quitte souvent mon bureau vers les 2 heures ou 3 heures du matin. Quand nous siégeons tard le soir, le personnel quitte le bureau assez tard. Dans vos discussions, a-t-il été question de la sécurité aux heures tardives de la nuit pour les gens qui quittent l'Assemblée nationale, qu'il s'agisse du personnel ou des députés? [Français]

M. François Arsenault:

Oui, un peu, mais il faut dire que les stationnements destinés à ceux qui utilisent leur voiture sont quand même situés assez près de l'Assemblée. Ils ne sont pas nécessairement sur les terrains de l'Assemblée, mais ils sont quand même assez près. Toute la Colline du Parlement est très bien fournie en systèmes de caméras de sécurité. Les environs du Parlement sont dans un environnement vraiment très sécuritaire. Assurément, quelqu'un qui quitte les lieux à deux heures du matin, lorsque les rues sont désertes, peut avoir certaines inquiétudes, mais, à ma connaissance, aucun député ou membre du personnel n'a été victime d'un incident malheureux dans le secteur. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je pense que cette séance a été très utile pour nous. Nous avons de nouvelles idées et de nouvelles pistes de réflexion. Je sais que vous êtes très occupé et je vous remercie d'avoir pris le temps de nous parler. Merci beaucoup.

Avant de lever la séance, j'ai une dernière question pour les membres du Comité. Nous avons beaucoup parlé des enfants aujourd'hui. Que penseriez-vous d'installer un terrain de jeu devant l'édifice du Centre?

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président: La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on May 05, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.