header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-06-02 PROC 25

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. This is meeting number 25 of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, of the first session of the 42nd Parliament. This meeting is being held in public for the first part. The second part will be in camera.

I'd like to welcome Mr. Liepert, who is replacing Mr. Reid, and Mr. Lightbound, who is replacing Ruby, more of a regular replacement or fill-in.

Welcome everyone to the East Block. Except for the library, this is the only Parliament building that looks pretty much the same as when it was first built. Those who have been here for a while know this is where the Prime Minister's offices—

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

The war room.

The Chair:

Yes. The Prime Minister's offices were in East Block originally.

In the first part of the meeting we'll go over some outstanding business items and then in the second hour we'll go in camera to look after the draft interim report.

There are a couple of things I want to get out of the way. We might consider asking the clerk to look into our doing a field trip of the West Block because that's where we're going and we're making some recommendations related to Parliament sitting. We might want to see where they are on it and what it looks like, especially the chambers. No one disagrees with that?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I was there a few weeks ago with the government operations and estimates committee. There's not much to see other than the chambers. It's still pretty much an open courtyard.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I have a quick question. Would we be allowed to bring any staff on the tour?

The Chair:

Sure. I don't see why not.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

The last time that we went, in the previous Parliament, about a year ago, they wanted to keep it reasonably limited because it's difficult with a large group. I think there might have been one or two staff who were allowed. It might have to be limited, but you'll know when you ask, Mr. Chair.

Mr. David Christopherson:

At the public accounts committee, when the Auditor General did a thing on the renovation project, it was chaos all over the place, but even with that we did bring our staff. I would think it's further along at this time. I'm not actually pushing it. I'm just seeking to find out whether or not it would be allowed. You could let us know.

The Chair:

We'll find out when we ask.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I wasn't trying to indicate anything, Mr. Chair, so whatever—

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, I didn't take it that way either.

The Chair:

Is that agreed?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: The second thing is, someone at one of our meetings asked the Speaker or the Clerk, I can't remember who, how many seats the new room 200, which will be the new House of Commons, would hold. He's written back to us saying 340 individual seats. We need 338 right now. That's bigger than where we are now.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No, we have 339....

The Chair:

They're not individual.... If the letter is written in correct English, then they're separate seats.

The other thing I want to get on the record is our meeting next week with the delegation from Austria. It's going to be Tuesday, between 4 p.m. and 5 p.m. and it'll probably be in one of the Senate meeting rooms in the Centre Block. You'll get a notice of course.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You're going to do a fine job.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

[Inaudible—Editor]

The Chair:

Blake and I won't be there so you'll have to chair, David.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Nice try.

The Chair:

The first order of business will be Standing Order 28(3).

David has a suggested compromise which we will pass out.

David, you'll have to be persuasive in your presentation.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Do you know what? I've decided on a different approach. What's happening is that I'm defending the position of another office. It's actually the House leader's office. We're starting to get jammed here. I'm having trouble breaking it because it's not my file. I'm the conduit.

My understanding is that it takes unanimous agreement to make the change, if that's correct. I thought originally it was just a majority vote.

I see you shaking your head. Could I get clarification, then?

The Chair:

We pass it with whoever is here. We make a report to the House with a majority vote. We ask for concurrence in the report, because we have to change the Standing Orders and the House has to agree. If we don't get unanimous consent, we ask a bunch of times. Mr. Preston asked 25 times, I think, last Parliament for approval of a report.

Mr. David Christopherson:

There was a reason for that.

The Chair:

We ask a whole bunch of times and if we don't get unanimous consent, then we can bring a concurrence motion and have a three-hour debate and then pass it, but unanimously.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Given that it's our Standing Orders, that's not a preferred process for making rules.

What I don't want to do is spend a half hour trying to make a persuasive argument for somebody else's case, especially when we're talking about the meaning of individual words.

What I was going to suggest to colleagues is whether there is any chance we could get agreement to ship this to the House leaders and force them to come to an agreement. It's their stuff, their language. Throw it to them. Let them come up to an agreement and come back to us. If they admit defeat, that they cannot come to an agreement, then fine. Then we can deal with it and we'll go through the majority process and life will go on. But for this to be ground zero on this to continue debating, I think we're just going to end up chasing our tail over and over here. I'm not in a position to give concurrence.

Do we really want to spend the next hour debating words that are somebody else's responsibility or would we be better off to ship it back to the House leaders and say that those folks come to a common agreement, advise us, and then we'll do our proper thing. I leave that to colleagues because I'm worried about the alternative and I think that may be fairly practical I hope.

(1110)

The Chair:

Before we open debate on that, let me just give you a bit more background on your amendment.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Sure.

The Chair:

One is you have “House Officer” in it, and there is no such standard term. It's not used in the Standing Orders. We don't know technically who that means.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Excuse me, Chair, to tell you where we are, I haven't been part of that discussion. I don't know about anybody else here. Maybe they have more control over their House leader than I do. But I get told by the House leader how these things are going to go as opposed to I tell him.

Right from the get-go when you say there's a particular problem, that's House leader stuff. I was a House leader at Queen's Park. This is exactly the kind of stuff they deal with. Having us do it makes no sense.

Sorry to interrupt, but it's better to provide context.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Mr. Chair, as much as I have complete faith in Mr. Christopherson's ability to carry a debate for an hour all on his own if he needed to, I think what he's saying makes some sense. That seems to have been the approach. We've also often decided that we want to go back and consult with our House leader, and if that's what we're going to continually do—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Exactly.

Mr. Blake Richards:

—let's just let them have a discussion and see if they have something they can recommend to us and then we can look at it.

The Chair:

Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

I'll be quick. I agree.

The Chair:

The consensus is we will defer to the House leaders. If they can't come to something, we'll come back here and vote, remembering that it's by majority here and in the House eventually if we have to do a concurrence debate.

I was just going to report back on the response from the minister. The response was something like she's not available over the next few weeks. At that point I wrote a letter, or the clerk did under my instructions, again saying that we really want her and here are the available dates, here is when our meetings are, and we really want to get this done before the summer. That just went. We'll see what response we get. Obviously, she's dealing with the Senate right now on that bill, but we'll see what response I get to that.

On the conflict of interest, I think we can deal with this fairly quickly because I just put this on as a sort of update of where we are. As you know, we had some problems, a lot of people on our committee had some problems with the suggested wording. First of all, we had a problem with understanding what the gifts.... It wasn't clear enough in the conflict what was a gift, what wasn't, what we're allowed to do and what we're not. We asked the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner to do guidelines, which she did, but in terms of the guidelines, there are a lot of questions or items for debate on our committee.

We had an informal dinner meeting and at that time we came up with some ideas. Because Mr. Christopherson couldn't make it that night, Mr. Reid was going to put them down and then discuss them with Mr. Christopherson. Depending on that, once that happens, they may or may not have something to bring back to us. So we're going to leave it at that for now. I'm just giving the committee an update on where we are.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, that's fine. Thanks for that.

The Chair:

That one's dealt with.

Other than the report on committee business, which we're going to shortly, which I will introduce, was there anything else that people think we can do, now that we're on a roll? It looks as if I got everything on my list.

Now on this report, which you all got yesterday, we're going in camera, even though there's almost no one here.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

(1110)

(1130)



[Public proceedings resume]

The Chair:

We're in public.

Jamie.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

I want to speak to what you said before we broke for the in camera session, about the Minister of Justice not being able to attend committee.

The Chair: They didn't say they weren't able; they just said they weren't able in the next few weeks.

Mr. Jamie Schmale: In June, I think that was the goal. We wanted to deal with this hopefully before we rose by the end of June. I think it's quite upsetting. We gave her lots of notice. We gave her weeks in advance of the meeting. We meet for an hour. I don't think that's a whole lot of time. Bill C-14 is dealt with; it's through the House, anyway.

For her to give us an hour of her time on an issue the governing party feels is a priority to get off the plate, or on the plate, depending on if there's something there.... The fact that she has decided she can't meet before the end of June goes contradictory to what we've been talking about. Let's deal with this. Let's find out if there's something there, and if there is, let's deal with it and let's get through it as fast as possible.

To keep this on the agenda over and over again and drag this out.... Now it's going to go on through the summer, and we'll have to deal with it in September and October when we return. That we just can't find an hour is pretty disappointing, I think.

The Chair:

I may not have been clear. They didn't say she couldn't meet in June. They just said for the next few weeks, and they're looking for a date. I wrote back to emphasize that we want the meeting to deal with this before the summer. We're waiting for the response to that. The letter just went out.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Mr. Chair, to make it clear, this is exactly the issue I was raising a number of weeks ago, that we needed to give some advance notice because we've had these kinds of excuses before from Liberal ministers. I'm getting a little tired of it. It's grown old already. There's no excuse. She's had advance notice.

I'm certainly willing, and I hope all members would agree, if her schedule is really that tight that she can't find an hour within our normal meeting schedule, we'll meet outside of our normal schedule if we have to, within some reasonable hours. She has to have one hour somewhere in June for this committee. If not, we kind of know how seriously the government is really taking this matter, and that would be a real concern. Let's press this issue. This is not acceptable.

The Chair:

David and then Arnold.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks, Chair.

I can appreciate my colleague's frustration. I said to the government we went through this, and I took a chance on the government's word, back when we were bringing in the democratic reform minister. I forget the details. They could be gotten quickly if we need them if someone wants to refute my point.

The essence of it was the government wanted language like “reasonable” and “available”, but all kinds of commitments went with it; it wasn't part of the motion.

I ended up voting for that, and I said at the time I'm taking a bit of a risk. I'm taking these government members at their word, and I'm hoping I won't regret that.

Then, in my opinion, we got jerked around. The minister did not come before us in that timely fashion. It was well after the fact, and the appointments as I recall had been made. We had questions about that process.

As one member of this committee, and it's just me over here in the NDP corner, I did back the government, and I gave them the benefit of the doubt, and they let me down. We're in the same kind of thing again, and therefore, I'm going to give the balance of my opinion to my colleagues in the Conservative caucus when they say this is not acceptable. There's a bit of a track record going on here, and I will join them and say it's feeling like a dodge.

This is a matter of privilege. Let's remember, when a matter of privilege comes up in the House, if the Speaker believes there's a prima facie case, the Speaker stops everything else and takes a motion with regard to that privilege. It seizes control of the House until the House has disposed of that motion.

Then when it comes here, we make it a priority, and we say that's privilege. We went through it last week when we had the other privilege that we dealt with very well.

To say this is not an extreme priority on the part of Parliament—not the opposition; the opposition didn't send it here, Parliament did. For the minister to now say similar to the previous minister that she's sorry but she's not available in the next couple of weeks....

The next couple of weeks covers how long we're going to be sitting, and that means we get outside the sitting area. You don't have to be here as long as I've been here, and as long as Blake has been here, to understand that's what it looks like. The government has a bit of a track record, and it's not a good one.

I want to add my voice to the position of the official opposition, and I would also lend my support to the idea that if it takes meeting outside our regular hours for us to accommodate a matter of privilege, if the minister's willing to meet with us before the House rises, then that's exactly what we should do as a part of our obligation on a matter of privilege.

What I do not think is acceptable is we get this “I'm just not available; my schedule doesn't fit”, and we're supposed to take that legitimately. We did the first time, and we ended up wearing it, but not the second time. I'm from Hamilton. You don't do that to us twice.

(1135)

The Chair:

Arnold.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I appreciate my colleague's comments. We did this on good faith and asked for the minister's availability. There may just be a misunderstanding.

We're meeting on a Tuesday. Typically, that's when cabinet meets when we're meeting as a committee.

The suggestions of coming off-hours, we will go back to the minister and make it clear that we would be prepared to meet at a time that would be convenient for her. We will push it from the government members' side as well.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

We don't want to get burned twice.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Nothing less than a yes answer at some time when she's available will be acceptable.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

I understand your position. At the end of the day, I don't control the timing of members of the executive council, but we will push it.

I also want to go back to some of the comments Mr. Reid made in the last meeting. He noted that this particular minister, along with the Minister of Health, are pretty busy, given this week's agenda and the compressed time schedule they are dealing with right now. He did note that notwithstanding that, we would like her to appear as urgently as possible. There is a lot on her plate right now. I am mindful of their difficult schedules.

Maybe there's a misunderstanding. If they are willing to meet us off-hours, it might give us a lot more options.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Again, I'll make it very clear.

I don't think there's a single person in Canada who will believe that the minister cannot find one hour in two weeks anywhere in her schedule. Certainly no one here will believe it, and I don't believe any Canadian will believe it. I certainly hope the government is going to try to take this seriously.

I understand the position you're in. You can't speak for her, but I think it will be quite clear how this government treats matters of privilege and how this government considers the importance of this Parliament and taking it seriously. If she doesn't appear here, people will know that this government is not serious about this Parliament and being accountable to it. That will be very clear.

The Chair:

I see a consensus around the room that we will let her know that we will adjust our time, if necessary.

Jamie.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Yes, I am the same. I agree with what Blake was saying. As a matter of privilege we need to go with it. I appreciate what everyone on the other.... I saw a lot of nodding heads, which is a good sign. As David said, we would appreciate this not happening again.

I agree, Arnold, you're going to do the best you can, but that's why we gave the advance notice.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Agreed. It's notice.

I'll be frank, I'm just as surprised, but we will follow up.

(1140)

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I agree with Blake. You can't speak. But I don't think anyone would agree that she can't find an hour somewhere in the clock.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

That's what I'm saying. I think there might be some miscommunication.

Let's just clarify. Give me an opportunity to clarify.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Absolutely.

The Chair:

Okay. Are we done?

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous. Cette réunion est la 25e du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre que nous tenons au cours de la 1re session de la 42e législature. La première partie de nos délibérations sera publique et nous poursuivrons ensuite à huis clos.

Permettez-moi de commencer par souhaiter la bienvenue à M. Liepert, qui remplace M. Reid, ainsi qu'à M. Lightbound, qui remplace Ruby, et pour qui cela devient une habitude.

Bienvenue à tous dans cet édifice de l'Est. Hormis la bibliothèque, c'est le seul édifice du Parlement qui a conservé, pour l'essentiel, la même apparence qu'à l'époque de sa construction. Ceux d'entre vous qui siègent ici depuis un certain temps savent que ces locaux ont abrité les bureaux du premier ministre…

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Le centre de crise.

Le président:

Oui. À l'origine, les bureaux du premier ministre étaient situés dans cet édifice de l'Est.

Nous allons commencer cette réunion en nous penchant sur quelques questions en suspens et, ensuite, nous étudierons à huis clos l’ébauche du rapport intérimaire.

J’aimerais que nous commencions par régler un certain nombre de choses. C’est ainsi que nous pourrions demander à notre greffier d’essayer d’organiser une visite du chantier de l’édifice de l’Ouest, puisque c’est là que nous irons et que nous nous apprêtons à formuler certaines recommandations sur les modalités de fonctionnement du Parlement. Cela nous permettrait de constater l’état d’avancement des travaux, en particulier de ceux des chambres. Êtes-vous tous d’accord?

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

J’y suis allé il y a quelques semaines, avec le Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires. Hormis les chambres elles-mêmes, il n’y avait pas grand-chose à voir. Pour l’essentiel, c’est une cour à ciel ouvert.

Le président:

D’accord.

M. David Christopherson:

J’ai une brève question à ce sujet. Si nous y allons, les membres du personnel pourront-ils nous accompagner?

Le président:

Bien sûr. Je ne vois pas ce qui les en empêcherait.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Il y a environ un an, dans la législature précédente, lorsque nous y sommes allés pour la dernière fois, nous avions été invités à limiter le nombre de visiteurs parce que l'accompagnement d'un groupe important est plus complexe. Si j’ai bonne mémoire, un ou deux membres du personnel avaient été autorisés à se joindre à nous. Il se peut qu’il en soit encore de même, mais vous le saurez en posant la question, monsieur le président.

M. David Christopherson:

À l’époque à laquelle le vérificateur général s’est penché sur le projet de rénovation, le Comité permanent des comptes publics s’y est rendu alors que c’était un véritable chantier. Cela n’a pas empêché notre personnel de se joindre à nous. J’imagine que les travaux ont progressé depuis cette époque. Je ne tiens pas particulièrement à insister sur ce point mais simplement à déterminer si nous aurions ou non le droit d’inviter le personnel à se joindre à nous. Vous nous le direz quand vous le saurez vous-même.

Le président:

Nous verrons bien la réponse qu’on nous donnera.

M. Blake Richards:

Monsieur le président, il n’y avait là aucun sous-entendu de ma part.

M. David Christopherson:

Je ne vous en ai pas prêté non plus.

Le président:

Êtes-vous tous d’accord?

Des voix: D’accord.

Le président: J’en viens maintenant au second point. Lors de l’une de nos réunions, quelqu’un a demandé au président ou au greffier, je ne sais plus à qui, combien la pièce 200, la nouvelle Chambre des communes, allait avoir de sièges. Nous avons reçu une réponse écrite: il y en aura 340. Actuellement, il nous en faut 338. Nous en aurons donc plus que maintenant.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Non, nous en avons 339…

Le président:

Pour reprendre la terminologie de la lettre, celle-ci ne parle pas de sièges individuels mais de places assises.

Il y a un autre sujet que je veux voir figurer au procès-verbal: notre réunion de la semaine prochaine avec la délégation autrichienne. Elle aura lieu le mardi, de 16 à 17 heures, probablement dans l’une des salles de réunion du Sénat dans l’édifice du Centre. Bien évidemment, vous recevrez la confirmation du lieu et de l’heure en temps voulu.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous allez très bien vous en tirer.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

[Note de la rédaction: inaudible]

Le président:

M. Richards et moi-même serons absents et vous n’aurez donc d’autre choix que de présider, monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Belle tentative.

Le président:

Nous en venons maintenant au premier point à l’ordre du jour, soit le paragraphe 28(3) du Règlement.

M. Christopherson nous propose un compromis que nous allons faire circuler.

Vous allez devoir nous faire un exposé convaincant.

M. David Christopherson:

Au risque de vous surprendre, j’ai décidé d’adopter une approche différente. J’ai en effet retenu le point de vue qui prévaut au cabinet du leader à la Chambre des communes, qui commence à être embouteillé. Je risque d'avoir un peu de mal à vous fournir des explications parce que ce n’est pas à proprement parler mon dossier. Je ne suis qu’un porte-parole.

Je crois savoir, et corrigez-moi si je me trompe, qu’il faut un consentement unanime pour pouvoir procéder à la modification. Je croyais au début qu’il suffisait d’un vote majoritaire.

Je vous vois hocher la tête. Pouvez-vous alors me dire ce qu’il en est réellement?

Le président:

Ce sont les députés présents qui l’adoptent. En cas de vote majoritaire, nous déposons un rapport à la Chambre et demandons son acceptation, parce que cela implique de modifier le Règlement et que la Chambre doit donner son accord. Si nous n’obtenons pas un consentement unanime la première fois, nous le redemandons un certain nombre de fois. Si j’ai bonne mémoire, M. Preston a demandé 25 fois l’approbation d’un rapport lors de la législature précédente.

M. David Christopherson:

Il y avait une raison à cela.

Le président:

Nous pouvons donc nous y reprendre de nombreuses fois pour obtenir un consentement unanime. Si nous échouons, nous pouvons présenter une motion portant adoption d’un rapport du comité et tenir un débat d’une durée de trois heures avant de l’adopter, mais toujours à l’unanimité.

M. David Christopherson:

Comme il s’agit là de notre Règlement, ce n’est pas la solution que nous privilégions pour adopter des règles.

Je ne tiens aucunement à tenter pendant une demi-heure de vous convaincre du bien-fondé de la thèse d’autrui, surtout si c’est pour faire une analyse mot à mot d’un texte.

C’est pourquoi je m’apprêtais à demander à mes collègues s’il leur paraît possible que nous convenions de transmettre cette proposition aux leaders à la Chambre pour les obliger à s’entendre sur le texte. Cela relève de leur domaine; c’est leur langage. Envoyez la leur, laissez-les parvenir à une entente et revenir devant nous. S’ils reconnaissent alors avoir échoué, nous pourrons alors nous pencher à nouveau sur la question et tenter d’obtenir un vote majoritaire, et la vie continuera… Quant à estimer qu’il s’agit là d’un point fondamental qui justifierait de poursuivre le débat, je crois que cela reviendrait à tourner en rond. Je ne suis pas en mesure d’en proposer l’adoption.

Tenons-nous réellement à passer l'heure qui vient à débattre de termes qui relèvent de la responsabilité de quelqu’un d’autre ou ne ferions-nous pas mieux de renvoyer le tout aux leaders à la Chambre en leur demandant de s’entendre entre eux et de nous informer du résultat pour nous permettre de faire la part du travail qui nous incombe. Je m’en remets à mes collègues parce que je me demande bien ce que nous pourrions faire d’autre et qu’il me semble que c’est là une solution plutôt pratique. Du moins je l’espère.

(1110)

Le président:

Permettez-moi, avant que nous en débattions, de préciser un peu plus le contexte dans lequel se situe votre amendement.

M. David Christopherson:

Bien sûr.

Le président:

Le texte de cet amendement utilise l'expression « agent supérieur de la Chambre », un titre ou une fonction qui n’existe pas. Le Règlement ne fait aucune mention d’un tel agent. Nous ignorons qui cela désigne concrètement.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous voudrez bien m’excuser, monsieur le président, de vous dire où nous en sommes, mais je n’ai pas participé à cette discussion. À ma connaissance, personne d’autre parmi nous n’y a participé. Il se peut qu’ils exercent un plus grand contrôle sur leur leader parlementaire que moi. C’est le leader à la Chambre qui m’a expliqué comment les choses se déroulent et non pas moi qui le lui ai dit.

Quand vous dites au tout début qu’il y a un problème précis, c’est celui du leader à la Chambre. J’ai déjà occupé cette fonction à Queen’s Park. C’est précisément le genre de questions dont s’occupent les leaders à la Chambre. Nous demander de le faire à leur place n’a aucun sens.

Je vous demande pardon de vous avoir coupé la parole mais, dans ce genre de cas, il vaut mieux préciser le contexte.

M. Blake Richards:

Monsieur le président, autant je fais confiance à M. Christopherson pour faire traîner à lui seul un débat pendant une heure, si cela le sert, autant ce qu’il nous dit me paraît logique. Il me semble que c’est l’approche que nous avions adoptée. Il nous est arrivé fréquemment de décider de nous adresser à notre leader à la Chambre et de le consulter, et si c’est ce que nous allons continuer à faire…

M. David Christopherson:

C’est en plein ça.

M. Blake Richards:

… laissons-les en discuter et voyons s’ils parviennent à nous faire une recommandation que nous pourrons alors étudier.

Le président:

Monsieur Chan.

M. Arnold Chan (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

Je serai bref. Je suis d’accord.

Le président:

Nous convenons donc que nous allons transmettre la question aux leaders à la Chambre. S’ils ne parviennent pas à s’entendre, nous étudierons à nouveau la question et passerons ensuite au vote, sans oublier que la décision sera prise à la majorité, ici comme à la Chambre, si nous devions tenir un débat sur une motion d’adoption.

Je m’apprêtais tout juste à vous faire rapport sur la réponse de la ministre. Elle nous a indiqué qu’elle ne pourra se libérer d’ici quelques semaines. Je lui ai alors écrit à mon tour, ou plutôt le greffier s’en est chargé à ma demande, en répétant à la ministre que nous tenons à l’entendre et en lui précisant les dates auxquelles nous sommes disponibles. Nous lui avons donné à nouveau nos dates de réunion et lui avons redit que nous tenons vraiment à terminer cette étude avant l’été. La lettre est bien partie. Nous verrons bien quelle réponse nous recevrons. Nous savons fort bien qu’elle est actuellement occupée à défendre ce projet de loi devant le Sénat, mais nous verrons bien quelle réponse elle nous fera.

En ce qui concerne les conflits d’intérêts, je crois que nous devrions pouvoir traiter cette question assez rapidement parce qu’il s’agit simplement, à mes yeux, de faire le point sur l’état d’avancement de nos travaux. Comme vous le savez, nous avons éprouvé certaines difficultés, beaucoup de membres de notre comité ayant jugé problématique la formulation suggérée. Tout d’abord, nous avons eu de la difficulté à bien comprendre la définition de « cadeaux ». Nous avons trouvé que les explications sur ce qui constitue ou non un cadeau, sur ce qui nous est autorisé ou non, données dans le code manquaient de clarté. Nous avons demandé à la commissaire aux conflits d’intérêts et à l’éthique de nous présenter des lignes directrices, ce qu’elle a fait. Ces dernières soulèvent toutefois chez nous quantité de questions ou de sujets à débattre lors des réunions de notre Comité.

Nous avons organisé un repas de travail informel pour en discuter. Lors de celui-ci, nous avons émis un certain nombre d’idées. Comme M. Christopherson n’a pu se libérer ce soir-là, M. Reid devait mettre ces idées sur papier et en discuter avec M. Christopherson. Les deux devaient ensuite décider s'il y avait lieu pour eux de nous en reparler. Nous allons donc en rester là pour l’instant. Je me contente d’indiquer aux membres du Comité où nous en sommes en la matière.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord. C'est très bien ainsi. Je vous en remercie.

Le président:

Cette question est réglée.

Hormis le rapport sur les affaires du Comité, que je tiens à vous présenter et dont nous allons ensuite discuter, y a-t-il un autre sujet que vous aimeriez que nous abordions, maintenant que nous sommes sur notre lancée? J’ai l’impression que j’ai tout inscrit sur ma liste.

Pour revenir maintenant à ce rapport, que vous avez tous reçu hier, nous allons poursuivre notre séance à huis clos, même si nous sommes pratiquement seuls ici.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

(1110)

(1130)



[La séance publique reprend. ]

Le président:

Nous reprenons la séance publique.

Jamie.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Je veux revenir sur ce que vous nous avez dit avant que nous siégions à huis clos au sujet de la ministre de la Justice qui n’est pas en mesure de venir témoigner devant notre Comité

Le président: Sa réponse ne disait pas qu’elle n’est pas en mesure de venir, mais plutôt qu’elle ne le pourra pas au cours des quelques semaines à venir.

M. Jamie Schmale: Si je me souviens bien, notre objectif était d’en finir en juin. C’est le voeu que nous avions formulé. Je trouve cela assez vexant. Nous lui avons transmis notre demande longtemps à l’avance, des semaines avant la réunion. Nous avions prévu de la rencontrer une heure. Cela n’avait rien d’excessif. Nous en avons fini avec le projet de loi C-14; de toute façon, il a franchi toutes les étapes à la Chambre.

Elle pourrait bien nous accorder une heure de son temps sur un dossier qu’il faut, de l’avis du parti au pouvoir, clore ou étudier rapidement, selon la vision qu’on a de son contenu. Le fait qu’elle n’accepte pas de nous rencontrer avant la fin juin ne va pas nous permettre de respecter le calendrier que nous nous étions fixé. Attaquons-nous à ce dossier, voyons s’il y a là quelque chose d’important et, si c’est le cas, occupons-nous-en et finissons notre travail le plus rapidement possible.

Conserver ce sujet à l’ordre du jour encore et encore et faire traîner les choses… L’été va passer et nous devrons nous y attaquer en septembre et en octobre, à notre retour. Je suis fort déçu que nous ne puissions pas y consacrer ne serait-ce qu'une petite heure.

Le président:

Je n’ai peut-être pas été assez clair. La réponse que nous avons reçue ne disait pas qu’elle ne pourrait pas nous rencontrer en juin. Elle disait simplement que ce ne serait pas possible dans les quelques semaines qui suivaient, et qu’elle cherchait à fixer une date. Je viens tout juste de lui rappeler par écrit combien nous tenons à ce que cette réunion ait lieu avant l’été. Nous attendons sa réponse.

M. Blake Richards:

Monsieur le président, pour éviter toute ambiguïté, c’est exactement le problème que je soulevais il y a quelques semaines, soit que nous devrions faire parvenir assez longtemps à l’avance des préavis à nos invités parce que nous avons déjà entendu ce genre d’excuses des ministres libéraux. C’est une pratique que je trouve un peu agaçante. Elle a un air de déjà vu. Il n’y a pas d’excuse qui tienne. Elle a été prévenue à l’avance.

Je suis tout à fait prêt, et j’espère que les autres membres du Comité le seront avec moi, à tenir cette réunion en dehors de nos heures normales de travail, dans les limites du raisonnable, si son horaire est vraiment si chargé qu’elle ne peut dégager une heure pour venir nous rencontrer. Elle doit certainement pouvoir se libérer une heure en juin. Si ce n’est pas le cas, nous pourrons en déduire que le gouvernement ne prend pas vraiment cette question au sérieux, ce qui serait préoccupant. Insistons encore. Cela n’est pas acceptable.

Le président:

Nous entendrons dans l'ordre David, puis Arnold.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Je comprends fort bien les frustrations de mon collègue. J’ai indiqué au gouvernement que nous avons analysé cette question et pris le risque de nous fier à la parole donnée, lorsque nous avons entendu le ministre responsable de la réforme démocratique. J’ai oublié les détails. Nous pourrions les retrouver rapidement en cas de besoin si quelqu’un devait prétendre que je suis dans l’erreur.

Pour l’essentiel, le gouvernement voulait que nous utilisions des termes comme « raisonnable » et « disponible », mais cela s’accompagnait de toutes sortes d’engagements, qui ne figuraient pas dans la motion.

J’ai fini par voter en faveur de cette motion, j’ai précisé à l’époque que je prenais un peu un risque. Je me fiais à la parole de ces membres du gouvernement et j’espère que je ne vais pas devoir le regretter.

À mon avis, nous avons été trompés. La ministre n’est pas venue nous rencontrer en temps opportun. Et pourtant, c’était bien après les engagements qui avaient été pris, et les rendez-vous avaient été fixés. Je m’en souviens. Nous avions des doutes sur ce processus.

À titre de membre de ce Comité, et il y a que moi ici dans le coin du NPD, j’ai appuyé le gouvernement. Je lui ai accordé le bénéfice du doute et il m’a laissé tomber. Nous nous retrouvons encore dans la même situation. C’est pourquoi, dorénavant, je vais appuyer mes collègues du caucus conservateur quand ils disent que cela n’est pas acceptable. Ce n’est pas la première fois que cela se produit et je me joins à eux pour estimer que cela ressemble à une esquive.

C’est une question de privilège. Il ne faut pas oublier que lorsqu’une telle question est soulevée en Chambre, si le Président estime qu’il y a apparence d’un grief justifié, il doit interrompre toute autre activité et adopter une motion concernant ce privilège. Il prend alors le contrôle de la Chambre jusqu’à ce que celle-ci ait disposé de cette motion.

Ensuite, lorsque la question nous est transmise, nous lui accordons la priorité et nous disons s’il s’agit ou non d’une question de privilège. Nous avons déjà eu à en débattre la semaine dernière au sujet d’une autre question de privilège que nous avons traitée tout à fait comme il convenait.

Prétendre qu’il ne s’agit pas là d’une priorité absolue du Parlement, pas de l’opposition puisque ce n’est pas elle qui nous a demandé d’étudier cette question, mais bien le Parlement… Que la ministre se permette de nous donner une réponse comparable à celle de son prédécesseur, soit qu’elle est navrée mais qu’elle n’est pas disponible pour les quelques semaines à venir…

Ces quelques semaines à venir correspondent à la période pendant laquelle nous allons continuer à siéger, et cela revient à dire que nous allons déborder cette période. Il n’est pas nécessaire d’avoir siégé aussi longtemps que moi ici, ou aussi longtemps que M. Richards, pour comprendre de quoi il s’agit. Force nous est de dire que les antécédents du gouvernement en la matière ne sont pas fameux.

Je tiens à ajouter ma voix à celle de l’opposition officielle et j’appuie également l’idée voulant que, s’il faut organiser une réunion en dehors de nos heures normales de travail, si la ministre est prête à nous rencontrer avant que la Chambre ne s’ajourne, c’est exactement ainsi que nous devrions procéder dans le cadre des obligations qui nous incombent sur une question de privilège.

Je ne trouve pas que nous devrions tolérer une autre réponse du genre « Je ne suis pas disponible; mon emploi du temps ne me le permet pas. » Il n’est pas question de prendre cela pour argent comptant. Nous l’avons fait la première fois et nous avons fini par en supporter les conséquences. On ne nous y reprendra pas. Je viens d’Hamilton et on ne nous fait pas le coup deux fois.

(1135)

Le président:

Arnold.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je prends bien la mesure des commentaires de mes collègues. Nous avons procédé de bonne foi et demandé à la ministre quelles étaient ses disponibilités. Il s’agit peut-être tout simplement d’un malentendu.

Nous nous réunissons mardi. En règle générale, nous nous réunissons le même jour que le Cabinet.

Nous allons proposer à la ministre de la rencontrer à un moment qui lui conviendra en dehors de nos heures normales de travail. Les députés du parti ministériel vont aussi insister pour obtenir ce rendez-vous.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Nous ne voulons pas être pris deux fois à ce jeu.

M. Blake Richards:

Nous ne pourrons tolérer d'autre réponse que l'acceptation d'une rencontre, au moment qui lui conviendra.

M. Arnold Chan:

Je comprends votre point de vue. En fin de compte, je n’exerce aucun contrôle sur l’emploi du temps des membres du conseil exécutif, mais nous allons insister.

Je tiens également à revenir sur certains des commentaires de M. Reid lors de notre dernière réunion. Il nous a rappelé que cette ministre, tout comme sa collègue de la Santé, sont fort occupées avec le programme de cette semaine et les calendriers comprimés auxquels elles doivent faire face. Cela dit, il a rappelé que nous aimerions qu’elle comparaisse devant nous aussi rapidement que possible. Elle est fort occupée actuellement et je réalise fort bien que son calendrier est surchargé.

Il y a peut-être là un malentendu. Si elles sont prêtes à nous rencontrer en dehors de nos heures normales de travail, cela pourrait nous offrir une plus grande marge de manoeuvre.

M. Blake Richards:

Permettez-moi de le redire très clairement.

Je ne crois pas qu’une seule personne au Canada puisse croire que la ministre ne puisse sur une période de deux semaines dégager une heure pour nous rencontrer. En tout cas, personne ici ne va le croire et je crois également qu’aucun Canadien n’avalerait ça. J'espère très sincèrement que le gouvernement va prendre notre demande au sérieux.

Je réalise fort bien que vous êtes en porte-à-faux. Vous ne pouvez vous exprimer en son nom, mais cela pourrait fort bien montrer l’importance et le sérieux que le gouvernement accorde à ce Parlement. Si elle ne comparaît pas devant nous, les gens réaliseront que ce gouvernement ne prend pas ce Parlement au sérieux et ils l’en tiendront responsable. Ce sera très clair.

Le président:

Je constate que tout le monde est d’accord pour que nous l’informions que nous sommes prêts, au besoin, à nous adapter aux impératifs de son calendrier.

Jamie.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Oui, je partage le même avis. Je suis d’accord avec M. Richards. Comme il s’agit là d’une question de privilège, nous n’avons d’autre choix que de procéder ainsi. Je suis content de constater que tous les membres de l’autre… J’en ai vu beaucoup faire oui de la tête, ce qui me paraît être un bon signe. Comme l’a dit M. Christopherson, nous aimerions que cela ne se reproduise pas.

Je suis convaincu, Arnold, que vous allez faire de votre mieux, mais c’est la raison pour laquelle nous avons informé la ministre à l’avance.

M. Arnold Chan:

C’est d’accord. Il s’agit donc de lui donner un préavis.

Pour être franc, je suis tout aussi surpris que vous, mais nous allons exercer un suivi.

(1140)

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je suis d’accord avec M. Richards. Vous ne pouvez pas vous exprimer librement, mais je ne crois pas que quiconque croirait qu’il lui est impossible de dégager une heure pour nous quelque part dans son calendrier.

M. Arnold Chan:

C’est bien ce que je dis. C’est pourquoi je pense qu’il peut y avoir un malentendu.

Laissez-moi la possibilité de préciser les choses.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Tout à fait d’accord.

Le président:

Bien. En avons-nous terminé?

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on June 02, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.