header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-06-16 PROC 29

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning, everyone. I call the meeting to order.

This is meeting 29 of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. This meeting is being held in public.

There are a couple of updates I want to give you. The meeting on Tuesday at 11 a.m. will be at the trailer, the one halfway up the hill from the Confederation Building to Centre Block. You'll get a notice from the clerk. We'll meet there at the regular time. They'll do a briefing, both safety and a briefing on the project. You'll put on all your safety clothes, etc., and then we'll do the tour. If people think there are more questions after that or if people want a further briefing or whatever, you can decide afterward if all your questions haven't been answered during the tour.

Go ahead, Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

I would assume that should Parliament rise before Tuesday, the tour would not happen. Do we know—

The Chair:

That's a good question.

That'll be up to us. If Parliament were to rise before Tuesday, which would be wonderful, do people still want to continue with the tour or not? It's not an official meeting, so why don't we keep it on for those who are interested, especially those who live in Ottawa?

Is that okay? That's a good point you brought up, though.

Mr. Blake Richards:

The only reason I asked is that I know some members will be here, and it would be great for those who are. Some who wouldn't be here would be disappointed, but I certainly think it would be okay to continue with it. Perhaps other people have different opinions. I don't know.

The Chair:

No one objects, so if Parliament rises, we'll still leave the tour on for those who happen to stay or go.

Go ahead, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

I think Parliament will be sitting on Tuesday, but in the event we're not, may I suggest that we are the committee that monitors this on an ongoing basis, so doing another one in the autumn would be appropriate under any circumstances, frankly.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

That's a good point.

The Chair:

We'll keep on if the House isn't sitting, if members want to go.

I've mentioned to the parties that we have a letter that we should, out of courtesy, resolve before the summer. We'll distribute the analysis of it electronically to you and hopefully we'll deal with it before the summer somehow. That would be in camera, to protect the privacy of the person.

We will resume consideration of Mr. Richards' motion concerning the study of the question of privilege on Bill C-14. We're still on the same motion as in the previous meeting.

Seeing no hands, I will note that Mr. Schmale was in the middle of a long oratory that he hadn't quite finished and would like to continue. After that, Mr. Richards and Mr. Reid are still on the list.

Go ahead, Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you.

Mr. Reid, prior to the meeting, said that he liked where my arguments were going, but he just needed a bit more convincing, so I thought I should take this time to, hopefully, convince him.

The Chair:

You go ahead and convince Mr. Reid.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Mr. Chair, I thought that was the only right thing to do.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Chair, I have a point of order. I'd just like to make sure that Mr. Reid lets us know when he's been convinced.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Probably not until one o'clock. Just shake me, wake me up, and I'll let you know.

The Chair:

New historical precedents for us, Mr. Reid...?

Mr. Scott Reid:

They are old historical precedents, but they are newly discovered through my research—

Mr. Blake Richards:

By the looks of all the paper in front of Mr. Schmale, he may not get the opportunity to share any precedents with us, because there's a lot of documentation that he appears to be ready to....

The Chair:

If you guys all leave, we'll send you an email when Mr. Schmale is finished.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair: Jamie, you're on. You have a lot of paper there, so we're excited.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I have lots of water, paper.... We'll see how we go.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

To continue where I left off, we were talking about the importance of continuing on with this investigation. We have direction from the Speaker. We're trying to convince all members here that Mr. Richards' motion does have precedents, does have a requirement to continue on.

I should point out that these words were not taken by us from out of the sky. They were taken from the Minister of Justice directing us a little further. We feel that by getting this list, it will help us continue in our investigation.

As a journalist, I want to talk about a few things, about how the two articles—Laura Stone's in The Globe and Mail and the CBC's The National the day after—had pretty specific details and very convincing wording that it was fact and not journalistic speculation.

I'll just quickly quote from “Principles for Ethical Journalism” taken from the Canadian Association of Journalists: Journalists have the duty and privilege to seek and report the truth, encourage civic debate to build our communities, and serve the public interest. We vigorously defend freedom of expression and freedom of the press as guaranteed under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. We return society’s trust by practising our craft responsibly and respecting our fellow-citizens’ rights.

I think it's under the first point, “We strive for accuracy and fairness”, that we go into our debate here. The quote continues: We avoid allowing our biases to influence our reporting. We disclose conflicts of interest. We give people, companies or organizations that are criticized in our reporting the opportunity to present their points of view prior to publication. We respect people’s civil rights, including the rights to privacy and a fair trial. We don’t alter photos, videos or sound in ways that mislead the public.

Then you go to these articles. Again, I go back to the wording of “according to a source”, says Laura Stone in The Globe and Mail, and “according to the source, who is not authorized to speak publicly about the bill”.

Then we go to the CBC's The National on April 13, “Sources tell the CBC...”.

Again, this is not journalistic speculation. These are words of fact, and of course the reporter wouldn't do that, based on their goals of striving for accuracy and fairness. Speaking as a former journalist, and I know there are other former journalists at this table, it's your wording that is important. If it were just speculation, you would not use “Sources tell the CBC”, or say that the piece of legislation will do this or won't allow for this. That is a very important point.

Going back to the principles, journalists are “independent and transparent”. They “don’t give favoured treatment to advertisers or special interests”. They “don’t accept or solicit gifts or favours from those they might cover”. The principles continue: We don’t report about subjects in which we have a financial interest. We don’t participate in movements and activities that we cover. Editorial boards and columnists or commentators endorse political candidates or causes. Reporters do not.

This is where we tie it in to what we're doing here: We generally don’t conceal our identities. When, on rare occasions, a reporter needs to go “undercover” in the public interest, we will clearly explain why.

Clearly this is not the case in these situations with CBC's The National and The Globe and Mail with Laura Stone. When you're talking to a source, of course you're not going to identify the source. That's clearly something we all accept and something that is paramount to continuing as a journalist, but again, it's the wording that says that they did have conversations with someone—someone who had access to this legislation.

In this case, we're trying to find the source of this leak, and based on the justice minister's own testimony, it seems a good place to start, or a good place to continue this investigation, Chair, is to find out who had access to this documentation. That is why it is so important to see this list.

I'll go on even further and I'll tie this in.

(1110)



Again, from the Canadian Association of Journalists: We keep our promises We identify sources of information, except when there is a clear and pressing reason to protect [the sources].

The valuable reason for keeping their sources anonymous is clear. That's why we do not obviously have any idea of the source, because that source was not supposed to reveal the text of the legislation.

It then says, “We explain the need for anonymity when we decide to grant it.” That's clearly not the case here, but that's our job. We independently corroborate facts given by unnamed sources. If we promise to protect a source's identity, we do so.

That's from the Canadian Association of Journalists.

Obviously we don't expect Laura Stone or the CBC's The National to disclose their sources, so that again leaves it up to us to continue this investigation. Was this declared before Parliament had the chance to see it? Again, there is very clear wording in these articles.

As a journalist myself, there were many years that you would have sources who, in many cases, would like to maybe leak a story ahead of time, because it's a way of framing the debate the way they want it. It's a way of getting ahead of the story on certain issues that may or may not be controversial. For this case, and if you look at the articles, it did frame the debate how they wanted it.

This was clearly leading the conversation in the direction the government wanted to take it. It's a very controversial bill. It's a very emotional bill. It's a bill of a magnitude that impacts on pretty much everybody across the country. To think that it would not be a good strategy to get ahead of it or steer the conversation in a certain direction...I think it was a good communications strategy.

However, there are very good details that suggest it was leaked before Parliament had eyes on it. If we just give up now and say, “Well, I think we asked the Minister of Justice. She said no. We believe her, so that's good enough”, then how do we prevent this from happening again? How do we stop this?

There are very clear indications in these articles that very clear details were released that certainly give very clear evidence that this was more than just a casual conversation or a reporter taking a wild guess. Going to the ethics guidelines from the Canadian Association of Journalists, it talks here about accuracy. This is where it ties into this, because, yes, I think it was pretty accurate: We are disciplined in our efforts to verify all facts. Accuracy is the moral imperative of journalists and news organizations, and should not be compromised, even by pressing deadlines of the 24-hour news cycle.

Chair, again these are pretty specific details. It was pointed out that there was one part that wasn't in the bill, but as was pointed out by Mr. Reid and Mr. Richards, in a conversation or one on one, if the reporter was taking the notes by old-fashioned writing, there could have been a minor error. But for the rest of it, that looks pretty clear. We seek documentation to support the reliability of those sources and their stories, and we are careful to distinguish between assertions and fact. The onus is on us [the reporters] to verify all information, even when it emerges on deadline.

(1115)



Mr. Chair, I think that both reporters did just that in their articles, The Globe and Mail and The National. To look at both stories and see how close they are in their details, again, Mr. Chair, this tells you that these reporters are not taking a guess because the stories would be wildly different. The wording tells us the same story.

Why, Chair, are we giving up? Why are we stopping this investigation? Why, Chair, do we not ask for a detailed list? Why don't we look into this further?

There are a lot of former political staffers at this table too. I can imagine, should we find this person, he or she might be watching very closely right now and wondering whether we are going to get somewhere. “Are they going to find that list and get to me?” As a former staffer, if I possibly were the source of this leak, I think I'd be sweating right now.

The chair has pointed out that the justice minister said that she asked her political staff, she asked her deputy minister, to conduct an investigation. Her staff said, no, it wasn't them. The deputy minister said they went through the list of people who had the draft legislation and they said it wasn't them.

This is my hockey analogy. As a referee, I'm sure everyone I give a penalty to would say it wasn't them. I would say a number of times that the penalty was correct and it was the correct call, but everyone will say no. I don't blame them. It's only what you do.

That's why this investigation...and I'm hoping I'm convincing the other side here.

(1120)

Mr. Scott Reid:

You're starting to convince me.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I'm starting to convince Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You're only just starting. I need more facts.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

You need more facts. Okay.

Mr. Scott Reid:

More primary documentation would be appropriate, in my view.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I am so glad you said that, Mr. Reid, because look at all of this paper I have to go through.

Look at what I have to do here.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is Mr. Reid convinced yet?

An hon. member: I don't think he is. He looks very skeptical.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

He said he's getting there.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm intrigued, as I'm sure everybody is.

An hon. member: Didn't he talk about sheep and cows last time?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Cattle as the super class of all animals.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I'll have to see if I can fit something in here.

Mr. Blake Richards:

If you are going to hockey, you need to get in something about maple syrup, Mounties, and things like that, so you're being very Canadian.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Very good. I like that.

I will have to focus here. I didn't get much sleep last night. I had my windows open and I live in a noisy neighbourhood. There was a cat meowing all night long, and it wouldn't stop meowing. It gave me lots of time to think, if I can get my head together here.

I will continue with quoting the ethics guidelines from the Canadian Association of Journalists, “We make sure to retain the original context of all quotations or clips, striving to convey the original tone”, which we are seeing in these articles. “Our reporting and editing will not change the meaning of a statement or exclude important qualifiers.”

It's in the ethics guidelines, right there; they do not change the meaning or statement. Look at the articles. If this is not a leak, why are the stories so close together? Why does the wording of both stories show statement of fact rather than just speculation?

I will quote here from March 19, 2001. At that time, the Speaker ruled on a question of privilege regarding an incident whereby the media was briefed on a justice bill, Bill C-15, before the members of Parliament. The Speaker indicated that there were two important issues in that case: “the matter of the embargoed briefing to the media and the issue of members' access to information required to fulfil their duties.”

In that ruling, the Speaker said: In preparing legislation, the government may wish to hold extensive consultations and such consultations may be held entirely at the government’s discretion. However, with respect to material to be placed before parliament, the House must take precedence.... The convention of the confidentiality of bills on notice is necessary, not only so that members themselves may be well informed, but also because of the pre-eminent rule which the House plays and must play in the legislative affairs of the nation.... To deny to members information concerning business that is about to come before the House, while at the same time providing such information to media that will likely be questioning members about that business, is a situation that the Chair cannot condone.

Mr. Chair, I think we find ourselves in the same type of situation.

This bill was probably the most important bill I will get to vote on in this term, in this Parliament, and—if the voters are willing to return me to this place, which I hope they are—probably in my entire career. Nothing will be as wide-reaching as this bill, the magnitude of this bill.

By the way, I did a constituency referendum on Bill C-14. Of almost 4,000 returned ballots, 78% voted in favour of Bill C-14. It was a good experience to do that and consult the constituents. My riding, Mr. Chair, is not as big as yours, but as the House was sitting at the time, it was a way to consult a large number of constituents in a small to medium-sized area in that short period of time and get a fairly accurate reading of constituents. Everybody, regardless of how they voted, had the opportunity to tell me how to vote. The range of comments was very good, lots of good feedback. People were telling me to vote yes or no based on a wide range of reasons, whether they saw a family member suffer—

(1125)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

How did you vote?

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I voted yes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Oh, interesting. You listened to your constituents.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I listened to the constituents, absolutely. I wasn't sure what to expect, actually, coming into that referendum. I had never done that. I took the lead from Mr. Reid, who has done seven or eight of them.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Seven.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I will probably do a few more.

Mr. Blake Richards:

He likes referendums.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I do like referendums.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I am a fan of referendums. I am wearing my Swiss flag today—

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Yes, that's right. They did one. That is a good idea.

Mr. Scott Reid:

—in honour of the profound respect the Swiss have for democracy.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I agree. That's good.

Actually, let's segue into that.

Thank you, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You're welcome.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Speaking of consulting, this is a government that likes to consult, so let's do that. Let's consult. Let's keep looking into it.

You know, we look at the issues that are before us today, and on this side of the House, some of the answers seem pretty obvious, like the Trans-Pacific Partnership or the pipeline issue, building new pipelines to get our oil to market. Those seem like an easy yes.

In this case, I think we have an easy yes here. We're just convincing the other side. We're working on it, though. We're getting there, so let's consult. We all like to consult, so let's keep going. Let's dig in. Let's dig in and keep going. There are many different ways we can take it.

As a reporter, most of the time your conversations come from staff, maybe high-up staff in the communications department. That's why it was important to note, as Mr. Richards did last time, that we're not asking for the Prime Minister to attend, because we're pretty sure it wasn't him. It was on the staff level, probably someone in the communications department, hence the wording of his motion asking for those communications people to attend, because in all likeliness that's the best place to start.

It was often that I would get tips as a reporter. They would come through the communications department because that's who you would have the relationship with. As a new government staring out, they would want to build those relationships with reporters. I think much of the political staff—either from what I've read or staff I knew—would have to be, I guess, for the most part, from various backgrounds, or from different provinces with backgrounds in provincial government. At the same time, a lot of these relationships would be new. They would be fostering these relationships and they would want them to grow.

How do they do that? Possibly, they give a bit more information than they probably should. Judging by the accuracy, I don't think this is a watering hole conversation that happened. This was something a little more than that. We're going to get to the bottom of this.

How is my convincing so far?

(1130)

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm taking notes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

On what?

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

He's ready for it.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Might I do a brief question here?

The Chair:

Go ahead.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's one of the things you mentioned earlier on. Just before it moves on to different themes, I wanted to dwell upon it.

He quoted verbatim from The Globe and Mail article and also from the CBC coverage. Although the content overlaps very closely, the wording of it suggests to me the possibility that these might actually be two separate leaks.

It seems unlikely that someone would have said to Laura Stone and to whomever the person at CBC was, “Could you get together in one room so that we can do a conference call?” The CBC does not quote The Globe and Mail and say that it was their source, nor the reverse. This suggests to me that there were probably two leaks going on here. Up to this point, we've treated this as if it were a single leak. There may be a single leaker, don't get me wrong, but there is a possibility that these are two distinct contempts, if you will, grouped for convenience as a single contempt. I wonder if Mr. Schmale could comment a little bit on what strikes him in this regard.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Yes, that's actually a very good point. It goes back to my previous comment about how journalists try to make inroads in government departments, especially with a new government. As communications staff you're trying to build relationships, and if you want to fast-track a relationship, this is a possible way to do it to build trust, especially given the magnitude of this bill and how many people it affects.

You could see departments possibly not knowing what others are doing and what conversations are happening, and different people having these conversations. You're absolutely right. The CBC did not quote The Globe and Mail. Do we, then, have two sources? Do we have one who seems to enjoy the limelight by talking to journalists when they're not supposed to about legislation that has yet to be tabled?

That's why it's so important that we get this list. The justice minister pointed us in that direction. It was the minister herself pointing us in that direction.

Let's continue the conversation, then. Let's consult. Let's find the people who may possibly have had access to the legislation. We may see something that we're not seeing now.

I say to Mr. Reid's saying that there could possibly be two sources, you're absolutely right. That is a bigger issue, when you now have two people talking about legislation that has yet to be tabled in the House before legislators have a chance to look at it.

Mr. Scott Reid:

With your permission, Mr. Chair...?

The Chair:

Yes, go ahead.

Mr. Scott Reid:

If I may say so, that does imply coordination. In fact, there is no logical scenario I can imagine whereby, if you have more than one person doing the leaking, there wasn't coordination, which frankly points more in the direction of a deliberate strategy from some political actor, some elected official who is ultimately in a decision-making position here. It just strains credulity to imagine two people, simultaneously and independently, leaking to the media with identical selections of facts.

(1135)

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I agree, because as we mentioned, if you want to frame the debate on an issue of this magnitude, how do you do it? They did it quite well, in my opinion. The problem is that they gave very significant details about a bill that had yet to be tabled in the House of Commons, which is why we're discussing this issue and hopefully getting some consensus on this motion.

The Chair:

Do we have any more questions for the witness?

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Is there any more consulting I can do? I have lots of information to hopefully convince everyone here.

I'm going to speak about privileges and immunities from the House of Commons Procedure and Practice, the second edition, of 2009. It goes to what we're talking about here. The rights accorded to the House and its Members to allow them to perform their parliamentary functions unimpeded are referred to as privileges or immunities. In modern parlance, the term “privilege” usually conveys the idea of a “privileged class”, with a person or group granted special rights or immunities beyond the common advantages of others. Parliamentary privilege refers, however, to the rights and immunities that are deemed necessary for the House of Commons, as an institution, and its Members, as representatives of the electorate, to fulfill their functions. It also refers to the powers possessed by the House to protect itself, its Members, and its procedures from undue interference, so that it can effectively carry out its principal functions which are to legislate...and hold the government to account. In that sense, parliamentary privilege can be viewed as the independence Parliament and its Members need to function unimpeded.

Here we are, then. Apparently we all saw the article, so are we “unimpeded”? We got a preview of what was in the legislation before it was tabled; that was handy. Are we, then, unimpeded? Well, no, I don't think so. We're seeing clearly that we were given details before it was even tabled in the House. Privilege has long been an important element of our tradition of government. The practices and precedents of the House of Commons of Canada regarding parliamentary privilege stretch far back into colonial times. At an early stage, the young assemblies of the colonies, modelling themselves on Westminster, claimed the privileges of the British House, though without statutory authority. At Confederation, the privileges of the British House were made applicable to the Canadian Parliament in the Constitution Act, 1867, and for many years the Canadian House continued to look to the experience of the British House for guidance in matters of parliamentary privilege.

Again, in the article, showing language of statement of fact clearly identifying in its language that “sources tell the CBC the legislation will not...”, we're seeing that privilege was violated here, Chair. We're seeing through the justice minister's testimony, her own words, that she gave us this direction, and Mr. Richards asked very clearly, how else we would carry on this investigation. It was her giving us ideas on how to pursue this, because I believe she took it very seriously. I honestly believe that and I thank her for her testimony. I thank her for appearing before this committee. I think it was very important that she did so. I think it was very important that she came out and talked to us and rather cleared the record, because I think she did. I appreciated her assistance in guiding us along as we do our jobs as members of this committee.

For those of you who may need a bit more definition of what privilege is and why it's so important, the definition of parliamentary privilege is found in Erskine May's Treatise on The Law, Privileges, Proceedings and Usage of Parliament: Parliamentary privilege is the sum of the peculiar rights enjoyed by each House collectively...and by Members of each House individually, without which they could not discharge their functions, and which exceed those possessed by other bodies or individuals. Thus privilege, though part of the law of the land, is to a certain extent an exemption from the general law.

O'Brien and Bosc then go on to say: Those “peculiar rights” can be divided into two categories: those extended to Members individually, and those extended to the House collectively. Each category can be further divided. The rights and immunities accorded to Members individually are generally categorized under the following headings: freedom of speech; freedom from arrest in civil actions; and exemption from jury duty;

(1140)



There are quite a few more, and I'm happy to comment on those as well.

We'll go back here, “Parliamentary privilege is the sum of the peculiar rights enjoyed by each House collectively…and by Members of each House individually, without which they could not discharge their functions”.

Here we have an article telling us very specific details of what will not be in a bill that has huge magnitude across this country. Why is it that the reporters got the briefing? That goes back to what Mr. Reid was saying about whether it is one leak, one source. Is it two sources? Possibly. If it's two sources that's an even bigger issue we should be investigating. It would be nice to get to the bottom of this, because if you allow this to happen...it's almost like a child. You don't reward bad behaviour, so if we stop, are we rewarding bad behaviour? Are we getting to the end of this? Just saying, no, means the staffer might be thinking, “Wow, I got away with that. Okay, this bill seems pretty important, the press is itching for any details they can get, so what's the harm? They clearly will not get any further. It will go to maybe one witness, and then they will shut it down and say they did their job and it won't get any further.”

How is that actually correcting the problem? You're rewarding bad behaviour by saying, that's good enough, even though the justice minister gave us direction, gave us an avenue to pursue, gave us idea on where to go.

I can talk a bit about historical privilege and how this applies to us here. This, again, is from the House of Commons Procedure and Practice, second edition, from 2009. Parliamentary privileges were first claimed centuries ago when the English House of Commons was struggling to establish a distinct role for itself within Parliament. In the earliest days, Parliament functioned more as a court than as a legislature, and the initial claims to some of these privileges were originally made in this context. These privileges were found to be necessary to protect the House and its Members, not from the people, but from the power and interference of the King and the House of Lords. Over time, as the House of Commons gained stature and power as a deliberative assembly, these privileges were established as part of the common law of the land. The House of Commons in Canada has not had to challenge the Crown, its executive, or the Upper House in the same manner as the British House of Commons.

That, of course, makes sense. The privileges of the British House of Commons were formally made applicable to the Canadian Parliament at the time of Confederation by the Constitution Act, 1867, and were articulated in a statute now known as the Parliament of Canada Act. Nonetheless, these privileges enjoyed by the House and its Members are of the utmost importance; they are in fact vital to the proper functioning of Parliament. This is as true now as it was centuries ago when the English House of Commons first fought to secure these privileges and rights.

Chair, this is as true now as it was centuries ago and for a very good reason, as I just pointed out.

There are two articles, very close in detail, one source, possibly two. They're very clearly saying, we have a source. They are statements of fact. I just find it inconceivable that we continue to say, “Good enough, brush this under the rug, and we're fine.”

(1145)



This weekend I'm going back to my riding and I'm going to attend a bunch of events. Some people may know this is happening. Some people may not, but I think you could ask anybody in any workplace what they would do if a confidential document were leaked. Would they just give up on the investigation? Would they keep going until they possibly found the source? Would they keep investigating? Maybe they find the source or maybe they don't. If they don't, do they put mechanisms in place to prevent this from happening again?

I don't think anyone would say, “Let's give up after one witness.” I can't see anybody saying that's good enough. That goes back to rewarding bad behaviour. If we just say, “Yes, we're good enough”, I think that sets a very bad precedent.

We look at the mandate of PROC. We look at all of the different cabinet committees. There are 57. We did a bit of research. I want to thank my staff for doing a bit of research and helping me out.

The justice minister led us to believe that she and her staff were not responsible for the leak. Now we go on to who possibly had access. According to the justice minister, both the PMO and the health minister and staff had access.

Let's look at the health minister's staff. We're just going to make up a list and see if that works. I apologize for those whose names I get terribly wrong: Danielle Boyle, the executive assistant to the chief of staff; Robert Brown, the senior project officer; Peter Cleary, director of parliamentary affairs; David Clements, director of communications; Jordan Crosby, parliamentary secretary's assistant; Cindy Dawson, scheduling assistant to the minister; Adam Exton, special assistant, parliamentary affairs; Geneviève Hinse, chief of staff; Jesse Kancir, policy adviser; Mark Livingstone, special assistant for the Atlantic region; Janet MacDonald, the CFIA departmental liaison; Andrew MacKendrick, the press secretary—I think that's a pretty important one—Kathryn Nowers, the policy adviser; Caroline Pitfield, the director of policy; Jennifer Saxe, the House of Commons departmental liaison; Mark Thompson, the driver—probably I would say no on that one—and Lydia Turpin, the receptionist.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I concur on that.

I think if we ever get the distribution list, I feel confident that Mr. Thompson will not be on that distribution list. That's a bit of a guess, but I feel confident.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I would probably concur with that, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

There are 57 PMO staff. There are 17 staff of the Minister of Health, and that doesn't include any officials that could have access as well.

Let's go over the PMO staff, because there are 57 of them. We don't know what cabinet committees the legislation went to. That's why it's so important to get this list, because there are a lot of cabinet committees and a lot of people who had access to this bill. Let's go through the Prime Minister's staff. We did the Minister of Health's.

We have Gerald Butts, the principal secretary, who is the executive assistant to the Prime Minister. Geoff Hall is the scheduler to the Prime Minister. Probably not the photographer, but I'm going to guess, Daniel Arnold, the director of research and advertising. Roland Paris is the senior adviser to the Prime Minister, but that was on defence, so I'm guessing he wouldn't. The director of operations probably did not. I'm guessing here, possibly the regional desk, because they would be responsible for distribution once it was tabled. We have Lindsay Hunter of the Ontario regional desk. Jamie Kippen is another regional desk for Ontario. Cyndi Jenkins is from the Atlantic region. Jessie Chahal is from the Prairies and northern regional desk. Brittney Kerr is from the British Columbia desk, and Marie-Laurence Lapointe is from the Quebec regional desk. Terry Guillon, the lead media advance, most likely did have access. Probably not the writers of the correspondence, or the members of the deputation, but we don't know. We're just doing some speculation right now.

The Prime Minister's press secretary would probably be one that I'd be interested in hearing from, because I would guess that person would be on the list. The executive assistant to the director of communications would definitely be on it, as well as the lead of media relations and the communications officer. There are two communications officers. The chief of staff, Katie Telford, would probably be one we'd like to have a chat with, definitely. We're going through these names, but without that list, how do we keep going? Why would we reward bad behaviour in not continuing? It's clear and important for this committee to acquire who had access, as well as question other government ministers and senior PMO staff.

Chair, should we not give the same opportunity to the ministers and staff to clear themselves and their staff of any potential accountability for that leak? You go back to hockey, and I'll do another analogy. I know my predecessor liked to use hockey analogies a lot. I know that Mr. Reid does appreciate them sometimes. On any team, whether it's hockey, baseball, or football, the captains are the leaders. The captains speak for their teams. The team members take their lead from the captains. Most of the time you don't run a play based on, “Well, I think this is the right idea. The quarterback said we're going to run this play, but I think it's better if we run this play and not tell anyone”. I'm thinking, and this is speculation on my part, they wanted to frame a story in a certain way with the huge magnitude of this bill, so they said, “Let's start the conversation a couple of days early. Let's get the ball rolling, and let's start forming the conversation as we'd like it”.

That's why it's important to speak to the captains, or the leads, the department heads, and find out where their range of thinking is and where they might direct us.

(1150)



Without this list we are just giving up and not even continuing in our mandate to carry out this investigation as directed by the Speaker. Without continuing, we don't even know what mechanisms we could send to the House for possible implementation so that this doesn't happen again, or recommendations to the various departments on how they might be able to prevent this from happening again.

Let's see the list, let's talk to those people, and let's have them give us the opportunity to clear them. Maybe they'd like to clear themselves instead of having this cloud hanging over them.

We go back to the Canadian Association of Journalists who have a duty to report the truth. I think it's clear, based on the wording, that they had very good sources to do that.

We'll give some background, and this goes on to why we have to do this. We have to continue this investigation because privilege is something we hold dear in this place.

As to privilege—and this is where it came from in Canada—centuries ago the British House of Commons began its struggle to win its basic rights and immunities from the king. The earliest cases go back to the 14th and 15th centuries when several members and Speakers were imprisoned by the king, who took offence to their conduct in Parliament, despite the claims of the House that these arrests were contrary to its liberties.

In the Tudor and the early Stuart periods, though Parliament was sometimes unable to resist the stronger will of the sovereign, the conviction continued to be expressed that Parliament, including the House of Commons, was entitled to certain rights. The elected Speaker of the House of Commons in 1523, Sir Thomas More, was among the first Speakers to petition the king to seek the recognition of certain privileges for the House. By the end of the 16th century, the Speakers' petition to the king had become a fixed practice.

Despite these early petitions of the Speaker, the king was not above the informing the Commons that their privileges, particularly freedom of speech, owed their existence by his sufferance. James I did this in 1621.

In protest, the Commons countered, “every Member of the House of Commons hath and of right ought to have freedom of speech…and…like freedom from all impeachment, imprisonment and molestation (other than by censure of the House itself) for or concerning any speaking, reasoning or declaring of any matter or matters touching the Parliament or parliament business”.

In rebuke, James I ordered that the Journals of the House be sent to him. He tore out the offending page of protest and then dissolved Parliament

Nor was privilege able to prevent the detention or arrest of members at the order of the crown. On several occasions in the early 17th century, members were imprisoned without trial while the House was not sitting or after the dissolution of Parliament.

In 1626, Charles I arrested two members of the House while it was in session, and in 1629 judgments were rendered against several members for this action. These outrages by the crown were denounced after the civil war, and in 1667 both Houses agreed that the judgment against the arrested members had been illegal and contrary to the privileges of Parliament.

In 1689, the implementation of the Bill of Rights confirmed once and for all the basic privilege of Parliament, including freedom of speech. Article 9 states, “freedom of speech and debates or proceedings in Parliament ought not to be impeached or questioned in any court or place out of Parliament”.

Here we go. We're tying this in. This is from O'Brien and Bosc:

(1155)

Free speech in the House was now finally established and protected from interference either from the Crown or the courts. In the late seventeenth century and the first half of the eighteenth century, some claims of the House as to what constituted privilege went too far. The privilege of freedom from arrest in civil matters was sometimes applied not only to Members themselves, but also to their servants. In addition, Members sought to extend their privilege from hindrance or molestation to their property, claiming a breach of privilege in instances of trespassing and poaching. Such practices were eventually curtailed by statute because they clearly had become a serious obstruction to the ordinary course of justice. Thus, privilege came to be recognized as only that which was absolutely necessary for the House to function effectively and for the Members to carry out their responsibilities as Members.

Mr. Chair, right there, privilege was recognized as “absolutely necessary for the House to function effectively and for the Members to carry out their responsibilities”.

Here we go again: a bill of huge magnitude, affecting pretty much every Canadian, released in significant detail, and saying what is not going to be in the bill. That provides evidence to the fact that the source had quite a bit of knowledge as to what was in this bill.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Mr. Chair, I have a point of order.

(1200)

The Chair:

Sorry, we have a point of order.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I just want to make sure.... I think I am next on the speaker's list, if I am not mistaken. Is that correct?

The Chair:

Are you getting antsy that you are not going to have any time?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes. I understand Mr. Schmale has a lot to say that is important, and I want him to have that opportunity. Actually, I needed to use the washroom, Mr. Chair, and I wanted to make sure he still had more to say, because I didn't want to miss my opportunity if he was done while I was out of the room for a moment.

The Chair:

Mr. Schmale, do you have a significant amount?

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I could probably keep going.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I just wanted to be sure that I wouldn't miss my opportunity.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I appreciate that.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you, Mr. Schmale.

The Chair:

We wouldn't want you to miss....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The trouble is that Mr. Reid is not convinced yet.

Mr. Scott Reid:

My feeling is that it would not be your loss, Mr. Richards, but our loss if we didn't have an opportunity to hear what you have to say.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I think you feel that way. I am not sure that others do.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I appreciate that.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I would be quite upset if you missed your opportunity, Mr. Richards. I am happy to keep going.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you, Mr. Schmale. I appreciate that.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

See how well we are getting along.

We just explained a bit of history as to why privilege is so important. Based on the fact that it is so important, based on the fact that I think we all agree it is important, and based on the fact that the House does need to see the legislation before it is leaked, that leak prevents us from doing our jobs properly or carrying out our responsibility as members of Parliament.

I ask rhetorically—but if the other side would like to answer, I am happy—why would they shut that down? You never know, the shoe could be on the other foot. We could be switching places at some point. Why would you not like to get through this now, start a precedent, maybe put in mechanisms so that this doesn't happen again, and maybe work towards something where we don't have this again, whether it be this Parliament, the next Parliament, or any future Parliaments? Let's work to fix this and get to the bottom of it.

I will continue and hopefully convince the other members that I am on the right track here: In the midst of their occasional [duties], the House of Lords and the House of Commons both acknowledged that a balance had to be maintained between the need to protect the essential privileges of Parliament and, at the same time, to avoid any risk that would undermine the interests of the nation. In this connection, it was agreed in 1704 that neither House of Parliament had any power, by any vote or declaration, to create for themselves any new privileges not warranted by the known laws and customs of Parliament. Since then, neither House alone has ever sought to lay claim to any new privilege beyond those petitioned for by Speakers or already established by precedent and law. The nineteenth century witnessed numerous cases of privilege, which helped to determine the bounds between the rights of Parliament and the responsibility of the courts. Perhaps the most famous of the court cases was Stockdale v. Hansard. In 1836, a publisher—

Mr. Scott Reid:

I remember it well.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I thought you would. I know you would remember this, and you could probably quote this without a book in front of you. —John Joseph Stockdale, sued Hansard, the printer for the House of Commons, for libel on account of a report published by order of the House. Despite numerous resolutions of the House protesting the court proceedings and the committal to prison of Stockdale by the House, the courts refused to acknowledge the claims of the House because it had not been proven that the claimed privilege existed....

Based on all that, again, we go back to what the justice minister said and what the Canadian Association of Journalists said in their “Principles for Ethical Journalism”. I think you know this, David. You are a former journalist.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Like you, I was a journalist and a staffer, but I chose the right party.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I would disagree with that but I appreciate your comments.

(1205)

Mr. Scott Reid:

We chose the right party. He chose the centre party.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

And there's nothing left.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

Relevance...?

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

You look at the “Principles of Ethical Journalism”. They strive for accuracy and fairness. They're independent and transparent. They keep their promises. They respect diversity and they are accountable.

That keeps them from just printing items out of thin air, or if it is speculation, from using language and guiding...when clearly fact is the case. In this case, the language tells us what we need to know.

Mr. Chair, I would submit that the reporter knew somebody.

The Chair:

Mr. Schmale, just in case you didn't notice, Mr. Richards is back.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I didn't know that.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Mr. Chair, I didn't want to pressure the member to rush. I know he has lots to say. I'm anxious to have an opportunity as well, but I wouldn't want to take away from his opportunity either.

Don't feel pressured, Mr. Schmale.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid, I assume you want to get in too.

Mr. Scott Reid:

No, I don't want to get in.

I just want to say that I'm finding him more and more convincing.

A voice: So it's working.

Mr. Scott Reid: I would be reluctant to stop him before he gets to the key points, which I feel are coming closer by the minute.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

They are.

Chair, could you let me know when there are two minutes left?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Could we call a vote at that point?

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

That's true; at fifteen seconds or less, then.

Thank you to Mr. Richards. I actually didn't see you sneak in behind me.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I can be like that sometimes.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

You're stealthy.

Where was I on this? Yes, the reporter identified someone in the know who had provided specifics to this bill. As we're going through this step by step, I think we can say they're referring to the source in both cases. I think it's clear, and I think maybe we all agree, that there are specific elements of the legislation in these articles, with very similar details. I think we've established that it proves these just weren't picked out of the air. I don't think you can have two articles.... Well, The National could have the same details, but they would have to quote their sources, which would at that point have been The Globe and Mail, “According to The Globe and Mail this, this, and that”.

To Mr. Reid's point, are there one or two sources of the leak? Maybe, but we don't know until we get on this. Was it a coordinated effort to leak this information and to frame the story as the government wanted? We don't know until we get this list.

Going back to privilege, and again why it's so important, I do stress that privilege came to be, and it was absolutely necessary for the House to function effectively and for the members to carry out their responsibilities. The late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries also saw, for the first time, the systematic study of the history of privilege and contempt with the publication of several manuals on parliamentary procedures. The culmination of these efforts to understand and elucidate better the constitutional history of Parliament was achieved in 1946 with the publication of the 14th edition of May.

I cited that a little earlier. This edition presented a thorough and elaborate examination of parliamentary privilege based on an exhaustive examination of the Journals and the principles of the law of Parliament. It also cited instances of misconduct of strangers or witnesses, disobedience to the rules or orders of the House or committees, attempts at intimidation or bribery and molestation of Members or other Officers of the House as cases that more properly involve a contempt of Parliament rather than an explicit breach of an established privilege. The British House of Commons now takes a more narrowly defined view of privilege than was formerly the case, with the emphasis being placed on parliamentary proceedings. The change became apparent in 1967 when the Select Committee on Parliamentary Privilege accepted the need for the radical reform of the law, practice, and procedure relating to privilege and especially contempt, agreeing that they required simplification and clarification and to be brought into harmony with contemporary thought. The Committee went further to express the conviction that the recognized rights and immunities of the House “will and must be enforced by the courts as part of the law of the land”.

Now I'm not saying this applies in this case, but I think the point about privilege is very much clear: While the House took note of the Committee’s report, it was never adopted. In 1977, the Committee of Privileges re-examined the meaning of privilege and contempt, and the general thrust and conclusions of the 1967 report were reiterated in its report, later adopted by the House. The Committee recommended that the application of privilege be limited to cases of clear necessity in order to protect the House, its Members and its officers from being obstructed or interfered with in the performance of their functions.

Now, Chair, to do our duty, as I've stated a couple of times already, and to do our duty properly, as members of Parliament, to leak a bill, in this case a very important bill, but to leak any bill before parliamentarians have had a chance to take a look at it and examine it blocks us from effectively carrying out our responsibilities as members of this place.

(1210)



If we all have the heads-up that one or two sources of the leak find it okay to go on their own, maybe with direction from their team captain, and we do not investigate, which is what I think the other side is implying, that we just call it a day and shut down, then that is not letting us do our job. Without mechanisms in place to either stop it from happening, or to find the source of the leak, this could actually prevent us from doing our job. Could this happen again? Quite possibly it could, because there doesn't seem to be a consequence. Again, it's rewarding the child's bad behaviour.

This will say why it's important here: Privilege in the Pre-Confederation British North American Colonies From the establishment in 1758 of the first legislative assembly in Nova Scotia, the common law accorded the necessary powers to the legislature and its Members to perform their legislative work. “Members had freedom of speech in debate and the right of regulating and ordering their proceedings, and were protected from being arrested in connection with civil cases, because the legislature had first call on their services and attendance.” As to the power of an Assembly in the colonies to punish and more especially imprison for contempt, the situation was not at all clear. In effect, the rights enjoyed by the Assemblies in the pre-Confederation period were quite limited. However, as early as 1758, the House of Assembly of Nova Scotia had an individual arrested and briefly confined because of threats made against a Member of the Assembly. In Upper and Lower Canada, the Constitutional Act, 1791, adopted by the British Parliament, was silent on the privileges of the Legislatures, although by 1801 the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly in Upper Canada claimed “by the name of the Assembly, the freedom of speech and generally all the like privileges and liberties as are enjoyed by the Commons of Great Britain our Mother Country”. ...the Assembly of Upper Canada proceeded to fight for and assert many of the same privileges, such as freedom from arrest while sitting and freedom from jury duty, claimed by the British Commons. The Assembly also claimed the power to send for and question witnesses and to punish any individual who refused to appear or answer questions, using its power of imprisonment to ensure obedience of its orders. Although challenged on occasion, the Assembly was successful in enforcing its privileges.... In the period prior to responsible government, the Assembly in Upper Canada guarded its reputation by punishing libels against it in the newspapers and also fought for the right to initiate money bills, that is, bills for appropriations and taxation. In general, the Assembly of Upper Canada was satisfied that it could discharge its functions with the privileges it had. In the same period, the Assembly of Lower Canada also asserted both individual and corporate privileges—freedom from arrest and freedom from the obligation to appear in court with respect to civil suits brought against Members, and the right of the Assembly to punish for contempt, no matter the offender. The Assembly was not afraid to put forward its claims of privilege against the Crown. In 1820, it blocked the conduct of business at the opening of a new Parliament because of a dispute over the return of election writs and again in 1835 over comments made by the Governor about the privileges of the Assembly. With the Union Act, 1840 which created the Province of Canada out of Upper and Lower Canada, and especially following the achievement of responsible government, issues of privilege were less frequent or serious. This can be attributed to the fact that responsible government acknowledged the supremacy of the Assembly.

Chair, it's right there.

(1215)

The Chair:

That's very interesting.

Mr. Schmale, given that we all have a copy of that book—I know you're reading it into the record and it's 1,471 pages long—maybe you might just refer to the pages you want us to read into the minutes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Mr. Chair, I might respond to that.

I think there is some legitimacy to it. I think I might object if he were to try to read the whole book, but I assume he's not going to do that. If, in order to build the point, he needs to have that in front of him, I think asking people to read it later would make it difficult to make the point he's trying to make.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I would argue that maybe it would be appropriate to let him continue.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Thank you, Mr. Richards.

As was mentioned, Chair, that's why I tried to tie this in. I appreciate what you're saying, and I will not read this whole book. When you talk about privilege, it's in place for a reason, as I pointed out. It's there to allow us to do our jobs as members. Without these rules, we find ourselves in an interesting situation, because how many times can this happen, or how many times will we allow it to happen, before we take it more seriously than we're taking it right now? We want to continue with this investigation. There are others who don't. What does this say to those who possibly might want to foster their relationship with certain reporters, with the media? It says that the privilege I was mentioning doesn't mean much, because the investigation is going to be short and sweet, and probably not get to the meat of it, which is about who had access. Question those people, and try to find out who did it.

Chair, with any investigation, which may slow it down from happening again, if the people who have access to the legislation knew that should a leak happen again in the future they would most likely be called before this committee, would they be more likely or less likely to do this type of activity again? I would say, probably not.

Although we are a friendly bunch, being called before a parliamentary committee and asked to face questions on whether or not they were the source of a possible leak probably isn't that much fun, and probably quite uncomfortable. It probably causes loss of sleep and probably causes a whole bunch of stress they don't need.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Would that be different from the loss of sleep you had with the cat meowing last night?

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Then the mind starts running. Your mind starts running when you're up. It's hard to get back to sleep.

If you were the source of the leak and you knew that you were going to be called before the committee—because we will find out who has the access—I don't think you'd want to do this again. However, rewarding bad behaviour.... If you were the source of the leak and you knew the investigation wasn't going to go very far and you knew that there was a very good chance you were not going to be called before the committee to answer questions about this leak and the actions you may have taken, why wouldn't you do it again?

If privilege is so important, and I think we all agree it is, and if we all don't want it to happen again, how is ending this investigation going to solve anything? It will solve nothing. You might as well take this book and say, well, it only works in certain times, in certain circumstances.

It's like the rules of hockey. As a referee, you don't get to choose the rules. You're there to enforce them. You may not agree with certain rules, but that's not your job.

We have a job. There are rules. Our job is to get to the bottom of this. Our job is to make sure the rules are enforced. To basically give up goes against everything. How many times can this happen or will this happen until we stand up and say enough is enough; at what point? Some could argue, and I would actually say that this bill is probably the most important, as I said before, but how many times do we say, “It's okay, that bill doesn't have much magnitude”? Do we just start leaking legislation to the media beforehand? That's what will happen. That's what will happen because we are not clamping down on it, because we are not taking these steps to find out why.

I can't remember who said it last time, maybe Mr. Richards or Mr. Reid. We might not get to the cause of the source, but to put some fear into that person I think is one way to make sure they think twice about doing this again.

Again, Chair, I'll mention this, and I know you don't want me to read the whole thing, and I understand why. Here we go. This is from chapter 3, at page 85: By far, most...cases of privilege raised in the House relate to matters of contempt challenging the perceived authority and dignity of Parliament and its Members. Other cases have involved charges made by the Member about another Member or media allegations concerning [other] Members. The premature disclosure of committee reports and proceedings has frequently been raised as a matter of privilege as has the provision of deliberately misleading information to the House by a Minister and the provision of misleading testimony by a witness before...committee. Finally, the denial of access of members to the Parliamentary Precinct.....

That obviously doesn't have relevance here.

I think this goes to show, Chair, that we take parliamentary privilege very seriously. Do we, though? If we don't pursue this, do we actually take it seriously? Do we just say, “We had one witness; that's good enough”? As Mr. Reid pointed out, we have one source for sure, because that was the first one, in The Globe and Mail article. Do we have a possible second source?

(1220)



If yes, were they working together on a way to get the message out before the legislation was tabled in the House in order to shape the discussion the way the government wanted it? If you're looking at it as that serious, which I believe it is, why shut it down? Why not let us go and continue to ask these questions?

As I pointed out, Mr. Chair, when I read those names, I believe I said there were 57 in the Prime Minister's office. With the Minister of Health, I can't remember exactly. There were 20-odd people who obviously cared, but not all of them are going to have access to this legislation. The ones who would have an advantage to leak this information would have access, and that's who we want to talk to. That's why it's so important that we see that list. If we're talking about the openness and the transparency of the government, and how they're going to do things differently, okay. I wasn't here in the last Parliament, but okay, let's say we're going to do things differently. How is shutting down this investigation going to prove that we are open and transparent?

There's a quote here in the Ottawa Citizen mentioning that the opposition has been unable to offer any evidence that there was premature disclosure. I sincerely disagree with that. I think we're laying out our case bit by bit here on how important parliamentary privilege is, why it's so important, why journalists strive for accuracy and fairness, why they keep their promises, why they are accountable, and why members of Parliament need to have these rules in place in order to do their jobs properly.

If we're not taking it any further, then why would we go? We need to have these rules in place for a reason. There's a reason why. I'll quickly quote here: The manner in which questions of privilege were raised following Confederation was vastly different from today’s procedure. Dozens of cases between 1867 and 1913 followed the same, simple course. A Member would rise, explain the matter of privilege and conclude with a motion calling on the House to take some action—usually that someone be called to the Bar or that the matter be referred to the Standing Committee on Privileges and Elections for study and report. At that point, without any intervention on the part of the Speaker, debate would begin on the motion, amendments might be moved and, finally, the House would come to a decision on the matter. The House would then take whatever further action was required by the motion. Perhaps because of the immediate recognition given to Members rising on “questions of privilege”, it was also common throughout this time for Members to take the floor ostensibly to raise such a question, but in fact to make personal explanations. Members used the claim of a breach of privilege as a ready means to be recognized by the Speaker and to gain the floor in order to state a complaint or grievance of whatever kind. Here, too, they met with little interference from Chair Occupants.

That's good. Thank you. From 1913 to 1958, while the number of “questions of privilege” blossomed for such purposes as the recognition of school groups in the gallery, congratulatory messages, complaints, grievances and a plethora of procedural matters, in addition to the continued “personal explanations”, the number of legitimate matters of privilege dealt with by the House declined dramatically with only three being referred to the Standing Committee on Privileges and Elections and one to a special committee.

Let's look at my point. How do you stop this from happening again? We have direction from the Speaker to look at this.

(1225)



I think everyone wants to make sure this doesn't happen again, and I'm sure that when the members opposite, or possibly over on this side.... I don't think they would appreciate its happening. I know we don't, so let's start looking at ways by which we can stop this from happening again in the future, so that we are not dealing with it over and over again.

We're also looking at committee time, Chair. How many times could this be referred to us, so that we just keep dealing with it and dealing with it? Otherwise, we would just say, “What's the point of the rules? It doesn't matter; they're not going to be enforced. Nobody is going to be called on it.” Then what happens? That's probably a very extreme case, but these rules are here for a very good reason.

(1230)

The Chair:

On a point of order, I'll hear Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is it acceptable for me to make an inquiry to the member vis-à-vis one of the points he made, or would that be out of order?

The Chair:

That's fine.

I'd just like Mr. Schmale to know that he has only left half an hour for his two colleagues to speak.

However, Mr. Reid, go ahead and ask Mr. Schmale a question.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I wanted to go back to one of the items he raised. After he made the point, I was interested enough to go over and pick up the article. This is from Kady O'Malley's live blog. She had quoted from a statement from the Prime Minister's Office that was provided to the Ottawa Citizen, which contains the following wording, and this is the justification not merely from the members here, but we know this is from the PMO—the same PMO that would almost certainly be the source of authorization for any leak, so that makes the wording particularly interesting. It says: Since the opposition has been unable to offer any evidence that there even was a premature disclosure of the bill during six different committee meetings, the government members on the committee have decided to oppose any motion that randomly calls anyone as a part of their fishing expedition....

Leaving aside the unnecessarily snarky wording in that.... I myself have managed to never snark even once in 16 years in the House of Commons, as everybody knows.

At any rate, I just wanted to ask this. Is it reasonable to assume that the opposition can provide evidence, when the Liberals and the PCO are the ones who have the evidence and they're withholding that evidence by refusing to allow this motion to go forward? Isn't this a perverse situation, in which they're saying, “We have evidence that could settle this matter. You haven't provided it, because we're refusing to provide it to you; therefore, we want to shut down the hearings in which you have failed to produce the evidence that we actually have in our back pocket?”

Does that seem as odd to you, Mr. Schmale, as it does to me?

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Mr. Reid, that's exactly correct. That's what I'm getting to with this. I appreciate that I'm convincing you on this.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You're starting to.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

You're absolutely right; they have the evidence. We would like to see it in order to complete our investigation or continue it or move forward. If we don't see this evidence, then....

They're actually admitting to having this evidence. We know they are. The justice minister said they did, and the list is pointing us in that direction. You don't have to go very far, then, to look at the minister's own words, in which she basically said that the people who had it were the “need to know”. She also laid out here: ...employees who are responsible for developing policy and for developing proposals for the minister, ministerial and departmental personnel supporting a minister on a particular policy proposal or issue that is the subject....

We're being very well led in a direction, and I think she wants to see this come to an end, and possibly see a culprit found, or as we mentioned, see measures put in place to reduce the chance of this happening again, or not happening again.

Let's face it, if we do nothing, this will definitely happen again. If we put mechanisms in place to prevent its happening again, I think that's a good thing. I think everyone wants to see that.

The minister—and I can read the names because I didn't do the justice department—said all her departmental officials who worked on this draft legislation, as well as her exempt staff, had the valid security and the clearance at appropriate levels. That's a fairly narrow line. We're not talking about hundreds. To get this list, to say that there are hundreds upon hundreds of people we can call in here, well, that's not true. It's a very narrow list of people we can call in on this.

I don't think this investigation is going to take forever, but it will take forever if the opposition feels that we are not being allowed to carry out our parliamentary functions on this committee and we report back to the House that one witness was good enough, although she gave us information pointing us in a direction, and they claim they have the evidence or the information we need to allow us to continue our investigation, but we'll just shut it down and end it.

Does that not seem a bit odd to anyone else here, that we would just put the blinders on and say, “Yes, we're good”?

We're getting there. We're getting to the end here. We want to take the next step. I know that we on this side want to take the next step. The Minister of Justice pointed us in this direction. By just saying, yes, we're good....

Again, she said here, and I quote, that she has “spoken with [her] deputy minister”. She can assure that the “department follows all necessary precautions”, and she can assure us “that no breach of information nor evidence of such a breach was reported”. Therefore, here we go again, “no internal inquiry was initiated”.

That, Chair, brings me to my hockey referee analogy.

Of course you're going to say no, if I just ask in passing. I don't know whether everyone was called into the office and put on the hot seat, but of course you're going to say no.

I actually believe the justice minister when she says she has no idea or that she was not the source of the leak. I believe that. I actually quite respect her for coming to this committee and talking to us about what her thoughts were on this situation.

(1235)



Here it is again, Chair, and this is again saying why we need to continue and why we need that list. She said: ...it's worth remembering that this sensitive piece of legislation was not crafted by the Department of Justice alone. My department worked closely...with officials in other departments, and my exempt staff worked with their counterparts in other offices.

She also goes on to say, as per the Privy Council guidelines: ...drafts of memorandums to cabinet containing specific policy recommendations were shared with central agencies and other departments and agencies to solicit feedback and to address any potential concerns from various policy perspectives.

As the Minister of Justice, she can't comment on other departments or agencies, but that goes back to Mr. Reid's point that they have the evidence. They have a list that will point us in the right direction. We know that journalists have principles, a guideline for ethical journalism, and they follow that. Both articles, within a day of each other, cited sources, both to the CBC and to The Globe and Mail, with very specific details of the legislation that you would have to have in order to speak with some confidence and some accuracy.

Let's get that list. The Minister of Justice pointed us in that direction. Again, Mr. Chair, it wasn't us making this up. She pointed: here you go; this is the direction you have to follow in order to continue your investigation.

It makes me question why we're shutting this down. Do we wait until this happens again? Does it become the Wild West? What happens here? You're having articles showing statement of fact, and as Mr. Reid correctly pointed out, if we have a second source, that's a big problem too, because now we have additional people speaking out of turn.

That's a pretty soft reason for doing it, if they didn't take direction from their team captain. Who knows whether that's the case? Again we can't find this out. Did they do it on their own to further their own careers? Did they do it to further their relationships with journalists? Did they do it because they had direction from above giving them instruction to form the story that they wanted?

Putting that all together, how are we not continuing? I ask the question, how do we not continue with this? I'll point out this and then I'll go on to my next tangent here.

There were two cases, one in 1993 and one in 2005. The Supreme Court of Canada established the legal and constitutional framework for considering matters of parliamentary privilege. Since parliamentary privileges are rooted in the Constitution, courts may determine the existence and scope of a claimed privilege. However, recognizing that a finding of the existence of a privilege provides immunity from judicial oversight, the courts may not look at the exercise of any privilege or at any matter that falls within privilege. Once the courts have determined the existence and scope of the privilege, their role ceases. Matters that fall within parliamentary privilege are for the House alone to decide.

We know it's not a legal matter. We know it's for us to decide. One witness? That is probably not a pretty thorough investigation.

(1240)



Are we welcoming this to happen again?

Mr. Blake Richards:

I have a point of order, Mr. Chair.

Would it be permissible if I could just briefly ask a question of Mr. Schmale with regard to something he's referring to right now?

The Chair:

I have no problem with that.

Mr. Schmale, just so you know, you only have 15 minutes left for your two colleagues who are on the list to speak, but I'll let Mr. Richards ask you a question related to something you just said.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I might say, Mr. Chair, as anxious as I am to speak, I do understand what Mr. Schmale is saying. I do have a lot of points I want to make as well. There are a lot of important facts in here. I've found it illuminating, and I'm sure that many of the other committee members have as well.

Certainly, I don't hold any ill will for his using the time he needs to make his arguments. Don't feel as though it's necessary to caution him on that. I do understand and appreciate.

The Chair:

I appreciate your sensitivity.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thanks, Mr. Chair. I knew you would.

He was referring to some of the claims that were being made, I think by the government side. It seemed the members were making claims that one witness was good enough, and I wanted to ask him if he felt it would be unfair to the Prime Minister, the Prime Minister's Office, and the Health Minister, if they weren't given the same opportunity as the Justice Minister was given to clear up any suspicion or doubt there might be about whether there was involvement by their offices. Obviously, I would think if I were in their position, I would want the opportunity to clear that up and take the cloud away that was hanging over my head.

I wondered if you thought that was sort of an unreasonable thing to expect, that they would be given that opportunity.

(1245)

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Absolutely not.

I agree. The way the Justice Minister came in and cleared the air, she was very good about it. She answered questions very well. I'm actually quite surprised that the Minister of Health and others would not want to take this opportunity to clear that air, just to get it off their plates, make a point that it wasn't them and they had nothing to do with this, and allow us to actually say that we did more than a one-witness exercise, which does nothing to deter events like this from possibly happening again.

If we do nothing, this will happen again, because there are no repercussions, no fear of being called before a committee. It will become common practice, and then where does parliamentary privilege go? Do we no longer need to see legislation beforehand?

I say that is probably the extreme case, but I think my point is clear. If you reward bad behaviour, it will happen again.

The Chair:

Mr. Richards, just related to your question, I don't sense any urgency to rush to a vote on the first of your five motions.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Obviously, we would like to see a positive result so that we can carry on with our investigation. We're not hearing that.

We've been led to understand that the Prime Minister's Office has directed the members of this committee to vote down those motions. That's obviously quite concerning. Something that I wanted to talk about in my remarks is just that: the Prime Minister's Office seemingly getting involved in the matters of a committee, telling members and forcing upon their government members what they must do, and that's to sweep this under the rug. That's obviously a huge concern to us here in the opposition.

I would hope that members would think better than that and choose to vote to ensure privilege is upheld and not take their orders from the Prime Minister to sweep this under the carpet.

The Chair:

Mr. Schmale, you still have the floor.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Thank you, sir.

I agree with Blake on them obviously getting the orders from somewhere. I think we on this side agreed it was odd that they did not want to continue this investigation, especially after our two days of explaining our case for why it would be a good idea to do that, and why, in order to preserve parliamentary privilege, that we continue this investigation....

Now that obviously someone in some department or some agency—probably the PMO—has given direction that it would be in the best interests to shut this investigation down, that to me is equally as concerning. Why are we being blocked from doing our job as directed by the Speaker of the House of Commons? As we all know, within our system, there are checks and balances. It's Parliament's role to keep the government in check, but if the government is directing its parliamentary members to shut down the investigation on certain issues like this, do we not feel that we have had our powers clipped?

Actually, this might clarify something here about parliamentary privilege and why it's so important. This is picking up where I left off: The primary question asked by the courts is whether the claimed privilege is necessary for the House of Commons and its Members to carry out their parliamentary functions of deliberating, legislating and holding the government to account, without interference from the executive or the courts.

Right there, Chair, that's exactly what I said. How do we keep the checks and balances in place if the executive is shutting down its parliamentary members or giving direction to its parliamentary members to shut down committee work?

(1250)

The Chair:

Which page are you on?

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

It's page 78. It continues: In determining its existence and scope, the courts will first establish—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

On a point of order, Chair, I feel quite offended that we're being accused of taking orders. There's no factual evidence here. It's a completely unfounded accusation from the other side. We're sitting here listening, and if we're convinced of the reasoning for these motions, we will vote according to how we feel, but I think it's completely baseless and unfounded to accuse us of taking orders from anybody—at least not myself. I can speak for myself on that matter.

Mr. Blake Richards:

If I can respond to that, Chair—

The Chair:

On the point of order, Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

In fact it is founded, Mr. Chair. There were reports in the media that the Prime Minister's Office had in fact put out a statement indicating that they were directing that this motion be defeated.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Who? Sorry? There were reports...?

Mr. Blake Richards:

I can provide the link to the article.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Sure. Did I [Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. Scott Reid:

According to Kady O'Malley in the Ottawa Citizen, she says: ...on Wednesday evening, a statement from PMO—which was provided to the Ottawa Citizen—confirmed that was the case....

Then, the statement from the PMO is: Since the opposition has been unable to offer any evidence that there even was a premature disclosure of the bill during six different committee meetings, the government members on the committee have decided to oppose any motion that randomly calls anyone as part of their fishing expedition.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

We may have decided on our own.... Anyway, at this committee we have not decided—

Mr. Blake Richards:

I had actually seen another article which indicated that the Prime Minister's Office had directed the member, so—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Anyway, I believe it's—

Mr. Blake Richards:

Regardless of the fact, it seems obvious that the government itself—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'm here to correct the record.

Mr. Blake Richards:

—is looking to shut down the—

The Chair:

Blake, hold it. Ruby has the floor. Then you can respond if you want.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'd like the ability to be able to correct the record and state here before this committee today that no one has told me to vote any which way on any of these motions. Based on your arguments and what we've been presented by the witnesses who have come before us—and not just one witness, but three different witnesses, and five different positions at five meetings—we'll make our conclusion based on what we have before the committee and nothing else.

The Chair:

Is there anyone else on the point of order?

Mr. Schmale, you have the floor, since you're not finished.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Sure.

I'd like to apologize, Ruby, if I have not done my job in this last hour and a bit of convincing you. I hope to take the next—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It's an hour and 50 minutes.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

—few minutes to convince you.

Before I do, I'd like to quickly move an amendment to Mr. Richards' motion, Chair, through you.

I'd like to move that the motion be amended in its final line by deleting all words after “Committee”.

The Chair:

This is the first of Mr. Richards' five motions. It's the one on the list and the one we've been debating for two meetings. He would remove all the words right at the end of the motion, after the word “Committee”. The words being eliminated are “no later than June 21st, 2016”.

Is there any discussion on the amendment?

Sorry, the debate's now on the amendment. We can start the debate all over again on the amendment.

Now that we're starting a new debate, who would like to speak to the amendment?

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I can quickly speak if you want.

The Chair:

Jamie, do you want to be on the list? Okay.

Go ahead.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I'll just give some background on why we need to make this amendment. It's because the committee, as you know, Chair, is likely not going to be meeting between now and June 21. That makes the date in the original motion by Mr. Richards out of order. I think we need to make this change because, clearly, as I mentioned, the reasons are quite obvious.

I put that before our friends here.

(1255)

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

I have a point of order.

The Chair:

On a point of order, go ahead Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I seek your guidance, Chair.

If this amendment fails or does not carry before June 21, what then is the status of the original motion?

The Chair:

I'll ask the clerk that.

If this isn't adopted, another amendment could be moved, the clerk suggests.

Mr. David Christopherson:

In other words, it in no way becomes untimely or out of order because we surpass that date before we reach a conclusion, correct?

We're clarifying his legal position here. I'm just trying to help.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Reid, are you convinced yet?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Actually, I think I am convinced and I'm not easy to convince, I should tell you. I'm a tough customer but that was very persuasive.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You could just see it starting to happen partway through the meeting. It was quite clear. I could tell by the body language; he was nodding.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I could see the transition taking place.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson made a very good point that all the motions, actually, in theory, could lapse before the next time we're meeting on this, which is June 23. Because they're all out of date, we have to propose new motions.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The motion itself, I believe, is in order as long as this amendment is in debate. The amendment, of course, allows us to continue on past the 21st. In fact may I suggest—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Now we're going way deep into the rabbit hole.

The Chair:

Sorry?

Mr. David Christopherson:

It was nothing but a smart-ass remark that's not helpful.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm just trying to clarify your ruling, Mr. Chair. The reason I'm trying to clarify it is that obviously there are other motions as well.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I do understand that they have the same date; however, I would argue that the substance of the motions would still be important to consider. Obviously, there is an opportunity for those to be amended as well.

I would think that it would be possible for us to still carry them and just seek an amendment to them, because the substance is still important and very germane to the subject matter that we're studying on this important matter of privilege.

I would hope that they could still be moved. Obviously, there would be an amendment required.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

For greater certainty, Mr. Chair, I now move separately and severally each of the amendments that Mr. Richards moved, with the change that the words “no later than June 21, 2016” be dropped. Please consider those to have been moved.

(1300)

The Chair:

Can we do that?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm happy to read them into the record if you wish.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid, the clerk informs me you can't move an amendment to motions that aren't before the floor, and our time is up.

Mr. Scott Reid:

No, I'm not moving amendments. I'm actually moving motions that are identical in wording, except that the words after “Committee” in the last line are not contained in each of those. I'd be happy to read them into the record.

The Chair:

Are you moving new motions?

Mr. Scott Reid:

They would be new motions.

The Chair:

The clerk informs me that you cannot move more motions while there's a motion on the floor under debate.

Our time is up, but my initial prima facie ruling would be that Mr. Reid made a good point on this motion, and that because the amendment's on the floor, that would make it timely. That's eligible. I'll consult further, but it appears to me that the others will have expired. We're still within the time limit though, so you could just resubmit them without those last words. With the 48 hours, you have lots of time.

Is everyone set with that?

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous. La séance est ouverte.

C'est la 29e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. La réunion est publique.

J'aimerais vous donner quelques informations. La réunion prévue pour mardi à 11 heures va se tenir dans l'édifice temporaire, celui qui se trouve au milieu de la Colline lorsqu'on va de l'édifice de la Confédération à l'édifice du Centre. Vous recevrez un avis par la greffière. Nous nous rencontrerons là à l'heure habituelle. Il y aura une séance d'information, d'abord au sujet de la sécurité et ensuite, au sujet du projet. Vous mettrez vos vêtements de sécurité, etc., et nous ferons ensuite la visite. Si les gens pensent vouloir poser davantage de questions après la visite ou s'il y a des députés qui veulent recevoir davantage d'information, nous pourrons décider ensuite ce que nous voulons faire, si toutes les questions n'ont pas obtenu de réponses au cours de la visite.

Allez-y, monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Je pense que, si le Parlement ajourne ses travaux avant mardi, la visite n'aura pas lieu. Savons-nous...

Le président:

C'est une bonne question.

Cela dépendra de nous. Si le Parlement devait cesser de siéger avant mardi, ce qui serait magnifique, est-ce que vous voulez quand même faire la visite ou non? Ce n'est pas une séance officielle, je propose donc de la faire quand même pour ceux que cela intéresse, en particulier pour ceux qui habitent à Ottawa?

Cela vous convient-il? Vous avez toutefois soulevé un point tout à fait pertinent.

M. Blake Richards:

J'ai posé la question parce que je sais que certains députés seront ici et que ce serait une excellente chose pour eux. Ceux qui ne seront pas ici seront déçus, mais je pense qu'il serait tout à fait acceptable de la faire quand même. Peut-être que d'autres membres du Comité ont des opinions différentes. Je n'en sais rien.

Le président:

Personne ne s'oppose, de sorte que, si le Parlement ajourne ses travaux, nous ferons quand même la visite pour ceux qui seront là.

Allez-y, monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Je pense que le Parlement va siéger mardi, mais si ce n'était pas le cas, je mentionnerais que c'est notre comité qui surveille ces travaux de façon permanente de sorte qu'il serait tout à fait approprié de faire une autre visite en automne, quelles que soient les circonstances.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Bonne remarque.

Le président:

Nous ferons la visite si la Chambre ne siège pas, si les députés veulent la faire.

J'ai mentionné aux différents partis que nous avions reçu une lettre qui, par courtoisie, appelle une réponse avant l'été. Nous allons distribuer l'analyse de cette lettre de façon électronique et j'espère que nous pourrons y répondre avant l'été. Cela se ferait à huis clos, pour protéger la vie privée de la personne concernée.

Nous allons reprendre l'examen de la motion de M. Richards, au sujet de l'étude de la question de privilège relative au projet de loi C-14. C'est la motion que nous examinions au cours de notre séance précédente.

Je ne vois pas de mains levées de sorte que je note que M. Schmale était au milieu d'un long discours qu'il n'avait pas tout à fait terminé et qu'il aimerait poursuivre. Après cela, il y a encore M. Richards et M. Reid sur la liste.

Allez-y, monsieur Schmale.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Merci.

M. Reid a déclaré, avant la séance, qu'il trouvait mes arguments intéressants, mais que je ne l'avais pas encore tout à fait convaincu; j'ai donc pensé que je prendrais ce temps de parole pour essayer de le convaincre.

Le président:

Allez-y et essayez de convaincre M. Reid.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Monsieur le président, j'ai pensé que c'était la chose à faire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur le président, j'invoque le Règlement. J'aimerais simplement être sûr que M. Reid va nous dire qu'il est finalement convaincu, lorsqu'il le sera.

M. Scott Reid:

Probablement pas avant 13 heures. Secouez-moi un peu, réveillez-moi et je vous le dirai.

Le président:

Avez-vous de nouveaux précédents à nous signaler, monsieur Reid?

M. Scott Reid:

Ce sont des précédents anciens, mais c'est grâce à ma recherche qu'ils ont été découverts récemment...

M. Blake Richards:

Si je me fie à la pile de documents qui se trouvent devant M. Schmale, je dirais qu'il n'aura peut-être pas la possibilité de nous parler de précédents, parce qu'il y a vraiment beaucoup de documents qu'il semble être sur le point de...

Le président:

Si vous quittez tous la salle, je vous enverrai un courriel lorsque M. Schmale aura terminé.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président: Jamie, vous avez la parole. Vous avez là beaucoup de papier, alors nous sommes très intéressés.

M. Jamie Schmale:

J'ai beaucoup d'eau, de papier... Nous verrons comment vont les choses.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais reprendre là où j'en étais resté; nous parlions de l'importance de poursuivre cette enquête. Nous avons une directive du Président. Nous essayons de convaincre tous les membres du Comité que la motion de M. Richards s'appuie sur des précédents et qu'il faut donc la poursuivre.

Je dois mentionner que ces mots n'ont pas été choisis au hasard. Ce sont ceux de la ministre de la Justice qui nous demande de poursuivre cette étude. Nous estimons qu'en obtenant cette liste, nous pourrons poursuivre notre enquête.

En tant que journaliste, j'aimerais parler d'un certain nombre de choses, notamment du fait que deux nouvelles — l'article de Laura Stone dans le Globe and Mail et le National de CBC le lendemain — contenaient des détails assez précis et étaient formulées de façon très convaincante, ce qui montre qu'il s'agissait de faits et non pas de spéculations de journalistes.

Je vais citer rapidement des passages des « Principes de l'éthique journalistique » de l'Association canadienne des journalistes. Les journalistes ont le devoir et le privilège de rechercher la vérité, de la faire connaître, d'encourager les débats pour mieux souder nos collectivités et de servir l'intérêt public. Nous défendons vigoureusement la liberté d'expression et la liberté de la presse, telles que garanties par la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés. Nous répondons à la confiance que la société place en nous en pratiquant notre profession de façon responsable et en respectant les droits de nos concitoyens.

Je crois que c'est le premier point « Nous recherchons l'exactitude et l'impartialité » qui s'applique à notre débat. La citation se poursuit ainsi: Nous refusons de laisser nos préjugés influencer notre travail. Nous divulguons les conflits d'intérêts. Nous offrons aux personnes, sociétés ou organisations que nous critiquons la possibilité de présenter leurs points de vue avant de publier ces critiques. Nous respectons les droits civils des citoyens, y compris le droit au respect de la vie privée et à un procès équitable. Nous ne modifions pas les photos, les vidéos ou le son de façon à tromper le public.

Passons maintenant à ces nouvelles. Encore une fois, je reviens à l'expression « d'après une de nos sources », écrit Laura Stone dans le Globe and Mail et « d'après une de nos sources, qui n'est pas autorisée à parler publiquement du projet de loi ».

Passons ensuite à l'émission The National de la CBC le 13 avril: « Des sources ont déclaré à la CBC... ».

Là encore, ce ne sont pas des spéculations de journalistes. Ce sont des mots qui relatent des faits, et bien entendu, le journaliste n'agirait pas de cette façon, puisqu'il doit normalement s'efforcer de viser l'exactitude et l'impartialité. Je suis un ancien journaliste et je sais qu'il y a d'autres anciens journalistes dans cette salle, et je peux dire que c'est la formulation qui est importante. S'il s'agissait d'une simple spéculation, on ne dirait pas « Des sources ont déclaré à CBC », et on ne dirait pas que cette mesure législative aura tel ou tel effet. C'est un aspect très important.

Pour revenir aux principes, les journalistes sont « indépendants et transparents ». Ils « n'accordent pas un traitement de faveur aux annonceurs ou aux intérêts particuliers ». Ils « n'acceptent pas, ni ne demandent, de cadeaux ou de faveurs de ceux dont ils parlent ». D'autres principes suivent: Nous ne parlons pas de sujets dans lesquels nous avons un intérêt financier. Nous ne participons pas aux mouvements et aux activités que nous couvrons. Les comités de rédaction, les chroniqueurs ou les commentateurs peuvent appuyer des causes politiques ou des candidats. Les journalistes ne le font pas.

Et c'est ici que cela touche ce que nous faisons ici: D'une façon générale, nous ne dissimulons pas notre identité. Lorsque, cas exceptionnel, un journaliste doit agir « secrètement » dans l'intérêt public, nous en fournissons clairement les raisons.

Il est évident que ce n'est pas ce qui s'est passé dans les cas dont je parlais, l'émission The National de CBC et l'article de Laura Stone dans le Globe and Mail. Lorsque l'on parle à une source, il est évident que celle-ci n'est pas identifiée. C'est un aspect que nous acceptons et qui est essentiel si l'on veut continuer à travailler comme journaliste, mais là encore, il ressort de la formulation que les journalistes ont eu des conversations avec quelqu'un — avec une personne qui avait accès à ce projet de loi.

Dans ce cas-ci, nous essayons de trouver la source de cette fuite et d'après le témoignage que nous a fourni directement la ministre de la Justice, il semble qu'une bonne façon de commencer ou de poursuivre cette enquête, monsieur le président, est de chercher à savoir qui avait accès à ces documents. C'est pourquoi il est extrêmement important de voir cette liste.

Je vais poursuivre encore un peu et je relierai tout cela ensemble.

(1110)



Encore une citation tirée de l'Association canadienne des journalistes: Nous respectons nos promesses Nous identifions nos sources d'information, sauf lorsqu'il existe un motif clair et urgent de les protéger [les sources].

Il existe un motif évident pour que l'anonymat de leurs sources soit conservé. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous ne savons vraiment pas qui est cette source, parce que celle-ci était tenue de ne pas divulguer le texte de ce projet de loi.

On lit ensuite, « Nous expliquons pourquoi l'anonymat est nécessaire lorsque nous l'accordons ». Ce n'est évidemment pas le cas ici, mais c'est ce que nous devons faire. Nous corroborons de façon indépendante les faits communiqués par des sources anonymes. Si nous promettons de protéger l'identité d'une source, nous le faisons.

Tout cela est tiré de l'Association canadienne des journalistes.

Bien évidemment, nous ne nous attendons pas à ce que Laura Stone ou les responsables de l'émission The National de CBC divulguent leurs sources; c'est donc à nous de poursuivre cette enquête. Ces déclarations ont-elles été faites avant que le Parlement ait eu la possibilité de voir le document? Encore une fois, on retrouve des termes très clairs dans ces articles.

En tant que journaliste moi-même, il m'est arrivé très souvent d'avoir des sources qui étaient disposées à laisser sortir une nouvelle un peu à l'avance, parce que cela leur permettait de formuler la question de la façon qui leur convenait. C'est une façon de présenter certains sujets qui peuvent être ou ne pas être controversés. Dans ce cas-ci, et si vous lisez ces informations, c'est effectivement ce qui s'est passé, elles présentent la question de la façon souhaitée.

Le but était clairement d'orienter la discussion dans la direction que souhaitait le gouvernement. C'est un projet de loi très controversé. C'est un projet de loi qui suscite des réactions très vives. C'est un projet de loi d'une importance considérable parce qu'il touche à peu près tous les Canadiens. Il serait difficile d'affirmer que ce ne serait pas une bonne stratégie de sortir cette nouvelle ou de diriger le débat dans une certaine direction... Je pense que c'était une excellente stratégie de communication.

Il y a toutefois des détails très précis qui semblent indiquer que le texte a été communiqué avant que le Parlement l'ait vu. Si nous en restons là et disons: « Eh bien, je crois que nous avons posé la question à la ministre de la Justice. Elle a répondu que non. Nous la croyons de sorte qu'il faut en rester là », alors comment empêcher que cela se reproduise? Comment mettre fin à ce genre de chose?

Ces informations contiennent des éléments qui indiquent très clairement que des éléments précis ont été communiqués et qu'ils n'ont pas été transmis au cours d'une conversation normale ou que c'est un journaliste qui a tout simplement imaginé des choses. Si l'on revient au code de déontologie de l'Association canadienne des journalistes, on constate qu'il parle d'exactitude. C'est l'aspect qui touche le cas qui nous intéresse, parce que, oui, je crois que c'était très précis: Il nous incombe d'essayer de vérifier tous les faits. L'exactitude est un impératif moral pour les journalistes et les organismes d'information et celle-ci ne devrait jamais être compromise, même avec les heures de tombée qui ponctuent le cycle des nouvelles en continu.

Monsieur le président, je répète qu'il y a là des détails extrêmement précis. On a fait remarquer qu'il y avait un élément qui ne se retrouvait pas dans le projet de loi mais, comme l'ont dit M. Reid et M. Richards, au cours d'une conversation ou d'une discussion entre deux personnes, si le journaliste prenait des notes à la main, la façon traditionnelle, il est possible qu'une erreur mineure se soit glissée dans ce compte rendu. Mais pour le reste, il semble que les choses soient assez claires. Nous recherchons des documents pour garantir la fiabilité de nos sources et de l'information et nous distinguons soigneusement les affirmations des faits. Il nous incombe à nous [les journalistes] de vérifier toutes les informations, même lorsqu'elles arrivent au dernier moment.

(1115)



Monsieur le président, je crois que c'est bien ce qu'ont fait ces journalistes avec l'information publiée dans le Globe and Mail et dans l'émission The National. Si l'on examine les deux versions, on constate combien elles se ressemblent dans les moindres détails; encore une fois, monsieur le président, cela veut dire que ces journalistes ne sont pas en train de faire des devinettes parce que leurs versions seraient bien différentes. Les termes utilisés transmettent la même nouvelle.

Monsieur le président, pourquoi renoncer? Pourquoi mettre un terme à cette enquête? Pourquoi, monsieur le président, ne pas demander une liste détaillée? Pourquoi ne pas enquêter davantage?

Il y a aussi beaucoup d'anciens attachés politiques à cette table. Je peux m'imaginer, si nous découvrions qui est cette personne, qu'elle est peut-être en train de suivre de très près notre réunion et de se demander si nous allons arriver à quelque chose. « Vont-ils réussir à trouver cette liste et à savoir qui je suis? » En tant qu'ancien attaché politique, si j'étais la source de cette fuite, je crois que je serais très inquiet.

Le président a fait remarquer que la ministre de la Justice a déclaré avoir demandé à ses collaborateurs, à son sous-ministre, de faire une enquête. Ses collaborateurs ont affirmé que ce n'était pas eux. Le sous-ministre a affirmé qu'ils avaient examiné la liste des personnes qui étaient en possession du projet de loi et il a dit que ce n'était pas ces personnes.

Voilà la comparaison que je fais avec le hockey. Si j'étais arbitre, je suis sûr que le joueur à qui je donnerais une pénalité dirait qu'il n'a rien fait. Je pourrais bien répéter que la pénalité était justifiée, que c'était la bonne décision, mais tout le monde dira le contraire. Je ne le leur reproche pas. C'est ce qui se fait.

C'est la raison pour laquelle nous faisons cette enquête... et j'espère que je vais réussir à convaincre les gens de l'autre côté de la table.

(1120)

M. Scott Reid:

Vous commencez à me convaincre.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je commence à convaincre M. Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous ne faites que commencer à le faire. J'ai besoin de plus de faits.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Vous voulez davantage de faits. Très bien.

M. Scott Reid:

Je pense qu'il serait bon de disposer de davantage de documents primaires.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je suis vraiment heureux que vous ayez dit cela, monsieur Reid, parce que regardez la masse de documents que j'ai à vous présenter.

Regardez ce que j'ai à faire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

M. Reid est-il enfin convaincu?

Une voix: Je ne pense pas qu'il le soit. Il a l'air très sceptique.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Il a dit qu'il commençait à l'être.

M. Scott Reid:

Je suis intrigué par tout cela, comme tout le monde je crois.

Une voix: Est-ce qu'il n'a pas parlé de moutons et de vaches la dernière fois?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Du bétail comme la super catégorie des animaux.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je vais voir si je peux introduire quelque chose ici.

M. Blake Richards:

Si vous utilisez le hockey, alors il faudrait faire aussi quelque chose avec le sirop d'érable, la GRC, des choses de ce genre, pour que vous soyez vraiment Canadien.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Très bien. J'aime bien ça.

Je vais devoir me ressaisir. Je n'ai pas beaucoup dormi la nuit dernière. Ma fenêtre était ouverte et j'habite un quartier bruyant. Il y a un chat qui a miaulé toute la nuit, sans arrêt. Cela m'a laissé beaucoup de temps pour réfléchir, si je peux retrouver le fil de mes idées.

Je vais poursuivre en citant les lignes directrices déontologiques de l'Association canadienne des journalistes « Nous veillons à conserver le contexte original de toutes les citations ou extraits, pour ainsi tenter de transmettre le ton original » que nous voyons dans ces informations. « Notre information ou nos extraits ne vont pas modifier le sens d'une déclaration ou supprimer des nuances importantes ».

Cela se trouve dans les lignes directrices déontologiques, c'est là; les journalistes ne changent pas le sens ou les déclarations. Regardez les informations. Si ce n'est pas une fuite, pourquoi est-ce que ces informations se ressemblent autant? Pourquoi est-ce que la formulation des deux nouvelles contient des énoncés de faits et non de simples hypothèses?

Je vais citer une déclaration qui remonte au 19 mars 2001. À l'époque, le Président s'était prononcé sur une question de privilège concernant un cas où une séance d'information avait été donnée aux médias au sujet d'un projet de loi de la Justice — le projet de loi C-15, avant qu'il soit transmis aux députés. Le Président avait déclaré que ce cas soulevait deux questions importantes: « le breffage sous embargo à l'intention des journalistes et la question de l'accès à l'information dont les députés ont besoin pour remplir leurs fonctions ».

Dans cette décision, le Président a déclaré: Pour préparer ses mesures législatives, le gouvernement peut souhaiter tenir de larges consultations, et il est tout à fait libre de le faire. Mais lorsqu'il s'agit de documents à présenter au Parlement, la Chambre doit avoir préséance. La convention de la confidentialité des projets de loi inscrite au Feuilleton est nécessaire non seulement pour que les députés eux-mêmes soient bien informés, mais aussi en raison du rôle capital que la Chambre joue, et doit jouer, dans les affaires du pays... Ne pas fournir aux députés des informations sur une affaire dont la Chambre doit être saisie, tout en les fournissant à des journalistes qui les interrogeront vraisemblablement sur cette question, est une situation que la présidence ne saurait tolérer.

Monsieur le président, je pense que nous nous trouvons dans une situation de ce genre.

Ce projet de loi est probablement le projet de loi le plus important sur lequel je serais amené à voter pendant cette session, cette législature et, si mes électeurs souhaitent me renvoyer ici, ce qu'ils feront, je l'espère, probablement pendant toute ma carrière. Aucun projet de loi n'aura une portée aussi considérable que celui-ci.

Je tiens à mentionner que j'ai fait un référendum dans ma circonscription au sujet du projet de loi C-14. Soixante-dix-huit pour cent des quelque 4 000 bulletins reçus étaient favorables au projet de loi C-14. J'ai bien aimé l'expérience de faire ce référendum et de consulter les électeurs. Monsieur le président, ma circonscription n'est pas aussi vaste que la vôtre, mais la Chambre siégeait à cette époque et c'était une façon de consulter un grand nombre d'électeurs dans une région de taille moyenne ou petite dans un délai très court et de me faire ainsi une bonne idée de ce que pensaient mes électeurs. Ils ont tous eu, quelle que soit leur opinion, la possibilité de me dire comment voter. Les commentaires étaient très variés et de très bonne qualité. Les gens me disaient de voter oui ou non en me fondant sur toutes sortes de raisons, le fait qu'ils avaient vu un membre de leur famille souffrir...

(1125)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Comment avez-vous voté?

M. Jamie Schmale:

J'ai voté oui.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oh, voilà qui est intéressant. Vous avez écouté vos électeurs.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Oui, j'ai écouté mes électeurs. En fait, je ne savais pas trop à quoi m'attendre avec ce référendum. Je n'en avais jamais fait. Je me suis inspiré de ce qu'avait fait M. Reid, qui en a fait sept ou huit.

M. Scott Reid:

Sept.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je vais sans doute en faire d'autres.

M. Blake Richards:

Il aime les référendums.

M. Jamie Schmale:

J'aime les référendums.

M. Scott Reid:

Je suis un partisan des référendums. Je porte mon drapeau suisse aujourd'hui...

M. Jamie Schmale:

Oui, c'est exact. Ils en ont fait un, c'était une bonne idée.

M. Scott Reid:

... en honneur du profond respect que ressentent les Suisses pour la démocratie.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Oui. Voilà qui est bien.

En fait, je vais poursuivre dans cette direction.

Merci, monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Je vous en prie.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Pour parler de consultation, le gouvernement aime consulter, alors faisons-le. Consultons. Continuons à examiner la question.

Nous sommes saisis tous les jours de différentes questions et de ce côté de la Chambre, il y a des réponses qui sont assez évidentes, comme le Partenariat transpacifique ou la question du pipeline, la construction de nouveaux pipelines pour commercialiser notre pétrole. Il semble facile de dire oui.

Dans ce cas-ci, je crois qu'il est également facile de dire oui. Nous essayons simplement de convaincre l'autre côté. Nous continuons à essayer de le faire. Nous allons y parvenir, alors consultons. Nous aimons tous consulter alors continuons à le faire. Continuons à creuser. Continuons à creuser et à enquêter. Il y a beaucoup de façons de le faire.

Lorsqu'on travaille comme journaliste, on parle la plupart du temps avec le personnel, parfois avec le personnel de la direction des communications. C'est pourquoi il est important de mentionner, comme l'a fait M. Richards la dernière fois, que nous ne demandons pas au premier ministre de comparaître, parce que nous sommes à peu près certains que ce n'était pas lui. C'était un de ses attachés, probablement quelqu'un du service des communications, et c'est pourquoi la motion demande au personnel des communications de se présenter, parce que c'est probablement par là qu'il faut commencer.

On transmet souvent des informations à un journaliste. Elles viennent du service des communications parce que c'est avec ce service que vous travaillez. C'est un nouveau gouvernement qui veut avoir de bonnes relations avec les journalistes. Je dirais que la plupart des membres du personnel politique — je me base sur ce que j'ai lu ou sur les gens que j'ai connus — ont, dans l'ensemble, des formations variées ou viennent de différentes provinces et connaissent bien les gouvernements provinciaux. Mais en même temps, la plupart de ces relations sont récentes. Ils veulent cultiver ces relations et ils veulent qu'elles se renforcent.

Comment le font-ils? Eh bien, ils donnent sans doute un peu plus d'information qu'ils ne devraient le faire. Si je me base sur l'exactitude de l'information, je ne pense pas qu'il y ait eu une conversation autour d'un verre. Cela allait un peu plus loin. Nous allons savoir ce qui s'est vraiment passé.

Suis-je suffisamment convaincant?

(1130)

M. Scott Reid:

Je prends des notes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Sur quoi?

M. Jamie Schmale:

Il est prêt à se décider.

M. Scott Reid:

Puis-je poser une brève question?

Le président:

Allez-y.

M. Scott Reid:

Cela a trait à une des choses que vous avez mentionnée plus tôt. Avant de passer à d'autres aspects, j'aimerais approfondir ce point.

Il a cité textuellement l'article du Globe and Mail et également, l'émission de la CBC. Il est vrai que les contenus sont très proches mais la formulation semble indiquer, d'après moi, qu'il s'agit peut-être de deux fuites différentes.

Il semble peu probable que quelqu'un ait dit à Laura Stone et au responsable de l'émission de la CBC: « Venez dans cette pièce, nous allons faire un appel conférence! » CBC ne cite pas le Globe and Mail pour dire que c'est sa source, ni le contraire. C'est ce qui m'amène à penser qu'il y a eu probablement deux fuites. Jusqu'ici, nous avons considéré qu'il n'y avait qu'une seule fuite. Il se peut qu'il n'y ait qu'une source pour cette fuite, ne vous méprenez pas, mais il est possible qu'il y ait deux cas d'outrage différents, si je peux m'exprimer ainsi, qui ont été regroupés pour plus de commodité en un seul. Je me demande si M. Schmale pourrait me dire un peu ce qu'il pense de cet aspect.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Oui, en fait c'est une excellente remarque. Cela fait référence à mon commentaire précédent au sujet de la façon dont les journalistes essaient de pénétrer dans les ministères, en particulier lorsqu'il s'agit d'un nouveau gouvernement. Le personnel du service des communications essaie d'établir des relations et si l'on veut les développer rapidement, c'est une façon de créer un climat de confiance, en particulier, compte tenu de l'ampleur de ce projet de loi et du nombre de gens qu'il va toucher.

Il est possible que les ministères ne sachent pas ce que font les uns et les autres, quelles sont les conversations qui se tiennent et quelles sont les personnes qui y participent. Vous avez tout à fait raison. CBC ne cite pas le Globe and Mail. Cela veut-il dire que nous avons deux sources? Est-ce qu'il y en a une seule qui semble aimer parler aux journalistes de mesures législatives qui n'ont pas encore été déposées et dont ils ne devraient pas normalement parler.

C'est la raison pour laquelle il est très important d'obtenir cette liste. La ministre de la Justice nous a montré cette voie. C'est la ministre qui nous a elle-même indiqué cette direction.

Poursuivons la conversation, alors. Consultons. Trouvons les gens qui ont pu avoir accès au projet de loi. Nous trouverons peut-être alors quelque chose que nous n'avons pas encore trouvé.

Je dis à M. Reid qu'il a parfaitement raison de dire qu'il y a peut-être eu en fait deux sources. C'est une question plus vaste, parce qu'il s'agit alors de deux personnes qui parlent d'une mesure législative qui n'a pas encore été présentée à la Chambre, et que les législateurs n'ont pas encore vue.

M. Scott Reid:

Si vous permettez, monsieur le président...?

Le président:

Oui, allez-y.

M. Scott Reid:

Si j'ose m'exprimer ainsi, cela sous-entend effectivement la coordination. De fait, je ne peux imaginer aucun scénario logique dans lequel, s'il y a plus d'une personne divulguant les renseignements, il n'y aurait pas coordination, ce qui, à franchement parler, pointe davantage dans le sens d'une stratégie délibérée d'un acteur politique, un fonctionnaire élu qui, en bout de ligne, occupe un poste décisionnaire ici. L'idée que deux personnes divulguent, simultanément et indépendamment, des renseignements aux médias comportant un choix de faits identiques dépasse l'entendement.

(1135)

M. Jamie Schmale:

J'en conviens, parce que comme nous l'avons dit, comment une personne qui voudrait orienter le débat sur une question d'une telle envergure s'y prendrait-elle? Elle s'y est prise très bien, à mon avis. Le problème est que cette ou ces personnes ont communiqué des détails importants au sujet d'un projet de loi qui n'avait pas encore été déposé à la Chambre des communes, ce qui est la raison pour laquelle nous débattons de la question et, avec un peu d'espoir, arriverons à un consensus sur cette motion.

Le président:

Avons-nous d'autres questions pour le témoin?

M. Jamie Schmale:

Y a-t-il plus de consultations encore que je pourrais faire? Je dispose d'une grande quantité de renseignements qui, j'espère, convaincront tout le monde ici.

Je vais parler des privilèges et immunités décrits dans l'ouvrage intitulé La procédure et les usages de la Chambre des communes, deuxième édition, 2009. Cela se rapporte à ceux dont nous parlons ici. Les droits accordés à la Chambre et à ses députés pour qu’ils puissent exercer leurs fonctions parlementaires sans entraves sont appelés privilèges ou immunités. De nos jours, le terme « privilège » implique habituellement l’idée d’une « classe privilégiée », d’une personne ou d’un groupe qui jouit d’immunités ou de droits particuliers au-delà de ce qui est normalement consenti aux autres citoyens. Le privilège parlementaire s’applique plutôt aux droits et immunités jugés nécessaires pour permettre à la Chambre des communes, en tant qu’institution, et à ses députés, en tant que représentants de l’électorat, d’exercer leurs fonctions. Il désigne également les pouvoirs dont la Chambre est investie pour se protéger, ainsi que ses députés et ses procédures, d’une ingérence indue et s’acquitter efficacement de ses principales fonctions, à savoir légiférer, délibérer et demander des comptes au gouvernement. En ce sens, on peut considérer le privilège parlementaire comme l’indépendance dont ont besoin le Parlement et ses membres pour accomplir leur travail sans entraves.

Voilà où nous en sommes. Apparemment, nous avons tous vu l'article; sommes-nous « sans entraves »? Nous avons eu un avant-goût de ce qui se trouvait dans le projet de loi avant que celui-ci ne soit déposé; c'était pratique. Sommes-nous, donc, sans entraves? Eh bien, non, je ne le crois pas. On peut voir clairement que nous avons reçu des détails avant qu'ils ne soient même déposés à la Chambre. Le privilège est depuis longtemps une caractéristique importante de notre tradition parlementaire. En matière de privilège parlementaire, les usages et précédents de la Chambre des communes du Canada remontent aux premiers temps de l’ère coloniale. S’inspirant de Westminster, les jeunes assemblées des colonies ne tardèrent pas à revendiquer les privilèges de la Chambre britannique, sans pouvoir toutefois se référer à une loi particulière. Avec la Confédération, les privilèges de la Chambre britannique furent appliqués au Parlement du Canada par la Loi constitutionnelle de 1867 et, pendant de nombreuses années, la Chambre canadienne continua de prendre la Chambre britannique comme guide en matière de privilège parlementaire.

Dans l'article, la formulation indiquait clairement que « des sources informent Radio-Canada que la loi ne portera pas... »; nous voyons là, monsieur le président, l'atteinte au privilège. Nous voyons que, dans son témoignage, la ministre de la Justice nous a elle-même orientés dans cette direction, et M. Richards a demandé clairement comment nous pourrions mener cette enquête autrement. C'était elle-même qui nous a donné des indications sur la façon de donner suite à cela, parce que je crois qu'elle prend les choses très au sérieux. Je crois sincèrement cela, et je la remercie de son témoignage. Je la remercie d'avoir comparu. Qu'elle l'ait fait a été très important. Je crois que c'était très important qu'elle soit venue nous parler et mettre les choses au clair, parce que c'est ce qu'elle a fait, à mon avis. J'apprécie son aide dans l'orientation qu'elle nous a donnée pour que nous poursuivions notre travail à titre de membres de ce comité.

Pour ceux d'entre vous qui pourraient avoir besoin d'un peu plus de renseignements sur la définition de privilège et la raison pour laquelle il est si important, je cite la définition de privilège parlementaire qui se trouve dans l'ouvrage La procédure et les usages de la Chambre des communes: Le privilège parlementaire est la somme des droits particuliers à chaque chambre, collectivement, […] et aux membres de chaque chambre individuellement, faute desquels il leur serait impossible de s’acquitter de leurs fonctions. Ces droits dépassent ceux dont sont investis d’autres organismes ou particuliers. On est donc fondé à affirmer que, bien qu’il s’insère dans l’ensemble des lois, le privilège n’en constitue pas moins, en quelque sorte, une dérogation au droit commun.

O'Brien et Bosc poursuivent en disant: On peut répartir en deux catégories les « droits particuliers » en question: ceux accordés aux parlementaires individuellement et ceux dont jouit la Chambre à titre collectif. Chaque catégorie peut à son tour être subdivisée. On regroupe habituellement sous les rubriques suivantes les droits et immunités accordés aux parlementaires à titre individuel: la liberté de parole; l’immunité d’arrestation dans les affaires civiles; l’exemption du devoir de juré;

(1140)



Il y en a beaucoup d'autres et je suis tout à fait disposé à commenter ceux-ci également.

Revenons maintenant à la phrase « Le privilège parlementaire est la somme des droits particuliers à chaque chambre, collectivement, […] et aux membres de chaque chambre individuellement, faute desquels il leur serait impossible de s’acquitter de leurs fonctions ».

Nous avons ici un article qui nous présente des détails très précis de ce qui ne figurera pas dans un projet de loi d'une importance énorme pour tous le pays. Pourquoi les journalistes ont-ils eu l'information? Et cela nous ramène à ce que M. Reid disait, à savoir s'il s'agit d'une seule fuite, d'une seule source. Ou s'agit-il de deux sources? C'est possible. S'il s'agit de deux sources, c'est sur un problème encore plus gros que nous devons faire enquête. On a intérêt à aller au fond des choses, parce que si l'on permet que ceci se produire... c'est presque comme l'enfant. Il ne faut pas récompenser le mauvais comportement; donc, si nous arrêtons, récompensons-nous le mauvais comportement? Sommes-nous en train d'aller jusqu'au bout de cette question? Je dis que si nous ne le faisons pas, le membre du personnel pourrait s'exclamer: « Oh, j'ai réussi sans conséquence. Bon, ce projet de loi semble être très important et la presse a soif de détails; donc, où est le mal? De toute évidence, ils n'iront pas plus loin. Ils entendront peut-être un témoin, puis concluront en disant qu'ils ont fait leur travail et ça n'ira pas plus loin. »

Comment cela corrige-t-il le problème? On récompense un mauvais comportement en disant que c'est assez, même si la ministre de la Justice nous a orientés, nous a indiqué la voie à suivre, nous a donné une idée de ce que nous devons faire.

J'aimerais parler un peu de l'historique du privilège, et de la façon dont cela nous concerne. Là encore, cela est tiré de l'ouvrage La procédure et les usages de la Chambre des communes, deuxième édition, 2009. Les privilèges parlementaires ont été revendiqués pour la première fois il y a plusieurs siècles, lorsque la Chambre des communes tentait, en Angleterre, de se donner un rôle distinct au sein du Parlement. À ses débuts, le Parlement faisait fonction de tribunal plutôt que d’assemblée législative, et c’est dans ce contexte que sont nés les privilèges parlementaires. On estimait à l’époque que ces privilèges étaient nécessaires afin de protéger la Chambre et ses députés, non pas du peuple, mais du pouvoir et de l’ingérence du roi ainsi que de la Chambre des lords. Avec le temps, la Chambre des communes s’est vu reconnaître le rôle et le pouvoir d’une assemblée délibérante, ses privilèges étant établis comme partie intégrante de la common law du royaume. La Chambre des communes du Canada n’eut pas à s’opposer à la Couronne, à l’exécutif ou à la chambre haute de la même manière que les Communes britanniques.

C'est logique, bien sûr. Les privilèges de celles-ci furent officiellement appliqués au Parlement canadien, au moment de la Confédération, par la Loi constitutionnelle de 1867, et énoncés dans une loi qui est devenue la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada. Néanmoins, les privilèges dont jouissent la Chambre et ses députés sont extrêmement importants; de fait, ils jouent un rôle vital dans la bonne marche du Parlement. Cela est aussi vrai aujourd’hui qu’il y a des siècles, à l’époque où les Communes britanniques luttaient pour obtenir ces droits et privilèges.

Monsieur le président, cela est aussi vrai aujourd'hui qu'il y a des siècles, et pour une très bonne raison, comme on vient de le voir.

Il y a eu deux articles, très semblables sur le plan des détails, une source, peut-être deux. Ces articles indiquaient clairement qu'ils avaient une source. Ce sont des déclarations de faits. Je trouve inconcevable que nous continuions à dire: « C'est assez, balayons tout ça sous le tapis, et ça va aller. »

(1145)



Cette fin de semaine, je retourne dans ma circonscription et je vais assister à une panoplie d'événements. Il peut y avoir des gens qui savent ce qui se passe, d'autres pas, mais je crois qu'on peut demander à n'importe qui, dans n'importe quel milieu de travail, ce qu'ils feraient si un document confidentiel était divulgué. Abandonneraient-ils simplement l'enquête? Continueraient-ils à chercher jusqu'à ce qu'ils puissent trouver la source? Poursuivraient-ils l'enquête? Ils trouveraient peut-être la source, ou ils ne la trouveraient peut-être pas. S'ils ne la trouvaient pas, mettraient-ils en place des mécanismes visant à éviter que cela se reproduise?

Je crois que personne ne dirait: « Abandonnons après un témoin. » Je ne peux pas imaginer que quelqu'un dise que cela suffit. Si nous nous déclarons simplement satisfaits, cela créera un très mauvais précédent.

Nous prenons en compte le mandat du PROC. Nous examinons les différents comités du Cabinet. Il y en a 57. Nous avons fait la recherche. J'aimerais remercier mon personnel d'avoir fait cette recherche et de m'avoir aidé.

La ministre de la Justice nous a fait entendre qu'elle et son personnel n'étaient pas responsables de la fuite. Regardons maintenant qui aurait pu avoir accès. Selon la ministre de la Justice, tant le CPM que la ministre de la Santé et leur personnel avaient accès.

Jetons un coup d'oeil sur le cabinet de la ministre de la Santé. Faisons simplement une liste, et voyons où cela va nous mener. Je m'excuse d'avance pour les noms que je déforme: Danielle Boyle, adjointe exécutive à la chef de cabinet; Robert Brown, agent principal de projets; Peter Cleary, directeur aux affaires parlementaires; David Clements, directeur des communications; Jordan Crosby, adjoint au secrétaire parlementaire; Cindy Dawson, adjointe à l'agenda de la ministre; Adam Exton, adjoint spécial aux affaires parlementaires; Geneviève Hinse, chef de cabinet; Jesse Kancir, conseiller en politiques; Mark Livingstone, adjoint spécial pour la région de l'Atlantique; Janet MacDonald, liaison ministérielle ACIA; Andrew MacKendrick, attaché de presse — je crois que celui-ci est plutôt important —; Kathryn Nowers, conseillère en politiques; Caroline Pitfield, directrice des politiques; Jennifer Saxe, liaison ministérielle avec la Chambre des communes; Mark Thompson, chauffeur — je dirais probablement non pour lui — et Lydia Turpin, réceptionniste.

M. Scott Reid:

Je suis du même avis.

Je crois que si nous recevons un jour la liste de diffusion, je suis pas mal certain que M. Thompson n'y figurerait pas. C'est une supposition, mais je pense bien avoir raison.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je suis d'accord, monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Le CPM compte 57 membres du personnel. Il y en a 17 dans le cabinet de la ministre de la Santé, et cela ne comprend pas les fonctionnaires qui auraient pu aussi avoir accès.

Passons en revue les membres du personnel du CPM, parce qu'il en compte 57. Nous ne savons pas à quels comités du Cabinet le projet de loi est allé. Voilà pourquoi il est si important d'obtenir cette liste, parce qu'il y a beaucoup de comités du Cabinet et beaucoup de gens qui ont eu accès à ce projet de loi. Passons en revue les membres du personnel du Cabinet du premier ministre. Nous l'avons fait pour celui de la ministre de la Santé.

Nous avons Gerald Butts, le secrétaire principal, qui est l'adjoint exécutif du premier ministre. Geoff Hall est l'adjoint à l'agenda du premier ministre. Probablement pas le photographe, mais c'est une supposition, Daniel Arnold, directeur de la recherche et de la publicité. Roland Paris conseiller principal auprès du premier ministre, mais c'était pour la défense, je suppose donc qu'il ne l'aurait pas vu. Le directeur des opérations, lui non plus. Je suppose, peut-être le bureau régional, parce qu'il serait responsable de la diffusion une fois le projet de loi déposé. Nous avons Lindsay Hunter du Bureau régional de l'Ontario. Jamie Kippen, un autre membre du Bureau régional de l'Ontario. Cyndi Jenkins, du Bureau régional de l'Atlantique. Jessie Chahal du Bureau régional des Prairies et du Nord. Brittney Kerr du Bureau régional de la Colombie-Britannique et Marie-Laurence Lapointe du Bureau régional du Québec. Terry Guillon, l'éclaireur en chef des médias, aurait probablement eu accès. Probablement pas les rédacteurs de la correspondance, ni les membres de la délégation, mais on ne sait pas. Ce sont simplement des hypothèses pour l'instant.

L'attaché de presse du premier ministre est probablement une personne que j'aimerais entendre, parce que je suppose qu'elle serait sur la liste. L'adjointe exécutive auprès du directeur des communications serait certainement sur la liste, ainsi que la chef d'équipe, relations avec les médias, et les agents aux communications — il y a deux agents aux communications. La chef de cabinet, Katie Telford, est probablement une personne avec qui nous aimerions avoir une conversation, certainement. Nous sommes en train de passer en revue ces noms, mais sans la liste, comment continuer? Pourquoi récompenserions-nous le mauvais comportement en ne continuant pas? Il est manifestement important pour ce comité que nous déterminions qui avait eu accès, et interrogions d'autres ministres et membres du personnel cadre du CPM.

Monsieur le président, ne devrions-nous pas accorder la même possibilité aux ministres et au personnel de se disculper eux-mêmes et les membres de leur personnel de toute responsabilité éventuelle de cette fuite? Vous revenez au hockey, et je vais faire une autre analogie. Je sais que mon prédécesseur aimait beaucoup utiliser les analogies au hockey. Je sais que M. Reid les apprécie parfois. Dans n'importe quelle équipe, que ce soit au hockey, au baseball ou au football, c'est le capitaine qui dirige. Le capitaine dirige son équipe. Les membres de l'équipe suivent l'exemple du capitaine. La plupart du temps, les joueurs ne se disent pas: « Eh bien, je pense que c'est la bonne idée. Le quart-arrière a dit que nous allons faire ce jeu, mais je crois qu'il est mieux que nous suivions cette autre stratégie sans rien dire à personne. » Je pense, et c'est une hypothèse de ma part, qu'ils voulaient orienter le narratif d'une certaine façon en raison de l'importance de ce projet de loi et se sont dit: « Lançons le débat un ou deux jours plus tôt. Ouvrons la marche et commençons à former la conversation comme nous le souhaitons. »

Voilà pourquoi il est important de parler aux capitaines, ou aux dirigeants, les chefs de service, et de découvrir ce qu'ils pensent et dans quel sens ils pourraient nous orienter.

(1150)



Sans cette liste, nous abandonnons simplement et nous n'exécutons même pas notre mandat d'enquête comme nous l'a ordonné le Président. Si nous ne continuons pas, nous ne saurons même pas quels mécanismes recommander à la Chambre de mettre en oeuvre pour que cela ne se reproduise pas, ni quelles recommandations faire aux divers ministères pour qu'ils sachent comment éviter que cela se reproduise.

Voyons cette liste, parlons à ces gens, et donnons-leur la possibilité de se disculper. Peut-être qu'ils aimeraient bien mieux se disculper plutôt que de vivre avec ce doute qui plane sur eux.

Nous revenons à l'Association canadienne des journalistes, aux journalistes qui ont le devoir de présenter la vérité. Je crois qu'il est clair, d'après la formulation, qu'ils avaient eu de très bonnes sources pour faire cela.

Je vais vous donner un certain contexte, qui se rapporte à la raison pour laquelle nous devons faire ceci. Nous devons continuer notre enquête parce que le privilège est une chose qui nous est précieuse.

En ce qui concerne le privilège — et c'est de là que c'est venu au Canada —, la lutte de la Chambre des communes britannique pour faire reconnaître par le roi ses immunités et droits fondamentaux a commencé il y a plusieurs siècles. Les premières luttes remontent aux XIVe et XVe siècles, lorsque plusieurs députés et Présidents de la Chambre furent emprisonnés par un souverain se disant offensé par leur conduite au Parlement. Le roi passa outre aux objections de la Chambre qui affirmait que ces arrestations constituaient une violation de ses libertés.

Sous le règne des Tudor et au début de celui des Stuart, bien que la volonté du souverain l’ait parfois emporté sur celle du Parlement, on continua d’affirmer l’existence de certains droits propres au Parlement et notamment à la Chambre des communes. Le Président des Communes en 1523, sir Thomas More fut l’un des premiers à présenter une pétition demandant au roi de reconnaître à la Chambre certains privilèges. À la fin du XVIe siècle, la pétition présentée au roi par le Président de la Chambre avait trouvé place dans les usages.

Malgré les pétitions que lui adressait le Président de la Chambre, le roi n’hésitait pas à faire savoir aux Communes que leurs privilèges, et notamment la liberté de parole, s’exerçaient selon son bon plaisir. C’est ce que fit Jacques Ier en 1621.

En guise de protestation, les Communes répliquèrent que: « chaque membre de la Chambre des communes bénéficie, comme il convient en droit, de la liberté de parole [...] et de l’immunité le protégeant de la destitution, de l’emprisonnement et de la molestation (autre que les mesures de censure que la Chambre pourrait prononcer à son encontre) pour des discours, raisonnements ou déclarations sur des sujets ayant trait soit au Parlement, soit aux travaux parlementaires ».

Pour marquer sa désapprobation, le roi Jacques Ier ordonna que le Journal de la Chambre lui soit envoyé; il en déchira la page qui lui avait déplu et prononça sur le champ la dissolution du Parlement.

Le privilège parlementaire n’empêcha pas non plus la détention ou l’arrestation de certains députés sur ordre de la Couronne. À plusieurs reprises, au début du XVIIe siècle, des députés furent emprisonnés sans procès quand la Chambre ne siégeait pas ou après dissolution du Parlement.

En 1626, Charles Ier ordonna l’arrestation de deux députés pendant que la Chambre siégeait et, en 1629, plusieurs députés furent reconnus coupables de cette action. Ces outrages commis par la Couronne furent dénoncés après la Guerre civile et, en 1667, les deux chambres convinrent que le jugement rendu à l’encontre des députés arrêtés avait été illégal et contraire aux privilèges du Parlement.

En 1689, l’adoption du Bill of Rights confirma une fois pour toutes la liberté de parole, privilège fondamental du Parlement. L’article 9 dispose que « ni la liberté de parole, ni celle des débats ou procédures dans le sein du Parlement, ne peut être entravée ou mise en discussion en aucune cour ou lieu quelconque que le Parlement lui-même ».

Et nous y voilà. Nous faisons le lien. Voici ce qu'O'Brien et Bosc disent:

(1155)

C’est ainsi que fut définitivement instaurée la liberté de parole de la Chambre, liberté protégée de toute ingérence extérieure, aussi bien de la Couronne que des tribunaux. Vers la fin du XVIIe siècle et jusqu’au milieu du XVIIIe, la Chambre poussa parfois trop loin la question de ses privilèges. Ainsi, il est arrivé qu’on reconnaisse l’immunité en matière civile non seulement aux députés, mais également à leurs domestiques. De plus, les députés essayèrent d’élargir aux biens leur appartenant l’immunité contre les entraves ou la brutalité, allant jusqu’à faire état d’une violation de leurs privilèges en cas de braconnage ou de violation de propriété. On finit par mettre un terme à ces pratiques qui créaient de sérieux obstacles au cours ordinaire de la justice, et on reconnut que seul relevait du privilège ce qui était absolument nécessaire au fonctionnement efficace de la Chambre et à l’exercice du mandat parlementaire des députés.

Monsieur le président, justement là, le privilège est reconnu comme étant ce qui est « absolument nécessaire au fonctionnement efficace de la Chambre et à l'exercice du mandat parlementaire des députés ».

Et nous y revoilà: un projet de loi d'extrême importance, touchant presque tous les Canadiens, dévoilé avec beaucoup de détails et des précisions de ce qui ne figurera pas dans le texte. C'est la preuve que la source connaissait très bien ce qui figurait dans le projet de loi.

M. Blake Richards:

Monsieur le président, j'invoque le Règlement.

(1200)

Le président:

Désolé, il y a rappel au Règlement.

M. Blake Richards:

Je veux simplement m'assurer... Je pense que je suis la personne suivante sur la liste, si je ne m'abuse. N'est-ce pas?

Le président:

Commencez-vous à craindre que vous n'aurez pas assez de temps?

M. Blake Richards:

Oui. Je comprends que M. Schmale a beaucoup de choses importantes à dire, et je veux certainement qu'il en ait la possibilité. De fait, j'aimerais visiter la salle des toilettes, monsieur le président, et je voulais m'assurer qu'il avait encore beaucoup de choses à dire, parce que je ne voulais pas rater mon tour s'il avait fini pendant que j'étais hors de la salle.

Le président:

Monsieur Schmale, vous reste-t-il encore beaucoup?

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je pourrais probablement continuer pendant longtemps.

M. Blake Richards:

Je voulais simplement m'assurer que je ne raterais pas mon tour.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je l'apprécie.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci, monsieur Schmale.

Le président:

Nous ne voudrions certainement pas que vous ratiez...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le problème, c'est que M. Reid n'est pas encore convaincu.

M. Scott Reid:

Ce ne serait pas vous, monsieur Richards, qui seriez perdant, mais nous qui le serions si nous n'avions pas la possibilité d'entendre ce que vous avez à dire.

M. Blake Richards:

Je crois que c'est votre avis. Je ne suis pas sûr que d'autres sont du même avis.

M. Scott Reid:

Je l'apprécie.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je ne voudrais surtout pas que vous manquiez cette occasion, monsieur Richards. Je poursuivrai avec plaisir.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci, monsieur Schmale. Je l'apprécie.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Vous voyez comme nous nous entendons bien?

Nous venons de voir un bout de l'histoire sur la raison pour laquelle le privilège est si important. Compte tenu du fait qu'il est si important, compte tenu du fait que nous convenons tous, je crois, qu'il est important, et compte tenu du fait que la Chambre doit certainement voir la loi avant que celle-ci ne fasse l'objet d'une fuite, cette fuite nous empêche de faire notre travail correctement ou de nous acquitter de nos responsabilités en tant que députés.

Je pose la question rhétorique — mais si l'autre côté voulait répondre, j'écouterais la réponse avec plaisir — pourquoi étoufferaient-ils cela? On ne sait jamais, les rôles pourraient être inversés. Nous pourrions changer de place à un moment donné. Pourquoi ne voudriez-vous pas aller jusqu'au fond des choses maintenant, créer un précédent, peut-être instituer des mécanismes visant à ce que ceci ne se reproduise plus, et peut-être faire en sorte que nous ne nous retrouvions plus dans cette situation, que ce soit au cours de cette législature, de la prochaine législature ou de toute autre législature subséquente? Travaillons pour régler ceci et aller jusqu'au fond des choses.

Je vais donc continuer et, je l'espère, convaincre les autres députés que je suis sur la bonne voie: Malgré des [responsabilités] occasionnel[les], la Chambre des lords et la Chambre des communes reconnurent toutes deux qu’il fallait maintenir un équilibre entre la sauvegarde des privilèges essentiels du Parlement et la nécessité d’écarter tout ce qui risquait d’aller à l’encontre des intérêts du pays. C’est ainsi qu’en 1704, le Parlement décida que ni l’une ni l’autre de ses chambres ne pouvait, par vote ou par déclaration, s’attribuer de nouveaux privilèges non justifiés par le droit existant ou la coutume parlementaire. Depuis, ni l’une ni l’autre des chambres n’a, de son propre chef, revendiqué de nouveaux privilèges au-delà de ceux réclamés dans les pétitions des Présidents ou déjà établis en vertu de la loi ou d’un précédent. Au dix-neuvième siècle, la question de privilège fut souvent soulevée, ce qui contribua à délimiter les droits du Parlement et la responsabilité du pouvoir judiciaire. Parmi les affaires portées devant les tribunaux, la plus connue est sans doute celle de Stockdale versus Hansard. En 1836, l'éditeur…

M. Scott Reid:

Je m'en souviens bien.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je pensais bien que vous vous en souviendriez. Je sais que vous vous souviendriez de cela, et vous pourriez probablement citer cela sans livre devant vous. [...] l’éditeur de la Chambre des communes, Hansard, fut poursuivi pour diffamation par l’éditeur John Joseph Stockdale, qui lui reprochait un certain compte rendu publié sur ordre de la Chambre. Malgré de nombreuses résolutions de la Chambre protestant contre cette action en justice, et sa décision d’emprisonner Stockdale, les tribunaux refusèrent de faire droit aux revendications de la Chambre [...]

Sur le fondement de tout cela, encore une fois, nous revenons à ce que la ministre de la Justice a dit et à ce que l'Association canadienne des journalistes a dit dans ses Principes pour un journalisme éthique. Je pense que vous savez cela, David. Vous êtes un ancien journaliste.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comme vous, j'ai été journaliste et reporter attitré, mais j'ai choisi le bon parti.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je ne suis pas d'accord là-dessus, mais j'apprécie vos commentaires.

(1205)

M. Scott Reid:

Nous avons choisi le bon parti. Lui a choisi le parti du centre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Et il ne reste rien.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président:

Pertinence...?

M. Jamie Schmale:

Prenez les Principes pour un journalisme éthique. Ils aspirent à l'exactitude et à l'équité. Ils sont indépendants et transparents. Ils tiennent leurs promesses. Ils respectent la diversité, et ils sont tenus de rendre des comptes.

Cela les empêche d'imprimer des choses à partir de rien, ou, si c'est de la spéculation, d'employer un langage et d'orienter... lorsqu'il est clair que les faits sont cruciaux. Dans ce cas-ci, le langage nous dit ce que nous devons savoir.

Monsieur le président, j'avancerais que le reporter connaissait quelqu'un.

Le président:

Monsieur Schmale, juste au cas où vous ne l'auriez pas remarqué, M. Richards est de retour.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je ne le savais pas.

M. Blake Richards:

Monsieur le président, je ne voulais pas pousser le membre à se presser. Je sais qu'il a beaucoup à dire. J'ai hâte d'avoir une occasion aussi, mais je ne voudrais pas non plus que ce soit aux dépens de son occasion.

Ne vous sentez pas pressé, monsieur Schmale.

Le président:

M. Reid, je présume que vous aussi voulez intervenir.

M. Scott Reid:

Non, je ne veux pas intervenir.

Je veux seulement dire que je le trouve de plus en plus convaincant.

Une voix: Donc, ça fonctionne.

M. Scott Reid: Je serais réticent à l'arrêter avant qu'il arrive aux points clés, dont je pense que nous nous en rapprochons de minute en minute.

M. Jamie Schmale:

C'est effectivement le cas.

Monsieur le président, pourriez-vous m'avertir lorsqu'il ne restera plus que deux minutes?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pourrions-nous alors demander un vote?

M. Jamie Schmale:

C'est vrai; à quinze secondes ou moins, donc.

Merci à M. Richards. En vérité, je ne vous avais pas vu entrer subrepticement derrière moi.

M. Blake Richards:

Il m'arrive parfois d'être ainsi.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Vous êtes furtif.

Où en étais-je au sujet de cette affaire? Oui, le reporter avait identifié un initié qui avait fourni des détails précis au sujet de ce projet de loi. Puisque nous examinons cela étape par étape, je pense que nous pouvons dire qu'ils renvoient à la source dans les deux cas. Je pense qu'il est clair, et je pense que peut-être nous sommes tous d'accord, qu'il y a des éléments précis de la loi dans ces articles, avec des détails très semblables. Je pense que nous avons établi que cela prouve qu'ils n'ont pas été tout simplement tirés de nulle part. Je ne pense pas que l'on peut avoir deux articles... C'est-à-dire que le National pouvait avoir les mêmes détails, mais il faudrait qu'ils citent leurs sources, qui, à ce stade, auraient été le Globe and Mail, « Selon le Globe and Mail, ceci, ceci et cela ».

Concernant la question soulevée par M. Reid, y a-t-il une ou deux sources à cette fuite? Peut-être, mais nous ne le savons pas jusqu'à ce que nous nous y penchions. Y a-t-il eu un effort coordonné en vue de couler ces renseignements et de présenter la nouvelle de la manière que le gouvernement le souhaitait? Nous ne le savons pas jusqu'à ce que nous obtenions cette liste.

Pour revenir au privilège, et, encore une fois, à pourquoi il est si important, je souligne que le privilège a vu le jour, et il était absolument nécessaire pour que la Chambre fonctionne efficacement et pour que les membres s'acquittent de leurs responsabilités. C’est à la fin du XVIIIe et au XIXe siècle que commença l’étude systématique du développement historique du privilège parlementaire et de l’outrage au Parlement, avec la publication de plusieurs ouvrages sur la procédure parlementaire. Toutefois, les efforts en vue de mieux comprendre et élucider l’histoire constitutionnelle du Parlement atteignirent leur apogée avec la publication, en 1946, de la 14e édition de May

J'ai cité cela un peu plus tôt. Cette édition présente un examen approfondi et minutieux du privilège parlementaire, fondé sur une étude exhaustive des Journaux et des principes sur lesquels repose le droit du Parlement. On y cite des exemples d’inconduite de la part de témoins ou de personnes extérieures à l’institution, de désobéissance à des règles ou à des ordres de la Chambre ou d’un comité, ainsi que de tentatives d’intimidation, de corruption ou de brutalité à l’endroit de députés ou de dignitaires de la Chambre comme autant de cas qui constituent plutôt un outrage au Parlement qu’une violation proprement dite d’un privilège. La Chambre des communes de Grande-Bretagne applique maintenant une définition plus étroite du privilège, qui met l’accent sur les délibérations du Parlement. Cette orientation est devenue manifeste en 1967 quand le Select Committee on Parliamentary Privilege reconnut la nécessité d’entreprendre une réforme radicale des règles, pratiques et procédures actuelles touchant les privilèges, et notamment l’outrage. Il convint que les diverses règles et procédures devaient être simplifiées et clarifiées et mises en accord avec la pensée contemporaine. Par ailleurs, le comité se dit persuadé que les droits et immunités reconnus à la Chambre « doivent de toute évidence être garantis par les tribunaux puisqu’ils font partie intégrante du droit britannique ».

Maintenant, je ne dis pas que cela s'applique au présent cas, mais je pense que le point qui concerne le privilège est très clair: La Chambre prit acte du rapport, qui ne fut toutefois jamais adopté. En 1977, le Committee of Privileges a réexaminé le sens à donner aux notions de privilège et d’outrage et, dans son rapport, adopté plus tard par la Chambre, il a repris l’orientation générale et les conclusions du rapport de 1967. Il a recommandé de limiter l’application du privilège aux cas d’évidente nécessité pour protéger la Chambre, ses députés et ses fonctionnaires contre les obstructions ou les ingérences dans l’exercice de leurs fonctions

Maintenant, monsieur le président, pour accomplir notre devoir, comme je l'ai affirmé à quelques reprises déjà, et pour bien accomplir notre devoir de membre du Parlement, couler un projet de loi, dans ce cas-ci un projet de loi très important, mais couler n'importe quel projet de loi avant que les parlementaires aient eu la chance d'y jeter un coup d'œil et de l'examiner, cela nous empêche de nous acquitter efficacement de nos responsabilités de membres de ce lieu.

(1210)



Si nous apprenons tous qu'une ou deux sources de la fuite jugent acceptable d'aller leur propre chemin, peut-être suivant des instructions de leur chef d'équipe, et nous ne menons pas d'enquête, ce que je pense que l'autre côté insinue, dans ce cas, nous pouvons tout simplement nous arrêter et fermer boutique, dans ce cas, cela ne nous laisse pas faire notre travail. Sans mécanismes en place soit pour faire cesser ce qui se passe ou pour trouver la source de la fuite, cela pourrait bel et bien nous empêcher de faire notre travail. Est-ce que cela pourrait se reproduire? C'est fort possible, parce qu'il ne semble y avoir aucune conséquence. Encore une fois, on récompense la mauvaise conduite de l'enfant.

Le passage suivant dira pourquoi c'est important ici: Le privilège dans les colonies de l'Amérique du Nord britannique avant la Confédération Dès l’établissement de la première assemblée législative en Nouvelle-Écosse, en 1758, la loi accorda à l’assemblée et à ses membres les pouvoirs nécessaires pour leur permettre d’exercer leur mandat. Comme Maingot le fait observer: « C’est ainsi que les députés jouissaient de la liberté de parole dans les débats et qu’ils étaient protégés contre toute arrestation liée à un litige au civil, car l’assemblée avait droit en priorité à leur présence et à leur participation. » Quant au pouvoir d’une assemblée des colonies de punir et, en particulier, d’emprisonner l’auteur d’un outrage, la situation était loin d’être claire. De fait, avant la Confédération, les droits des assemblées législatives étaient très limités. Toutefois, dès 1758, la Chambre d’assemblée de la Nouvelle-Écosse arrêta et détint brièvement un individu ayant proféré des menaces à l’endroit d’un député. Dans le Haut et le Bas-Canada, la Loi constitutionnelle de 1791, adoptée par le Parlement britannique, restait muette sur les privilèges des assemblées législatives; en 1801, cependant, le Président de l’Assemblée législative du Haut-Canada revendiqua « au nom de l’Assemblée, la liberté de parole et, de façon générale, tous les privilèges et libertés dont bénéficie la Chambre des communes de Grande-Bretagne, notre mère patrie ». L’Assemblée du Haut-Canada se battit pour se voir reconnaître plusieurs des privilèges des Communes britanniques, comme l’immunité d’arrestation en séance et l’exemption du devoir de juré. Elle revendiqua également le pouvoir d’envoyer chercher des témoins et de leur poser des questions ainsi que de punir toute personne refusant de comparaître ou de répondre à ses questions, utilisant son pouvoir d’incarcération pour faire respecter ses ordres. Il y eut des protestations à l’occasion, mais l’Assemblée réussit à faire respecter ses privilèges. Avant l’avènement du gouvernement responsable, l’Assemblée du Haut-Canada protégeait sa réputation en sanctionnant les libelles dont elle faisait l’objet dans les journaux et en luttant pour le droit de proposer des projets de loi de finances, c’est-à-dire des projets de loi de crédits et d’imposition. En règle générale, elle considérait qu’elle pouvait s’acquitter de ses fonctions grâce aux privilèges dont elle disposait. Au cours de cette période, l’Assemblée du Bas-Canada revendiquait à la fois des privilèges individuels et collectifs — l’immunité d’arrestation et l’exemption de l’obligation de comparaître dans les actions civiles intentées contre des députés, ainsi que le droit de l’Assemblée d’imposer des sanctions pour outrage, quel qu’en soit l’auteur. L’Assemblée ne craignait pas de revendiquer ses privilèges face à la Couronne. En 1820, elle interrompit le déroulement des travaux à l’ouverture d’une nouvelle législature à cause d’un différend lié au rapport sur les résultats du scrutin, et de nouveau en 1835 en raison de commentaires faits par le gouverneur au sujet de ses privilèges. Avec l’adoption de l’Acte d’union de 1840 qui faisait une seule province, le Canada-Uni, des deux colonies du Haut et du Bas-Canada, et en particulier par suite de l’établissement du gouvernement responsable, les problèmes de privilège furent moins fréquents et moins graves. Avec l’avènement du gouvernement responsable, la suprématie de l’Assemblée était reconnue, [...].

Monsieur le président, c'est là.

(1215)

Le président:

C'est très intéressant.

Monsieur Schmale, puisque nous avons tous un exemplaire de ce livre — je sais que vous le versez au dossier et il fait 1 520 pages — peut-être que vous pourriez simplement citer les pages que vous voulez que nous versions au procès-verbal.

M. Blake Richards:

Monsieur le président, je pourrais peut-être répondre à cela.

Je pense qu'il y a une certaine légitimité à sa démarche. Je pense que je m'opposerais peut-être s'il tentait de lire tout le livre, mais je présume qu'il ne fera pas cela. Si, pour exprimer l'idée, il doit l'avoir devant lui, je pense qu'en demandant aux gens de le lire plus tard, il deviendrait difficile d'exprimer l'idée qu'il tente d'exprimer.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. Blake Richards:

J'avancerais qu'il serait peut-être indiqué de le laisser continuer.

Le président:

D'accord.

Monsieur Schmale.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Merci, monsieur Richards.

Comme on l'a mentionné, monsieur le président, c'est pour cette raison que j'ai tenté d'intégrer cela. Je vous entends, et je ne lirai pas tout ce livre. Lorsque l'on parle de privilège, il existe pour une raison, comme je l'ai souligné. Il est là pour nous permettre de faire notre travail de députés. Sans ces règles, nous nous trouvons dans une situation intéressante, parce que, combien de fois cela peut-il se produire, ou combien de fois permettrons-nous que cela se produise, avant que nous prenions cela plus au sérieux que nous le faisons maintenant? Nous voulons poursuivre la présente enquête. Il y en a d'autres qui ne le veulent pas. Qu'est-ce que cela dit à ceux qui pourraient peut-être vouloir entretenir leurs rapports avec certains reporters, avec les médias? Cela dit que le privilège que je mentionnais ne signifie pas grand-chose, parce que l'enquête sera brève et douce, et elle n'ira probablement pas au fond de l'affaire, qui est la question de savoir qui avait accès. Interrogez ces gens-là, et tentez de découvrir qui l'a fait.

Monsieur le président, avec toute enquête, qui peut ralentir la répétition d'un pareil incident, si les gens qui ont accès à la loi savaient que, s'il devait y avoir une autre fuite à l'avenir, ils seraient fort probablement convoqués devant ce comité, seraient-ils plus susceptibles ou moins susceptibles de se livrer de nouveau à ce type d'activité? Je dirais, probablement pas.

Bien que nous soyons une bande sympathique, être convoqué devant un comité parlementaire et devoir être interrogé quant à savoir si l'on a été la source d'une fuite possible n'est probablement pas si agréable, et est probablement passablement embêtant. Cela cause probablement des pertes de sommeil et tout un tas de stress dont ils n'ont pas besoin.

M. Blake Richards:

Cela serait-il différent de la perte de sommeil que vous a causé les miaulements du chat la nuit dernière?

M. Jamie Schmale:

Puis, l'esprit s'active. Votre esprit commence à s'activer lorsque vous êtes éveillé. C'est difficile de se rendormir.

Si vous êtes la source de la fuite et vous saviez que vous seriez convoqué devant un comité — parce que nous allons découvrir qui a l'accès — je ne pense pas que vous voudriez refaire cela. Toutefois, récompenser une mauvaise conduite... Si vous étiez la source de la fuite et vous saviez que l'enquête n'irait pas bien loin et vous saviez qu'il était fort probable que vous ne soyez pas convoqué devant le comité pour répondre à des questions au sujet de cette fuite et des actes que vous avez pu poser, pourquoi ne le referiez-vous pas?

Si le privilège est si important, et je pense que nous convenons tous qu'il l'est, et si nous voulons tous que cela ne se reproduise pas, comment est-ce que mettre fin à la présente enquête réglera quoi que ce soit? Cela ne réglera rien. Aussi bien prendre ce livre et dire, eh bien, il fonctionne seulement à certaines époques, dans certaines circonstances.

C'est comme les règles au hockey. En tant qu'arbitre, vous n'avez pas la possibilité de choisir les règles. Vous êtes là pour les faire respecter. Il se peut que vous ne soyez pas d'accord avec certaines règles, mais cela n'est pas votre travail.

Nous avons un travail. Il y a des règles. Notre travail consiste à aller au fond de cette affaire. Notre travail consiste à nous assurer que les règles sont respectées. Baisser les bras va à l'encontre de tout. Combien de fois cela peut-il se produire ou cela se produira-t-il avant que nous nous levions et que nous disions assez, c'est assez; à quel stade? Certains pourraient soutenir, et, je dirais, en fait, que ce projet de loi est probablement le plus important comme je l'ai dit auparavant, mais, combien de fois disons-nous « Ça va, ce projet de loi n'a pas beaucoup d'importance »? Est-ce que nous commençons tout simplement à couler des projets de loi aux médias au préalable? C'est cela qui se produira. C'est cela qui se produira parce que nous ne nous y attaquons pas, parce que nous ne prenons pas ces mesures pour découvrir pourquoi.

Je ne parviens pas à me souvenir qui l'a dit la dernière fois, peut-être M. Richards ou M. Reid. Nous ne trouverons peut-être pas la source, mais je pense qu'inspirer la peur à cette personne constitue une des façons de nous assurer qu'elle y pensera à deux fois avant de refaire cela.

Encore une fois, monsieur le président, je vais mentionner ceci, et je sais que vous ne voulez pas que je le lise au complet, et je comprends pourquoi. Allons-y. Cet extrait est tiré du chapitre 3, à la page 85: La plupart des questions de privilège soulevées à la Chambre des communes ressortent à ce qui est perçu comme un outrage à l’autorité et à la dignité du Parlement et de ses députés. Parmi les autres cas, mentionnons les accusations portées par un député contre un autre [député] ou les allégations des médias concernant d['autres] députés. La divulgation prématurée de rapports et de délibérations de comités a souvent fait l’objet de questions de privilège, tout comme les déclarations trompeuses faites délibérément à la Chambre par un ministre[128] et les faux témoignages d’une personne ayant comparu devant un comité. Enfin, le refus de faire entrer des députés dans l’enceinte du Parlement...

Cela n'est évidemment pas pertinent ici.

Je pense que cela démontre, monsieur le président, que nous prenons le privilège parlementaire très au sérieux. Mais, est-ce le cas? Si nous ne poursuivons pas cette enquête, est-ce que nous le prenons effectivement au sérieux? Est-ce que nous nous contentons de dire: « Nous avons eu un témoin; c'est suffisant »? Comme M. Reid l'a souligné, nous avons certainement une source, parce qu'elle a été la première, dans l'article du Globe and Mail. Se peut-il que nous ayons une deuxième source?

(1220)



Si oui, est-ce qu'elles travaillaient ensemble sur une façon de diffuser le message avant que le projet de loi soit présenté à la Chambre afin de poser les termes du débat comme le gouvernement le souhaitait? Si vous considérez que c'est grave à ce point, ce que je crois être le cas, pourquoi mettre un terme à l'enquête? Pourquoi ne pas nous laisser aller et continuer à poser ces questions?

Comme je l'ai souligné, monsieur le président, quand j'ai lu ces noms, je crois que j'ai dit qu'il y en avait 57 dans le Cabinet du premier ministre. Dans le cas du ministre de la Santé je ne parviens pas à me souvenir exactement. Il y avait environ une vingtaine de personnes qui étaient évidemment intéressées, mais toutes n'auront pas accès à ce projet de loi. Celles qui auraient un avantage à couler ces renseignements auraient accès, et c'est à ces personnes que nous voulons parler. C'est pour cette raison qu'il est si important que nous voyions cette liste. Si nous parlons de l'ouverture et de la transparence du gouvernement et de comment il fera les choses différemment, d'accord. Je n'étais pas ici lors du dernier Parlement, mais, d'accord, disons que nous allons faire les choses différemment. Comment est-ce que mettre fin à cette enquête prouvera que nous sommes ouverts et transparents?

Il y a une citation ici dans le Ottawa Citizen qui mentionne que l'opposition a été incapable de produire la moindre preuve qu'il y avait eu une divulgation prématurée. Je suis sincèrement en désaccord avec cela. Je pense que nous exposons notre thèse pièce par pièce ici quant à savoir à quel point le privilège parlementaire est important, pourquoi il est si important, pourquoi les journalistes aspirent à l'exactitude et à l'équité, pourquoi ils tiennent leurs promesses, pourquoi ils doivent rendre des comptes, et pourquoi il est nécessaire que ces règles existent pour que les membres du Parlement puissent faire leur travail correctement.

Si nous n'allons pas plus loin, alors, pourquoi partirions-nous? Nous devons avoir ces règles en place pour une raison. Il y a une raison à cela. Je vais citer rapidement ici: Après la Confédération, la façon de soulever la question de privilège était bien différente de la procédure actuelle. À des douzaines de reprises entre 1867 et 1913, on procéda de la même manière. Un député prenait la parole pour exposer sa question de privilège et exhortait la Chambre à prendre certaines mesures, qui consistaient surtout à convoquer quelqu’un à la barre ou à renvoyer l’affaire au Comité permanent des privilèges et des élections, pour qu’il l’étudie et en fasse rapport. Puis, sans intervention du Président, on passait au débat sur la motion, à laquelle on pouvait proposer des amendements, après quoi la Chambre se prononçait. Elle prenait ensuite les mesures prévues dans la motion. Comme les questions de privilège étaient entendues immédiatement, bon nombre de députés se prévalaient de cette procédure pour fournir, en réalité, des explications personnelles. Les députés invoquaient l’atteinte aux privilèges afin d’obtenir rapidement le droit de parole de la part du Président; ils en profitaient alors pour formuler une plainte ou un grief. Ici encore, la présidence n’intervenait que très rarement.

C'est bon. Merci. De 1913 à 1958, alors qu’on soulevait à tout propos la « question de privilège », ne fût-ce que pour signaler la présence d’un groupe scolaire à la tribune, féliciter quelqu’un, présenter des doléances, évoquer diverses questions de procédure ou encore « s’expliquer », le nombre de questions légitimes marqua un net recul; seulement trois furent renvoyées au Comité permanent des privilèges et des élections et une à un comité spécial.

Examinons mon idée. Comment empêchons-nous que cela ne se reproduise? Le président de la Chambre nous a donné instruction d'examiner cette question.

(1225)



Je pense que tous veulent s'assurer que cela ne se reproduise plus, et je suis certain que lorsque les membres opposés, ou peut-être de ce côté-ci... Je ne pense pas qu'ils apprécieraient que cela se produise. Je sais que nous ne l'apprécions pas, alors commençons donc à examiner les mesures que nous pourrions prendre pour empêcher que cela se reproduise à l'avenir, afin que nous n'ayons pas à en traiter à répétition.

Cela touche également le temps du comité, monsieur le président. Combien de fois ce type d'incident pourrait nous être renvoyé, de telle sorte que nous continuions à en traiter et à en traiter? Autrement, nous dirions tout simplement, « À quoi servent les règles? Ça ne fait rien; on ne les fera pas respecter. Personne ne sera interpellé à ce sujet. » Qu'arrive-t-il alors? C'est probablement un cas très extrême, mais ces règles sont là pour une très bonne raison.

(1230)

Le président:

Sur une question d'ordre, je vais entendre M. Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Est-il acceptable que je pose une question au membre relativement à une des remarques qu'il a faites, ou est-ce que cela serait déplacé?

Le président:

Cela ne pose aucun problème.

Je voudrais simplement que M. Schmale sache qu'il a seulement laissé une demi-heure à ses deux collègues pour parler.

Toutefois, M. Reid, allez-y et posez une question à M. Schmale.

M. Scott Reid:

Je voulais revenir sur une des remarques qu'il a faites. Après qu'il a fait cette remarque, j'ai été suffisamment intéressé pour aller récupérer l'article. Il provient du blog en direct de Kady O'Malley. Elle avait cité un passage d'une déclaration du Cabinet du premier ministre qui avait été faite au Ottawa Citizen, qui comporte le passage suivant, et il s'agit de la justification pas seulement des membres ici, mais nous savons que cela provient du Cabinet du premier ministre — le même Cabinet du premier ministre qui serait presque assurément la source d'autorisation de toute fuite, ce qui rend le passage particulièrement intéressant. Le voici: Puisque l'opposition a été incapable de produire la moindre preuve qu'il y ait même eu une divulgation prématurée du projet de loi au cours de six réunions de comités différentes, les membres du gouvernement qui siègent au comité ont décidé de s'opposer à toute motion qui cite qui que ce soit au hasard dans le cadre de leur partie de pêche...

En laissant de côté les éléments inutilement sarcastiques dans ce... Pour ma part, je suis parvenu à ne jamais être sarcastique ni même une fois en 16 ans à la Chambre des communes, comme tout le monde le sait.

Dans tous les cas, je voulais seulement demander ceci. Est-il raisonnable de présumer que l'opposition peut produire des preuves, lorsque les Libéraux et le cabinet du CCP sont ceux qui possèdent les preuves et ils retiennent ces preuves en refusant de permettre que cette motion aille de l'avant? N'est-ce pas une situation perverse, dans laquelle ils disent, « Nous avons des preuves qui pourraient régler cette affaire. Vous ne les avez pas produites, parce que nous refusons de vous les fournir; par conséquent, nous voulons mettre un terme aux audiences au cours desquelles vous n'avez pas produit les preuves que nous détenons en fait dans notre poche arrière. »

Cela vous paraît-il aussi bizarre, à vous, monsieur Schmale, qu'à moi?

M. Jamie Schmale:

Monsieur Reid, vous avez parfaitement raison. C'est bien ce que je voulais dire. Je suis heureux d'avoir pu vous convaincre.

M. Scott Reid:

Je commence à en être convaincu.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Vous avez tout à fait raison; ils ont en main les éléments dont nous avons besoin. Nous voudrions y avoir accès afin de pouvoir poursuivre notre enquête, ou bien la compléter et passer à autre chose. Si nous ne parvenons pas à obtenir ces renseignements...

Ils reconnaissent les avoir et nous savons qu'ils les ont. La ministre de la Justice l'a dit elle-même, et la liste des personnes en question permettrait d'orienter nos recherches. Il suffit de se reporter aux propos de la ministre qui a précisé que ce sont les personnes qui avaient un « besoin réel de connaître ». Devant le comité, elle s'est exprimée en ces termes: ... les employés chargés de l'élaboration de politiques et de l'élaboration de propositions pour le ministre; le personnel ministériel qui appuie un ministre au sujet d'une proposition ou d'une question particulière de politique qui fait l'objet...

Tout mène dans cette direction, et elle voudrait, me semble-t-il, qu'on mette un terme à tout cela, et peut-être même que l'on trouve le coupable. Elle voudrait sans doute, comme nous l'avons dit tout à l'heure, voir adopter des mesures pour éviter que cela arrive à nouveau.

Comprenez bien que si nous ne faisons rien, ce genre d'incident va se reproduire. Il serait bon de mettre en place des mécanismes permettant d'éviter cela. Tout le monde est vraisemblablement du même avis.

Je pourrais nommer les personnes en cause étant donné que nous n'avons pas cité les collaborateurs du ministère de la Justice. La ministre a bien dit que les fonctionnaires de son ministère qui ont travaillé à cet avant-projet de loi, ainsi que son personnel exonéré détenaient la cote de sécurité valide du niveau approprié. Il s'agit donc d'un groupe assez restreint. Il est donc inexact de dire qu'il nous faudrait convoquer des centaines de personnes. Nous n'aurions en effet à convoquer qu'un petit groupe de personnes.

Cette enquête ne devrait pas prendre trop longtemps, mais elle s'éternisera, effectivement, si l'opposition juge qu'on empêche le Comité d'exercer ses fonctions parlementaires, et si notre rapport à la Chambre montre que nous n'avons auditionné qu'un seul témoin. Elle nous a fourni assez de renseignements pour orienter nos recherches, et ils reconnaissent posséder les renseignements qui nous permettraient de poursuivre notre enquête. Allons-nous simplement décider de nous arrêter là?

Serais-je le seul à trouver curieux que l'on ferme les yeux en prétendant néanmoins avoir fait notre travail?

Nous tendons au but, et je souhaite que nous passions à l'étape suivante. Je sais que c'est ce que souhaitent les gens de notre bord. La ministre de la Justice nous a fourni une piste. Or, si nous estimons avoir fait notre travail...

La ministre a ici même affirmé avoir « parlé avec mon sous-ministre ». Elle nous a assuré que « mon ministère a pris toutes les précautions nécessaires », et « qu'aucune violation de la confidentialité des renseignements, ni indice d'une telle violation n'ont été signalés ». Et elle a fini par dire que « aucune enquête interne n'a été lancée ».

Monsieur le président, cela me rappelle l'analogie de l'arbitre de hockey.

Si je vous demande cela simplement en passant, vous allez naturellement dire non. Je ne sais pas si les personnes en cause ont été convoquées et mises sur la sellette, mais vous allez naturellement dire non.

Je crois volontiers la ministre de la Justice lorsqu'elle affirme ne pas savoir qui est à l'origine de la fuite, et lorsqu'elle affirme que ce n'est pas elle. Je la crois. Je respecte beaucoup le fait qu'elle se soit présentée devant le Comité pour dire ce qu'elle pensait de la situation.

(1235)



Mais, encore une fois, monsieur le président, c'est pour cela qu'il nous faut obtenir la liste en question. D'après la ministre: [...] il ne faut pas oublier que le ministère de la Justice n'était pas le seul à travailler à l'élaboration de cette mesure législative délicate. Mon ministère a travaillé en collaboration étroite avec les fonctionnaires d'autres ministères, et mon personnel exonéré a travaillé avec ses homologues dans d'autres bureaux.

Puis elle a ajouté que, conformément aux lignes directrices du Conseil privé: [...] on a partagé les ébauches de mémoire au Cabinet contenant des recommandations précises en matière de politique avec les organismes centraux et d'autres ministères et organismes pour en obtenir le point de vue et régler toute préoccupation éventuelle de divers points de vue politiques.

Elle n'était pas, en tant que ministre de la Justice, à même de se prononcer sur ce qui a pu se faire dans d'autres ministères ou organismes, mais cela nous ramène à ce que M. Reid disait tout à l'heure, c'est-à-dire qu'ils possèdent bien les éléments d'information qu'il nous faudrait. Ils ont en main une liste qui nous permettrait d'orienter nos recherches. Nous savons que les journalistes ont des principes, et que, dans l'exercice de leur profession, ils s'en tiennent à une certaine éthique. Les deux articles ont, à un jour d'intervalle, précisé, tant sur les ondes de Radio-Canada que dans les colonnes du Globe and Mail, que des sources leur avaient fourni des détails très précis sur le projet de loi. Or pour se prononcer avec autant d'assurance et d'exactitude, il leur fallait avoir eu connaissance du texte.

Procurons-nous cette liste. La ministre de la Justice nous a orientés en ce sens. Encore une fois, monsieur le président, nous n'inventons rien. Elle nous a elle-même indiqué dans quelle direction orienter notre enquête.

Je me demande donc pourquoi nous envisageons d'arrêter nos recherches. Allons-nous attendre que ce genre de chose se reproduise? On n'est tout de même pas au far-west! Les articles qui ont paru font état de faits précis. Comme M. Reid l'a relevé à juste titre, s'il existe une seconde source, le problème est encore plus grave car cela voudrait dire que plusieurs personnes ont désobéi aux consignes en disant des choses qu'elles n'auraient pas dû dire.

Est-ce effectivement ce qui s'est passé? Nous ne sommes pas encore en mesure de le savoir. Ont-ils agi par ambition? Ont-ils agi ainsi pour entrer dans les bonnes grâces de journalistes? Ou ont-ils en cela obéi aux ordres de leur hiérarchie qui souhaitait influencer l'opinion?

Cela étant, comment pourrait-on ne pas vouloir aller plus loin? Je vous pose la question. Je voudrais maintenant changer de sujet.

Dans deux arrêts rendus en 1993 et en 2005, la Cour suprême du Canada a établi le cadre juridique et constitutionnel pour l'examen des questions relatives au privilège parlementaire. Comme le privilège parlementaire est issu de la Constitution, les tribunaux peuvent déterminer l'existence et l'étendue d'un privilège revendiqué. Cependant, compte tenu du fait qu'une décision établissant l'existence d'un privilège entraîne une exemption de contrôle judiciaire, les tribunaux ne peuvent se pencher sur l'exercice d'un privilège ou sur une question qui relève du privilège. Une fois que l'existence et l'étendue d'un privilège ont été déterminées, leur rôle cesse. Il appartient uniquement à la Chambre de trancher les questions qui relèvent du privilège parlementaire.

Nous savons ainsi qu'il ne s'agit pas d'une question de caractère juridique. C'est à nous qu'il appartient de décider. Nous ne convoquerions alors qu'un seul témoin? Ce ne serait pas pousser très loin l'enquête.

(1240)



Acceptons-nous que ce genre de choses se reproduise?

M. Blake Richards:

Monsieur le président, je souhaite faire un rappel au Règlement.

Pourrais-je poser, très rapidement, à M. Schmale une question sur le sujet qu'il vient d'évoquer?

Le président:

Je n'ai aucune objection.

Monsieur Schmale, je précise que vous n'avez laissé qu'un quart d'heure à vos deux collègues qui souhaiteraient eux aussi intervenir. Je vais néanmoins permettre à M. Richards de vous poser une question au sujet de ce que vous venez de dire.

M. Blake Richards:

Monsieur le président, j'ai hâte, à mon tour, d'intervenir, mais je comprends fort bien l'argument avancé par M. Schmale. J'aurais moi-même un certain nombre d'arguments à faire valoir. Je trouve tout cela très intéressant et de nombreux membres du Comité sont sans doute du même avis.

Je ne lui en veux aucunement d'avoir pris le temps qu'il lui fallait pour présenter ses arguments. Ne vous sentez pas obligé de l'admonester à cet égard.

Le président:

Je vous remercie de votre courtoisie.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci, monsieur le président. J'en étais persuadé d'avance.

Il évoquait certaines déclarations faites par des députés du parti ministériel. Certains députés prétendaient en effet que nous pourrions nous en tenir à un seul témoin. Je souhaitais lui demander si, d'après lui, il ne serait pas injuste envers le premier ministre, envers le bureau du premier ministre et envers la ministre de la Santé, de ne pas leur donner, comme nous l'avons fait pour la ministre de la Justice, l'occasion de lever les soupçons ou les doutes au sujet du rôle qu'aurait pu jouer en cela un de leurs collaborateurs. À leur place, je souhaiterais, en effet, pouvoir tirer les choses au clair et dissiper les soupçons.

Vous paraît-il déraisonnable de leur en fournir l'occasion?

(1245)

M. Jamie Schmale:

Pas du tout.

Je suis d'accord. La ministre de la Justice est venue tirer les choses au clair. Elle n'a pas hésité à répondre à nos questions. Je suis même surpris que la ministre de la Santé, et d'autres encore, ne souhaitent pas saisir l'occasion de fournir des éclaircissements, et de préciser qu'aucun de leurs collaborateurs n'est impliqué. Si nous nous en tenons à un seul témoin, ce genre de chose est appelé à se reproduire.

Si nous ne faisons rien, de tels incidents se reproduiront étant donné l'absence de conséquences. Si personne ne craint d'être convoqué par un comité, les fuites se multiplieront. Dans ce cas-là, qu'advient-il du privilège parlementaire? Serait-ce que nous n'avons désormais plus besoin d'être informés par avance du contenu d'un projet de loi?

Ce qui s'est passé est peut-être un cas extrême, mais vous comprenez fort bien où je veux en venir. En l'absence de sanctions, ce genre de chose est appelé à se reproduire.

Le président:

Monsieur Richards, vous ne semblez pas pressé de voir mettre aux voix la première des cinq motions que vous proposez.

M. Blake Richards:

Il est clair que nous souhaiterions obtenir une réponse positive afin de pouvoir poursuivre notre enquête. Or, cela ne semble pas être le cas.

Il semblerait en effet que le Bureau du premier ministrea demandé aux membres du Comité de rejeter les motions en question. Je trouve cela plutôt préoccupant. Il s'agit d'une question que je voulais justement évoquer. Le Bureau du premier ministre semble être intervenu dans les travaux du Comité, en demandant aux députés du parti ministériel d'enterrer l'affaire. Or, pour les députés de l'opposition, c'est naturellement très préoccupant.

J'ose espérer que les membres du Comité se raviseront, et choisiront d'agir de manière à maintenir les privilèges parlementaires en refusant d'obéir au premier ministre lorsqu'il leur demande d'étouffer l'affaire.

Le président:

Monsieur Schmale, vous avez toujours la parole.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je vous remercie.

Je suis d'accord avec Blake, et ils semblent effectivement avoir reçu des ordres d'ailleurs. Les députés de notre bord trouvaient en effet curieux qu'ils ne veuillent pas poursuivre l'enquête, d'autant plus que, pendant deux jours, nous avons tenté d'expliquer que le maintien des privilèges parlementaires exige que nous poursuivions notre enquête.

Il est maintenant clair que quelqu'un, dans un ministère ou un autre organisme, vraisemblablement le BPM, a fait savoir qu'il serait préférable d'arrêter l'enquête, ce qui est à mes yeux tout aussi préoccupant. Pourquoi nous empêche-t-on d'accomplir la tâche que nous a confiée le Président de la Chambre des communes? Dans le cadre de notre système d'équilibre des pouvoirs, il appartient au Parlement d'exercer des contrôles sur l'action du gouvernement. Mais, si le gouvernement ordonne aux députés de la majorité, comme c'est le cas en l'occurrence, de clore une enquête, comment ne pas considérer que l'on porte atteinte à nos attributions?

Permettez-moi de vous lire un extrait qui permet d'éclairer un aspect des privilèges parlementaires et d'en faire ressortir l'importance. Je reprends là où je m'étais interrompu: La principale question que se pose un tribunal consiste à savoir si le privilège revendiqué est nécessaire pour permettre à la Chambre des communes et à ses députés d'exercer leurs fonctions parlementaires — légiférer, délibérer et demander des comptes au gouvernement — sans ingérence du pouvoir exécutif ou du pouvoir judiciaire.

Monsieur le président, c'est tout mon argument. Comment maintenir l'équilibre des pouvoirs si l'exécutif verrouille l'action des députés de la majorité, ou leur ordonne de faire obstacle aux travaux d'un comité?

(1250)

Le président:

Cela se trouve à quelle page?

M. Jamie Schmale:

À la page 78. Et puis ceci: Pour déterminer son existence et son étendue, le tribunal établit d'abord [...]

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Monsieur le président, j'invoque le Règlement. Je trouve offensant que l'on nous accuse d'être aux ordres. L'accusation ainsi proférée par les gens de l'autre bord est sans fondement. Nous participons aux travaux du Comité, et si les arguments invoqués à l'appui de ces motions nous paraissent convaincants, nous nous prononcerons comme nous estimons devoir le faire. On nous accuse d'être aux ordres, mais l'accusation est parfaitement gratuite, du moins en ce qui me concerne.

M. Blake Richards:

Permettez-moi de répondre, monsieur le président...

Le président:

Je vous demande, monsieur Richards, de vous en tenir au rappel au Règlement.

M. Blake Richards:

Monsieur le président, j'estime pour ma part que l'accusation est fondée. Les médias ont confirmé que le Bureau du premier ministre avait diffusé un communiqué indiquant qu'on avait demandé aux députés de rejeter la motion.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Mais qui? Pardon? Les médias en ont fait écho...?

M. Blake Richards:

Je peux vous donner le lien qui mène à l'article.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Très bien. Ai-je... [Note de la rédaction: inaudible]

M. Scott Reid:

Selon Kady O'Malley, écrivant dans le Ottawa Citizen: [...] mercredi soir, un communiqué du BPM porté à la connaissance du Ottawa Citizen, a confirmé que c'était effectivement le cas [...]

Puis, ce communiqué du BPM: Étant donné qu'après six séances du comité, l'opposition n'a pas produit la moindre preuve que le texte du projet de loi aurait été divulgué prématurément, les membres du comité faisant partie de la majorité ministérielle ont décidé de s'opposer à toute motion tendant à convoquer arbitrairement des témoins dans le cadre d'une véritable pêche à l'aveuglette.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Mais on a très bien pu décider cela de nous-mêmes. Quoi qu'il en soit, nous n'avons, au sein du Comité, aucunement décidé...

M. Blake Richards:

J'ai en outre eu connaissance d'un autre article, selon lequel le Bureau du premier ministre avait dit au député, et...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Quoi qu'il en soit, j'estime que...

M. Blake Richards:

Il semble, malgré tout, que le gouvernement...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Mais j'entends mettre les choses au point.

M. Blake Richards:

... tente actuellement de mettre fin à...

Le président:

Un instant, Blake. Ruby a la parole. Vous pourrez répondre ensuite si vous le voulez.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je tiens à mettre les choses au point et à faire savoir que personne ne m'a dit comment me prononcer sur l'une ou l'autre des motions en cause. D'après ce que vous avez dit, et selon ce que nous ont dit les témoins qui ont comparu devant le Comité — je précise qu'il y a eu trois témoins et que, au cours des cinq séances du Comité, cinq points de vue différents ont été présentés. Nous allons nous décider uniquement en fonction de ce qui a été dit au Comité.

Le président:

Quelqu'un d'autre veut-il intervenir dans le cadre du rappel au Règlement?

Monsieur Schmale, la parole est à vous puisque vous n'aviez pas terminé.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Merci.

Ruby, veuillez m'excuser si je ne suis pas parvenu à vous convaincre au cours de l'heure qui vient de s'écouler. J'espère profiter des...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

La séance dure depuis une heure et 50 minutes.

M. Jamie Schmale:

... quelques minutes qui suivent pour essayer de vous convaincre.

Mais, par votre intermédiaire, monsieur le président, je souhaite avant cela proposer, très rapidement, un amendement à la motion présentée par M. Richards.

Je propose que l'on amende la motion en supprimant les mots « au plus tard le 21 juin 2016 ».

Le président:

Il s'agit de la première des cinq motions proposées par M. Richards. Elle figure sur la liste et nous en avons discuté lors des deux dernières séances. M. Richards souhaite supprimer le membre de phrase « au plus tard le 21 juin 2016 ».

Y a-t-il des observations sur l'amendement?

Désolé, mais la discussion porte sur l'amendement. Nous pouvons reprendre dès le début la discussion sur l'amendement.

Nous entamons maintenant une nouvelle discussion. Qui souhaite s'exprimer au sujet de l'amendement?

M. Jamie Schmale:

Si vous voulez, je pourrais en dire quelques mots.

Le président:

Voulez-vous, Jamie, que j'inscrive votre nom sur la liste? Bon.

Vous avez la parole.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Permettez-moi d'expliquer en quelques mots pourquoi nous devrions adopter cet amendement. Comme vous le savez, monsieur le président, il est probable que le Comité ne se réunira pas à nouveau avant le 21 juin. Cela étant, la date prévue dans la motion présentée par M. Richards n'a pas lieu d'être. La motion doit donc être amendée pour des raisons évidentes.

C'est ce que je propose à nos collègues.

(1255)

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Permettez-moi d'invoquer le Règlement.

Le président:

Vous avez la parole, monsieur Christopherson, pour un rappel au Règlement.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, je vous demande conseil.

Si l'amendement n'est pas adopté avant le 21 juin, qu'adviendra-t-il de la motion?

Le président:

Permettez-moi de consulter notre greffière.

Selon la greffière, dans ce cas-là, un autre amendement pourrait être proposé.

M. David Christopherson:

Cela veut-il dire que la motion ne devient pas caduque du simple fait qu'elle n'est pas adoptée avant la date prévue?

Nous tentons juste de voir ce qu'il en est sur le plan juridique. Je cherchais simplement à être utile.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Reid, est-on parvenu à vous convaincre?

M. Scott Reid:

Je crois avoir été convaincu, en effet, bien qu'il ne soit pas facile de me convaincre. Je suis un dur à cuire, mais l'argument avancé était tout à fait convaincant.

M. Blake Richards:

Je l'ai vu à un certain moment commencer à changer d'avis. C'est sa gestuelle qui me l'a indiqué car il opinait de la tête.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai vu en effet le changement s'opérer.

Le président:

M. Christopherson a parfaitement raison de dire que, théoriquement, les motions pourraient toutes devenir caduques avant notre prochaine réunion, le 23 juin. Étant donné que les motions seront toutes caduques d'ici là, nous allons devoir en présenter de nouvelles.

M. Scott Reid:

J'estime pour ma part que la motion demeure recevable tant que l'on continue à discuter de l'amendement. Le dépôt de cet amendement nous permet en effet de poursuivre le débat au-delà du 21. Je dirais même...

M. David Christopherson:

Je sens que nous allons passer là de l'autre côté du miroir.

Le président:

Pardon?

M. David Christopherson:

J'essayais juste de faire de l'esprit.

M. Blake Richards:

Monsieur le président, je n'ai pas bien saisi la portée de votre décision, car il y a aussi les autres motions.

Le président:

En effet.

M. Blake Richards:

Elles prévoient toutes la même date, mais j'estime que l'on devrait néanmoins en étudier le fond. Nous pourrons bien sûr les amender elles aussi.

Selon moi, nous pourrions, après les avoir amendées, encore les adopter, car l'idée qui en est à l'origine demeure importante, et parfaitement pertinente en ce qui concerne la question essentielle des privilèges parlementaires.

Elles doivent manifestement être amendées, mais je souhaite qu'elles puissent encore être présentées.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Pour éviter toute équivoque, monsieur le président, je propose l'adoption individuelle et collective des amendements présentés par M. Richards, c'est-à-dire la suppression des mots « au plus tard le 21 juin 2016 ». Je vous demande de considérer ces amendements comme ayant été proposés.

(1300)

Le président:

Pouvons-nous procéder ainsi?

M. Scott Reid:

Si vous le souhaitez, c'est très volontiers que j'en donnerai lecture aux fins du compte rendu.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid, la greffière me fait savoir qu'on ne peut pas proposer un amendement à une motion qui n'est pas encore débattue, et nous sommes à court de temps.

M. Scott Reid:

Mais, je n'entends aucunement proposer des amendements. Ce que je propose, ce sont des motions formulées en les mêmes termes, sauf qu'on supprime les mots « au plus tard le 21 juin 2016 ». J'en donnerai très volontiers lecture aux fins du compte rendu.

Le président:

Est-ce à dire que vous proposez de nouvelles motions?

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, il s'agirait de nouvelles motions.

Le président:

La greffière me fait savoir que vous ne pouvez pas proposer de nouvelles motions tant qu'une motion demeure à l'étude.

Nous sommes à court de temps, mais j'estime, a priori, qu'en ce qui concerne cette motion, M. Reid avance un argument valable, et que dans la mesure où son amendement est en cours de discussion, la motion est recevable. Je vais demander conseil, mais les autres motions sont devenues, me semble-t-il, caduques. Nous sommes encore dans les délais, cependant, et vous pourriez simplement les présenter à nouveau en supprimant le membre de phrase évoqué tout à l'heure. Cela vous laisse 48 heures. Vous avez donc largement le temps.

Sommes-nous d'accord sur ce point?

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on June 16, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.