header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-03-19 PROC 145

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Welcome to the 145th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

Today, as we continue our study of parallel debating chambers, we are pleased to be joined by Mr. Bruce Stanton, member of Parliament for Simcoe North, who is also the Deputy Speaker and Chair of the Committee of the Whole. As a personal note, he is also the chair of the Canada-Myanmar Friendship Group. For members' information, Mr. Stanton has authored articles on the subject of parallel chambers in both the IRPP's Policy Options magazine and the Canadian Parliamentary Review.

Thank you for being here.

Just before you start, I want to let members know that the delegation from Kenya never made it, so the meeting you got a notice for is not on. Take it off your schedule if you did include it.

Mr. Stanton, we're delighted you're here. I actually think this is one of the most exciting projects that PROC has undertaken, so we look forward to your suggestions. [Translation]

Mr. Bruce Stanton (Simcoe North, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Good morning.

Thank you for the invitation to appear as part of your study of a parallel or concurrent debating chamber for the House of Commons.[English]

Before I get into this, I'd first like to say that I really don't consider myself to be an expert in these matters, but I have shared and will share my perspective today on some of the research I have done in this area. Of course, as some of you may know, some of this was published in the Canadian Parliamentary Review and in the IRPP op-ed the chair mentioned, but these are also my own observations, as a parliamentarian, here since 2006.

I am going to touch on three main things here in my opening comments. The first will be a general description of the concept; second will be some reasons we might be considering this kind of innovation; and third will be some thoughts on how, if the decision were to proceed, that might be dealt with.

After that, of course, I'd be happy to take your questions. [Translation]

Firstly, in terms of the second chamber itself, the briefing materials and the testimony of Mr. Natzler, the clerk of the UK House, will give you a rough idea of how the system works. Both Australia's House of Representatives and the UK Parliament use them. Australia was the first country to implement the structure, in 1993, and the UK followed, to a degree inspired by Australia’s experience, in 1999.[English]

Each has evolved into a permanent and valued part of its parliamentary institution, and it's noteworthy that their functions and the way they serve MPs and Parliament are somewhat different.

The Federation Chamber in Australia, for example, is used as an adjacent lane for parts of the legislative process, such as second reading and report-stage debates, whereas the U.K. keeps all its consideration of government legislation in the main chamber.

In my view, this is telling. While we share the Westminster parliamentary tradition with our Commonwealth friends in the U.K. and Australia, our Standing Orders, conventions and practices have evolved differently to suit our needs and the priorities of parliamentarians here.[Translation]

However, there are some common virtues of the two second chambers. These virtues include the following.

They have a low quorum of three people, including the chair occupant, a member from the government side and member from the opposition. The forum is less controversial, since the debates by their nature are less divided.

(1105)



The parallel structure affords more time for members of Parliament to debate and to speak about issues that have direct relevance in their constituencies. The second chambers operate on a fixed schedule that’s around 30% to 35% of the time in the main chamber.

The second chambers are seen as a way of managing or supplementing the noncontroversial aspects of the day's business that would otherwise take debating time away from the more consequential business of the main chamber, such as routine proceedings, adjournment debates and members statements.[English]

They can act as a proving ground for testing new procedures that may be considered for implementation in the House, and for MPs to hone their debating skills and familiarity with procedures. They are also a help for newer presiding officers to gain knowledge of their roles and points of procedure that will invariably become helpful when they preside in the House.

They generally operate on the same rules of order as the main chamber. They are televised, transcribed and journaled, and provide a small gallery for the public. In our case we would have to add to that simultaneous translation—in essence, the same way that we support standing committees.

The physical setting is similar to a large committee room. The more intimate setting aids decorum. The U.K. and Australia use a U-shaped design to invite more collegiality across party lines.

Since their inception, each of the two chambers has created new features that have become very popular. In the U.K., as you heard, they use the chamber for e-petition debates that can have in excess of 100,000 signatures. Due to the high level of public interest in these debates, they can attract a big online audience, which have been noted to be sometimes higher than for other debates that are broadcast. In Australia, time is reserved for what is called “constituency statements”, like a three-minute S.O. 31, which both members and ministers can use to tailor messages to their own constituents. You'll know that our ministers are prohibited from using that in our S.O. 31 system.[Translation]

The reviews of each second chamber after more than a decade of use—two decades in the case of Australia—show that each overcame the early concerns and skepticism regarding their merit and usefulness.

Secondly, I want to address the reasons for embarking on a project like this. I believe that it's important that any effort to establish a second chamber be based on a reasonable need or short-coming with our current parliamentary system and procedures.

Understanding the scope of the problems would be instrumental in explaining how a proposed second chamber would work, and more importantly, why it's worth doing. Though the outcomes were favourable for the parliaments in our fellow Commonwealth countries, it's recommended that we understand what issue or gap a second chamber would be intended to address.[English]

There should be a cross-party consensus on this before proceeding much further, and it would take some additional work even to land on what the rationale for such a project would be in the Canadian context.

For the examination of where these gaps or areas of improvement could lie, Samara has done some excellent exit surveys of MPs and tapping of the views of MPs currently serving. House leaders, whips past and present, and table officers have an understanding and experience of parliamentary processes that is unique compared with that of the average backbencher, and their insights on where the current system could be improved would be invaluable.

(1110)



I would also suggest getting a firm understanding of the original motivations for both the Federation Chamber and Westminster Hall, because they are instructive. The way these two chambers operate today reflects very much their initial raison d’être. That is why, for example, Westminster Hall is more a domain for backbench business versus the main chamber, whereas the Federation Chamber acts as more of an adjacent lane for a wider array of House business.

Finally, as you look at possible steps for your study and recommendations, it is worth looking at how the Select Committee on Modernisation proceeded with their investigations into what eventually became Westminster Hall.[Translation]

The select committee was aware that creating a second chamber would be, for the institution, a radical and broad innovation to the usual practices. The UK first looked into the second chamber idea in 1994, based on Australia's success. It wasn't until December 1998 that the select committee tabled a discussion document for members of Parliament presenting the possible advantages of the chamber. At that point, the select committee wasn't even proposing to start a second chamber on an experimental basis.[English]

Their intent was to set the idea out in some detail, so members could give their views on the basis of as much information as possible. They then invited members to comment on the proposal over several months, after which they could determine whether to proceed, but if so, how it might best be implemented. As they explained, members will wish to consider it with care, not only in principle but how it might work in practice.

With the inputs they received from MPs in hand, the modernisation committee tabled its second report in the House on March 24, 1999. It was debated in the House in May, and that second report became the basis of a trial of Westminster Hall starting in November of that year. It was not until 2001-02 that Westminster Hall became a permanent part of the U.K. House of Commons parliamentary process.[Translation]

In summary, I believe that your consideration of this idea is a constructive exercise. Parliament, like any other organization with which we have worked, must constantly seek to improve the efficiency of its internal and administrative processes and make good use of its time. The time demands on parliamentarians is a recurring theme throughout the evolution of our standing orders and our practices and traditions.[English]Moreover, we should always be looking for ways to demonstrate to our constituents the value and consequence of the exercise of our duties as MPs.

There are many possible advantages to moving ahead with this idea, and the success in the U.K. and in Australia is well established. For our Parliament, having a good grasp of the issues, obstacles or limits that a second parallel chamber could address is the crucial first step.

I thank you for your attention. I'm happy to take your questions, Mr. Chair. [Translation]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Stanton.[English]

Great.

In the report, you referred to the information from Samara. We have a report here. It's in English, but it's in translation, so you will get a copy of that shortly.

Also, we have someone from Samara here. Could you put your hand up, in case anyone wants to talk to you later?

I have just a quick question. Am I correct that the Australian double chamber evolved because the Canberra state chamber did it first? Are you aware of that?

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

I'm not certain of that, Mr. Chair. I do know that, in the original evolution of this around 1993, it was a fairly volatile time politically for the House of Representatives. They were having real issues with essentially closure of debates, time allocation—“guillotining” was the word they used at that time. They really got to somewhat of an impasse there. I think that got them looking at finding other ways to get on with it. The Federation Chamber was born out of that.

The Chair:

We will go to questioning. If it's okay with the committee, I thought we might do one round normally, and then if people are reasonable, just open it up informally to different people, as we have in the past.

Is that okay?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Let's begin.

The Chair:

Let's start with Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Mr. Stanton, all partisanship aside, I'm a fan. Thank you very much. I enjoyed your article when it first appeared in Canadian Parliamentary Review, I think it was.

I've been following this issue and looking into it further in other jurisdictions, much like you have. During my time, I'm going to do two things: I'm going to ask you questions, but I'm also going to give myself the opportunity to vent my spleen on many of these issues.

I say that because I am absolutely envious of many of the things I've heard in witness testimony about Westminster, the clerk there, and what I've read from Australia. I've seen how they have made strides well advanced of what they were back then, both in Australia and England, but also in New Zealand, and how they've managed to do that with a great deal of maturity.

As a matter of fact, if I may be so bold, sometimes they debate the way their House operates in such a mature fashion that it makes us look like a stationary clown car where reasoned debate goes madly off in different directions. That is most disappointing, because we had an episode last year that was absolutely disgraceful, and I think we should all be blamed for that.

I saw it 10 years ago. I saw it 10 months ago. I think ideas like yours get lost, because I don't know if we're mature enough to deal with them yet. That's my view. That's 15 years of my spleen vented.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Simms: There are two things about that. There is the Federation Chamber in Australia and then the Westminster Hall. One is a supplemental, if I may use that term, in the sense of there being over 600 members of Parliament. A lot of it deals with the backbench business of emergency debates, e-petitions and constituency statements. I'd love to get three minutes to talk about my constituency. I think we all should have that. The Australian model is more of a parallel chamber. That's the one that's adjacent.

My opinion is that we would be better served with a parallel way of doing this. In other words, for the actual legislation that's in the House now, we should have the opportunity to go beyond the House and discuss it outside if we want to talk about a certain issue of the day. As a matter of fact, I do believe that we could deal with the issue of travel on Fridays, because it seems like everybody who is in government wants to get rid of Friday sittings. Everybody in the opposition wants to keep Fridays; it doesn't matter what party it is. That's been going on for 50-odd years.

This could be a situation where Friday is set up for a parallel chamber, and you don't have to be there on a Friday; you want to be there on a Friday because it deals with a bill that is pertinent to the people you represent.

Do you have a preference between the two?

(1115)

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

I think there are features of both that could be seen as advantageous, depending on how we.... As I stressed in my remarks, this comes down to what we think will work best. I agree with taking a look at this in a mature and less partisan fashion, because you're essentially trying to innovate and improve the processes that serve not only parliamentarians but, through them, the public as well. I think this is where the parallel chambers have worked successfully, and certainly in the case of Westminster Hall with the addition of their debates. They have debates on a number of issues that would never be seen here other than the rare take-note debates that we have in the chamber.

I agree with your point, Mr. Simms, with regard to looking at the U.K. example. They used a modernization committee to take up consideration of just that issue. They were able to bring forward some ideas in fairly precise detail.

On the other point you mentioned with regard to debates and taking the issues of governmental business for additional comment, the chambers do use a form of what we would consider adjournment debates. This is where members of the government and opposition are both present, and there's an opportunity for opposition members to then pose questions. You can have this exchange in the parallel chamber. Let's face it: adjournment proceedings are highly subscribed. Quite often there isn't the time to permit them all.

There are a number of different options. This is why, as opposed to landing on a firm position as to what it should be and what it should entail, I think we should take a good look at some of these advantages, and what we can agree upon we could move forward with.

(1120)

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes, I think you're right. As I said earlier about the parallel function of it, I think that's the prime importance of a parallel chamber. I think you could cover off the other stuff and constituency statements as well.

In the age of social media, we all want to get on camera so we can record it for our Facebook accounts or what have you. I don't mean that facetiously. It's what we do.

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

Right.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I have so many constituents who say, “Gee, when do you get up in the House and say something?” I tell them that I just did it the day before. But nobody watches CPAC, and if they did, I'd be rather alarmed.

The thing about what you're saying is that I fundamentally agree with the function of it, and it should be flexible in the case of this country, because all the other stuff does mean something to a backbench member of Parliament.

In addition to the legislative function and the vetting, let's go back to the guillotining that you talked about—or as we call it, by a fancier name—

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Speaking of guillotining, government programming started back in the late 1990s. It allows people to see what is available for debate, because you can't do it forever, right? Despite the consternation over time allocation, that we don't like it, we've been using it. And I say “we” meaning around the board. Let's face it, you know, at some point you're going to say, “Why are you cutting this off? Oh, and by the way, how come you haven't passed any legislation yet?”

So how does it help in that situation for this chamber to serve a role?

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

I think it would be worth considering that in his testimony, Clerk Natzler was right onto something here. It was to say that as we go forward on this, we should be mindful that we're going to do something that at the very least leaves both opposition and government neutral as it relates to the function of a second chamber, that you're not, on the one side, adding or taking away opportunities for government to make sure they can implement their agenda, or on the other side be in any way changing the degree to which the opposition have the opportunity to put those arguments towards the government. At the very least, we should achieve a balance with that if there are going to be changes at all.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much for your comprehensive reply to Mr. Simms.

I'd also like to welcome Frank Baylis to the committee. He's had a long-time interest in changing our democratic systems to make them more efficient, so he's studied this as well.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Thank you.

First of all, welcome, Bruce. We're glad to have you here.

I want to ask about something from your presentation. You mentioned, and I think this is true for both Westminster Hall and the Federation Chamber, that they operate on a fixed schedule. It's around 30% to 35% of the total sitting hours per week of the House of Commons, or House of Representatives in the case of Australia. Are the numbers right for both of those?

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

It seems to be fairly consistent, Mr. Reid.

In each case the chambers have a regular schedule per week, not unlike in the House. That's not to say that each rubric of that schedule is used every week, but for the most part it is, and there's a fixed schedule of set times for a certain part of business to be taken up. For example, in Westminster Hall, on a certain day a time is reserved for e-petition debates, and there's one hour for the liaison committee. There's even a section, I believe, on Thursday for backbench business.

Mr. Scott Reid:

And that has to be done in order to allow coordination with the business of the House, so that people aren't expected to be in two places at once, much as with with our committees.

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

That's entirely correct, and that's why on average, on balance, the time that's taken in the parallel chamber is around 35% of the total hours that are taken up in the main chamber.

Mr. Scott Reid:

So if you had the goal of ramping it up so that it would run at 100% of the number of hours of the main chamber, it would be logistically difficult or impossible, unless you were to have it run into the wee hours of the night.

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

Yes, and I think at that point, one would have to wonder.... That would be an even more radical innovation than what we've seen in both of these other parliaments. They were very specific in setting certain aspects of business in the second chamber, and it was directly in line with what they felt they needed to solve or address, gaps or weaknesses with the current system.

Another recurring theme was the time needed in the main chamber. There was never any doubt that the main chamber is the important forum, especially for exchange and debate on the more controversial and consequential issues of the day.

(1125)

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

The Chair:

And votes.

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

And votes, certainly. As I said, votes are never taken in the parallel chamber.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. That gives us an idea. There are some hard limits on how far you can go, unless you're willing to go into the wee hours of the night, in which case you can go back to the main chamber, because it too shuts down at night, presumably because we are all reluctant to sit overnight—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Most of the time.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, most of the time. Perhaps not this week—

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid:—but in other weeks.

Here's the thing. The reason I ask that question is that to me.... Others will identify different things they think are of primary concern, but to me the thing that gets squeezed out of the parliamentary calendar, the legitimate business that just doesn't get taken care of the way it should be, is private members' business. I'm not referring to S.O. 31s, although I think members' statements are important. I'm talking about actual private members' legislation. We have a lottery. I'm guessing that about 270 MPs are eligible for the lottery.

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

Yes, all of them except ministers, parliamentary secretaries and Deputy Speakers.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, and Deputy Speakers, who are tragically and unfairly excluded in one of the great crimes of our modern times.

We get to about item 150 and then we run out of time.

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I am in this category, with an item of mine coming up soon. It's a motion. We'll likely get the first hour of debate in, but not the second. That's just the way it works. I'm not happy about that. I'm less unhappy than I'd be if I were someone whose item would have come up with the House sitting in July. The point is, we can move that over to a parallel chamber entirely, I would think. I'm just wondering, if we made that the primary focus of a second chamber—effectively a private members' business chamber—whether we would then be able to go through this.

I have a wrinkle to this question. Right now, about 170 people are included. It's reasonable to expect, at least if the supplementaries were to last a century—that's how we should think in an institution like this—that we're talking about 500 members of Parliament. That's a reasonable estimate as to how many members of Parliament there will be a century from now. If I add another 180 items on there, could we still get through a four-year Parliament and allow everybody a fair shot?

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

Well, it is just as you have described. It's the straight time. We only have one hour a day in the main chamber in which we take up consideration of private members' business, be that bills or motions, so there is a limit there. One could consider adding time to the chamber, I suppose. I don't think there would be agreement to reduce time for government orders and other important parts of the rubric.

When you consider that now only a little more than 50% of eligible members ever get a chance to bring forward a private item for debate in the main chamber, it is conceivable that part of that consideration could be taken up in the parallel chamber and you could essentially move that business along much more quickly.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes.

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

I would want to think about the consequences of that for supporting the whole process of preparing bills and all of the functions that currently support private members in that area. You'd have to think about that, but it would certainly be doable. It might be one of those areas of current limitations that a parallel chamber could very much address.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have only less than a minute here, and the next question is one that I did actually run by you beforehand.

You have a rotation of House officers, Speakers and Deputy Speakers who serve in the House during normal debates. Would it be necessary to have a separate rotation, perhaps with an expanded body of people or a separate body of people who are chairs and deputy chairs of the parallel chamber?

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

Again, you could come at that differently. We currently have a panel of chairs, as does the U.K., which is appointed by the Speaker to preside over meetings not just in the House, but also, for example, in association annual general meetings.

There's a designated group of people. In some cases, it includes senators, and I wouldn't see doing that in a House-type committee, but they are eligible for doing that kind of work.

There would be an additional up to 12 hours a week, potentially, where you would need a chair occupant to manage that. The House may want to consider if they would need to add an additional chair occupant on a regular basis to manage those additional hours, but it could be quite easily done.

(1130)

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. [Translation]

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll now move on to Mr. Christopherson. [English]

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thanks, Chair.

Deputy Speaker, thanks so much for attending today.

You and I have similar experience in this place. You arrived in the 39th Parliament in 2006, and I got here in the 38th Parliament, just 18 months before you, so most of our experience is the same.

Again, to speak to my experience in coming to this, I've also been a House leader in opposition at Queen's Park, but I was also a part of the House management committee when we were in government. I served a stint as deputy leader, trying to be a referee, similar to you. I think I have a good feel, from all sides, for the concerns and the opportunities.

Let me just say that since this first came on our radar a few years ago when we started to do a review, you and Frank and Mr. Reid and a few others—Mr. Simms—have really taken this to heart. I've had an interest in it, but some of you have gone further and done the research on it.

I only say that to reflect on having been here long enough to see enough things come to life and then go away, then come to life and go away again. However, I think this has some legs. This has captured our attention. We've continued to work on it and people have taken it to heart. If I can be so bold, albeit I won't be here, my gut tells me that this is going to come to be and that it's going to be a good thing. It's a question of how we do it and the process.

If I could jump ahead in my thinking, I think a trial is going to be a definite component of this, because nobody is going to want to go too fast, too far.

I appreciate your recognizing the politics of this, because there are two sides of it. One is the most efficient way to give all members as much participation as possible, particularly in light of our being in a number of eras where more and more power is devolving to the PMO. That's not just to the executive, but concentrated in the PMO.

If I can make a shot for my motion coming up that speaks to our taking back control of hiring our own agents, I will remind people that we still allow the executive to do the hiring process for someone like our Auditor General. It's our Auditor General, but we let the executive, a subset of Parliament, do the hiring process. That's except for the night before when there's a quick little, “Hey, are you okay with Bob Smith?”, and that's it. That's the extent of consultation. To heck with that; we own it.

To me, this is another aspect of trying to reach out and grab back what the historical purpose of Parliament and individual members were.

I would emphasize that no one speaks better to this than Mr. Reid, in terms of both his longevity here, which surpasses ours, and from his interest and being a historian in his own right.

I do think that a trial is going to be a component. That's the one side of it.

The politics of it on the other hand—and I'm glad you touched on it because we have to deal with that too—is that the government wants as much time as possible to get its bills through so that it can say, “Yes, we allowed lots of debate.” Mr. Simms, I think you nailed it right on. The government gets kind of screwed both ways: If you don't allow debate then you're being undemocratic, and if you don't get bills passed, you're being ineffective. Good luck trying to work your way through that.

When we put this in place, we're going to need to be cognizant of that. That's why I'm really happy we are talking, for now, that this is looked at from the view of enhancing, and I would say returning backbench members to their rightful place as important members. We're not supposed to be here just echoing what our leaders tell us to say or to vote the way that our whips say, although that's what we do a lot of the time. We on this committee should be doing everything we can to enhance and preserve the role of individual members, which historically has been going the wrong way.

This was a really good presentation, by the way. Thank you.

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

Thank you.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I liked what you said in noting that we need to reflect on our initial raison d'être. If we stay on that point and let the government of the day, regardless of who it is, know that this is not about trying to play any games with that timing, but rather enhancing the backbench.... Whether it will eventually get into that, remains to be seen.

I will ask you a question. I'm clearing my throat, Scotty.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson: I found it curious that you mentioned ministers. Could you expand on that a bit?

As you know, we separate that pretty clearly here, and yet you're bringing.... That brings back some interesting points. Ministers of the Crown—and I've sat as a minister, provincially—are still members in their own right, with constituencies and constituents and the politics of getting re-elected.

What are your thoughts on how we would sort of break with our tradition, or are we better to stay with keeping the ministers out of it because that system works best for us?

What are your thoughts, Bruce?

(1135)

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

As you pointed out, Mr. Christopherson, ministers are still MPs and they rarely get an opportunity to get on the record on matters that are pertinent to the people they represent.

Australia embarked on what's called a “constituency statement”. They initially scheduled 30 minutes for those, meaning there are roughly 10 of those as part of the rubric, I think, once a week where they have the opportunity. On numerous occasions, there had to be motions made to extend the 30 minutes to 60 minutes. This has happened frequently because of the demand for these three-minute constituency statements.

As you know, ministers are not permitted to participate in S.O. 31s, so it was another avenue for them to get on the record, much like in the spirit of the backbench elements of Westminster Hall, on matters that are directly important and related to the people at home. Often this has been the case. Ministers clearly appreciate that as much as anyone.

Mr. David Christopherson:

So you think that is something we should at least consider even in the initial trial process?

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

It has been a grand success in Australia. Yes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm probably out of time.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks, Chair.

The Chair:

That was a great exercise to see who could talk the longest without asking a question.

Now I will open it up informally to anyone who would have a question.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Chair, I believe my colleague Mr. Reid may have a couple of questions later.

I have a broad question to get your thoughts on it.

First of all, I do want to thank our friends at Samara. I see that Dr. Paul Thomas is here. I would say Dr. Thomas is one of my two favourite Canadian political scientists who are named Paul Thomas. I just want to point that out. I do appreciate the exceptional work that Samara does and the information it provided to this committee.

You talked a bit about the evolution, especially of Westminster, and how they got to that point. I hadn't realized the process they went through with the initial committee report and the period for members to respond and give some thought to what they wanted, and then coming up with the final report and debating it in the House. It seemed like a very logical process they went through, whether it started that way or not or whether events got in the way.

How would you envision a similar process playing out here? Would it replicate that process, with an initial report and a period for feedback and then a final report that could then be debated in the House? That's my first question.

Connected to that, should we as committee, if we decide to look at that process, also have a part in that looking at other aspects related to that? I'm thinking about some of the Westminster innovations such as the Backbench Business Committee. Should we be looking at that at the same time to see how that might play a role?

We had a review of the e-petition systems here. One thing that was suggested in the past and wasn't adopted at the time was like in the U.K., with a debate to be triggered based on a petition. Should that be rolled up into this type of discussion, or should we focus only on a parallel chamber process? Should we include more in it at the same time? Can we have your thoughts on that?

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

Those are two good points.

In terms of the process going forward, I do recommend...because as the U.K. recognized, this is a fairly large—they said “radical”—innovation in their usual practices. They were very cautious with it. They had a select committee look entirely just at putting that set of initial proposals together, which they then got out to all MPs for a period of months over Christmas break and into the following year, before they came back with a second report. That formed the basis of the debate that went into the House. Then they started it on an experimental basis for a year.

When they first came out with that first set of proposals, they weren't even at that point suggesting a pilot project. They just said, here's what we're thinking, and we really want to see what you think of this proposal. I think the input they had back from MPs went into report two, and that eventually formed the basis of the Standing Orders.

On the second point, the whole culture of backbench business in the U.K. is different and has evolved differently. It would not be my recommendation to go down that road. It might be something for another look, maybe chapter two for the modernization committee, if we were to create such a thing.

It certainly has merit. I think there would be aspects of the program that you could put in a second chamber that would improve opportunities for backbench members to get on record matters that are relevant to their constituents. I would want to get a separate understanding of just how backbench business and that committee operates in the U.K. That is fascinating, I grant you, but I think that would be something for a separate look.

(1140)

Mr. John Nater:

Mr. Christopherson mentioned, and it was mentioned around the table as well, that if we were to implement changes, we should do it on a trial or provisional basis. I suspect you would recommend that as well.

What time period do you think is acceptable? Is it the length of a single Parliament? Is it two Parliaments? What timeline do you think would be appropriate to be able to get to know the system, first of all, but then actually to have a legitimate opportunity to see if it's working and achieving the goal that was set out?

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

In each case, when they got to the point of establishing a pilot project, there were reports a year or so after the first year of operations. That was a report to Parliament, around which there was a determination made as to whether they would go forward, and in some cases what changes or modifications they would make.

In terms of the span of time, a committee looking at this would need at least several months—there's a ton of information out on this—to put together an initial set of proposals. They would need to get it out for input and consultation—that's perhaps another half year—and then try an experimental or pilot project, all broadly within the framework of one Parliament. Then, perhaps at the end of that Parliament or some time shortly after, there would be a report on its utility and its usefulness to Parliament, and only after that—probably in the Parliament after that—an adoption, if Parliament chose to make it a permanent part of the institution.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Other members?

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Just a quick comment before I ask a rather more serious question. If we have the parallel chamber sitting after the regular chamber, wouldn't that make it a serial chamber?

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

I take that as a rhetorical question.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When these topics have come up in the past, what have been the credible arguments against doing this, if there were any? Have there been serious...? What are the points made against it?

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

There were, in the initial go-around, in both instances. In the case of Australia, there were dissenting reports on that initial debate and the tabling of the first reports. There was concern that the parallel chamber would in some way diminish the pre-eminence of the main chamber. There was a sensitivity to that. In addition, there was a feeling that it would be inconsequential for audiences at home.

In all cases, the experience showed that early skepticism was essentially solved or dissipated over time, because of the values and some of the enhancements they made to the program. They added things like the constituency statements and having more of what we call “take-note debates”. The debating schedule in Westminster Hall is full. You basically apply to get your debate put on the agenda—either a 30-minute or a two-hour debate. You have to guarantee as the applicant that people from different caucuses will show up and participate. Those debates have been extremely relevant to the people at home. You'll know that take-note debates for us are a pretty rare occurrence. It's pretty much the domain of the usual channels in the main chamber.

Honestly, as we look at this, the opportunities for that parallel chamber to make that kind of a difference are certainly there.

(1145)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Has anybody ever made a parallel chamber and then closed it because it just didn't work?

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

Not to my knowledge.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have one final, quick question before I cede the floor. Are the party structures and the party control in favour of these things in general, or is there a threat to control over business by giving more power to the backbench from party organizations?

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

Again, that touches on the culture that has developed in the U.K. in particular. Backbench business and the role of backbenchers have been given a very much higher but different kind of profile, going right back to their 1922 Committee. Things have evolved, just as I said at the outset.

Our set of conventions, traditions and Standing Orders has evolved differently from theirs. It's a situation where the functions of the chamber need very much to line up with what we consider our needs to be. Members here have the best understanding of what's going to make a difference, not only for the efficiency of their time—you'll know that we're all under pressure time-wise—but also because it will correspond in essence to bringing the public closer to Parliament, giving them a much greater and stronger connection with the work we do here.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Simms had a question, but he's deferring, if it's okay with the committee, to Mr. Baylis. Is that okay?

You have a question, Mr. Baylis?

Mr. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

If we were to do something in Canada, we'd still not be the pioneers. Can we say that? We're not the first. We're not the second. We're not even, how would I say, a rapid third follower. How long have these been in place in Australia and in the U.K.?

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

They have been since 1994; so Australia has more than 25 years' experience. At mid-decade it did its 20-year report, which to a great extent was the source of the research I did. Yes, we're certainly not early to this at all.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I'm asking because we're great in Parliament at talking things over and over again. We wouldn't be reinventing the wheel here, would we?

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

No. There are really excellent reports on what the pros and cons have been and the process they undertook to get to the introduction of a second chamber. I will say that there are even differences between those two, Australia and the U.K. In the same vein, we can't take what they did and necessarily replicate it here.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

We can't copy and paste it.

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

I think we need to take account of any gaps or issues or limits that such a device or mechanism might help.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

We would take something that pioneers have done for decades but customize it as Canadian.

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

That would be my read of it, yes.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Given this approach, when you first go down a path, you go slowly; the second time, when it's been well travelled, you can go with a little more security. I'm just curious, timing-wise, about how long it would take to put this thing in there. Is bringing parliamentarians up to speed on what it would look like the main thing you'd like to accomplish?

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

Yes.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I know we talked about Samara. It did its survey, and most parliamentarians were against a second chamber. I presume they don't know what it means when they say they're against the second chamber.

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

I took that report, if I can say so, to be more neutral. There's not a wide understanding of what a parallel chamber even is, among parliamentarians, because it's something new for us. In the last Samara report you're referring to, I didn't see the result as being at all a diminishment of that idea. I think, with more information, that could be looked at.

To get back to the origins of your question, Mr. Baylis, the first part would be creating the initial proposed standing order, but we would take some time to really get that right. We would use the examples of the other Houses and put forward the best proposal we could and then get input from MPs. That should take some time, months at least, in which they would have the opportunity to study and reflect on that.

(1150)

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I'd like to hear your thoughts on this. If we were to propose something along the lines of “this is the proposal”—you never get things 100% right anyway—and built into it that after a certain period of time, etc., that would be within the same Parliament.... I note this because one Parliament could say, “We really like it”, but then they could all be voted out. It could happen.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Frank Baylis: A new group could come in and say, “What's this about?”. I'm wondering if it should start and at least be evaluated within the term of the same people. What are your thoughts on that?

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

I think that's a really sound way of framing it, honestly, because you're right that in a four-year Parliament you would have the opportunity to also put it out as a proposal, get feedback on it, propose a pilot, and allow at least a year or so for that to operate, to learn from how it works, its shortcomings and its advantages, and to table a report on the first year of operations. That would all be completed before the end of a Parliament, and in the next Parliament, then, a motion could be taken up to adopt it.

I'll say again, just as a final point, that the best way to accomplish this, of course, is to have all registered parties in the House working together on this.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Do I have one last question?

The Chair:

You can have one more.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Just speaking to the historical sense, you mentioned that there was reluctance in both Houses of Australia and Westminster when it first came. Am I correct in understanding that after it had run, it gained popularity?

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

Yes.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

How did that happen?

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

The early criticism and skepticism all but abated after several years of operation. I mean, it's not to say that there still might not be some dissenting voices out there, but by and large it was seen as an innovation that, no question, was an advantage and a help to the work of parliamentarians and to Parliament itself. In the case of the U.K., these e-petition debates, as Clerk Natzler said at your last meeting, are sometimes the most watched bits of Parliament that you're going to find, aside from some special committees from time to time at which there's controversy or something of that nature. In terms of general debates, it has the effect of bringing the public closer to the proceedings of Parliament.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Madame Lapointe. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Thank you.

Mr. Stanton, I listened to you very carefully. I'll ask you the following question to make sure that I understood correctly.

You're proposing, for example, that the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs conduct a fairly extensive study. However, consultations and studies take time. As my colleague Mr. Baylis was saying, some things already exist, including reports. You mentioned limits earlier. We mustn't reinvent the wheel each time.

If I have understood correctly, you're proposing that, in the next Parliament, we conduct a major study and prepare a report on the topic. You're suggesting that we set up pilot projects and carry out the projects in the next Parliament. Is that correct?

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

Yes. First, the Parliament of the United Kingdom may have created a select committee on modernization to study this issue specifically.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Yes.

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

Therefore, it may not be necessary for a subcommittee of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs to do so. In this case, it will be up to us to decide. However, the topic and study are very broad, and consequences and changes must be implemented in all Parliament's processes and procedures. As a result, I think that the committee can first propose a set of recommendations for consideration and consultations with the members of Parliament. If they so wish, a motion could then be introduced to establish the second chamber. It would on an experimental basis, in my opinion.

I agree that this process will take up to two years, in order to obtain all the comments and recommendations from the other members. The new second chamber will then be tested for a certain period, on an experimental basis.

(1155)

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

You spoke earlier about all the people in Great Britain and Australia who were initially skeptical. However, this skepticism is no longer necessarily an issue. Have these countries carried out studies and prepared reports on the topic?

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

In my opinion, some things have become obvious over time and as the second chamber project progresses. Concerns and skepticism were initially expressed. However, these concerns didn't materialize. More importantly, there has been further improvement with regard to the business of parliamentarians. The benefits showed a significant improvement, despite the initial concerns.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Just to follow up, we've been talking around it, but I really want your perspective because, in your capacity as Deputy Speaker, you've spent more time than most of us thinking of this place holistically—every day, it's your job—and how things move and what's doable and what isn't.

I think it's fair to say that there is a lot of interest and a fair bit of support, and some of us are actually excited about this as a positive move forward. All of that is to say that it looks as if, right now, Chair, at least at this committee, if we could find the sweet spot, I think we're in a position, I would hope, to put together a report that actually moves this forward.

My question to you is this: In the real world of how this place actually operates, the question is ideally, within that context, for those of us who want this to happen, what do you think we should shoot for in this Parliament? Do you think there is enough time that we could actually get into the details? Should we spend more time now drilling down on details to get it as close to ready as possible, and then ask the House to endorse it, and then carry that over?

Or do you think that, given the realities—and you and I have been through a number of Parliaments now—that we're better off to just wrap up this report and give a favourable recommendation to the next Parliament?

I sense that you're enthusiastic toward this as an idea, as many of us are.

So that was a long way to ask what you think is the best we could do in this Parliament with this committee, given that we probably have majority support across all three of the recognized parties to do something. What do you think that something is? What's the most ambitious thing we could do to see this come to light, given that we're into the silly season, we're running out of runway, but we do have time?

Give us your thoughts, sir.

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

Yes, it might not be the most ambitious approach that I would take, but I think if your committee were to table its recommendations based on what it has reviewed here and to give perhaps an initial path forward as to what next steps Parliament may wish to consider in the next iteration, that would still form the basis of a study on record, looking at the facts—the pros and cons of this idea—and then putting it into play so it could be picked up by the next Parliament to move forward with....

In that report, you might want to take some of what this committee considers to be the highlights, or what you consider to be the advantageous aspects of a parallel chamber.

But if you were to go forward, also give some thought to what that path of development might look like. Is it a separate committee? Is it a subcommittee of this one? However, agreeably, your work is very busy. You have a lot on your table. It might not be ideal for this committee to do. But that's the way I would see it.

I agree with your latter suggestion around getting that documented evidence summarized and reported to the House, but beyond that I don't see creating a pilot project by the end of this Parliament. There are a few other things going on between now and June, and it might just get lost in the matters pending.

(1200)

Mr. David Christopherson:

So as much as possible, tee up the next Parliament—

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

That's what I would suggest.

Mr. David Christopherson:

—and if they, in the majority, are as enthusiastic, they would have something to work with.

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

Yes, very much.

There will be members who will be back in the next Parliament, who will know that this is an area of study in which there was some interest and can pick it up from there, if the next Parliament wishes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Excellent, that's a great contribution to this discussion. Thank you so much, Deputy.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We have time for one short question. Either it could be Mr. Simms or he could defer to Mr. Whalen.

Is that okay?

You have one question.

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair, for the opportunity.

Thank you very much, Mr. Deputy Speaker. It's a great report.

In your presentation, you mentioned one point, which is that it's important to know what gap we're trying to address by having a second chamber.

What is your view on the gap that needs to be addressed by the second chamber, or is there one?

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

Well, I have looked at this in more of a conceptual sense. I would certainly defer to members to really think about and discuss those things.

In my view, and speaking not so much as a chair occupant but as an MP over these years, I do think that the opportunities for more MPs to get on the record matters that are directly relevant to their own constituents has been a feature of the other parallel chambers that has been resoundingly successful.

I would suggest finding ways to do that through debates, through constituency statements and through other aspects of that part, while not taking away from the main chamber the importance of its taking up consideration of government and more controversial and consequential business.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Do you think this could happen simply by shortening the amount of time that each individual would have to participate in regular debates? Many chambers in the world limit the amount of time you speak on an issue to three minutes per reading. It seems that 10 minutes per reading has a lot of repetition.

Mr. Bruce Stanton:

Yes, it can have that effect.

If you were to venture into that area—not to say it isn't worth consideration—you're getting into an area that is very much the domain of the parties and how they wish to debate important measures before the House as they relate to government business. I think time limitations are a different kind of discussion. I do believe that both on the government side and on the opposition side—and we see this repeated time and again—parties want the opportunity to get on the record on these matters that are very much part of our law-making, so I would not want to see this in any way derogating from the ability of the House to perform that important function. This is perhaps why a secondary chamber gives an additional ability to do some of these things without taking away the preeminence of the main chamber.

The Chair:

There is one last quick question from Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

To be honest, this is a comment, not a question, to my colleague, Mr. Whalen I'm responding to his suggestion that you can shorten interventions to three minutes.

As a practical matter, it's often difficult to express a complex thought, especially one that involves providing the chamber with background information in a shorter intervention. I recently was addressing the indigenous languages act and had to go through population statistics on Inuktitut speakers and how many of them are unilingual. You just can't do that quickly.

You can always divide your time. We already have a process for allowing 20-minute speeches to be divided into 10. One could easily subdivide further and accomplish that goal. A folkway has to develop of accepting that, but division of time is all done by consent anyway. I think that's a better way of achieving what you're pointing to than to put a cap on, which creates an irreversible problem. I can't say that I'm going to be aggregating the time of the next three speakers in order to provide a more fulsome discussion.

I just wanted to get that on the record.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Reid, and thank you, Mr. Stanton. This has been very helpful to kick off our debate on the potential of this.

We'll just suspend for a couple of minutes to change witnesses.

(1200)

(1205)

The Chair:

Welcome back to meeting 145 of the committee.

During the break, I had a compliment on how well our committee works together. I may have to refer to that in the future at some time. I'll keep that.

Our next order of business is the study of the Centre Block rehabilitation project.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, on a point of order, we're starting a few minutes past 12. Would it be agreeable to the committee, in order to get a full hour with these witnesses, if we go a little bit past 1 p.m. to sort of even out?

(1210)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a meeting at 1, but you guys can go longer.

The Chair:

Do we have agreement? Okay.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can we go on autopilot for that time?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, no votes.

The Chair:

Autopilot and no votes. Okay. That's fair.

Our next order of business is a study of the Centre Block rehabilitation project. As members will recall, one of our last meetings in Centre Block before it closed was on this subject. We agreed that it was important for PROC to be involved in the process throughout the project, a point that the Speaker supported when he appeared before us recently in relation to the House's interim estimates. The issue was also raised at the February 28 meeting of the Board of Internal Economy.

As we continue the discussion, we're delighted to be joined today by officials from the House of Commons: Michel Patrice, Deputy Clerk, Administration; Stéphan Aubé, Chief Information Officer; and Susan Kulba, Senior Director and Executive Architect, Real Property Directorate.

Thank you all for being here.

Although we're extending this, I still want to have the last five minutes to do some committee business for our next meeting, if that's okay.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Totally.

The Chair:

You may want to stay, because one of the things I want to talk about is the tree.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

A tree?

The Chair:

Yes: “the” tree.

Mr. Patrice, if you could give your opening statement and enlighten us, that would be great.

Mr. Michel Patrice (Deputy Clerk, Administration, House of Commons):

Thank you, Mr. Chair and members of the committee. I intend to do a short presentation in order to maximize the exchange with the committee.[Translation]

I'm pleased to be joining you today to present the governance model approved by the Board of Internal Economy. My goal is to ensure the ongoing involvement of members of Parliament in the Centre Block rehabilitation project and to speak with you so that you have the chance to share your expectations and observations.[English]

In terms of the governance model, at the last meeting of the Board of Internal Economy, the board decided to establish a working group composed of one member from each recognized party. That working group would report to the board but would be involved in the rehabilitation project of Centre Block to ensure that MPs were fully engaged, aware and part of the decision-making. Ultimately, while the authority of the decision rests with the board, they would do a report and go into more of the granularity in terms of the Centre Block rehabilitation project.

Obviously, in addition to this working group, as I said last time I appeared before this committee, at the administrative level there is an integrated working group with the administration of the House of Commons, Public Services and Procurement Canada, and also our Hill partner that is looking at and overseeing the project more in terms of its execution and its implementation.

In addition, there's this committee, which is for us a forum, in terms of the governance, to come here on a regular basis to provide updates and to consult and to receive your views on your expectations and needs.

I would suggest that in a nutshell, this is the model of governance. Obviously, there are other aspects that will flow from the work and from looking at the project in terms of where we go and how Centre Block will be rehabilitated. Other stakeholders, such as the media and the public, will for sure also be engaged in consultation, whether through this committee, the working group or the board itself.

I will say, having gone through the West Block experience, a significant number of lessons were learned from that project. From my perspective and in my personal opinion, the most significant one was that the MPs were not sufficiently engaged in the West Block development and its creation. I welcome, then, the direction we've received from the board in establishing that working group of MPs that will assure their continuous involvement at a high level in the project and its granularity. Centre Block is obviously an iconic building for the centre of parliamentary democracy, but it's also your workplace, so it's important that your needs be taken into consideration and that the reality of your lives here be recognized and taken into account in the rehabilitation.

Susan, Stéphan and I are ready to answer any questions you may have.

Thank you very much.

(1215)

The Chair:

Just before I go to the first questioner, did the board make any suggestion that this committee might have input into the Board of Internal Economy if there were a need to make an adjustment in this building?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

The board talked about this committee quite a bit during that discussion and obviously welcomes any involvement this committee may want to have in the project, and recognizes—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Our lobbying worked.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. That's music to our ears.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't have a full seven minutes of questions, so I'll start with what I've got for now.

You mentioned you have a new oversight panel of members from the existing parties, to come in. How is it going to work? Will you have one member from each party look over the blueprints, the plans, or have an overview once a year?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

No. I think those MPs are going to be more involved than that. Obviously, we will consult and meet with them on a regular basis.

One of the first asks, I would suggest, given the discussion we had at the board, as members suggested, is that this group come up with proposed guiding principles or fundamental principles for the rehabilitation of the Centre Block. That's going to be in addition to giving them a detailed briefing on the project, its structure, the way it works. The different players and stakeholders will have to have a discussion to develop those guiding and fundamental principles, which obviously will be presented to the board.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How is the shutdown of Centre Block going now? We've been gone now for a couple of months.

Ms. Susan Kulba (Senior Director and Executive Architect, Real Property Directorate, House of Commons):

To date, obviously it's become a project site. A period of decommissioning has started and there are continued investigations. As you know when you occupied the building, the investigations were slightly intrusive. Now they are getting more and more intrusive. They're the type of investigation work that would have disturbed operations. They are ongoing and will increase over the next number of months, as well as the decommissioning, moving out all of the assets that were left behind at the end of their life cycle. That's where we're at right now.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is the timeline you're seeing now consistent with what we have heard in the past, of 10 years?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Ten years has often been mentioned, but I would suggest that it's premature to determine a number of years until the scoping has been deep enough to understand the state of the building. I find it a very interesting project, but I've learned that in reality we're not sure how the building has been constructed. We have pictures from that time. For example, as the building was built over a period of years and rebuilt after the fire, I understand the foundation structure was wood. Then there was a technological change in the industry and it moved to steel. That we have learned from pictures from the construction at the time, so I think it would be premature to talk about how long it's going to take and the state of the building once we start opening it up, but 10 years often comes up. We'll see as it develops.

The same answer would apply to the budget.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is there any possibility of it being faster than 10 years?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I think anything is possible.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

A final question before I hand it off to Ms. Sahota, if there's still time.

When I started here, I heard that the West Block was to be closed to put in committee rooms. Is that still the intention? Is that a plan in stone or will we decide 10 years from now?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I think that option was put on the table. It's not cast in stone right now because there's going to be an evolution over the next 10 years in the needs of Parliament or the House of Commons in that time.

We just heard a discussion about the possible creation of a parallel chamber. Is that an option?

(1220)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is there any reason that West Block has to be closed when Centre Block reopens or could it stay open right through—

Mr. Michel Patrice:

The West Block will stay open after Centre Block is renovated. For example, a lot of the offices here are planned to become MP's offices, MP's suites.

Every option for the chamber is on the table, but it's been designed so it could be reconstructed to create multiple committee rooms.

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

I'm interested to know how you're going to select the MPs for the working committee.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

That's a prerogative of the parties.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

The parties will choose.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

The parties will determine, yes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Is this the official parties or every party that has a seat in the House?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

It's the recognized parties.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

You mentioned there are a lot of lessons you learned from the construction of West Block. You mentioned that having MPs involved was something that had been overlooked at this time.

Can you be more specific as to what actual physical lessons, aside from the involvement of members of Parliament, you learned from the opening of West Block, what things were overlooked here?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

It could be a very long list. Obviously, we're going to do a report and we're going to assess. We're still learning things.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What about three big ones, off the top of your head?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

One of them, I would say, is about the operationalization of the building versus the construction. How can we do that better? We had a model. When it was developed it was that we finish the building—the construction, the structure and so on—and then we integrate the technology and the testing. We accelerated that process toward the end of the project, when we started to do it in parallel to basically shorten the time to operationalize and make the building fully operational. I think it's a qualified success, but I think we have learned that, if we want to do that and do it in a more serial manner, the way that we do the project—we've discussed it often amongst ourselves—is by zone. We need a clean zone before we start doing the technology.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

And I have two more. I don't think I have much more time.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Stéphan.

Mr. Stéphan Aubé (Chief Information Officer, House of Commons):

If I could add to this, as we just talked about, instead of saying an end date 10 years ago, but kind of focusing on an end period, to give ourselves maybe a return of Parliament versus saying it has to be that September. We can look within a yearly period. It gives us the proper time to do the operationalization, as Michel talked about, so we can move in at the proper time for Parliament. That's one big thing.

The other one is the balance between security and operations. We want to make sure.... For example, we had some issues with the exterior doors on this building. Security requirements were very high to meet requirements for this building, recognizing that it caused many operational issues. These are lessons learned that we want to make sure are folded into the design of the Centre Block, as an example.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you to our guests for being here today.

Based on what came out of the previous discussion regarding the effort to try to move toward getting authorization for a plan at the front end from parliamentarians, I think that makes sense. I think it's a logical way to start approving the overall theme and needs. Facing up to some of the compromises it involves on our part would be helpful.

I do observe that there are some things for which we can't avoid putting off some of the decisions, based on the fact that our needs and expectations are going to change. I'll give you an example of one.

We're going through this process with my family's business. We're building a new head office. We have to deal with the fact that expectations about washrooms are changing. Washrooms were traditionally women's washrooms and men's washrooms. Now we've started to incorporate the idea of baby changing washrooms. Now you have three sets of washrooms with less space in each one. Maybe we want a gender non-specific washroom in the future. We can actually guess at what our future selves are going to want.

Given that the washrooms in Centre Block are a vexed question anyway, this is something where an approval process may have to occur several years down the road for certain aspects of the building. We can get to some of the lighting—I'd point to that as another example—possibly as changes occur, as well as ventilation, because expectations as to acceptable carbon dioxide levels are likely to shift over time. I throw those out.

I wanted to ask a couple questions on general themes here. On the relationship between the Centre Block renovation and the long-term plan, is the group that's being set up just meant to feed back regarding Centre Block only, or on long-term plans as well?

(1225)

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I would suggest it's the long-term plan as well, because it's all part and parcel of a bigger project, which is the parliamentary campus.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

I have just been reading that the rehabilitation of Centre Block isn't what is referred to as the “functional requirements” gathering phase. Do you have an end date in mind for that phase?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I will just give you the end date of what we talked about as design completion. We're talking about January 20, 2022.

Susan, would you go more into—

Ms. Susan Kulba:

Yes. The gathering of the requirements is part of the pre-design and schematic phases, which essentially are ongoing until February 2020. We're at the very beginning of schematic design.

Mr. Scott Reid:

February 2020 or February 2022?

Ms. Susan Kulba:

Pre-design and schematic design go to February 2020.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

Ms. Susan Kulba:

Then we enter a phase that's called “detail design”. That would go until the beginning of 2022.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. Are these timelines published on some website somewhere?

Ms. Susan Kulba:

No. These are the planned timelines by PSPC at this point.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right. Is this the sort of document—I think you're referring to something—that you would be comfortable tabling with us so we can have a better grasp ourselves?

Ms. Susan Kulba:

Sure.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. Maybe the clerk can get that from you at some convenient time.

Getting our heads around that is obviously helpful. We're not sure in 2022, or even 2020, for that matter, what the structure of Parliament will look like. Is it going to be a majority or a minority? Who will be the Prime Minister? We're not sure about all of that stuff. That would be really useful. Who is going to be in what position on this committee, or on the Board of Internal Economy?

Is phase two of the visitor centre considered to be part of the Centre Block renovation, or is that considered to be something else?

Ms. Susan Kulba:

It is. That's correct. It's part of the Centre Block rehabilitation.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is phase two effectively a fait accompli? We've all heard about the famous elm tree. I remember that elm tree from when I was a kid. I grew up in Ottawa. I have a certain amount of sentimental attachment to it.

Leaving aside my personal attachment, evidently other people have an attachment to it as well, as we've all seen. The plan is to have that come down, as I understand it, by the end of this month in order to harvest it for furniture. It's coming down in order to facilitate the expanded visitor welcome centre, or phase two of the centre.

I have to ask the question. First of all, is the tree's downing a fait accompli? Is the giving out of contracts, the locking-in of expenditures for the visitor welcome centre, also at this point a fait accompli, or is there still room for input prior to these things happening? I'm not sure I should be asking that, too, by the way.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

The visitor welcome centre is obviously a big component of the Centre Block rehabilitation project because we have to look at a window of the next 50 years. Centre Block should be able to sustain the next 50 years of Parliament.

The visitor welcome centre is basically an addition of space to move certain functions out of Centre Block to provide more space in Centre Block, to recognize, for example, the growth in the number of MPs that is likely to occur during the next 50 years, and also the various services and so on.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I would say, yes, it's an integral part of the Centre Block project.

Mr. Scott Reid:

No, no. I was not asking about that, but about whether or not contracts have been given out, designs have been made, expenses have been incurred in a way where an attempt to slow down and take a look at them would have the effect of causing—

(1230)

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I think the contracts have been given. I don't know when it's—

Ms. Susan Kulba:

The overall project contracts were awarded—

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Yes.

Ms. Susan Kulba:

—for design and for the construction managers.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

So a hole will be dug because the visitor welcome centre will be underground, but the design in terms of what's going to be contained in what room and what space has not been established.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Are the contracts that have been let so far in the public domain?

Ms. Susan Kulba:

Yes. They were tendered by Public Services and Procurement Canada.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I realize you are not from Public Works, but would you be in a position to direct us or our clerk to that information?

Ms. Susan Kulba: Absolutely.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

We will provide that information to the clerk.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That would be very helpful to us.

I think I'm out of time, Mr. Chair. Maybe I will try getting back in the open round.

Thank you.

The Chair:

If it's okay with people, we will do an open round after Mr. Christopherson.

But before we go to Mr. Christopherson, I want to get clarification on something related to what Mr. Reid was talking about.

I'm assuming that the ultimate authority for anything that happens in the parliamentary precinct is under the auspices of the Speaker and/or the Board of Internal Economy. No one can trump that. Do the Speaker and the Board of Internal Economy have the last say in everything that happens in the parliamentary precinct both inside and outside of buildings?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I would say that in practice it's a bit more complex than that in terms of the requirements for parliamentarians and Parliament. It's definitely under the authority of the Speakers and the boards of their respective Houses, but it remains a reality that the Parliament Buildings and the grounds are in the custody of or belong to the Government of Canada.

It's the same in terms of how ultimately they're the ones who obtain the funding for the projects, and it's the executive that basically grants the funds for the projects. It's a mixed model, I would say, but obviously in terms of requirements, needs and identifying the needs, it's the parliamentarians under the Speaker and their respective board.

There's also another player on the Hill, and it's basically the National Capital Commission with respect to federal land use in terms of the grounds themselves. It's sometimes a web of players that are involved.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I'm going to add that there's also what we call FHBRO, which is about the heritage, preserving the heritage fabric of the building. That is another entity that gets involved in terms of what we can or cannot do to the heritage buildings.

The Chair:

It's very helpful to understand that complexity a bit.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks, Chair. I'm glad you asked that question, because it's quite germane to the point.

Before I do that, though, I do want to just give us all a little pat on the back—nobody else can do it; I can tell you that. We started out getting a report on West Block. We became alarmed at the lack of MP input. We were determined, ourselves, at this committee, that it was going to change in the future, and we made a decision that we were going to make an overture to BOIE. Each of us was then asked to go back and lobby our respective whips and members of BOIE. It would seem that was effective, based on what I'm hearing now, that there was constant talk about “PROC, PROC, PROC”. That's good. I'd just start out by congratulating the chair and the committee on being able to do this. Having been around for a while, I can tell you it's pretty big, in the world of moving government and decision-making, that we've been able to insert ourselves in the way we need to.

That being said, based on your last answer, though, it seems to me that we should be pushing for a little more clarity. The very question the chair asked is the one that was on my mind. I thought the combination Speaker/BOIE was the end of the road. I thought, “They make the decision; that's it.” Now I'm hearing it's not quite that simple, because at least the government—in its capacity to allocate money but recognizing that Parliament, and not the executive, controls the purse strings at the end of the day, though they can ask for money, as they will do tonight.... It's Parliament that says, “Yes, you can have the money”, or, “No, you can't have the money.” We see what goes down, down in the States, when that kind of thing gets challenged.

Then there is, as you've mentioned, the National Capital Commission. It gets its oar in the water. There's something called FHBRO or something close to that. It gets its oar in the water. Now we're putting our oar in the water. I think, Chair, that we should ask the staff to come back and give us a flowchart, as well as they understand it. I see the look on your face, and that's why I want it. The fact that it's nebulous leaves us out in nowhere land. We can think we're an important part of this, but we're all politicians. We can make something something or we can make something nothing, starting with the same something—it just depends on what we want to do with it.

I would like to see that clarity. Doing that, Chair, I think would allow this committee to establish the exact role of that integrated working group. To me, their reporting, if you will, or their advice goes to BOIE, yet I think we should still maintain that the group come in to meet with PROC, I guess as a separate entity. We could even define it as a subcommittee of this committee to make sure that it still stays here.

The fact is the parties get to pick who they're sending. Again we're now back into the executive structure of how this place runs, potentially leaving ordinary members once out, meaning they get to pick who those people are. They may or may not be the ones the rest of us would see as the best representatives of our interests. I'd still like to see some kind of line item—not so much on accountability but on input and dialogue—between that integrated working group and this group.

To put all of that in a nutshell, I'd like to see, as well as can be determined—the fact that it's not clear is one reason I want to see it—the flowchart of decision-making. In that I would ask you to include where you see the working group or where BOIE sees the working group. Then, Chair, we'll have an opportunity to delve into the details of that.

I was surprised. I'll tell you I was a bit surprised that BOIE said, “We have decided.” I'm okay, because I think it's a good move, but I was hoping we were establishing the kind of working relationship in which it would say, “This is where we're thinking of going. Does this satisfy your needs?”

To me, there still needs to be a clarification of the relationship between BOIE and final decision-making, the integrated working group, and PROC, and how they actually fit into an actual process.

(1235)

The Chair:

The ministers too should be in this chart, where they have an effect.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Well, yes. That's why I said, Chair, that I heard there were at least four entities—FHBRO; the government, meaning the executive; the National Capital Commission; and the Speaker/BOIE. Then you could add PROC to that. We have our oar in the water, so that's five players.

Again, the fact that you can't make it clear is my point. I'm not expecting it to come back such that you need to go and figure out how this works; I want to see it right now. If it's a bit of a web or unclear, I'd like to see that reflected so that we can help provide clarity, because it's in the clarity that we'll actually determine whether we get meaningful input or not.

That's kind of where I am right now, Chair. I hope that provides focus for when we next take up this issue. Thank you.

Thank you very much for your presentation.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

I guess we could add the heritage department to that flow chart too.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes. Add everybody who has a say in the decision-making and in what order.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Mr. Chair, I would perhaps add that there are other tenants as well in Centre Block, such as the Senate, PCO, Parliamentary Protective Service, and the Library of Parliament.

Mr. David Christopherson:

And the media.

Mr. John Nater:

The media and all of those are part of that web.

The Chair:

Okay.

We'll go informally now, beginning with Madame Lapointe. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I want to thank the witnesses for being here and for taking the time to return to the committee to answer our questions.

The last time you were here, I was surprised by the little informed provided. We didn't know where we were headed. At least, that's the impression that you gave me. We would start by leaving Centre Block, and then we would see where we stood. That's how I saw things.

Mr. Aubé, thank you for providing information on the number of square meters in Centre Block in comparison with West Block. We can see that the support space in West Block has increased in comparison with the support space in Centre Block. However, you haven't provided details. Is it because the information isn't available?

(1240)

Mr. Stéphan Aubé:

I provided some details.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

You mentioned postal services and communication rooms. It's very detailed, but we don't know what used to be in Centre Block. We went from 570 to 1,441 square metres. I believe that the storage service gained space, and there must be reasons for this. The rest of the information is very clear.

Mr. Stéphan Aubé:

We'll provide those details later, Ms. Lapointe.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you. That's nice of you.

Ms. Kulba, at the previous meeting, you said that the decommissioning would take nine months and that it would help you know where we're headed.

Parliamentary business ended in mid-December. I remember that, on the very popular show Infoman, the Prime Minister demonstrated how quickly the offices had been emptied. In mid-December, I had the impression that we were removing everything from Centre Block.

The decommissioning started three months ago, and is scheduled to take nine months. Where do you stand after three months?

Ms. Susan Kulba:

We are about 20% complete.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

You’re 20% complete, but we are a third of the way through the scheduled timeframe.

Mr. Patrice, as I understand it, once the building is decommissioned, then, we’ll know what the next steps are. Is that right?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I didn’t give any details on the next steps. Beyond decommissioning the building, we need to conduct some investigative work. That will give us information on the building’s condition, mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems, and other structural elements. I can tell you that it will take a bit more than nine months.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Decommissioning involves emptying everything out of Centre Block in order to study its structural condition.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

We need to open up the walls and floors to see their internal structure.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

The decommissioning process is 20% complete.

Ms. Kulba, in response to a question from my fellow member Mr. Bittle, you said you were going to provide us with a first steps plan in January. I don’t think I received it. Is the plan ready?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

The plan actually comes from the Board of Internal Economy. The plan had to be presented to and discussed with the Board of Internal Economy, which then had to provide direction. That direction was provided at our last meeting.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

The Board of Internal Economy gave you…. You showed up with a….

Mr. Michel Patrice:

A discussion took place, and the Board of Internal Economy gave us direction. Discussions took place and a decision was made. I am very glad for the direct involvement and ongoing engagement of members.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

That’s important, to be sure. As you said earlier, this is our workplace.

Mr. Patrice, I was a bit surprised when you said that anything was possible in relation to the 10-year timeline.

Might we be returning to Parliament in eight or nine years, or could it take as long as 15 years?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Unfortunately, I don’t have a crystal ball. I wouldn’t want to speculate as to whether it will be sooner or later. We’ll see. It will become clearer as the work progresses.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

I still find it quite surprising that Centre Block is being closed and that so little is known about its structural condition. Back in October, I watched an episode of Découverte. The program reported quite a bit of detailed information. From the show, it seemed that everything had been evaluated and that there was a clear sense of what the next steps were. I don’t get the impression that—

(1245)

Mr. Michel Patrice:

For historic buildings and projects of this magnitude, it’s always possible to come up with better projections or guesses. I prefer to deal in facts, because I like to know that, when I say something, it’s based on research and science, as opposed to average-based data for similar projects.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

I see.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

We have a very high-level plan. The experts and other stakeholders know exactly what has to be done to deliver a successful project. There are very high-level steps, and those working on the project know exactly where the process is headed. Neither we nor the experts know all the details about the project.

I often liken it to a home renovation, which, by the way, is much more straightforward because we know how a home is built. Nevertheless, there are always surprises. Everything can’t be expected to go according to plan during a small renovation. That is all the more true when carrying out a project of this magnitude, with this kind of construction and symbolism at stake. The surprises will be many.[English]

I would go back to something Mr. Reid mentioned, because right now he's involved in a project. Obviously at some point in time we're going to have a design and a plan. I'm going to suggest that we cannot be fools and think that those plans won't change if the project is under way for a period of 10 years, for example. We need to be ready to reassess when needed or when the circumstances change, and to address and accept changes to the design, even though it may have been adopted, approved and agreed to in January 2022, for example. We need to be open-minded enough to go back and say, “Things have changed, or as we were doing it we found a better solution, or the needs have changed in terms of bathrooms, or layout,” and things like that.

That's why it's important in my view that MPs, and I repeat, are continuously engaged. When I say continuously, I'm talking from the start to the end, because we're not doing this building for ourselves; we're doing it for you, because that's your workplace and that's the art of democracy. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Of course, the technology is changing so quickly.

We'll go to Mr. Graham and then Mr. Reid.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have more comments than questions at the moment.

We were talking about the oversight committee. I'll come back to it quickly. I proposed that it become a subcommittee of PROC or a committee of the chair and vice-chairs of PROC, or something, to have a direct connection between that oversight committee and PROC. We're in the loop and it's not a committee of whips, who have a very different perspective from all the other MPs, which is one thing I'm concerned about.

So I want that on the record now.

The other thing is to ensure that a former parliamentarian is on the oversight committee, someone like David who will soon be a former parliamentarian, who has a deep understanding of privilege of the place—which not everybody does—and somebody who will still remember Centre Block when it reopens, because by the time this project is finished, a PROC committee might not have anybody who's ever seen the inside of Centre Block. So it would be nice to have somebody on that oversight committee who remembers what it was supposed to look like. If three-quarters of Parliament changes again, which can happen every generation, and it takes a generation to do Centre Block, no one's going to have a clue what Centre Block's supposed to do.

So I think it's important to have that institutional memory brought with us by people who have worked in that building and know what it can and should do.

But I do have a quick question. It's been a burning question for me since we opened West Block, albeit it's less serious. Why is there a cat door on the side doors of all of our committee rooms? Take a look at that door. You'll find a little cat door on it.

Ms. Susan Kulba:

It's for cable pass-through.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Cable pass-through, okay, because it's just the right size and shape for a cat.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: That's all I've got for now. Thank you.

Ms. Susan Kulba:

The cats are long gone.

Mr. Stéphan Aubé:

It's a requirement of the media so that they will have access, if ever they need to televise outside.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's for the media, okay.

Sorry, I did have one more quick comment. The elm tree shouldn't be cut down. Shut it down for 10 years and renovate it.

(1250)

The Chair:

You have a sensitivity to cats and trees.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

There is some evidence. I was just reading.... I've got so many papers here, but our friends at Greenspace have given us some information about the elm tree.

They've got a piece here that discusses the tree and says it may not be as unhealthy as has been reported. I took the liberty of confirming that there was a parallel story of an elm tree, the Washington Elm in Cambridge, Massachusetts, supposedly the spot under which Washington commanded the American army in the revolution. It was already old and large at that time. As a result it was seen as iconic and it survived and finally died of old age at the age of 210 in 1923, the moral of the story being that this tree might have a lot of life in it if it's allowed to live.

I want to ask a couple of questions relating to the visitors centre, phase two.

So the work on phase two will begin, I assume, before major work on Centre Block begins, Ms. Kulba?

Ms. Susan Kulba:

In digging into the ground, yes, that's what they're planning at this point. Again, the schedules are not firmed up through Public Works. We've received some draft preliminary ones but their plan is to start to dig—

Mr. Scott Reid:

That would have the effect of removing the circular drive from operation. Would it also have the effect of intruding upon things like Canada Day celebrations, the light shows, and the weekly Wednesday yoga that has become a part of our culture up here—for some of us less intensively, I admit, than others. I'm not as stretchy as other people, I guess.

But all of these things could be intruded upon. We have no information at all, and some of these things are taken very seriously by Ottawa residents and by Canadians in general.

Ms. Susan Kulba:

That's correct. Public Works has indicated to the best of their ability that they want to keep the activities of the Hill ongoing.

So right now we know that they want to put hoarding just forward of the Vaux wall and that those activities would still have about half the lawn to use. So the space will be reduced, but they want to maintain the sound and light shows and the Canada Day celebrations. That's what they're trying to achieve.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Perhaps, colleagues, it might make sense to get someone from Public Works to give more detailed answers on those considerations.

Is there a completion date estimate or cost estimate for phase two as opposed to the overall Centre Block renovations at this point?

Ms. Susan Kulba:

Not that we have. We don't have that information from Public Works.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Do you think somebody has that information, or is it something that is still too early to tell because we don't know?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

It's probably too early right now.

Mr. Scott Reid:

We don't know about the geology down there, whether we have to do blasting and that sort of thing.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

We know it's Canadian bedrock, so we know there's going to be blasting.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Do we know if there would be as much blasting as there was for phase one? It was quite intrusive.

Ms. Susan Kulba:

I would expect at least that much, yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

From looking at the 2006 development plan, which gives us a bit of an idea of an anticipated footprint, I get the impression that it is larger. I could be wrong, but it looks like it is larger than phase one was in terms of the volume of space.

Ms. Susan Kulba:

I would say yes to that. It's not determined 100% yet, because we haven't firmed up all the requirements. All the requirements to support Parliament that can't fit in the Centre Block as is are going to spill out into that underground visitor welcome facility, so that final footprint has yet to be decided exactly because we don't have all of the requirements that feed into it.

Mr. Scott Reid:

One thing I heard from one person who had been involved in this process was that there was talk of putting a museum of parliamentary history into that space. Have you heard anything about that?

Ms. Susan Kulba:

No, I'm not aware of that. There will be visitor services in that space, which may include potentially some interpretation services, but there has certainly been no mention of museums.

(1255)

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

For example, I know that the Library of Parliament is thinking of maybe having some interpretation services in that facility, but I've never heard anything about the museum.

Mr. Scott Reid:

When I heard that, I meant to raise it eventually.

To make what seems to me to be an obvious observation, we should be trying to minimize to the extent we can, in a way that is compatible with the other objectives we have to achieve, the amount of bedrock we have to blast and remove. If there's anything that can be done elsewhere rather than there, then it should be moved there.

I offer the fact that at number 1 Wellington, we have a series of underused committee rooms in what used to be a railway tunnel. If, for example, there were a desire to display some of the artifacts associated with Parliament's history to interested visitors, it would be reasonable to use that space once the Senate has returned to the Centre Block rather than try to create space in what is now solid bedrock, both because that would be very expensive and also because it would be more intrusive.

If you're blasting further out, you've got to come further out, and you take up more of the Hill, and that blasting really is intrusive. When we were sitting through the House of Commons and committee meetings, I think we'd all agree when the blasting was under way it was genuinely intrusive.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Especially a few days after the shooting.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, that's right.

Even when it wasn't, explosions would shake the foundation and so on... I don't want to exaggerate the importance of that, but I could see how it could intrude on a number of things.

There was one last question on that theme. What has been done so far with phase two of the visitor welcome centre, I suspect, must have had no input from the new process you've suggested. But is the intention to allow that process to kick in for any further decisions made on phase two of the visitor centre?

A voice: Correct.

Mr. Scott Reid: Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

I have one very brief question. It's about this building.

Up on the fourth floor within the Mackenzie Tower is a wonderful room. It's currently used as a spousal lounge, but it's not accessible. I find that concerning. My mother-in-law uses a wheelchair. My wife and I have three young children, so we often use a stroller to get all three of them there. They're at the age of four and under. That room's not accessible. I find it a little bit concerning that we've spent $800 million plus, yet we have a wonderful room that looks lovely on the inside and is not accessible. I hope that we can have some thoughts on why that might be.

Ms. Susan Kulba:

Yes, it was a challenge to find a use for that room. I have to say that you start going through a list of priorities and knowing that it wasn't going to be accessible.... There was space across the hall provided for activities that would require accessibility for some of the people participating in those activities. No matter what space we would have assigned there, to put a lift in was just not feasible.

Mr. John Nater:

So that room will never be accessible for...?

Ms. Susan Kulba:

At this point, no.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

[Inaudible—Editor] I don't get it.

Ms. Susan Kulba:

We do have space across there for some activities, but in working with that particular user group, they preferred to have both spaces.

The Chair:

Given the connection, as you said, between the various authorities, including the relevant ministers, would it make sense to have a bit more formal connection between the relevant ministers and the Board of Internal Economy on this particular project, just so they're not working in isolation?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I would suggest that the government is also represented on the board with the ministers who are on the board. Without getting into their own internal way of functioning, I would suggest that there are members of cabinet on the board.

The Chair:

I think there is only one member, and it's not the minister responsible for Public Works, or whoever does have a responsibility related to the Hill.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

We have the House leader, who is on the board, and also right now Mr. LeBlanc. We also have the whip.

The Chair:

David.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm sorry, Chair, but I want to come back to this. If I'm too far off, I'll of course follow your guidance to get back, but I am really disturbed to hear this. I understand the practical reasons why. I accept that, but here's the thing. In this day and age, not only a government building but the premier government building on Parliament Hill, one of the buildings used for spouses—meaning the public—is not accessible. We deliberately designed, built and designated a room for Canadian citizens to use. In this case it's a spouses lounge, but it could be anything, and if you have any kind of disability regarding mobility, you can't get in there.

I'm sorry, but I find that unacceptable. Either we bite the bullet and spend the money that it takes to make it accessible or we don't use it for a public space, and we use it for some other capacity. To say that we had no other choice but to go ahead and create a space that disabled Canadians can't get to.... In this case, it might even directly be a member or a member's spouse, partner or parent, which is what the room is designated for, and if they aren't perfectly able-bodied, they can't use it.

I have trouble with it. Maybe that's just me, but I am having trouble with that. Again, I understand the practicality. I am not faulting anyone per se, but in allowing a space for the public or for anybody, any person at all—visitor, worker, member, family, whoever—that is not accessible, we've made a major blunder. All it's going to take is one spouse or partner to make an issue out of it, and we have no defence. I'll bet you dollars to doughnuts that if that happened we'd quickly shut it down and find another space.

Again, I'll just leave with colleagues one of these forward headaches that won't be mine.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson: I urge all of you to give some thought to the idea that we've done something and allowed something—and now we're aware of it—that makes no sense given current laws and attitudes, especially around equality.

Thanks.

(1300)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Are there any more questions for our witnesses before we go to committee business?

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have just a quick observation. I'm sure there were defensible reasons—we might not agree with them—for the space not being accessible, reasons that relate to honouring the heritage of the building and not being able to adjust floor levels without intruding upon materials that are a century and a half old. It's also conceivable that parliamentarians, who tend to be very sensitive to this kind of need, if they were in a position to say so, would have said that on this occasion we were going to override the heritage consideration for the sake of accessibility.

Looking forward, I think this is a good example of the kind of thing where you hit some kind of line, and where it would be helpful to have people and parliamentarians to say that in this case something overrides another normally absolutely solid line, and that a red line is actually not a red line in this case.

The Chair:

Thank you all.

If you could stay, I want to do a little committee business here.

First of all, on the elm tree, I'm suggesting that we do two things. I think most members are aware of the issue. We should have an emergency meeting, bringing in Public Works or whoever, plus the people who wrote us the letter, and scope it out and learn more about it. Second is to write a strong letter to Public Works, the BOIE and the Speaker that there be a moratorium on cutting it down until we have that meeting so we can make our recommendations.

I don't know what people think of that.

A voice: It's an important idea, Chair.

Mr. David Christopherson:

So moved.

The Chair:

Okay, we'll schedule that.

Second, our next meeting on Thursday may or may not occur, because we may be voting all night on the supplementary estimates. But if it does, for the next two meetings, just to give the Speaker some ability to work, on this study we're doing now on the dual chambers, we could have Samara, for one, and maybe the Clerk, for another, give us input, if people think those would be valuable witnesses. Would that be good?

Mr. Reid's motion may be after the break week. Hopefully we'll have room for that. It's the one about us carrying on this work into future PROCs and parliaments.

Minister Gould suggested that April 11 would be the best day for her on election and security intelligence threats. Here I speak of Ms. Kusie's motion. Is April 11 okay with people?

(1305)

Mr. David Christopherson:

Mr. Chair, I have a reminder. We mentioned it at our informal luncheon. I mentioned it at our formal meeting. Again, I just want to remind members that public accounts is still very interested in getting a couple of standing order changes to improve and beef up the ability of public accounts to do their oversight. I just want to put it on a future list that at some point in the near future I'm hoping that we'll receive a report from public accounts in terms of a couple of standing order changes that, in an ideal world, would get unanimity and get through the House quickly. As you're thinking through things we want to work on, there's at least one meeting there that I'm hoping will happen in April or in May at the latest.

The Chair:

People may want to get any feedback they need from their parties on that, and we'll add it to the schedule, if we get that request from Public Works.

Ms. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

She's coming on April 11. What is our schedule until that time?

The Chair:

It depends on whether we have a meeting on Thursday.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay.

The Chair:

If not, there are things we've agreed to. First of all is an emergency meeting on the elm tree; then on the dual chambers, we would have Samara and the Clerk as witnesses; and then possibly this Public Works request, if we get it. Those are the things we've talked about.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Also, in order to have Australia as a witness on the dual chambers, we'll have to have an evening meeting, because that's early in the morning for them. I assume everyone—

Mr. David Christopherson:

We should go there.

The Chair:

Is that a motion to travel to Australia?

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson:

I could move it.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

So is an evening meeting good?

A voice: Yes.

The Chair: Thank you.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bienvenue à la 145e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Aujourd'hui, nous poursuivons nos discussions sur les chambres de débat parallèles, et nous sommes heureux d'accueillir M. Bruce Stanton, député de Simcoe-Nord, qui est aussi vice-président et président du comité plénier. Sur une note plus personnelle, j'ajouterai qu'il est également président du Groupe d'amitié Canada-Myanmar. À titre d'information pour les membres, M. Stanton est l'auteur d'articles sur les chambres parallèles qui ont paru dans la revue Options politiques de l'IRPP et dans la Revue parlementaire canadienne.

Merci d'être avec nous.

Avant que vous preniez la parole, j'aimerais informer les membres que la délégation du Kenya n'a pas réussi à se rendre, alors la rencontre a été annulée et vous pouvez la retirer de votre horaire si elle y était inscrite.

Monsieur Stanton, nous sommes ravis de votre présence. Je pense en fait qu'il s'agit d'un des projets les plus excitants que le Comité ait entrepris, alors nous avons hâte d'entendre vos suggestions. [Français]

M. Bruce Stanton (Simcoe-Nord, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Bonjour.

Je vous remercie de l'invitation à comparaître dans le cadre de votre étude sur une chambre de débat parallèle ou concomitante à la Chambre des communes.[Traduction]

Avant de commencer, j'aimerais préciser que je ne me considère pas comme un expert en la matière, mais j'ai présenté et je vais vous présenter mon point de vue aujourd'hui en fonction des recherches que j'ai menées. Bien sûr, comme certains d'entre vous le savent sans doute, une partie de l'information a été publiée dans la Revue parlementaire canadienne et dans un article d'opinion paru dans la revue Options politiques de l'IRPP, comme le président l'a mentionné, mais il s'agit encore une fois de mes observations personnelles à titre de parlementaire en poste depuis 2006.

Mon témoignage portera sur trois grands axes: d'abord, une description générale du concept, ensuite les raisons justifiant une innovation de ce genre, et enfin, mes réflexions sur la manière de procéder si on décide d'aller de l'avant.

Ensuite, bien sûr, je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions.[Français]

En premier lieu, en ce qui concerne la chambre parallèle elle-même, les documents d'information et le témoignage de M. Natzler, greffier de la Chambre du Royaume-Uni, vous auront donné une idée générale du fonctionnement du système. La Chambre des représentants de l'Australie et le Parlement du Royaume-Uni y ont tous les deux recours. L'Australie a été le premier pays à mettre en place cette structure en 1993, puis le Royaume-Uni a, dans une certaine mesure, emboîté le pas en 1999 en s'inspirant de l'expérience de l'Australie.[Traduction]

Ces deux chambres sont désormais un élément permanent et utile de leur institution parlementaire, et il convient de noter que leurs fonctions et leur utilité pour les députés et leur Parlement respectif diffèrent quelque peu.

Par exemple, la Chambre de la fédération en Australie sert d'avenue parallèle pour certains éléments du processus législatif, comme les débats à l'étape de la deuxième lecture ou à l'étape du rapport, alors que, au Royaume-Uni, toutes les délibérations sur un projet de loi du gouvernement se déroulent dans la chambre principale.

À mon avis, cette différence est éloquente. Bien que nous ayons en commun la tradition parlementaire de Westminster avec nos amis du Commonwealth du Royaume-Uni et de l'Australie, nos règlements, nos conventions et nos pratiques respectifs ont évolué différemment en fonction des besoins et des priorités des parlementaires.[Français]

On trouve toutefois certaines caractéristiques communes aux deux chambres parallèles, dont les suivantes.

Il y a un quorum réduit, soit trois personnes, y compris le président, un député du parti gouvernemental et un député de l'opposition. Il n'y a aucun vote. C'est un forum moins divisé, car les débats sont, par nature, moins tranchés.

(1105)



La structure parallèle donne plus de temps aux députés pour débattre et prendre la parole sur des questions qui touchent directement leur circonscription. Il y a un horaire fixe qui correspond à environ 30 % ou 35 % des périodes à la Chambre principale.

Les chambres parallèles sont considérées comme une manière de gérer ou de compléter les aspects non controversés des travaux quotidiens qui grugeraient du temps de débat sur des dossiers de plus grande envergure à la Chambre principale, par exemple les affaires courantes, les débats d'ajournement et les déclarations de députés. [Traduction]

La chambre parallèle est un terrain d'essai pour les nouvelles procédures qui pourraient être appliquées à la chambre principale et permet aux députés de perfectionner leurs qualités d'orateur et leurs connaissances de la procédure. Elle permet également aux nouveaux présidents d'apprendre leur rôle et de se familiariser avec les éléments de procédure qui leur seront assurément utiles lorsqu'ils présideront les délibérations de la Chambre.

En règle générale, la chambre parallèle est assujettie au même règlement que la chambre principale: télédiffusion, transcription et journaux des délibérations. Il y a une petite tribune du public. Dans notre cas, il faudrait ajouter l'interprétation simultanée — essentiellement, le même appui offert aux comités permanents.

Les installations physiques ressemblent à une grande salle de comité. L'aménagement plus intime favorise le décorum. Le Royaume-Uni et l'Australie utilisent un aménagement des sièges en forme de U afin de favoriser la collégialité entre députés de différents partis.

Depuis leur création, chacune des deux chambres parallèles a mis en place de nouveaux éléments désormais populaires. Au Royaume-Uni, les débats sur les pétitions électroniques peuvent avoir lieu lorsque la pétition comprend plus de 100 000 signatures. En raison du haut degré d'intérêt du public, beaucoup de personnes suivent ces débats en ligne, parfois dans une plus grande mesure que les autres débats télédiffusés. En Australie, une période est réservée aux « déclarations des circonscriptions ». Il s'agit de déclarations de trois minutes semblables à celles accordées aux députés à l'article 31 du Règlement; les députés et les ministres peuvent présenter un message visant les habitants de leur circonscription, ce que nos ministres n'ont pas le droit de faire au cours de la période des déclarations des députés.[Français]

Les études menées sur les deux chambres parallèles après plus de 10 ans d'existence — 20 ans dans le cas de l'Australie — montrent qu'elles ont toutes deux surmonté les préoccupations et le scepticisme concernant leur validité et leur utilité.

En deuxième lieu, j'aimerais aborder les raisons justifiant l'adoption d'un projet comme celui-ci. Il est important, je crois, que tous les efforts pour l'établissement d'une chambre parallèle soient fondés sur un besoin raisonnable ou une lacune du système et des procédures parlementaires actuels.

Il est important de connaître la portée des problèmes pour bien expliquer le fonctionnement de la chambre parallèle proposée et, surtout, les raisons pour lesquelles cette avenue est la bonne. Bien que le projet ait porté ses fruits dans le Parlement de nos amis du Commonwealth, il est recommandé de bien saisir le problème ou la lacune que viendra régler la chambre parallèle envisagée.[Traduction]

C'est un élément sur lequel les divers partis devraient s'entendre avant que le projet n'aille plus loin. Il faudrait déployer plus d'effort, ne serait-ce que pour convenir des raisons pour lesquelles un projet de la sorte devrait être mis en place dans le contexte canadien.

Si l'on cherche une étude sur les lacunes et points d'amélioration potentiels du système en place, Samara a fait un excellent travail à l'aide des enquêtes de fin de mandat des députés et d'entrevues auprès de députés en poste. Les leaders à la Chambre et les whips, anciens ou en poste, et les greffiers ont une connaissance et une expérience concernant nos processus parlementaires qui sont uniques et que n'ont pas les députés d'arrière-ban. Leurs observations sur les améliorations possibles au système seraient précieuses.

(1110)



Je recommande aussi qu'on étudie sérieusement les motifs pour lesquels la Chambre de la fédération et le Westminster Hall ont été créés puisque cette information sera très révélatrice. Le fonctionnement de ces deux chambres parallèles reflète leur raison d'être originale. C'est pourquoi le Westminster Hall est le lieu d'étude privilégié des initiatives des députés d'arrière-ban par opposition à la chambre principale, et c'est pourquoi la Chambre de la fédération sert d'avenue parallèle à une gamme plus vaste de travaux de la chambre principale.

En dernier lieu, il conviendrait, pendant que vous étudiez les étapes à venir et les recommandations à formuler, que vous vous penchiez sur les travaux qu'a effectués le Comité spécial de la modernisation en vue de la création du Westminster Hall.[Français]

Le comité spécial était conscient que la création d'une chambre parallèle serait, pour leur institution, une innovation radicale et profonde des pratiques traditionnelles. Le Royaume-Uni a envisagé la possibilité d'une chambre parallèle en 1994 en raison du succès que connaissait l'Australie. Il a fallu attendre décembre 1998 avant que le comité spécial dépose un document d'étude présentant aux députés les avantages potentiels d'une chambre parallèle. À ce moment, le comité spécial ne recommandait même pas la mise à l'essai d'une telle chambre.[Traduction]

Le Comité spécial visait plutôt à présenter des renseignements sur la question, de sorte que les députés puissent formuler des commentaires éclairés. Il a ensuite invité les députés à s'exprimer sur la proposition au cours de plusieurs mois, après quoi on déciderait si les travaux devaient se poursuivre et, dans l'affirmative, de quelle manière il conviendrait de mettre en place la chambre parallèle. Comme ils l'ont mentionné, les députés étaient appelés à étudier la proposition avec sérieux, non seulement dans son principe, mais également dans la forme concrète que pourrait prendre la chambre.

Après avoir recueilli les observations des députés, le Comité spécial de la modernisation a présenté à la Chambre son deuxième rapport le 24 mars 1999. Le rapport a fait l'objet d'un débat en mai, puis il a servi de fondement pour la mise à l'essai du Westminster Hall en novembre de la même année. Ce n'est qu'en 2001-2002 que le Westminster Hall est devenu un élément permanent du processus parlementaire de la Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni.[Français]

En résumé, je crois que votre étude de la question est un exercice constructif. Le Parlement, comme tout autre organisme avec lequel nous avons été appelés à travailler, doit constamment chercher à renforcer l'efficience de ses processus internes et administratifs, et à bien utiliser son temps. La gestion du temps des parlementaires est un élément récurrent au fil de l'évolution du Règlement ainsi que de nos pratiques et de traditions.[Traduction]De plus, il nous faut toujours être à la recherche de moyens de démontrer à nos électeurs la valeur et les résultats de nos fonctions de députés.

Il y a de nombreux avantages à explorer le projet plus en profondeur, et les systèmes en place au Royaume-Uni et en Australie ont fait leurs preuves. Pour le Parlement du Canada, il convient d'avoir une excellente idée des problèmes, obstacles ou limites que viendrait régler une chambre parallèle. Il s'agit d'une première étape cruciale.

Je vous remercie de votre attention. Monsieur le président, je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions. [Français]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Stanton.[Traduction]

Excellent.

Dans le rapport, vous parlez de l'information recueillie par Samara. Nous avons un rapport ici. Il est en anglais, mais en cours de traduction, alors vous en recevrez un exemplaire sous peu.

De plus, nous avons quelqu'un de Samara ici. Pourriez-vous lever la main, au cas où quelqu'un voudrait vous parler plus tard?

J'ai simplement une petite question. Ai-je raison de penser que la chambre double de l'Australie a été instaurée dans la foulée de la chambre de l'État de Canberra, qui l'a été en premier? Le savez-vous?

M. Bruce Stanton:

Je n'en suis pas certain, monsieur le président. Je sais que, lorsque le tout a commencé vers 1993, la situation politique était très volatile à la Chambre des représentants. Les questions entourant les motions de clôture, l'attribution de temps — qu'on appelait à l'époque la « guillotine » — étaient de vrais casse-tête et les avaient menés véritablement dans une impasse. Je pense que cela les a amenés à chercher d'autres solutions, et la Chambre de la fédération en a été une.

Le président:

Nous allons passer à la période des questions. Si les membres du Comité sont d'accord, j'ai pensé que nous pourrions avoir une série de questions comme à l'habitude, puis si les gens sont raisonnables, procéder de manière informelle, comme nous l'avons fait par le passé.

Est-ce que cela vous convient?

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Allons-y.

Le président:

Nous allons commencer par M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Monsieur Stanton, en mettant de côté tout esprit de partisanerie, je suis un admirateur. Merci beaucoup. J'ai bien aimé votre article lorsqu'il est paru, si je me souviens bien, dans la Revue parlementaire canadienne.

J'ai suivi le dossier et examiné ce qui s'est passé dans d'autres pays, un peu comme vous l'avez fait. Pendant le temps qui m'est alloué, je vais faire deux choses: vous poser des questions et livrer le fond de ma pensée sur divers sujets.

Je le dis parce que j'envie beaucoup de choses dont nous ont parlé des témoins au sujet de Westminster, le greffier là-bas, et ce que j'ai lu à propos de l'Australie. J'ai vu les grands progrès qu'ils ont réalisés depuis le début, tant en Australie qu'en Angleterre, et aussi en Nouvelle-Zélande, et leur façon de gérer le tout avec une grande maturité.

En fait, j'irai jusqu'à dire qu'ils discutent parfois du fonctionnement de leur chambre d'une façon si mature qu'à côté de cela nous avons l'air d'un cirque où un débat rationnel part dans toutes sortes de direction. C'est très décevant, car nous avons eu un débat de ce genre l'an dernier dont nous devrions tous avoir honte.

J'ai été témoin de cela il y a 10 ans. J'ai été témoin de cela il y a 10 mois. Je pense que les idées comme les vôtres s'évanouissent, car je ne sais pas si nous avons la maturité nécessaire pour nous en occuper. C'est mon point de vue. Je vide mon sac après 15 ans de frustrations.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Simms: Il y a deux éléments ici. Il y a la Chambre de la fédération en Australie et le Westminster Hall. L'une est complémentaire, si je peux utiliser ce mot, car il y a plus de 600 députés. On y traite principalement des affaires des députés d'arrière-ban, les débats d'urgence, les pétitions électroniques et les déclarations des circonscriptions. J'adorerais disposer de trois minutes pour parler de ma circonscription. Je pense que nous devrions tous disposer de ce temps. Le modèle australien ressemble davantage à une chambre parallèle, à une avenue parallèle.

Je pense qu'il serait plus avantageux pour nous d'avoir une avenue parallèle. En d'autres mots, nous devrions avoir la possibilité, pour la mesure législative dont la Chambre est saisie à l'heure actuelle, d'en discuter à l'extérieur de la Chambre si nous voulons discuter d'un point particulier. En fait, je crois que nous pourrions discuter de la question des déplacements le vendredi, car il semble que tous les députés du gouvernement veulent supprimer les jours de séance le vendredi, et que tous les députés de l'opposition veulent continuer à siéger le vendredi, et ce, peu importe le parti au pouvoir. La situation perdure depuis une cinquantaine d'années.

Le vendredi pourrait être la journée des débats dans la chambre parallèle. On n'aurait pas à y assister tous les vendredis, mais seulement lorsqu'on y discute d'un projet de loi qui est pertinent pour les gens qu'on représente.

Avez-vous une préférence entre les deux?

(1115)

M. Bruce Stanton:

Les deux comportent des caractéristiques qui peuvent être avantageuses, selon la façon dont nous... Comme je l'ai souligné dans mes observations, il faut se demander ce qui fonctionnera le mieux pour nous. Je suis d'accord avec vous qu'il faut examiner la question de façon mature et moins partisane, car ce qu'on s'efforce de faire essentiellement, c'est d'innover et d'améliorer les procédures qui ne servent pas seulement les parlementaires, mais par leur entremise, la population également. Je pense que c'est dans ce cas que les chambres parallèles prouvent leur utilité, et c'est le cas assurément du Westminster Hall avec l'ajout de débats. Ils ont des débats sur des sujets qu'on ne verrait jamais ici, sauf pour les rares débats exploratoires que nous avons à la Chambre.

Je suis d'accord avec votre idée, monsieur Simms, d'examiner l'exemple du Royaume-Uni. Ils ont eu recours à un comité de modernisation pour se pencher uniquement sur cette question. Ils ont amené des idées qui étaient relativement bien détaillées.

Au sujet de l'autre point que vous avez mentionné concernant les débats et la possibilité de discussions additionnelles sur les enjeux gouvernementaux, les chambres utilisent ce qu'on pourrait appeler des débats d'ajournement. Des membres du gouvernement et de l'opposition sont présents, et les députés de l'opposition ont alors l'occasion de poser des questions. Ce genre d'échanges peut avoir lieu dans la chambre parallèle. Il faut bien l'admettre: les débats d'ajournement sont très populaires. Bien souvent, on manque de temps.

Il existe différentes options. C'est pourquoi, au lieu d'adopter une position ferme sur sa nature et ce qu'elle doit englober, je pense qu'il faut examiner certains avantages et ce sur quoi nous pouvons nous entendre pour aller de l'avant.

(1120)

M. Scott Simms:

Oui, je pense que vous avez raison. Comme je l'ai mentionné plus tôt au sujet de la fonction parallèle, à mon avis, c'est l'importance fondamentale d'une chambre parallèle. On peut y discuter d'autres enjeux et y tenir les déclarations des circonscriptions.

À l'ère des médias sociaux, nous voulons tous que cela soit filmé afin de pouvoir l'enregistrer sur nos comptes Facebook ou autres. Je ne dis pas cela pour plaisanter. C'est ce que nous faisons.

M. Bruce Stanton:

C'est juste.

M. Scott Simms:

De nombreux électeurs me demandent: « Eh bien, quand vous levez-vous pour prendre la parole à la Chambre? » Je leur réponds que j'ai pris la parole la veille, mais personne ne regarde CPAC, et s'ils le faisaient, je m'inquiéterais.

Je suis tout à fait d'accord avec ce que vous dites au sujet de son rôle, et il faut que ce soit souple dans notre cas, car tout le reste a de l'importance pour les députés d'arrière-ban au Parlement.

En plus de la fonction législative et du processus d'examen, revenons aussi à la guillotine dont vous avez parlé — ou du nom plus joli que nous lui avons donné...

Le président:

Il vous reste 30 secondes.

M. Scott Simms:

Parlant de la guillotine, on a commencé à diffuser des émissions gouvernementales à la fin des années 1990. De cette façon, les gens peuvent voir ce qui fait l'objet des débats, car cela ne peut pas s'éterniser, n'est-ce pas? Même si l'attribution de temps soulève la consternation, même si on dit qu'on n'aime pas cela, nous nous en servons. Et je dis bien « nous », tous partis confondus. Soyons réalistes, car d'un côté, on demande pourquoi on clôt le débat, et de l'autre, pourquoi aucun projet de loi n'a encore été adopté?

Dans ce genre de situation, quel rôle utile la chambre pourrait-elle jouer?

M. Bruce Stanton:

Je pense que le greffier Natzler avait un bon point à ce sujet, à savoir qu'en allant de l'avant, nous ne devons pas oublier que ce que nous allons faire laissera, à tout le moins, tant l'opposition que le gouvernement neutres au sein de la chambre parallèle, c'est-à-dire que d'une part, on ne donne pas plus ou moins de chances au gouvernement de mettre en oeuvre son programme, et d'autre part, qu'on ne donne pas plus ou moins de chances à l'opposition de faire valoir ses arguments auprès du gouvernement. Nous devons, à tout le moins, parvenir à un équilibre ici si nous voulons apporter quelque changement que ce soit.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup d'avoir répondu de façon aussi détaillée à M. Simms.

J'aimerais également souhaiter la bienvenue à M. Frank Baylis au Comité. Il s'intéresse depuis longtemps aux façons de rendre nos systèmes démocratiques plus efficaces, alors il a examiné la question également.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Merci.

Tout d'abord, bienvenue, Bruce. Nous sommes heureux de vous avoir avec nous.

J'aimerais vous poser une question concernant votre exposé. Vous avez mentionné, et je crois que c'est vrai tant pour le Westminster Hall que pour la Chambre de la fédération, qu'ils ont un horaire fixe. Cela correspond à environ 30 % à 35 % du nombre total d'heures de séances par semaine à la Chambre des communes, ou à la Chambre des représentants en Australie. Est-ce exact dans les deux cas?

M. Bruce Stanton:

Cela semble être plutôt uniforme, monsieur Reid.

Dans chaque cas, les chambres ont un horaire hebdomadaire régulier, tout comme la chambre principale. Cela ne veut pas dire que chacune des rubriques de cet horaire est employée hebdomadairement, mais la plupart d'entre elles le sont. Un horaire fixe est établi, et il est composé de périodes consacrées à certaines parties des travaux. Par exemple, à Westminster Hall, une certaine période d'un certain jour de la semaine est réservée aux débats sur les pétitions électroniques, et une heure est réservée au comité de liaison. Je crois qu'il y a même une partie du jeudi consacrée aux initiatives des députés d'arrière-ban.

M. Scott Reid:

Et cet horaire doit être établi afin de permettre la coordination des activités de cette chambre avec les travaux de la chambre principale. Ainsi, les gens ne sont pas censés être à deux endroits en même temps, tout comme les séances de nos comités sont coordonnées.

M. Bruce Stanton:

C'est tout à fait exact, et c'est la raison pour laquelle, en moyenne, l'horaire de la chambre parallèle correspond à environ 35 % des périodes de la chambre principale.

M. Scott Reid:

Donc, si votre but était d'élargir cet horaire jusqu'à ce qu'il atteigne la durée totale des périodes de la chambre principale, il serait difficile, voire impossible, de le faire d'un point de vue logistique, à moins que la chambre parallèle poursuive ses activités jusqu'au petit matin.

M. Bruce Stanton:

Oui, et je pense qu'à ce moment-là, on se demanderait... Cette innovation serait encore plus radicale que ce que nous avons observé dans ces deux autres parlements. Ils ont attribué de façon très précise certains aspects de leurs travaux à la seconde chambre, et cela cadre exactement avec ce dont ils avaient l'impression d'avoir besoin pour combler les lacunes du système actuel ou remédier à ses faiblesses.

Un autre thème récurrent était le temps qui était nécessaire à la chambre principale. Il n'y a jamais eu aucun doute que la chambre principale est la tribune qui importe, en particulier pour les échanges et les débats portant sur les enjeux controversés ou significatifs du moment.

(1125)

M. Scott Reid:

C'est exact.

Le président:

Et les votes.

M. Bruce Stanton:

Et les votes, assurément. Comme je l'ai indiqué, les votes n'ont jamais lieu dans la chambre parallèle.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. Cela nous donne une idée des possibilités. Il y a certaines restrictions fixes qui ne peuvent être surmontées, à moins que nous soyons disposés à poursuivre nos activités jusqu'au petit matin, auquel cas nous pouvons retourner à la chambre principale, car elle est aussi fermée la nuit en raison de notre réticence à siéger pendant cette période...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La plupart du temps.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, la plupart du temps. Peut-être pas cette semaine...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid: ..., mais les autres semaines.

La situation est la suivante. La raison pour laquelle je pose cette question, c'est que, selon moi... D'autres députés soulèveront d'autres questions qui sont particulièrement préoccupantes, selon eux, mais, à mon avis, les initiatives qui sont sacrifiées au cours de l'établissement du calendrier parlementaire, les affaires légitimes qui ne reçoivent simplement pas l'attention qu'elles devraient, ce sont les affaires émanant des députés. Je ne fais pas allusion aux déclarations faites par les députés en vertu de l'article 31 du Règlement, même si je considère qu'elles sont importantes. Je parle des projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire proprement dits. Nous participons à une loterie. Je suppose qu'environ 270 députés ont le droit de participer à cette loterie.

M. Bruce Stanton:

Oui, tous les députés sauf les ministres, les secrétaires parlementaires et les Vice-présidents de la Chambre.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, et les Vice-présidents de la Chambre, qui sont tragiquement et injustement exclus du processus, ce qui représente l'un des plus grands crimes de notre ère moderne.

Nous nous rendons à peu près jusqu'au point 150, puis nous manquons de temps.

M. Bruce Stanton:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Je fais partie de cette catégorie, étant donné que l'une de mes initiatives sera présentée bientôt. Il s'agit d'une motion. Il est probable que nous aurons le temps de mener la première heure de débats, mais non la seconde. Ça ne me plaît pas, mais c'est ainsi que les choses fonctionnent. Toutefois, je suis moins frustré que si mon initiative avait été étudiée si la Chambre siégeait en juillet. Le fait est que nous pourrions transférer complètement ces travaux à la chambre parallèle, je pense. Je me demande simplement si nous serions en mesure d'étudier toutes ces initiatives si c'était la priorité de la deuxième chambre — ce qui en ferait effectivement la chambre des affaires émanant des députés.

Toutefois, cette question a un hic. À l'heure actuelle, environ 170 personnes participent au processus. Il est raisonnable de s'attendre à ce que nous parlions d'environ 500 députés, du moins si les questions supplémentaires devaient se poursuivre pendant un siècle — et c'est ainsi que nous devrions envisager une institution de ce genre. C'est là une estimation raisonnable du nombre de députés qui se succéderont au cours des 100 prochaines années. Si j'ajoutais 180 questions supplémentaires au calendrier, pourrions-nous en venir à bout au cours d'une législature de quatre ans et donner à tous des chances égales?

M. Bruce Stanton:

Eh bien, les choses se passent exactement comme vous l'avez décrit. C'est une question de temps simple. À la chambre principale, nous ne disposons que d'une heure pour examiner les affaires émanant des députés, que ce soit des projets de loi ou des motions. Il y a donc une limite à ce qui peut être fait. Je suppose que nous pourrions envisager de prolonger les sessions à la chambre. Je ne crois pas que les parlementaires accepteraient de réduire le temps consacré aux ordres émanant du gouvernement et à d'autres parties importantes de l'ordre du jour.

Lorsque nous prenons en considération le fait que seulement un peu plus de la moitié des députés admissibles ont la chance de présenter une initiative parlementaire qui sera débattue à la chambre principale, il est concevable qu'une partie de cet examen puisse se dérouler à la chambre parallèle et qu'essentiellement, nous puissions faire avancer ces affaires beaucoup plus rapidement.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui.

M. Bruce Stanton:

Il faudrait que je réfléchisse aux répercussions que cela aurait sur le soutien du processus de préparation des projets de loi et sur tous les services qui appuient actuellement les députés dans ce domaine. Il faudrait réfléchir à cela, mais ce serait certainement faisable. Les affaires émanant des députés pourraient être l'un des aspects présentement limités auxquels une chambre parallèle pourrait remédier.

M. Scott Reid:

Il me reste moins d'une minute, mais ma prochaine question est l'une de celles qu'en fait, je vous ai présentées à l'avance.

Un groupe d'agents supérieurs, de Présidents et de Vice-présidents de la Chambre assurent tour à tour des fonctions à la Chambre pendant les débats habituels. Serait-il nécessaire d'organiser une rotation distincte, reposant peut-être sur un groupe élargi de personnes ou sur un groupe distinct de personnes qui occupent les postes de présidents et de vice-présidents de la chambre parallèle?

M. Bruce Stanton:

Je le répète, vous pourriez aborder ce problème différemment. Tout comme le Royaume-Uni, nous disposons actuellement d'un groupe de présidents qui ont été nommés par le Président de la Chambre en vue de présider non seulement des réunions à la Chambre, mais aussi des assemblées générales annuelles d'associations, par exemple.

Il y a un groupe de personnes désignées qui, dans certains cas, comprend des sénateurs. Je n'envisagerais pas de leur faire présider des comités du genre de ceux de la Chambre, mais ils ont le droit d'assumer ce genre de travail.

Nous aurions éventuellement besoin qu'un président occupe le fauteuil pendant 12 heures de plus par semaine. La Chambre pourrait vouloir examiner la possibilité d'ajouter régulièrement un autre président pour gérer ces heures supplémentaires, mais cela pourrait être fait très facilement.

(1130)

M. Scott Reid:

Merci, monsieur le président. [Français]

Le président:

Merci.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Christopherson. [Traduction]

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le Vice-président, je vous remercie infiniment d'assister à la séance d'aujourd'hui.

Vous et moi avons vécu une expérience semblable ici. Vous êtes arrivé en 2006 dans le cadre de la 39e législature, alors que je suis arrivé ici seulement 18 mois avant vous, dans le cadre de la 38e législature. La plupart de nos expériences sont donc identiques.

Pour parler de l'expérience que j'avais en arrivant ici, je préciserais de nouveau que j'ai été leader parlementaire de l'opposition à Queen's Park, mais j'ai aussi été membre du comité de gestion de la Chambre lorsque nous étions au pouvoir. Enfin, j'ai également passé un certain temps à occuper le poste de leader adjoint, en essayant, un peu comme vous le faites, de jouer les arbitres. Je pense avoir une bonne idée des possibilités et des préoccupations qui existent sur tous les fronts.

Permettez-moi de dire simplement que, depuis que cela est apparu sur nos écrans radars il y a quelques années alors que nous commencions à mener une étude, vous, Frank, M. Reid et quelques autres personnes — dont M. Simms — avez pris cette question à coeur. Cet enjeu a aussi suscité mon intérêt, mais certains d'entre vous sont allés plus loin et ont mené des recherches à cet égard.

Je mentionne cela seulement pour rendre compte du fait que je suis ici depuis assez longtemps pour avoir vu des idées apparaître et disparaître, puis réapparaître pour disparaître de nouveau. Cependant, je pense que cette idée se tient vraiment. Elle a capté notre attention. Nous avons continué de l'étudier, et les gens l'ont vraiment pris à coeur. Si je puis me permettre — même si je ne serai pas ici pour le voir —, mon instinct me dit que cette idée verra le jour et que ce sera une bonne chose. La question est de savoir comment nous procéderons et en quoi consistera le processus.

Si je peux prendre les devants, je dirais qu'à mon avis, un essai fera sûrement partie des étapes à franchir, car personne ne voudra aller trop vite ou trop loin.

Je vous suis reconnaissant de reconnaître le côté politique de cette entreprise, parce qu'il y a deux façons de l'envisager. Premièrement, c'est le moyen le plus efficace de donner à tous les députés autant d'occasions de participer que possible, compte tenu surtout du fait que nous traversons des périodes où un nombre de plus en plus important de pouvoirs sont transférés au Cabinet du premier ministre. Ils ne sont pas seulement transférés à l'exécutif; ils sont concentrés dans le Cabinet du premier ministre.

Si je peux me permettre de lancer un message à propos de ma motion à venir qui traite de la reprise du contrôle de l'embauche de nos propres agents, je rappellerai aux gens que nous permettons toujours à l'exécutif de mener le processus d'embauche d'une personne comme notre vérificateur général. Il s'agit de notre vérificateur général, mais nous permettons à l'exécutif, c'est-à-dire un sous-ensemble du Parlement, de procéder à son embauche. C'est ce qui se produit, si l'on fait abstraction du fait qu'on nous demande la veille si l'on voit des objections à la nomination de Bob Smith. Voilà l'étendue de la consultation. Au diable cette façon de faire; ce processus relève de nous.

Selon moi, il s'agit là d'une autre façon de tenter de regagner la raison d'être historique du Parlement et de chaque député.

J'insisterai sur le fait que personne n'explique cela mieux que M. Reid, en raison de sa longévité ici, qui surpasse la nôtre, et de l'intérêt qu'il manifeste à cet égard, étant donné qu'il est lui-même un historien.

Je pense qu'un essai sera l'une des étapes à franchir. C'est là un aspect de cet enjeu.

Un autre aspect de cet enjeu est son côté politique — et je suis heureux que vous l'ayez mentionné, car c'est un aspect que nous devrons également gérer —, c'est-à-dire le fait que le gouvernement désire disposer d'autant de temps que possible pour faire adopter ses projets de loi, de manière à pouvoir affirmer qu'il a permis aux députés de débattre longuement de la question. Monsieur Simms, je pense que vous avez visé en plein dans le mille. En quelque sorte, le gouvernement perd sur les deux tableaux: s'il ne permet pas que ses projets de loi fassent l'objet de débats, il est considéré comme antidémocratique, et s'il ne parvient pas à faire adopter ses projets de loi, il est considéré comme inefficace. Je lui souhaite bonne chance dans ses tentatives de concilier tout cela.

Lorsque nous mettrons ce système en place, nous devrons être conscients de cela. C'est la raison pour laquelle je suis très heureux que nous discutions de cela pour le moment, que nous examinions le système en vue de l'améliorer et, je dirais, de redonner aux députés d'arrière-ban la place qui leur revient en tant qu'importants participants au système. Nous ne sommes pas censés être ici simplement pour répéter les paroles que nos chefs veulent entendre ou pour voter comme nos whips l'exigent, bien que nous le fassions très souvent. Nous, les membres du Comité, devrions faire tout en notre pouvoir pour préserver et enrichir le rôle de chaque député, un rôle qui a été perverti dans le passé.

Soit dit en passant, votre exposé était excellent. Merci.

M. Bruce Stanton:

Merci.

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai aimé ce que vous avez dit en nous faisant remarquer que nous devons réfléchir à notre raison d'être initiale. Si nous insistons sur ce point et que nous faisons savoir au gouvernement du moment, quel qu'il soit, que nous ne tentons pas de jouer des jeux pour perturber son calendrier, mais plutôt d'enrichir le rôle des députés d'arrière-ban... Il reste à savoir si, tôt ou tard, il souscrira à cette idée.

Je vais vous poser une question. Je m'éclaircis la voix, Scotty.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David Christopherson: Je trouve curieux que vous ayez mentionné les ministres. Pourriez-vous nous en dire un peu plus à ce sujet?

Comme vous le savez, nous établissons une distinction assez claire à ce sujet, et pourtant vous soulevez... Cela nous rappelle quelques arguments intéressants. Les ministres — et j'ai été moi-même ministre à l'échelle provinciale — sont tout de même des députés de plein droit. Ils ont une circonscription et des électeurs à satisfaire et, d'un point de vue politique, ils doivent être réélus.

Selon vous, comment romprions-nous en quelque sorte avec cette tradition, ou serait-il préférable d'exclure les ministres de ce processus parce que le système fonctionnerait mieux pour nous?

Qu'en pensez-vous, Bruce?

(1135)

M. Bruce Stanton:

Comme vous l'avez souligné, monsieur Christopherson, les ministres sont tout de même des députés, et ils ont rarement l'occasion de parler publiquement de questions qui sont pertinentes pour les gens qu'ils représentent.

L'Australie a lancé ce qui est connu sous le nom de « déclarations des circonscriptions ». Initialement, ils consacraient 30 minutes à ces déclarations, ce qui signifie qu'il y avait environ 10 déclarations par semaine, je pense, dans le cadre de ce point à l'ordre du jour. À de nombreuses reprises, il leur a fallu présenter des motions en vue de prolonger cette période en la faisant passer de 30 à 60 minutes. Cela se produit fréquemment en raison de la demande pour ces déclarations des circonscriptions, qui durent trois minutes.

Comme vous le savez, les ministres ne sont pas autorisés à participer aux déclarations en vertu de l'article 31 du Règlement. Par conséquent, c'était un autre moyen pour eux de s'exprimer publiquement, pareillement à la volonté des députés d'arrière-ban de Westminster Hall, à propos de questions qui concernent les membres de leur circonscription et qui les préoccupent. Cela a souvent été le cas. Manifestement, les ministres se réjouissent de ces occasions autant que les autres députés.

M. David Christopherson:

Donc, vous pensez que c'est une option que nous devrions au moins envisager, même dans le cadre d'un processus d'essai initial?

M. Bruce Stanton:

Oui. Cette initiative a été couronnée de succès en Australie.

M. David Christopherson:

Mon temps de parole est probablement écoulé.

Le président:

Oui.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

C'était un excellent exercice, qui nous a permis de déterminer qui pourrait parler le plus longtemps sans poser de questions.

Je vais maintenant céder officieusement la parole à toute personne qui souhaiterait poser une question.

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Monsieur le président, je crois que mon collègue, M. Reid, aura peut-être quelques questions à poser tout à l'heure.

J'aimerais obtenir votre avis sur une question générale.

Tout d'abord, je tiens à remercier nos amis chez Samara. Je vois que M. Paul Thomas est ici. Je dirais qu'il est l'un de mes deux politologues canadiens préférés du même nom. Je tenais simplement à le souligner. Je suis reconnaissant du travail exceptionnel qu'effectue Samara et de l'information que ses représentants ont fournie à notre comité.

Vous avez parlé un peu de l'évolution de Westminster en particulier et de la façon dont les choses en sont arrivées là. Je n'étais pas conscient du processus suivi là-bas, c'est-à-dire le rapport initial du comité et la période accordée aux députés pour leur permettre d'y réagir et de faire part de leurs réflexions sur la façon de procéder, puis l'élaboration du rapport final et, enfin, le débat à ce sujet à la Chambre. C'est, me semble-t-il, une procédure tout à fait logique, peu importe la position adoptée au début ou les facteurs qui ont fait obstacle au projet.

Comment envisageriez-vous de mettre en place un processus similaire ici? Reproduirions-nous les mêmes étapes, c'est-à-dire la publication d'un rapport initial, suivie d'une période de rétroaction, puis le dépôt d'un rapport final qui serait ensuite débattu à la Chambre? Voilà ma première question.

Dans le même ordre d'idées, si nous décidions d'examiner ce processus au sein de notre comité, devrions-nous également tenir compte d'autres aspects connexes? Je songe à certaines des innovations propres à Westminster, comme le comité des affaires des députés d'arrière-ban. Devrions-nous étudier cette option en même temps pour voir comment cela pourrait jouer un rôle?

Notre comité a mené un examen des systèmes de pétitions électroniques. Une des suggestions faites dans le passé — suggestion qui n'a pas été retenue à l'époque —, c'était l'idée de déclencher des débats en fonction des pétitions, comme c'est le cas au Royaume-Uni. Devrions-nous aborder ce sujet dans le cadre de ce genre de discussions, ou devrions-nous plutôt nous concentrer uniquement sur la création d'une chambre de débat parallèle? Faut-il y inclure d'autres éléments par la même occasion? Qu'en pensez-vous?

M. Bruce Stanton:

Ce sont deux bons arguments.

En ce qui concerne la marche à suivre, je recommande... parce que, comme le Royaume-Uni l'a reconnu, il s'agit d'une innovation assez importante — que les parlementaires britanniques ont qualifiée de « radicale » — dans leurs usages habituels. Ils ont fait preuve d'une grande prudence. Un comité spécial s'est vu confier la tâche exclusive d'élaborer une série de propositions initiales, lesquelles ont ensuite été soumises à l'attention de tous les députés pendant plusieurs mois durant le congé de Noël et au cours de l'année suivante, avant de présenter un deuxième rapport. C'est ce qui a constitué le fond du débat à la Chambre. Par la suite, le projet a été mis à l'essai pendant une année.

Lorsque le comité a publié la première série de propositions, il n'était même pas encore prêt à proposer un projet pilote. Il a simplement présenté son avis et demandé aux députés de se prononcer sur la proposition. Je crois que les commentaires des députés ont été intégrés dans le deuxième rapport, ce qui a servi de base aux règlements.

Pour ce qui est du deuxième point, la culture des initiatives des députés d'arrière-ban étant différente au Royaume-Uni, cet aspect a évolué différemment. Je ne recommanderais pas que nous suivions la même voie. C'est quelque chose que nous pourrions examiner dans le cadre d'une autre étude, peut-être en guise de deuxième projet pour le comité de la modernisation, si jamais nous devions créer une telle entité.

L'idée est certes valable. Je pense que certains aspects du programme pourraient être mis à contribution dans une chambre parallèle en vue de permettre aux députés d'arrière-ban d'avoir plus d'occasions de prendre la parole sur des questions qui touchent les gens qu'ils représentent. Je préfère toutefois que nous examinions séparément la façon dont les initiatives des députés d'arrière-ban et le comité connexe fonctionnent au Royaume-Uni. C'est fascinant, je vous le concède, mais je crois que cette question mérite une étude distincte.

(1140)

M. John Nater:

Comme M. Christopherson et d'autres l'ont mentionné, si nous devions apporter des changements, il faudrait le faire à titre expérimental ou provisoire. Je présume que c'est ce que vous recommanderiez également.

À votre avis, quel échéancier serait acceptable? Est-ce la durée d'une législature? S'agit-il plutôt de deux législatures? Quel délai serait approprié, d'après vous, pour que l'on puisse d'abord apprendre à connaître le système, puis avoir une occasion légitime de voir s'il fonctionne bien et atteint l'objectif fixé?

M. Bruce Stanton:

Dans chaque cas, lorsque les parlementaires en sont venus à établir un projet pilote, des rapports ont été publiés environ 12 mois après la première année d'existence. C'était un rapport au Parlement, dans le cadre duquel on déterminait s'il fallait aller de l'avant et, dans certains cas, quels changements ou modifications s'imposaient.

En ce qui a trait à l'échéancier, un comité chargé d'étudier cette question aurait besoin d'au moins plusieurs mois — il y a une tonne d'information là-dessus — pour élaborer une série initiale de propositions. Il faudrait ensuite les publier aux fins de commentaires et de consultations — ce qui nécessite peut-être six mois de plus —, puis les mettre à l'essai dans le cadre d'un projet pilote, le tout grosso modo au cours d'une seule législature. Par la suite, peut-être à la fin de la même législature ou peu de temps après, il y aurait un rapport sur l'utilité d'une telle chambre pour le Parlement. Ce n'est qu'après ces étapes que nous pourrons l'adopter — probablement au cours de la législature suivante —, si le Parlement choisit d'en faire une partie permanente de l'institution.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

D'autres observations?

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aurais une brève observation à faire avant de poser une question un peu plus sérieuse. Si nous avons une chambre parallèle qui siège après la chambre régulière, n'y aurait-il pas alors des débats à répétition?

M. Bruce Stanton:

Je suppose que c'est là une question de pure forme.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Lorsque ces sujets ont fait l'objet de discussions dans le passé, quels arguments crédibles ont été invoqués contre un tel projet, le cas échéant? Y a-t-il eu de sérieux...? Quels points ont été soulevés par les détracteurs?

M. Bruce Stanton:

C'est ce qui s'est produit dans le processus initial, et ce, dans les deux cas. En Australie, des opinions dissidentes ont été exprimées durant le débat initial et après le dépôt des premiers rapports. Certains craignaient que la chambre parallèle diminue en quelque sorte la prééminence de la chambre principale. Cela touchait une corde sensible. De plus, on estimait que ce serait sans conséquence pour les téléspectateurs.

Dans tous les cas, l'expérience a montré que le scepticisme initial s'est essentiellement dissipé avec le temps en raison des valeurs et de certaines des améliorations apportées au programme. On y a ajouté notamment les déclarations des circonscriptions, en plus d'accroître la fréquence de ce que nous appelons des « débats exploratoires ». Le calendrier des débats au Westminster Hall est bien rempli. Il faut, en somme, présenter une demande pour inscrire un sujet à l'ordre du jour — il peut s'agir d'un débat de 30 minutes ou de 2 heures. L'auteur de la demande doit garantir que les membres des différents caucus se présenteront et participeront aux discussions. Ces débats se sont révélés d'une grande pertinence pour les gens à la maison. Vous n'êtes pas sans savoir que, chez nous, les débats exploratoires sont assez rares. Cela relève, en gros, des voies habituelles utilisées dans la chambre principale.

Honnêtement, en examinant ce dossier, nous constatons qu'il existe certes des possibilités pour qu'une chambre parallèle produise ce genre de résultats.

(1145)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

A-t-on déjà créé une chambre parallèle qui a ensuite dû fermer ses portes parce que cela n'a tout simplement pas fonctionné?

M. Bruce Stanton:

Pas à ma connaissance.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une dernière petite question à poser avant de céder la parole. Les structures des partis et leurs directions respectives sont-elles en faveur de ces choses en général, ou est-ce que le fait de donner plus de pouvoirs aux députés d'arrière-ban représente une menace d'empiétement sur les affaires des organisations politiques?

M. Bruce Stanton:

Encore une fois, cela se rapporte à la culture qui s'est développée au Royaume-Uni en particulier. Les initiatives et le rôle des députés d'arrière-ban ont obtenu une visibilité nettement supérieure, mais de façon différente, et ce, dès la création de leur comité en 1922. Les choses ont évolué, comme je l'ai dit au début.

Nos conventions, traditions et règlements ont évolué différemment des leurs. Il faut vraiment veiller à ce que les fonctions de la chambre soient en adéquation avec ce que nous considérons comme étant nos besoins. Les députés ici comprennent très bien ce qui améliorera la situation, non seulement pour l'efficacité en matière de temps — vous savez sans doute que nous faisons face à des contraintes de temps —, mais aussi parce que cela permettra essentiellement de rapprocher le public du Parlement, renforçant ainsi son lien avec le travail que nous accomplissons ici.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

M. Simms avait une question, mais il cède son tour à M. Baylis, si le Comité est d'accord. Cela vous convient-il?

Vous avez une question, monsieur Baylis?

M. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Si nous devions faire quelque chose au Canada, nous ne serions toujours pas des pionniers. Est-ce exact? Nous ne sommes pas le premier ni le deuxième pays à le faire. Nous ne sommes même pas — comment dire — le troisième pays à emboîter le pas. Depuis combien de temps ces chambres sont-elles en place en Australie et au Royaume-Uni?

M. Bruce Stanton:

Elles existent depuis 1994; l'Australie a donc une expérience de plus de 25 ans. Au milieu de la décennie, le Parlement australien a préparé un rapport visant une période de 20 ans, et c'est ce qui a constitué, dans une large mesure, la source de mes recherches. En effet, nous ne sommes certainement pas parmi les premiers dans ce dossier.

M. Frank Baylis:

Je vous pose la question parce que nous, parlementaires, sommes passés maîtres dans l'art de discuter de questions à d'innombrables reprises. Nous ne réinventerions pas la roue ici, n'est-ce pas?

M. Bruce Stanton:

Non. Il existe d'excellents rapports sur les avantages et les inconvénients et sur le processus que les autres pays ont suivi pour établir une chambre parallèle. J'admets qu'il existe même des différences entre l'Australie et le Royaume-Uni. Là encore, nous ne pouvons pas nécessairement reproduire ce qu'ils ont fait.

M. Frank Baylis:

Nous ne pouvons pas faire du copier-coller.

M. Bruce Stanton:

Je crois que nous devons tenir compte des lacunes, des problèmes ou des limites qu'un tel système ou mécanisme pourrait aider à régler.

M. Frank Baylis:

Nous prendrions une mesure que les pionniers ont adoptée depuis des décennies, mais nous l'adapterions au contexte canadien.

M. Bruce Stanton:

C'est ce que je dirais, oui.

M. Frank Baylis:

Compte tenu de cette approche, lorsqu'on s'engage dans une voie pour la première fois, on y va lentement, mais la deuxième fois, on peut s'y prendre avec plus d'assurance. Je suis simplement curieux de savoir combien de temps il faudrait pour mettre le tout en place. Votre principal objectif serait-il de montrer aux parlementaires à quoi cela pourrait ressembler?

M. Bruce Stanton:

Oui.

M. Frank Baylis:

Je sais que nous avons parlé de Samara. Cette organisation a mené un sondage, et la plupart des parlementaires étaient contre l'idée d'une chambre parallèle. Je présume qu'ils ne savent pas ce que cela signifie lorsqu'ils disent s'opposer à la création d'une chambre parallèle.

M. Bruce Stanton:

Selon moi, ce rapport était, pour ainsi dire, plutôt neutre. La plupart des parlementaires ne comprennent même pas ce qu'est une chambre parallèle, parce que c'est quelque chose de nouveau pour nous. Dans le dernier rapport de Samara auquel vous faites allusion, je ne trouve pas que le résultat vient diminuer l'importance de cette idée. Je crois que c'est envisageable, à condition d'avoir plus d'information.

Pour revenir à votre question de départ, monsieur Baylis, la première étape consisterait à élaborer une proposition initiale de règlements, mais il nous faudrait un certain temps pour vraiment bien faire les choses. En nous appuyant sur les exemples des autres chambres, nous présenterions la meilleure proposition possible, puis nous demanderions l'avis des députés. Ce travail devrait prendre au moins plusieurs mois pendant lesquels les députés auraient l'occasion d'étudier la proposition et d'y réfléchir.

(1150)

M. Frank Baylis:

J'aimerais savoir ce que vous pensez de ceci. Si nous devions présenter une proposition — rien ne sera jamais parfait, de toute façon —, et que nous y intégrions les commentaires formulés après un certain temps, etc., il faudrait procéder au cours de la même législature... Je le signale parce que les députés élus pour une législature donnée pourraient vraiment aimer cette idée, mais ils pourraient ensuite tous être défaits. C'est possible.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Frank Baylis: Un nouveau groupe pourrait venir et dire: « Qu'est-ce que c'est que cette histoire? » Je me demande si le projet devrait débuter et, à tout le moins, être évalué durant le mandat des mêmes personnes. Qu'en pensez-vous?

M. Bruce Stanton:

Je crois que c'est une excellente façon de présenter la situation, bien franchement, parce que vous avez raison de dire que, dans une législature de quatre ans, on aurait l'occasion de mettre de l'avant la proposition, de recueillir des commentaires là-dessus, de proposer un projet pilote et de laisser la chambre parallèle fonctionner pendant au moins un an afin d'en tirer des leçons, d'en cerner les lacunes et les avantages et de déposer un rapport sur la première année de fonctionnement. Le tout serait achevé avant la fin d'une législature et, au cours de la suivante, une motion d'adoption pourrait alors être présentée.

Je le répète, et c'est mon dernier point: la meilleure façon d'y parvenir consiste, bien entendu, à amener tous les partis enregistrés à la Chambre à travailler ensemble sur ce dossier.

M. Frank Baylis:

Ai-je le temps de poser une dernière question?

Le président:

Oui, une toute dernière.

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous avez dit que, du point de vue historique, il y avait une certaine réticence chez les parlementaires en Australie et au Royaume-Uni lorsque cette idée a été proposée pour la première fois. Ai-je raison de dire qu'après sa mise en place, la chambre parallèle a gagné en popularité?

M. Bruce Stanton:

Oui.

M. Frank Baylis:

Comment expliquer cela?

M. Bruce Stanton:

Les critiques et le scepticisme exprimés au début se sont dissipés après plusieurs années de fonctionnement. Cela ne signifie pas qu'il n'y a plus aucune voix dissidente, mais en général, cette pratique a été considérée comme une innovation qui s'est avérée, sans contredit, avantageuse et utile pour le travail des parlementaires et pour le Parlement lui-même. Dans le cas du Royaume-Uni, comme le greffier Natzler l'a dit lors de votre dernière séance, les débats les plus regardés au Parlement portent sur les pétitions électroniques, mis à part les travaux occasionnels de certains comités spéciaux lorsqu'il y a une controverse ou quelque chose de ce genre. En ce qui concerne les débats en général, cela a pour effet de rapprocher le public des délibérations du Parlement.

M. Frank Baylis:

Merci.

Le président:

Madame Lapointe, vous avez la parole. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Stanton, je vous ai écouté avec beaucoup d'attention. Je vais vous poser la question suivante pour m'assurer d'avoir bien compris.

Vous proposez, par exemple, que le Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre fasse une étude assez exhaustive. Or, faire des consultations et des études prend quand même un certain temps. Comme mon collègue M. Baylis le disait, certaines choses existent déjà, entre autres des rapports. Vous parliez plus tôt de limites. Il ne faut pas réinventer la roue chaque fois.

Si j'ai bien compris, vous proposez que, lors de la prochaine législature, on fasse une grande étude et un rapport à ce sujet. Vous suggérez qu'on mette sur pied des projets pilotes et que cela prenne effet au cours de la législature suivante. Est-ce exact?

M. Bruce Stanton:

Oui. Premièrement, il est possible que le Parlement du Royaume-Uni ait créé un comité spécial de modernisation pour faire une étude précisément sur cette question.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Oui.

M. Bruce Stanton:

Par conséquent, il n'est peut-être pas nécessaire qu'un sous-comité du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre le fasse. Dans ce cas, ce sera à nous d'en décider. Cependant, parce que le sujet et l'étude sont très vastes, qu'il y a des conséquences et que des changements doivent être appliqués à tous les processus et procédures du Parlement, je pense que le Comité peut d'abord proposer une série de recommandations afin que celles-ci soient étudiées et que les députés soient consultés. S'ils le souhaitent, une motion pourrait alors être présentée pour mettre sur pied de cette chambre parallèle. Ce serait à titre expérimental, à mon avis.

Je suis d'accord sur le fait que ce processus prendra jusqu'à deux ans, entre autres pour recevoir tous les commentaires et les recommandations des autres députés. Il s'agira ensuite de faire l'essai de la nouvelle chambre parallèle pendant une certaine période, à titre expérimental.

(1155)

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Tout à l'heure, vous parliez de tous ceux qui, aussi bien en Grande-Bretagne qu'en Australie, étaient sceptiques au départ. Or ce scepticisme n'est plus nécessairement présent. Dans ces pays, a-t-on fait des études et des rapports à ce sujet?

M. Bruce Stanton:

À mon avis, certaines choses sont devenues évidentes avec le temps et le déroulement du projet de chambre parallèle. Des préoccupations et du scepticisme ont été exprimés au départ. Cependant, ces inquiétudes ne se sont pas matérialisées. Surtout, il y a eu plus d'amélioration en ce qui a trait aux affaires des parlementaires. Les avantages représentaient une nette amélioration alors qu'il y avait des inquiétudes au départ.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson, vous avez la parole.

M. David Christopherson:

Dans le même ordre d'idées, je sais que nous discutons de la question, mais j'aimerais vraiment avoir votre point de vue, parce que, en votre qualité de Vice-président de la Chambre, vous avez passé plus de temps que la majorité d'entre nous à penser globalement à cet endroit — au quotidien, c'est votre travail — et au déroulement des travaux et à ce qui est possible et à ce qui ne l'est pas.

Je crois qu'il est juste de dire que cela suscite un fort intérêt et beaucoup d'appui, et certains d'entre nous sont en fait enthousiastes par rapport à ce pas dans la bonne direction. Tout cela pour dire que, monsieur le président, au moins au Comité, si nous arrivons à trouver le bon compromis, je crois que nous pourrons, du moins je l'espère, pondre un rapport qui permettra à cette idée de voir le jour.

Voici ma question. Dans le contexte réel du fonctionnement de la Chambre des communes, pour ceux d'entre nous qui souhaitent que ce projet se concrétise, selon vous, quel devrait être notre objectif pour la législature actuelle? Croyez-vous que nous avons suffisamment de temps pour réellement entrer dans les détails? Devrions-nous consacrer plus de temps maintenant à régler les détails en ce sens pour faire avancer le plus possible le projet, demander ensuite à la Chambre son aval et poursuivre le travail avec la prochaine législature?

Au contraire, êtes-vous plutôt d'avis que, compte tenu des réalités — et vous et moi avons connu un certain nombre de législatures —, il serait préférable de terminer notre rapport et de formuler une recommandation favorable en ce sens pour la prochaine législature?

J'ai l'impression que vous êtes enthousiaste par rapport à cette idée, tout comme bon nombre d'entre nous.

Bref, tout cela pour vous demander ce que vous estimez être la meilleure façon de procéder au Comité pour la législature actuelle, étant donné qu'une majorité de députés des trois partis reconnus sont favorables à faire quelque chose. À votre avis, quelle forme pourrait prendre ce « quelque chose »? Quelle serait la mesure la plus ambitieuse que nous pourrions prendre pour contribuer à concrétiser cette idée, comme nous sommes au coeur de la saison folle et que notre marge de manoeuvre est de plus en plus réduite, même s'il nous reste encore du temps?

Qu'en pensez-vous, monsieur?

M. Bruce Stanton:

Oui. Ce n'est peut-être pas l'approche la plus ambitieuse que je prendrais, mais je crois que, si le Comité formule des recommandations en se fondant sur ses travaux pour proposer une marche à suivre concernant les prochaines étapes que la prochaine législature pourrait envisager, cela formera tout de même le fondement d'une étude officielle qui a porté sur les faits et les avantages et les inconvénients de cette idée en vue de mettre la question sur la table pour que la prochaine législature ait la possibilité d'aller de l'avant avec...

Dans un tel rapport, vous pourriez souligner ce que le Comité considère comme les points saillants ou ce que vous considérez comme les avantages d'une chambre parallèle.

Toutefois, si vous souhaitez aller de l'avant en ce sens, je vous invite aussi à penser à la forme que pourrait prendre ce cheminement pour donner vie à cette idée. Est-ce un comité distinct? Est-ce un sous-comité du Comité? Cependant, j'avoue que votre travail n'est pas de tout repos. Vous avez beaucoup de pain sur la planche. Ce n'est peut-être pas idéal que ce soit ce comité qui fasse ce travail. C'est ainsi que je vois la chose.

Je suis d'accord avec votre dernière suggestion de résumer les données probantes dans un rapport qui sera présenté à la Chambre. Cependant, au-delà de cela, je ne crois pas qu'il soit possible de créer un projet pilote d'ici la fin de la législature actuelle. Il y a déjà plusieurs autres choses qui se passeront d'ici juin, et cela risque de se perdre dans toutes les affaires en suspens.

(1200)

M. David Christopherson:

Bref, dans la mesure du possible, préparer le tout pour la prochaine législature...

M. Bruce Stanton:

C'est ce que je proposerais.

M. David Christopherson:

... et si la majorité des députés de la prochaine législature sont enthousiastes par rapport à cette idée, ils auraient un bon point de départ.

M. Bruce Stanton:

Oui. C'est exact.

Certains députés seront réélus pour la prochaine législature, et ils seront au courant que c'est un sujet qui suscitait un certain intérêt. Les députés pourront alors reprendre le travail là où nous serons rendus, si c'est ce que souhaite la prochaine législature.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est excellent. Cela contribue beaucoup à nos discussions. Merci beaucoup, monsieur le Vice-président.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous avons le temps pour une petite question. M. Simms peut la poser, ou il peut choisir de laisser M. Whalen y aller.

Est-ce correct?

Vous avez une question.

M. Nick Whalen (St. John's-Est, Lib.):

Je vous remercie énormément de me donner l'occasion de poser une question, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le Vice-président, merci beaucoup. C'est un excellent rapport.

Dans votre exposé, vous avez mentionné qu'il est important de bien saisir la lacune que nous essayons de régler avec une chambre parallèle.

Selon vous, quelle est la lacune que nous devons régler et que viendra régler la deuxième chambre? Y en a-t-il une?

M. Bruce Stanton:

Eh bien, je me suis penché sur cette idée davantage sur le plan conceptuel. Je laisse certainement les députés réfléchir à ces éléments et en discuter.

Je m'exprime ici davantage à titre de député de longue date plutôt que d'occupant du fauteuil, mais je crois qu'une caractéristique des autres chambres parallèles qui a connu un succès retentissant est que cela permet à plus de députés de prendre la parole sur des questions qui touchent directement les gens qu'ils représentent.

Je propose de trouver des manières de le faire durant les débats, les déclarations des circonscriptions et d'autres occasions similaires, tout en préservant la prééminence de la chambre principale qui se penche sur les affaires du gouvernement et les questions qui sont plus controversées et qui ont plus de conséquences.

M. Nick Whalen:

Croyez-vous que nous pourrions tout simplement y arriver en réduisant le temps de parole de chaque député pour participer aux débats réguliers? De nombreuses chambres dans le monde limitent le temps de parole des députés à trois minutes par lecture. J'ai l'impression qu'il y a beaucoup de répétitions avec des interventions de 10 minutes par lecture.

M. Bruce Stanton:

Oui.

Cela peut avoir un tel effet. Si vous vous aventurez dans ce sujet — je ne dis pas que cela n'en vaut pas la peine —, vous touchez un domaine qui relève particulièrement des partis et qui touche la manière dont ils souhaitent débattre de mesures importantes devant la Chambre qui ont trait aux affaires du gouvernement. Je crois que la réduction de la durée des interventions est une autre discussion. Je crois que tant du côté des députés ministériels que de l'opposition — et nous le voyons sans cesse — les partis souhaitent avoir l'occasion de prendre la parole sur ces questions qui font vraiment partie intégrante de notre processus législatif. Bref, je souhaite que cela ne nuise pas à la capacité de la Chambre d'exercer cette fonction importante. Voilà peut-être pourquoi une chambre parallèle permet de faire certains de ces travaux sans nuire à la prééminence de la chambre principale.

Le président:

Nous avons une dernière petite question du côté de M. Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Pour être honnête, ce n'est pas une question; c'est un commentaire en réponse à mon collègue, M. Whalen. J'aimerais répondre à sa suggestion concernant la possibilité de réduire les interventions à trois minutes.

En pratique, c'est souvent difficile d'exprimer une idée complexe, en particulier s'il faut fournir à la Chambre un peu de contexte, avec une intervention plus courte. J'ai récemment pris la parole au sujet de la Loi sur les langues autochtones et j'ai passé en revue les statistiques démographiques sur les locuteurs de l'inuktitut pour montrer dans quelle mesure bon nombre d'entre eux étaient unilingues. Ce n'est tout simplement pas possible de le faire rapidement.

Rien ne vous empêche de partager votre temps. Nous avons déjà un processus en place qui permet de diviser des interventions de 20 minutes en interventions de 10 minutes. Un député pourrait facilement repartager son temps pour arriver à cette fin. Cette pratique doit gagner en popularité pour être acceptée, mais il faut le consentement de la Chambre de toute manière pour partager son temps. Je crois que c'est une meilleure façon d'arriver à votre objectif que l'imposition d'une limite, ce qui entraîne un problème irréversible. Je ne peux pas dire que je vais combiner le temps imparti aux trois prochains intervenants pour avoir une discussion plus approfondie sur la question.

Je tenais seulement à signaler ce point.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Reid, et merci, monsieur Stanton. Cela nous aidera énormément à donner le coup d'envoi à nos délibérations sur le potentiel de cette idée.

Nous allons prendre une pause de quelques minutes pour laisser aux nouveaux témoins le temps de s'installer.

(1200)

(1205)

Le président:

Nous reprenons les travaux de la réunion 145 du Comité.

Durant la pause, j'ai été complimenté sur le haut degré de collaboration de notre comité. J'aurai peut-être besoin d'y faire référence dans l'avenir à un moment donné. Je vais garder précieusement ce compliment.

Le prochain point à l'ordre du jour de la réunion est l'étude sur le projet de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, j'invoque le Règlement. Nous reprenons nos travaux, et il est déjà passé midi depuis quelques minutes. Le Comité est-il d'accord pour poursuivre les travaux un peu après 13 heures pour avoir une heure pleine avec ces témoins?

(1210)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une réunion à 13 heures, mais la réunion peut se poursuivre sans moi.

Le président:

Sommes-nous d'accord? D'accord.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pouvons-nous procéder en mode pilote automatique pour cette période?

M. Scott Reid:

Oui. Aucun vote.

Le président:

En mode pilote automatique et aucun vote. D'accord. C'est raisonnable.

Le prochain point à notre ordre du jour est une étude sur le projet de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre. Comme vous vous en souvenez, l'une de nos dernières réunions dans l'édifice du Centre avant sa fermeture portait sur ce sujet. Nous avions convenu que c'était important pour le comité PROC de participer au processus tout au long du projet, et le Président de la Chambre a dit qu'il était du même avis lorsqu'il a récemment comparu devant le Comité pour discuter du budget provisoire des dépenses de la Chambre. Cette question a aussi été soulevée lors de la réunion du 28 février du Bureau de régie interne.

Nous poursuivons donc nos travaux, et nous sommes ravis d'accueillir aujourd'hui des fonctionnaires de la Chambre des communes: Michel Patrice, sous-greffier, Administration; Stéphan Aubé, dirigeant principal de l'information, et Susan Kulba, directrice principale et architecte exécutive, Direction des biens immobiliers.

Merci à tous les témoins de leur présence ici.

Même si nous prolongerons la réunion, je tiens tout de même à réserver les cinq dernières minutes pour des travaux du Comité concernant notre prochaine réunion, si cela vous convient.

M. Scott Reid:

Absolument.

Le président:

Vous souhaiterez peut-être rester, parce que l'un des éléments dont je souhaite parler a trait à un arbre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Un arbre?

Le président:

Oui: « cet » arbre.

Monsieur Patrice, je vous invite à faire votre exposé et à nous expliquer ce qu'il en est.

M. Michel Patrice (sous-greffier, Administration, Chambre des communes):

Merci, monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité. J'ai l'intention de seulement faire un bref exposé, ce qui nous laissera plus de temps pour les échanges.[Français]

C'est un plaisir d'être avec vous aujourd'hui pour vous présenter le modèle de gouvernance approuvé par le Bureau de régie interne, afin d'assurer l'implication soutenue et continue des députés dans le projet de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre, ainsi que pour échanger avec vous, afin que vous puissiez nous faire part de vos attentes et observations.[Traduction]

Pour ce qui est du modèle de gouvernance, à sa dernière réunion, le Bureau de régie interne a décidé de créer un groupe de travail composé d'un député de chaque parti reconnu. Ce groupe de travail fera rapport au Bureau de régie interne, mais il participera au projet de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre pour s'assurer que les députés sont pleinement consultés et informés et qu'ils participent au processus décisionnel. Au bout du compte, même si le pouvoir décisionnel demeure entre les mains du Bureau, le groupe de travail produira un rapport et il procédera à un examen plus détaillé du projet de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre.

Évidemment, en plus de ce groupe de travail, comme je l'ai mentionné la dernière fois que j'ai témoigné devant le Comité, sur le plan administratif, il y a un groupe de travail intégré composé de représentants de l'Administration de la Chambre des communes, de Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada et de notre partenaire sur la Colline qui supervise davantage la réalisation et la mise en oeuvre du projet.

Par ailleurs, il y a votre comité, qui se veut une tribune pour nous, en ce qui a trait à la gouvernance, où nous pouvons faire le point régulièrement sur le projet, vous consulter et prendre note de vos commentaires sur vos attentes et vos besoins.

Voilà en gros le modèle de gouvernance. Évidemment, il y a d'autres aspects qui découlent des travaux, de la suite des choses concernant le projet et de la réhabilitation en soi de l'édifice du Centre. D'autres intervenants, comme les médias et les citoyens, seront évidemment consultés que ce soit par l'entremise de ce comité, du groupe de travail ou du Bureau de régie interne.

Comme j'ai vécu la réhabilitation de l'édifice de l'Ouest, je dois dire que nous avons tiré de nombreuses leçons de ce projet. De mon point de vue — et c'est mon opinion personnelle —, la leçon la plus importante était que les députés n'avaient pas suffisamment été consultés quant à l'élaboration du projet de réhabilitation de l'édifice de l'Ouest et à sa création. Je suis donc heureux de l'orientation que nous avons reçue du Bureau de régie interne avec l'établissement d'un groupe de travail composé de députés qui veillera à ce que des députés soient consultés de manière continue concernant le projet dans son ensemble et les détails. L'édifice du Centre est évidemment un édifice emblématique qui représente le centre de la démocratie parlementaire, mais c'est aussi votre milieu de travail. Il est donc important de tenir compte de vos besoins et de la réalité de vos vies dans la réhabilitation de cet édifice.

Susan, Stéphan et moi-même sommes prêts à répondre à vos questions.

Merci beaucoup.

(1215)

Le président:

Avant de passer au premier intervenant, pouvez-vous nous dire si le Bureau de régie interne a laissé entendre que le Comité aura son mot à dire si un changement est nécessaire dans cet édifice?

M. Michel Patrice:

Le Bureau a beaucoup parlé de ce comité durant nos discussions, et il accueille évidemment avec plaisir toute contribution de ce comité dans le projet et il reconnaît...

M. David Christopherson:

Nos démarches ont porté leurs fruits.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Cela fait plaisir à entendre.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez la parole.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'ai pas de questions pour meubler sept minutes, mais je vais poser celles que j'ai pour l'instant.

Vous avez mentionné la création d'un nouveau groupe de surveillance composé de députés des partis reconnus. Comment cela fonctionnera-t-il? Demanderez-vous à un député de chaque parti de passer en revue les bleus et les plans ou cela prendra-t-il la forme d'un survol une fois par année?

M. Michel Patrice:

Non. Je pense que ces députés s'impliqueront plus que cela. De toute évidence, nous les consulterons et les rencontrerons régulièrement.

Selon ce que le Bureau a discuté, la première tâche de ce groupe consistera, comme les membres l'ont proposé, à dresser une liste de principes directeurs ou fondamentaux proposés en vue de la réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre. Le groupe se chargera également d'offrir des séances d'information détaillées sur le projet, sa structure et la manière de procéder. Les divers acteurs et intervenants devront tenir une discussion afin d'élaborer ces principes directeurs et fondamentaux, lesquels seront présentés au Bureau, bien entendu.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comment se déroule la fermeture de l'édifice du Centre, que nous avons quitté depuis quelques mois?

Mme Susan Kulba (directrice principale et architecte exécutive, Direction des biens immobiliers, Chambre des communes):

Il est maintenant devenu un site de projet, bien entendu. Une période de fermeture a débuté et l'édifice fait l'objet d'investigations continues. Ces dernières, comme vous le savez pour avoir occupé l'édifice, sont quelque peu intrusives. Maintenant, elles le deviennent de plus en plus. C'est le genre d'investigation qui aurait perturbé les activités. Ces démarches sont en cours et iront en augmentant au cours des prochains moins. On s'emploie également à fermer l'édifice et à en retirer tous les biens et meubles laissés derrière à la fin de leur cycle de vie. Voilà où nous sommes rendus actuellement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'échéancier est-il toujours celui dont il a été question par le passé, soit de 10 ans?

M. Michel Patrice:

L'échéancier de 10 ans a souvent été évoqué, mais je pense qu'il est prématuré de fixer un nombre d'années avant d'avoir évalué suffisamment la situation pour comprendre l'état du bâtiment. Je trouve que c'est un projet très intéressant, mais j'ai appris qu'en réalité, nous ne sommes pas certains de la manière dont l'édifice a été construit. Nous avons des photos prises à l'époque. Par exemple, comme la construction s'est étalée sur un certain nombre d'années et que l'édifice a été reconstruit après l'incendie, je crois comprendre que la structure des fondations était en bois. Un changement de technologie est survenu au sein de l'industrie, qui a commencé à utiliser l'acier. C'est ce que les photos prises lors de la construction nous ont appris. Je pense donc qu'il est prématuré de parler de l'état de l'édifice et de la longueur des travaux une fois que nous commencerons à ouvrir les murs, mais il est souvent question d'un échéancier de 10 ans. Nous verrons ce qu'il en est à mesure que les travaux avanceront.

La même réponse s'appliquerait au budget.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les travaux pourraient-ils prendre moins de 10 ans?

M. Michel Patrice:

Je pense que tout est possible.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une dernière question à poser avant de céder la parole à Mme Sahota, s'il reste du temps.

À mon arrivée à la Chambre, j'ai entendu dire que l'édifice de l'Ouest serait fermé afin d'y aménager des salles de comité. Est-ce encore ce qu'on a l'intention de faire? Le plan est-il coulé dans le béton ou prendra-t-on une décision dans 10 ans?

M. Michel Patrice:

Je pense que cette option a été envisagée. Le plan n'est pas définitif pour le moment, car les besoins du Parlement ou de la Chambre des communes vont évoluer au cours des 10 prochaines années.

Nous venons d'entendre parler de la création possible d'une chambre parallèle. Est-ce une option?

(1220)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Y a-t-il une raison pour laquelle l'édifice de l'Ouest doit être fermé quand l'édifice du Centre rouvrira, ou pourrait-il rester ouvert jusqu'à...

M. Michel Patrice:

L'édifice de l'Ouest restera ouvert une fois que l'édifice du Centre aura été rénové. Par exemple, un grand nombre de bureaux se trouvant ici doivent devenir des bureaux ou des suites de députés.

Chaque option envisagée pour la Chambre est sur la table, mais l'aménagement a été conçu pour que l'on puisse reconstruire le tout afin de créer de multiples salles de comité.

Le président:

Madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

J'aimerais savoir de quelle manière vous choisirez les députés qui formeront le comité de travail.

M. Michel Patrice:

C'est une prérogative des partis.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Les partis choisiront.

M. Michel Patrice:

Ce sont les partis qui détermineront la composition du comité, oui.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Est-ce que ce seront les partis officiels ou tous les partis qui occupent un siège à la Chambre?

M. Michel Patrice:

Ce seront les partis reconnus.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous avez indiqué que vous avez beaucoup appris de la construction de l'édifice de l'Ouest, ajoutant que les députés n'avaient pas été invités à s'impliquer jusqu'à maintenant.

Si on laisse de côté la participation des députés, pouvez-vous être plus précis quant aux leçons concrètes que vous avez tirées de l'ouverture de l'édifice de l'Ouest? À quoi n'avait-on pas pensé?

M. Michel Patrice:

La liste pourrait s'avérer très longue. À l'évidence, nous allons préparer un rapport et évaluer le déroulement des choses. Nous sommes encore en train d'apprendre.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

De mémoire, quelles seraient les trois principales leçons?

M. Michel Patrice:

L'une d'entre elles concerne l'opérationnalisation de l'édifice lors de la construction. Comment pouvons-nous faire mieux? Nous avions un modèle. Lorsqu'il a été élaboré, il était prévu que nous terminions la construction et la réfection de la structure de l'édifice, après quoi nous installerions la technologie et procéderions aux essais. Nous avons accéléré le processus vers la fin du projet, commençant à travailler en parallèle afin de raccourcir essentiellement le temps nécessaire à l'opérationnalisation de l'édifice pour le rendre pleinement fonctionnel. Ce fut un succès relatif, mais je pense que nous avons appris que, si nous voulons procéder ainsi et avancer plus en séries, nous devons, comme nous en avons souvent discuté entre nous, procéder par zones. La zone doit être propre pour que nous puissions commencer à y installer la technologie.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'ai deux autres questions, mais je ne pense pas qu'il me reste beaucoup de temps.

M. Michel Patrice:

Stéphan.

M. Stéphan Aubé (dirigeant principal de l'information, Chambre des communes):

Si vous me permettez d'ajouter une observation, au lieu de parler d'un horizon de 10 ans, comme nous venons de l'indiquer, nous devrions nous concentrer sur une période de fin des travaux en vue d'un retour possible du Parlement au lieu de fixer ce retour en septembre. Nous pouvons viser une période de l'année; voilà qui nous laisserait le temps nécessaire pour rendre l'édifice fonctionnel, comme Michel l'a souligné, et agir à temps pour accommoder le Parlement. C'est un point crucial.

Il faut également concilier la sécurité et les activités. Nous voulons nous assurer... Par exemple, nous avons éprouvé des problèmes avec les portes extérieures de l'édifice. Les exigences en matière de sécurité étaient très élevées pour cet édifice, ce qui a causé des problèmes opérationnels. Nous avons tiré des leçons de la situation, des leçons dont nous voulons tirer parti dans l'aménagement de l'édifice du Centre.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Je remercie nos invités de comparaître aujourd'hui.

D'après ce qui est ressorti des discussions précédentes sur les efforts déployés pour tenter de faire approuver un plan initial par les parlementaires, je pense que c'est sensé. Je considère que c'est une manière logique de commencer à faire approuver le thème général et les besoins. Il serait utile que nous connaissions certains des compromis que nous devrons faire.

Je constate que nous ne pouvons reporter certaines décisions, étant donné que nos besoins et nos attentes évolueront. Je vais vous donner un exemple.

Mon entreprise familiale est en train de traverser un processus semblable alors que nous construisons un nouveau bureau principal. Nous devons composer avec le fait que les attentes à l'égard des toilettes évoluent. Traditionnellement, il y avait des toilettes pour hommes et pour femmes. Nous avons maintenant commencé à intégrer le concept de salles à langer. Il y a maintenant trois groupes de toilettes où l'espace est plus restreint. Nous voudrons peut-être aménager des toilettes non genrées dans l'avenir. De fait, nous pouvons prévoir ce que nous voudrons dans l'avenir.

Comme les toilettes de l'édifice du Centre constituent une question délicate de toute façon, c'est un point au sujet duquel un processus d'approbation pourrait avoir lieu dans plusieurs années au sujet de diverses facettes de l'édifice. À titre d'exemple, nous pourrions modifier l'éclairage et la ventilation, car les attentes quant aux niveaux acceptables de dioxyde de carbone changeront probablement au fil des ans. Ce ne sont là que quelques exemples.

Je voulais poser quelques questions sur les thèmes généraux. En ce qui concerne la relation entre la rénovation de l'édifice du Centre et le plan à long terme, le groupe qui est en train d'être mis sur pied doit-il se prononcer sur l'édifice du Centre uniquement ou sur les plans à long terme également?

(1225)

M. Michel Patrice:

Selon moi, il s'intéresserait au plan à long terme également, car tout cela fait partie intégrante d'un projet global touchant le campus parlementaire.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

J'ai lu récemment que la réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre n'est pas ce qu'on appelle la phase de collecte des « exigences fonctionnelles ». Avez-vous une date butoir pour cette phase?

M. Michel Patrice:

Je vous donnerai la date butoir que nous avons évoquée pour la fin de la phase de conception. Il est question du 20 janvier 2022.

Susan, pourriez-vous en dire plus...

Mme Susan Kulba:

Oui. La collecte des exigences s'inscrit dans les phases de conception préliminaire et d'élaboration des esquisses, lesquelles se poursuivront essentiellement jusqu'en février 2020. Nous en sommes au tout début de la conception des esquisses.

M. Scott Reid:

Février 2020 ou 2022?

Mme Susan Kulba:

La conception préliminaire et l'élaboration d'esquisse doivent se terminer en février 2020.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

Mme Susan Kulba:

Nous entamerons ensuite ce qui s'appelle la « conception détaillée », phase qui se poursuivra jusqu'au début de 2022.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. Cet échéancier est-il publié sur un site Web quelconque?

Mme Susan Kulba:

Non. Pour le moment, ce sont les dates établies par SPAC.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. Est-ce le genre de document — auquel vous avez fait référence, je pense — que vous seriez prêts à nous remettre pour que nous comprenions mieux de quoi il en retourne?

Mme Susan Kulba:

Bien sûr.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. Vous pourriez le remettre au greffier en temps opportun.

Le fait de comprendre le dossier nous est évidemment d'une grande aide. La structure du Parlement en 2022, ou même en 2020, est incertaine. Le gouvernement sera-t-il majoritaire ou minoritaire? Qui sera le premier ministre? Nous en sommes incertains. Il nous serait donc utile d'en savoir plus. Qui occupera quelles fonctions au sein de ce comité ou du Bureau de régie interne?

Considère-t-on que la phase 2 du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs fait partie de la rénovation de l'édifice du Centre ou qu'il s'agit-il d'une initiative distincte?

Mme Susan Kulba:

Cette phase fait bel et bien partie de la réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre.

M. Scott Reid:

La phase 2 est-elle un fait accompli? Nous avons tous entendu parler du fameux orme. Comme j'ai grandi à Ottawa, cet arbre est pour moi un souvenir d'enfance et j'éprouve à son égard un certain attachement sentimental.

Mis à part mon attachement personnel, d'autres personnes y sont manifestement également attachées, comme nous avons pu le constater. D'après ce que je comprends, on entend l'abattre d'ici la fin du mois pour utiliser son bois afin d'en faire des meubles. Son abattage doit faciliter l'agrandissement du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs dans le cadre de la phase 2 de l'édifice du Centre.

Je vous demanderai donc si l'abatage de cet arbre est un fait accompli. A-t-on déjà accordé les contrats et fixé les dépenses relatives au Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, ou est-il encore possible d'intervenir avant que ce ne soit chose faite? Je ne suis pas certain que je devrais poser cette question, soit dit en passant.

M. Michel Patrice:

Le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs constitue, de toute évidence, une composante importante du projet de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre, car il faut envisager un horizon de 50 ans. L'édifice du Centre doit pouvoir héberger le Parlement pendant 50 ans.

On ajoute essentiellement de l'espace pour le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs afin de transférer certaines fonctions ailleurs qu'à édifice du Centre pour qu'il y ait plus d'espace. Par exemple, le nombre de députés et de services divers augmentera probablement au cours des 50 prochaines années.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

M. Michel Patrice:

Je dirais que oui, cette phase fait partie intégrante du projet de l'édifice du Centre.

M. Scott Reid:

Non, non. Ce n'est pas ce que je demandais. Je voulais savoir si, oui ou non, les contrats ont été accordés, les esquisses, réalisées, et les dépenses, effectuées, de sorte que toute tentative de ralentir le processus pour se pencher sur la question aurait pour effet de...

(1230)

M. Michel Patrice:

Je pense que les contrats ont été accordés. J'ignore quand c'est...

Mme Susan Kulba:

Les contrats pour l'ensemble du projet ont été accordés...

M. Michel Patrice:

Oui.

Mme Susan Kulba:

... pour les gestionnaires de la conception et de la construction.

M. Michel Patrice:

Un trou sera donc creusé pour accueillir le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, qui sera souterrain, mais l'aménagement intérieur n'a pas encore été déterminé.

M. Scott Reid:

Les contrats accordés jusqu'à maintenant sont-ils du domaine public?

Mme Susan Kulba:

Oui. Les appels d'offres ont été publiés par Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada.

M. Scott Reid:

Je comprends que vous ne faites pas partie de ce ministère, mais seriez-vous en mesure de nous indiquer, à nous ou à notre greffier, où nous pourrions trouver l'information?

Mme Susan Kulba: Mais certainement.

M. Michel Patrice:

Nous transmettrons l'information au greffier.

M. Scott Reid:

Cela nous serait fort utile.

Je pense que mon temps est écoulé, monsieur le président. Je tenterai peut-être d'intervenir au cours du tour de table.

Merci.

Le président:

Si cela vous convient, nous effectuerons un tour de table après l'intervention de M. Christopherson.

Avant d'accorder la parole à M. Christopherson, toutefois, je veux clarifier quelque chose à propos du sujet abordé par M. Reid.

Je présume que le Président et/ou le Bureau de régie interne constituent l'autorité suprême pour tout ce qui concerne ce qui se passe sur la Cité parlementaire. Personne ne peut surpasser leur autorité. Ont-ils le dernier mot pour tout ce qui concerne ce qui se passe sur la Cité parlementaire, et ce, tant à l'intérieur qu'à l'extérieur des édifices?

M. Michel Patrice:

Je dirais que dans les faits, c'est un peu plus complexe que cela en ce qui concerne les exigences relatives aux parlementaires et au Parlement. Les Présidents et les bureaux sont indubitablement responsables de leurs chambres respectives, mais les édifices et les terrains du Parlement relèvent de la responsabilité du gouvernement du Canada, auquel ils appartiennent.

Il en va de même pour l'obtention du financement pour les projets; c'est le pouvoir exécutif qui accorde essentiellement des fonds à cet égard. Je dirais que c'est un modèle mixte, mais les exigences, les besoins et leur identification relèvent évidemment de la responsabilité des parlementaires, sous l'égide du Président et de leur bureau respectif.

Un autre acteur intervient sur la Colline, et c'est essentiellement la Commission de la capitale nationale, qui s'occupe de l'utilisation des terres fédérales. Parfois, toute une gamme d'acteurs sont appelés à jouer un rôle.

Le président:

Merci.

M. Michel Patrice:

J'ajouterais que le Bureau d'examen des édifices fédéraux du patrimoine intervient également afin de préserver la trame patrimoniale des édifices. C'est une autre entité qui joue un rôle afin d'indiquer ce que nous pouvons ou ne pouvons pas faire aux édifices patrimoniaux.

Le président:

Il est très utile de comprendre un peu la complexité de la situation.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président. Je suis ravi que vous ayez posé cette question, car elle est étroitement liée au sujet à l'étude.

Mais avant d'y répondre, je veux nous féliciter — personne ne peut le faire; je peux vous le dire. Nous avons commencé avec un rapport sur l'édifice de l'Ouest. Nous nous inquiétions au sujet du manque de participation des députés. Nous étions résolus, à ce comité, de changer cette situation à l'avenir, et nous avons décidé de faire preuve d'ouverture à l'égard du Bureau de régie interne. On a demandé à chacun de nous d'exercer des pressions auprès de nos whips et des membres du Bureau de régie interne. Je crois que ces démarches ont été efficaces, d'après ce que j'entends maintenant, et on parlait constamment du comité de la procédure. C'est bien. Je vais tout d'abord féliciter le président et le Comité d'avoir réussi à faire cela. Je suis ici depuis un bon moment déjà, et je peux vous dire que c'est énorme, dans le monde des gouvernements successifs et des processus décisionnels, que nous ayons pu participer à ce processus comme nous devions le faire.

Cela dit, si je me fie à votre dernière question, j'ai l'impression que nous devrions demander un peu plus de clarté. J'avais en tête la question que le président a posée. Je croyais que le Président et le Bureau de régie interne constituaient l'étape finale. Je me disais: « Ils prennent la décision, et c'est fini. » On me dit maintenant que ce n'est pas aussi simple, car le gouvernement — dans sa capacité d'allouer des fonds mais en reconnaissant que le Parlement, et non pas l'organe exécutif, tient les cordons de la bourse au final, même s'il peut demander de l'argent, comme il le fera ce soir... C'est le Parlement qui dit « oui, vous pouvez obtenir l'argent » ou « non, vous ne pouvez pas obtenir l'argent ». Nous voyons ce qui se passe aux États-Unis, lorsque ces décisions sont contestées.

Puis il y a, comme vous l'avez mentionné, la Commission de la capitale nationale. Elle a son mot à dire. Il y a ce que l'on appelle le BEEFP ou quelque chose qui s'y rapproche. Il a son mot à dire. Maintenant, nous ajoutons notre voix au chapitre. Je pense, monsieur le président, que nous devrions demander au personnel de revenir et de nous fournir un diagramme et de nous faire part de ce qu'il en comprend. Je vois l'expression sur votre visage, et c'est la raison pour laquelle je veux ce diagramme. Le fait que c'est nébuleux nous laisse perplexes. Nous pouvons croire que nous jouons un rôle important dans ce processus, mais nous sommes tous des politiciens. Nous pouvons transformer quelque chose en quelque chose ou en rien; cela dépend de ce que nous voulons en faire.

J'aimerais que ce soit clair. Ce faisant, monsieur le président, ce comité pourrait ainsi établir le rôle exact de ce groupe de travail intégré. Pour moi, il doit rendre des comptes, pour ainsi dire, ou offrir ses conseils au Bureau de régie interne. Or, je pense que le groupe devrait rencontrer le comité de la procédure, en tant qu'entité distincte. Nous pourrions alors en faire un sous-comité de ce comité.

Le fait est que les partis peuvent choisir qui ils envoient. Là encore, nous revenons à la structure exécutive quant au fonctionnement de cet endroit, et les simples députés peuvent choisir les gens qu'ils veulent. Pour le reste d'entre nous, ces personnes peuvent ne pas être les meilleurs représentants pour défendre nos intérêts. J'aimerais que quelque chose soit prévu — pas tant un mécanisme de reddition de comptes, mais plutôt des suggestions et des discussions — entre ce groupe de travail intégré et ce groupe.

Bref, j'aimerais voir — le fait que ce ne soit pas clair en est l'une des raisons — le meilleur diagramme pouvant être créé pour la prise de décisions. Je vous demanderais d'inclure où le groupe de travail devrait se situer dans le diagramme, selon vous ou le Bureau de régie interne. Ensuite, monsieur le président, nous aurons l'occasion d'examiner les détails.

J'ai été surpris. Je dois vous dire que j'ai été un peu étonné d'entendre le Bureau de régie interne dire « nous avons décidé ». Cela me va, car je pense que c'est une bonne chose, mais j'espérais que nous établissions le type de relation de travail où le Bureau dirait « c'est l'orientation que nous entendons prendre; cela répond-il à vos besoins? ».

À mon sens, il faut clarifier la relation entre le Bureau de régie interne et la prise de décision finale, le groupe de travail intégré et le comité de la procédure, et préciser comment ils cadrent dans le processus.

(1235)

Le président:

Les ministres devraient également figurer dans ce diagramme, là où ils ont une incidence.

M. David Christopherson:

Eh bien, oui. C'est pourquoi j'ai dit, monsieur le président, que j'ai entendu qu'il y avait au moins quatre entités — le BEEFP, le gouvernement, à savoir l'organe exécutif, la Commission de la capitale nationale, ainsi que le Président et le BRI. On pourrait ajouter le Comité de la procédure. Nous avons notre mot à dire, si bien qu'il y a cinq intervenants.

Là encore, le point que je fais valoir est le manque de clarté. Je ne m'attends pas à ce que vous retourniez et établissiez le fonctionnement; je veux que ce soit fait maintenant. Si c'est un peu ambigu ou nébuleux, j'aimerais que nous contribuions à apporter des clarifications, car cette clarté permettra de déterminer si les personnes concernées ont suffisamment voix au chapitre.

C'est ce que je pense en ce moment, monsieur le président. J'espère que nous apporterons ces clarifications lorsque nous étudierons la question. Merci.

Merci beaucoup de votre exposé.

M. Michel Patrice:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

J'imagine que nous pourrions ajouter le ministère du Patrimoine à ce diagramme également.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui. Ajoutez tous les intervenants qui ont leur mot à dire dans le processus de prise de décisions et dans quel ordre.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, j'ajouterais également qu'il y a d'autres locataires dans l'édifice du Centre, notamment le Sénat, le BCP, le Service de protection parlementaire et la Bibliothèque du Parlement.

M. David Christopherson:

Et les médias.

M. John Nater:

Les médias et tous les autres intervenants de ce réseau.

Le président:

D'accord.

Nous allons procéder de façon informelle maintenant, en commençant avec M. Lapointe. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les témoins d'être avec nous et de prendre le temps de revenir au Comité pour répondre à nos questions.

La dernière fois que vous êtes venu témoigner, j'ai été surprise par le peu d'information qui avait été présentée. On ne savait pas où on allait. C'est à tout le moins l'impression que vous m'avez donnée. Tout d'abord, on allait commencer par sortir de l'édifice du Centre et, après, on verrait où on en serait. C'est ainsi que je l'ai perçu.

Monsieur Aubé, je vous remercie de nous avoir donné de l'information sur le nombre de mètres carrés que nous avions à l'édifice du Centre par rapport à celui à l'édifice de l'Ouest. On voit que la superficie des locaux auxiliaires à l'édifice de l'Ouest a augmenté par rapport à celle à l'édifice du Centre, mais vous n'avez pas détaillé cette information. Est-ce parce qu'elle n'est pas disponible?

(1240)

M. Stéphan Aubé:

Je l'ai un peu détaillée.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Vous avez parlé des services postaux et des salles de communication. C'est très détaillé, mais on ne sait pas ce qu'il y avait auparavant à l'édifice du Centre. On est passé de 570 à 1 441 mètres carrés. Je crois que c'est le service d'entreposage qui a gagné cet espace et il doit y avoir des raisons à cela. Le reste de l'information est très claire.

M. Stéphan Aubé:

Nous allons vous fournir ces détails plus tard, madame Lapointe.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Merci, c'est gentil.

Madame Kulba, à la réunion précédente, vous avez dit que le déclassement prendrait neuf mois et que cela vous aiderait à savoir où on s'en va.

Les travaux parlementaires ont pris fin au milieu de décembre. Je me rappelle que, à l'émission très populaire Infoman, le premier ministre montrait la rapidité avec laquelle on avait vidé les bureaux. Au milieu de décembre, j'ai eu l'impression qu'on sortait tout de l'édifice du Centre.

Cela fait trois mois que le déclassement a commencé, sur une période prévue de neuf mois. Où en êtes-vous après ces trois mois?

Mme Susan Kulba:

Nous en sommes à environ 20 %.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Vous en êtes à 20 % et on en est au tiers de la période prévue.

Monsieur Patrice, c'est une fois le déclassement complété qu'on saura quelles sont les prochaines étapes. Vous ai-je bien compris?

M. Michel Patrice:

Je n'ai pas donné de détails sur les prochaines étapes. Au-delà du déclassement, il faut faire du travail d'investigation, ce qui nous donnera de l'information sur l'état de l'édifice, ses éléments mécaniques et électriques, la tuyauterie et d'autres éléments structurels. Je vous dirais que cela prendra un peu plus que neuf mois.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Le déclassement, c'est vider l'édifice du Centre pour pouvoir étudier l'état de la structure.

M. Michel Patrice:

Il faut ouvrir les murs et les planchers pour examiner l'intérieur de la structure.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Le déclassement en est donc à 20 %.

Mon collègue M. Bittle a posé une question à ce sujet. Madame Kulba, vous avez dit que vous alliez nous présenter en janvier un plan sur les premières étapes, mais je ne crois pas l'avoir reçu. Ce plan est-il prêt?

M. Michel Patrice:

En fait, le plan vient plutôt du Bureau de régie interne. Il fallait que la discussion et la présentation aient lieu au Bureau et que celui-ci fournisse des directives. C'est ce que nous avons obtenu lors de la dernière réunion du Bureau.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Le Bureau de régie interne vous a donné... Vous êtes arrivés avec un...

M. Michel Patrice:

Il y a eu un dialogue, et le Bureau de régie interne nous a donné des directives. Il y a eu des discussions et une décision. Pour ma part, je suis bien content qu'il y ait cette implication directe, continue et soutenue des députés.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Oui, franchement, c'est important. Comme vous le disiez tantôt, il s'agit de notre lieu de travail.

Vous m'avez un peu surprise, monsieur Patrice, quand vous avez dit plus tôt que tout était possible et qu'on parlait ici de 10 ans, plus ou moins.

Est-ce qu'on pourra y retourner dans 8 ou 9 ans, ou est-ce que cela pourrait aller jusqu'à 15 ans?

M. Michel Patrice:

Malheureusement, je ne suis pas prophète. Je ne peux pas m'avancer et vous dire que ce sera plus long ou plus court. Nous verrons. Cela va se définir au fur et à mesure que le projet va avancer.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Je continue d'être très surprise qu'on ferme cet édifice et qu'on ne semble pas très informé sur la structure. J'ai vu l'émission Découverte en octobre dernier. Cela paraissait très détaillé. On semblait savoir où l'on s'en allait, avoir tout mesuré, partout. En tout cas, à l'émission Découverte, on semblait savoir où l'on s'en allait. Je n'ai pas l'impression que...

(1245)

M. Michel Patrice:

Pour des projets de cette ampleur et des édifices historiques de cette nature, on peut faire de meilleures prévisions ou de meilleures conjectures. Or pour ma part, j'aime travailler avec des faits et, quand j'avance quelque chose, j'aime vraiment que ce soit basé sur la recherche et sur la science plutôt que sur une moyenne provenant de projets de cette nature.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord.

M. Michel Patrice:

Il y a effectivement un plan de très haut niveau. Les experts et les gens savent exactement ce qu'ils doivent faire pour que la conclusion du projet soit un succès. Il y a des étapes, à très haut niveau, et dans ce projet les gens savent très bien où ils s'en vont. Ce que je vous dis, c'est que, comme les experts, nous ne possédons pas toute l'information, dans le détail, de ce projet.

J'ai souvent fait l'analogie avec un projet de rénovation, qui, soit dit en passant, est beaucoup plus simple étant donné que nous savons comment nos maisons sont construites. Cela dit, il y a toujours des surprises. On ne peut pas s'attendre à ce qu'il n'y ait pas de surprises dans un petit projet de rénovation. C'est d'autant plus vrai dans un projet de cette ampleur, avec un édifice construit de cette façon et avec un tel symbolisme. Les surprises seront nombreuses.[Traduction]

Je veux revenir sur quelque chose que M. Reid a mentionné, car il participe actuellement à un projet. De toute évidence, à un moment donné, nous aurons un plan. Nous ne devrions pas être malavisés et penser que ces plans ne changeront pas si le projet est en cours pour une période de 10 ans, par exemple. Nous devons être prêts à le réévaluer au besoin ou lorsque les circonstances changent et à accepter les modifications à la conception et à s'y adapter, même s'ils seront adoptés et approuvés en janvier 2022, par exemple. Nous devons faire suffisamment preuve d'ouverture d'esprit pour revenir et dire, « La situation a changé, nous sommes en train de trouver une meilleure solution, ou les besoins ont changé pour ce qui est des salles de bain ou de l'aménagement, notamment ».

C'est pourquoi il est important que les députés, et je le répète, participent constamment au processus. Par constamment, j'entends du début à la fin, car nous ne construisons pas cet édifice pour nous; nous le faisons pour vous, car c'est votre lieu de travail et c'est l'art de la démocratie. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Merci beaucoup.

M. Michel Patrice:

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Bien entendu, la technologie évolue très rapidement.

Nous allons entendre M. Graham, puis M. Reid.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce sont davantage des observations que des questions que j'ai en ce moment.

Nous parlons du comité de la surveillance. Je vais y revenir rapidement. J'ai proposé d'en faire un sous-comité du comité de la procédure ou un comité du président et des vice-présidents du comité de la procédure pour qu'il y ait un lien direct entre le comité de la surveillance et le comité de la procédure. Nous sommes engagés dans ce processus et ce n'est pas un comité composé de whips, qui ont une perspective très différente de celle des autres députés, ce qui est une source de préoccupation pour moi.

Je tiens donc à le préciser aux fins du compte rendu.

Par ailleurs, nous devrions nous assurer qu'un ancien parlementaire siège au comité de la surveillance, quelqu'un comme David qui sera bientôt un ancien parlementaire, qui comprend très bien le privilège de l'endroit — et ce n'est pas tout le monde qui le comprend — et qui se souvient de l'édifice du Centre au moment de sa réouverture, car d'ici la fin du projet, un comité de la procédure pourrait ne compter aucun membre qui ait déjà vu l'intérieur de l'édifice du Centre. Il serait bien si un membre du comité de la surveillance se rappelait ce à quoi l'édifice ressemblait. Si les trois quarts des parlementaires changent à nouveau, ce qui peut se produire à chaque génération, et il faudra une génération pour aménager l'édifice du Centre, personne n'aura la moindre idée de ce que l'édifice du Centre est censé faire.

Je pense donc qu'il est important d'avoir cette mémoire institutionnelle qu'ont les personnes qui ont travaillé dans cet édifice et qui savent ce qu'il peut et devrait faire.

Mais je veux poser une question brièvement. C'est une question qui me brûle les lèvres depuis que nous avons ouvert l'édifice de l'Ouest, même si elle est moins sérieuse. Pourquoi y a-t-il une porte pour chats sur toutes les portes des côtés de toutes nos salles de comité? Regardez cette porte. Vous y trouverez une petite porte pour chats.

Mme Susan Kulba:

C'est pour faire passer des câbles.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est pour faire passer des câbles, d'accord, car c'est juste la bonne forme et la bonne taille pour un chat.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. David de Burgh Graham: Ce sont toutes les questions que j'ai pour l'instant. Merci.

Mme Susan Kulba:

L'époque des chats est révolue depuis longtemps.

M. Stéphan Aubé:

C'est une exigence des médias pour qu'ils puissent avoir accès s'ils doivent téléviser quelque chose à l'extérieur.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est pour les médias, d'accord.

Désolé, j'ai une autre brève observation à formuler. On ne devrait pas couper le frêne. Prenez 10 ans pour le remettre en état.

(1250)

Le président:

Vous êtes sensible aux chats et aux arbres.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Il y a des preuves. Je lisais justement... J'ai tellement de documents ici, mais nos amis à Greenspace nous ont fourni des renseignements sur le frêne.

Il y a des informations ici sur l'arbre qui font état qu'il ne serait pas aussi malade qu'on l'a signalé. J'ai pris la liberté de confirmer qu'il y avait une histoire parallèle au sujet d'un autre frêne, le Washington Elm à Cambridge, au Massachusetts, apparemment situé à l'endroit où Washington était aux commandes de l'armée américaine durant la révolution. Il était déjà vieux et gros à l'époque. Par conséquent, il était considéré comme étant emblématique et il a survécu et est mort de vieillesse à l'âge de 210 ans en 1923, la morale de l'histoire étant qu'il n'en reste peut-être plus pour longtemps pour cet arbre si on le laisse vivre.

Je veux poser quelques questions au sujet de la phase deux du centre des visiteurs.

Donc, je présume que les travaux à la phase deux débuteront avant que les travaux majeurs de l'édifice du Centre commencent, madame Kulba?

Mme Susan Kulba:

On procédera à des travaux d'excavation, oui; c'est ce qui est prévu pour l'instant. Là encore, les calendriers n'ont pas été confirmés par Travaux publics. Nous avons reçu des calendriers préliminaires, mais le plan est de commencer à creuser...

M. Scott Reid:

Cela aurait l'incidence de retirer la promenade circulaire. Cela aurait-il aussi une incidence sur les célébrations de la fête du Canada, les spectacles de lumières et les séances de yoga hebdomadaires du mercredi qui font désormais partie de notre culture ici — moins intensément pour certains d'entre nous. Je ne suis pas aussi flexible que d'autres, j'imagine.

Mais cela pourrait empiéter sur ces activités. Nous n'avons aucune information, et des résidants d'Ottawa et du Canada prennent ces activités très au sérieux.

Mme Susan Kulba:

C'est correct. Travaux publics a fait savoir qu'il veut maintenir les activités sur la Colline.

Donc, à l'heure actuelle, il veut installer des palissades de chantier devant le mur Vaux et environ la moitié de la pelouse pourrait être utilisée pour ces activités. L'espace sera réduit, mais le ministère veut maintenir les spectacles de sons et de lumières et les célébrations de la fête du Canada. C'est ce qu'il essaie d'accomplir.

M. Scott Reid:

Chers collègues, il serait peut-être logique de demander à un représentant de Travaux publics de fournir des réponses plus détaillées sur ces points.

Y a-t-il une estimation de la date d'achèvement ou du coût de la phase deux par rapport aux rénovations globales de l'édifice du Centre à l'heure actuelle?

Mme Susan Kulba:

Non. Nous n'avons pas ces renseignements de Travaux publics.

M. Scott Reid:

Pensez-vous que quelqu'un possède ces renseignements, ou est-il encore trop tôt pour le savoir?

M. Michel Patrice:

C'est probablement trop tôt.

M. Scott Reid:

Nous ne savons pas quelle est la géologie du terrain et si nous devons effectuer des travaux de dynamitage, notamment.

M. Michel Patrice:

Nous savons que c'est un sous-sol rocheux canadien, si bien qu'il y aura du dynamitage.

M. Scott Reid:

Savons-nous s'il y aura autant de travaux de dynamitage que durant la phase un? C'était assez intrusif.

Mme Susan Kulba:

Je m'attends que ce sera au moins tout autant, oui.

M. Scott Reid:

En regardant le plan d'aménagement de 2006, qui nous donne une petite idée de ce que l'on peut prévoir, j'ai l'impression que c'est plus vaste. Je me trompe peut-être, mais on dirait que la superficie est plus importante qu'à la phase un.

Mme Susan Kulba:

Je vous répondrais que oui. Cela n'a pas encore été déterminé à 100 % car nous n'avons pas encore confirmé toutes les exigences. Toutes les exigences pour soutenir le Parlement qui ne peuvent pas s'appliquer à l'édifice du Centre seront transférées au Centre d'accueil des visiteurs souterrain, si bien qu'il reste à établir exactement ce plan final car nous ne connaissons pas encore toutes les exigences.

M. Scott Reid:

Une personne qui a participé à ce processus a fait savoir qu'il y a eu des discussions pour aménager un musée de l'histoire parlementaire dans cet espace. Avez-vous entendu quoi que ce soit à ce sujet?

Mme Susan Kulba:

Non, je ne suis pas au courant de cela. Il y aura des services aux visiteurs dans cet espace, ce qui pourrait inclure des services d'interprétation, mais on a fait aucunement mention de musées.

(1255)

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

M. Michel Patrice:

Par exemple, je sais que la Bibliothèque du Parlement songe à ce qu'il y ait des services d'interprétation dans cette installation, mais je n'ai jamais entendu parler du musée.

M. Scott Reid:

Lorsque j'en ai entendu parler, j'avais l'intention de soulever ce point tôt ou tard.

Pour faire ce qui me semble être une observation évidente, nous devrions essayer de minimiser le plus possible, tout en veillant à ce que soit compatible avec les objectifs que nous devons atteindre, la superficie de sous-sol rocheux que nous devons dynamiter et retirer. Si nous pouvons aménager un espace ailleurs, alors nous devrions le faire.

À l'édifice situé au 1, rue Wellington, nous avons diverses salles de comité sous-utilisées dans ce que nous appelions autrefois le tunnel ferroviaire. Si, par exemple, on veut exposer certains des artéfacts associés à l'histoire du Parlement pour les visiteurs intéressés, il serait raisonnable d'utiliser cet espace lorsque le Sénat sera de retour dans l'édifice du Centre, plutôt que d'essayer de créer un espace qui se trouve au-dessus d'un sous-sol rocheux solide, ce qui serait très dispendieux et plus intrusif.

Si vous dynamitez plus loin, alors vous accaparerez une plus grande section de la Colline, et ces travaux de dynamitage sont très intrusifs. Lorsque nous siégions aux séances à la Chambre des communes et aux comités, je pense que nous pouvons tous convenir que les travaux de dynamitage étaient vraiment intrusifs.

M. David Christopherson:

Surtout les jours qui ont suivi la fusillade.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, c'est vrai.

Mais même le reste du temps, les explosions font trembler les fondations et tout... Je ne veux pas en exagérer l'importance, mais je peux concevoir que ce soit intrusif à plusieurs égards.

J'ai une dernière question à ce sujet. Tout ce qui a été fait jusqu'à maintenant dans la phase deux, au Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, n'a pas dû faire l'objet de la nouvelle procédure dont vous parlez, j'imagine, mais l'intention est-elle qu'elle intervienne dans les décisions futures de la phase deux pour le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs?

Une voix: Tout à fait.

M. Scott Reid: Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Je n'ai qu'une brève question à poser sur cet édifice-ci.

Au quatrième étage, dans la tour Mackenzie, il y a une salle superbe qui sert actuellement de salle familiale, mais elle n'est pas accessible. Je trouve que c'est malheureux. Ma belle-mère est en fauteuil roulant. Ma femme et moi avons trois jeunes enfants, donc nous utilisons souvent une poussette pour les y emmener. Notre plus vieille a quatre ans. Cette salle n'est pas accessible. Je trouve un peu troublant que nous dépensions plus de 800 millions de dollars et que nous ayons une salle magnifique, très belle de l'intérieur, mais qui n’est pas accessible. J'aimerais que nous réfléchissions un peu aux raisons à cela.

Mme Susan Kulba:

Oui, il a été difficile de trouver une utilité pour cette salle. Je dois dire qu'on avait toute une liste de priorités et que comme on savait qu'elle ne serait pas accessible... Il y a un espace de l'autre côté du couloir qui est prévu pour les activités nécessitant une meilleure accessibilité. Mais peu importe l'usage que nous devions attribuer à cette salle, il n'était tout simplement pas possible d'y installer un élévateur.

M. John Nater:

Cette salle ne sera donc jamais accessible?

Mme Susan Kulba:

Pour l'instant, non.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

[Inaudible] Je ne comprends pas.

Mme Susan Kulba:

Nous avons des salles de l'autre côté du couloir qui peuvent servir à certaines activités, mais d'après nos discussions avec ce groupe d'utilisateurs, ils préféraient avoir accès aux deux espaces.

Le président:

Compte tenu des liens qui existent entre les diverses personnes en autorité, comme vous l'avez dit, y compris entre les ministres responsables, serait-il logique d'établir un lien un peu plus officiel entre les divers ministres responsables et le Bureau de régie interne dans le cadre de ce projet, pour qu'ils ne travaillent pas tous en vase clos?

M. Michel Patrice:

J'aimerais mentionner que le gouvernement est aussi représenté au Bureau par les ministres qui en font partie. Sans trop entrer dans son mode de fonctionnement interne, je vous dirais qu'il y a des membres du Cabinet qui font partie du Bureau.

Le président:

Je pense qu'il n'y en a qu'un qui en fait partie, et ce n'est pas la ministre responsable des Travaux publics, ni quiconque a des responsabilités liées à la Colline.

M. Michel Patrice:

Il y a la leader du gouvernement à la Chambre qui en fait partie actuellement, de même que M. LeBlanc. Le whip aussi, d'ailleurs.

Le président:

David.

M. David Christopherson:

Je m'excuse, monsieur le président, mais j'aimerais revenir un peu à cela. Si je m'éloigne trop du sujet, je m'en remets bien sûr à vos lumières pour me ramener sur la bonne voie, mais ce que j'entends me dérange beaucoup. J'en comprends les raisons pratiques. Je les accepte, mais le fait est qu'aujourd'hui, à notre époque, l'un des édifices fréquentés par les conjoints des parlementaires, c'est-à-dire par le public, n'est pas accessible, et on parle là non seulement d'un édifice gouvernemental, mais du principal édifice gouvernemental sur la Colline du Parlement. Nous avons délibérément conçu, construit et aménagé une salle pour les citoyens canadiens. Dans ce cas-ci, c'est une salle familiale, mais ce pourrait être n'importe quoi, et quiconque ayant un handicap sur le plan de la mobilité ne peut pas y accéder.

Je m'excuse, mais je trouve cela inacceptable. Soit nous prenons le taureau par les cornes et dépensons ce qu'il faut pour rendre cette salle accessible, soit nous ne l'utilisons pas comme espace public et nous l'utilisons autrement. De dire que nous n'avons pas d'autre choix que d'y créer un espace auquel les Canadiens handicapés n'ont pas accès... Dans ce cas-ci, il pourrait même s'agir d'un député lui-même, de sa conjointe, de son partenaire ou de son parent, alors que c'est justement la fonction de cette pièce, mais si la personne n'est pas physiquement apte à 100 %, elle ne pourra pas l'utiliser.

Cela me dérange. Ce n'est peut-être que moi, mais cela me dérange. Encore une fois, j'en comprends les raisons pratiques. Je ne jette le blâme sur personne en particulier, mais je pense qu'en créant un espace inaccessible pour le public ou quiconque (visiteurs, travailleurs, députés, membre de la famille, peu importe), nous faisons une grosse bourde. Il suffira d'une conjointe ou d'un conjoint qui s'en plaint, et nous n'aurons rien à dire pour notre défense. Je parierais gros que si cela arrivait, nous fermerions rapidement cette salle et en trouverions une autre.

Encore une fois, je laisse mes collègues réfléchir aux maux de tête que cela pourrait leur causer à l'avenir, mais ce ne sera pas mon problème.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David Christopherson: Je vous somme toutes et tous de bien réfléchir au fait que nous permettons une chose — et nous en sommes maintenant conscients — qui n'a aucun sens compte tenu des lois et des attitudes d'aujourd'hui, particulièrement en matière d'égalité.

Merci.

(1300)

Le président:

Merci.

Avez-vous d'autres questions à poser à nos témoins avant que nous ne discutions des travaux du Comité?

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Je n'ai qu'une brève observation à faire. Je suis certain qu'il y a des raisons, avec lesquelles nous ne sommes peut-être pas d'accord, qui justifient la création d'un espace inaccessible, des raisons liées à la valeur patrimoniale de l'édifice et au fait qu'on ne puisse pas modifier le niveau des étages sans endommager des matériaux qui datent d'un siècle et demi. Il est aussi concevable que les parlementaires, qui sont généralement très sensibles à ce genre de besoin, décident, s'ils le peuvent à ce moment-ci, de donner préséance à l'accessibilité plutôt qu'aux considérations patrimoniales.

Pour les prochaines fois, je pense que c'est un bon exemple où l'on se heurte à un genre de barrière et où il serait utile que les parlementaires et les autres affirment que dans ce cas, quelque chose d'autre aura préséance sur une limite habituellement intouchable et que cette limite n'est pas vraiment intouchable dans ce cas-ci.

Le président:

Merci à toutes et à tous.

Si vous voulez bien rester un peu, j'aimerais que nous discutions rapidement des travaux du Comité.

Premièrement, au sujet de l'orme, je propose deux choses. Je pense que la plupart des députés sont au courant de la situation. Nous devrions organiser une rencontre d'urgence et y inviter des représentants de Travaux publics ou toute autre personne compétente, en plus de celles qui nous ont écrit la lettre, pour bien définir les enjeux et recueillir toute l'information. Deuxièmement, il faudrait écrire une lettre convaincante à Travaux publics, au BRI et au Président de la Chambre afin de réclamer un moratoire sur sa coupe jusqu'à ce que nous puissions nous réunir pour faire des recommandations.

Je ne sais pas ce que vous en pensez.

Une voix: Ce serait important, monsieur le président.

M. David Christopherson:

Je le propose.

Le président:

Très bien, nous l'inscrirons à l'horaire.

Deuxièmement, notre prochaine séance, jeudi prochain, pourrait ne pas avoir lieu parce que nous pourrions devoir passer la nuit à voter sur le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses. Si toutefois elle a lieu, pour les deux prochaines séances, question que le Président de la Chambre puisse faire son travail concernant cette étude sur les deux chambres, nous pourrions entendre Samara, dans un premier temps, puis peut-être le greffier, dans un deuxième, si nous croyons que ce seraient des témoins pertinents. Est-ce que cela vous conviendrait?

Nous pourrions donner suite à la motion de M. Reid après la semaine de relâche. J'espère que nous aurons du temps pour cela. C'est la motion sur la poursuite de nos travaux par les futurs PROC au cours des prochaines législatures.

La ministre Gould a laissé entendre que le 11 avril serait la meilleure journée pour sa comparution concernant les menaces aux élections et aux renseignements de sécurité. Je parle ici de la motion de Mme Kusie. Êtes-vous d'accord pour viser le 11 avril?

(1305)

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais faire un petit rappel. Nous l'avons mentionné lors de notre dîner informel. Je l'ai mentionné aussi lors de notre rencontre officielle. Encore une fois, je tiens à rappeler aux membres que le comité des comptes publics souhaite toujours vivement effectuer quelques modifications au Règlement pour améliorer et renforcer son pouvoir d'exercer son rôle de surveillance. J'aimerais que ce soit inscrit à la liste des sujets sur lesquels nous nous pencherons dans un avenir rapproché. J'espère que nous recevrons bientôt un rapport des comptes publics sur les modifications à apporter au Règlement, des modifications qui, dans un monde idéal, feraient l'unanimité et seraient adoptées par la Chambre rapidement. Comme vous réfléchissez à nos futurs sujets d'étude, j'espère que nous pourrons nous réserver au moins une séance pour cela en avril ou en mai, au plus tard.

Le président:

Les membres voudront peut-être connaître l'opinion de leur parti à ce sujet, puis nous l'ajouterons au calendrier, si nous en recevons la demande de Travaux publics.

Madame Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Elle viendra le 11 avril. Qu'avons-nous à l'horaire d'ici là?

Le président:

Tout dépend de la séance de jeudi, qui se tiendra ou non.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Très bien.

Le président:

Sinon, il y a déjà des choses dont nous avons convenu. Premièrement, il y aura une réunion d'urgence concernant l'orme, puis une autre sur les deux chambres, où nous recevrons Samara et le greffier comme témoins, puis il pourrait y avoir cette demande de Travaux publics, si nous la recevons. Ce sont les choses dont nous avons parlé.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci.

Le président:

De même, pour que nous puissions inviter des témoins de l'Australie à comparaître sur la question des deux chambres, nous devrons prévoir une séance de soir, parce que cela correspond au matin là-bas. Je présume que tout le monde...

M. David Christopherson:

Nous devrions aller là-bas.

Le président:

Est-ce une motion pour que nous nous rendions en Australie?

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. David Christopherson:

Je pourrais le proposer.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président:

Êtes-vous donc d'accord pour que nous tenions une réunion de soir?

Une voix: Oui.

Le président: Merci.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on March 19, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.