header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-11-07 PROC 77

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1210)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Order.

Welcome back to the 77th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. For members' information, we are now in public.

Members will recall PROC's 33rd report in the previous session of Parliament, which was concurred in by the House on March 11, 2015, and called for the committee to conduct a review of the electronic petition system after it had been in place for two years.

In order to assist us with this review, we are joined by Charles Robert, Clerk of the House of Commons, and André Gagnon, deputy clerk, procedure. Thank you for being here. It's your first visit to the House.

Basically, before we make these rules for electronic petitions permanent in the Standing Orders, we want to see how the first two-year trial period worked and if there were any problems or any suggested changes to the procedures we have in place. We've asked you and we've asked any of the parties to bring forward any issues they had with the system. We look forward to your opening comments.

Mr. Charles Robert (Clerk of the House of Commons):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. Thank you for the invitation to address the committee in its review of the House of Commons e-petition system.

To provide some context, I will begin with a brief summary of the current process. Essentially an e-petitioner creates an account, provides some basic personal information, and then drafts the petition using a standardized template provided on the e-petitions website.

Next, the e-petitioner must identify at least five supporters and choose a member of Parliament to act as the sponsor of the petition. Members have 30 days to respond. If they refuse to be the sponsor or if no response is received within the 30 days, the petitioner may select another member. If five members have declined to sponsor the petition, it would not be allowed to proceed.[Translation]

Once a member is a sponsor, the petition is reviewed for conformity, translated, and is then open for signatures for 120 days on the website. Those that garner fewer than 500 signatures are simply archived on the site, while those with 500 signatures or more may be presented in the House once the sponsor receives a certificate containing the text of the petition and the total number of signatures.

The process of presenting the e-petition to the House is identical to that for paper petitions, although only government responses to petitions are posted on the website.[English]

The e-petitions site has generated significant interest. In the last year it has accounted for roughly one-third of all traffic on the House of Commons website, with approximately 2.5 million visits to the e-petitions site from over 3,000 different communities. Of these, 40% were redirected from social media sites, and about two-thirds of visits occurred on mobile devices. This shows that the social media sharing tools and the mobile responsiveness of the site were important aspects of its design.[Translation]

During this time, 1,343 e-petitions have been created, 400 or 30% of which have been published on the site, collectively garnering over 1.1 million signatures. The primary reasons for which petitions are not published are that the draft is simply not completed by the petitioner or the petition is withdrawn before reaching the publication stage. It is quite rare for e-petitions to be found inadmissible given the guidelines established by the committee and outlined in the Standing Orders and the templates and user guides available on the site.[English]

Among the 400 published e-petitions, 70% have reached the required minimum of 500 signatures. In addition, the site has proven to be quite secure, allowing for strong protections for the personal information that is gathered.

That being said, with certain modifications, including increased flexibility, this process and system could be made even more efficient. For example, the 120-day signature deadline prevents petitions that reach the 500-signature threshold quickly—the average is nine days—from being presented earlier. If fewer than five sponsors respond, or if some are ineligible, then the petition cannot proceed. The wording of a petition is reviewed only after a member has agreed to sponsor it, making it difficult to finalize the language of the petition.[Translation]

Finally, differences remain between the rules to certify paper and electronic petitions.

For example, the threshold for signatures is 25 for paper petitions but 500 for electronic ones. Other requirements, such as the size of the paper on which they are submitted, still exist for paper petitions only.[English]

That efficiencies can be found does not detract from the overall success of our e-petition system. In fact, it has positioned us to respond to this committee recommendation for a uniform and accessible electronic format for government responses to both e-petitions and paper petitions. I can assure the committee that the appropriate consultations with the Privy Council Office have already begun.[Translation]

One of the main considerations has been whether it would be possible to envisage a paperless system for all responses to petitions, and whether it could serve as the basis for a broader system of electronic sessional papers. Such a system could one day allow for other types of documents which are tabled in the House, such as answers to written questions, to be filed electronically and published more widely than is currently the case.

I wish to thank you, Mr. Chair, for this opportunity. Mr. Gagnon and I would be pleased to respond to any questions that members may have.

(1215)

[English]

The Chair:

Can I just confirm that you said that the wording is finalized after the person finds a sponsor, so that an MP could be sponsoring something and wouldn't know what the final wording is?

Mr. André Gagnon (Deputy Clerk, Procedure):

The validation of the petition itself is done after a sponsor has been found, but the sponsor would see the text that is submitted.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Thank you.

To follow up on that point, is this purely for grammatical problems, translation, and that kind of thing, as opposed to anything that relates to the substance of the petition?

Mr. André Gagnon:

The substance is also looked at—for instance, if the petition deals with a matter that has to do with provincial jurisdiction instead of a federal jurisdiction or if the language used is not respectful.

Mr. Scott Reid:

If, let's say, someone wanted to put forward a petition asking Parliament to take a stand on Quebec's recent Bill 62 relating to receipt of provincial government services with your face covered, would that be ruled inadmissible?

Mr. André Gagnon:

The question at that time would be to determine if it is part of the jurisdiction of the members of Parliament or government, if it is advisable for them, and if it is permitted for them to do such a thing.

Mr. Charles Robert:

I think the complexity of the question also relates to the fact that it might involve a charter issue, and that has broader applications than simply the question of federal-provincial jurisdiction.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Just to follow that, if you don't mind, this relates to another discussion we've had in the past over allowing or disallowing private members' bills. I've always taken the view that we should be as expansive as possible. If a private member's bill, like a government bill, crosses a jurisdictional line should it be passed, it would eventually, to the degree that it is ruled ultra vires, be ruled unconstitutional by the courts. That's the rule for the courts and not for us. I would take a similar approach here.

Surely we have both a moral right and a moral obligation to be prepared to take positions on any issue, regardless of jurisdictional boundary. We don't have the right constitutionally to act upon such issues, but we have the right and the obligation to have intelligent thoughts on them, particularly as it is entirely conceivable, as happened in the past, that something that was formerly the jurisdiction of one level of government would be transferred by means of an amendment to the other level, because we ultimately felt that was the right thing to do.

Let's think about this. Let's say someone puts forward a petition saying that some item of jurisdiction ought to be transferred from the provinces to the federal government. Let's say it's related to the whole rollout of marijuana. The provinces get to decide the age, and the idea is that it should be federal. If they had a petition on that, would you regard it as being permissible or impermissible?

Mr. André Gagnon:

In fact, if the petition were to ask Parliament or ask the government to initiate discussions with their provincial counterparts, that would certainly be acceptable, in the sense that it is under the jurisdiction of the government to initiate discussions on separation of powers between provincial and federal jurisdictions.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is it okay if I—

The Chair:

I see where you're going.

If it's okay with the committee, I'm going to do this informally, as we did with the last section, as long as it works okay.

Okay, go ahead.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I don't want to monopolize. I just have a different direction to go with this. Is that okay?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The traditional paper petition system, which has existed almost since time immemorial, certainly since the 1200s, presupposes that one's right to anonymity is forfeited when one signs a petition. The undersigned people have signed on, but it's on paper. Originally it went to London; now the petition comes to Ottawa. It is not readily available electronically to others, who are far removed. I think we all sense there's something different with an electronically collected signature that would be as readily available to, say, Vladimir Putin or the plutocrats who run China as it would be to their member of Parliament and anybody else going to the clerk's office to examine the records.

I think, but I actually don't know, that I'm expressing views that everybody shares here, but I think we all probably feel most comfortable with that information remaining well captured and behind some kind of impenetrable wall where you can confirm that the same person hasn't signed a petition 3,000 times on the one hand, but on the other hand, the aforementioned individuals don't get to see who signed.

I'll just ask the question. Given that we've seen numerous leaks, the paradise papers being the latest of them, are there any further security measures that you think are appropriate? Are there any concerns in this regard that you think we need to pay extra attention to?

(1220)

Mr. André Gagnon:

Mr. Reid, this precise question was one that was very much of interest for the previous committee that agreed to put in place the system of e-petitions, and I would say it was probably one of the most important questions that came up in trying to build an e-petition system. The way it is built today has made us very proud to say that all of the information that has been gathered has been gathered in a way that respects all of the high standards regarding privacy of information, and we also apply a policy of erasing all of that information in a timely manner. We do that after, not before, an individual who has signed an e-petition has received a response from the House of Commons indicating that there was a government response to the petition.

As you can imagine, we keep that information, but that information is only available to House of Commons authority and not to members or to anyone outside.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Effectively, then, there's a certain window during which the petition is live. You can still get more signatures. Then there's a window after that during which the government can respond, and when the response occurs, it's sent out to everybody who signed it, and at some point shortly after that, the data is deleted.

Mr. André Gagnon:

In a regular fashion, during the year, we erase a lot of the information we have received, yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Simms is next, and then Mr. Kennedy.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

I was not on PROC, but I was critic in the last Parliament, and I vehemently, viciously supported this when it came to the House from Mr. Stewart over there. I hope to get his comments later, if that's—

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

He's next after you.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Great.

I have a couple of quick questions.

I see your point about 25 names versus 500 names. That's quite a discrepancy. I'm not sure if this is a question for you or him at this point. I want to clarify because, on the record, I think that's a bit excessive. Not achieving the 500 within that 120-day period means it's unsuccessful, right, for presentation?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Yes, but at the same time, as was pointed out, it seems to be easily managed, and you can do it quite often in nine days.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I see, but you cannot do that.... That's right, you said that earlier. You cannot present it to the House, even if you achieve the 500 within that period. All right. That's a very good point.

On the privacy issue, if I go around my riding and put together a petition, or someone I know does it, I can get access to all the information, and so on and so forth. Does the sponsor of this petition get access to the information as to who has signed?

Mr. André Gagnon:

When you mention sponsor, do you mean the member of Parliament who is sponsoring the petition?

Mr. Scott Simms:

No, I'm sorry. I'm using the wrong terminology.

Well, it's actually both, either the member of Parliament or the person organizing the petition. Thank you for that.

(1225)

Mr. André Gagnon:

If we refer to the petitioner, that is the person who organizes the petition. That person would have access only to the names of the supporters. The five supporters they need to identify, but that's the information they give out themselves. They don't have access at all to the, let's say, 2,000 signatories to the petition. They would not have access to that.

Mr. Scott Simms:

They don't have access to the names or anything.

Mr. André Gagnon:

The only thing they would have is the information on the website as of now, which is to indicate how many signatories come from each of the provinces and territories. That's it.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That is it.

Mr. André Gagnon:

Yes.

As for the member of Parliament who is the eventual sponsor of a petition, that person gets the basic information of the petitioner, the person who initiates it. As you can imagine, in some cases the member of Parliament would like to get in contact and talk on the phone with this individual to see what the motivations are behind that, the story behind all of those things, and to get more information. However, that's the only information provided to the sponsor.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That is the e-petitioner information only.

Mr. André Gagnon:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's all I have for now, because I'm interested to hear what Mr. Stewart has to say.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Stewart.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart (Burnaby South, NDP):

Thank you very much. It's a great pleasure to be part of the e-petitions odyssey as it continues along.

I remember my wife suggesting this idea to me way back when I drew the lottery number for the private member's bill and was supported, of course, by Mr. Christopherson, Mr. Simms, and eventually the whole Parliament. It's really neat to see what happened after all that.

That 1.1 million Canadians have signed electronic petitions and that it accounts for a third of the traffic on the website is a great success. It has a lot to do with the work that happened at the PROC committee. When you're a proponent of such ideas, sometimes you're keen or overstretched. I think PROC did a good job in reeling in my expectations. The clerks did such a good job of making sure that the security concerns were met. It has been dealt with in such a professional manner. In fact, I've had many jurisdictions contact me to ask what the lessons are, because they want to put this in place. I think it's a good example right around the world.

Initially, the ideas came from the U.K. and the United States. When you look at the U.K. example, you see that it started off a lot like us. It had e-petitions that didn't really have a prize at the end, other than a response, but eventually, as the petitioning system developed, more and more people started signing.

If you're looking at the figures, it's 1.1 million signatories, but most of those have come within the last few months anyway. We've had one petition recently that had 130,000 signatures, one that had 70,000, and one that had 50,000, all on different issues and all from different parties, so it's a good cross-partisan thing.

What was found in the U.K. was that this was a self-training system: you signed an e-petition for the first time and you got an email back saying that this was the response from the government, and then you began to think about how this thing works, and then you started your own. That's what we're seeing: a ramping up of participation and traffic. It is similar to what happened in the U.K.

What happened in the U.K. was that signatures rose to 400,000 or 500,000, eventually crossing the million threshold. The government began to wonder, “What do we do now?” What will happen when a million Canadians—it will happen at some point—sign an electronic petition? Will a response that's emailed back be enough? Is that enough when one thirty-fifth of your country signs something?

The answer provided was that if an electronic petition crosses a certain threshold, then it triggers either a study by a committee or a debate in the House of Commons. That would be like a non-binding take-note debate. In fact, the U.K. found great satisfaction with that, because there were many things rippling under the currents of society in the U.K. that weren't being addressed in Parliament, so this debate allowed it to address those issues.

If we're thinking about making changes, I definitely think we should keep this, because it seems to be working well. The concerns expressed in PROC earlier have been met. It has been well shepherded by the clerks, who have paid a lot of attention to it. We could consider the next step, which is what would an e-petition of 100,000 or 500,000 signatures trigger? Would there be something else other than a response back?

I would suggest something like a take-note debate. That was in my original super-keen proposal, but now that we've had a very wise decision to have a test run to show that the data is all protected, that Canadians are interested, that there is international interest, and that most people seem very happy with it, could we move to the next point where there is...not a reward, but some kind of acknowledgement that there's a significant issue within Canadian society that Canadians are engaging in?

That's perhaps the challenge...not a challenge, but a suggestion I would make to the committee. Is there perhaps any light that could be shed on it if we moved to that stage or that addition to these changes to the Standing Orders?

(1230)

Mr. Charles Robert:

I think it's a very attractive idea. It helps to encourage the whole notion that we live increasingly with the digital world, with the ambition of enhancing our participatory democracy.

One of the real differences, which goes to Mr. Simms's question about the level of support required, is that when you're doing this on paper, you're actually doing it very physically, using your time, and you're geographically constrained. You have to take it to the shopping centre and hope that people will sign it. Once you launch it onto the website, it's actually nationwide and it's accessible 24-7.

I remember one MP from way back when, in the old days, who remarked how his life was changing dramatically because he was getting tons of correspondence from people but could no longer rely on knowing that they were his constituents. They were people from across the country who had complaints to raise with the member, or issues to raise, and they wanted them addressed.

With petitions, clearly, if citizens in vast numbers want to participate, that's something that I suppose Parliament would want to take note of. The idea of having a further debate to have an exchange of views among the membership of the House would not necessarily be a bad thing, to acknowledge that in fact the signing of these petitions in vast numbers made a difference in terms of the agenda of the House.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Could I add one other point?

The Chair: Yes.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart: Looking through the data, what I found really exciting was the number of signatures that were coming from the north, from Nunavut, the Northwest Territories, and the Yukon. It's almost impossible for an MP to go to remote communities to deliver or to collect paper petitions. Electronic petitioning has allowed remote and northern communities to participate in a way that they've never done before. Again, that's an unintended side effect, but it's something that's very good to see.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

I'm neutral, but that's a great comment.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: What is the threshold in the U.K.?

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

It's 100,000.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham is next.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thanks, Chair. I only have a couple of quick questions. They're more for Mr. Stewart than the Clerk.

You talked about the process in the United Kingdom forcing a debate. This ties back to earlier studies of PROC. Is that debate in the secondary debating chamber?

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

It can be in either one, I think, but that's where they usually take place.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It would go to the second chamber. Okay.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

They're sorted by a committee first; they're not a direct.... My earlier suggestion was that it automatically trigger a debate, but in fact in the U.K. they're sorted by a backbench committee first, which we could also talk about in another session.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fair enough.

My only other question is this: of the one-point-something million people who have signed this petition, do we know how many are repeat customers? Is it 1.1 million people or 1.1 million signatures from 300,000 people?

Mr. André Gagnon:

I'm sorry. I'm not sure I understand.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You said that there are over a million signatures, right?

Mr. André Gagnon: Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: Is it the same 100,000 people signing over and over again, or is it really a million people who have signed?

Mr. Charles Robert:

You can't sign the same petition twice.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No, but you can sign all the different petitions.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Well, anyone can do that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My point is, is it the same people who are signing petitions every time, or are we constantly bringing new people into the process? Do we have any idea?

Mr. André Gagnon:

I don't think we would have the tools now to answer that question.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

All right. Thanks.

The Chair:

Are there other comments? I actually have a comment...Ruby, go ahead.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

You were stating that you can't sign the same petition twice. Are you certain of that? Has anyone ever tried something like that? Has there been suspicious activity? Have there been any hacks into the system? You said you had a secure system. I'm coming from another committee that was—

Voices: Oh, oh!

Ms. Ruby Sahota: —talking purely about technology, so my mind is there right now. I'm just wondering how secure it is, whether there have been some threats, and how you've dealt with those kinks, if there have been any.

(1235)

Mr. André Gagnon:

If you want to talk about the threats, if there were any, the threats were exactly the same ones as for the rest of the websites. That would answer that part.

In terms of being able to sign the same petition twice, we have systems in place to identify either the email address or the IP address. As you will remember, this committee decided to propose that there shouldn't be any IP addresses from the Government or Parliament of Canada, and to also make sure that there wouldn't be any email addresses from the government or Parliament.

Moreover, when you have duplicates, if it's a regular citizen and the same citizen tries to sign twice, we will get that in our analysis of the data.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Today people have multiple devices and multiple email addresses. We all do. We all probably do. We're all sitting around this table—

Mr. André Gagnon:

That's where you need to find a balance between the tools you have and the information you gather, in terms of making sure that those electronic signatures are valid. Clearly, if you go through both processes, the paper and electronic process, you could probably end up concluding that the electronic process is much more sophisticated and authentic than the paper petitions were. As you can imagine, sometimes the information there is very hard to demonstrate.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Don't get me wrong, because I do think the benefits outweigh some of these issues. Overall, I simply wanted to get an understanding.

You think the e-petition program has been successful, from your perspective, and if anything were to be amended, it would be this particular rule. You shouldn't have to wait 120 days, because if you gathered the required number of signatures, you should be able to proceed with the process.

Mr. André Gagnon:

That certainly has come out. A lot of members, as you're probably aware, try to present petitions regarding a bill that will be debated in the House for second reading. If there are petitions coming to the House at that time, being tabled in the House, and your e-petition is stuck in that 120 days, you won't be able to table that petition with good timing.

Yes, this120-day maximum could be re-evaluated so that members could present the petition earlier in that process. That could be an item.

We have found that it has been cumbersome for some citizens not to gather supporters but to write in the information and all those things. Is the number of supporters still good at five? Should it be fewer? Should it be only one, or should it be no supporters at all? What could be looked at is the validation of the petition. The process we have right now is that the petition is validated at the end of the process, before it goes online. It's at that time that we sometimes find mistakes or find that adjustments need to be made. If significant adjustments need to be made, the person needs to contact all of their supporters, because it's essentially not the same petition that's being proposed.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It must be embarrassing for the member to be putting their name on something and supporting it, and then—

Mr. André Gagnon:

The good thing about it is that at that point in the process, it's not yet public. It is still a discussion.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I have one final question.

What was the thought process behind not allowing the member who supports the petition to be able to see all the signatories? What's the idea behind that? In a paper petition, you would be able to see everybody who is signing on. You can see what region they come from. Maybe a lot of them are your constituents.

Why do we not have access to that information?

Mr. André Gagnon:

First, there is more information gathered for e-petitions, since we have to send the information back to the different signatories. There is information there regarding email address, the actual address of the individual, and the phone number. There's a lot of information that you usually don't find on paper petitions.

(1240)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

No, but does—

Mr. André Gagnon:

The numbers are also significant.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Maybe I'm confused. I thought I heard you say that the member who supports it doesn't get that information, that the member only gets the petitioner's information. The member doesn't know anybody else who signed it.

Mr. André Gagnon:

Exactly. That's the case. The decision not to make that information public was the decision of this committee.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It was the decision of this committee. That's what I wanted to know.

Mr. André Gagnon:

That was adopted by the House afterwards.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

It wouldn't have gone through if it was a data collection exercise available to any party, and I think Mr. Reid can probably confirm that.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

That was the worry.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

It was more to protect the citizens from having their data go everywhere.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes, but in paper petitions their data is everywhere.

Mr. Kennedy Stewart:

Yes, that's true. There are fewer signatures, though.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes.

The Chair:

There's less information. There's no phone number.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks, Chair. My question is to both you and to our witnesses.

On page 4 of the written presentation, at the beginning of the meeting, it was said, and I quote, That being said, with certain modifications, including increased flexibility, this process and system could be made more efficient.

That suggests to me that there may be a host of recommendations that would be coming. How are we going to do that, Chair? Is there a second meeting? Are we going to ask them for the recommendations?

You guys know I don't play games. That would also provide a forum and an opportunity for Mr. Stewart to make his good arguments about looking at the idea of a next step, i.e., a trigger point. We can consider that. It seemed to me from the way I read this that there would likely be some detailed recommendations, should we ask for them. I guess I'm seeking from the witnesses and yourself, Chair, how much of my assumption is right or wrong.

Mr. André Gagnon:

We're certainly at your disposal if you need to have more details than what we've already mentioned. I think the different items that I and the Clerk mentioned clearly serve as a basis for the committee if it wants to modify or increase the number of participants in e-petitions while maintaining the integrity of these petitions.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson's question was whether there are more things you're going to recommend, other than what's in your opening comments.

Mr. André Gagnon:

The—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Correct me if I'm wrong, but what I heard was that if we ask for them, we will receive detailed recommendations from the staff. I think that sends it over to you. Is it your thinking, then, that we would ask them for that and schedule a meeting and make it a little bit open-ended to provide some opportunity for Mr. Stewart to make his arguments about going forward, whether we decide to or not, and allow him the opportunity in this Parliament to make that case?

I'm in your hands, Chair, seeking your guidance as to how you see us moving forward.

The Chair:

Are there any thoughts from committee members?

Go ahead, Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

I have no issue with this. Let's get as much information as we can. We discussed it, and we clarified that there is no pressing deadline on this issue, that the rules will carry forward, so let's hear what the recommendations are. Since there is no timetable, this might be a good one- or two-day study in the new year.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I like that. What we could do, building on that idea, is ask the staff if they would provide that to us, and as soon as the clerk receives it, you could bring it to us as a matter of business, and then we could schedule that meeting.

You're right, Mr. Bittle, that there's no real deadline, and we do have some other things that do, but we still don't want to miss the opportunity during this Parliament to do a review.

Again, if we ask the staff, through you, Chair, on our behalf, to generate those recommendations, when they're received by the clerk, they would go to you. You would bring them to us as a matter of business, and then we would schedule a meeting to delve into those recommendations and afford a chance to anyone else who wanted to make any amendments, in particular Mr. Stewart, since it's his idea we're building on.

That's just a thought, Chair.

The Chair:

Can you consider yourself asked?

Mr. Charles Robert: That was my take.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair: We won't put it in writing, but we'll look forward to further recommendations.

Mr. André Gagnon:

I wouldn't use the word “recommendations”. From our perspective, it would probably be more like issues you would want to explore, and that would bring you to a decision, or not, on the different—

(1245)

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Mr. Robert, is that because you don't want to presume to be telling...? I'm just curious why you wouldn't—

Mr. Charles Robert:

Indeed, this House is your House. We're here as your servants.

Mr. David Christopherson:

If we ask you, as our servants, to generate recommendations—

Mr. Charles Robert:

We would be obliged to put them in that language.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I leave it with you, Chair.

An hon. member: We'll recommend some issues.

Some hon members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

Okay, that's all done, but before we leave this topic, are there any other comments relating to petitions?

I have one, actually.

There seems to be a bit of a dichotomy, of not parallel processes—and I'm not saying it's good or bad—between the physical petition and the electronic one. It may just be wording, but on a physical petition the member of Parliament is the presenter. They're not allowed to have an opinion. They just present it. However, when you use the word “sponsor”, it gives the impression that you actually support the petition, that you are sponsoring a petition that you'd like to see go ahead. To me, those are two different processes for the same thing, a petition. I'm not saying that's good or bad, but I would prefer if they might be similar.

Are there any comments on that?

Mr. André Gagnon:

If you remember, Mr. Chair, it was part of the discussion the last time it was studied, and if I remember well, the guidelines that we provided and prepared clearly state that the sponsor is not the supporter of a petition. He supports the idea that citizens should be able to petition Parliament.

Then again, maybe the word could be changed.

Mr. Charles Robert:

It actually does raise the issue about whether or not you can refuse to be the one who actually brings forward the petition. If you're just basically a presenter, you're actually fulfilling a kind of mechanical process, but I think you're quite right, Mr. Chair, in reading in the word “sponsor” that it's something more than being simply just the mechanical presenter.

The Chair:

Could I ask the committee what they think about changing the word “sponsor” to “presenter” on electronic petitions? It would be my preference.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Will you make that your top recommendation?

The Chair:

Okay. Let's include that in our next discussion.

Is there anything else?

Mr. Clerk, as this is your first time here and you might see us a lot—

Mr. Charles Robert:

I hope so.

The Chair:

—do you want to offer any welcoming remarks to our committee? We welcome you to the House.

Mr. Charles Robert:

I remember vividly my time before you in June. I thought then I was given quite a warm welcome.

I appreciate my opportunity to appear before you today, and I look forward to those occasions in the future when I will again have a chance to bring whatever intelligence and experience I have to the work of this fantastic House and this committee to bear.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. We'll see you Thursday.

Mr. Charles Robert:

I guess.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll suspend for a minute and then go into committee business.

(1245)

(1250)

The Chair:

We'll start with this item.

We asked the minister to send a letter on what she was looking for with regard to the leaders' debates commissioner. She sent it, so people have that. It's as much an information item as anything else. I haven't read it, because we just got it.

I don't know if anyone wants to comment on that or if we could leave it as an information item.

Mr. Scott Reid:

We'll leave it and then discuss it in public on, say, Thursday.

The Chair:

Okay. That's this Thursday.

By Thursday of constituency week, everyone is bringing in their witness list.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is the deadline on Thursday 4 p.m. or 5 p.m.?

The Chair:

It's at 5 p.m.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's 5 p.m. on Thursday, November 16.

The Chair:

Yes.

The second item is really quick. Maybe we'll just make this a standard procedure.

There's a group from Ghana coming November 28 to 30. With other parliaments, we've set up an informal meeting outside PROC time when any member who wants to come can do so. Unless I hear otherwise, or there's nothing controversial, maybe we'll just do that when we get requests, if that's okay with the committee members. I'll just inform you that it's coming, and if someone has an issue, we can bring that up at committee.

Ms. Malcolmson, I wasn't at the subcommittee, but there are people here who were. On your private member's bill, administration said it should be non-votable because it was similar to a government bill, Bill C-64. She has the right within five days to appear before the committee or send written reasons stating why she disagrees. Five days would elapse the Monday after we get back, so we'd have the Monday after we get back. Basically we need to schedule time either this week or on the Monday we get back when she could present to committee, and committee could make a decision.

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I suggest, so we don't force ourselves to have an extra meeting, that we try to append it to the end of the meeting on Thursday, from 1:00 to 1:30 or something like that.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I want to be clear. Are we talking about the consideration of her request or about holding the meeting?

The Chair:

We are talking about the timing of when we do the consideration of her request. Oh, she's asked to come before committee.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes.

The Chair:

Then we're just talking about the timing of when she can come.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm still thinking of Thursday, at the end.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I just wanted to make sure we weren't having a meeting to plan a meeting. We're going to give her her rights; the question is just when we're going to do that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We're planning the planning meeting now, so we don't need to plan the planning meeting. We're good.

Mr. David Christopherson:

There we go. We're almost talking plain.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I was saying that it should be on Thursday at the end of the meeting we already have scheduled, so at one o'clock we could enter into this subject.

The Chair: Would it be half an hour?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: I would imagine that would take care of it.

The Chair: It would be this Thursday.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: This Thursday, yes, two days from now. Otherwise we have to schedule another meeting between now and—

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

We're talking about a time to have a meeting. Why don't we just do that right now?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's because she has to come too.

(1255)

The Chair:

For Thursday's schedule, the first hour is supplementary estimates. The first half hour is on the House of Commons and the second half hour is on PPS, because that's totally separate from the House of Commons budget. Then, in the second hour, the first half hour is on PPS management related to the present labour situation, and the second hour is on the three unions.

We're pretty booked up on Thursday, so our only options are basically to add half an hour to that meeting at one o'clock, as David is suggesting, or to have a special meeting the Monday after we return from constituency week.

Mr. David Christopherson:

By unanimous consent, the House could do anything. If Sheila agreed....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The House, not us.

The Chair:

That's what he said: the House.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I said the House, but we can make that recommendation. If we're unanimous, we could recommend to the House that they agree, especially if we have agreement from Sheila. I don't want to delay this. Obviously, it's my colleague, but if it's a matter of a day or two and this works better, I'm sure she would be accommodating. She's a very reasonable person.

To do the extension on Thursday would be the easiest, but there is the option of getting the House to lift the five days, with the agreement of Sheila.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It's easier, rather than getting into all of this.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I agree. I think Thursday is easier. I'm just offering what the alternative could be.

The Chair:

Is there anyone opposed to extending Thursday's meeting by half an hour and having Ms. Malcolmson come? Then we could make a decision after she leaves.

Some hon. members: No.

The Chair: Okay, we'll consider that done.

Thank you.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1210)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte.

Bienvenue à la 77e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. J'aimerais rappeler aux membres du Comité que la réunion est publique.

Les membres du Comité se souviendront du rapport 33 que le Comité a produit lors de la dernière session parlementaire. Ce rapport a été approuvé par la Chambre des communes le 11 mars 2015 et il demande au Comité d'entreprendre un examen du système et du processus de pétitions électroniques deux ans après la mise en oeuvre du système.

Afin de nous aider à mener cet examen, nous accueillons Charles Robert, greffier de la Chambre des communes, et André Gagnon, sous-greffier de la Procédure. Je vous remercie d'être ici. C'est votre première comparution à la Chambre.

Essentiellement, avant d'intégrer les règles s'appliquant aux pétitions électroniques de façon permanente dans le Règlement, nous voulons vérifier comment s'est déroulée la période d'essai de deux ans et s'il y a eu des problèmes ou si on suggère des modifications à la procédure qui a été mise en place. Nous vous avons demandé — ainsi qu'aux autres partis — de signaler les problèmes qui pourraient avoir émergé dans le système. Nous avons hâte d'entendre votre exposé.

M. Charles Robert (greffier de la Chambre des communes):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je vous remercie de m'avoir invité à comparaître devant le Comité dans le cadre de l'examen du système de pétitions électroniques de la Chambre des communes.

Pour vous donner un peu de contexte, je commencerai par un survol rapide du processus actuel. Essentiellement, pour lancer une pétition électronique, il faut créer un compte, fournir des renseignements personnels de base et rédiger une pétition en utilisant le modèle présenté dans le site Web des pétitions électroniques.

Ensuite, le pétitionnaire doit désigner au moins cinq appuyeurs et choisir un député qui parrainera la pétition. Le député choisi dispose de 30 jours pour répondre. S'il refuse de parrainer la pétition ou s'il ne donne pas de réponse dans les 30 jours, le pétitionnaire peut choisir un autre député. Si cinq députés refusent de parrainer la pétition, celle-ci doit être retirée.[Français]

Lorsqu'un député accepte de parrainer une pétition, celle-ci subit un examen de conformité. Puis, elle est traduite et affichée dans le site Web pendant 120 jours. Il est alors possible de la signer. Les pétitions qui recueillent moins de 500 signatures sont tout simplement archivées dans le site Web, tandis que celles qui sont signées par au moins 500 personnes peuvent être présentées à la Chambre des communes une fois que le parrain a reçu un certificat attestant le texte de la pétition et le nombre total de signatures.

Le processus de présentation d'une pétition électronique à la Chambre est identique à celui qui s'applique aux pétitions sur papier, mais seules les réponses du gouvernement aux pétitions électroniques sont affichées dans le site Web.[Traduction]

Le site des pétitions électroniques suscite un grand intérêt. Dans la dernière année, il a attiré le tiers environ de toutes les visites faites sur le site Web de la Chambre des communes. En tout, 2,5 millions de visites provenant de plus de 3 000 communautés différentes y ont été dénombrées. De ce nombre, 40 % ont été redirigées par des sites de médias sociaux, et environ les deux tiers d'entre elles ont été faites à partir d'appareils mobiles. Cela montre que les outils de partage des médias sociaux et la convivialité pour les utilisateurs d'appareils mobiles sont des aspects importants de la conception du site.[Français]

Au cours de cette période, 1 343 pétitions électroniques ont été créées, et 400 d'entres elles, soit 30 %, ont été publiées sur le site, où elles ont collectivement recueilli plus de 1,1 million de signatures. Lorsqu'une pétition n'est pas publiée, c'est habituellement parce que le pétitionnaire ne complète pas son ébauche ou que la pétition a été retirée avant l'étape de la publication. Il est très rare qu'une pétition électronique soit jugée irrecevable à la lumière des lignes directrices établies par le Comité et énoncées dans le Règlement de la Chambre des communes et les modèles et les guides d'utilisation affichés dans le site Web.[Traduction]

Sur les 400 pétitions électroniques publiées, 70 % ont atteint le seuil minimum de 500 signatures. En outre, le site s'est avéré très sûr; il protège très bien les renseignements personnels recueillis.

Cela dit, le processus et le système pourraient devenir plus efficaces si certaines modifications étaient apportées, notamment s'ils étaient plus souples. Par exemple, la période maximale de 120 jours fixée pour obtenir 500 signatures retarde la présentation des pétitions qui atteignent ce chiffre rapidement — la période moyenne est de neuf jours. Par ailleurs, si moins de cinq députés répondent à la demande de parrainage, ou si certains sont inadmissibles, la pétition ne peut pas être affichée. D'autre part, le texte de la pétition est seulement examiné après qu'un député ait accepté de la parrainer, ce qui complique la rédaction de la version définitive.[Français]

Enfin, il y a toujours des différences entre les règles de certification des pétitions sur papier et celles applicables aux pétitions électroniques.

Par exemple, le nombre minimal de signatures est de 25 pour les pétitions sur papier et de 500 pour les pétitions électroniques. D'autres exigences s'appliquent seulement aux pétitions sur papier. Notons, entre autres, les dimensions de la feuille sur laquelle la pétition est déposée.[Traduction]

Le fait qu'il soit possible de rendre les pétitions électroniques plus efficaces n'enlève rien au succès général du système. En fait, nous sommes aujourd'hui bien placés pour pouvoir répondre à la recommandation du Comité concernant l'adoption d'un modèle uniforme et accessible en format électronique pour les réponses du gouvernement aux pétitions électroniques et sur papier. Je peux assurer le Comité que les consultations requises auprès du Bureau du Conseil privé ont déjà commencé.[Français]

Entre autres points importants, nous avons examiné la possibilité d'instaurer un système sans papier pour toutes les réponses aux pétitions, système qui pourrait servir de base à un autre, plus vaste, applicable aux documents parlementaires électroniques. Un système du genre pourrait, un jour, traiter d'autres types de documents présentés à la Chambre, comme les réponses aux questions écrites, qui seraient alors déposés sous forme électronique et diffusés plus largement que ce n'est le cas actuellement.

Monsieur le président, je vous remercie. M. Gagnon et moi serons heureux de répondre aux questions du Comité.

(1215)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Puis-je confirmer que vous avez dit que le texte est finalisé après que la personne ait trouvé quelqu'un pour parrainer la pétition, ce qui signifie qu'un député pourrait parrainer une pétition sans connaître le texte définitif?

M. André Gagnon (sous-greffier, Procédure):

La validation de la pétition est effectuée après avoir trouvé un parrain, mais le parrain peut voir le texte présenté.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Merci.

Pour faire suite à ce point, s'agit-il seulement de problèmes de grammaire, de traduction, etc., plutôt que des problèmes liés au contenu de la pétition?

M. André Gagnon:

On examine aussi le contenu — par exemple, si la pétition vise un enjeu qui relève des provinces et non du gouvernement fédéral ou si le langage utilisé n'est pas respectueux.

M. Scott Reid:

Si, par exemple, une personne souhaitait présenter une pétition qui demande au Parlement de prendre position sur le projet de loi 62 récemment présenté par le Québec qui prévoit que les services dispensés par le gouvernement provincial doivent être reçus à visage découvert, cette pétition serait-elle déclarée inadmissible?

M. André Gagnon:

À ce moment-là, il s'agirait de déterminer si cela relève de la compétence des députés ou du gouvernement, et si une telle chose est conseillée et autorisée.

M. Charles Robert:

Je crois que la question est également complexe parce qu'elle pourrait faire intervenir la Charte, et que cela dépasse la question de la compétence fédérale ou provinciale.

M. Scott Reid:

À ce sujet, si vous me le permettez, j'aimerais faire valoir un point qui est lié à une autre discussion que nous avons eue précédemment sur la question de permettre ou non les projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire. J'ai toujours été d'avis que nous devrions couvrir le plus de terrain possible. Si un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire, tout comme un projet de loi du gouvernement, empiétait sur une compétence provinciale après son adoption, il serait éventuellement déclaré inconstitutionnel par les tribunaux, dans la mesure où il serait jugé ultra vires. C'est la règle pour les tribunaux, mais pas pour nous. J'adopterais une approche semblable dans ce cas-ci.

Nous avons certainement, sur le plan moral, le droit et l'obligation d'être prêts à prendre position sur n'importe quel enjeu, peu importe la compétence dont il relève. Sur le plan constitutionnel, nous n'avons pas le droit de prendre des mesures à l'égard de ces enjeux, mais nous avons le droit et l'obligation de réfléchir intelligemment à leur sujet, surtout qu'il est tout à fait possible — et c'est déjà arrivé — qu'une question qui relève d'un certain palier de gouvernement soit transférée par l'entremise d'une modification à un autre palier de gouvernement, car nous avons déterminé, au bout du compte, que c'était la meilleure chose à faire.

Réfléchissons à la question. Imaginons qu'une personne présente une pétition pour qu'une certaine compétence soit transférée des provinces au gouvernement fédéral. Imaginons que cette compétence est liée à l'encadrement de la marijuana. Les provinces peuvent déterminer l'âge légal, mais on pense que cette décision devrait être prise à l'échelon fédéral. Si une telle pétition était présentée, la jugeriez-vous admissible ou non?

M. André Gagnon:

En fait, si la pétition demandait au Parlement ou au gouvernement d'entamer des discussions avec ses homologues provinciaux, ce serait certainement acceptable, dans la mesure que le gouvernement est responsable d'entamer des discussions sur la séparation des pouvoirs provinciaux et fédéraux.

M. Scott Reid:

Me permettez-vous de...

Le président:

Je vois où vous voulez en venir.

Si les membres du Comité sont d'accord, je vais procéder de façon informelle, comme nous l'avons fait pour le dernier point, dans la mesure où cela fonctionne bien.

D'accord. Allez-y.

M. Scott Reid:

Je ne veux pas monopoliser la conversation. Je veux simplement aborder la question sous un autre angle. Puis-je le faire?

Le président:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Le système traditionnel de pétition sur papier, qui existe presque depuis des temps immémoriaux — certainement depuis les années 1 200 —, présume qu'une personne perd son droit à l'anonymat lorsqu'elle signe une pétition. Les soussignés ont apposé leur signature, mais c'est sur papier. Autrefois, la pétition était envoyée à Londres, mais maintenant, elle est envoyée à Ottawa. Les personnes éloignées ne peuvent pas rapidement la consulter de façon électronique. Je crois que nous avons tous l'impression que c'est différent lorsque l'accès aux signatures recueillies électroniquement est aussi rapide, par exemple, pour Vladimir Poutine ou les ploutocrates qui gèrent la Chine que pour les députés parlementaires ou tout individu qui se rend au bureau du greffier pour consulter les dossiers.

Je crois — mais je ne peux pas en avoir la certitude — que j'exprime le point de vue de tout le monde lorsque j'affirme que nous nous sentons probablement tous plus à l'aise lorsque les renseignements sont bien gardés et protégés par une protection impénétrable qui permet, d'un côté, de confirmer que la même personne n'a pas signé une pétition 3 000 fois, mais d'un autre côté, de confirmer que les personnes susmentionnées ne peuvent pas voir les signatures.

J'aimerais poser une question. Étant donné que nous avons été témoins de plusieurs fuites — la plus récente étant liée aux documents sur les paradis fiscaux —, selon vous, faut-il prendre d'autres mesures de sécurité? Devrions-nous nous concentrer davantage sur certaines préoccupations?

(1220)

M. André Gagnon:

Monsieur Reid, cette question précise a soulevé un grand intérêt au sein du comité précédent qui a accepté de mettre en oeuvre le système de pétitions électroniques, et je dirais que c'était probablement l'une des questions les plus importantes qui ont été soulevées pendant la conception d'un système de pétitions électroniques. La conception actuelle du système nous permet de déclarer fièrement que tous les renseignements ont été recueillis dans le respect des normes les plus élevées en matière de protection de la vie privée. Nous avons également une politique qui consiste à supprimer rapidement tous les renseignements recueillis. Nous le faisons après, et non avant, qu'un signataire de pétition électronique ait reçu une réponse de la Chambre des communes qui indique que le gouvernement a répondu à la pétition.

Comme vous pouvez l'imaginer, nous conservons ces renseignements, mais seuls les responsables de la Chambre des communes peuvent les consulter. Les députés ou les gens à l'externe n'y ont pas accès.

M. Scott Reid:

Il y a donc une période pendant que la pétition est affichée. Vous pouvez toujours obtenir plus de signatures. Ensuite, il y a une période pendant laquelle le gouvernement peut répondre, et lorsque cette réponse est fournie, elle est envoyée à tous les signataires. Enfin, après un certain temps, les renseignements sont supprimés.

M. André Gagnon:

Oui, nous effaçons régulièrement, pendant l'année, une grande partie des renseignements que nous avons reçus.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Le président:

La parole est à M. Simms, et ensuite à M. Kennedy.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Je ne faisais pas partie du Comité de la procédure, mais j'étais porte-parole pendant la dernière session parlementaire et j'ai ardemment et énergiquement appuyé ceci lorsque M. Stewart l'a présenté à la Chambre. J'espère entendre ses commentaires plus tard, si c'est...

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Il aura la parole après vous.

M. Scott Simms:

Excellent.

J'aimerais poser quelques brèves questions.

Je comprends ce que vous voulez dire lorsque vous parlez de 25 noms comparativement à 500 noms. C'est une différence assez importante. Je ne sais pas si ma question s'adresse à vous ou à lui. Je tiens à obtenir des éclaircissements, car j'aimerais ajouter au compte rendu que c'est un peu excessif, selon moi. Si la pétition n'obtient pas 500 signatures pendant cette période de 120 jours, cela signifie qu'elle n'a pas réussi à atteindre les objectifs pour être présentée, n'est-ce pas?

M. Charles Robert:

Oui, mais en même temps, comme il a été souligné, cela semble être un objectif facile à atteindre, car il est souvent atteint en neuf jours.

M. Scott Simms:

Je vois, mais vous ne pouvez pas faire cela... C'est exact, vous l'avez dit plus tôt. Vous ne pouvez pas la présenter à la Chambre, même si vous réussissez à obtenir 500 signatures pendant cette période. D'accord. C'est un très bon point.

En ce qui concerne la question de la protection de la vie privée, si je récolte des signatures pour une pétition dans ma circonscription, ou si quelqu'un que je connais le fait, je peux avoir accès à tous les renseignements, etc. Le parrain de la pétition peut-il avoir accès aux renseignements sur les signataires?

M. André Gagnon:

Lorsque vous mentionnez le parrain, parlez-vous du député qui parraine la pétition?

M. Scott Simms:

Non, je suis désolé. J'utilise le mauvais terme.

En fait, il s'agit des deux, c'est-à-dire le député ou la personne qui organise la pétition. Je vous remercie d'avoir apporté cette précision.

(1225)

M. André Gagnon:

Si nous parlons du pétitionnaire, c'est la personne qui organise la pétition. Cette personne aurait seulement accès aux noms des appuyeurs, c'est-à-dire les cinq appuyeurs qu'elle doit identifier, mais ils fournissent eux-mêmes ces renseignements. La personne n'a pas accès aux noms des 2 000 signataires de la pétition, par exemple.

M. Scott Simms:

Elle n'a pas accès aux noms ou à autre chose.

M. André Gagnon:

La seule chose à laquelle elle aurait accès, ce sont les informations qui sont publiées sur le site Web, c'est-à-dire le nombre de signataires dans chaque province et territoire. C'est tout.

M. Scott Simms:

C'est tout.

M. André Gagnon:

Oui.

En ce qui concerne le député qui devient le parrain d'une pétition, il reçoit les renseignements de base du pétitionnaire, c'est-à-dire de la personne qui a organisé la pétition. Comme vous pouvez l'imaginer, dans certains cas, le député aimerait communiquer ou téléphoner à cette personne pour connaître les raisons de cette pétition, c'est-à-dire ce qui motive le pétitionnaire, et obtenir davantage de renseignements. Toutefois, ce sont les seuls renseignements fournis au parrain.

M. Scott Simms:

Il reçoit seulement des renseignements sur la personne qui a organisé la pétition électronique.

M. André Gagnon:

Oui.

M. Scott Simms:

C'est tout pour l'instant, car j'aimerais entendre l'avis de M. Stewart.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Stewart.

M. Kennedy Stewart (Burnaby-Sud, NPD):

Merci beaucoup. Je suis très heureux de pouvoir participer à cette odyssée des pétitions électroniques.

Je me souviens que c'est ma conjointe qui m'a proposé l'idée lorsque mon numéro a été choisi lors de la loterie pour les projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire. Évidemment, l'idée a été appuyée par M. Christopherson et M. Simms et, finalement, par l'ensemble du Parlement. C'est vraiment super de voir tous les chemins parcourus depuis.

Le fait que 1,1 million de Canadiens ont signé des pétitions électroniques et que cela représente le tiers de l'achalandage sur le site Web constitue une grande réussite. Cette réussite est en partie attribuable aux travaux du PROC. Lorsque l'on propose de telles idées, on est parfois enthousiaste ou débordé. Je crois que le Comité a fait de l'excellent travail pour modérer mes attentes. Les greffiers ont fait un excellent travail pour éloigner les préoccupations relatives à la sécurité. La question a été abordée avec professionnalisme. D'ailleurs, de nombreux pays ont communiqué avec moi pour s'informer des leçons apprises, car ils souhaitent adopter un système semblable. Je crois qu'il s'agit d'un bon exemple pour le reste du monde.

L'idée est d'abord venue du Royaume-Uni et des États-Unis. Si l'on prend, par exemple, le système du Royaume-Uni, celui-ci a connu des débuts semblables au nôtre. Le pays disposait d'un système de pétitions électroniques qui ne menait à aucun résultat concret, outre une réponse du gouvernement, mais, plus tard, au fur et à mesure que le système de pétitions a été développé, de plus en plus de citoyens se sont mis à signer les pétitions.

Selon les données recueillies, 1,1 million de personnes a signé des pétitions, mais, pour la plupart, c'était au cours des derniers mois. Récemment, trois pétitions portant sur différents sujets et proposées par différentes parties ont recueilli respectivement 130 000, 70 000 et 50 000 signatures. Il s'agit d'un système multipartite.

Nous avons remarqué qu'au Royaume-Uni, c'est en participant au système que les gens le découvrent: les gens signent d'abord une pétition, puis reçoivent un courriel du gouvernement en guise de réponse. Cela les aide à comprendre le fonctionnement du système et les incite à lancer leur propre pétition. C'est aussi ce que nous avons remarqué: une augmentation du taux de participation et de l'achalandage. C'est un peu ce qui s'est produit au Royaume-Uni.

Au Royaume-Uni, 400 000 ou 500 000 ont signé des pétitions, et, finalement, le seuil du million de signatures a été franchi. Le gouvernement s'est alors demandé quoi faire avec cette réalité. Que se passera-t-il lorsque un million de Canadiens — car, cela se produira un jour — signeront une pétition électronique? Est-ce qu'un courriel en guise de réponse sera suffisant? Est-ce suffisant lorsque le un trente-cinquième de la population du pays signe une pétition?

Il a été proposé que lorsque le nombre de signataires d'une pétition électronique franchi un certain seuil, cela entraîne la tenue d'une étude par un comité ou la tenue d'un débat à la Chambre des communes. Il s'agirait d'un débat exploratoire non contraignant. D'ailleurs, le Royaume-Uni s'est dit très satisfait de ce processus, car de nombreuses questions d'intérêt pour les citoyens n'étaient pas abordées au Parlement. Donc, ce genre de débat a permis de discuter de ces questions.

Si nous souhaitons apporter des changements, je crois sincèrement qu'il faudrait conserver ce système, car il semble bien fonctionner. Les préoccupations soulignées au PROC ont été éloignées. Les greffiers ont bien piloté ce dossier et y ont prêté beaucoup d'attention. Maintenant, si une pétition électronique obtient, disons, 100 000 ou 500 000 signatures, que se passera-t-il? Y aura-t-il autre chose qu'une simple réponse? C'est peut-être la prochaine question sur laquelle il faudrait se pencher.

Je propose qu'une telle participation entraîne la tenue d'un débat exploratoire. Il s'agit de ma proposition super enthousiaste originale, mais, maintenant que nous avons pris la très sage décision de faire un essai afin de démontrer que les données sont bien protégées, que les Canadiens sont intéressés, qu'il y a un intérêt à l'échelle internationale et que la plupart des gens semblent satisfaits des résultats, pourrions-nous passer à la prochaine étape où il y a... pas une récompense, mais une sorte de reconnaissance qu'une question importante au sein de la société canadienne soulève l'intérêt des citoyens?

C'est peut-être le défi... pas un défi, mais une proposition que j'aimerais faire au Comité. Serait-il possible d'apporter des précisions sur la question si nous décidons de passer à la prochaine étape ou d'apporter des modifications au Règlement?

(1230)

M. Charles Robert:

Je crois qu'il s'agit d'une idée très séduisante. Elle aide à encourager la notion selon laquelle nous vivons de plus en plus dans un monde numérique et souhaitons accroître la participation démocratique.

Une des différences concrètes, et cela revient à la question de M. Simms au sujet du niveau de soutien nécessaire, c'est que le lancement d'une pétition sur papier demande beaucoup d'effort physique et de temps et celui qui lance une telle pétition est limité sur le plan géographique. Il doit se rendre dans des centres commerciaux et espérer que les gens signeront sa pétition. Dès qu'une pétition est lancée sur le site Web, elle est accessible à l'échelle du pays, et ce, jour et nuit.

Je me souviens d'un député, il y a longtemps, même très longtemps, qui disait que sa vie avait considérablement changé, car il recevait une tonne de correspondances de gens qui n'étaient pas nécessairement ses électeurs. Des gens de partout au pays communiquaient avec lui pour formuler des plaintes ou soulever des questions et voulaient que celles-ci soient abordées.

Évidemment, si les pétitions recueillent un grand nombre de signatures, j'imagine que le Parlement devra en prendre note. L'idée de tenir un débat à la Chambre sur le sujet d'une pétition n'est pas nécessairement mauvaise, car cela soulignerait à la population que la signature en grand nombre de ces pétitions a un impact sur les travaux de la Chambre.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Puis-je ajouter quelque chose?

Le président: Allez-y.

M. Kennedy Stewart: En examinant les données, j'ai trouvé très intéressant de voir le nombre de signatures provenant du Nord, du Nunavut, des Territoires du Nord-Ouest et du Yukon. Il est presque impossible pour un député de se rendre dans les communautés éloignées pour y porter ou pour aller chercher des pétitions. Les pétitions électroniques ont permis aux communautés éloignées et du Nord de participer comme jamais. Encore une fois, il s'agit d'un effet secondaire involontaire, mais c'est une bonne chose.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Je suis neutre, mais c'est un très bon commentaire.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président: Quel est le seuil au Royaume-Uni?

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Le seuil est fixé à 100 000 signatures.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, vous avez la parole.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je n'ai que quelques questions brèves à poser. Elles s'adressent davantage à M. Stewart qu'au greffier.

Vous dites que le processus au Royaume-Uni entraîne la tenue d'un débat. Il y a un lien ici avec d'autres études menées précédemment par le PROC. Ce débat a-t-il lieu dans la chambre des débats parallèles?

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Il peut avoir lieu dans l'une de deux Chambres, je crois, mais c'est habituellement dans la chambre de débat parallèle.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans la chambre des débats parallèles. D'accord.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Les pétitions sont d'abord triées par comité; elles ne sont pas directement... J'ai proposé, plus tôt, qu'il y ait automatiquement un débat, mais, en réalité, au Royaume-Uni, un comité de députés d'arrière-ban fait d'abord le tri des pétitions, une option dont nous pourrions parler lors d'une prochaine séance.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

La seule autre question que j'aurais est la suivante: des quelque un million de personnes qui ont signé ces pétitions, combien l'ont fait à plusieurs reprises? Parle-t-on de 1,1 million de personnes ou de 1,1 million de signatures apposées par 300 000 signataires?

M. André Gagnon:

Je suis désolé, mais je ne comprends pas votre question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous dites qu'il y a plus d'un million de signatures, n'est-ce pas?

M. Gagnon: Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Est-ce 100 000 personnes qui ont signé à plusieurs reprises ou est-ce vraiment un million de personnes différentes qui ont signé?

M. Charles Robert:

On ne peut pas signer deux fois la même pétition.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Non, mais on peut signer toutes les pétitions.

M. Charles Robert:

Oui, tout le monde peut le faire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce que je veux dire, c'est est-ce que ce sont les mêmes personnes qui signent les pétitions ou est-ce qu'il y a toujours de nouvelles personnes qui participent au processus? Le savons-nous?

M. André Gagnon:

Je ne crois pas que nous ayons les outils nécessaires pour répondre à cette question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Merci.

Le président:

Quelqu'un d'autre voudrait intervenir? J'aurais un commentaire à... Allez-y, Ruby.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous dites qu'on ne peut pas signer plus d'une fois une pétition. En êtes-vous certain? Est-ce que quelqu'un a déjà essayé? Avez-vous constaté des activités douteuses? Le système a-t-il déjà été piraté? Vous dites que le système est sécuritaire. Je siège à un autre comité où...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Mme Ruby Sahota:... il n'a été question que de technologie. C'est donc l'état d'esprit dans lequel je me trouve. Je me demande à quel point le système est sécuritaire, si il y a eu des menaces et comment vous avez traité ces menaces, s'il y a lieu.

(1235)

M. André Gagnon:

Au sujet des menaces, s'il y en a eu, ce sont les mêmes auxquelles les autres sites Web sont confrontés. Cela répond à cette question.

Concernant la possibilité de signer une pétition à plusieurs reprises, notre système identifie soit l'adresse courriel ou l'adresse IP. Vous vous souviendrez que le Comité a proposé qu'il ne soit pas possible d'utiliser ni une adresse IP ni une adresse courriel du gouvernement ou du Parlement.

De plus, lorsqu'il y a un dédoublement, s'il s'agit d'un citoyen ordinaire qui tente de signer deux fois une même pétition, nous le verrons lors de l'analyse des données.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

De nos jours, les gens ont plus d'un appareil et plus d'une adresse courriel. C'est le cas pour nous tous. Nous sommes tous ici, autour de cette table...

M. André Gagnon:

C'est à ce chapitre qu'il faut trouver un équilibre entre les outils disponibles et les données recueillies pour s'assurer que les signatures électroniques sont valides. Évidemment, si vous comparez le processus des pétitions papier et des pétitions électroniques, vous en conclurez probablement que le processus de pétitions électroniques est beaucoup plus moderne et authentique que le processus de pétitions papier. Vous comprendrez qu'il est parfois très difficile d'extraire les données.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Comprenez-moi bien: je crois que les avantages sont plus importants que certains de ces problèmes. Je voulais simplement mieux comprendre.

Selon vous, le système des pétitions électroniques est une réussite et, si des modifications doivent être rapportées, ce serait en ce qui a trait à cette règle en particulier. Si une pétition obtient le nombre de signatures nécessaire, le délai de 120 jours ne devrait pas s'appliquer et la pétition devrait passer à la prochaine étape.

M. André Gagnon:

C'est l'une des choses qui ont été proposées. Comme vous le savez probablement, beaucoup de députés tentent de présenter une pétition sur un projet de loi qui fera l'objet d'un débat en deuxième lecture à la Chambre. Si d'autres pétitions ont été déposées à la Chambre et que votre pétition électronique est coincée pendant 120 jours, vous ne pourrez pas la présenter à la Chambre en temps opportun.

Oui, le délai de 120 jours pourrait être réévalué afin que les députés puissent présenter plus tôt leurs pétitions. Il pourrait s'agir d'une option.

Nous avons découvert que certains citoyens trouvent compliqué non pas d'obtenir des appuyeurs, mais bien de fournir les renseignements nécessaires. Est-il encore pertinent de demander cinq appuyeurs pour une pétition? Ce nombre devrait-il être revu à la baisse? Devrait-on demander un seul appuyeur ou éliminer cette exigence relative aux appuyeurs? Nous pourrions examiner le processus de validation des pétitions. Selon le processus actuel, une pétition est validée à la fin du processus, avant qu'elle ne soit publiée en ligne. C'est parfois à ce moment que nous trouvons des erreurs ou jugeons que des ajustements doivent être apportés. Si des ajustements importants doivent être apportés à une pétition, la personne qui a lancé ladite pétition doit communiquer avec tous les appuyeurs, car la pétition n'est essentiellement plus la même.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il doit être gênant pour un député qui appuie une pétition et y ajoute son nom et ensuite...

M. André Gagnon:

La bonne nouvelle, c'est qu'à cette étape du processus, la pétition n'est pas encore publique. Il s'agit encore uniquement d'une discussion.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'aurais une dernière question à vous poser.

Quelle a été la réflexion qui a mené à la décision de ne pas permettre à un député qui appuie une pétition de voir qui sont les autres signataires? Quel est le raisonnement derrière cette décision? Dans le cadre d'une pétition sur papier, on peut voir le nom de tous ceux qui ont signé la pétition. On peut voir d'où ils viennent. Peut-être que beaucoup d'entre eux sont nos électeurs.

Pourquoi n'avons-nous pas accès à cette information?

M. André Gagnon:

D'abord, parce que les pétitions électroniques contiennent plus de renseignements, puisque nous devons retourner ces renseignements aux signataires. Ces renseignements contiennent des adresses courriel, des adresses civiques et des numéros de téléphone. Il y a beaucoup de renseignements que l'on ne retrouve pas habituellement sur une pétition papier.

(1240)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Non, mais...

M. André Gagnon:

Il y a aussi un nombre important de signataires.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je suis confuse. Je croyais vous avoir entendu dire que les députés qui appuient une pétition n'ont pas accès à cette information, qu'ils ont uniquement accès aux informations concernant celui qui a lancé la pétition. Le député ne sait pas qui sont les autres signataires.

M. André Gagnon:

C'est exact. C'est ce comité qui a pris la décision de ne pas rendre cette information publique.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il s'agissait d'une décision de ce comité. C'est ce que je voulais savoir.

M. André Gagnon:

Cette décision a par la suite été confirmée par la Chambre.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Cette décision n'aurait pas été prise s'il s'agissait d'un exercice de collecte de données accessibles à tous les partis, et je crois que M. Reid pourra vous le confirmer.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il s'agissait d'une source d'inquiétude.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

L'idée était davantage de protéger les citoyens et d'empêcher que leurs données soient dispersées.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui, mais dans le cas des pétitions papier, leurs données circulent partout.

M. Kennedy Stewart:

Oui, c'est vrai, mais il y a moins de signataires.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui.

Le président:

Il y a aussi moins de renseignements. Les signataires ne fournissent pas leur numéro de téléphone sur une pétition papier.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson, vous avez la parole.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président. Ma question s'adresse à vous et à nos témoins.

À la page 4 de l'exposé présenté au début de la séance, il a été dit, et je cite: Cela dit, le processus et le système pourraient devenir plus efficaces si certaines modifications étaient apportées, et notamment s'ils étaient plus souples.

Cela me laisse croire qu'une foule de recommandations pourrait être formulée. Comment allons-nous procéder, monsieur le président? Aurons-nous une deuxième séance sur le sujet? Allons-nous leur demander de formuler des recommandations?

Vous savez que je suis sérieux. Il pourrait également s'agir d'un forum et d'une occasion pour M. Stewart de nous présenter ses arguments concernant la prochaine étape, c'est-à-dire, l'adoption d'un point critique. Nous pourrions y réfléchir. Selon ma lecture de l'information, si nous demandons des recommandations, certaines seraient probablement détaillées. Ce que je vous demande, à vous et aux témoins, monsieur le président, c'est si mon hypothèse est bonne ou mauvaise.

M. André Gagnon:

Si nécessaire, nous pouvons certainement vous fournir plus de détails que ce que nous vous avons fourni aujourd'hui. Je crois que les différents éléments que le greffier et moi avons soulignés pourraient servir de base au Comité s'il souhaite accroître le nombre de participants aux pétitions électroniques tout en assurant l'intégrité de ces pétitions.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson voulait savoir si vous alliez formuler d'autres recommandations outre celles déjà formulées dans votre exposé.

M. André Gagnon:

Le...

M. David Christopherson:

Corrigez-moi si je me trompe, mais ce que j'ai compris, c'est que si nous en faisons la demande, nous recevrons des recommandations détaillées de la part du personnel. Je pense que la balle est dans votre camp. Dans ce cas, pensez-vous que nous devrions soumettre la demande, puis convoquer une réunion un peu plus large pour que M. Stewart puisse faire valoir ses arguments en faveur du changement, que nous décidions d'aller de l'avant ou non, et défendre son point de vue au cours de la présente législature?

Monsieur le président, je m'en remets à vous quant à la direction que nous devons prendre pour la suite des choses.

Le président:

Les membres du Comité ont-ils d'autres réflexions?

Allez-y, monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Cela ne me pose aucun problème. Recueillons le plus d'information possible. Nous en avons discuté, puis nous avons convenu qu'étant donné que le délai n'est pas serré et que les règles seront appliquées, nous pouvons écouter les recommandations. Comme il n'y a pas d'échéance, nous pourrions organiser une bonne étude d'une ou deux journées dans la nouvelle année.

M. David Christopherson:

Cela me convient. Nous pourrions donc demander au personnel de nous fournir ses recommandations. Dès que le greffier les recevra, il pourra nous les soumettre à titre de travaux du Comité, après quoi nous pourrons planifier la réunion.

Monsieur Bittle, vous avez raison de dire qu'il n'y a pas de véritable échéance et que nous avons d'autres chats à fouetter. En revanche, nous ne voudrions pas manquer l'occasion de faire l'examen au cours de la présente législature.

Par votre intermédiaire, monsieur le président, si nous demandons encore au personnel de formuler ces recommandations, elles vous seront remises lorsqu'elles parviendront au greffier. Vous nous les remettriez ensuite dans les travaux du Comité, après quoi nous organiserions une réunion pour les examiner, et donnerions une chance à quiconque voudrait y apporter des modifications, en particulier M. Stewart, puisque nous nous inspirons de son idée.

Ce n'est qu'une réflexion, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Pouvez-vous considérer cela comme une demande?

M. Charles Robert: C'est ce que j'en avais déduit.

Des députés: Ah, ah!

Le président: Nous n'allons pas le demander par écrit, mais nous attendrons d'autres recommandations.

M. André Gagnon:

Je n'utiliserais pas le mot « recommandations ». De notre point de vue, il s'agirait plutôt de questions à explorer, qui vous mèneront ou non à une décision sur les différents...

(1245)

Le président:

D'accord.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur Robert, est-ce parce que vous ne voulez pas prétendre dire...? Je me demande simplement pourquoi vous ne...

M. Charles Robert:

En effet, cette Chambre est la vôtre, et nous sommes à votre service.

M. David Christopherson:

Puisque vous êtes à notre service, si nous vous demandons des recommandations...

M. Charles Robert:

Nous serions obligés de vous les fournir dans cette langue.

M. David Christopherson:

Je m'en remets à vous, monsieur le président.

Un député: Nous allons vous recommander quelques problèmes.

Des députés: Ah, ah!

Le président:

D'accord. Nous avons terminé, mais avant de passer à un autre sujet, y a-t-il d'autres commentaires sur les pétitions?

J'en ai un, à vrai dire.

Il semble y avoir une certaine dichotomie, des procédures non parallèles — sans dire si c'est bon ou mauvais — entre les pétitions physiques et électroniques. C'est peut-être une simple question de lexique, mais dans une pétition physique, le député est la personne qui présente la pétition. Il n'est pas autorisé à émettre son opinion, et il se limite à présenter la pétition. Or, lorsque le mot « parrain » est employé, on a l'impression que le député appuie la pétition, qu'il parraine une pétition qu'il souhaite voir aller de l'avant. À mes yeux, ce sont là deux procédures différentes pour une même chose, à savoir la pétition. Je ne dis pas que c'est bon ou mauvais, mais je préférerais qu'elles soient similaires.

Y a-t-il des commentaires à ce sujet?

M. André Gagnon:

Monsieur le président, vous vous souviendrez qu'il en avait été question la dernière fois que nous avons étudié la question. Si ma mémoire est bonne, les lignes directrices que nous avons fournies établissent clairement que le parrain de la pétition n'est pas nécessairement un sympathisant. Il souscrit simplement à l'idée que les citoyens devraient pouvoir adresser des pétitions au Parlement.

Là encore, le mot pourrait être changé.

M. Charles Robert:

On peut effectivement se demander si un député est en droit de refuser de présenter la pétition. S'il ne fait que la présenter, il met en oeuvre une sorte de procédé mécanique, mais vous avez raison de dire que le mot « parrain » sous-entend plus qu'une simple présentation machinale, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Puis-je demander aux membres du Comité ce qu'ils pensent de remplacer le mot « parrain » par « présentateur » dans les pétitions électroniques? Je préférerais cela.

M. David Christopherson:

Est-ce votre principale recommandation?

Le président:

En fait, nous allons ajouter le sujet à notre prochaine discussion.

Y a-t-il autre chose?

Monsieur le greffier, puisque c'est la première fois que vous êtes des nôtres, et que vous nous verrez probablement souvent...

M. Charles Robert:

J'espère bien.

Le président:

... souhaitez-vous dire un mot d'ouverture aux membres du Comité? Nous vous souhaitons la bienvenue à la Chambre.

M. Charles Robert:

Je me souviens très bien de mon passage devant vous en juin dernier. J'avais trouvé l'accueil plutôt chaleureux.

Je suis heureux d'avoir l'occasion de comparaître devant vous aujourd'hui. J'ai hâte de mettre encore ma perspicacité et mon expérience au service de cette merveilleuse Chambre et de votre comité.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Nous vous verrons jeudi.

M. Charles Robert:

Je suppose.

Des voix: Ah, ah!

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons suspendre la séance un instant, après quoi nous passerons aux travaux du Comité.

(1245)

(1250)

Le président:

Nous allons commencer par ce sujet.

Nous avions demandé à la ministre d'envoyer une lettre pour nous expliquer ses attentes relatives au commissaire aux débats des chefs. Elle nous l'a fait parvenir, et les membres du Comité l'ont en main. Il s'agit d'un élément d'information autant que le reste. Je ne l'ai pas lue puisque nous venons de la recevoir.

J'ignore si quelqu'un veut en parler, ou si nous laissons simplement la lettre comme élément d'information.

M. Scott Reid:

Nous allons la conserver et en discuter en séance publique jeudi, disons.

Le président:

D'accord. Vous parlez de ce jeudi.

D'ici jeudi de la semaine de relâche parlementaire, tout le monde devra m'avoir soumis sa liste de témoins.

M. Scott Reid:

Jeudi, avons-nous jusqu'à 16 ou 17 heures?

Le président:

C'est 17 heures

M. Scott Reid:

La liste doit donc être remise le jeudi 16 novembre à 17 heures.

Le président:

Oui.

Le deuxième élément sera très rapide. Peut-être que cela deviendra une procédure normale.

Une délégation du Ghana sera en visite du 28 au 30 novembre. En collaboration avec d'autres parlements, nous avons organisé une rencontre informelle en dehors des heures de séance de notre comité PROC, et tout député qui le souhaite peut y assister. Sauf indication contraire de votre part, ou s'il n'y a pas d'objection, nous examinerons peut-être la question lorsque nous recevrons des demandes, si les membres du Comité sont d'accord. Je vous informe simplement que la rencontre aura lieu, et si quelqu'un a quelque chose à dire, nous pourrons en discuter au sein du Comité.

Pour ce qui est de Mme Malcolmson, je n'ai pas assisté à la réunion du Sous-Comité, mais certains y étaient. En ce qui concerne le projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire, l'administration a déclaré qu'il ne fera pas l'objet d'un vote puisqu'il ressemble au projet de loi C-64 émanant du gouvernement. Mme Malcolmson a cinq jours pour comparaître devant le Comité ou pour envoyer par écrit les motifs de son désaccord. La période de cinq jours se termine le lundi suivant notre retour, de sorte que nous aurons jusqu'à cette journée-là. Nous devons donc essentiellement prévoir du temps cette semaine ou le lundi suivant notre retour pour que Mme Malcolmson ait l'occasion de s'adresser au Comité, après quoi nous pourrons prendre une décision.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pour éviter que nous soyons obligés de tenir une réunion supplémentaire, je propose d'ajouter le sujet à la fin de la séance de jeudi, soit entre 13 heures et 13 h 30 ou quelque chose de semblable.

M. David Christopherson:

Je veux bien comprendre. Parlons-nous de l'examen de la demande ou de la séance elle-même?

Le président:

Nous parlons du moment où nous examinerons sa demande. Oh, nous la convoquerons devant le Comité.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord.

Le président:

Dans ce cas, nous parlons simplement du moment où elle pourra comparaître.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je propose toujours jeudi, à la fin de la réunion.

M. David Christopherson:

Je voulais simplement m'assurer que nous n'organisons pas une réunion pour en planifier une autre. Nous allons bel et bien lui accorder son droit; il reste simplement à décider à quel moment.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous sommes en train de faire la réunion de planification, de sorte que nous n'avons pas besoin de la prévoir à l'horaire. Tout est correct.

M. David Christopherson:

Voilà. C'est presque clair.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je disais que nous devrions la convoquer jeudi, à la fin de la réunion déjà à l'horaire; nous pourrions aborder ce sujet vers 13 heures.

Le président: Nous aurions une demi-heure?

M. David de Burgh Graham: J'imagine que cela suffirait.

Le président: Ce serait donc ce jeudi.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Oui, ce jeudi, dans deux jours. Autrement, nous devrons prévoir une autre réunion d'ici...

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Puisque nous cherchons un moment pour tenir une réunion, pourquoi ne pas aborder le sujet maintenant?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est parce que la députée doit être présente aussi.

(1255)

Le président:

Ce jeudi, la première heure est dédiée au Budget supplémentaire des dépenses. La première demi-heure est consacrée à la Chambre des communes, et la deuxième, au Service de protection parlementaire, ou SPP, puisque son budget est totalement distinct de celui de la Chambre. À la deuxième heure, la première demi-heure est consacrée à la gestion du SPP et à l'état actuel des relations de travail, et la deuxième heure, à trois syndicats.

Nous sommes assez occupés jeudi. Par conséquent, nos seules options sont essentiellement d'ajouter une demi-heure à cette séance après 13 heures, comme David le propose, ou de tenir une réunion spéciale le lundi suivant notre retour de la semaine de relâche.

M. David Christopherson:

Avec un consentement unanime, la Chambre peut faire n'importe quoi. Si Sheila accepte...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La Chambre, mais pas nous.

Le président:

C'est ce qu'il a dit: la Chambre.

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai dit la Chambre, mais nous pouvons lui soumettre cette recommandation. Si nous avons l'unanimité, nous pourrions recommander à la Chambre de modifier les règles, surtout si Sheila est d'accord. Je ne veux rien retarder. Il s'agit évidemment de ma consoeur, mais si la séance est reportée d'une ou deux journées et que c'est plus pratique, je suis persuadé qu'elle se montrera conciliante. Elle est très raisonnable.

Le plus simple serait de prolonger la séance de jeudi, mais il est possible de convaincre la Chambre de lever le délai de cinq jours, avec l'accord de Sheila.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Ce serait plus facile que de nous lancer dans toute cette procédure.

M. David Christopherson:

Je suis d'accord. Je pense que jeudi est plus simple. Je ne fais que proposer l'autre option.

Le président:

Est-ce que quelqu'un s'oppose à ce que la réunion de jeudi soit prolongée d'une demi-heure et à ce que Mme Malcolmson vienne? Nous pourrons prendre une décision après son départ.

Des députés: Non.

Le président: D'accord, c'est réglé.

Merci.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on November 07, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.