header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-12-07 PROC 84

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1200)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

We're going to start a minute early because we have such a great witness here.

Welcome to the 84th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, as we continue to study the creation of an independent commissioner responsible for leaders' debates.

If it's okay I'd like to just pass our routine budget for our meals, witnesses, and so on, which was handed out. Does anyone have any objections to that? Anyone opposed?

Then it's carried. Thank you very much.

I'd like to welcome to the committee the esteemed Mr. Preston, the former chair of this committee. Welcome back, Mr. Preston.

We are pleased to be joined by Janet H. Brown, executive director of the United States Commission on Presidential Debates, who is appearing by video conference from Washington, D.C.

Thank you for participating in our study. I know the members of our committee have been anxiously awaiting your presentation, so we're really happy you're here today. You get to make some opening remarks, and then committee members get to ask questions.

The members will have seven minutes each to ask you questions and answers; the questions and the answers add up to the seven minutes.

Go ahead with your opening remarks, please.

Ms. Janet Brown (Executive Director, Commission on Presidential Debates):

Good day to everyone there. Thank you for this opportunity. It's a great honour to be discussing this issue with all of you, and I hope this next hour will be a productive one. I have very brief opening thoughts to share, and then I look forward to having the greatest amount of time focused on the questions that are of concern to you.

The Commission on Presidential Debates is an independent, non-partisan, not-for-profit organization based here in Washington, D.C. It is governed by an 11-person board of directors. We have no ties to the federal government or to any political party or campaigns. We receive no public funding from the government or from party sources. We are not congressionally chartered. We look the way we do in large part because there are rules that are enforced by the Federal Election Commission that govern debate sponsorship during the general election period, meaning the last two months after the nominating conventions.

One rule is that a debate sponsor needs to be either a media organization or a not-for-profit, which is what we are. If you are not, you then are in peril of violating campaign contribution laws. In either case—a media or a not-for-profit—you must have pre-published objective criteria to determine who will be invited to debate. Ours are generally issued one year before the debates. We were started in 1987, and we have both sponsored and produced all of the debates since then. Obviously, there are three very important, large constituencies when it comes to debates. One is the public. Two is the participants. Three is the media that both disseminate the signal and cover the debates.

The commission is here to represent the public. It is obviously a part of doing debates that you need to coordinate and work very carefully with the media, whether it's about selecting dates for the debates, or about their coverage. We work very closely with federal law enforcement. We work with the campaigns. Our main constituents are the public. If the debates do not educate the public and help them make an informed decision on the candidates, they have not succeeded.

All of our debates have been 90 minutes long. In the last four to five weeks of the general election period, they are carried without interruption, commercial or otherwise, by all of the major networks under what we refer to as the White House pool basis. I can comment on this if this is of interest, but essentially it means that the cameras that are in the debate hall are owned by one network. They are putting out a signal that is picked up and broadcast by any member of the pool. It can also be purchased by non-members of the pool for a reasonable fee.

The CPD selects the dates, the venues, the formats, and the moderators, and decides who will participate in the debates. We do not lobby, poll, represent candidates' positions on the issues, or work on any kind of effort that is designed to either encourage people to register or to get out and vote. We have a very narrow charter that was in the original documents filed with the District of Columbia to incorporate the commission in 1987. That really summarizes who we are, what we do, and the way we are organized. I would stop here and welcome your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. That's great.

It's great to have a model to listen to.

We'll first go to Ms. Tassi, for seven minutes of questions and answers.

Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Mr. Chair, please give me a signal when I've had about half my time, because I'm going to be sharing it with Ms. Sahota. That would be appreciated.

Thank you for your video testimony today.

Can you share with us how you think social media and online platforms can play a greater role in improving electors' access to debates?

(1205)

Ms. Janet Brown:

Social media essentially are media. They are commercial media companies. They have come onto the scene with a presence that has grown dramatically in the last few years. They play a significant role in engaging younger people in particular. One of the things we have tried to wrestle with, Ms. Tassi, is that in this country there has been an effort by social media to put themselves in a unique category that requires unique care and attention in terms of their ability to play a central role in the debates.

We believe there's no question that they should be accommodated in terms of space to be on site and covering debates. They clearly have significant capacity to bring to the discussion about issues that will be raised in the debates and leading up to the debates, and to have online discussions that would involve and engage people who otherwise may not find this interesting or accessible.

One needs to remember that at the end of the day, a debate-sponsoring organization is in the business of at least a couple of important things. One is securing the agreement of the candidates to participate. Without that, there are no debates. The second is focusing on formats that will create the most informative content that you can, and then saying to media companies of whatever variety, “Please cover this. Please engage your audiences in the lead-up to the debates. Please use this in any way that you believe will excite people about learning more about the candidates and the issues.”

At least for a very small organization like we are, it's important to let the social media companies take the lead on how they can do that in the sphere they are present and thriving in.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Further to that, what would you suggest or share with this committee with respect to the success of bringing all the parties together? Are there certain tips or advice you can give us in terms of ensuring that the partners are able to work together in getting information out to the public, that, for example, as many broadcasters are carrying it as possible, that there's buy-in, and that people are happy?

Can you share with us the structure of what you have set up, what you have learned from it, and the successes you've had in that?

Ms. Janet Brown:

The media are inherently competitors. They all want each of us to come to their outlet to consume news, entertainment, or whatever kind of programming it is.

It has been very important for us to make sure that every member of the media, whether they are new or old, print or electronic, online or otherwise, knows that what we do can be trusted, that it is neutral, professionally produced, fair to all participants in a given debate, and that there is no thumb on the scale when it comes to selecting moderators or formats that may be seen as giving one participant or another a leg up, an advantage. It is something that we work at very assiduously.

When we pick dates, for instance, we realize that we are going into a time of year that is particularly busy and important for networks. They are starting new programming, doing the baseball playoffs, and starting the football series.

I've learned a lot from reading all of the testimony by your previous witnesses. Clearly, whether it's hockey in Canada or the World Series here, those are very valuable time slots that you are asking commercial entities to give over to carrying a debate in real time. There are inevitably conflicts, and there will be times when you discover that a major television network has a contractual obligation that they cannot avoid. It is interesting that some of our highest viewership has occurred even when one of the major networks had to carry a baseball playoff game because they had that contract with Major League Baseball.

I think the bottom-line answer to your question is that it is extremely important to approach these media entities early to explain the process, to hear their concerns and input, to try to reconcile their concerns with decisions that are made about the debates, and to get key decisions made very early and announced early. We announced the dates and venues for the debates a year ahead of time because, to some extent, certainty helps in terms of all of these other entities doing planning.

Our teamwork with the networks is extremely important to us. In spite of what one of your witnesses who comes from that world said about our being a sham and a racket, I would hope that members of the White House television network pool would say that they think dealing with the commission is straight up and honest. There are no surprises. There are no secrets. We try to hear their concerns and to be as accommodating as it's possible to be.

In the United States anyway, there is no night that isn't someone's sacred cow, and you are going to run into nights that have big commercial value to the networks. That's just a fact, but that is one of the reasons why, in having networks serve as debate sponsors, there is an inherent conflict: they want to be profitable entities. They have the right to want that, but it means that when you're trying to sponsor a debate, there's an inherent conflict built into that.

(1210)

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay. Thank you.

I'm sorry, but we've eaten up all the time, so we'll have Ms. Sahota in the next round.

The Chair:

Okay. Thank you very much.

You can rest assured that we don't think you're a sham and a racket, or we wouldn't have you here today.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you, Ms. Brown, for joining us via video conference today. It's great to have your insights from south of the border.

I want to start with some of the more logistics-type issues of the commission. Obviously the commission's work would ramp up in an election year versus a non-election year. Does the commission have permanent staff outside of an election year? How would that compare to an election year in terms of the amount of staff the commission may have?

Ms. Janet Brown:

You're looking at the permanent staff, Mr. Nater?

Mr. John Nater:

Yes.

Ms. Janet Brown:

At the moment, I have the great privilege of having an assistant that is running circles around me: we are it.

We will have a grand total of maybe five people in the office when we are at full strength, but we have an outside production staff that has roughly seven key leaders to it, starting with our executive producer. When their teams are put together, it's a production staff of roughly 65 people. They are all professionals in the area of television. They have their own companies. They do very high-stakes live TV, ranging from the opening of the Olympics to states of the union, summit conferences.

They come together to do our production and they're involved as need be, with increasing time devoted to this, obviously, as you get closer to the debates themselves. The commission has outside legal counsel, financial, and accounting, but it's a very small operation.

Mr. John Nater:

Are the production staff affiliated at all with private broadcasters or are they independent of the private broadcasters?

Ms. Janet Brown:

They are independent.

Mr. John Nater:

Okay. Very good.

You mentioned that you receive no public funding for the work you do. What's the order of magnitude in terms of the cost of the commission during an election year, and where would that funding typically come from?

Ms. Janet Brown:

Debate year to debate year, obviously, it goes up. There is a now a lot of security required, and it didn't used to be. In 2016 an individual debate cost just shy of $2 million, which, as those of you who are television experts know, is extremely inexpensive television.

We raise our money from any sources that would be permitted for us as a not-for-profit organization under the Internal Revenue Service designation that we qualify for, so essentially our fundraising is done the same way that an educational or a religious entity would do it. We raise the money from foundations, corporations, and sometimes individuals, and the money for each debate itself.... We have held almost all of them on college and university campuses, given the fact it's very consistent with the educational purpose of the debates. When we go to a campus, that campus is asked to raise the funds that their debate will cost. Those funds are paid to the commission and in return we pay all the bills.

The budget varies depending on how much money we can raise in an individual debate cycle. We like to have a cushion so that we're enabled to do some educational work and, increasingly, to do the inspiring work we're doing with a 32-member network of international debate organizations that are all NGOs, many from emerging democracies that want to start their own debate traditions, having watched the U.S.

(1215)

Mr. John Nater:

We understand that the memorandums of understanding, the contracts between the commission and the two parties, are typically not released to the public. How does the commission deal with requests to release those MOUs? What's the reasoning behind keeping those MOUs confidential?

Ms. Janet Brown:

It's easy for us, Mr. Nater, because we in fact are not parties to the MOUs. That is a common misunderstanding. We have nothing to do with them. Quite often, the campaigns will do an MOU that addresses a variety of issues, including items such as what use can be made of debate footage, for example, can it be used in campaign ads or for other uses?

The commission has never been a party to those agreements and never will be. It is entirely up to the campaigns as to whether they choose to release the MOU. I think that in some cases they don't want to release it because some of the provisions look a little bit less than monumental in their scale of concern given the importance of this election contest.

Mr. John Nater:

You mentioned in your opening comments as well that there's an 11-member board of directors at the commission. Would you be able to share with us how those members are appointed and who is typically sought to fill that 11-person board?

Ms. Janet Brown:

The commission was the direct result of a study that was conducted at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in 1985, which was co-chaired by former secretary of defence Melvin Laird and former DNC party chairman Robert Strauss. It was a 40-person body that studied a number of different election-related issues, including debates. The one item they reached consensus on was that there should be an independent entity that does nothing but debates, that does not do anything else that might pose a conflict.

The original members of the commission board were largely chosen from that group of people, which was a 40-person group that included leadership from all the different sectors of society. There is a provision in the bylaws that says there will be a nominating committee within the commission's structure that will look at names of people who might be recruited to serve on the commission.

One of your witnesses mentioned that we are “bipartisan”. We are non-partisan, and I think that right now the board is probably evenly divided between Republicans, Democrats, and independents in terms of how they would self-identify.

We look for people who have had some experience that would make political debates at this level a familiar experience, who understand that they have to be completely neutral in their decisions regarding the debates and the participants, and that even if they have previously been involved in partisan politics, this is a place where, to quote current and founding co-chairman Frank Fahrenkopf, no one wears a party hat: they wear a U.S. of A. hat. You look for people who will understand that this is an unusual role to be playing during a general election. It is one that people feel strongly enough about that they're willing to take part in what are quite often some very difficult decisions and criticism.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now I'd like to welcome to the committee former House leader, the Honourable Peter Van Loan, and also Pierre-Luc Dusseault.

Now we'll go to Mr. Dusseault from the New Democratic Party. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault (Sherbrooke, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I am always happy to be at this committee.

I'd like to go back to the context and history that preceded the foundation of your non-profit organization. I am interested in how you went about ensuring your credibility.

In Canada, it would not be easy to create such an organization and attempt to demonstrate its credibility with political parties to organize or supervise debates.

How did your non-profit organization historically ensure its credibility in regard to organizing debates?

(1220)

[English]

Ms. Janet Brown:

Monsieur Dusseault, that is a very good question. The entity that had sponsored the debates in the three cycles before the commission was created was the League of Women Voters, which is also a not-for-profit. The league does lobbying and represents issues, and that gets into the realm of what candidates have to say on those issues.

The commission was seen as a way to strip away any other activity, but the task that you ask about was difficult. It was not without a great deal of effort on our part to try to explain who we were and who we weren't, and to say that we were going to try very hard to gain the trust of the broadcasters, the campaigns, and the public to put debates on that would be seen as absolutely neutral and absolutely fair.

The League of Women Voters was understandably not happy to see a competitor enter the playing field, and one thing we wanted to do was to be extremely respectful of the groundbreaking role they had played. I am happy to say that the co-chair of the commission's board right now is Dorothy Ridings, who used to be head of the League of Women Voters.

It is a task that there is no manual for. If you are going to create a new entity like this, which is playing a huge, visible, and important role in a national election, you basically need to think very carefully about what the public face of that organization is going to be and how it is going to explain what it is doing.

I would argue one of the handicaps we had to overcome was our name. It sounds as though the commission is a part of the federal government. We are not, which is a good thing, but the answer is, it is difficult.

One thing I would like to say is that depending on how you go forward, please consider the CPD at the disposal of your committee and your colleagues. If there is ever any way in which we can save you some of the aspirin we've had to take over the years, we would be honoured to. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Thank you.

The other topic I'd like to raise is the room you make for more marginal parties. During the last presidential election, there was more attention focused on independent candidates.

How did you handle requests from independent parties? This could potentially be an irritant in Canada. In Canada, there may be more diverse political parties. It would potentially be irritating that certain parties not have the right to take part in debates.

Did you have to deal with this issue in connection with recent debates? How did you respond? [English]

Ms. Janet Brown:

It may surprise you to know that in 2016, approximately 150 people registered with the Federal Election Commission as candidates for president of the United States.

We have criteria that are applied to anyone whose name has been registered with the FEC or who appears on any single state ballot in the U.S. Those criteria in the last few cycles have been three: constitutional eligibility to run and serve as the president of the United States; a chance to mathematically win the electoral college vote, because that's what matters here at the end of the day, as you know; and the candidate must meet 15% support in the polls approximately two weeks before the first debate.

That 15% is arrived at by taking five national polls that tend to be jointly conducted by newspapers and the large television networks. We average those polls—they need to be based on a very large sample survey—and see whether or not anyone, including the major party nominees, has met the 15%. If they have, they are included in the debate. The criteria are reapplied after each debate before the next debate, so that if someone's position changes, we can accommodate that.

Our debates take place in the last four weeks of the general election. You are right: there are a lot of other party candidates who would like very much to get air time. Increasingly in this country there are forums on different media outlets, particularly C-SPAN, that afford that opportunity and, of course, in particular, social media is a place where it is very cost-efficient to get your message out if you are a small candidate.

The short answer to your question is that the commission is chartered only to do general election debates between candidates who meet its FEC-mandated criteria. We cannot do anything that is especially targeted to accommodate candidates who do not meet that criteria.

(1225)

The Chair:

Quickly, could you tell us the percentages that the Republican candidate and the Democratic candidate had two weeks before the last election?

Ms. Janet Brown:

It was significantly more than 15%. If you would like the exact numbers, I would be happy to give them to you. They were both in excess of 40%.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for being here today. Your testimony is fascinating.

What keeps coming to mind is along the lines of what was said by my colleague from the NDP. We're trying to figure out where the authority would come from. In your commission, where does your authority come from? What if one of the main presidential candidates were to back off, to back out and say “this isn't for me”? What if she decided that she wanted a women's league to hold the debates? What would you do in that kind of situation?

Ms. Janet Brown:

Not only could that happen, it has happened. It was very interesting to read the testimony and the questions from the committee on that issue particularly, because the fact is that at the end of the day there's only one lever that matters in debates: what the public wants.

When it appears that a candidate is balking and in fact perhaps says they're not going to one or more of the debates, the public outcry here is huge and very swift. I would argue that this is actually a much bigger enforcement mechanism than saying that person will be denied funding or advertising time, or that there will some kind of a sanction. These debates are now expected by the public, which I should think would be the case in Canada, given your long history.

In particular, some of your witnesses have talked about the fact that for the average citizen who is not following politics every second, it's towards the end of the campaigns, the end of the general election time, that many people are in fact paying attention, and this is when they want to hear from these candidates. If it looks as though the candidates are saying that they have better things to do, that they don't want to do this and they'll use a competing invitation as a reason not to do it, people get angry, and that anger will manifest itself very quickly, because their basic feeling is, “What do you have to do that is more important?”

The debates in the United States are, I would argue, the last event that belongs to the public. The conventions are preplanned, and certainly most of us could never go to one just because we decided we wanted to. The ads are produced. Campaign stops are prescreened. The debates belong to the public, and they take place without filters: this is listening to the candidates directly.

The public outcry is very quick, and I think that's a very good thing. There has been talk in this country of legislation mandating debates, particularly perhaps tied to federal funding: that if you are a candidate receiving federal funding, you must debate. I think the common wisdom is that legislation like that would probably be deemed unconstitutional.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Really?

Ms. Janet Brown:

It would be the reverse of free speech. It would be mandated speech.

The other concern that you can well imagine in this country is that if Congress got into the business of defining what a debate sponsor should look at, it would not stop with simply setting it up. It would come with a long list of what—

(1230)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Well, my next question, Ms. Brown, was going to be along those lines. You're covering fantastic material. I know that you're mentioning some of the objections to having it legislated, but do you see any value in having it legislated?

Ms. Janet Brown:

I do not because of what I was going to say, which is that I think it would actually make the process much more rigid. I think it would be irresistible for the legislative body not to put in a lot of detail about how many debates, what schedule, what format, and how they would be run.... That, I would argue, might inhibit a debate sponsor's ability to be flexible as technology changes, as—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What if legislation were to legislate an independent commission or commissioner to create a framework with maybe a more flexible, loose mandate that there had to be one debate, at least one debate in each official language, and maybe some parameters, but leaving room for flexibility and for the commission to decide, through an arm's-length process, how these debates would be conducted? They would then negotiate with moderators, media, and other stakeholders as to how the debates would take place and when and where.

Ms. Janet Brown:

I think it is something that you should definitely look at; it may well be the right way to go.

In this country, I think it would have been problematic. Perhaps the single reason that it would be the most problematic is that Congress, for the most part, is a partisan organization. It's very important that a debate sponsor be open to any candidate and any party and be strictly non-partisan. I think it would be difficult.... I know it would be difficult.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Along those lines, I have another question. You mentioned something interesting, which was that the average cost of a debate is about $2 million. You fundraise for the funds that your not-for-profit has, or companies and corporations are responsible for some of that funding you receive. Do people see that as somewhat of a conflict of interest at times? Can that be perceived as a conflict of interest?

Ms. Janet Brown:

They can see it that way until they understand that in return for the donation that anyone is making to us, they get nothing. They get no access to the campaigns or the candidates, and they get no input on any of our decisions, so there is no conflict. In fact, it is remarkable to see what motivates the foundations and corporations that give to us. They think this is an important piece of our civic education process, and that's why they do it.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What kinds of corporations come forward to donate to the commission? For example, is it academic institutions? You were saying that if you hold the debate at an academic institution, they're responsible for the funding. If you hold it at another venue, are various other stakeholders coming forward or do you think it's still mostly the academic community that sees the value in this commission?

Ms. Janet Brown:

No. It's very broad. Academic institutions see the value because, needless to say, it is bringing a historic event to their campuses that hundreds if not thousands of their students can volunteer in and have an opportunity that they would never have otherwise. They certainly see it. Corporations see it.

We have a wide range of entities that have participated in contributing to our work. It is not a huge list, because the fact of the matter is that we can't do very much for them, but it is a list of companies that over the years have ranged from telecommunications companies to airlines and car companies. It's a very wide range of entities that see this as something that they believe is an important and valuable part of our democracy.

(1235)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll now go to the Honourable Peter Van Loan.

Hon. Peter Van Loan (York—Simcoe, CPC):

In the last presidential cycle, how many presidential debates took place?

Ms. Janet Brown:

There were three presidential and one vice-presidential.

Hon. Peter Van Loan:

Were they all under your auspices?

Ms. Janet Brown:

Yes.

Hon. Peter Van Loan:

I think you alluded to occasions when candidates have said.... Have there have been other debates since you've been established that have taken place outside your auspices and have been broadcast?

Ms. Janet Brown:

No.

Hon. Peter Van Loan:

You don't do the primary ones. Is that right?

Ms. Janet Brown:

That's correct.

Hon. Peter Van Loan:

Okay.

You said something that I thought was very interesting. You said that one of the handicaps you face is that the name of the commission makes it sound like it is part of the federal government. Can you elaborate on why that is a handicap and how that impairs your ability to do your job, or on what is the perception that you say results from it?

Ms. Janet Brown:

Simply, I think “commission” is actually a really lovely word, but in most countries, and certainly in this country, I think it implies that there has been an official commission given to a person or an entity. In this country, it leads people to assume that we are congressionally chartered and probably congressionally funded. We are neither, as I've made clear.

I don't think it has handicapped our work, thankfully, but it does create an initial misimpression with some people, because they assume that all that they see when a debate starts in fact has been funded by the federal government. It does not occur to them that we are a not-for-profit and we need to raise our own operating funds.

Hon. Peter Van Loan:

If somebody has that impression that you're funded by the federal government, why would that be a bad thing?

Ms. Janet Brown:

It's not—

Hon. Peter Van Loan:

You say it's a handicap. Why would it be a bad thing?

Ms. Janet Brown:

If we go to someone and say that we were wondering if they would like to support our educational work, or the work that is involved in putting on the debates, and they ask why they would need to do that because we are federally funded and obviously federally chartered, it's simply one more briefing requirement that you need to go through to have them understand that this is not what we are.

Hon. Peter Van Loan:

It's not that you think it would be a bad thing for a government entity to run it.

Ms. Janet Brown:

No. I am not saying that it's a bad thing. I think if we're—

Hon. Peter Van Loan:

If Congress came to you and said, “We've decided we're going to fund you; we're going to pass a law and this is going to be the new independent commission”, what would you anticipate your response would be to such an initiative, if it came out of Congress?

Ms. Janet Brown:

That would be a big question. It would be one that the board would have to consider very carefully. It wouldn't be that easy. We are a legal entity. For Congress to come and say that would be a totally de novo issue that would have to be addressed.

I am not saying that I think it is a bad concept for you to explore. I think in this country it's a good thing that the commission was established and has run as an independent, non-partisan entity.

Hon. Peter Van Loan:

Let's say Congress said that they're setting up their own commission to replace you—not to take over you—because they think that would be better. It would be publicly funded. It would level the playing field, and it would deal with these other perceptions that another member asked you about. How would you respond to that kind of initiative?

Ms. Janet Brown:

I don't know. That's a very complicated question. One would have to sit down and try to figure out the responsible way to answer it.

Our commitment is to make sure the debates happen. Very early in our first year, I had reason to be in the office of a very senior United States senator with a very senior member of the United States House, who is now an international household word. We were discussing the fact that the League of Women Voters was not very happy about the fact that we had been started. There was some pleading going on about the fact that we should co-sponsor these with the league, that there were different issues designed to try to make it all gentler than it seemed to be going. I will never forget what the senator, a rather colourful western senator, said. I will not repeat it right now, but you can probably imagine, he—

(1240)

Hon. Peter Van Loan:

You can't tempt us like that and then not share.

Ms. Janet Brown:

Yes, I know. It's sad.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Ms. Janet Brown: He turned to his House colleague and said, “You know, the American public doesn't give a”—blank, blank—“who sponsors them. They just want to know they will happen.” There was silence for a few seconds after that, while we all tried not to giggle or feign offence. It was a cogent point that only a westerner could have made with the colourful accent that he put on it.

The point was not to get caught up in the mooring lines. Let's try to make sure that we are focused on.... Look, these debates need to happen. They need to happen predictably. They need to happen in a way the public believes is fair.

Hon. Peter Van Loan:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll now go to Mr. Bittle for five minutes.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thanks very much.

Ms. Brown, thank you for agreeing to help us out on this issue.

We heard from the broadcasters. In your comments you mentioned the concerns of American broadcasters with the date on which you were deciding to air the debates.

What goes into your decision? Our broadcasters came and said to please find the hole in the schedule, so to speak, because that would potentially create a greater audience.

How do you deal with Monday night football, the World Series, and the popular hit TV show on at that time? How do you address those concerns?

Ms. Janet Brown:

Mr. Bittle, we try to spread the pain.

We try first of all not to have two debates on any one night, no two debates on a Tuesday, for instance. It's not just the networks' commitments, it is also federal and religious holidays, obviously, in October. It is a very, very difficult task. I've had some very colourful conversations with senior network executives who don't think we quite understand what we're doing here.

Last time I actually volunteered to make one of America's most loved colour commentators on NFL the debate moderator, which didn't seem to go over at that network with the amusement that I thought it carried, but whatever.

You sit down basically 18 to 20 months ahead of time, and try very hard to look at what you can know. Here's one of the dilemmas: Built into the baseball series schedule are travel and rain days. What happens if it's done in five games? What happens if it goes to six or seven games? You inevitably are going to run into something. You just are. We try to run into the fewest number of things. We try to keep open lines of communication. If someone wants to call and use colourful language to say how they feel about it, they are more than welcome to do that.

It's inevitable that you will run into something. You just try to do it in a way that is fair and respectful.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

My time is fairly limited. Are there any potential pitfalls or concerns that your organization runs into that you'd like to highlight for us? That's a bit of an open question, I know, but is there any advice we haven't discussed that you've seen in your work and would like to pass on to our committee?

Ms. Janet Brown:

No one ever says, “Attagirl.” No one writes us and says, “Wow, that was so great. Thank you. Please keep it up.”

You know this: you are all in public service. You will hear from the critics. You will get beat up a lot. It is very important to try to keep the focus on what the main event is.

For us, it's to make sure the debates happen, and that they happen in a way that is respectful, dignified, and substantive. The rest of it, you have to try to navigate. In our case, it's very helpful that this is all we do. We don't do anything else. We also are mindful that we aren't here to win popularity contests.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

How much time is left, Mr. Chair? One minute.

I'll pass it on to Mr. Graham.

(1245)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you. I have one very short question.

You talked earlier about working with 32 debate commissions around the world. I'm wondering if you can tell me more about who they are and what you do with them.

Ms. Janet Brown:

Yes. In fact, I would invite you all to go to our website, debatesinternational.org, and there you will see the members and the information exchange, which is the focus of our work. We have a number of South American entities involved. We did a lot of work in Argentina two years ago. In fact, a colleague of mine and I just got back from Mexico City, where a conversation along these lines is also happening. Interestingly, as you may well know, their election authority is the debate sponsor, and it's something that they are wrestling with in terms of whether to go forward that way.

We have quite a number of countries in Africa that are doing extremely brave and pioneering work, particularly Ghana. We have Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, and a number of the former Soviet Union countries. Serbia has done some really revolutionary work in format. These are very brave people. We're all equals learning from each other.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: Thank you.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

If I may, Mr. Chair, I have a very quick point.

If you do go to that website—and this is selfish and shameless self-promotion—you will see that we are the top story on debatesinternational.org. I encourage everyone to visit.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

That's very good to know. I'll repeat that: Canada is at the top of what, 38 countries?

I'm going to morph this into open format. I'll allow one question from any committee member.

Mr. Dusseault. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

There is a question I did not get a chance to ask earlier.

I would like to know, given that you represent the image of your organization, and its credibility and impartiality, how you were chosen. This is a situation we will probably experience here in Canada, when this organization is set up. No matter what the organization may be, it is always up to the person who represents it to ensure its credibility and neutrality.

I'd like to know how you were chosen, and what the process was.

Ms. Janet Brown:

That's something I wonder about myself.[English]

I had worked in the government for, I guess, 15 years when my name was submitted to the founding co-chairs as a possible staff director for the commission. Due to the fact that I had worked for individuals such as former ambassador Elliott Richardson and former senator John Danforth of Missouri, I think I was seen as somebody that hopefully would be credible to people on both sides of the aisle and, equally important, to people from the other parties that participate and were interested in this process. I had some media experience, and Washington is my original home.

It's not an easy task. I'm grateful that I was considered, but it's hard to find someone who will not be a flashpoint and will be someone who can be out front and try to explain to the public who this group is and why you should trust them.

The Chair:

How are the chairman of the board and the board selected?

Ms. Janet Brown:

The original board was selected as an outgrowth of that original study in 1985, the Strauss-Laird study. At the time, Paul Kirk and Frank Fahrenkopf were the chairs of the Democratic and Republican national committees respectively. They took steps to incorporate the commission and served as the founding chairs. They ended their partisan political service shortly thereafter, and there has never been any other tie between a board member and the political parties.

There is a nominating function that is outlined in the bylaws, which is internal to the board. There's a nominating committee, which is named by the chairs and consults inside and outside in looking for new members of the board.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Do other members have questions?

Parliamentary Secretary Fillmore.

(1250)

Mr. Andy Fillmore (Halifax, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you very much for your words today. It looks like what we're hearing from a number of witnesses—you may have learned this from your reading—is that a light and agile structure is the preferred structure in terms of something that will allow flexibility for who knows what...conditions may change in the future.

What you have learned, I guess, is what I want to ask you about. What would be the lightest sort of agile structure that might work for us? What key pieces need to be in place that would still allow flexibility?

Ms. Janet Brown:

When I saw that phrase in someone's testimony, I underlined it. I couldn't agree more. If you create something that is large, you've already given a management to-do list that may run into the actual task at hand. I think the lighter you can make it.... I guess it can't get too much lighter than two people, which is where we are, although for a long time it was one person, so that's a bit lighter.

I think the most important thing is to define the tasks and who and how many people you need to get that done. We all know that when you create a new organization you can go for broke with things that ideally one might think you would want or could use, but this is a unique business. I would argue that it's very important to define what you really need and what you need to do. There are debate variables that are out there; they're defined. It's the number of debates and the length of them: what do they look like and how do you get to where you need to be in terms of both sponsorship and production of those tasks?

Again, as I said, a lot of thought went into the commission. By the time I was hired, there had been two full years of work given to this. If we can share that in a way that helps inform your deliberations, I'd be delighted, but I think being light and agile is critical.

Mr. Andy Fillmore:

Do you feel that there is a right number of debates? Are there too many debates? Are there too few? Is there a right number that the public has an appetite for and will tune in for?

Ms. Janet Brown:

In our case, there has been a traditional observation of Labour Day as the start of the general election period. This means that we've never started the debates before the first week of September.

Also, there is a general reluctance on the part of the candidates to ever have a debate within 10 days to two weeks of the general election. There is a sense in some campaigns that debates freeze the campaign, and that the candidate has to stop and prepare and really focus on the debate.

Given all the other things that a campaign wants to get done during September and October, it has led us to believe that three presidential debates of 90 minutes apiece, without commercial interruption, is about right. In trying to go for four, there might be a problem to get candidate agreement, and I don't think two is enough to cover the number of topics that are key on both domestic and international policy.

Mr. Andy Fillmore:

To go one layer deeper yet, are they themed debates on the economy, the environment, etc.?

Ms. Janet Brown:

In the last two cycles, we have done something different that's worked very well. The first and last presidential debates have been divided into six 15-minute segments. Each of those segments is on a topic that the moderators select and announce roughly 10 days before the debate. The segment starts with a question that is posed to all of the debate participants. They have two minutes to respond, and the balance of the 15 minutes is used for a discussion, with minimal participation by the moderator. In the last two cycles, those have in fact been divided between domestic and foreign topics. That is the way it has worked.

It's not an open-book exam, but it does allow the candidates to understand that these are going to focus on the salient issues and what they are.

The Chair:

Can you remind us who chooses the topics, who writes the questions, who chooses the moderator, and what the conditions are for a moderator to be chosen?

Ms. Janet Brown:

In the reverse order, we choose the moderators, and we use three criteria in that process: number one, someone who is intimately familiar with the candidates and their positions on the issues; number two, someone who has had extensive experience in live TV; and number three, someone who will understand that, for better or for worse, they are not on the ballot. They are there to facilitate, not to compete. The moderators alone choose and know the questions. The commission does not know. The candidates do not know.

(1255)

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Earlier you said that the threshold is set at 15% for participation in debates.

Ms. Janet Brown:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Why is it so high?

Ms. Janet Brown:

If you are not at 15% support in the polls four weeks before the election, I think history would show that there is virtually no chance you will be elected by the amount of the American public that would be needed for that. Many of you may be familiar with the experience of the League of Women Voters in 1980 when John Anderson, who had been a member of the United States House of Representatives from Illinois, was running as an independent. He was invited by the league to participate in the first debate with then Governor Reagan. President Carter, the incumbent, declined to participate because he basically said he was not going to share the stage with someone who was not a majority and not a competitive candidate. So the first debate was Mr. Reagan and Mr. Anderson. The league reapplied the criteria after that first debate, and Mr. Anderson did not meet the criteria. The second and only debate between Mr. Carter and Mr. Reagan took place thereafter.

There is always the risk that a candidate who has a great deal of support will decline to participate if they believe that a candidate who does not have a realistic chance of being elected has been included in a debate in the last three to four weeks of the campaign. This is simply the way the commission has done it. There are people who think that it should be much lower, or that it should be based on ballot access and not on percentage support. If a debate sponsor came forth and said they wanted to sponsor debates using different criteria, they would have every right to do that. There is nothing that says that the commission is the only entity that could put forth a proposal, but this is where our board of directors has come out on this issue. It is thoroughly reviewed, by the way, in between every series of debates to see whether it needs to be altered.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I have three quick questions.

Are the members of the 11-person board compensated?

Ms. Janet Brown:

They are not.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

They are not. Okay.

What's your overall yearly budget? Are you able to share that?

Ms. Janet Brown:

I honestly don't have a number that would represent an accurate number once you take out all of the educational and other issues, but it's well under a million dollars.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay.

How do you evaluate at the end, in terms of doing better and self-improvement and so on? Is there a mechanism...?

Ms. Janet Brown:

Absolutely. We do studies on things ranging from production to.... As I said, there's a review of the candidate selection criteria. We talk to the debate venues and ask what happened that could be improved. We talk to law enforcement. We talk to the media. We talk to the moderators. We do a complete review of what happened, and after action reports to see where we can work on things to make them better the next time. We review formats after every cycle.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Monsieur Dusseault. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Could the debate, audio and video, be royalty-free, so that anyone could use it and broadcast it free of charge, in all or in part?

Is that a possibility? [English]

Ms. Janet Brown:

That is a question for the television networks, because the fact is the way we do this on a White House pool basis means that the signal that is transmitted, the actual broadcast, belongs to the White House pool. They are putting money into each debate in the form of the cameras, the cameramen, the production truck, and the transmission of the signal. That cost is shared by members of the pool, so it is entirely their decision as to whether they would waive even a nominal fee and say that it could be made available to anybody with no charge. Needless to say, social media companies have been pushing for some time to say that they are owed that, but that is a decision for the members of the White House television pool to make.

(1300)

The Chair:

Do you have a backup generator in case of a power failure?

Ms. Janet Brown:

We have triple redundancy on every element that goes into the debate hall.

I don't know if any of you saw the 1976 debate between Mr. Ford and Mr. Carter in Philadelphia or have seen video of it. The power failed, and there was a 27-minute silence on the stage. I needn't tell any of you how excruciating that would be, if you were in a debate of that level of magnitude, to be standing there for 27 minutes wondering what exactly had happened.

I had to laugh. Two Super Bowls ago when there was a power failure in New Orleans and a large part of the stadium went dark, I said to my husband, “I give it 45 seconds.” He said, “Forty-five seconds to what?” I said, “Until my engineer emails me and says 'not on our watch, it wouldn't have happened'”. It was about 30 seconds.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Ms. Janet Brown: The answer is absolutely, you have backup systems on backup systems.

The Chair:

It sounds like you're a very efficient administrator. Thank you very much for appearing today. It's been very helpful for us. I think it will be a big part of our deliberations.

Ms. Janet Brown:

Thank you. It's a privilege.

The Chair:

To the committee, for our meeting next Tuesday, December 12, which is our last scheduled meeting for this year, we have Twitter and La Presse currently scheduled. We're waiting to hear back from TVA and the Huffington Post. In the second hour, we will be giving drafting instructions to our analysts.

There's another thing for people to think about, not right now but over Christmas if you want to. After our 18 votes the other night, if you want to revisit the discussion we had on electronic voting when we were discussing the Standing Orders—

An hon. member: Applied voting.

The Chair: —or applied voting, keep that in your Christmas package.

Is there anything else for the good of the nation? Okay.

Tuesday will be our last meeting. Is everyone agreed? We'll give instructions and come back....

Also, Trinidad and Tobago couldn't be reached for today, but we're going to try to get them to the first or second meeting when we come back.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We have 29 more countries to talk to.

The Chair:

Yes, right—out of order.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1200)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Nous commençons une minute plus tôt, car nous accueillons un témoin fantastique.

Bienvenue à la 84e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Aujourd'hui, nous poursuivons notre étude sur la création d'un commissaire indépendant chargé des débats des chefs.

Si vous êtes d'accord, j'aimerais que nous adoptions notre budget courant pour nos repas, nos témoins, etc. Il vous a été distribué. Quelqu'un y voit-il des objections? Y a-t-il des opposants?

Dans ce cas, il est adopté. Merci beaucoup.

J'aimerais souhaiter la bienvenue à l'éminent M. Preston, ancien président de ce comité. Bienvenue, monsieur Preston.

Nous sommes heureux d'accueillir Janet H. Brown, directrice générale de la Commission sur les débats présidentiels des États-Unis, qui comparaît par vidéoconférence de Washington, D.C.

Nous vous remercions de participer à notre étude. Je sais que les membres de notre comité attendaient votre comparution avec impatience, et nous sommes donc très heureux de vous accueillir aujourd'hui. Vous pourrez livrer un exposé et les membres du Comité vous poseront ensuite des questions.

Les membres du Comité auront chacun sept minutes pour vous poser des questions et entendre les réponses. Les questions et les réponses sont comprises dans les sept minutes.

Je vous invite maintenant à livrer votre exposé.

Mme Janet Brown (directrice exécutive, Commission on Presidential Debates):

Bonjour tout le monde. Je vous remercie de me donner l'occasion de comparaître. C'est un grand honneur de discuter de cet enjeu avec vous tous, et j'espère que la prochaine heure sera productive. J'ai un bref exposé à livrer, et je consacrerai le plus de temps possible aux questions qui vous préoccupent.

La Commission sur les débats présidentiels est un organisme indépendant, non partisan et sans but lucratif et il est situé ici, à Washington, D.C. Il est dirigé par un conseil d'administration composé de 11 personnes. Nous n'avons aucun lien avec le gouvernement fédéral, avec les partis ou avec les campagnes. Nous ne recevons aucun financement public du gouvernement ou des sources des partis. Nous ne sommes pas mandatés par le Congrès. Notre identité est en grande partie attribuable aux règles appliquées par la Commission électorale fédérale qui régissent le parrainage des débats en période d'élection générale, c'est-à-dire les deux derniers mois après les conventions d'investiture.

Selon l'une de ces règles, le parrain d'un débat doit être un organisme médiatique ou un organisme à but non lucratif, et c'est ce que nous sommes. Dans le cas contraire, un organisme risquerait de violer les lois sur les contributions aux campagnes. Dans les deux cas — un organisme médiatique ou un organisme à but non lucratif —, il faut avoir une liste de critères objectifs préalablement publiée pour déterminer les participants qui seront invités au débat. Notre liste est habituellement publiée un an avant les débats. Nous avons commencé nos activités en 1987, et nous avons parrainé et produit tous les débats depuis ce temps. Manifestement, lorsqu'il s'agit des débats, il y a trois grands groupes très importants. Le premier est formé du public, le deuxième, des participants et le troisième, des médias qui diffusent et couvrent les débats.

La Commission représente le public. Visiblement, lors d'un débat, il est très important de coordonner et de collaborer minutieusement avec les médias, qu'il s'agisse de choisir les dates auxquelles se dérouleront les débats ou qu'il s'agisse de la couverture médiatique. Nous collaborons aussi étroitement avec les organismes d'application de la loi fédéraux. Nous travaillons avec les intervenants des campagnes. Notre groupe principal, c'est le public. Si les débats n'informent pas les membres du public en vue de les aider à prendre une décision éclairée au sujet des candidats, ils n'ont pas atteint leur objectif.

Tous nos débats durent 90 minutes. Pendant les quatre ou cinq dernières semaines de la période d'élection générale, ils sont diffusés sans interruption publicitaire ou d'une autre nature sur toutes les grandes chaînes dans le cadre de ce que nous appelons le bassin de la Maison-Blanche. Je peux vous en parler si cela vous intéresse, mais cela signifie essentiellement que les caméras qui se trouvent dans la salle des débats appartiennent à la même chaîne. Cette chaîne diffuse un signal qui est capté et rediffusé par tous les membres du bassin. Ce signal peut également être acheté, à un prix raisonnable, par des intervenants qui ne font pas partie du bassin.

La Commission sur les débats présidentiels choisit les dates, les salles, les formats et les modérateurs, ainsi que les participants au débat. Nous ne faisons aucun lobbying, nous ne menons aucun sondage, nous ne représentons la position d'aucun candidat sur les différents enjeux, et nous ne participons à aucun effort en vue d'encourager les gens à s'inscrire ou à aller voter. Nous avons une charte très restreinte qui se trouvait dans le document présenté au District de Columbia pour incorporer la Commission, en 1987. Cela résume vraiment qui nous sommes et ce que nous faisons, ainsi que la façon dont nous sommes organisés. Je vais m'arrêter ici, et je serai heureuse de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. C'est fantastique.

C'est formidable de pouvoir écouter la description d'un modèle.

Nous entendrons d'abord Mme Tassi. Elle a sept minutes pour les questions et les réponses.

Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Monsieur le président, veuillez me faire signe lorsque la moitié de mon temps sera écoulé, car je le partage avec Mme Sahota. Je vous en serais reconnaissante.

Je vous remercie de témoigner par vidéoconférence aujourd'hui.

Pouvez-vous nous donner votre avis sur la façon dont les médias sociaux et les plateformes en ligne peuvent jouer un rôle plus important lorsqu'il s'agit d'améliorer l'accès des électeurs aux débats?

(1205)

Mme Janet Brown:

Les médias sociaux sont essentiellement des médias. Ce sont des sociétés de médias commerciales. Leur présence s'est accrue de façon spectaculaire ces dernières années. Ils jouent un rôle important dans la participation des jeunes en particulier. L'une des notions que nous tentons de maîtriser, madame Tassi, c'est que dans notre pays, les médias sociaux se sont efforcés de se créer une catégorie unique qui requiert des soins et une attention uniques en raison de leur capacité de jouer un rôle de premier plan dans les débats.

Nous croyons qu'il ne fait aucun doute qu'on devrait accorder l'espace nécessaire aux médias sociaux sur le site, afin qu'ils puissent couvrir les débats. En effet, ils sont visiblement en mesure de lancer la discussion sur des enjeux qui seront soulevés dans les débats et pendant la période qui mène aux débats, et d'entretenir des discussions en ligne auxquelles participeront des gens qui pourraient autrement trouver ces discussions inintéressantes ou inaccessibles.

Il faut se rappeler qu'au bout du compte, un organisme qui parraine un débat accomplit au moins deux choses importantes. Tout d'abord, il faut obtenir la participation des candidats. Sans cela, il n'y a pas de débat. Deuxièmement, il faut trouver des formats qui permettront de créer le contenu le plus informatif possible, et convaincre ensuite les sociétés médiatiques de couvrir ces débats et de soulever l'intérêt des audiences avant la tenue des débats. Les médias peuvent utiliser tout ce qui peut pousser les gens à s'informer sur les candidats et les différents enjeux.

Dans le cas d'un très petit organisme comme le nôtre, il est important de laisser les sociétés de médias sociaux décider de la façon dont elles peuvent faire cela dans le milieu où elles évoluent et prospèrent.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

En plus de cela, que suggéreriez-vous ou que diriez-vous aux membres du Comité pour les aider à rassembler toutes les parties? Pouvez-vous nous donner certains conseils qui nous permettront de veiller à ce que tous les partenaires puissent collaborer en vue de diffuser l'information au public? Par exemple, comment pouvons-nous veiller à ce que le plus grand nombre possible de radiodiffuseurs transmettent l'information, afin que les gens la reçoivent et soient contents?

Pouvez-vous nous décrire la structure que vous avez établie et ce que vous avez appris, et nous parler de vos réussites dans le cadre de cette structure?

Mme Janet Brown:

Les médias sont intrinsèquement des concurrents. Ils veulent tous devenir notre source de nouvelles, de divertissement ou d'autres types émissions.

Nous avons trouvé qu'il était très important que chaque intervenant des médias, qu'il s'agisse de nouveaux ou d'anciens médias, de médias imprimés ou électroniques, en ligne ou autres, sache que ce que nous faisons est digne de confiance, que nous fonctionnons de façon neutre, que nous produisons de façon professionnelle, que nous sommes justes envers tous les participants de chaque débat, et que nous ne subissons aucune influence extérieure lorsqu'il s'agit de choisir les modérateurs ou des formats qui pourraient être perçus comme favorisant un participant ou un autre ou lui donnant un avantage. Nous préparons tout cela très sérieusement.

Lorsque nous choisissons des dates, par exemple, nous sommes conscients que nous entrons dans une période de l'année qui est particulièrement occupée et importante pour les différentes chaînes. En effet, elles lancent de nouvelles émissions, elles diffusent les éliminatoires du baseball et c'est le début de la saison de football.

J'ai appris beaucoup en lisant les témoignages de vos témoins précédents. Qu'il s'agisse de hockey au Canada ou des séries mondiales ici, ce sont visiblement des créneaux horaires très importants auxquels on demande aux entités commerciales de renoncer, afin de diffuser un débat en temps réel. Il y a inévitablement des conflits, et on découvre parfois qu'une grande chaîne de télévision a une obligation contractuelle à laquelle elle ne peut pas se soustraire. Il est intéressant de mentionner que certaines de nos cotes d'écoute les plus élevées ont été enregistrées pendant que l'une des grandes chaînes devait diffuser une partie de baseball des séries, car elle avait signé un contrat avec la Ligue nationale de baseball.

Je crois qu'au bout du compte, la réponse à votre question, c'est qu'il est extrêmement important de communiquer avec ces entités médiatiques dès le début pour leur expliquer ce processus, pour écouter leurs préoccupations et leur avis, pour tenter de réconcilier leurs préoccupations avec les décisions qui sont prises au sujet des débats, et pour pouvoir prendre et annoncer des décisions importantes très tôt dans le processus. Nous annonçons les dates et les endroits où se tiendront les débats un an à l'avance, car dans une certaine mesure, cela aide certainement ces autres entités à planifier leurs activités.

Notre travail d'équipe avec les grandes chaînes est extrêmement important pour nous. Même si l'un des témoins de ce milieu qui a comparu avant nous vous a dit que nous étions des imposteurs et des escrocs, j'espère que les membres du bassin du réseau de télévision de la Maison-Blanche affirmeraient qu'à leur avis, leurs échanges avec les membres de la Commission ont été directs et honnêtes. Il n'y a ni surprise ni secret. Nous tentons d'écouter leurs préoccupations et d'être aussi conciliants que possible.

Aux États-Unis, tous les soirs sont sacrés pour quelqu'un, et on devra empiéter sur des soirs qui ont une grande valeur commerciale pour les chaînes de télévision. C'est tout simplement un fait, mais c'est aussi l'une des raisons pour lesquelles, lorsque les grands réseaux servent de parrains aux débats, il y a un conflit inhérent, car ces entités existent pour faire des profits. Elles ont le droit, mais cela signifie que lorsqu'elles tentent de parrainer un débat, cela représente un conflit inhérent.

(1210)

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'accord. Merci.

Je suis désolée, mais le temps est écoulé. Nous entendrons donc Mme Sahota lors de la prochaine série de questions.

Le président:

D'accord. Merci beaucoup.

Soyez assurés que nous ne pensons pas que vous êtes des imposteurs et des voleurs, car si c'était le cas, nous ne vous aurions pas invités à comparaître aujourd'hui.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président: Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président. J'aimerais également remercier Mme Brown de comparaître par vidéoconférence aujourd'hui. Nous sommes très heureux d'entendre votre avis au sud de la frontière.

J'aimerais tout d'abord parler de certains des enjeux liés à la logistique de la Commission. Manifestement, la charge de travail de la Commission est plus élevée lors d'une année d'élection que lors d'une année sans élection. La Commission a-t-elle des employés permanents pendant les années sans élection? Comment ce nombre d'employés se compare-t-il à une année d'élection?

Mme Janet Brown:

Vous parlez des employés permanents, monsieur Nater?

M. John Nater:

Oui.

Mme Janet Brown:

En ce moment, j'ai le grand privilège d'avoir un assistant extrêmement compétent. Nous sommes les deux seuls employés.

Nous avons un grand total d'environ cinq employés lorsque notre équipe est complète, mais nous avons un personnel de production externe composé d'environ sept leaders principaux, en commençant par notre producteur délégué. Lorsque leurs équipes sont formées, le personnel de production compte environ 65 personnes. Ce sont tous des professionnels dans le domaine de la télévision. Ils ont leurs propres sociétés. Ils produisent de la télévision en direct aux heures de grande écoute, qu'il s'agisse des cérémonies d'ouverture des Jeux olympiques ou des discours à la nation, en passant par les sommets.

Ils nous aident à faire notre production et ils participent au besoin. Manifestement, ils nous consacrent plus de temps à mesure que nous nous rapprochons des débats. La Commission fait également appel à des services externes dans les domaines du droit, des finances et de la comptabilité, mais c'est une très petite opération.

M. John Nater:

Les employés de la production sont-ils affiliés aux radiodiffuseurs privés ou sont-ils indépendants?

Mme Janet Brown:

Ils sont indépendants.

M. John Nater:

D'accord. Très bien.

Vous avez mentionné que vous ne receviez aucun financement public pour vos activités. Quels sont les coûts de fonctionnement approximatifs de la Commission lors d'une année d'élection, et d'où ce financement provient-il habituellement?

Mme Janet Brown:

Ces coûts augmentent manifestement d'une année de débat à l'autre. Par exemple, il faut maintenant avoir beaucoup de sécurité, mais ce n'était pas le cas auparavant. En 2016, un débat individuel coûtait juste un peu moins de 2 millions de dollars, ce qui est extrêmement peu coûteux dans le domaine de la télévision, comme les experts en télévision parmi vous le savent.

Nous obtenons des fonds de toutes les sources auxquelles nous avons accès à titre d'organisme à but non lucratif en vertu de la désignation du Service interne du revenu à laquelle nous sommes admissibles. Nous amassons donc des fonds de la même façon qu'une entité éducative ou religieuse. Nous obtenons des fonds de fondations, d'entreprises et parfois de particuliers, et les fonds pour chaque débat... Nous les avons presque tous organisés dans des campus collégiaux ou universitaires, étant donné que ce milieu correspond très bien à l'objectif éducatif des débats. Lorsque nous nous installons sur un campus, nous demandons à ce campus d'amasser les fonds nécessaires pour payer les coûts de leur débat. Ces fonds sont versés à la Commission et en retour, et nous payons toutes les factures.

Le budget varie selon les sommes que nous pouvons amasser dans un cycle de débat. Nous aimons avoir une réserve, car cela nous permet de mener des activités éducatives et, de plus en plus, d'effectuer le travail inspirant que nous accomplissons à l'aide d'un réseau de 32 membres composé d'organisations internationales de débats qui sont toutes des ONG, et dont un grand nombre proviennent de démocraties émergentes qui souhaitent lancer leur propre tradition de débats après avoir regardé les débats aux États-Unis.

(1215)

M. John Nater:

D'après ce que nous comprenons, les protocoles d'entente et les contrats entre la Commission et les deux partis ne sont habituellement pas divulgués au public. Comment la Commission gère-t-elle les demandes de divulgation de ces protocoles d'entente? Comment justifie-t-on la confidentialité de ces protocoles d'entente?

Mme Janet Brown:

C'est facile pour nous, monsieur Nater, car nous ne participons pas aux protocoles d'entente. C'est une erreur fréquente. Nous n'avons rien à voir avec ces protocoles d'entente. Très souvent, les intervenants des campagnes rédigent un protocole d'entente qui vise une série d'enjeux, notamment des questions liées à l'utilisation des enregistrements des débats, par exemple, si on peut les utiliser dans des publicités dans le cadre d'une campagne ou pour d'autres raisons.

La Commission n'a jamais participé à ces protocoles d'entente et ne le fera jamais. Il revient entièrement aux intervenants des campagnes de décider s'ils divulgueront les protocoles d'entente. Je crois que dans certains cas, ils ne veulent pas les divulguer, car certaines dispositions leur causent énormément de préoccupations étant donné l'importance de l'élection.

M. John Nater:

Dans votre exposé, vous avez aussi mentionné que la Commission a un conseil d'administration comptant 11 membres. Pouvez-vous décrire le processus de nomination de ces membres et nous dire quelles sont les qualités recherchées chez les gens qui y sont nommés?

Mme Janet Brown:

La Commission a été créée dans la foulée d'une étude menée par le Center for Strategic and International Studies en 1985 sous la coprésidence de l'ancien secrétaire de la Défense, M. Melvin Laird, et de l'ancien président du comité national du Parti démocrate, M. Robert Strauss. Le Centre était un organisme comptant 40 membres qui a mené des études sur divers enjeux liés aux élections, y compris les débats. Le seul aspect qui a fait consensus était la nécessité d'avoir un organisme indépendant qui se chargerait exclusivement des débats et qui ne mènerait aucune autre activité pouvant entraîner des conflits.

Les membres initiaux du conseil d'administration de la Commission étaient principalement issus de ce groupe de 40 personnes, groupe qui comprenait des chefs de file de tous les secteurs de la société. Une disposition des règlements prévoit la création, au sein de la Commission, d'un comité de sélection chargé d'étudier les candidatures pour d'éventuels membres de la Commission.

Un des témoins que vous avez entendus a indiqué que nous sommes un organisme bipartisan. Nous sommes plutôt un organisme non partisan. Je dirais que sur le plan de l'orientation politique, l'effectif actuel du conseil est probablement réparti de façon égale entre républicains, démocrates et indépendants.

Nous recherchons des gens dont l'expérience pourrait contribuer à faire des débats politiques de ce niveau une expérience familière, des gens qui sont conscients de la nécessité de faire preuve d'impartialité totale dans la prise des décisions relatives aux débats et aux participants et qui savent que même s'ils ont été actifs en politique partisane dans le passé, ils se trouvent dans un endroit où — pour citer le coprésident fondateur et actuel président Frank Fahrenkopf —, personne ne représente un parti, mais tout le monde agit pour les États-Unis. On cherche des gens qui sont conscients qu'ils sont appelés à jouer un rôle inhabituel pendant une élection générale. Il faut des gens aux convictions assez solides pour accepter de jouer ce rôle, étant donné qu'ils auront souvent à prendre des décisions très difficiles et qu'ils seront souvent exposés aux critiques.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

J'aimerais maintenant accueillir au Comité un ancien leader à la Chambre, l'honorable Peter Van Loan, ainsi que M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Dusseault, du Nouveau Parti démocratique. [Français]

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault (Sherbrooke, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je suis toujours heureux de siéger à ce comité.

J'aimerais revenir sur le contexte et l'historique qui ont précédé la fondation et la création de votre organisation sans but lucratif. Je m'intéresse à la façon dont vous avez assuré votre crédibilité.

Au Canada, la création d'un tel organisme qui tenterait de démontrer sa crédibilité auprès des partis politiques pour organiser ou superviser les débats ne serait pas facile.

Comment votre association à but non lucratif a-t-elle, historiquement, assuré la crédibilité relativement à l'organisation des débats?

(1220)

[Traduction]

Mme Janet Brown:

Monsieur Dusseault, vous posez une excellente question. L'organisme qui a parrainé les débats dans les trois cycles électoraux précédant la création de la commission était la League of Women Voters, aussi un organisme sans but lucratif, qui mène des activités de lobbying et de défense des enjeux, notamment des enjeux dont les candidats pouvaient discuter.

La commission était perçue comme un mécanisme permettant d'empêcher toute autre activité, mais pour ce qui est du point que vous avez soulevé, cela a été difficile. Nous avons dû consacrer d'importants efforts pour expliquer notre rôle et pour faire valoir que nous travaillerions avec acharnement pour obtenir la confiance des diffuseurs, des responsables de campagne et du public afin d'organiser des débats qui seraient jugés comme tout à fait neutres et équitables.

Évidemment, la League of Women Voters ne voyait pas d'un bon œil l'arrivée d'un organisme concurrent dans ce domaine. Nous tenions à faire preuve d'un grand respect à l'égard du rôle novateur joué par cet organisme. C'est avec plaisir que je souligne que l'actuelle coprésidente du conseil d'administration de la commission est Mme Dorothy Ridings, une ancienne directrice de la League of Women Voters.

Il n'existe pas de manuel d'instruction pour ce genre de choses. Si vous choisissez de créer un tel organisme, un organisme qui sera appelé à jouer un rôle considérable et visible dans le cadre d'une élection nationale, vous devez réfléchir soigneusement à l'image publique que vous lui donnerez et à la façon dont il expliquera son rôle.

Je dirais qu'une de nos difficultés était liée au nom de notre organisme, qui donne l'impression que la commission fait partie du gouvernement fédéral. Ce n'est pas le cas, une chose, mais la réponse est que ce n'est pas une tâche facile.

Je tiens à préciser, quelle que soit votre décision, que le CPD demeure à l'entière disposition du Comité et de vos collègues. Si nous pouvons contribuer d'une façon quelconque à vous éviter d'avoir à consommer autant de cachets d'aspirine que nous en avons pris au fil des ans, nous serions honorés de le faire. [Français]

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Je vous remercie.

L'autre sujet que je voulais aborder est celui de la place que vous faites aux partis plus marginaux. Lors de la dernière élection présidentielle, un peu plus d'attention a été portée à des candidats indépendants.

Comment avez-vous traité les demandes des partis indépendants? Cela pourrait potentiellement être un irritant au Canada. Au Canada, il y a peut-être plus de diversité en ce qui a trait aux partis politiques. Ce serait potentiellement irritant que certains partis n'aient pas le droit de participer aux débats.

Lors des récents débats, avez-vous eu affaire à cette question? Quelle a été votre façon d'y répondre? [Traduction]

Mme Janet Brown:

Vous serez peut-être surpris d'apprendre qu'en 2016, environ 150 personnes se sont enregistrées à titre de candidat à la présidence des États-Unis auprès de la Federal Election Commission.

Nous avons des critères pour toute personne dont le nom est enregistré auprès de la FEC ou figure sur les bulletins de vote d'un État. Au cours des derniers cycles, nous avons appliqué trois critères. Premièrement, le candidat doit satisfaire aux exigences de la Constitution relatives à l'admissibilité à titre de candidat à la présidence des États-Unis et à l'exercice de cette fonction. Deuxièmement, il doit avoir des chances mathématiques de remporter le vote du collège électoral, puisque c'est le facteur déterminant dans ce pays, en fin de compte, comme vous le savez. Troisièmement, il doit avoir 15 % de l'appui populaire dans les sondages menés dans les deux semaines précédant le premier débat.

Ce pourcentage de 15 % est calculé d'après les résultats de cinq sondages nationaux, lesquels sont habituellement menés conjointement par les journaux et les principaux réseaux de télévision. Nous établissons une moyenne pour ces sondages, qui doivent être fondés sur un échantillonnage très large, pour déterminer si les candidats, y compris ceux des principaux partis, obtiennent un appui de 15 %. Si c'est le cas, ils participent aux débats. Nous reprenons cette démarche après chaque débat, mais avant le débat suivant, de façon à tenir compte des fluctuations de l'appui.

Les débats ont lieu dans les quatre dernières semaines de campagne d'une élection générale. Vous avez raison de dire que beaucoup de candidats d'autres partis aimeraient avoir plus de temps d'antenne. On trouve au pays de plus en plus de tribunes sur les différents médias qui permettent de le faire, notamment sur C-SPAN. Évidemment, les réseaux sociaux en particulier constituent une tribune où les candidats moins importants peuvent diffuser leur message à faible coût.

Pour faire une réponse courte, la commission a uniquement pour mandat d'organiser les débats des élections générales avec les candidats qui satisfont aux critères établis par la FEC. Nous ne sommes pas autorisés à prendre des mesures ciblées pour accommoder les candidats qui ne satisfont pas aux critères.

(1225)

Le président:

Rapidement, pourriez-vous nous dire quels étaient les pourcentages recueillis par le candidat républicain et la candidate démocrate deux semaines avant la dernière élection?

Mme Janet Brown:

C'était beaucoup plus de 15 %. Si vous voulez les chiffres exacts, je vous les fournirai avec plaisir. Ils dépassaient tous les deux les 40 %.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci d'être ici aujourd'hui. Votre témoignage est fascinant.

L'aspect qui revient sans cesse est lié aux propos de mon collègue du NPD. Nous essayons de déterminer d'où viendrait ce pouvoir. Qui a accordé ce pouvoir à votre commission? Qu'arriverait-il si l'un des principaux candidats à la présidence se retirait en disant que cela ne lui convient pas? Qu'arriverait-il si une candidate voulait que les débats soient parrainés par une ligue de femmes? Que feriez-vous dans un tel cas?

Mme Janet Brown:

Ce n'est pas seulement une possibilité; c'est déjà arrivé. J'ai trouvé fort intéressant de lire les témoignages et les questions du Comité sur cette question, parce qu'en fin de compte, l'important dans ces débats est ce que le public demande.

Aux États-Unis, lorsqu'un candidat semble réticent et indique qu'il ne participera pas à un ou plusieurs débats, cela soulève rapidement un tollé dans la population. À mon avis, il s'agit d'un mécanisme beaucoup plus dissuasif que de dire qu'une personne se verra refuser du financement, du temps d'antenne pour la publicité ou qu'on lui imposera des sanctions quelconques. Le public s'attend maintenant à la tenue de tels débats et je crois que c'est aussi le cas au Canada, étant donné votre longue histoire.

Plus particulièrement, certains des témoins que vous avez entendus ont indiqué que le citoyen moyen ne suit pas l'actualité politique en tout temps et que les gens commencent à porter attention à ces questions vers la fin des campagnes électorales, à l'approche du jour de l'élection générale, et c'est à ce moment-là qu'ils veulent entendre ce que les candidats ont à dire. Si les candidats donnent l'impression qu'ils ont mieux à faire, qu'ils ne veulent pas participer et qu'ils invoquent une invitation à une autre activité pour justifier leur absence, les gens se fâchent et leur colère se manifeste rapidement. Essentiellement, la question qu'ils se posent alors est la suivante: « Qu'a-t-il de mieux à faire? »

Je dirais qu'aux États-Unis, les débats sont les derniers événements qui appartiennent toujours au public. Les conventions sont planifiées; la plupart d'entre nous ne pourraient jamais y assister même si nous le voulions. La publicité est produite. Les escales de campagne sont minutieusement choisies. Les débats appartiennent au public et se déroulent sans filtre; il n'y a pas d'intermédiaire entre le public et les candidats.

Donc, cela soulève rapidement le tollé du public et je crois que c'est une très bonne chose. L'adoption d'une loi obligeant la participation aux débats a fait l'objet de discussions au pays, en particulier dans les cas liés au financement fédéral. L'idée était qu'un candidat qui reçoit du financement fédéral serait tenu de participer au débat. Je pense qu'on s'entend pour dire qu'une telle mesure législative serait probablement considérée comme inconstitutionnelle.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vraiment?

Mme Janet Brown:

Ce serait contraire à la liberté d'expression, étant donné ce serait obligatoire.

Comme vous pouvez l'imaginer, l'autre préoccupation que cela suscite au pays, c'est que si le Congrès commençait à intervenir dans les activités du parrain d'un débat , il ne s'arrêterait pas aux questions d'organisation. Ce serait assorti d'une longue liste de...

(1230)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Eh bien, madame Brown, ma question suivante était dans cette veine. Vous traitez de sujets formidables. Je suis consciente que vous avez relevé certaines objections quant à l'idée d'adopter une mesure législative à cet égard, mais y aurait-il des avantages à adopter une loi, selon vous?

Mme Janet Brown:

Je ne le crois pas; j'allais dire que cela aurait pour effet d'accroître considérablement la rigidité du processus, à mon avis. Je pense que l'organe législatif ne pourrait s'empêcher d'apporter toutes sortes de précisions, notamment sur le nombre de débats, l'horaire, la formule, l'organisation... À mon avis, cela réduirait la capacité du parrain d'un débat de s'adapter à l'évolution de la technologie...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Et si la mesure législative visait à régir les activités d'une commission indépendante ou d'un commissaire afin de créer un cadre qui pourrait être plus flexible? Par exemple, cela pourrait être un mandat flexible selon lequel il devrait y avoir un débat — au moins un débat dans chacune des langues officielles, avec certains paramètres, peut-être —, mais avec une certaine marge de manoeuvre, laissant ainsi à la commission la latitude nécessaire pour décider de la formule utilisée pour ces débats grâce à un processus indépendant. L'organisme pourrait ensuite négocier avec les médiateurs, les médias et d'autres intervenants pour décider du déroulement, de la date et du lieu des débats.

Mme Janet Brown:

Je pense que c'est quelque chose qu'il convient certainement d'examiner. Cela pourrait bien être la bonne solution.

Je pense que cela aurait posé problème aux États-Unis, surtout parce que le Congrès est essentiellement un organisme partisan. Il est très important que le parrain d'un débat fasse preuve d'ouverture à l'égard de tout candidat et de tout parti et qu'il fonctionne en toute impartialité. Je pense que ce serait difficile... Je sais que ce serait difficile.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'ai une autre question dans la même veine. Vous avez mentionné un aspect intéressant: un débat coûte en moyenne 2 millions de dollars. Votre organisme sans but lucratif finance ses activités à l'aide de campagnes de financement, et une partie de votre financement provient d'entreprises de sociétés privées. Les gens considèrent-ils parfois qu'il s'agit d'un conflit d'intérêts? Cela peut-il être perçu comme un conflit d'intérêts?

Mme Janet Brown:

Les gens peuvent avoir cette perception, du moins jusqu'au moment où ils prennent conscience que l'entité qui a fait un don ne reçoit rien en retour. Les donateurs n'ont aucun accès aux organismes de campagne ou aux candidats, ils n'ont aucune incidence sur nos décisions, quelles qu'elles soient. Donc, il n'y a aucun conflit d'intérêts. En fait, il est remarquable de constater ce qui motive les fondations et les sociétés qui font des dons à notre organisme: elles considèrent qu'il s'agit d'un aspect important de l'éducation citoyenne. Voilà pourquoi elles le font.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Quels types de sociétés font des dons à la commission? S'agit-il d'établissements d'enseignement, par exemple? Plus tôt, vous avez indiqué que lorsque vous organisez un débat dans un établissement d'enseignement, c'est l'établissement qui assure le financement. Lorsque vous organisez un débat ailleurs, divers intervenants se manifestent-ils, ou considérez-vous que c'est surtout le milieu universitaire qui accorde de l'importance à cette commission?

Mme Janet Brown:

Non. C'est très large. Il va sans dire que les établissements d'enseignement conscients de leur importance, puisqu'il s'agit d'une occasion d'organiser sur leurs campus un événement historique auquel peuvent participer, à titre de bénévoles, des centaines sinon des milliers de leurs étudiants, ce qui représente une expérience qu'ils n'auraient pas eue autrement. Ces établissements sont certainement conscients de ce que cela représente, et les sociétés aussi.

De nombreuses entités contribuent au financement de nos activités. La liste n'est pas très longue, car il n'en demeure pas moins que nous n'avons pas beaucoup à leur offrir en retour. Cela dit, au fil des ans, diverses entreprises ont contribué, des compagnies de télécommunications aux sociétés aériennes, en passant par les constructeurs automobiles. Donc, un large éventail d'entités considère qu'il s'agit là d'un aspect important et utile de notre démocratie.

(1235)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant à l'honorable Peter Van Loan.

L'hon. Peter Van Loan (York—Simcoe, PCC):

Combien de débats des candidats à la présidence y a-t-il eu lors de la dernière élection présidentielle?

Mme Janet Brown:

Il y a eu trois débats présidentiels et un débat pour la vice-présidence.

L'hon. Peter Van Loan:

Se sont-ils déroulés sous votre supervision?

Mme Janet Brown:

Oui.

L'hon. Peter Van Loan:

Je crois que vous avez parlé de certaines occasions où les candidats avaient dit... Depuis votre entrée en fonction, y a-t-il eu d'autres débats télévisés qui ne relevaient pas de votre responsabilité?

Mme Janet Brown:

Non.

L'hon. Peter Van Loan:

Vous n'êtes pas responsable des débats des élections primaires. C'est exact?

Mme Janet Brown:

C'est exact.

L'hon. Peter Van Loan:

D'accord.

Vous avez dit que le nom de la commission donnait à penser qu'elle faisait partie du gouvernement fédéral, ce qui vous pose problème. Je trouve cela très intéressant. Pouvez-vous nous dire pourquoi cela vous pose problème et comment cela nuit à votre capacité de faire votre travail ou nous parler de la perception des gens à l'égard de la commission?

Mme Janet Brown:

Je trouve que le mot « commission » est un bien beau mot, mais dans la plupart des pays — et certainement dans le nôtre —, il donne à penser qu'il s'agit d'une commission officielle donnée à une personne ou à une entité. Ici, les gens pensent que nous sommes mandatés — et probablement financés — par le Congrès, ce qui n'est pas le cas, comme je l'ai dit clairement.

Je ne crois pas que cela nuise à notre travail — heureusement—, mais cela crée une fausse impression chez certaines personnes au départ, parce qu'elles présument que tout ce qu'elles voient dans un débat est financé par le gouvernement fédéral. Elles ne pensent pas que nous sommes une organisation à but non lucratif et que nous devons recueillir nos propres fonds de fonctionnement.

L'hon. Peter Van Loan:

Pourquoi serait-il mauvais qu'une personne croie que votre organisation est financée par le gouvernement fédéral?

Mme Janet Brown:

Ce ne l'est pas...

L'hon. Peter Van Loan:

Vous dites que c'est un handicap. Pourquoi est-ce que ce serait une mauvaise chose?

Mme Janet Brown:

Si nous approchons une personne pour lui demander d'appuyer notre travail en matière d'éducation ou le travail nécessaire en vue d'organiser les débats, il se peut qu'elle nous demande pourquoi nous avons besoin de son aide, puisque notre organisation est financée par le gouvernement fédéral et est mandatée par le Congrès. Il faut tout simplement lui expliquer que ce n'est pas le cas.

L'hon. Peter Van Loan:

Ce n'est pas que vous pensiez que ce serait une mauvaise chose si la commission était gérée par une entité du gouvernement.

Mme Janet Brown:

Non. Je ne dis pas que ce serait une mauvaise chose. Je crois que si nous...

L'hon. Peter Van Loan:

Si le Congrès vous approchait et vous disait qu'il avait décidé de vous financer, qu'il allait adopter une loi pour créer une nouvelle commission indépendante, quelle serait votre réaction?

Mme Janet Brown:

C'est une grande question. Il faudrait que notre conseil étudie la question très attentivement. Ce ne serait pas aussi facile que cela. Nous sommes une entité juridique. Si le Congrès souhaitait créer une nouvelle commission, il faudrait étudier la question.

Je ne dis pas qu'il s'agit d'un mauvais concept à envisager. Je crois que dans notre pays, c'est une bonne chose d'avoir établi la commission à titre d'entité indépendante et non partisane.

L'hon. Peter Van Loan:

Si le Congrès mettait sur pied sa propre commission pour vous remplacer — pas pour prendre le contrôle de votre commission — parce qu'il jugeait que la sienne serait meilleure. Elle serait financée par l'État. Cela permettrait d'équilibrer les règles du jeu et de régler la question des perceptions dont vous ont parlé d'autres députés. Comment réagiriez-vous à une telle initiative?

Mme Janet Brown:

Je ne sais pas. C'est une question très complexe. Il faudrait s'asseoir et penser à la façon responsable d'y répondre.

Notre mandat consiste à veiller à ce qu'un débat ait lieu. Très tôt au cours de notre première année, j'ai dû rencontrer un très haut sénateur des États-Unis et un très haut membre de la Chambre des représentants. Nous avons parlé de la League of Women Voters, qui n'était pas très heureuse de la création de la commission. Selon certains, nous aurions dû coparrainer les débats avec la ligue. On disait que certains enjeux étaient montrés de manière à faire paraître les choses plus belles qu'elles ne l'étaient. Je n'oublierai jamais ce que le sénateur — un homme de l'Ouest assez coloré — a dit. Je ne le répèterai pas ici, mais vous pouvez probablement vous imaginer...

(1240)

L'hon. Peter Van Loan:

Vous ne pouvez pas piquer notre curiosité comme cela et ne pas nous le dire.

Mme Janet Brown:

Je sais, c'est triste.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Mme Janet Brown: Il s'est retourné vers son collègue de la Chambre et lui a dit: « Vous savez, la population américaine n'a rien à — bip, bip — de qui les parraine. Elle veut juste avoir un débat. » Un silence de quelques secondes s'en est suivi, alors que nous tentions de ne pas rire ou d'avoir l'air offusqués. C'était un point convaincant que seul un homme de l'Ouest pouvait faire avec son accent coloré.

Ce qu'il voulait dire, c'est qu'il ne fallait pas s'enfarger dans les fleurs du tapis. Il fallait se concentrer sur... Il faut que les débats aient lieu. Il faut qu'ils soient prévisibles. Il faut qu'ils se tiennent d'une manière que la population juge équitable.

L'hon. Peter Van Loan:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

La parole est maintenant à M. Bittle. Vous disposez de cinq minutes, monsieur.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Madame Brown, nous vous remercions d'avoir accepté de nous aider avec notre étude.

Nous avons entendu les diffuseurs. Dans vos commentaires, vous avez parlé des préoccupations des diffuseurs américains à l'égard de la date à laquelle vous décidiez de diffuser les débats.

Comment prenez-vous cette décision? Nos diffuseurs nous ont demandé de trouver le trou dans l'horaire, si je puis dire, parce que cela permettrait d'attirer plus de téléspectateurs.

Comment conjuguez-vous avez le football du lundi soir, les séries mondiales et l'émission la plus populaire de la télévision? Comment abordez-vous ces préoccupations?

Mme Janet Brown:

Nous tentons de répartir la douleur, monsieur Bittle.

Tout d'abord, nous tentons de ne pas tenir les deux débats le même jour: pas deux débats un mardi, par exemple. Il n'y a pas seulement les engagements des réseaux à prendre en compte; il y a aussi les congés fédéraux et les fêtes religieuses en octobre. C'est une tâche très difficile. J'ai eu des conversations assez musclées avec les hauts dirigeants des réseaux qui pensent que nous ne savons pas ce que nous faisons.

La dernière fois, j'ai proposé de faire de l'un des commentateurs de la NFL les plus populaires le modérateur du débat, ce qui n'a pas semblé faire rire les gens du réseau, mais bon.

Il faut se préparer 18 ou 20 mois à l'avance et essayer de prévoir les choses. Je vous donne un exemple de dilemme: dans l'horaire des séries de baseball, on prévoit des jours de déplacements et des jours de pluie. Qu'arrivera-t-il si la série se joue en cinq parties? Qu'arrivera-t-il si elle se joue en six ou même en sept parties? Il y aura toujours quelque chose. C'est inévitable. Nous tentons d'en prévoir le plus possible. Nous tentons de garder les voies de communication ouvertes. Si une personne veut nous appeler et nous donner son avis, elle est la bienvenue.

Il y aura toujours des imprévus. Nous tentons d'organiser la diffusion de manière juste et respectueuse.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je n'ai pas beaucoup de temps. Y a-t-il des pièges possibles ou des préoccupations dont vous aimeriez nous parler? C'est une question ouverte, je le sais, mais y a-t-il des sujets que nous n'avons pas abordés ou des conseils que vous aimeriez donner au Comité?

Mme Janet Brown:

Personne ne vient nous féliciter. Personne ne nous écrit pour nous dire « Wow, vous faites du beau travail. Merci. Continuez. »

Vous le savez: vous travaillez tous dans la fonction publique. Vous êtes critiqués. On ne vous ménage pas. C'est très important de se concentrer sur le principal.

Pour nous, c'est d'assurer la tenue des débats de façon digne, respectueuse et positive. Pour le reste, on s'adapte. Ce qui aide dans notre cas, c'est que nous ne faisons rien d'autre que cela. Nous savons aussi que nous ne sommes pas là pour gagner un concours de popularité.

M. Chris Bittle:

Combien de temps me reste-t-il, monsieur le président? Une minute.

Je vais céder le reste de mon temps de parole à M. Graham.

(1245)

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci. J'aimerais poser une très courte question.

Vous avez parlé plus tôt de votre collaboration avec 32 commissions de débat internationales. Pourriez-vous nous en dire plus à leur sujet et sur votre travail avec elles?

Mme Janet Brown:

Oui. En fait, je vous inviterais à consulter notre site Web, debatesinternational.org. Vous y trouverez une liste des membres et vous pourrez en apprendre plus sur l'échange d'information qui est au coeur de notre travail. Plusieurs entités de l'Amérique du Sud collaborent avec nous. Nous avons fait un travail important en Argentine il y a deux ans. En fait, mon collègue et moi sommes allés à Mexico récemment, où l'on tente de mettre sur pied une commission du genre. Comme vous le savez peut-être, au Mexique, c'est l'autorité électorale qui parraine le débat; on se demande si l'on veut continuer ainsi.

De nombreux pays d'Afrique font un travail d'avant-garde très brave. Je pense surtout au Ghana. Il y a aussi la Jamaïque, Trinité-et-Tobago et plusieurs pays de l'ancienne Union soviétique. La Serbie a fait un travail révolutionnaire. Ce sont des gens très braves. Nous apprenons tous les uns des autres.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Merci.

M. Chris Bittle:

Si vous me le permettez, monsieur le président, j'aimerais soulever un point, rapidement.

Je vais être égoïste et faire de l'autopromotion ici, mais le Comité fait la manchette du site Web de la commission. Je vous invite à le consulter: debatesinternational.org.

Des voix: Oh oh.

Le président:

C'est très bon à savoir. Je vais le répéter: le Canada est en tête de... combien de pays, 38?

Nous allons maintenant passer à une formule ouverte. N'importe quel membre du Comité peut poser une question.

Allez-y, monsieur Dusseault. [Français]

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Il y a une question que je n'ai pas eu l'occasion de poser plus tôt.

J'aimerais savoir, étant donné que vous représentez l'image de votre organisation, sa crédibilité et sa neutralité, comment vous avez été choisie. C'est une situation que nous allons probablement vivre, ici au Canada, lors de la mise sur pied de cette organisation. Peu importe de quelle organisation il s'agit, c'est toujours la personne qui la représente qui en assure la crédibilité et la neutralité.

J'aimerais savoir comment vous avez été choisie et au terme de quel processus.

Mme Janet Brown:

C'est une question que je me pose moi-même.[Traduction]

Je travaillais pour le gouvernement depuis environ 15 ans lorsqu'on a proposé ma candidature à titre de directrice exécutive aux coprésidents fondateurs de la commission. Comme j'avais travaillé pour certaines personnes comme l'ancien ambassadeur Elliott Richardson et l'ancien sénateur John Danforth du Missouri, j'étais perçue comme une personne crédible par les membres des deux côtés de la Chambre et — de manière tout aussi importante — par les gens des autres parties qui s'intéressaient au processus. J'avais une certaine expérience avec les médias et j'étais originaire de Washington.

Ce n'est pas une tâche facile. J'étais heureuse qu'on ait pensé à moi, mais c'est difficile de trouver une personne neutre qui saura expliquer à la population la raison d'être du groupe et gagner sa confiance.

Le président:

Comment choisit-on le président et les membres du conseil?

Mme Janet Brown:

Les membres du conseil d'origine avaient été choisis à la suite de l'étude Strauss-Laird de 1985. À l'époque, Paul Kirk était président du comité national démocrate et Frank Fahrenkopf était président du comité national républicain. Ils s'étaient chargés de constituer la commission en personne morale et en étaient les présidents fondateurs. Ils avaient mis fin à leur service politique partisan peu de temps après et il n'y a plus jamais eu de lien entre un membre du conseil et les partis politiques.

Les règlements prévoient une fonction de nomination interne au sein du conseil. Il y a un comité de mises en candidature, dont les membres sont nommés par les présidents, et qui tient des consultations internes et externes afin de trouver de nouveaux membres du conseil.

Le président:

Merci.

Avez-vous d'autres questions?

Le secrétaire parlementaire Fillmore.

(1250)

M. Andy Fillmore (Halifax, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Nous vous remercions de votre témoignage. D'après ce qu'on entend de plusieurs témoins — vous l'avez peut-être appris dans vos lectures —, une structure légère et souple est préférable puisqu'elle permet de s'adapter à tous les imprévus... les conditions risquent de changer au fil du temps.

J'aimerais vous parler de ce que vous avez appris. Quelle serait la meilleure structure pour nous? Quels sont les éléments clés qui doivent être en place pour nous permettre la souplesse nécessaire?

Mme Janet Brown:

J'ai souligné un passage de la transcription des témoignages, avec lequel je suis tout à fait d'accord: si la structure est trop lourde, la liste de choses à faire risque de nuire au mandat de l'organisation. Je crois que plus la structure sera légère... J'imagine qu'on ne peut pas aller en deçà de deux personnes. C'est ainsi que l'on fonctionne à la commission, même si c'était une seule personne pendant longtemps.

Je crois que le plus important, c'est de définir les tâches à réaliser, puis de déterminer le nombre de personnes requises et de les choisir. Lorsqu'on crée une nouvelle organisation, on peut se ruiner avec les choses qu'on aimerait avoir ou qu'on pourrait utiliser, mais il s'agit ici d'une entreprise unique. Je crois qu'il est très important de déterminer ce dont on a vraiment besoin et ce qu'on doit faire. Il y a les variables du débat; elles sont définies. Il s'agit du nombre de débats et de leur durée: à quoi ressemblent-ils et comment peut-on atteindre les objectifs en ce qui a trait au parrainage et à l'exécution des tâches?

Encore une fois, comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, on a mis beaucoup de travail dans la commission. Lorsque j'ai été engagée, on y travaillait depuis deux ans déjà. Si nous pouvons vous faire part de notre expérience afin d'orienter vos délibérations, j'en serai heureuse, mais je crois que l'essentiel, c'est d'avoir une structure légère et souple.

M. Andy Fillmore:

Selon vous, y a-t-il un nombre idéal de débats? Y a-t-il trop de débats? Y en a-t-il trop peu? Y a-t-il un nombre idéal, qui suscitera l'intérêt du public?

Mme Janet Brown:

Dans notre cas, la tradition veut que les élections générales soient déclenchées le jour de la fête du Travail. Cela signifie que les débats n'ont jamais commencé avant la première semaine de septembre.

En outre, les candidats sont généralement réticents à tenir un débat de 10 jours à deux semaines avant les élections générales, certains ayant l'impression que ces débats freinent les campagnes parce que le candidat doit s'arrêter pour se préparer et mettre vraiment l'accent sur le débat.

Compte tenu de toutes les autres choses que les partis veulent faire pendant les mois de septembre et d'octobre, il nous est apparu qu'il convenait de tenir trois débats de 90 minutes chacun, sans interruption commerciale. Si le débat durait quatre heures, il pourrait être difficile d'obtenir l'accord des candidats, et je ne pense pas que deux heures suffiraient à couvrir le nombre de sujets importants dont il faut traiter sur le plan de la politique nationale et internationale.

M. Andy Fillmore:

Pour examiner la question encore plus profondément, les débats sont-ils organisés autour d'un thème, comme l'économie ou l'environnement?

Mme Janet Brown:

Au cours des deux derniers cycles, nous avons procédé autrement et cela a très bien fonctionné. Le premier et le dernier débat présidentiel ont été divisés en six segments de 15 minutes, chacun d'entre eux portant sur un sujet choisi par les animateurs et annoncé environ 10 jours avant le débat. Le segment s'ouvre sur une question posée à tous les participants, lesquels disposent de deux minutes pour y répondre. Une discussion a lieu au cours des 15 minutes restantes, pendant laquelle l'animateur intervient très peu. Au cours des deux derniers cycles, les débats ont été divisés entre les sujets nationaux et étrangers. C'est ainsi que nous avons procédé.

Ce n'est pas un examen avec documentation, mais cela permet aux candidats de comprendre que le débat portera sur les questions clés et de savoir quels sujets seront abordés.

Le président:

Pouvez-vous nous rappeler qui choisit les sujets, qui écrit les questions, qui choisit l'animateur et quelles sont les conditions régissant le choix d'un animateur?

Mme Janet Brown:

En ordre inverse, nous choisissons les animateurs en nous appuyant sur trois critères: la personne doit connaître très bien les candidats et leurs positions sur les sujets abordés, posséder une grande expérience de la télévision en direct et comprendre que, pour le meilleur ou pour le pire, elle n'est pas candidate aux élections. Son rôle consiste à animer le débat et non à y participer. Les animateurs seuls choisissent et connaissent les questions. Ni la Commission ni les candidats ne les connaissent.

(1255)

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez indiqué plus tôt que le seuil est établi à 15 % pour que les candidats puissent participer aux débats.

Mme Janet Brown:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pourquoi ce seuil est-il si élevé?

Mme Janet Brown:

Si un candidat ne récolte pas un appui de 15 % dans les sondages quatre semaines avant les élections, l'histoire montre qu'il n'a pratiquement aucune chance d'être élu en raison du nombre de voix nécessaires pour y parvenir. Nombre d'entre vous savent peut-être ce que la League of Women Voters a fait en 1980 lorsque John Anderson, représentant de l'Illinois à la Chambre des représentants des États-Unis, faisait campagne à titre de candidat indépendant. La ligue l'a invité à participer au premier débat avec M. Reagan, alors gouverneur. Le président Carter avait décliné l'invitation en disant essentiellement qu'il ne partagerait pas la scène avec un candidat qui n'avait pas de majorité et qui n'était pas concurrentiel. Le premier débat s'est ainsi tenu entre M. Reagan et M. Anderson. La ligue a par la suite appliqué de nouveau ce critère, et M. Anderson n'y a pas satisfait. Le deuxième débat a donc opposé M. Carter et M. Reagan, pour lesquels ce fut le seul affrontement.

Il y a toujours un risque qu'un candidat jouissant d'un soutien substantiel ne participe pas au débat s'il pense qu'un candidat qui n'a pas de chance réaliste d'être élu participe à un débat au cours des trois à quatre dernières semaines de campagne. C'est tout simplement ainsi que la Commission procède. Certains considèrent que ce seuil devrait être bien plus bas ou qu'il devrait s'appuyer sur l'accès aux élections et non sur le pourcentage d'appui. Si le parrain d'un débat disait vouloir utiliser un critère différent, il serait tout à fait en droit de le faire. Rien ne stipule que la Commission est la seule entité à pouvoir présenter une proposition, mais c'est l'approche que notre conseil d'administration a adoptée. Soit dit en passant, ce seuil fait l'objet d'un examen exhaustif entre chaque série de débats pour voir s'il doit être modifié.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Tassi.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

J'ai trois brèves questions.

Les 11 membres du conseil d'administration sont-ils rémunérés?

Mme Janet Brown:

Non.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Ils ne sont pas rémunérés. D'accord.

Quel est votre budget annuel global? Pouvez-vous nous l'indiquer?

Mme Janet Brown:

Je n'ai honnêtement pas de chiffre qui serait juste une fois qu'on a enlevé les montants relatifs à l'éducation et à d'autres initiatives, mais c'est bien moins que 1 million de dollars.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'accord.

Comment évaluez-vous vos résultats à la fin en vue de vous améliorer? Disposez-vous d'un mécanisme à cette fin?

Mme Janet Brown:

Bien sûr. Nous examinons divers aspects, comme la production. Comme je l'ai indiqué, nous réexaminons les critères de sélection des candidats et parlons aux responsables des salles où se sont tenus les débats pour leur demander ce qu'il s'est passé et ce qui pourrait être amélioré. Nous parlons aussi avec les organismes d'application de la loi, les médias et les animateurs. Nous effectuons un examen exhaustif de ce qui s'est passé et rédigeons ensuite des rapports afin de voir ce que nous pourrions améliorer la prochaine fois. Nous examinons les formats après chaque cycle.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Dusseault. [Français]

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Le débat, audio et vidéo compris, pourrait-il être libre de droits, de façon à ce que n'importe qui puisse l'utiliser et le diffuser gratuitement, en tout ou en partie?

Considérez-vous que c'est envisageable? [Traduction]

Mme Janet Brown:

Cette question concerne les réseaux de télévision, car étant donné que nous collaborons avec l'équipe de production de la Maison-Blanche, les transmissions lui appartiennent. Cette équipe investit de l'argent dans chaque débat pour les caméras, les cameramans, les camions de production et la transmission du signal. Les membres de l'équipe se partagent les coûts; c'est donc à eux qu'il revient de décider de ne pas imposer ne serait-ce qu'un droit minimal et de laisser quiconque diffuser les débats gratuitement. Il va sans dire que les entreprises de médias sociaux exercent des pressions en ce sens, faisant valoir qu'on leur doit bien cela, mais la décision revient à l'équipe de production de la Maison-Blanche.

(1300)

Le président:

Avez-vous des génératrices de secours en cas de panne de courant?

Mme Janet Brown:

Il y a une triple redondance sur chaque élément utilisé dans la salle de débat.

J'ignore si certains d'entre vous ont regardé le débat qui a opposé M. Ford à M. Carter à Philadelphie en 1976 ou en ont vu une vidéo. Par suite d'une panne d'électricité, le silence a régné sur scène pendant 27 minutes. Je n'ai pas besoin de vous dire à quel point il a dû être inconfortable, dans un débat de cette importance, de rester debout pendant 27 minutes à se demander ce qu'il se passe exactement.

Je n'ai pas pu m'empêcher de rire lorsqu'une panne d'électricité est survenue lors de l'avant-dernier Super Bowls, à la Nouvelle-Orléans, plongeant une grande partie du stade dans le noir. J'ai dit à mon conjoint d'attendre 45 secondes. Quand il m'a demandé « 45 secondes pour quoi? », je lui ai répondu que c'est le temps que cela prendrait pour que mon ingénieur m'appelle pour me dire que pareille chose ne se serait pas produite si c'était nous qui avions été responsables de l'événement. Cela a pris environ 30 secondes.

Des voix: Ah, ah!

Mme Janet Brown: Pour répondre à votre question, nous avons des systèmes de secours pour les systèmes de secours.

Le président:

Vous semblez être une administratrice très efficace. Merci beaucoup d'avoir témoigné aujourd'hui. Vous nous avez été d'une grande aide. Je pense que votre témoignage constituera une partie importante de nos délibérations.

Mme Janet Brown:

Merci. C'est un privilège que de témoigner.

Le président:

Je tiens à ce que les membres du Comité sachent qu'au cours de notre prochaine séance, qui se tiendra le mardi 12 décembre et qui sera notre dernière rencontre de l'année, nous recevons des témoins de Twitter et de La Presse. Nous attendons une réponse de TVA et du Huffington Post. Au cours de la deuxième heure, nous donnerons nos directives de rédaction aux analystes.

Il y a une autre chose à laquelle vous devriez réfléchir, pas maintenant, mais pendant la période des Fêtes si vous le souhaitez. Après les 18 votes de l'autre soir, si vous voulez réfléchir aux échanges que nous avons eus sur le vote électronique lorsque nous discutions du Règlement...

Un député: Du vote appliqué.

Le président: ... ou du vote appliqué, inscrivez cela à votre programme de Noël.

Y a-t-il autre chose que nous pourrions faire pour le bien du pays? D'accord.

Mardi, ce sera notre dernière séance. Est-ce que tout le monde est d'accord? Nous donnerons nos directives et reviendrons....

Sachez en outre que nous n'avons pas pu joindre les représentants de Trinité-et-Tobago aujourd'hui, mais nous tenterons de les faire comparaître au cours de la première ou de la deuxième séance, à notre retour.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous devons entendre 29 autres pays.

Le président:

Oui, en effet, mais cette remarque est irrecevable.

Des voix: Ah, ah!

Le président: La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on December 07, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.