header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-01-31 ETHI 133

Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Bob Zimmer (Prince George—Peace River—Northern Rockies, CPC)):

Welcome, everybody.

Per the notice of meeting this is meeting 133 of the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics. The study is on the privacy of digital government services.

Today we have with us somebody we've had several times before, Daniel Therrien, Privacy Commissioner of Canada. We also have Gregory Smolynec, deputy commissioner, policy and promotion sector, and Lara Ives, executive director, policy, research and parliamentary affairs directorate.

Before I go to Mr. Therrien, I want to go to Mr. Kent quickly.

Hon. Peter Kent (Thornhill, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

Colleagues, I hope I'll get unanimous consent on this. In light of yesterday's announcement by the Minister of Democratic Institutions of this new panel to screen advertising, messaging and reporting during the upcoming election, I'd like to suggest that we allocate at least one meeting to call representatives of some of the seven organizations that the minister said would be looking to screen acceptable reportage and advertising.

The Chair:

Mr. Angus.

Mr. Charlie Angus (Timmins—James Bay, NDP):

If I hear the suggestion correctly, I think it would be worth our while. As with all-party unanimous recommendations about protecting the electoral system, our committee brought forward recommendations. I think it's worth our having a view on this.

It seems to me that I'm looking at something that's probably much more fitted to a plan right now that deals with cybersecurity and cyber-threats, whereas what we've found in threats to elections are much more subtle. The manipulations might be harder to find.

It would be good to see if these representatives have looked at our work and we can question them on it. I would be very much in favour of that.

The Chair:

Mr. Saini.

Mr. Raj Saini (Kitchener Centre, Lib.):

I don't mind, but I'd prefer a formal motion so at least I can think about exactly what you want and which organizations they are.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Sure.

Mr. Raj Saini:

We would absolutely entertain it.

Hon. Peter Kent:

It's not required. I've moved it now. Let's vote on it now. If you see fit to defeat it, then we'll do a formal vote.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York, Lib.):

Can you repeat the exact language?

Hon. Peter Kent:

In light of the announcement made by the minister yesterday with regard to the special panel being created with representatives across—

The Chair:

The security task force, I think it is.

Hon. Peter Kent:

—the security task force, including Privy Council, CSIS—the seven organizations that were named.. We would invite them to find out exactly how they consider their new assignment, and perhaps give them a few weeks to get their heads around it. I assume they knew about it before the minister announced it yesterday, but it would be to have them talk about what they consider their mission to be, and how they'll carry it out.

The minister yesterday wasn't able to speak about where the red lines would be drawn in alerting Canadians to potential violation, or the intention of the panel, but I think it would be helpful, particularly given the work that we've done on this specifically for the past year.

The Chair:

Is it Raj next and then Charlie?

Mr. Charlie Angus:

I have language for a motion.

The Chair:

Okay. Go ahead, Mr. Angus.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

It's, “That the committee invite the appointed security task force of the seven organizations”—we could name them—“to brief the committee on their role in protecting the integrity of the Canadian electoral system for the 2019 election.”

The Chair:

Just to be clear, are you providing words for Mr. Kent?

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Yes. He was explaining what he wanted, but I think what we want very simply is a briefing from the appointed security task force on their role and plan for protecting the integrity of Canada's electoral system.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Chair, I can give you the specific list now; the app has loaded: the Clerk of the Privy Council, the federal national security and intelligence adviser, the deputy minister of justice, the deputy minister of public safety, and the deputy minister of global affairs Canada. It's a pretty esteemed panel.

The Chair:

Ms. Fortier.

(1535)

Mrs. Mona Fortier (Ottawa—Vanier, Lib.):

I would like to adjourn the debate on the motion and let the commissioner present.

The Chair:

We're going to Mr. Therrien's testimony first, and then we'll come back to it after. Is that fine?

Hon. Peter Kent:

The Liberals wish to seek guidance.

The Chair:

Is that fair, Mr. Angus?

Mr. Charlie Angus:

I just want to clarify the rules. Asking to adjourn debate, I don't believe it does. I would imagine that Peter would agree to defer it.

The Chair:

We're going to vote.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Assuming we're going to get back to the question....

The Chair:

We're voting on adjourning the debate.

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair:

I guess we'll get—

Hon. Peter Kent:

As long as we vote by the end of the meeting....

The Chair:

Okay. Sure.

Mr. Therrien, go ahead. [Translation]

Mr. Daniel Therrien (Privacy Commissioner of Canada, Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Members of the committee, thank you for inviting me to provide my views in the context of your study of the privacy implications and potential legal barriers relating to the implementation of digital government services in Canada.

A good starting point for this study, given that it defines the government's approach, is the government data strategy roadmap, published in November 2018, which was shared with us late last year.

In that document, the government indicates:

Data have the power to enable the government to make better decisions, design better programs and deliver more effective services. But, for this to occur, we need to refresh our approach.

Today, individual departments and agencies generate and hold a vast, diverse and ever-expanding array of data. These data are often collected in ways, based on informal principles and practices, that make it difficult to share with other departments or Canadians. Their use is inconsistent across the government and their value sub-optimized in the decision-making process and in day-to-day operations.

We of course support the use of technology to improve government decision-making and service-delivery but, as mentioned in your mandate, this must be done while protecting Canadians' privacy. In that regard, it is important to remember that privacy is a fundamental human right and that it is also a prior condition to the exercise of other fundamental rights, such as freedom, equality and democracy.

The government's roadmap underlines the difficulty of sharing data across departments and attributes this either to informal principles and practices or, in other circumstances, to legal barriers. I understand that there is in fact an exercise within government to identify these legal barriers with a view to potentially eliminating those found inconsistent with the new approach that the government feels is required to extract value from data.

I would say that what is a legal barrier to some may be seen as a privacy safeguard by others. The terminology that the government or other interveners use in this debate is not neutral. Many of the presumed barriers are found in sections 4 to 8 of the current Privacy Act. Should these rules be re-examined with an eye to improved government services in a digital age? Certainly. Should some of these rules be amended? Probably.

But, as you go about your study, I would ask you to remember that, while adjustments may be desirable, any new legislation designed to facilitate digital government services must respect privacy as a fundamental human right. I can elaborate on this point in the question period, if you wish. In other words, modalities may change but the foundation must be solid and must respect the rights to privacy. The foundation must be underpinned by a strengthened privacy law. As you know, we made recommendations to that effect in 2016. I would add a new recommendation here: that the public sector adopt the concept of protecting privacy from the design stage.

(1540)

[English]

I reviewed with interest the testimony before you by officials from Estonia at the launch of your study. While the Estonian model is often discussed for its technological architecture, I was struck by the fact that officials emphasized the greater importance, in their view, of attitudinal factors, including the need to overcome silos in state administration leading to reuse of personal information for purposes other than those for which it was collected.

This could be seen as validation of the view that our Privacy Act needs to be re-examined and that—quote, unquote—“legal barriers” should be eliminated. I would note, however, that in Estonia the elimination of silos did not lead to a borderless, horizontal management of personal data across government. Rather, in the Estonian model, reuse, or what we would call sharing of information, appears to be based on legislation that sets conditions generally consistent with internationally recognized fair information practice principles and with the GDPR, although I would encourage you to follow up with Estonia as to what these legal conditions actually are.

As to the technological aspects of the Estonian model, our understanding is that there is an absence of a centralized database. Rather, access is granted through the ability to link individual servers through encrypted pathways with access or reuse permitted for specific lawful purposes. This purpose-specific access by government agencies likely reduces the risk of profiling.

We understand that further privacy and security safeguards are attained through encryption and the use of blockchain. This is in line with one of our recommendations for revisions of the Privacy Act in 2016, namely, to create a legal obligation for government institutions to safeguard personal information.

I note that the Estonian model is based in part on a strong role for their data protection authority, which includes an explicit proactive role as well as powers to issue binding orders, apply for commencement of criminal proceedings and impose fines where data is processed in an unlawful manner or for violations of the requirements for managing or securing data. Similarly, the OPC should have a strong oversight and proactive role in line with our Privacy Act reform recommendations.

I'd like to conclude with some questions for you to consider as you take a deeper dive into the Estonian model or discuss its applications in a Canadian context.

First, we've heard officials say that the success of the system is based on strong trust, which requires strong safeguards. But no system, as you know, is totally safe. What mitigation measures are in place in Estonia when, and not if, there is a breach?

Second, Canada's data strategy road map posits that one of the valued propositions of a model such as Estonia's is the intelligence to be gathered from data analytics, but it is unclear to us how, given the segregated set-up of the data sets and the legislative regime in which it operates, providing for specific reuse for specific purposes, this could be accomplished. You may wish to explore this issue further.

Finally, we would suggest that obtaining clarity from Estonian officials on the legal conditions for reuse of data would help, because that's an important safeguard to ensure there is no overall profiling and what I refer to as borderless, horizontal data sharing.

Thank you for your attention. I'll be glad to answer your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you again, Mr. Therrien.

First up for seven minutes, we have a combination of Nate and David to start.

Go ahead.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Thanks very much.

My first question is about the Estonian model and legal pathways.

When Michael Geist was before us, he said that technological measures put in place sound great, but we couldn't trust in those measures and we needed to revisit the Privacy Act. I take it you are of the same view.

Revisiting the Privacy Act and the clarity of pathways for sharing of information, I understand in Estonia, yes, they have a tell-us-once model, but you require specific statutory authorities for that reuse, so your point about our clarifying what the Estonian legislation says is important.

With respect to the Privacy Act, it's also your view, I suppose, that we should clarify the pathways of sharing information here in Canada as well.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

Yes. We have long-standing rules, of course, to govern the conditions under which data can be shared between departments. Those are essentially sections 4 to 8 of the current public sector Privacy Act.

Your mandate speaks to legal barriers. The federal government's data strategy road map talks about potential legal barriers. I assume that when the government refers to barriers, they are referring to revisiting or reviewing whether sections 4 to 8 are still fit for a purpose. I accept that, but I say at the same time that these are important rules, and although certain adjustments and modalities can be envisaged, let's not lose sight of the main principle, which is that privacy should be respected.

(1545)

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Has the government come to you at all to discuss a digital ID project in any way?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

We had some discussions with government late last year about their data strategy road map, at a high level of generality, I would say. We were invited recently to offer views on strategies that individual departments are required or invited to adopt pursuant to the road map. That process has not started, but I welcome the invitation by government for us to give our advice.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

With respect to digital ID specifically, I understood that maybe there were some conversations under way at the federal level to pursue a digital ID project in concert with provinces. Have you been consulted on this specifically?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

This has been going on for a number of years. Perhaps Ms. Ives wants to add to this.

Ms. Lara Ives (Executive Director, Policy, Research and Parliamentary Affairs Directorate, Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada):

Yes. I'll just add that there have been various iterations over the years. I think the most recent was in 2012. We reviewed privacy impact assessments for authentication rather than a digital ID: means to access online government services. One of them is issued by the Government of Canada and the other one utilizes banking credentials, but it's not exactly on point with the digital ID.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I have a last question and then I'll turn it over to David.

Simply, are there examples of this government or previous governments implementing and moving off-line services online, providing greater digital services and doing it right by coming to you and saying, “Let's address privacy concerns”? Can we point to any Canadian example where there's been a service that's gotten it right? Take your time.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

In the spirit of being optimistic and positive, I would say that the Estonian model is interesting to look at from that perspective. It has many positive features. The devil is in the details, obviously, but it's not a bad place to start.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

All right. Thanks very much.

David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

I think data is easier to share than time, but we'll do what we can.[Translation]

I would like to understand how we can define the parameters for the permission that people give. On Tuesday, I used automatic vehicle licence plate readers as an example. When a car goes by, the reader records the plate number. That is being done by the government. We provide that data in a way that is not really voluntary, given that we have no other choice.

If departments or police services all over the country use that data without really having obtained people's permission to do so, how can we determine whether they have given their consent? Where do we draw the line?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

I will assume that your question is based on the principle that this is information in the public domain. Licence plates are public, in a sense, because the cars are travelling on public roads. People—the government, but companies too—rely on the public nature of that environment to collect data and then to use them in a way that does not see them as personal information. In that case, the rules on the use and disclosure of that information are more permissive.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

At each stage of a trip, the plate number can be read, revealing who it belongs to, where they live, and their record. Even if the data is not collected every time, individuals can be followed from one end of the country to the others, and their travels known.

That is not what licence plates are for, but, if we say they are in the public domain, are we allowed to use the data in that way? The United States is already doing it.

(1550)

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

We have to be careful in calling this information public. As you have just said, it is still possible to identify the person associated with a car, their behaviour, and so on. So, even if the information is called public, we have to wonder whether the information is actually personal, and what authority a given department has to collect it. It varies from department to department. Even though the information is in the public domain, collecting it has to be linked to a mandate of the department in question. That is a very important condition in the current legislation. It could be made stronger, along the lines of some recommendations we made in connection with amending the Privacy Act.

In summary, we have to be careful with data in the public domain. We have to make sure that each department collecting and using the information actually has a mandate to do so.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.[English]

Do I have any time left?

The Chair:

You're out of time. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

We'll go to Mr. Kent for the next seven minutes.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Thank you, Chair.

It's good to see you again, Commissioner, and your partners today at the table.

Given the significant differences between the Estonian model and Canada today.... The digital identity in Estonia covers literally a person's entire lifetime, not just their health and tax information but their education.... It covers just about every aspect of their daily life.

From reading your remarks, you seem to see the first stage of digital government, should it come to Canada, as beginning at the federal government level alone. Is there any practicality in trying to get into those areas where there is a sharp divide and no overlap with provincial and municipal jurisdictions?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

A very significant difference, of course, between Estonia and Canada is that we're a federal state whereas they're a unitary state. That creates certain difficulties in Canada in setting up a system, difficulties of various orders. These could be technological, but there are also different administrations and different legislation. I don't think it's inconceivable that there could be a system that would share information between the federal and provincial governments, but given the complexity of the Canadian federal state, it's probably more practical to start at one level.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Did you observe or have you read the transcript of Dr. Cavoukian's and Dr. Geist's appearance before committee this week?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

Yes.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Could you offer some of your general observations? Dr. Cavoukian had some very significant concerns.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

I'll put it in my terms.

I think the Estonian model is interesting in that the risk of digitized government services based on a common digital identifier, in the worst-case scenario, would be that the government, whether only the federal government or governments generally, would have a single profile of that individual. That is, of course, very difficult to reconcile with privacy.

One of the apparent virtues of the Estonian model is that the data is not centralized. It continues to reside in a large number of institutions, and there's a technological pathway with appropriate legal authority authorizing the information to be reused from one department to another. The decentralized aspect of the Estonian model, I think, at first blush, seems a positive feature that reduces what would otherwise be a risk.

You mentioned concerns that were expressed.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Yes.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

Can you be more specific?

Hon. Peter Kent:

I don't have the transcript in front of me, but basically, as I read many of the remarks that Dr. Cavoukian returned to, the cybersecurity of that digital information as it moves from the several repositories to whoever is requesting or accessing that information is vulnerable. The guarantees of absolute security do not yet exist.

(1555)

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

There is no question that technological systems are vulnerable to breaches. I'm not sure there will ever be a system that is free of that risk. I think, legally speaking, if digital services occur, it's important that there be a legal obligation for government to apply strong technological safeguards. Technologically, in Estonia, as you know, there are blockchains and encryption. These are state-of-the-art systems. Do they guarantee that there will not be breaches? No.

Hon. Peter Kent:

In your opening remarks you mentioned trust and consent. Again, a significant difference between Estonia and Canada is a very compliant population after the breakup of the Soviet Union, and a very forceful new democracy determined to create digital government from scratch.

Given Canadians' natural skepticism and generational cynicism about the digital world, and given Cambridge Analytica, Facebook, Aggregate IQ, all of the scandals and now controversy over Sidewalk Labs and people's concern about exposure, privacy, personal content, who owns what and how it's accessed, do you think that on that level alone it will be an uphill battle to get the consent of Canadians for this kind of digital government in any reasonable period of time? I'm talking about perhaps a decade, in our lifetimes.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

I think Estonian officials mentioned that even in Estonia, the systems are not implemented overnight. There are a number of steps.

I think technological safeguards are crucial. Legal safeguards are crucial. I will say that probably incremental implementation, where government has a chance to demonstrate that the system deserves trust, may lead us towards trust in the population. There's no question that currently, Canadians are concerned that their privacy is not being respected.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Kent.

Next up for seven minutes is Mr. Angus.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Therrien, it's always a pleasure to have you at our committee.

I want to follow up on your final statement about the question of trust and whether or not Canadians should be expected to trust a system such as this.

On my beat in this file over the years, I've seen that every year we have data breaches. Some are extremely significant data breaches, such as the loan information of a quarter million or more students, and recently, 80,000 individuals compromised through CRA.

In your work, is the number of breaches changing because technology is changing? Is it a standard...? Year in and year out, are we seeing some pretty significant, plus smaller, breaches? In terms of government departments, are you seeing much of a change?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

I would not say that we're seeing significant improvement in these matters. It's a huge challenge to build that trust; there's no question.

I'll use an example, because I think it's telling on many levels. As you know, the government implemented a pay system called Phoenix that was criticized on a number of levels. We, the OPC, investigated the security and privacy safeguards that were in place, or not, with respect to the Phoenix system. One of the very concerning things we found during that investigation was that there was a deliberate decision by government officials not to put in place strong monitoring of who had access to personal information in the system, because it would be costly, would delay the system, and so on and so forth.

Directly to your question, I don't see many improvements. I would say it is absolutely essential that before these systems are implemented more broadly—to go back to attitudes—that government officials have an attitude of ensuring that safeguards are in place before the systems are implemented.

(1600)

Mr. Charlie Angus:

I thank you very much for that response. It leads me into where I was concerned.

I've been here 15 years. I see my colleagues on the other side and they're flush with the hope of new believers that we have finally come to the kingdom of salvation and government will work; whereas, over the years I've become a skeptic, an agnostic.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Charlie Angus: I'm like the St. Thomas of government operations. I've sat on committee after committee where we were sure that bigger was better, that government always.... Whenever they were looking for who was going to get the contracts, they wanted to go as big as possible. Bigger was not better. Bigger was much more expensive. Bigger was always tied with deals, and the deputy ministers and who got the deals and who didn't.

Then we had Phoenix. I guess I would turn around to citizens in my riding and say, “Look at Phoenix. Do you trust?” In terms of the safeguards that need to be in place, would you not think it would be an extremely complex set of safeguards, that we would be able to assure Canadians that they can trust all their financial information, all their personal information, their life history with a department or a government that has, year in and year out, serious breaches in many and almost all of the serious, major departments?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

It's complex, but I would say it's within human capacity. It probably speaks to the need to implement this incrementally because systems cannot be changed overnight, so you start incrementally, I think. Of course, I would start with...there is no choice but to make government services digital for all kinds of reasons, including to improve services to the population. It's not a question of not doing it because it's too complex and daunting, but in implementing this policy there should not be short shrift given to policy safeguards, legal and technological safeguards.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Thank you for that.

Certainly, I know the people I deal with would prefer to have people actually answering phones if they had questions as opposed to getting their digital data quicker. We will always see them go with digital solutions as opposed to having people answer the phones.

I'm concerned about whether this is a one-way path or a two-way path. If I want to find my CRA information and I have a digital card, I can find that. It was suggested by one of my Liberal colleagues that it would be a great way for government to contact citizens.

To me, that's very concerning. If I am obligated to do everything online, if I have to give all this information online, there's the necessity, I think, of saying that this is so I can obtain services I want, but not necessarily for government to be able to contact me about what they want.

Do you see that if we have a two-way communication, it changes the nature of this, and the privacy rights of citizens become much more at risk from potential abuse?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

The situation you describe is exactly why I say it is essential to look very closely at the legal framework within which either data will be shared from one department to another, or a second department will be able to reuse data that the first department has à la Estonia.

It starts with the right legal framework, which limits the circumstances where a department calls on a citizen because another department has offered a service. That's extremely important. We have rules already in sections 4 to 8 of the Privacy Act. Yes, they can be reviewed, but it's not a bad place to start either. That's an important part of the foundation. Then I think the technology follows the principles that have been adopted with safeguards ensuring that, technologically speaking, data banks cannot talk to each other unless there's a legal authority to do that.

It starts with a well-defined and well-thought-out framework. Call it sharing. Call it reuse of information.

(1605)

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Angus.

Next up for seven minutes is Mr. Saini.

Mr. Raj Saini:

Good afternoon, Mr. Therrien. It's always a pleasure to have you here. I think you're the witness who visits this committee the most so that's great.

You made a submission to ISED dated November 23. I read it through. It was very interesting. One thing you did write was, “It is not an exaggeration to say that the digitization of so much of our lives is reshaping humanity.” I would go even further that once that march towards technology has started, it's very difficult for anybody to stop it. Eventually it will succeed.

I know the model we have been using is Estonia, but if you look at Estonia right now, you see there are 1.3 million people, four million hectares of land, and half of it is forest, so broadband connectivity is not really a big issue there. When we look at Canada right now and the latest UN survey on leading countries in e-government development, we see that we rank 23rd, so eventually the world is moving in this direction.

You indicated in the notes I have read that privacy is a big concern for you. There has to be a point as to where we start from and what the objective is. The majority of countries, especially advanced countries, are moving towards more digitization of government. Let's leave Estonia aside for a second. Where do we start from?

I'm going to frame this in two ways. The one frame I had is because in Estonia you have two levels of government. In some cases, we have four levels of government. How do we protect privacy? As Mr. Angus said, people want to have security of their data, but different governments do different roles. It's not one government that's a repository. The provincial government deals with health. The federal government has the CRA. How do we protect the privacy of Canadians going through different levels of government? How do we make the system interoperable among different departments within one level of government?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

I think an appropriate starting point might be to define what the specific circumstances are where government believes that it is inhibited from delivering efficient services because of what are often referred to as silos between departments that prevent information sharing. What are the practical problems? What do citizens actually want other than more efficient government generally? What kinds of services cannot be delivered efficiently in a timely way because of legal and bureaucratic impediments? I think that would be a start.

Mr. Raj Saini:

Also, the working theory in Estonia is that the public or the citizens own the data. It's up to them how they dispense that data and who they allow it to be shared with.

If we go one step forward, if we start off with the public sector, obviously the private sector is going to have some involvement, whether it be bank information or other information. If the private sector has different technology and the public sector has different technology.... One of the examples that has been given is blockchain technology.

One entity is governed by PIPEDA and another entity is governed by the Privacy Act. How would you mesh both of them together? Where would the touchpoint be where you could allow the public sector and the private sector to maintain privacy but also to maintain their own jurisdiction?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

I'm not a technologist, although now I'm gaining a bit more knowledge about technology after being in this position for a few years, but I think we're back to an incremental approach. The systems will be interoperable not overnight but gradually. Technology is a means. I would start with what government wants to do and what the impediments are to efficient services. Then I would determine what the required technology is to get you to the proper place.

(1610)

Mr. Raj Saini:

Obviously, the digitization of government is going to move forward. Whether we do it quickly or slowly, it's going to go forward. What role should there be and where should the insertion point be for the Office of the Privacy Commissioner in terms of the leading the way, making sure that the system has not been developed? Then afterward your office would come in and say there are points here that we have difficulty with.

Where do you see your insertion point? You're talking about technology. You're talking about privacy. You're talking about in some cases portability. You're talking about different levels of government. You're talking about interoperability within government. Where do you feel your office should insert itself to make sure that this becomes an effective approach?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

I will use the word “proactivity”, which I have used in this committee previously with respect to Privacy Act reform.

We have approached current officials to ask them to give advice as departments develop their individual strategies. I think that's part of it. If laws are amended, we should be consulted in the development of laws. Once laws are adopted, we should have the stronger powers that we have sought to ensure that legal privacy principles are actually being implemented. It's going to be a long journey.

My answer is that with our limited resources we're willing and able to play as proactive a role as possible. We will not define the objectives. Government will define the objectives, but we are able within our means to give advice as early as possible, and once systems are adopted, to play an oversight role with legal powers to play that role.

Mr. Raj Saini:

I have a final question.

You're talking about different actors and players. Do you think it would be better to start at a baseline where you had government, private sector, public sector, technologists sitting together to form a pathway going forward so that everybody is on the same page? In that way it would be done in step, in line, and proactively but intermittently in a way that makes sure that if iteratively there are changes that have to be made, they won't be made at the end of the development of a system, but at the beginning where it goes step by step.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

I think there's a place for that kind of overarching discussion at a level of principles, be they legal, bureaucratic, operational or technological. But in terms of implementing these, on balance, I think it's going to be done incrementally.

Mr. Raj Saini:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Next up for five minutes is Mr. Gourde. [Translation]

Mr. Jacques Gourde (Lévis—Lotbinière, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for being here, Mr. Therrien.

Do you think there is an economic study on digitizing data in Canada in the future, so that Canadians can have some idea about the issue? Is it in the millions, the billions?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

I did not hear the start of your question. Are you asking me about the cost of digitization?

Mr. Jacques Gourde:

Is there a study that establishes the cost of a digital world that will make sense in the future? We know that the firearms registry cost almost $2 billion, just to enter the data on long guns. Imagine how much it could cost to enter digital data for all of Canada.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

To my knowledge, there is no such study. It would be quite the undertaking to do one.

One of the reasons why I am in favour of the government digitizing its services is that health care, for example, could be improved. We may have to invest in technology, for example, but there would be a return on the investments, since health care would be more efficient.

To my knowledge, no such study exists. First, it is difficult to imagine the future without digitization. Second, even though there would be a significant cost, there would surely be a return on the investments.

Mr. Jacques Gourde:

Our departments' services are already digitized, but it is done piecemeal. Services are already being provided to Canadians, but everyone does their own thing.

(1615)

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

Yes.

Mr. Jacques Gourde:

Some things could probably be kept. What should be our approach? We could probably provide Canadians with many more services without throwing the baby out with the bathwater or starting everything from square one.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

I agree with you. That is why I talk about an approach in stages, where systems that work would be maintained. The government should identify where things are not working so well and make improvements. That does not mean opening everything to question and starting again from zero, technologically at least.

Mr. Jacques Gourde:

In an ideal digitized world, which of Canadians' confidential or more sensitive information would be less protected in that new world?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

The government has all kinds of extremely sensitive information. I have just talked about the area of health. Medical information is among the most important. Identification can depend on biometrics. This information is very sensitive. The government has no choice but to collect and use sensitive information that is the very essence of privacy. All the information that the government has will obviously contain sensitive data, such as financial information. As a result, the protections must be at a very high level.

Mr. Jacques Gourde:

Thank you, Mr. Therrien.

Mr. Chair, I just want to make a brief comment. When discussions are going on at the back of the room, it is tiring for those asking questions. Perhaps we could ask those who need to hold the discussions to leave the room. If the discussions are necessary, then let's stop the meeting completely. Personally, it bothers me. [English]

The Chair:

Yes, I think it has subsided now. I ask everybody in the room that if you're going to have a conversation that's loud enough to hear from the table here, to move into the hallway.

Thank you.

Go ahead, Mr. Gourde. [Translation]

Mr. Jacques Gourde:

That's it for me. Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Okay, thank you.

Next up for five minutes is Mr. Baylis.

Mr. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

It's good to have you back, Mr. Therrien, because you're very private and we don't get a lot of information.

There are a couple of statements that I would like to refute. One is that Canadians are afraid of technology or digitization. I point to the statistic that 85% of people do their taxes online. They're not forced to; they have the right to do it on paper. They choose to do it online for all types of efficiency reasons.

Have you any evidence, other than what's been stated, that Canadians are anti-technology or against digitization per se?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

I don't think I've said that Canadians are concerned with the use of technology.[Translation]

I did not say that they distrust technology.

Studies consistently show that Canadians are concerned that their privacy is not being protected, in both the public and the private sectors, and that they do not have control over their information. That is not to say that they do not use technology or that they distrust it. It is rather that they believe that their privacy is not being sufficiently protected, by the public or the private sectors.

Services have to be digitized, but with the use of different means, legal, technological or whatever, to make completely sure that the information is secure.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You are making quite an important distinction.[English]

Although there is the ability to be abused through digitization, people were stealing identities and doing all this long before we had computers and digitization. People aren't against digitization, but they just have a concern about their privacy and want to ensure that if we do go that route, we do what we can to protect their privacy. Is that what...?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

Yes, there was theft of information before, but clearly with digitization, the scope of the consequence of a breach is magnified greatly.

(1620)

Mr. Frank Baylis:

It is right now. That's true.

Ms. Cavoukian, who is an expert in this area, testified at the last session. She made the argument that security and privacy are not incompatible. It's not one or the other. In fact, we have to stop thinking this way. If things were done correctly, we could actually have more privacy with better security as opposed to always saying, “Well, if we had a lot more security, we'd lose on this side or that side.”

Do you have thoughts along those lines?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

I agree. It's not a zero-sum game between privacy and security, nor between privacy and innovation, nor between privacy and improved service delivery. It is possible to have all of that, provided that the systems, including the legal systems, are designed properly. That leads me to privacy by design, which is an important concept that should be in the law but should also be applied on the ground by the bureaucracy, by departments, in the delivery of services

Mr. Frank Baylis:

In a way, we find ourselves right now where we've heard comparisons to the wild west or whatever. When something is new, the people go out, prospect, run, grab territory and all that, and then afterwards the law comes in and we slowly structure things around it. We're living in an era right now where there are not sufficient laws certainly in the digital world, and we have to catch up, if I can say that. However, I would ask you to underline that we cannot, as some people say, go back or even just stay static. We have to go forward, but we can go forward with what Ms. Cavoukian came up with as a concept, which is rather new, and that is privacy by design, so that we start to think about privacy as we're designing the next one.

What are your thoughts there?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

I agree. I totally support the principle of privacy by design. I would say this with regard to the fact that digitization is something that will necessarily happen—that's true—but privacy by design means that, again, the way in which we proceed needs to be thought out seriously and rigorously.

One of the issues to be considered is the role of the private sector in the delivery of services by government. You mentioned the wild west. You're well placed to know there are important problems with the way in which certain corporations are handling the personal data of individuals. Improving government services is being thought out in terms of relying on technology owned by the private sector in the delivery of services. That's fine, but the way in which these services will be delivered, calling on the private sector—say, the Alexas of this world—the government needs to be very careful as to how this will happen for many reasons, including who owns or controls the information that goes through Alexa when a citizen is asking for services from its government. What happens to that information? Is this information under public control or private control? Is it monetized or not? These are very important and fundamental questions.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Baylis.

Mr. Kent, you're next up for five minutes.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Thanks.

Commissioner, this committee has tabled three reports with the government over the past year or so recommending in each of those reports that your powers be expanded, that you have order-making powers, that there be more serious and significant penalties for violations, that in terms of the act itself, the government consider the GDPR and upgrade, renovate, and stiffen Canadian privacy regulations from the very barely acceptable level we're at today.

Would you recommend that your office be a direct participant, a hand on the pen at the table, as the design of digital government is considered and written? In other words, do you think it's essential that the Privacy Commissioner be a key partner in any project going ahead, either in the early stages or certainly in later stages of digital government?

(1625)

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

We have value to add, for sure, and we have made our services available to government. Sometimes they have accepted that offer. Is it necessary? That might not be for me to say, but I do generally believe that we have value to add and that systems that would consider our recommendations have a better chance of being privacy sensitive.

Where it is not a question of choice is at the back end, where once a law is designed that, for instance, talks about the conditions under which data will be shared between departments, there needs to be a strong regulator to ensure that these conditions are respected. That is the OPC.

Hon. Peter Kent:

If digital government is the property of the government and if there was hypothetically a significant and serious data breach, a damaging data breach, involving the privacy of Canadian citizens or anyone in the digital government system, would you think it would be the Privacy Commissioner that would level penalties against those responsible for that data breach? How would that work if government is actually the corporate controller of that system?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

You're raising the issue—

Hon. Peter Kent:

It's about accountability.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

Okay, so government needs to be accountable in the way in which it manages information in relation to citizens. We, the OPC, are well placed to ensure that in individual circumstance the government is called to be accountable and that a breach of data be identified and remedied.

Does it need to lead to a financial penalty? I'm less certain of that in the public sector, but there needs to be somebody to identify violations of the law and to ensure that these violations are remedied, and we are well placed to do that.

Hon. Peter Kent:

The Estonian model has repositories. As you said, there are many silos that are hooked into the central system and the single citizen chip. There will almost certainly be competition for financial gain by a variety of parties to participate in digital government. Neil Parmenter, the president of the Canadian Bankers Association, in a speech that I attended last month, made a point of saying Canada's banks are trusted. There is the double-factor log-in, and he expressed an interest in the banks being a central participant in digital government. Do you have any thoughts on that type of proposition?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

It is true that banks offer services that, compared to others, are well protected. I have no problem in principle with banks or other reputable organizations, private organizations, being responsible, say, to manage the common identifier. That's one element of the system. What type of information they actually get when the government delivers services to the citizens, for me, is a different issue, but in terms of managing a secure common identifier, banks are probably well placed to do that.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Kent.

Last up is Monsieur Picard. [Translation]

Mr. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Good afternoon, Mr. Therrien.

Let me put something to you; I would like to know your opinion.

I am not criticizing the work we have done at all. I have thought for a long time that the committee has been doing valuable, excellent work. However, I want to suggest to you another way of looking at things.

We have been studying the protection of personal data for six or eight months. But I feel that we are spinning our wheels and getting nowhere, because we have not managed to define the problem we are trying to fix, by which I mean defining what personal information is. Let me explain.

People panic at the idea that a licence plate can be read, pretending that it is private. But all that plate can do is identify the vehicle on which it is mounted, not the person at the wheel. In the same way, an IP address does not reveal the identity of the person at the computer keyboard, just where the computer is located.

People gladly provide a lot of personal information. For example, you may remember when, in the first video clubs, we did not hesitate to provide our driving license numbers so that we could rent movies.

The reason why I feel that we do not want to touch the problem of defining personal information is that most of the witnesses we have heard from for almost a year have replied that the best way to protect our personal information was not through technology, but through transparency. Companies understand that people are ready to give them almost any personal information but, in return, they have to commit to telling them what they are going to do with it. So that means that the range of the data that you are ready to provide to anyone at all is not defined. As a result, if we are not able to define the problem that we want to fix, it will be difficult to define the measures that we want to take. Why not just simply stop right there and prevent any data transactions? If someone wants to conduct such a transaction, they would have to communicate with you to find out how to manage the information that is being communicated. That is the first part of my question.

(1630)

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

In law, I am afraid I must tell you that you are wrong when you suggest that IP addresses are not personal information. The Supreme Court decided otherwise in a judgment some years ago. Since an IP address can be linked to an individual, it is personal information that must be protected as such.

With licence plates, the issue is somewhat not quite the same. After all, 800 people do not drive my vehicle, just my wife and I. Perhaps that is personal information as well.

So personal information is defined. It is pretty simple; it is any information, including a number, that can be linked to an identifiable person. We can discuss it, but I am inclined not to accept your premise.

Is transparency part of the solution in protecting privacy? Yes, it is part of the solution but it is far from the entire solution. You can be transparent, but you can still damage someone's reputation. However, transparency is part of the solution.

This certainly is a complex question, and if we are having difficulty moving forward, it is because it is complex on a number of levels, including conceptual and technological. That is why, more recently, I have focused on privacy as a human right. So let's start with basic principles.

When I say that privacy is a fundamental right, it is a concept that should be recognized, not only in the law, but also by government bodies that, day after day, implement technological and other systems to collect data and to administer public programs, including by technology. That brings us back to the importance of protecting privacy from the design stage, a concept that we should always keep in mind. If we have a choice between providing a service in a way that endangers privacy and providing the same service differently, but just as effectively, in a way that protects privacy, the concept of protecting privacy from the design stage tells us that we should choose the latter option.

All these privacy issues may seem nebulous, but, in law, what constitutes personal information is quite clear. We have to keep in mind which aspects of privacy we want to protect, so that we make sure that it is protected in government activities and in legislation.

(1635)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Picard.

I have Mr. Angus for the last few minutes. I was asked to split some time by two other members who haven't had a chance to ask a question. We'll do that following Mr. Angus, and then we'll go to the motion that was brought up before.

We'll go to Mr. Angus for three minutes.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Mr. Therrien.

We began a study much earlier in this Parliament on a data breach with Cambridge Analytica and Facebook. Since then, I sometimes feel we've become the parliamentary committee on Facebook. We followed them halfway around the world trying to get answers, and we're still being buffaloed, and I think we'll invite half the world to come here to meet with us again in Ottawa when it's a little warmer to maybe get some more answers from Facebook. But it seems we go week in, week out with new questions and seemingly a continual lack of accountability.

I want to ask you a specific question, though, whether or not you've looked into it. We had the explosive article in The New York Times about the privileges given to certain Facebook users, to be able to read the personal, private messages of Facebook users. They mentioned that RBC was one of them. We've heard from RBC. They said they never had those privileges, that they never did that. The Tyee is now reporting that Facebook has told them that RBC had the capacity to read, write and delete private messages of Facebook users who were using the banking app.

Have you looked into that? Do you think that requires follow-up? Should we take RBC's word for it? Should we, as a committee, be considering this as some of our unfinished business on the Facebook file?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

The short answer is yes, in two respects.

When the British parliamentary committee published the documents from Six4Three, we saw references to the Royal Bank, and we considered whether to look at this particular aspect in the context of our investigation into Facebook and AIQ. As we were doing this, we received complaints from individuals on whether or not the Royal Bank was violating PIPEDA in some way in receiving information in that way. So that question is the subject of a separate investigation.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Just to be clear, you received complaints about RBC violations—

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

About RBC's alleged role in receiving information from Facebook, allegedly in violation of PIPEDA.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Okay. From your knowledge of this back channel that was given to certain preferred customers with Facebook, would it have been possible to read the private messages of Facebook users if you had access to that?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

I can't comment on that. We're investigating. We'll find out for sure.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

You're investigating. Okay, fair enough.

Thank you very much for that.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Angus.

We're going to go to Ms. Vandenbeld for two and a half minutes, and then....

Mrs. Mona Fortier:

She'll take it all.

The Chair:

Okay.

Go ahead.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, for your indulgence on my getting the last question. It's very important and interesting testimony.

I'd like to pick up on this idea of ownership and consent in the context of government. If I go on Air Canada, and they ask me for my email and cellphone number so they'll text me when my flight is delayed or anything, I have a choice to do that. However, there are things in government where you don't have a choice. You have to provide information. Your taxes are required. The idea of consent immediately has a different implication when something has to be provided.

In that context, how do you see consent, or even who owns that data? If I go to Air Canada, I can take my profile off. I have a choice. But with government, if there's a criminal record, you can't say you want to delete this or change that. The information no longer really belongs to the person.

Where does ownership and consent go when you're dealing with government?

(1640)

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

You're absolutely right that in a government context, consent is not always required for a government to collect information. The situation doesn't arise in quite the same way. We have rules already in the Privacy Act for this.

One rule is that, as it stands, government should collect information, to the extent possible, directly from the person interested in the information, either with or without consent, say, in a law enforcement situation. The principle is to collect directly from the individual, which then leads to questions around what's on social media or potentially publicly available. That's a difficult area to navigate under the current act. But the first principle is to collect normally from the individual concerned, with or without consent. That's not the quite the same situation as for the private sector. I agree that consent is not always required.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Given that, we heard that government is using things like predictive analytics and could also use more in the future. I think the example that was given is that CRA can even use some form of AI with predictive analytics to determine where fraud is more likely to be occurring, so they can target and look at those sorts of things.

However, if you think of the concept of privacy by design, that is specifically saying that data is used for the purpose for which it's collected. If you're providing information to CRA about your taxes, but CRA has a mandate to investigate tax fraud, it may not necessarily be the purpose for which it was collected, but it might be a legitimate use of the information by government. That's just one example.

In this world of more predictive analytics and more AI, where does the idea of privacy by design fit with that?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

In a tax context, there is information that CRA obtains directly from the taxpayer. It is possible that the CRA looks at social media and other environmental information to gather intelligence and may put all of this information towards artificial intelligence. It's important. Data analytics is a new reality and it has many advantages.

However, AI systems need to be implemented in a way such that the information that feeds the system is reliable and has been lawfully obtained, so that leads to certain consequences. If CRA looks at information on social media, and let's assume for a second that it is truly publicly available, that says nothing about the reliability of the information.

To answer your question, in an AI context, privacy by design ensures that AI is implemented in such a way that the information that feeds the system, first, has been lawfully obtained, second, is reliable, and third, does not discriminate on the basis of prohibited grounds of discrimination, but is based on objective factors of analysis.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

It's also been suggested that for many purposes we would de-identify data before you would go through this. Is that something you think is feasible?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

That is preferable but not always possible. It's conceivable that AI could work with personal information, but the preference would be to start with anonymized information.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, all.

Thanks to the commissioner and his staff for appearing before us today. It's always thoughtful and this issue seems to be ever growing, so again, thanks for coming today.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

You're welcome.

The Chair:

For the rest of the committee, we're going to stay for a minute, just to address the motion that was presented prior to Mr. Therrien's testimony.

We'll go back to Mr. Kent, first, and then to Mr. Angus.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Thank you, Chair.

I understand the Liberals would like 48 hours to consider the request, so in the interest of collegiality, I would accept that 48 hours.

However, I would put forward a motion saying that this original motion from today be dealt with as the first item of our next meeting.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Angus.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

I am absolutely outraged by my colleague's collegiality, so I am going to have to talk to my colleague beside me to decide if we are going to filibuster.

(1645)

The Chair:

It sounds like it's been a discussion that's been rather loud during the committee meeting, so next time, I would ask that it be a little quieter. It sounds like we're going to deal with this on Tuesday, so have a good weekend, everybody.

Yes, Mr. Angus.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

I have one other element. We were supposed to discuss my motion today, which is that we are going to have to plan for a parallel study to happen. Nathaniel has asked to be able to work on the language of my motion in advance of a public meeting.

Just in the interest of being really collegial—you get one out of the whole four years in Parliament, and this is it and you can put it in your pocket.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

We can put that on Twitter.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Yes, you could put it on Twitter. I'm being collegial today.

I will come back with some language that hopefully works for everyone and I'll pass it to Peter to look at it.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thanks, everybody. Have a good weekend.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'accès à l'information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l'éthique

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Bob Zimmer (Prince George—Peace River—Northern Rockies, PCC)):

Bienvenue, tout le monde.

Selon l'avis de convocation, il s'agit de la 133e réunion du Comité permanent de l'accès à l'information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l'éthique. L'étude porte sur la protection des données personnelles dans les services gouvernementaux numériques.

Aujourd'hui, nous accueillons une personne qui a comparu à plusieurs reprises dans le passé, Daniel Therrien, commissaire à la protection de la vie privée du Canada. Nous recevons également Gregory Smolynec, sous-commissaire, Secteur des politiques et de la promotion, et Lara Ives, directrice exécutive, Direction des politiques, de la recherche et des affaires parlementaires.

Avant de céder la parole à M. Therrien, je veux laisser M. Kent intervenir rapidement.

L'hon. Peter Kent (Thornhill, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Chers collègues, j'espère que j'obtiendrai le consentement unanime à ce sujet. À la lumière de la récente annonce de la ministre des Institutions démocratiques selon laquelle un nouveau groupe de travail sera mis sur pied pour surveiller la publicité, les messages et les renseignements divulgués au cours des prochaines élections, je suggère de prévoir au moins une réunion pour convoquer des représentants de quelques-unes des sept organisations qui assureront une surveillance pour veiller à ce que les reportages et les publicités soient acceptables.

Le président:

Monsieur Angus.

M. Charlie Angus (Timmins—Baie James, NPD):

Si je comprends bien, je pense que ce serait avantageux pour nous. Comme avec les recommandations unanimes des parties pour protéger le système électoral, notre comité a formulé des recommandations. Je pense qu'il vaudrait la peine de faire valoir notre point de vue à ce sujet.

Je pense que c'est probablement plus adapté à un plan qui porte sur la cybersécurité et les cybermenaces, étant donné que les menaces visant les élections sont beaucoup plus subtiles. Les manipulations peuvent être plus difficiles à repérer.

Il serait bien de savoir si ces représentants ont examiné nos travaux et de les interroger. Je serais très favorable à ce que l'on procède ainsi.

Le président:

Monsieur Saini.

M. Raj Saini (Kitchener-Centre, Lib.):

Je n'y vois pas d'inconvénient, mais je préférerais une motion officielle pour que je puisse savoir exactement ce que vous voulez et quelles sont les organisations.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

D'accord.

M. Raj Saini:

Nous l'envisagerons.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Ce n'est pas nécessaire. J'en fais la proposition. Passons au vote. Si vous jugez bon de rejeter la motion, alors nous procéderons à un vote en bonne et due forme.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York, Lib.):

Pouvez-vous répéter le libellé exact?

L'hon. Peter Kent:

À la lumière de l'annonce faite par la ministre hier selon laquelle un nouveau groupe de travail composé de représentants soit créé...

Le président:

C'est le groupe de travail sur la sécurité, je crois.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

... le groupe de travail sur la sécurité, qui comprend le Conseil privé, le SCRS —, les sept organisations qui ont été nommées... Nous les inviterions à expliquer comment elles perçoivent leur nouvelle fonction, et nous pourrions leur accorder quelques semaines pour y réfléchir. Je suppose qu'elles ont été mises au courant avant que la ministre en fasse l'annonce hier, mais on les inviterait à discuter de leur mission et de la façon dont ils la réaliseront.

La ministre n'a pas été en mesure de dire hier quand les Canadiens seront prévenus de violations éventuelles ou quel est l'objectif du groupe de travail, mais je pense que ce serait utile, plus particulièrement compte tenu des travaux que nous avons menés dans ce dossier au cours de la dernière année.

Le président:

Raj est le prochain intervenant, et ensuite Charlie?

M. Charlie Angus:

J'ai un libellé pour une motion.

Le président:

D'accord. On vous écoute, monsieur Angus.

M. Charlie Angus:

« Que le Comité invite le groupe de travail sur la sécurité composé de sept organisations » — nous pourrions les nommer — « pour expliquer au Comité son rôle afin de protéger l'intégrité du système électoral canadien pour les élections de 2019 ».

Le président:

Par souci de clarté, fournissez-vous le libellé pour M. Kent?

M. Charlie Angus:

Oui. Il expliquait ce qu'il voulait, mais je pense que nous voulons seulement que le groupe de travail sur la sécurité nous décrive son rôle et son plan pour protéger l'intégrité du système électoral du Canada.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Monsieur le président, je peux maintenant vous donner la liste car l'application a téléchargé. C'est le greffier du Bureau du Conseil privé, la conseillère à la sécurité nationale et au renseignement, la sous-ministre de la Justice, le sous-ministre de la Sécurité publique et le sous-ministre d'Affaires mondiales Canada. C'est un groupe de personnes estimées.

Le président:

Madame Fortier.

(1535)

Mme Mona Fortier (Ottawa—Vanier, Lib.):

J'aimerais qu'on ajourne le débat sur la motion et qu'on laisse le commissaire faire sa déclaration.

Le président:

Nous allons d'abord entendre le témoignage de M. Therrien, puis nous reviendrons à la motion plus tard. Est-ce que cela vous va?

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Les libéraux veulent demander conseil.

Le président:

Est-ce juste, monsieur Angus?

M. Charlie Angus:

Je veux seulement clarifier les règles. Je ne crois pas que demander l'ajournement du débat clarifie quoi que ce soit. Je suppose que Peter sera d'accord pour reporter le débat.

Le président:

Nous allons passer au vote.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Supposons que nous allons revenir à la question...

Le président:

Nous nous prononçons sur l'ajournement du débat.

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président:

J'imagine que nous...

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Tant que nous passons au vote d'ici la fin de la réunion...

Le président:

D'accord. Entendu.

Monsieur Therrien, on vous écoute. [Français]

M. Daniel Therrien (commissaire à la protection de la vie privée du Canada, Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée du Canada):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Messieurs les membres du Comité, je vous remercie de m'avoir invité à vous donner mon point de vue dans le cadre de votre étude sur les répercussions sur la protection de la vie privée et les obstacles juridiques éventuels liés à la mise en œuvre de services gouvernementaux numériques au Canada.

La Feuille de route de la Stratégie de données pour la fonction publique fédérale, qui a été publiée en novembre 2018 et qui nous a été communiquée à la fin de l'année dernière, constitue un bon point de départ pour cette étude, puisqu'elle définit l'approche du gouvernement.

Dans ce document, le gouvernement indique ce qui suit: Les données ont le pouvoir de permettre au gouvernement de prendre de meilleures décisions, de concevoir de meilleurs programmes et d'offrir des services plus efficaces. Mais pour que cela se produise [...] nous devons renouveler notre approche. Aujourd'hui, chaque ministère et organisme produit et détient un vaste éventail de données diversifiées et en constante expansion [...] Ces données sont souvent recueillies d'une manière, fondée sur des pratiques et des principes informels, qui rend difficile leur communication à d'autres ministères ou aux Canadiens. Leur utilisation est inégale dans l'ensemble du gouvernement et leur valeur est sous-optimisée dans le processus décisionnel et dans les opérations quotidiennes.

Nous appuyons, bien sûr, l'utilisation de la technologie pour améliorer la prise de décision du gouvernement et la prestation des services, mais, comme il est indiqué dans votre mandat, cela doit être effectué tout en protégeant la vie privée des Canadiens. À cet égard, il est important de se rappeler que la protection de la vie privée est un droit fondamental de la personne qui est également une condition préalable à l'exercice d'autres droits fondamentaux, comme la liberté, l'égalité et la démocratie.

La Feuille de route du gouvernement souligne la difficulté de communiquer les données dans tous les ministères et attribue cette situation aux pratiques et principes informels ou, parfois, à des obstacles juridiques. Je comprends qu'il existe en fait, au sein du gouvernement, un exercice servant à cerner ces obstacles juridiques en vue d'éliminer ceux qui seraient jugés incompatibles avec la nouvelle approche qui, selon le gouvernement, est nécessaire pour tirer parti des données.

Je dirais que ce qui est un obstacle juridique pour certains peut être considéré par d'autres comme une garantie de protection de la vie privée. La terminologie que le gouvernement ou d'autres intervenants utilisent dans ce débat n'est pas neutre. Plusieurs des obstacles présumés se trouvent aux articles 4 à 8 de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels actuelle. Ces règles devraient-elles être réexaminées en vue d'améliorer les services gouvernementaux à l'ère du numérique? Certainement. Certaines de ces règles devraient-elles être modifiées? Probablement.

Cependant, je vous demanderais de vous rappeler lors de votre étude que, bien que des rajustements puissent être souhaitables, toute nouvelle mesure législative conçue pour faciliter les services gouvernementaux numériques doit respecter la vie privée en tant que droit de la personne. Je pourrai préciser ce point au cours de la période des questions, si vous le voulez. Autrement dit, les modalités peuvent changer, mais la fondation doit être solide et respecter le droit à la vie privée. Cette fondation doit reposer sur une loi renforcée sur la protection des renseignements personnels. Comme vous le savez, nous avons fait des recommandations en ce sens en 2016. J'ajouterais ici une nouvelle recommandation, soit celle d'adopter, dans le secteur public, le concept de protection de la vie privée dès la conception.

(1540)

[Traduction]

J'ai examiné avec intérêt le témoignage qui vous a été présenté par des représentants de l'Estonie au lancement de votre étude. On parle souvent du modèle estonien en raison de son architecture technologique, mais j'ai remarqué que les représentants ont plutôt mis l'accent sur l'importance des facteurs liés à l'attitude, y compris le besoin de surmonter les cloisonnements administratifs de l'État afin de réutiliser des renseignements personnels à des fins autres que celles pour lesquelles ils ont été recueillis.

Cela pourrait être considéré comme une validation de l'opinion selon laquelle notre Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels doit être réexaminée et les « obstacles juridiques » doivent être éliminés. J'aimerais toutefois souligner qu'en Estonie, l'élimination des cloisonnements n'a pas entraîné une gestion horizontale tout azimut des données personnelles à l'échelle du gouvernement. Dans le modèle estonien, la réutilisation — ou la communication des renseignements personnels — semble plutôt fondée sur des lois généralement conformes aux principes de vie privée reconnus à l'échelle mondiale et au Règlement général sur la protection des données. Je vous encourage toutefois à faire un suivi sur les conditions juridiques qui sont en place en Estonie concernant la réutilisation.

En ce qui concerne les aspects technologiques du modèle estonien, nous comprenons qu'il n'existe pas de base de données centralisée. L'accès est plutôt accordé grâce à la capacité de relier des serveurs individuels au moyen de voies d'accès cryptées avec accès ou réutilisation autorisés à des fins légitimes déterminées. Ce système qui limite l'accès à des fins précises par les organismes gouvernementaux est susceptible de réduire le profilage.

Nous comprenons également que des mesures de protection de la vie privée et de sécurité sont prises au moyen du cryptage et de l'utilisation de la chaîne de blocs. Cela est conforme à l'une de nos recommandations de 2016 concernant la refonte de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels, à savoir de créer une obligation juridique pour les institutions gouvernementales de protéger les renseignements personnels.

Je constate que l'autorité chargée de la protection des données occupe une place importante dans le modèle estonien, ce qui comprend un rôle proactif explicite, ainsi que le pouvoir de rendre des ordonnances contraignantes, de demander l'ouverture de poursuites criminelles et d'imposer des amendes lorsque des données sont traitées de façon non conforme à la loi. De même, la place qu'occupe le Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée pour ce qui est de son rôle proactif et de surveillance devrait être tout aussi importante, conformément à nos recommandations concernant la réforme de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels.

J'aimerais conclure avec des questions que je veux que vous preniez en considération lorsque vous examinerez plus attentivement le modèle estonien ou discuterez de son application dans le contexte canadien.

Premièrement, nous avons entendu des représentants dire que le succès du système repose sur la confiance, laquelle requiert des protections solides. Toutefois, aucun système n'est entièrement sécuritaire. Quelles mesures d'atténuation sont en place dans le modèle estonien lorsque, et non pas si, il y a une atteinte à la sécurité?

Deuxièmement, la feuille de route de la stratégie de données du Canada suppose que la valeur d'un modèle comme celui de l'Estonie réside dans l'analyse des données détenues par l'ensemble du gouvernement. Étant donné la décentralisation des ensembles de données et le régime législatif qui limite la réutilisation à des fins précises, nous ne voyons pas bien comment cela pourrait être réalisé. Vous pourriez peut-être considérer cet enjeu.

Enfin, je suggère d'obtenir des éclaircissements de la part des fonctionnaires estoniens au sujet des conditions juridiques régissant la réutilisation des données, car c'est une mesure de protection importante pour veiller à ce qu'il n'y ait aucun profilage global et d'échange de données horizontales sans frontières, comme je l'appelle.

Merci de votre attention. Je me ferai un plaisir de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci encore une fois, monsieur Therrien.

Pour les sept premières minutes, nous entendrons Nate et David.

Allez-y.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Merci beaucoup.

Ma première question porte sur le modèle estonien et sur les voies légales.

Lorsque Michael Geist a comparu devant nous, il a dit que la mise en place de mesures technologiques semble être une excellente idée, mais que nous ne pourrions pas avoir confiance dans ces mesures et que nous devons revoir la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels. Je crois que vous êtes du même avis.

Pour revoir la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et assurer la clarté de l'échange de renseignements, je crois savoir qu'en Estonie, ils ont un modèle « une fois suffit », mais il faut des autorisations législatives précises pour pouvoir réutiliser les renseignements. Donc, votre argument selon lequel la loi en Estonie doit être clarifiée est important.

En ce qui concerne la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels, vous croyez que nous devrions clarifier les voies légales pour l'échange de renseignements au Canada également.

M. Daniel Therrien:

Oui. Nous avons des règles de longue date, bien entendu, pour régir les conditions en vertu desquelles les données peuvent être communiquées entre les ministères. Ce sont essentiellement les articles 4 à 8 de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels de la fonction publique.

Votre mandat traite des obstacles juridiques. La feuille de route de la stratégie de données énonce les obstacles juridiques éventuels. Je présume que lorsque le gouvernement parle d'obstacles, il fait référence à l'examen pour déterminer si les articles 4 à 8 sont encore appropriés. J'en conviens, mais je dis aussi que ce sont des règles importantes, et bien que certaines modalités ou certains ajustements peuvent être envisagés, ne perdons pas de vue l'objectif principal, à savoir qu'il faut respecter la vie privée.

(1545)

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Le gouvernement a-t-il communiqué avec vous pour discuter d'un projet d'identification numérique?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Nous avons eu des discussions très générales avec le gouvernement à la fin de l'année dernière à propos de la feuille de route de la stratégie de données. Nous avons été invités récemment à présenter nos points de vue sur les stratégies que les ministères doivent ou peuvent adopter conformément à la feuille de route. Ce processus n'a pas été entamé, mais j'accueille favorablement cette invitation du gouvernement.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

En ce qui concerne l'identification numérique plus précisément, je crois savoir que des conversations sont en cours au fédéral pour réaliser un projet conjointement avec les provinces. Vous a-t-on consulté à ce sujet?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Ces discussions sont en cours depuis un certain nombre d'années. Mme Ives a peut-être quelque chose à ajouter à ce sujet.

Mme Lara Ives (directrice exécutive, Direction des politiques, de la recherche et des affaires parlementaires, Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée du Canada):

Oui. J'ajouterais qu'il y a eu diverses versions au fil des ans. Je pense que la plus récente était en 2012. Nous avons passé en revue les évaluations des facteurs relatifs à la vie privée plutôt qu'un projet d'identification numérique: des moyens d'accès aux services gouvernementaux en ligne. L'une d'elles est publiée par le gouvernement du Canada et l'autre utilise les justificatifs bancaires, mais cela ne coïncide pas tout à fait avec l'identification numérique.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

J'ai une dernière question, puis je vais céder la parole à David.

Y a-t-il des exemples qui démontrent que le gouvernement actuel ou les gouvernements précédents ont mis en ligne des services pour offrir de meilleurs services numériques en s'adressant directement à vous et en vous disant, « Réglons les problèmes liés à la protection des renseignements personnels »? Avons-nous un exemple canadien d'un service qui a fait tout ce qu'il fallait? Prenez votre temps.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Daniel Therrien:

Dans un esprit d'optimisme et de positivisme, je dirais qu'il est intéressant d'examiner le modèle estonien de ce point de vue. Il renferme de nombreux aspects positifs. Ce sont les détails qui posent problème, de toute évidence, mais le modèle n'est pas si mal.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Très bien. Merci beaucoup.

David.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Je pense qu'il est plus facile de partager des données que du temps, mais nous allons faire ce que nous pouvons. [Français]

J'aimerais comprendre comment on peut définir les paramètres de l'autorisation donnée par une personne. Mardi, j'ai donné comme exemple les lecteurs automatiques de plaques d'immatriculation des véhicules. Lorsqu'une auto passe, le lecteur enregistre le numéro de la plaque. C'est le gouvernement qui fait cela. Ce sont des données que nous fournissons sans que ce soit vraiment volontaire, étant donné que nous n'avons pas d'autre choix que de les fournir.

Si, partout au pays, les ministères ou les services de police utilisent ces données sans vraiment avoir obtenu l'autorisation des gens pour le faire, comment peut-on déterminer si ceux-ci ont donné leur consentement? Où tire-t-on la ligne?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je vais considérer que votre question repose sur le principe voulant qu'il s'agisse d'informations du domaine public. Les plaques d'immatriculation sont publiques, dans un sens, puisque les voitures circulent sur les voies publiques. Des gens — le gouvernement, mais aussi des compagnies — se prévalent de la nature publique de l'environnement pour recueillir des données et les utiliser ensuite de façon à ce qu'elles ne soient pas considérées comme des renseignements personnels. Dans ce cas, les règles concernant l'utilisation et la divulgation de ces renseignements sont plus permissives.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À chaque étape du déplacement, on peut lire le numéro de la plaque et savoir à quel individu elle appartient, quelle est son adresse et quel est son historique. Même si on ne recueille pas chaque fois ces données, on peut suivre l'individu d'un bout à l'autre du pays et savoir quels sont ses déplacements.

Ce n'est pas le but des plaques d'immatriculation, mais, en déterminant que c'est du domaine public, a-t-on l'autorisation d'utiliser les données de cette façon? Les États-Unis le font déjà.

(1550)

M. Daniel Therrien:

Il faut être prudent avant de considérer des renseignements comme étant publics. En effet, comme vous venez de le dire, il est quand même possible d'identifier l'individu qui est associé au véhicule, son comportement, et ainsi de suite. Donc, même si les renseignements sont soi-disant publics, il faut se demander si ce sont néanmoins des renseignements personnels et quelle est l'autorité du ministère en question pour colliger les renseignements. Cela se fait ministère par ministère. Même si ces renseignements sont du domaine public, le fait de les recueillir doit être lié à un mandat du ministère en question. C'est une condition très importante prévue dans la loi actuelle. Elle pourrait être renforcée, selon certaines recommandations que nous avons faites en vue de modifier la LPRP.

Bref, il faut être prudent à l'égard des données qui sont du domaine public. En outre, il est important de s'assurer que chaque ministère qui collige et utilise de tels renseignements a bel et bien un mandat pour le faire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.[Traduction]

Me reste-t-il du temps?

Le président:

Vous n'avez plus de temps. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Nous allons maintenant entendre M. Kent pour les sept prochaines minutes.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je suis ravi de vous revoir, monsieur le commissaire, ainsi que vos partenaires qui sont ici aujourd'hui.

En raison des importantes différences entre le modèle estonien et le Canada à l'heure actuelle... L'identité numérique en Estonie couvre littéralement la vie entière des gens, pas seulement les données relatives à leur santé et leurs renseignements fiscaux, mais aussi leur éducation... Elle couvre pratiquement tous les aspects de leur vie quotidienne.

J'ai lu votre déclaration, et vous semblez considérer la première étape d'un gouvernement numérique, si on en vient à cela au Canada, comme étant le début au niveau fédéral. Est-il pratique d'essayer de se lancer dans des secteurs où il y a un écart marqué et aucun chevauchement entre les administrations provinciales et municipales?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Bien entendu, une très grande différence entre l'Estonie et le Canada est que c'est un État unitaire tandis que nous sommes un État fédéral. Cela crée diverses difficultés au Canada pour mettre sur pied un système. Ce sont des problèmes d'ordre technologique, mais les administrations et les lois sont différentes aussi. À mon avis, il n'est pas inconcevable d'avoir un système qui communiquerait les renseignements entre les gouvernements fédéral et provinciaux, mais en raison de la complexité de l'État fédéral canadien, il est probablement plus pratique de commencer à un niveau.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Avez-vous lu la transcription des témoignages de M. Cavoukian et de M. Geist, qui ont comparu devant le Comité cette semaine?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Oui.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Pourriez-vous nous faire part de vos observations générales? M. Cavoukian avait des préoccupations très importantes.

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je vais vous les présenter à ma façon.

Je pense que le modèle estonien est intéressant, car le risque des services gouvernementaux numérisés basés sur un identificateur numérique commun serait que le gouvernement, que ce soit le gouvernement fédéral ou les gouvernements en général, aurait un seul profil par personne. Il est alors très difficile d'assurer la protection des renseignements personnels.

L'un des avantages évidents du modèle estonien est que les données ne sont pas centralisées. Elles sont encore entre les mains d'un grand nombre d'institutions, et il y a une voie technologique avec des autorités judiciaires pertinentes qui autorisent que les renseignements soient réutilisés d'un ministère à un autre. La décentralisation du modèle estonien, à première vue, semble être un aspect positif qui réduit ce qui serait un risque autrement.

Vous avez mentionné des préoccupations qui ont été exprimées.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Oui.

M. Daniel Therrien:

Pouvez-vous être plus précis?

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Je n'ai pas la transcription devant moi, mais essentiellement, après avoir lu bon nombre des remarques formulées par M. Cavoukian, la cybersécurité est vulnérable lorsque des renseignements numériques sont transférés de dépôts de données à une entité qui demande d'y avoir accès. Les garanties de sécurité absolue n'existent pas encore.

(1555)

M. Daniel Therrien:

Il ne fait aucun doute que les systèmes technologiques sont vulnérables aux atteintes à la sécurité. Je ne suis pas certain s'il existera un jour un système exempt de ce risque. D'un point de vue juridique, je pense que s'il y a des services numériques, il est important qu'il y ait une obligation légale du gouvernement d'appliquer de robustes mesures de protection technologiques. Sur le plan technologique, en Estonie, comme vous le savez, il y a des chaînes de blocs et du cryptage. Ce sont des systèmes de pointe. Garantissent-ils qu'il n'y aura aucune atteinte à la sécurité? Non.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Dans votre exposé, vous avez parlé de confiance et de consentement. Encore une fois, l'une des principales différences entre l'Estonie et le Canada, c'est que l'Estonie a une population très docile depuis l'effondrement de l'Union soviétique et une nouvelle démocratie très énergique au sein de laquelle on est déterminé à créer un gouvernement numérique à partir de zéro.

Lorsqu'on tient compte du scepticisme naturel des Canadiens et du cynisme générationnel à l'égard de l'environnement numérique, ainsi que de Cambridge Analytica, de Facebook, d'Aggregate IQ, de tous les scandales et maintenant de la controverse liée à Sidewalk Labs et des préoccupations des gens liées à l'exposition, à la vie privée, au contenu personnel, à la question de savoir qui possède quelles données et comment elles sont accessibles, pensez-vous qu'étant donné tous ces facteurs, il sera difficile d'obtenir le consentement des Canadiens pour ce type de gouvernement numérique dans un délai raisonnable? Je parle peut-être d'une décennie — de notre vivant.

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je crois que les hauts fonctionnaires estoniens ont mentionné que même en Estonie, les systèmes n'ont pas été mis en oeuvre du jour au lendemain. Il faut suivre plusieurs étapes.

Je crois qu'il est essentiel d'avoir des mesures de protection sur le plan technologique. Les mesures de protection sur le plan juridique sont également essentielles. Je dirais probablement qu'une mise en oeuvre graduelle, dans laquelle le gouvernement a l'occasion de démontrer que le système mérite qu'on lui fasse confiance, pourrait rassurer davantage la population. Il ne fait aucun doute qu'actuellement, les Canadiens craignent que leur vie privée ne soit pas respectée.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Kent.

La parole est maintenant à M. Angus. Il a sept minutes.

M. Charlie Angus:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Therrien, nous sommes toujours heureux de vous accueillir au Comité.

J'aimerais revenir sur votre dernière déclaration au sujet de la confiance et sur la question de savoir si on devrait s'attendre à ce que les Canadiens fassent confiance à un tel système.

Au fil des ans, dans le cadre de mes travaux liés à ce dossier, j'ai observé que nous avions des fuites de données chaque année. Certaines d'entre elles sont des fuites de données extrêmement importantes, par exemple les renseignements liés aux prêts contractés par un quart de million d'étudiants ou plus, et récemment, les renseignements personnels de 80 000 personnes ont été compromis par l'entremise de l'ARC.

Vos travaux laissent-ils croire que le nombre de fuites change à mesure que la technologie évolue? Est-ce une norme...? D'une année à l'autre, observons-nous certaines fuites assez importantes, mais également des fuites plus petites? Observez-vous un grand changement au sein des ministères?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je ne dirais pas que nous voyons de grandes améliorations à cet égard. Il ne fait aucun doute qu'inspirer cette confiance représente un énorme défi.

J'aimerais utiliser un exemple qui est représentatif sur de nombreux plans, selon moi. Comme vous le savez, le gouvernement a mis en oeuvre un système de paie appelé Phénix qui a fait l'objet de critiques à plusieurs niveaux. Au Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée du Canada, nous avons mené une enquête sur les mesures de sécurité et de protection de la vie privée qui avaient été mises en oeuvre, ou qui ne l'avaient pas été, dans le système Phénix. L'une des conclusions très préoccupantes auxquelles nous sommes parvenus au cours de notre enquête, c'est que des hauts fonctionnaires du gouvernement ont délibérément décidé de ne pas surveiller étroitement l'accès aux renseignements personnels dans le système, car cela aurait été coûteux, cela aurait entraîné des retards dans le système, etc.

Pour répondre directement à votre question, je ne vois pas beaucoup d'amélioration. Je dirais qu'il est essentiel, avant de mettre en oeuvre ces systèmes à plus grande échelle — pour revenir aux attitudes —, que les hauts fonctionnaires du gouvernement adoptent une attitude qui consiste à veiller à ce que des mesures de sécurité soient déployées avant la mise en oeuvre des systèmes.

(1600)

M. Charlie Angus:

Je vous remercie beaucoup de cette réponse, car elle m'amène à ma préoccupation.

Je suis ici depuis 15 ans. Je vois mes collègues de l'autre côté et ils rayonnent de l'espoir des nouveaux croyants qui pensent que nous avons finalement atteint le salut et que le gouvernement fonctionnera. Mais moi, au fil des ans, je suis devenu sceptique et agnostique.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Charlie Angus: Lorsqu'il s'agit des activités du gouvernement, je suis comme saint Thomas. J'ai fait partie d'un comité après l'autre où nous étions certains que les plus gros joueurs étaient les meilleurs, que le gouvernement avait toujours... Chaque fois qu'on cherchait à attribuer des contrats, on tenait à choisir les plus gros fournisseurs possible. Mais les plus gros n'étaient pas les meilleurs. Les plus gros étaient beaucoup plus dispendieux. Mais les contrats, ainsi que les sous-ministres, favorisaient toujours les plus gros... et qui avait obtenu les contrats et qui ne les avait pas obtenus.

Ensuite, nous avons eu Phénix. Je présume que je demanderais aux citoyens de ma circonscription s'ils font confiance à Phénix. Ne croyez-vous pas qu'il faudrait mettre en oeuvre un ensemble extrêmement complexe de mesures de sécurité pour pouvoir rassurer les Canadiens sur le fait que tous leurs renseignements financiers, tous leurs renseignements personnels et tous les renseignements les concernant sont en sécurité, même s'ils se retrouvent dans un ministère ou un gouvernement qui subit, tous les ans, des fuites graves dans presque tous les grands ministères?

M. Daniel Therrien:

C'est complexe, mais je dirais que c'est humainement faisable. Cela indique probablement qu'il est nécessaire de mettre en oeuvre ce système de façon graduelle, car les systèmes ne peuvent pas être modifiés du jour au lendemain, et il faut donc y aller graduellement, selon moi. Manifestement, je commencerais par... On n'a pas le choix, il faut numériser les services gouvernementaux pour toutes sortes de raisons, notamment pour améliorer les services à la population. On ne peut pas refuser de le faire parce que c'est une tâche colossale ou trop complexe, mais lorsqu'on mettra cette politique en oeuvre, on ne devrait pas négliger les mesures de sécurité sur le plan politique, juridique et technologique.

M. Charlie Angus:

Merci.

Les gens auxquels je parle préféreraient certainement que des personnes répondent au téléphone lorsqu'ils ont des questions plutôt que d'obtenir leurs données numériques plus rapidement. Mais des solutions numériques seront toujours adoptées plutôt que des solutions qui favoriseraient l'embauche de gens pour répondre au téléphone.

J'aimerais savoir s'il s'agit d'un processus unidirectionnel ou bidirectionnel. Si je veux trouver mes renseignements personnels liés à l'ARC et que j'ai une carte numérique, je peux les trouver. L'un de mes collègues libéraux a laissé entendre que ce serait une excellente façon pour le gouvernement de communiquer avec les citoyens.

Pour moi, c'est très inquiétant. Si je suis obligé de tout faire en ligne et si je dois fournir tous mes renseignements en ligne, je crois qu'il est nécessaire de préciser que c'est dans le but de me fournir les services que je souhaite obtenir, mais pas nécessairement pour que le gouvernement soit en mesure de communiquer avec moi.

Comprenez-vous que si nous avons une communication bidirectionnelle, cela change la nature du processus, car le risque que les droits relatifs à la protection de la vie privée des citoyens soient bafoués augmente considérablement?

M. Daniel Therrien:

La situation que vous décrivez est exactement la raison pour laquelle je soutiens qu'il est essentiel d'examiner très attentivement le cadre juridique dans lequel des données seront échangées d'un ministère à l'autre ou dans lequel un ministère sera en mesure de réutiliser des données recueillies par un autre ministère, comme c'est le cas en Estonie.

Cela commence avec un cadre juridique approprié qui limite les circonstances dans lesquelles un ministère peut communiquer avec un citoyen parce qu'un autre ministère lui a offert un service. C'est extrêmement important. Nous avons déjà des règlements à cet égard dans les articles 4 à 8 de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels. Oui, ces articles peuvent faire l'objet d'un examen, mais c'est aussi un bon endroit pour commencer. C'est une partie importante du fondement. Ensuite, je crois que la technologie suit les principes qui ont été adoptés avec les mesures de sécurité nécessaires pour veiller à ce que, sur le plan technologique, les banques de données ne puissent pas communiquer entre elles, à moins qu'une loi les autorise à le faire.

Cela commence avec un cadre bien défini et bien conçu. On peut appeler cela un échange ou la réutilisation de renseignements.

(1605)

M. Charlie Angus:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Angus.

Nous entendrons maintenant M. Saini. Il a sept minutes.

M. Raj Saini:

Bonjour, monsieur Therrien. Nous sommes toujours heureux de vous accueillir. Je crois que vous êtes le témoin qui comparaît le plus souvent devant notre comité, et c'est très bien.

Le 23 novembre, vous avez présenté un mémoire à ISDE. Je l'ai lu. C'était très intéressant. Vous avez notamment écrit ceci: « Il n'est pas exagéré d'affirmer que la numérisation de tant d'aspects de nos vies est en train de redéfinir l'humanité. » J'irais encore plus loin en disant qu'une fois que cette marche vers la technologie est amorcée, il est très difficile de l'arrêter. Elle finira par réussir.

Je sais que nous utilisons le modèle de l'Estonie, mais si vous examinez la situation actuelle de ce pays, vous constaterez qu'il y a 1,3 million d'habitants sur 4 millions d'hectares, dont la moitié est recouverte de forêts. Il s'ensuit que la connectivité à large bande ne cause pas vraiment de grandes difficultés là-bas. Lorsque nous examinons la situation actuelle du Canada et la plus récente enquête des Nations unies sur les pays dominants dans la mise en oeuvre du gouvernement électronique, nous constatons que le Canada se trouve au 23e rang et que le reste du monde finira par s'engager dans cette voie.

Dans les notes que j'ai lues, vous indiquez que la protection de la vie privée vous préoccupe beaucoup. Nous devons établir un point de départ et un objectif. La majorité des pays, surtout les pays avancés, numérisent de plus en plus leur gouvernement. Laissons de côté l'exemple de l'Estonie pour l'instant. Où commençons-nous?

J'aborderai la question sous deux angles différents. Tout d'abord, l'Estonie a deux paliers de gouvernement. Dans certains cas, nous avons quatre paliers de gouvernement. Comment protégeons-nous la vie privée? Comme M. Angus l'a dit, les gens veulent que leurs données soient protégées, mais différents paliers de gouvernement jouent différents rôles. Les données ne sont pas toutes confiées à un seul palier de gouvernement. Par exemple, le gouvernement provincial s'occupe de la santé. Le gouvernement fédéral s'occupe de l'ARC. Comment protégeons-nous les renseignements personnels des Canadiens d'un palier de gouvernement à un autre? Comment favorisons-nous l'interopérabilité du système entre les différents ministères d'un même palier de gouvernement?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je crois qu'il serait bon de commencer par définir les circonstances précises dans lesquelles le gouvernement croit qu'il ne peut pas fournir des services efficaces en raison de ce qu'on appelle souvent le cloisonnement entre les ministères, ce qui nuit à l'échange de renseignements. Quels sont les problèmes d'ordre pratique? À part un gouvernement plus efficace, que souhaitent obtenir les citoyens? Quels types de services ne peuvent pas être fournis de façon efficace et rapide en raison d'obstacles juridiques et bureaucratiques? Je crois que ce serait un bon début.

M. Raj Saini:

De plus, selon l'hypothèse utilisée en Estonie, la population ou les citoyens sont propriétaires des données. Il leur revient de déterminer comment ces données sont distribuées et qui a le droit de les consulter.

Si nous allons à l'étape suivante, si nous commençons par le secteur public — manifestement, le secteur privé participera dans une certaine mesure, qu'il s'agisse de renseignements bancaires ou d'autres types de renseignements. Si le secteur privé a un type de technologie et que le secteur public a un autre type de technologie... L'un des exemples qui ont été utilisés est celui de la technologie des chaînes de blocs.

Une entité est régie par la LPRPDE et une autre entité est régie par la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels. Comment peut-on intégrer ces deux entités? Quel serait le point de contact où on pourrait permettre au secteur public et au secteur privé de protéger les renseignements personnels, tout en leur permettant de continuer à exercer leur compétence respective?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je ne suis pas technologue — même si, après avoir occupé ce poste pendant quelques années, j'ai maintenant acquis un peu plus de connaissances technologiques —, mais je crois que nous sommes revenus à une approche graduelle. Les systèmes seront interopérables — pas du jour au lendemain, mais graduellement. La technologie nous permettra d'y arriver. Je commencerais par déterminer ce que le gouvernement souhaite accomplir et par cerner les obstacles à la prestation de services efficaces. Ensuite, je déterminerais la technologie nécessaire pour y arriver.

(1610)

M. Raj Saini:

La numérisation du gouvernement ira manifestement de l'avant. Que les progrès soient rapides ou lents, elle ira de l'avant. Quel rôle devrait jouer le Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée et à quel moment devrait-il s'intégrer au processus, afin d'ouvrir la voie et de veiller à ce que le système n'ait pas été mis au point? Ensuite, votre Commissariat pourrait intervenir et indiquer les choses qui posent problème.

À votre avis, à quel moment votre Commissariat devrait-il intervenir? Vous parlez de technologie. Vous parlez de protection de la vie privée. Vous parlez, dans certains cas, de transférabilité. Vous parlez de différents paliers de gouvernement. Vous parlez d'interopérabilité au sein du gouvernement. À votre avis, où votre Commissariat devrait-il s'intégrer, afin de veiller à ce que cela devienne une approche efficace?

M. Daniel Therrien:

J'utiliserai le mot « proactivité », car je l'ai déjà utilisé devant votre comité lorsque j'ai parlé de la réforme de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels.

Nous avons communiqué avec des hauts fonctionnaires actuellement en poste pour leur demander de conseiller les ministères pendant qu'ils élaborent leurs stratégies. Je crois que cela fait partie de ce processus. Si des lois sont modifiées, nous devrions être consultés au sujet de l'élaboration de ces lois. Une fois les lois adoptées, nous devrions obtenir les pouvoirs plus accrus que nous avons demandés, afin de veiller à ce que des principes juridiques en matière de protection de la vie privée soient mis en oeuvre. Ce sera un long processus.

Ma réponse, c'est qu'avec nos ressources limitées, nous sommes prêts et disposés à jouer un rôle aussi proactif que possible. Nous ne déterminerons pas les objectifs. Le gouvernement déterminera les objectifs, mais nous sommes disposés, dans la mesure de nos moyens, à fournir des conseils aussitôt que possible, et une fois les systèmes adoptés, nous pourrons jouer un rôle de surveillance tout en ayant les pouvoirs juridiques nécessaires pour assumer ce rôle.

M. Raj Saini:

J'aimerais poser une dernière question.

Vous parlez de différents intervenants. À votre avis, serait-il préférable de commencer par réunir des intervenants du gouvernement, du secteur privé, du secteur public et du secteur de la technologie pour qu'ils déterminent la voie à suivre, afin que tout le monde soit sur la même longueur d'onde? De cette façon, le processus suivrait les étapes appropriées, mais de façon proactive et intermittente, de façon à veiller, si des changements répétitifs doivent être apportés, à ce qu'ils ne soient pas apportés à la fin du processus de développement d'un système, mais au début, lorsque ce développement suit les étapes appropriées.

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je crois qu'il y a lieu d'avoir ce type de discussion générale sur les principes, qu'ils soient juridiques, bureaucratiques, opérationnels ou technologiques. Toutefois, en ce qui concerne leur mise en oeuvre, je crois que cela sera fait de façon graduelle.

M. Raj Saini:

Merci.

Le président:

La parole est maintenant à M. Gourde. Il a cinq minutes. [Français]

M. Jacques Gourde (Lévis—Lotbinière, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Therrien, je vous remercie d'être ici.

Pensez-vous qu'il existe une étude économique sur la numérisation future des données au Canada, afin que les Canadiens aient un aperçu de la question? Cela représente-t-il des millions, des milliards?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je n'ai pas entendu le début de votre question. Me demandez-vous quel est le coût de la numérisation?

M. Jacques Gourde:

Existe-t-il une étude qui établit le coût d'un environnement numérique qui soit sain dans l'avenir? On sait que le registre des armes à feu a coûté presque 2 milliards de dollars, et ce, juste pour entrer les données sur les armes d'épaule. Imaginez combien cela pourrait coûter pour faire l'entrée des données numériques pour l'ensemble du Canada.

M. Daniel Therrien:

À ma connaissance, il n'y a pas de telle étude, et ce serait toute une entreprise d'en faire une.

L'une des raisons pour lesquelles je suis d'accord pour que le gouvernement numérise les services, c'est que cela permettrait d'améliorer les soins de santé, par exemple. Il peut y avoir des investissements dans la technologie, entre autres, mais il y aurait un rendement des investissements, puisque les soins de santé seraient d'une plus grande efficacité.

À ma connaissance, il n'y a pas de telle étude. Premièrement, il est difficile d'envisager l'avenir sans numérisation. Deuxièmement, même si les coûts sont importants, il y aura sûrement un rendement des investissements.

M. Jacques Gourde:

Les services de nos ministères sont déjà numérisés, mais cela se fait en vase clos. Ils donnent déjà des services aux Canadiens, mais chacun de son côté.

(1615)

M. Daniel Therrien:

Oui.

M. Jacques Gourde:

Il y a des choses qu'on pourrait sans doute garder. Quelle approche devrait-on avoir? On pourrait donner beaucoup plus de services aux Canadiens, mais sans jeter le bébé avec l'eau du bain ou tout recommencer à zéro.

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je suis d'accord avec vous. C'est pour cela que je parle d'une approche par étapes, où les systèmes qui fonctionnent seraient maintenus. Le gouvernement devrait cerner là où cela fonctionne moins bien et faire des améliorations. Cela ne veut pas dire de tout remettre en question et de repartir à zéro, sur le plan technologique du moins.

M. Jacques Gourde:

Dans un monde idéal de numérisation, quelles données confidentielles ou plus sensibles des Canadiens seraient moins bien protégées dans ce nouveau monde?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Le gouvernement possède toutes sortes de renseignements extrêmement sensibles. Je viens de parler du domaine de la santé. Les renseignements médicaux font partie des renseignements très importants. L'identification peut dépendre de la biométrie; ce sont des renseignements très sensibles. Le gouvernement ne peut faire autrement que de colliger et d'utiliser des renseignements sensibles qui sont au coeur de la vie privée et de l'intimité. Le lot d'informations que le gouvernement va détenir contiendra nécessairement des renseignements sensibles, par exemple des renseignements financiers. Par conséquent, il faut que les protections soient très élevées.

M. Jacques Gourde:

Merci, monsieur Therrien.

Monsieur le président, je veux juste faire une petite remarque. Quand il y a des conciliabules en arrière de la salle, c'est fatigant pour ceux qui posent des questions. Il faudrait peut-être demander à ceux qui ont besoin de discuter de sortir de la salle. S'il faut qu'il y ait de telles discussions, alors arrêtons la réunion complètement. Personnellement, cela me dérange. [Traduction]

Le président:

Oui. Je crois que c'est mieux maintenant. Je demanderais à tous les gens dans la salle d'aller parler dans le corridor s'ils souhaitent avoir une conversation assez forte pour que nous l'entendions à la table.

Merci.

Allez-y, monsieur Gourde. [Français]

M. Jacques Gourde:

J'ai terminé. Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

D'accord. Merci.

La parole est maintenant à M. Baylis. Il a cinq minutes.

M. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Je suis heureux de vous revoir, monsieur Therrien, car vous êtes très réservé et nous n'obtenons pas beaucoup de renseignements.

J'aimerais tout d'abord réfuter quelques affirmations. L'une d'entre elles, c'est que les Canadiens craignent la technologie ou la numérisation. J'aimerais invoquer la statistique selon laquelle 85 % des citoyens remplissent leur formulaire d'impôt en ligne. Ils ne sont pas obligés de le faire, car ils ont le droit de le faire sur papier. Toutefois, ils choisissent de le faire en ligne pour toutes sortes de raisons liées à l'efficacité.

Avez-vous des preuves, à part celles qui ont été fournies, que les Canadiens sont contre la technologie ou contre la numérisation?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je ne pense pas avoir dit que les Canadiens sont préoccupés par l'utilisation de la technologie.[Français]

Je n'ai pas dit non plus qu'ils se méfiaient de la technologie.

Les sondages démontrent constamment que les Canadiens sont préoccupés du non-respect de leur vie privée, que ce soit par le secteur public ou le secteur privé, et du fait qu'ils n'ont pas le contrôle de leurs informations. Cela ne veut pas dire qu'ils n'utilisent pas la technologie ou qu'ils s'en méfient. C'est plutôt qu'ils croient que leur vie privée n'est pas suffisamment protégée par le secteur public et le secteur privé.

Il faut numériser les services, mais en utilisant différents moyens, qu'ils soient légaux, technologiques ou autres, pour bien assurer la sécurité des informations.

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous faites une distinction assez importante.[Traduction]

Même si la numérisation peut permettre une mauvaise utilisation des données, il reste que le vol d'identité et ce genre de chose existaient bien avant la venue des ordinateurs et la numérisation. Les gens ne s'opposent pas à la numérisation; ils sont simplement préoccupés par la protection de leurs renseignements personnels et ils veulent s'assurer que, si nous nous engageons dans cette voie, nous fassions tout ce que nous pouvons pour protéger leur vie privée. Est-ce ce que...?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Oui, le vol d'information existait auparavant, mais il est clair qu'avec la numérisation les conséquences d'une atteinte à la protection des données sont beaucoup plus grandes.

(1620)

M. Frank Baylis:

Oui, effectivement. C'est vrai.

Mme Cavoukian, qui est une spécialiste du domaine, a témoigné lors de la dernière réunion. Elle a fait valoir que la sécurité et la vie privée ne sont pas incompatibles. Nous n'avons pas à choisir l'un ou l'autre. En fait, nous devons cesser de penser cela. Si nous faisons les choses correctement, il est possible de mieux protéger la vie privée grâce à de meilleurs moyens d'assurer la sécurité. Il faudrait cesser de dire « Eh bien, si nous améliorons la sécurité, ce sera au détriment de telle ou telle chose. »

Qu'avez-vous à dire à ce sujet?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je suis d'accord. Ce n'est pas un jeu à somme nulle en ce qui concerne la vie privée et la sécurité, ou la vie privée et l'innovation ou bien la vie privée et l'amélioration de la prestation des services. Nous pouvons faire tout cela, pourvu que les systèmes, y compris les systèmes juridiques, soient bien conçus. Cela m'amène à mentionner l'important concept qu'est la protection de la vie privée dès la conception, qui devrait exister en droit et qui devrait aussi être appliqué sur le terrain par la bureaucratie, les ministères, dans le cadre de la prestation des services.

M. Frank Baylis:

D'une certaine façon, nous sommes dans une situation où on a fait des comparaisons avec le Far West, par exemple. Lorsqu'il y a quelque chose de nouveau, les gens évaluent les possibilités et adoptent cette nouveauté. Ensuite, on légifère et lentement les choses se structurent en fonction des lois. Actuellement, la législation n'est pas suffisante, surtout dans le monde numérique, alors nous avons du rattrapage à faire, si je puis dire. Ainsi, j'aimerais que vous souligniez, comme certaines personnes l'affirment, que nous ne pouvons pas retourner en arrière ou même rester immobiles. Nous devons aller de l'avant, mais nous pouvons le faire de la façon qu'a proposé Mme Cavoukian, c'est-à-dire en assurant la protection de la vie privée dès la conception. C'est un concept plutôt nouveau qui nous permet de commencer à penser à la protection des renseignements personnels lors de l'étape de la conception.

Qu'en pensez-vous?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je suis d'accord. Je suis tout à fait en faveur du concept de la protection de la vie privée dès la conception. Je dirais qu'il est vrai que la numérisation aura forcément lieu, mais la protection de la vie privée dès la conception signifie que la façon dont nous procédons doit faire l'objet d'une sérieuse et rigoureuse réflexion.

Il faut notamment tenir compte du rôle du secteur privé dans la prestation de services gouvernementaux. Vous avez parlé du Far West. Vous êtes bien placé pour savoir qu'il existe d'importants problèmes en ce qui a trait à la façon dont certaines entreprises gèrent les renseignements personnels des gens. L'amélioration des services gouvernementaux se fait grâce à la technologie appartenant au secteur privé et qui est utilisée pour la prestation de services. C'est très bien, mais en ce qui a trait à la prestation des services, par l'entremise du secteur privé — par exemple, à l'aide des Alexa de ce monde — le gouvernement doit faire très attention à la façon dont cela se fera, et ce, pour de nombreuses raisons. Il doit notamment savoir à qui appartient l'information transmise par Alexa, ou qui gère cette information, lorsqu'un citoyen demande des services gouvernementaux. Qu'arrive-t-il à cette information? Est-ce qu'elle est gérée par le gouvernement ou le secteur privé? Est-ce qu'elle est monétisée? Ce sont là des questions très importantes et fondamentales.

M. Frank Baylis:

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Baylis.

Monsieur Kent, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Merci.

Monsieur le commissaire, le Comité a déposé trois rapports auprès du gouvernement au cours de la dernière année environ. Dans chacun de ces rapports, il recommande d'élargir vos pouvoirs, de vous conférer le pouvoir de rendre des ordonnances et d'accroître la sévérité des sanctions dans les cas de violation. Il recommande également, en ce qui concerne la loi, que le gouvernement tienne compte du RGPD et qu'il actualise et renforce la réglementation canadienne sur la protection des renseignements personnels, qui est à peine acceptable actuellement.

Recommanderiez-vous que votre commissariat participe directement à la conception du gouvernement numérique? Autrement dit, pensez-vous qu'il est essentiel que le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée soit un partenaire clé dans tout projet lié au gouvernement numérique, dès les premières étapes ou certainement les étapes ultérieures?

(1625)

M. Daniel Therrien:

Nous pouvons constituer une valeur ajoutée, c'est certain, et nous avons offert nos services au gouvernement. Parfois, il a accepté notre offre. Est-ce nécessaire? Ce n'est peut-être pas à moi de répondre à cette question, mais je peux dire que je crois de façon générale que nous constituons une valeur ajoutée et que les systèmes conçus en fonction de nos recommandations risquent de mieux assurer la protection des renseignements personnels.

Lorsque ce n'est pas une question de choix, lorsqu'une loi précise, par exemple, les conditions dans lesquelles les données sont échangées entre les ministères, il est nécessaire qu'un organisme de réglementation solide veille au respect de ces conditions. Cet organisme est le commissariat.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Si le gouvernement numérique est la propriété du gouvernement et qu'il survient une atteinte grave et importante à la protection des données, qui cause des torts et qui a des conséquences sur la protection des renseignements personnels de citoyens canadiens ou de quiconque, pensez-vous que ce serait le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée qui imposerait des sanctions aux responsables de cette atteinte à la protection des données? Comment cela fonctionnerait-il si le gouvernement est celui qui gère le système?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Vous soulevez la question...

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Je parle de la responsabilité.

M. Daniel Therrien:

D'accord. Le gouvernement doit être tenu responsable de la façon dont il gère les renseignements des citoyens. Le commissariat est bien placé pour veiller à ce que, dans une situation en particulier, le gouvernement soit tenu responsable et qu'il remédie à une atteinte à la protection des données.

Est-ce qu'une sanction pécuniaire doit être imposée? Je n'en suis pas certain en ce qui concerne le secteur public, mais quelqu'un doit repérer les infractions à la loi et veiller à ce que des mesures soient prises à cet égard. Nous sommes très bien placés pour faire cela.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

En Estonie, il y a des dépôts de données. Comme vous l'avez dit, il y a de nombreux silos liés au système central et il y a la carte d'identité avec puce. Il est presque certain que diverses entités vont se livrer concurrence pour bénéficier des gains financiers qu'on peut retirer de la participation au gouvernement numérique. Neil Parmenter, le président de l'Association des banquiers canadiens, dans un discours qu'il a prononcé le mois dernier et auquel j'ai assisté, a pris soin de souligner que les banques canadiennes sont dignes de confiance. Elles utilisent l'authentification à double facteur. M. Parmenter a fait valoir l'intérêt des banques à jouer un rôle central au sein du gouvernement numérique. Que pensez-vous de cela?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Il est vrai que les banques offrent des services qui, contrairement à d'autres, sont bien sécurisés. Je n'ai pas de problème en principe avec le fait que des banques ou d'autres organismes réputés, des organismes privés, soient responsables, par exemple, de la gestion de l'identificateur commun. C'est un des éléments du système. Le type d'information qu'ils obtiennent lorsque le gouvernement fournit des services aux citoyens constitue à mon sens une autre question, mais pour ce qui est de la gestion d'un identificateur commun sécurisé, j'estime que les banques sont sans doute bien placées pour effectuer cette tâche.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Kent.

La parole est maintenant à M. Picard. [Français]

M. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Bonjour, monsieur Therrien.

Je vais vous soumettre une prémisse, au sujet de laquelle j'aimerais connaître votre point de vue.

Je ne critique pas du tout le travail que nous avons fait. Je pense depuis longtemps que le Comité fait un travail respectable et excellent. Cependant, je vais vous proposer une autre façon de voir les choses.

Depuis environ six ou huit mois, nous étudions la protection des données personnelles, mais j'ai l'impression que nous pédalons dans le beurre et que nous travaillons pour rien, parce que nous n'avons pas été foutus de définir le problème à régler, c'est-à-dire de définir ce qui constitue une donnée personnelle. Je m'explique.

On panique à l'idée qu'on puisse lire une plaque d'immatriculation, sous prétexte que c'est de nature privée. Or, tout ce que cette plaque permet de faire, c'est identifier le véhicule sur lequel elle est installée, et non la personne qui est au volant. De la même manière, une adresse IP ne révèle pas l'identité de la personne qui tape au clavier de l'ordinateur, mais seulement l'endroit où se trouve ce dernier.

Les gens communiquent allégrement bien des données personnelles. Par exemple, rappelez-vous que, dans les premiers clubs vidéo, nous donnions sans hésiter notre numéro de permis de conduire pour avoir le droit de louer un film.

La raison pour laquelle j'ai l'impression qu'on ne veut pas toucher au problème de la définition d'une donnée personnelle, c'est que la plupart des témoins que nous avons entendus depuis presque un an nous ont répondu que la meilleure façon de protéger nos données personnelles n'était pas le recours à des moyens technologiques, mais la transparence: une entreprise comprend qu'un individu est prêt à lui donner à peu près n'importe quel renseignement personnel, mais elle s'engage en contrepartie à lui dire ce qu'elle en fera. Cela signifie donc que le spectre des données que vous êtes en mesure de fournir à quiconque n'est pas défini. Par conséquent, si nous ne sommes pas capables de définir le problème que nous voulons gérer, il sera difficile de définir les mesures que nous voulons prendre. Pourquoi ne pas simplement arrêter tout cela et interdire toute transaction de données? Si quelqu'un voulait faire une telle transaction, il devrait alors communiquer avec vous pour savoir comment gérer l'information transmise. C'est la première partie de ma question.

(1630)

M. Daniel Therrien:

En droit, je regrette de devoir vous dire que vous avez tort quand vous suggérez que les adresses IP ne sont pas des renseignements personnels. La Cour suprême en a décidé autrement dans un jugement, il y a quelques années. L'adresse IP pouvant être reliée à un individu, il s'agit d'un renseignement personnel qui doit être protégé à ce titre.

En ce qui a trait à la plaque d'immatriculation, la question ne se pose pas tout à fait de la même façon. Il n'y a quand même pas 800 personnes qui conduisent mon véhicule; il y a seulement mon épouse et moi. Il s'agit peut-être de renseignements personnels aussi.

Les renseignements personnels sont donc définis. Ce n'est pas sorcier: il s'agit de tout renseignement, y compris un numéro, qui se rapporte à une personne identifiable. Nous pourrions en discuter, mais je ne suis pas enclin à adhérer à votre prémisse.

Est-ce que la transparence fait partie de la solution pour protéger la vie privée? Oui, elle fait partie de la solution, mais elle n'est pas toute la solution, loin de là. On peut être transparent, mais quand même porter atteinte à la réputation d'un individu. Cela dit, la transparence fait partie de la solution.

Il s'agit effectivement d'une question complexe, et si nous avons de la difficulté à progresser, c'est parce qu'elle est complexe sur différents plans, notamment conceptuel et technologique. C'est pour cela que, plus récemment, j'ai mis l'accent sur la vie privée comme étant un droit de la personne. Commençons donc par les principes de base.

Quand je dis que la vie privée est un droit fondamental, il s'agit d'un concept qui devrait être reconnu non seulement par la loi, mais aussi par les instances gouvernementales qui, jour après jour, mettent en place des systèmes de collecte de données et d'administration de programmes publics, technologiques ou autres. Cela nous ramène à l'importance de la protection de la vie privée dès l'étape de la conception, un concept que nous devrions toujours garder à l'esprit. Si nous avons le choix entre offrir un service d'une façon qui met en danger la vie privée et offrir ce même service d'une autre façon tout aussi efficace, mais qui, elle, respecte la vie privée, le concept de protection de la vie privée dès l'étape de la conception nous dit que nous devrions choisir la deuxième option.

Toutes ces questions de vie privée peuvent sembler nébuleuses, mais, en droit, ce qui constitue un renseignement personnel est assez clair. Il faut nous rappeler quels éléments de la vie privée nous voulons protéger pour nous assurer de ce respect dans les activités du gouvernement et dans les lois.

(1635)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Je vous remercie, monsieur Picard.

La parole est à M. Angus pour les dernières minutes. On m'a demandé d'accorder un peu de temps à deux autres membres qui n'ont pas eu l'occasion de poser une question. C'est ce que je vais faire lorsque M. Angus aura terminé. Ensuite, nous allons passer à la motion qui a été présentée tout à l'heure.

La parole est à M. Angus pour trois minutes.

M. Charlie Angus:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie, monsieur Therrien.

Plus tôt au cours de la présente session parlementaire, nous avons entamé une étude sur une atteinte à la protection des données qui concerne Cambridge Analytica et Facebook. Depuis, j'ai parfois l'impression que nous sommes devenus le comité parlementaire spécialiste de Facebook. Nous avons parcouru la moitié de la planète pour essayer d'obtenir des réponses de la part de cette entreprise et nous nous faisons encore berner, et je crois que nous allons inviter la moitié de la planète à venir nous rencontrer encore une fois à Ottawa lorsque le temps sera plus clément afin d'obtenir peut-être davantage de réponses de la part de Facebook. Il me semble que toutes les semaines de nouvelles questions surgissent et qu'il semble y avoir continuellement une absence de reddition de comptes.

J'aimerais vous demander précisément si vous vous êtes ou non penchés là-dessus. Il y a eu cet article qui a fait grand bruit dans le New York Times à propos des privilèges accordés à certains utilisateurs de Facebook leur permettant de lire des messages personnels et privés de certains autres utilisateurs de Facebook. On mentionnait que la RBC en faisait partie. Nous avons entendu des représentants de la RBC. Ils ont affirmé qu'ils n'ont jamais bénéficié de tels privilèges, qu'ils n'ont jamais fait cela. La revue The Tyee affirme que Facebook lui a déclaré que la RBC est en mesure de lire, d'écrire et de supprimer des messages privés dans les comptes d'utilisateurs de Facebook qui utilisent l'application de la banque.

Vous êtes-vous penchés là-dessus? Croyez-vous que cette situation mérite d'être examinée? Devrions-nous croire la RBC sur parole? Devrions-nous, en tant que comité, considérer cela comme un autre dossier à étudier en ce qui concerne Facebook?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je dirais oui pour répondre brièvement, pour deux raisons.

Lorsque le comité parlementaire britannique a publié les documents de Six4Three, on y a vu le nom de la Banque royale, et nous nous sommes demandé si nous devions examiner cela dans le cadre de notre enquête sur Facebook et AIQ. Nous avons à ce moment-là reçu des plaintes de la part de personnes qui se demandaient si la Banque royale se trouvait à enfreindre la LPRPDE d'une certaine façon étant donné qu'elle recevait de l'information de cette manière. Cette question fait donc l'objet d'une enquête distincte.

M. Charlie Angus:

Soyons clairs, vous dites que vous avez reçu des plaintes à propos d'infractions commises par la RBC...

M. Daniel Therrien:

Des plaintes au sujet du fait que la RBC recevait présumément des renseignements de Facebook et qu'elle enfreignait semble-t-il la LPRPDE.

M. Charlie Angus:

D'accord. D'après ce que vous savez de ces privilèges accordés à certains clients de Facebook, pouvez-vous me dire s'il était possible de lire des messages privés d'utilisateurs de Facebook grâce à ces privilèges?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je ne peux pas faire de commentaires à ce sujet, car nous sommes en train de mener une enquête. Nous allons le déterminer, c'est certain.

M. Charlie Angus:

Vous êtes en train d'effectuer une enquête. D'accord, c'est très bien.

Je vous remercie beaucoup.

Le président:

Je vous remercie, monsieur Angus.

La parole est maintenant à Mme Vandenbeld pour deux minutes et demie, et ensuite...

Mme Mona Fortier:

Elle va prendre tout le temps de parole.

Le président:

D'accord.

Allez-y.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président, de m'accorder la dernière question. Le témoignage du commissaire est très important et très intéressant.

J'aimerais revenir sur l'idée de la propriété et du consentement dans le contexte du gouvernement. Si Air Canada me demande mon adresse courriel et mon numéro de téléphone cellulaire pour que je puisse recevoir des messages m'informant que mon vol est retardé, par exemple, j'ai le choix de donner ou non cette information. Toutefois, en ce qui concerne le gouvernement, vous n'avez pas toujours le choix. Vous devez fournir l'information, notamment à des fins fiscales. L'idée de consentement n'a automatiquement plus la même signification lorsque l'on doit fournir des renseignements.

Cela dit, comment envisagez-vous le consentement et même la propriété des données? Si je vais dans le site d'Air Canada, je peux supprimer mon profil. J'ai le choix. Mais en ce qui a trait au gouvernement, s'il s'agit d'un casier judiciaire, on ne peut pas décider de le supprimer ou de le modifier. L'information n'appartient plus réellement à la personne.

Qu'en est-il de la propriété et du consentement lorsqu'il s'agit du gouvernement?

(1640)

M. Daniel Therrien:

Vous avez tout à fait raison de dire qu'il n'est pas toujours nécessaire de donner son consentement à un gouvernement pour qu'il recueille des renseignements sur nous. La situation est différente. La Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels contient déjà des dispositions à cet égard.

Une des dispositions stipule que le gouvernement devrait recueillir des renseignements, dans la mesure du possible, directement auprès de la personne concernée, avec ou sans le consentement, par exemple, dans une situation d'application de la loi. Le principe est que le gouvernement doit recueillir l'information directement auprès de la personne, mais des questions se posent quant aux renseignements qui se trouvent dans les médias sociaux ou qui sont potentiellement publics. C'est difficile à gérer dans le cadre de la loi actuelle. Quoi qu'il en soit, le premier principe est que le gouvernement doit recueillir l'information auprès de la personne concernée, avec ou sans le consentement. Dans le secteur privé, ce n'est pas tout à fait la même chose. Je conviens que le consentement n'est pas toujours nécessaire.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Cela étant dit, nous avons entendu dire que le gouvernement a recours notamment à l'analytique prédictive et qu'il pourrait le faire davantage dans le futur. Je crois qu'on a donné comme exemple l'ARC, qui peut même utiliser une certaine forme d'intelligence artificielle et l'analytique prédictive pour déterminer où le risque de fraude est le plus probable, afin qu'elle puisse cibler ce genre de situation.

Par contre, le concept de la protection de la vie privée dès la conception implique précisément que les données sont utilisées aux fins pour lesquelles elles sont recueillies. Si vous fournissez des renseignements à l'ARC à propos de vos impôts, et que l'ARC a le mandat d'enquêter sur les fraudes fiscales, vos renseignements pourraient ne pas nécessairement être utilisés aux fins pour lesquelles ils ont été recueillis, mais il pourrait s'agir d'une utilisation légitime de l'information par le gouvernement. Ce n'est qu'un exemple parmi d'autres.

Dans un monde où on a davantage recours à l'analytique prédictive et à l'intelligence artificielle, qu'en est-il du concept de la protection de la vie privée dès la conception?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Dans le domaine fiscal, l'ARC obtient directement du contribuable certains renseignements. Il est possible que l'ARC utilise les médias sociaux et d'autres sources pour obtenir des renseignements et qu'elle recueille toute cette information pour alimenter un système d'intelligence artificielle. C'est quelque chose d'important. L'analytique est une nouvelle réalité et elle a de nombreux avantages.

Cependant, en ce qui concerne les systèmes d'intelligence artificielle, l'information qui alimente ces systèmes doit être fiable et avoir été obtenue légalement, ce qui entraîne certaines conséquences. Si l'ARC recueille des renseignements dans les médias sociaux, et présumons un instant qu'il s'agit d'information réellement publique, cela ne signifie pas que ces renseignements sont fiables.

Pour répondre à votre question, je dirais que, dans le contexte de l'intelligence artificielle, la protection de la vie privée dès la conception vise à faire en sorte que l'intelligence artificielle soit utilisée de façon à ce que l'information qui alimente le système ait premièrement été obtenue légalement, deuxièmement, soit fiable et, troisièmement, n'entraîne pas de discrimination pour des motifs interdits et soit fondée sur des facteurs d'analyse objectifs.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

On a aussi proposé, pour de nombreuses utilisations, d'anonymiser les données avant de les examiner. Croyez-vous que c'est faisable?

M. Daniel Therrien:

C'est préférable, mais ce n'est pas toujours possible. Je peux concevoir que l'intelligence artificielle utilise des renseignements personnels, mais il est préférable de commencer avec des renseignements anonymisés.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Je vous remercie tous.

Je remercie le commissaire et son personnel d'avoir comparu devant nous aujourd'hui. Vos propos nous éclairent toujours. C'est un sujet qui semble prendre continuellement de l'ampleur. Je vous remercie donc pour votre présence aujourd'hui.

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je vous en prie.

Le président:

Nous allons continuer un peu pour traiter de la motion qui a été présentée avant le témoignage de M. Therrien.

La parole est d'abord à M. Kent, et ensuite, ce sera au tour de M. Angus.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Je crois comprendre que les libéraux aimeraient disposer de 48 heures pour examiner la demande, alors, au nom de la collégialité, j'accepte d'accorder 48 heures.

Cependant, j'aimerais présenter une motion visant à faire en sorte que la motion originale d'aujourd'hui figure comme premier point à l'ordre du jour de notre prochaine réunion.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Angus.

M. Charlie Angus:

Je suis absolument outré par la collégialité dont fait preuve mon collègue, alors je vais devoir consulter mon voisin pour décider si nous allons faire de l'obstruction.

(1645)

Le président:

Il me semble que la discussion a été plutôt bruyante durant la réunion, alors, la prochaine fois, je vous demanderais d'être un peu plus calmes. Il semble que nous allons traiter de cela mardi prochain, alors je vous souhaite à tous une bonne fin de semaine.

Oui, monsieur Angus.

M. Charlie Angus:

Il y a une autre chose. Nous étions censés discuter de ma motion aujourd'hui, qui porte sur la planification d'une étude parallèle. Nathaniel souhaite travailler le libellé de ma motion avant la séance publique.

Au nom de la collégialité, comme on a dit, on vous accorde cela une fois pendant les quatre ans et c'est tout, alors profitez-en.

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous pouvez mettre cela sur Twitter.

M. Charlie Angus:

Oui, sur Twitter. Je fais preuve de collégialité aujourd'hui.

Je vais vous proposer une formulation qui, je l'espère, sera acceptable pour tout le monde et que je vais soumettre à Peter.

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Je vous remercie tous. Bon week-end.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on January 31, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.