header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-01-29 ETHI 132

Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Bob Zimmer (Prince George—Peace River—Northern Rockies, CPC)):

Good day, everybody. Welcome back—it's 2019—to the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics, meeting 132.

Before we get to our guests, we have some committee business. We have a couple of things. It's not necessary to go in camera.

Most of us in this room know about the international grand committee and the work we did in London. Charlie, Nathaniel and I went over in late November to join eight other countries to talk about this. Canada is picking up the torch where they left off. We're going to host it in Ottawa on May 28; that's what we're proposing. We looked at a date that would work for everybody, or as much as we could make that work, and May 28 seems to be the date.

I wanted to put that before the committee to make sure that we have your approval to move forward with it. It will be an all-day meeting, similar to what happened in London. It will start in the morning. We'll have meetings all throughout the day. We'll likely end the day at 4:30. Then we'll proceed into other things.

Mr. Raj Saini (Kitchener Centre, Lib.):

What day of the week is that?

The Chair:

It's a Tuesday.

Mr. Raj Saini:

Okay. Good.

The Chair:

I wanted to get some feedback on that. Perhaps you could raise your hand or give me a, “Yes, we're good to go”.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York, Lib.):

Yes, we're good to go.

The Chair:

Nate, you wanted to speak to it. Go ahead.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

To the extent that you need direction from the committee, I would say that your direction as chair is to act on our behalf to make arrangements as necessary to make this happen in Canada, to invite the parliamentarians and the countries that participated in the U.K., at a bare minimum, and if we want to expand it further, to work to do so.

The Chair:

Perfect.

Is that enough direction?

Mr. Kent.

Hon. Peter Kent (Thornhill, CPC):

Mr. Chair, what are the requirements with regard to the financial support for a meeting like this? Would this have to go to the liaison committee ?

The Chair:

It's a good question. There's a limit of about $40,000, so it's keeping it below that. I don't think that will be a problem.

Mike.

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Michael MacPherson):

Basically, this is what we would be looking for. We would be reimbursing witnesses who appeared at committee just as we would for a regular committee meeting. However, members coming from other jurisdictions, let's say from the House of Commons in England or from Australia or wherever, would be paying their own way to come here, just as we paid our own way to go to the first one.

Hon. Peter Kent:

What about for our facility usage?

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mike.

The Clerk:

We'll be fine. We'll have a budget to cover all that.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Good.

The Chair:

We'll be working a lot with Mike and the analysts to make sure it all comes to fruition. We want to make it an event that is really the next step in what we've already done. We look forward to it.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Yes.

The Chair:

Do you have any comments, Mr. Angus?

Mr. Charlie Angus (Timmins—James Bay, NDP):

No. We certainly want to move ahead with this, so I say you have the mandate to take the steps necessary. We can come back and discuss the theme and what it is the international community is going to want to talk about. We can do that at a later date.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Perhaps the analysts can mock up a proposal for us. I only would note that Sheryl Sandberg is on an apology tour; so there you have it.

The Chair:

We will keep a list of witnesses and keep you informed about who we're asking to the function. I think that name came up as one that will be on the list.

Do members have anything more to say about the international grand committee? Do we have sufficient direction?

Thank you, everybody. We'll pursue that.

Now we have the notice of motion. We talked a little bit about this.

Mr. Angus, go ahead.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

The subcommittee of the committee did meet to talk about direction in terms of taking us over the final few months. We have our study on digital governance. We have a whole bunch of other pieces that we have talked about that actually would fit under the rights of citizens in the age of big data. It could be ethical issues around AI or it could deal with people's financial information and what's happening. I will bring that forward.

Nathaniel said he wanted to look at some of the language. I don't want to take it up today, but I want to put it on the record that we're looking to do this. Some of the questions that we may be asking Dr. Geist or Ms. Cavoukian today, on the larger question of the rights of citizens in the age of big data, may be germane to that as well as what they may want to speak to on the issues of digital governance. We'll have the two studies going in parallel, so some of the evidence may be more germane to one study than another.

I'll bring that back on Thursday.

(1540)

The Chair:

You'll just withhold it for now?

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Yes.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Angus.

Getting back to the regular agenda, today we welcome two witnesses: as an individual, Dr. Geist, Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-Commerce Law, Faculty of Law, University of Ottawa; and via teleconference, Ann Cavoukian, Privacy by Design Centre of Excellence, Ryerson University.

We'll start off with you, Ms. Cavoukian.

Dr. Ann Cavoukian (Privacy by Design Centre of Excellence, Ryerson University, As an Individual):

Thank you very much.

Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. It's a pleasure to be here to speak to you today. I've worked with Michael for many years, so it's wonderful to be here with him to speak on these important issues.

What struck me in what you will be doing—I'm just going to read it out—is that your committee is to “undertake a study of digital government services, to understand how the government can improve services for Canadians while also protecting their privacy and security”.

That is so vitally important. That's how I want to address something which I created years ago and is called privacy by design, which is all about abandoning the zero-sum models of thinking that prevail in our society. Zero-sum just means that you can only have a positive gain in one area, security, always to the detriment of the other area, privacy, so that the two total to a sum of zero.

That either-or, win-lose model is so dated. What I would like you to embrace today is something called positive sum. Positive sum just means that you can have two positive gains in two areas at the same time. It's a win-win proposition.

It was started years ago. I did my Ph.D. at the U of T when the father of game theory, Anatol Rapoport, was there. We used to discuss this. I always remember saying, “Why do people embrace zero-sum?” I am the eternal optimist. I would much rather deliver multiple wins than an either-or compromise. He said, “It's simple, Ann. Zero-sum is the lazy way out, because it's much easier just to deliver one thing and disregard everything else.”

I want you to do more, and I think you want to. You want to deliver privacy and security as well as government improvements that can improve services to Canadians.

My privacy by design framework is predicated on proactively embedding much-needed privacy protective measures into the design of your operations and the design of your policies for whatever new services you want to develop and whatever you want to do in terms of data utility, but we do that along with privacy/security. It's a multiple-win model. It's privacy and data utility services to individuals. You can fill in the blanks, but it's “and” not “versus”. It's not one to the exclusion of the other. But how do you do both?

I know that I only have 10 minutes and I've probably used up five, so I'm going to keep the rest short.

In the privacy world, there's a key concept called data minimization. It's all about de-identifying data so that you can benefit from the value of the data to deliver much-needed services in other areas of interest to Canadians and individuals without forfeiting their privacy. When you de-identify personally identifiable data, both the direct and indirect identifiers, then you free the data, if you will, from the privacy restrictions, because privacy issues arise and end with the identifiability of the data. If the data are no longer personally identifiable, then there may be other issues related to the data, but they're not going to be privacy-related issues.

Data minimization and de-identification will drive this goal of having what I call multiple positive gains at the same time, making it a win-win proposition. I think it will make governments more efficient. You will be able to use the data that you have available and you will always be protecting citizens' personal information at the same time. That's absolutely critical.

I am happy to speak more. I can speak on this issue forever, but I want to be respectful of my time restrictions. I will gladly turn it over to you and answer any questions that you may have.

(1545)

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Geist. I'm sorry, Ms. Cavoukian. I'm a little ahead of myself.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: We will move to Dr. Geist for 10 minutes, please.

Dr. Michael Geist (Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-Commerce Law, Faculty of Law, University of Ottawa, As an Individual):

All right. Great. I don't think my wife is listening in.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Dr. Michael Geist: Good afternoon, everybody. My name is Michael Geist. I'm a law professor at the University of Ottawa, where I hold the Canada research chair in internet and e-commerce law and am a member of the Centre for Law, Technology and Society.

My areas of speciality include digital policy, intellectual property and privacy. I served for many years on the Privacy Commissioner of Canada's external advisory board. I have been privileged to appear many times before committees on privacy issues, including on PIPEDA, Bill S-4, Bill C-13, the Privacy Act and this committee's review of social and media privacy. I'm also chair of Waterfront Toronto's digital strategy advisory panel, which is actively engaged in the smart city process in Toronto involving Sidewalk Labs. As always, I appear in a personal capacity as an independent academic representing only my own views.

This committee's study on government services and privacy provides an exceptional opportunity to tackle many of the challenges surrounding government services, privacy and technology today. Indeed, I believe what makes this issue so compelling is that it represents a confluence of public sector privacy law, private sector privacy law, data governance and emerging technologies. The Sidewalk Labs issue is a case in point. While it's not about federal government services—it's obviously a municipal project—the debates are fundamentally about the role of the private sector in the delivery of government services, the collection of public data and the oversight or engagement of governments at all levels. For example, the applicable law of that project remains still somewhat uncertain. Is it PIPEDA? Is it the provincial privacy law? Is it both? How do we grapple with some of these new challenges when even determining the applicable law is not a straightforward issue?

My core message today is that looking at government services and privacy requires more than just a narrow examination of what the federal government is doing to deliver the services, assessing the privacy implications and then identifying what rules or regulations could be amended or introduced to better facilitate services that both meet the needs of Canadians and provide them with the privacy and security safeguards they rightly expect.

I believe the government services really of tomorrow will engage a far more complex ecosystem that involves not just the conventional questions of the suitability of the Privacy Act in the digital age. Rather, given the overlap between public and private, between federal, provincial and municipal, and between domestic and foreign, we need a more holistic assessment that recognizes that service delivery in the digital age necessarily implicates more than just one law. These services will involve questions about sharing information across government or governments, the location of data storage, transfer of information across borders, and the use of information by governments and the private sector for data analytics, artificial intelligence and other uses.

In other words, we're talking about the Privacy Act, PIPEDA, trade agreements that feature data localization and data transfer rules, the GDPR, international treaties such as the forthcoming work at the WTO on e-commerce, community data trusts, open government policies, Crown copyright, private sector standards and emerging technologies. It's a complex, challenging and exciting space.

I would be happy to touch on many of those issues during questions, but in the interest of time I will do a slightly deeper dive into the Privacy Act. As this committee knows, that is the foundational statute for government collection and use of personal information. Multiple studies and successive federal privacy commissioners have tried to sound the alarm on the legislation that is viewed as outdated and inadequate. Canadians understandably expect that the privacy rules that govern the collection, use and disclosure of their personal information by the federal government will meet the highest standards. For decades we have failed to meet that standard. As pressure mounts for new uses of data collected by the federal government, the necessity of a “fit for purpose” law increases.

I would like to point to three issues in particular with the federal rules governing privacy and their implications. First is the reporting power. The failure to engage in meaningful Privacy Act reform may be attributable in part to the lack of public awareness of the law and its importance. Privacy commissioners played an important role in educating the public about PIPEDA and broader privacy concerns. The Privacy Act desperately needs a similar mandate for public education and research.

Moreover, the notion of limiting reporting to an annual report reflects really a bygone era. In our current 24-hour social media-driven news cycle, restrictions on the ability to disseminate information—real information, particularly that which touches on the privacy of millions of Canadians—can't be permitted to remain outside the public eye until an annual report can be tabled. Where the commissioner deems it in the public interest, the office must surely have the power to disclose in a timely manner.

(1550)



Second is limiting collection. The committee has heard repeatedly that the Privacy Act falls woefully short in meeting the standards of a modern privacy act. Indeed, at a time when government is expected to be the model, it instead requires less of itself than it does of the private sector.

A key reform, in my view, is the limiting collection principle, a hallmark of private sector privacy law. The government should similarly be subject to collecting only that information that is strictly necessary for its programs and activities. This is particularly relevant with respect to emerging technologies and artificial intelligence.

The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada, which I know is coming in later this week, recently reported on the use of data analytics and AI in delivering certain programs. The report cited several examples, including Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada's temporary resident visa predictive analytics pilot project, which uses predictive analytics and automated decision-making as part of the visa approval process; the CBSA's use of advanced analytics in its national targeting program with passenger data involving air travellers arriving in Canada; and the Canada Revenue Agency's increasing use of analytics to sort, categorize and match taxpayer information against perceived indicators of risks of fraud.

These technologies obviously offer great potential, but they also may encourage greater collection, sharing and linkage of data. That requires robust privacy impact assessments and considerations of the privacy cost benefits.

Finally, we have data breaches and transparency. Breach disclosure legislation, as I'm sure you know, has become commonplace in the private sector privacy world and it has long been clear that similar disclosure requirements are needed within the Privacy Act. Despite its importance, it took more than a decade in Canada to pass and implement data breach disclosure rules for the private sector, and as long as that took, we're still waiting for the equivalent at the federal government level.

Again, as this committee knows, data indicate that hundreds of thousands of Canadians have been affected by breaches of their private information. The rate of reporting of those breaches remains low. If the public is to trust the safety and security of their personal information, there is a clear need for mandated breach disclosure rules within government.

Closely related to the issue of data breaches are broader rules and policies around transparency. In a sense, the policy objective is to foster public confidence in the collection, use and disclosure of their information by adopting transparent open approaches with respect to policy safeguards and identifying instances where we fall short.

Where there has been a recent emphasis on private sector transparency reporting, large Internet companies, such as Google and Twitter, have released transparency reports. They've been joined by some of Canada's leading communications companies such as Rogers and Telus. Remarkably, though, there are still some holdouts. For example, Bell, the largest player of all, still does not release a transparency report in 2019.

Those reports, though, still represent just one side of the story. Public awareness of the world of requests and disclosures would be even better informed if governments would also release transparency reports. These need not implicate active investigations, but there's little reason that government not be subject to the same kind of expectations on transparency as the private sector.

Ultimately, we need rules that foster public confidence in government services by ensuring there are adequate safeguards and transparency and reporting mechanisms to give the public the information it needs about the status of their data and appropriate levels of access so the benefits of government services can be maximized.

None of that is new. What may be new is that this needs to happen in an environment of changing technologies, global information flows and an increasingly blurry line between public and private in service delivery.

I look forward to your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you, Dr. Cavoukian and Dr. Geist.

We'll start off with Mr. Saini for seven minutes.

Mr. Raj Saini:

Good afternoon, Ms. Cavoukian and Dr. Geist. It's always a pleasure to have esteemed eminent experts here. I will do my best to keep my questions succinct.

Dr. Geist, in one of the things you brought up, you talked about the different levels of government. I come from a region of the country that has four levels of government: federal, provincial, regional and municipal. In the model we looked at earlier, the Estonian model, they have what they call a once-only principle, where there is one touch and all the information is disseminated, albeit Estonia is a small country and probably has only two levels of government. In some cases, we have three or four.

How do we protect Canadians' privacy? Each level of government has a different function and a different responsibility. Rather than giving all the information once to the federal government, then the provincial government, then the regional government and then the municipal government—and that information, as you know, can be shared, whether it be tax records, health records or criminal records—how can we have a way of protecting Canadians' privacy but also making our government services more efficient?

(1555)

Dr. Michael Geist:

You raise an interesting point. In some ways it highlights—and Ann will recall this and I'm sure may have comments—that when we were setting out to create private sector privacy law in Canada at the federal level, we were in a sense grappling with much the same question: How do we ensure that all Canadians have the same level of privacy laws regardless of where they happen to live and which level of government they're thinking about?

The sad reality is that decades later, the answer is they don't, and they still don't. We can certainly think about whether there are mechanisms we can find through which governments can more actively work together with respect to these issues. I think if we're candid about it, though, the reality is that provinces have taken different approaches with respect to some of these privacy rules, and that's just one other layer of government. Quebec's private sector privacy law predated the federal law. A couple of provinces have tried to establish similar kinds of laws. Other provinces have done it on a more subject-specific basis. The mechanism within PIPEDA that we use for that is to see whether the law is substantially similar, but the practical reality is that there are still many Canadians in many situations who don't, practically speaking, have privacy protections today because they don't have provincial laws that have filled those gaps. That's not even getting into the other layers you've talked about. It's a thorny constitutional issue and it is also one that raises really different questions around some of the substance as well.

Mr. Raj Saini:

Ms. Cavoukian, the next question is for you.

Some of the benchmarks of the Estonian model were that there had to be the once-only principle; they had to have a strong digital identity, but also more importantly, there had to be interoperability between different government departments. The way they structured it was to have not one singular database but different databases that held very specific and particular information that could be accessed. Their infrastructure is called X-Road. Is that a model we should be pursuing?

Also, what is the benefit or disadvantage of having data spread out? There are certain advantages, but there are also certain disadvantages. What would be the advantage or disadvantage of having that data spread out and, more importantly, of making it easier for Canadians to access the information they need?

Dr. Ann Cavoukian:

I think it's an excellent model and it's one you're going to be seeing more of. It's called a model of decentralization, in which all the data isn't housed in one central database that different arms of government can access. The problem with centralization is that it is subject to far greater risk in terms of data breaches, privacy infractions, unauthorized access to the data by curious employees, inside jobs and all of that. All of the data is placed at far greater risk if it's in one central location.

You may recall about six months ago that Tim Berners-Lee, who created the World Wide Web, was aghast and said he was horrified at what he'd created because it is a centralized model that everyone can basically break into more easily and access everyone's data in an unauthorized manner. Centralization also lends itself to surveillance and tracking of citizens' activities and movements. It is fraught with problems from a privacy and security perspective.

In Estonia, the decentralized model is superior, with different pots of information. Each database contains information that can be accessed for a particular purpose. Often that's referred to as the primary purpose of the data collection, and individuals within the government are limited as to the uses of the data. They have to use the data for the intended purposes. The more you have decentralized pots of information the greater the likelihood the data will remain and will be retained for the purposes intended and not used across the board for a variety of purposes that were never contemplated.

You have far greater control and people, citizens, can be assured of a greater level of privacy and security associated with that data. It's a model that is proliferating and you're going to see much more of it in the future. It doesn't mean that other arms of government can't access it. They just can't automatically access it and do whatever they want with it.

(1600)

Mr. Raj Saini:

That's great. Thank you.

I have one final question, Dr. Geist. You mentioned that there will be an interface or nexus between the private sector and the public sector. Obviously the two different sectors are governed by two different privacy regimes. More importantly, when we look at the Estonian model, we look at blockchain technology. It's a technology that's safe and accountable.

If you're going to have two different systems, the public sector and the private sector, the technology has to be equal. As we know, sometimes the private sector technology is greater than the public sector technology. How do we get both to change to make sure there's accountability and that the interface will work efficiently for the citizen?

Dr. Michael Geist:

I see accountability as being a legal principle and not a technological one, and that speaks to the accountability of the information that gets collected.

In terms of ensuring that both public and private are using best of breed security, for example, I think we've seen some of the mechanisms, at least in the public sector where we can try to do that, with the government's efforts to try to embrace different cloud computing services. It's a good illustration of how the government has recognized that cloud may offer certain concerns around where the data is stored and those kinds of localization issues, but it also may offer, depending on the provider, some of the best security mechanisms with regard to where that data's being stored. So how do you get the benefits of that, while at the same time creating some of the safeguards that may be necessary? We've seen some efforts in that regard.

Some of that comes down to identifying different kinds of data or perhaps, especially at the federal government level, different kinds of rules for different kinds of data. I think it does require an openness to blurring those lines sometimes, within the context of recognizing that we still need to ensure that Canadian rules are applicable.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Saini.

Next is Mr. Kent for seven minutes.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you both for attending before this committee.

The study of digital government is a huge topic. We began it last year and then back-burnered it, because of the Cambridge Analytica, Facebook and AggregateIQ study.

I was fascinated when I spent some time last year with Prime Minister Juri Ratas of Estonia. He showed me the card, the chip it contains and the fact that it's basically cradle-to-grave data. They've had a couple of breaches and glitches with their chip manufacturer, but it's a fascinating concept.

I'd like to ask both of you this. Whereas the Estonian digital government model is built on a fledgling democracy after the collapse of the Soviet Union, with a still compliant society that accepted the decision of its new government leaders to democratically impose this new digital government on the population, in our context, our wonderful Canadian Confederation has had, through 150 plus years, democratic challenges to government, with skepticism and cynicism in many ways, with regard to significant changes in government and referenda on any number of issues. I'm just wondering, for any government, whether federal, provincial, regional or municipal, in any of the contexts, how practical the pursuit of a single card with a chip à la Estonia is for Canada and Canadians.

Dr. Cavoukian, would you like to go first?

Dr. Ann Cavoukian:

Forgive me; I was shaking my head. Estonia is highly respected, no question. I personally would not want to go with one card with one chip that contained all your data. That's a centralized model that is just going to be so problematic, in my view, not only now but especially in the future.

There are so many developments. You may have heard of what's happening in Australia. They've just passed a law that allows the government there to have a back door into encrypted communications. Why do you encrypt communications? You want them to be secure and untouched by the government or by third parties, unauthorized parties. Australia has passed a law that allows it to gain back-door access into your encrypted communications and you won't know about it. No one can tell you about it. It is appalling to me.

Personally, I am not in favour of one identity card, one chip, one anything.

Having said that, I think we have to go beyond the existing laws to protect our data and find new models, and I say this with great respect. I was privacy commissioner of Ontario for three terms, 17 years. Of course we had many laws here and I was very respectful of them, but they were never enough. It's too little too late. Laws always seem to lag behind emerging technologies and developments. That's why I developed privacy by design. I wanted a proactive means of preventing the harms from arising, much like a medical model of prevention. Privacy by design was unanimously passed as an international standard in 2010. It has been translated into 40 languages and it has just been included in the latest law that came into effect last year in the European Union called the General Data Protection Regulation. It has privacy by design in it.

The reason I'm pointing to this is that there are things we can do to protect data, to ensure access to the data, digital access by governments when needed, but not across the board, and not create a model of surveillance in which it's all in one place, an identity card, that can be accessed by the government or by law enforcement.

You might say that the police won't access it unless they have a warrant. Regrettably, to that I have to say nonsense. That's not true. We have examples of how the RCMP, for example, has created what are called Stingrays. These impersonate cellphone towers so they can access the cellphone communications of everyone in a given area when they're looking for the bad guy. Of course, if they have a warrant, I'd say to them, “Be my guest, by all means. Go search for him.” Did they have a warrant? No. They did this without anyone knowing, but CBC outed them, and they finally had to come clean that they were doing this.

With the greatest of respect and not to say anything negative about Estonia, that's not the direction I would want us to take here, one of greater centralization. I would avoid that.

(1605)

Hon. Peter Kent:

Thank you.

Dr. Geist.

Dr. Michael Geist:

Ann has raised a number of really important issues, especially around that issue of centralization.

I couldn't help, as you were talking about that, thinking about the experience so far on the digital strategy advisory panel for Waterfront Toronto, which I must admit has been more than I bargained for. As chair of that panel for the past year—

Hon. Peter Kent:

I'm sure we'll get to that.

Dr. Michael Geist:

I have to say when you take a look at that, that isn't a single identity card. That is taking a relatively small piece of land and wanting to embed some of the kinds of technologies, emerging technologies, that allow for smart government. Both the controversy that has arisen in association with it, and even more, just the kind of public discussion around what we're comfortable with, which vendors we're comfortable with and what role we want government to play in all of this highlight some of the real challenges. That's in a sense a small pilot project for some of the smart city technologies. Talking about a single card for all data to me is a force multiplier behind that which raises a whole series of issues in our environment.

Hon. Peter Kent:

I'm sure in the two hours the committee will get back to the larger digital government question, but to come back to Sidewalk Labs, there's a bit of a David and Goliath situation in Sidewalk Labs, given the way Alphabet, the parent company to Google, has been dictating its dealings with the city and the other potential partners. Dr. Cavoukian's departure would speak to that, I would think.

Dr. Michael Geist:

Sure, she departed from her position as an adviser to Sidewalk Labs. My role has been on the advisory panel to Waterfront Toronto, and I still feel that it's early days in terms of trying to identify precisely what the final development project looks like and whether it gets approved. That's really what this advisory panel is all about: trying to better understand what kinds of technology are being proposed, what sort of data governance we have around the intellectual property and privacy, and ensuring that the terms are not dictated but rather better reflect what the community is thinking about.

(1610)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Kent.

Next up is Mr. Angus for seven minutes.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I would certainly like to begin with a discussion of Sidewalk Labs, because it's a very interesting proposal and it's certainly been fraught with a number of questions.

Dr. Cavoukian, your decision to step down from Sidewalk Labs raised a lot of eyebrows and a lot of questions. Can you explain why you felt that you no longer wanted to be part of this project?

Dr. Ann Cavoukian:

I didn't resign lightly. I want to assure you of that.

Sidewalk Labs retained me as a consultant to embed privacy by design—my baby, which I've been talking to you about—into the smart city they envisioned. I said, “I'd be very pleased to do that, but know that I could be a thorn in your side, because that will be the highest level of privacy, and in order to have privacy in a smart city...”. In a smart city, you're going to have technologies on 24-7, with sensors and everything always on. There's no opportunity for citizens to consent to the collection of their data or not. It's always on.

I said that in that model we must de-identify data at source, always, meaning that when the sensor collects your data—your car, yourself, whatever—you remove all personal identifiers, both direct and indirect, from the data. That way, you free the data from privacy considerations. You still have to decide who's going to do what with the data. There are a lot of issues, but they're not going to be privacy-related issues.

I didn't have any push-back from them, believe it or not. I didn't. They agreed to those terms. I said that to them right at the initial hiring.

What happened was that they were criticized by a number of parties in terms of the data governance and who was going to control the uses of the data, the massive amounts of data. Who will exercise control? It shouldn't just be Sidewalk Labs.

They responded to that by saying they were going to create something called a civic data trust, which would consist of themselves and members of various governments—municipal, provincial, etc.—and various IP companies were going to be involved in the creation of it. But they said, “We can't guarantee that they're all going to de-identify data at source. We'll encourage them to do that, but we can't give any assurance of that.”

When I heard that, I knew I had to step down. This was done at a board meeting in the fall. I can't remember when. Michael will remember. The next morning, right after the meeting, I issued my resignation, and the reason was this: The minute you leave this as a matter of choice on the part of companies, it's not going to happen. Someone will say, “No, we're not going to de-identify the data at source.”

Personally identifiable data has enormous value. That's the treasure trove. Everybody wants it in an identifiable form. You basically have to say what I said to Waterfront Toronto afterwards. They called me, of course, right after my resignation, and I said to them, “You have to lay down the law. If there is a civic data trust, or whoever is involved in this, I don't care, but you have to tell them that they must de-identify data at source, full stop. Those are the terms of the agreement.” I didn't get any push-back from Waterfront Toronto.

That's why I left Sidewalk Labs. I'm now working for Waterfront Toronto to move this forward, because they agree with me that we need to de-identify data at source and protect privacy. You see, I wanted us to have a smart city of privacy, not a smart city of surveillance. I'm on the international council of smart cities—smart cities all around the world—and virtually all of them are smart cities of surveillance. Think of Dubai, Shanghai and other jurisdictions. There is no privacy in them. I wanted us to step up and show that you can create a smart city of privacy. I still believe we can do that.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Thank you. I want to step in here.

One of the concerns I've been hearing from citizens in Toronto is about the need not just for privacy by design but democratic engagement by design; if this is a city, they're citizens' public spaces. We have a problem. We have a provincial government that is at war with the City of Toronto and has trashed a number of councillors, so there's a democratic deficit. We see Waterfront Toronto in an in-between place with a province that may be against it. We see the federal government continually dealing with this through Google lobbyists, so there are a lot of backroom dealings.

Where is the role for citizens to have engagement? If we're going to move forward, we need to have democratic voices to identify what is public, what is private, what should be protected and what is open. In terms of the other big players, we're dealing with the largest data machine company in the universe, which makes its money collecting people's data, and they're the ones who are designing all of this.

I'd like to ask you that, Dr. Cavoukian—I don't have much time, maybe one minute—and then Dr. Geist. Then maybe we'll get another round on this.

(1615)

Dr. Ann Cavoukian:

I want to make sure I leave time for Michael.

We need enormous transparency on exactly who's doing what and how this information is being disseminated in terms of the data and the decisions being made on the part of the various levels of government you talked about that always seem to be at each other. I'm not here to defend government, because there has to be a way that there can be an interplay in which citizens are allowed to participate and have an understanding of what the heck is going on. That is absolutely essential. I'm not suggesting that's not important; I just think we should be focusing on the privacy issues to at least make sure that privacy is addressed.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Dr. Geist, what are your thoughts?

Dr. Michael Geist:

I could really just comment on the role that my panel has been playing. All our meetings are open. The materials are made publicly available. In fact, we've learned about some of Sidewalk's plans from a technological perspective. They have come via the panel as they present to us. Anyone can attend those meetings. Those meetings are actively recorded. In fact, someone shows up to each meeting and records it themselves and then posts it to YouTube. There have been additional meetings. We have a meeting at MaRS next month that deals specifically with civic trusts.

This notion that there aren't avenues or there isn't public discussion taking place, I must admit with respect, is at odds with my experience in the year or so to date that I've been there, where literally anyone in Toronto can come out to any meeting they want.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Dr. Geist, with respect—and I've had this from Google—they tell me that people are frustrated because Google wants to talk about how much wood is being used in the building. Come on. Eric Schmidt cares about wood products in Toronto? They're talking about data. That's what people tell me. They come out of this and they're not getting answers.

Dr. Michael Geist:

That's precisely what we talk about at our committee. We spend our time talking about data governance issues, privacy issues, IP issues. In fact, we try to identify what the technologies are that they say they're going to put into place and what the implications are for IP, for privacy, for data governance. For example, the proposal for a civic trust came first to our panel.

As I say, could more be done? I'm sure it could, but I can say from my own perspective, from where I sit, that I see the media coming. I see citizens showing up. I see blog posts and otherwise coming out of that. All of this is taking place completely in the open.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Angus.

Next up is Mr. Erskine-Smith for seven minutes.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Thank you very much.

Thank you both for attending.

To begin I want to clarify a bit of a misconception in some of the questions from Mr. Kent with respect to the e-ID in Estonia. It is not a mini computer that centralizes all personal information. In fact, the very foundation of the Estonian digital government is decentralization. The digital ID is an identity card that allows them to access the system, but it's not storing mountains of personal information.

What I really want to get at, and I think the usefulness of this study, is to ask how we can apply the idea of privacy by design to digital government so that we can actually improve services for Canadians.

At the outset I would note that according to Estonia's public information, nearly 5,000 separate e-services enable people to run their daily errands without having to get off their computer at home. As a Canadian who wants better service out of his government, I want that. How do we alleviate privacy concerns from the get-go so we get better service?

If we look at the Estonian model, we have a digital ID. We have a separation of information between departments using X-Road and blockchain technology. Then we have transparency in the sense that when a government employee accesses my information, I can see who did it and it's time-stamped as to when they did it. If you add those layers of detail into a digital government system, is that sufficient to address privacy concerns? Are there other things we should be doing if we're looking to digital government?

I'll start with Dr. Cavoukian and then Dr. Geist.

Dr. Ann Cavoukian:

You have a number of elements that are very positive in what you've described in terms of the transparency associated with each service that's provided and the ease of access to this online by citizens.

I want to make one comment about blockchain. Let us not assume that blockchain is this great anonymous technology. It's not. It has benefits, but it also may have negatives. It's also been hacked. I'm going to read one very short sentence that came out from a text on the GDPR. GDPR is this new law that came into effect in the European Union. They said, “Especially with blockchain, there is no alternative to implementing privacy by design from the start, as the usual add-on privacy and enhancements simply will not satisfy the requirements of the GDPR.” GDPR has raised the bar on privacy dramatically. They're saying, “Sure, use blockchain, but don't do it without privacy by design because you have to make sure privacy is embedded into the blockchain.” There are some companies, like Enigma, that do it beautifully. They have an additional privacy layer.

I just want us to be careful not to embrace blockchain and other technologies without really looking under the hood and seeing what's happening in terms of privacy.

(1620)

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

My understanding is that in Estonia they were using this technology before it was called blockchain, but it was in 2002 that they implemented a system. The idea is that when they use blockchain as a technology, it's actually when information is being transferred as between departments on a back end. As a citizen, I log on and it's one portal for me, but on the back end, my information is housed in a number of different departments. If they want to share information, those pathways are only open by way of blockchain to ensure that it's private. If I'm at the CBSA, I can't see information that is at employment services...but duly noted on the blockchain concern.

With respect to, I guess, my fundamental question.... I have more specific questions, but this is the broad question. If we build in a digital ID, if we build in anonymization as between departments when they're sharing information and I can log on it and have user control of my information, if those are the three fundamental building blocks of this, am I missing something? Am I missing something else?

Dr. Ann Cavoukian:

It sounds very positive. You're going to have security embedded in [Technical difficulty—Editor]

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

The digital ID is itself an encryption device, exactly.

Dr. Ann Cavoukian:

Yes.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

As I understand it, in Estonia it's itself a microprocessor and it's an encryption device, so it verifies my identity.

By the way, on Estonia, the biggest sales pitch—and I know Mr. Kent might have been worried about it—when they came to our committee was that they said there's been no identity theft since they implemented this system—no identity theft. Why? Because if they lose the digital ID, the certificate can easily be revoked, so nobody can use that digital ID to access services in faking to be someone else.

If those are the three building blocks, and if you don't have a clear answer to any...and you say those all sound positive, the overarching question is, are there other layers we should be building in to make sure we have privacy by design built into digital government services, as Estonia does it? Is Estonia missing something or should we do what Estonia does?

Dr. Ann Cavoukian:

Estonia is very, very positive—

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

The—

Dr. Michael Geist:

If I could respond, I'm not going to speak specifically to Estonia, but I will say that there are two elements to it. When you're a hammer, everything looks like a nail, and when you're a law professor, everything looks like a legal issue. In terms of describing largely technological standards and saying that's how we're going to effectively preserve.... I understand why that has a great deal of appeal, but my view would be that you need a commensurate law in place as well.

The other thing is that one of my other issues that I focus on is access, of course, so what else do you need? You need to ensure that all Canadians have access to the network if we're going to be able to embrace these kinds of services. We still find ourselves with too many Canadians who do not have affordable Internet access. We need to recognize that part of any conversation about asking how we can provide these kinds of services to Canadians must include how we ensure that all Canadians have affordable access.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I appreciate those comments.

Because I'm running out of time, the last question I have is about data minimization. On the one hand, Estonia I think generally adopts this rule, but when we look at government services, we might say in the same way companies do that more data is better to deliver better services for consumers. As a government, we say that more data in certain instances is better. I want to use one example.

Very few Canadians take up the Canada learning bond. Everyone is eligible for the Canada child benefit because it's automatic, provided they file their taxes. Now, if we know who all the individuals are who have received the Canada child benefit, we also know that they're eligible for the Canada learning bond. By using that kind of information to proactively reach out to citizens to say, “Hey, by the way, there's free money here for your kid's education that you are eligible for, so please apply if you haven't applied”, we are having to use their information, ideally to improve services. Are there risks here that I should be worried about?

(1625)

Dr. Ann Cavoukian:

I don't think more data is better at all.

The example you give is a very worthwhile one. You want to reach out to people, but there are so many risks in using data for purposes never intended. Theoretically, we give data to the government for a particular purpose. We pay our taxes or we do whatever. That's the intent. It's the primary purpose of the data collection. The intention is that you're supposed to use that data for that purpose and limit your use of data to that unless you have the additional consent of the data subject, the citizen.

The minute you start deviating for what you might think is the greater good, and that it's better for them if you have access to all their data and can send them additional services or information.... They may not want you to do that. They may not want.... Privacy is all about control: personal control relating to the uses of your information. The minute you start stretching that out because you think—I don't mean you personally—the government knows better, that's going to take you down the path of surveillance and tracking, which is the completely wrong way to go. I say that with great respect, because I know you mean well here, but I would not go.... Plus, when you have data at rest, massive amounts of data at rest, it's a treasure trove.

The Chair:

Thank you, Dr. Cavoukian—

Dr. Ann Cavoukian:

It's a treasure trove for hackers. People are going to hack into that data. It's just going to be a magnet for the bad guys.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We have votes coming up at 5:30 p.m., and we have a bit of committee business that I have to take in camera for about five minutes, so I would look to be done at about 4:50 p.m., if that's possible.

We'll go to Mr. Gourde for five minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Jacques Gourde (Lévis—Lotbinière, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to the witnesses for being here today.

My question is very simple: can the Estonian model be applied in Canada, given our challenges, the various levels of governance and of access to the Internet on such a vast territory?

There are regions of Canada that are not connected. If we choose this, we will have to provide Canadians with two levels of service, to take those who have no access into account. Is it really worth it?

Ms. Cavoukian, you may answer first. [English]

Dr. Ann Cavoukian:

Improving service levels to citizens is, of course, extremely important and not everyone, as [Technical difficulty—Editor], has equal access to the Internet and different levels of technology. I think improving services to individuals, to citizens, is a very valid pursuit. It's the means by which you do it. This is always the question mark that arises. How do you reach out to individuals and direct more services in their direction without invading their privacy, without looking into what additional needs they may have? If they provide you with that information, then by all means, that's wonderful. That's positive consent. You can then direct additional services to them. But I don't want the government fishing into the data they already have about citizens to find out if some additional services might be of value to them.

I think you need to ask citizens if they would like to pursue these additional services, and then by all means direct them to work with you, etc. I don't think we should do it by means of digging into drifting databases of information on our citizens.

Dr. Michael Geist:

I'm glad you raised again the issue of access. As I've been writing for some time, I've long believed that one of the real reasons that governments.... This is not a partisan issue at all. We've had successive governments struggle with this issue. One of the reasons that there's a need to make real investments in ensuring universal, affordable access is that the cost savings in being able to shift to more and more e-services from a government perspective, I believe, depends upon ensuring that you have universal, affordable access.

Until you reach that point, I think you're quite right that you basically have to run parallel service sets to ensure that everybody does have access. You can't have certain kinds of government services that some people are effectively excluded from being able to access because they don't have access to the network. It makes sense to invest where the private sector has been unwilling to do so, and for a myriad of reasons. One of them is that there is a payoff from a government perspective, because I think it better facilitates the shift to some of those more efficient electronic services.

We are clearly not there yet. Studies repeatedly have found that we do not have universal, affordable access on the broadband side, and on the wireless side we continue to pay some of the highest wireless fees in the world. That tells us that we continue to have a significant policy problem when it comes to affordable communications in Canada.

(1630)

[Translation]

Mr. Jacques Gourde:

My last question is also quite simple.

Do we have the required level of programming expertise in Canada? I believe the industry is experiencing a crisis, a shortage of programmers. We have to look outside Canada. It seems that finding very competent people is quite complicated. The new generation does not seem to like this kind of work.

Would it be difficult to implement such services for and by Canadians? [English]

Dr. Michael Geist:

Well, speaking as a proud father of two kids who are doing engineering at the University of Waterloo, I'm not so sure that's true. I think we do see a lot of people increasingly move in that direction. When I take a look at my own campus at the University of Ottawa, and frankly at campuses across the country, there is an enormous interest in the STEM fields and the like. If there is a shortage of that expertise, I think it only serves to highlight just how in demand these skills are. It's not that we don't have people developing and moving into that area. I think we unquestionably do.

Dr. Ann Cavoukian:

I agree with Michael. I think we have very strong resources here in Canada. Perhaps they will be insufficient in the future, but certainly in terms of the younger generation, I mentor a lot of students and I always tell them, “Make sure you learn how to code.” You don't have to become a coder, but learn how the technology works. Learn how you can use various coding techniques to advance your interests in completely different areas, etc. The fundamentals are associated with understanding some of the emerging technology. I think that's pretty widely accepted now.

The Chair:

Thank you, Monsieur Gourde.

Next up is Mr. Baylis for five minutes.

Mr. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

I'd like first of all to follow up on a bit of clarification that Nate did with respect to what Peter was asking in regard to Estonia. I think that's the foundation. If we're going to go to a digital government, we need a digital identity.

Are you in agreement with that, Ms. Cavoukian, or do you have a concern with starting off with a digital identity?

Dr. Ann Cavoukian:

Forgive me, but I'm going to say it depends, because it depends on how it's constructed.

A digital identity, if it's strongly protected and is unique and encrypted and has very restrained access, may facilitate greater access to services, etc., but identity theft is huge. It's the fastest-growing form of consumer fraud ever. If you have a digital identity, that can also be subject—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Yes, but the new digital identities have biometrics. In the end, you can never stop a thief, but for someone finding my number, my SIN, say, versus finding that I have a properly encrypted digital identity that has biometrics and my eye scan and all of this, the likelihood of them stealing that is an order of magnitude less than what they can do today. I would say that —

Dr. Ann Cavoukian:

As long as the biometric is a strong biometric or uses biometric encryption, which encrypts the data automatically in a way that only the individual with their own biometric can decrypt it.... Unfortunately, there's a lot of association of biometrics with risk, so it's not a slam dunk that your biometrics are linked to your digital identity. You have to use biometric encryption and you have to ensure that it's properly kept. It's not that I'm disagreeing with you, sir. I'm just saying that the devil is all in the detail, and that's what we have to answer here.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I understand.

Would you like to weigh in on that, Dr. Geist?

Dr. Michael Geist:

Yes. I guess I would use the opportunity to again reiterate that for me the policy frameworks around the technology are in some instances just as important as the technology itself. Even in the way you phrased your question, you made a compelling case for why those technologies—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Let's assume that we're going to use the latest technology. The latest technology has all these things built into it—

Dr. Michael Geist:

Precisely.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

—versus, say, my social insurance number. If I give it to you today, it's done.

Dr. Michael Geist:

I get that, so that notion of using best of breed technology makes a whole lot of sense, but there is still a full policy layer that comes around that. I think there certainly will be many who will voice some amount of concern given that our previous experience is that sometimes there are assurances that we are going to use certain kinds of encryption or other sorts of technologies, so “don't you worry, there will be no access”. Until you come across a particular use case where you say it would be really great if law enforcement had access just under this circumstance or under that circumstance—

(1635)

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I think I understand. We're skating a little further ahead.

Let's say we start today. Estonia's benefit is that they were a new country and they were starting fresh, so they wouldn't have to convert. They're a small country with a small number of people, relatively speaking. Let's say we start today. It seems to me that the first step we have to do.... I agree with Ms. Cavoukian that we can keep the silos, and I agree that it's the safer approach. What Estonia does is they have a backbone so you can come in and go here or you can come in and go there, but it's not all one big database.

I also believe it will be a lot easier to build out from our existing silos, as opposed to trying to do it.... I'm in agreement with that, but it seems to me that if we're going to do it, we have to start off with a digital link, okay? Let's say I'm Frank Baylis and I just showed up on the system. “Okay,” it says, “prove to me you're Frank Baylis.” Right now, it says to type in my SIN, that number, and that's pretty easy to rip off, right? Whereas if it says, “Let's get a scan of your eyes” or “Let's get some biometrics” and some questions asked and all of that, it seems to me that, to your point, you could have privacy and security.

I think that was the first statement you made, Ms. Cavoukian. Can we not start there and have an agreement on that before we get into all the other stuff?

I'll pass it back. I cut you off. I'm sorry.

Dr. Michael Geist:

At the risk of saying that this is a chicken or egg kind of issue, I'm not comfortable giving you my biometric information unless we have a legal and privacy framework established in Canada that meets current privacy standards.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Okay, so you're saying that before we get there, before we start down that path, we better be darn sure that the privacy is just locked hard.

Dr. Michael Geist:

It's not just a matter of locked hard. We have a decades-old set of rules that effectively apply to that system.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

It doesn't work.

Dr. Michael Geist:

I don't think you can make an argument to say we're as modern and as digital as can be while using 1980s laws that provide the safeguards around the system that you've just created.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Do you want to weigh in, or am I out of time?

The Chair:

If she can answer in 20 seconds that would be great.

Dr. Ann Cavoukian:

I just want to say, Mr. Baylis, that I agree with you. We have to explore these new technologies. There's no question. We just have to ensure that in addition to what Michael said, we have to update our laws. They're so dated. We have to ensure the technology is such that we can truly safeguard the information and it won't be accessed by others.

I gave the example of biometric encryption. There's now a lot of concern about facial recognition technologies that are happening everywhere, obtaining your facial recognition, and using it for purposes never intended. I'm working with an amazing company out of Israel, an Israeli company called D-ID, which can actually obscure the personal identifier so it's not picked up by facial recognition.

There are a number of complexities. I'm sure we could address them as long as we address them up front, proactively, to prevent the harms from arising.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Baylis.

Next up, for another five minutes, is Mr. Kent.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Thank you very much, Chair.

This is a very interesting conversation. I apologize that votes are going to cut it short. You may anticipate being recalled, both of you, in the days and months ahead.

This committee has recommended to government in a couple of reports now that the General Data Protection Regulation be examined and that Canadian privacy regulations across the board and the Privacy Commissioner's powers be greatly strengthened and contemporized.

I wonder, just in the final few minutes we have, if you could offer cautions. I'm hearing signals from the government side that digital government is coming down the track: Stand back; it's about to be presented in some form or another. I wonder if you could both offer cautions to the government before they get too far down this track.

Dr. Cavoukian.

Dr. Ann Cavoukian:

I totally support Commissioner Daniel Therrien's call to the federal government to upgrade the PIPEDA, for example, which dates from the early 2000s. He also said we need to add privacy by design to the new law because, after all, they have embedded it in the GDPR. We need new tools. We need to be proactive. We need to identify the risks and address them up front. We can do this.

Upgrading the laws is absolutely essential. Giving the commissioner the much-needed authority that he needs but now lacks is essential. I can say, having been a privacy commissioner for three terms, that I had order-making power. I rarely used it, but that was the stick that enabled me to engage in informal resolution with organizations, government departments that were in breach of the privacy law. It was a much better way to work.

I had the stick. If I had to issue an order, I could do that. That's what Commissioner Therrien lacks. We have to give him that additional authority and embed privacy by design into the new law so we can have additional measures available to the government to proactively address a prevention model, much like a medical model of prevention. It would be much easier if we had that. Then far less would go to the already extended Privacy Commissioner to be addressed.

Thank you.

(1640)

Hon. Peter Kent:

Dr. Geist.

Dr. Michael Geist:

I would like to start by commending this committee for the reports it has put out over the last year or so, which I think have been really, really strong and have helped fuel a lot of the public discussion in this area. I think it's been really valuable.

I would say that I don't know what the government is thinking on this. I do know that they have held a consultation on a national data strategy. I guess in some ways I'm waiting to see what comes out of that. To me a national data strategy, to harken back to my comments off the top, really, if they take a holistic approach that recognizes that part of what you're dealing with in that context, includes data governance-related issues, PIPEDA-related issues, private sector-, public sector-, and Privacy Act-related issues including some of the enforcement types of issues that have been raised repeatedly by the Privacy Commissioner. That tells me there's a recognition that it's critically important to get that piece right for any number of reasons, including the prospect of trying to embrace some of the e-services that the government might want to move toward.

Hon. Peter Kent:

How critical is consent in that process?

Dr. Michael Geist:

Consent has long been viewed as a bedrock principle. I think one of the reasons we really struggle with some of these issues comes back to Mr. Erskine-Smith's question about why we can't find a way to inform someone and I think try to do good with that prospect. Part of the problem is that in theory we might ask if we can find a mechanism for our citizens to provide consent to allow the service provider, in this case the government, to inform them about the services they're eligible for. I would say that our standards of consent have become so polluted by the low standards found in PIPEDA, which I think have been widely abused, that few people actually trust what consent means at this stage.

One of the things I think we have to seize back is to try to find mechanisms to ensure that meaningful consent is truly meaningful, informed consent. We have strayed badly in that regard. It's possible that the GDPR will be part of the impetus for trying to do that.

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds, Mr. Kent.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Dr. Cavoukian.

Dr. Ann Cavoukian:

I couldn't agree more with Michael. He's absolutely right that the notion of consent is almost non-existent the way it's been whittled down.

You see, consent is essential to control. Privacy is all about personal control over the uses of your data. If you're not consenting to it in a positive way, with positive, affirmative consent, you don't know what's happening with your data. As for expecting people to search through all the legalese in the terms of service and the privacy policy to find the opt-out clause to say no to additional uses of these data and negative consent, life is too short. No one does that, but it's not because they don't care deeply about privacy.

In the last two years, all of the public opinion poll surveys from Pew Internet research have come in at the 90th percentile for concerns about privacy. I've been in this business for well over 20 years, and that's the first time I've seen such high levels of concern, with 91% very concerned about their privacy and 92% concerned about the loss of control over their data.

Positive consent, strong consent, is essential.

The Chair:

Thank you, Dr. Cavoukian.

Next up is Mr. de Burgh Graham for five minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

Anita had a very quick question to start. I'll then take it from there.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Thank you.

I'm sharing my time, so I would be grateful if the answers could be short.

I want to express my pleasure that we once again have expertise on the panel from the University of Ottawa, which is right here in Ottawa. It's good to see Dr. Geist here.

Dr. Geist, you spoke about the predictive analytics that are already being used by government. There's the example of the CRA fraud and being able to predict. If we were to go to data minimization and to only using data for the purposes for which it was collected, would that preclude the ability of government to use this kind of predictive analysis or AI?

(1645)

Dr. Michael Geist:

Not necessarily; I'll start by saying that. Think back to the controversy we saw last year with respect to StatsCan and the banking data. I thought one of the real weaknesses with respect to StatsCan was that they had never made enough of a compelling case that they couldn't achieve what their end goals were by collecting less than massive amounts of banking data from Canadians. Similarly, with respect to your question, I suppose it depends. If there is a compelling case that the existing data doesn't provide a sufficient level of information to be as effective as having more data would be, then it becomes part of that cost-benefit analysis. Maybe in some instances it does make sense to collect more, but I think it's incumbent on you to do part of that analysis before you simply collect and say, “Hey, the more data we have, the better this will be.”

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Dr. Geist, I first of all want to thank you for your point on Internet access. As I've said in many fora on many occasions, less than half my riding currently has 10 megabits or better. A good deal have satellite or even dial-up to this day in my riding. We're pretty tired of being left behind on this kind of file, so thank you for making that point.

How do we predict, define and declare what data is necessary and what is not necessary on the collection side? We say we only collect necessary data. How do we define that?

Dr. Ann Cavoukian:

May I speak?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Whoever would like to.

Dr. Ann Cavoukian:

The whole point is that when you're collecting data from members of the public, they don't give you their personal data to do whatever the heck you want with it. They give it to you for a particular purpose. They have to pay their taxes. They're required to do that. They realize that. They're law-abiding citizens. They give you the information necessary, but that doesn't mean that you, as the government, can do whatever the heck you want with it. They give it to you for a particular purpose. It's called purpose specification. It's use limitation. You are required to limit your use of the information to the purpose identified. That's fundamental to privacy and data protection. Personally identifiable data, which has sensitivity associated with it, must be used for the purposes intended.

Michael mentioned the Stats Canada debacle when they wanted to collect everyone's financial data from the banks. Are you kidding me? I'm sure you know how much outrage that created. They wanted to collect this from 500,000 households. Multiply that times four. It's completely unacceptable.

You have to be very clear what you want to do with the data and obtain consent for that legitimate purpose.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think that's my point.

I want to hark back to something that happened in the U.S. recently.

The EFF, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, recently found that the ALPR systems, automatic licence plate readers, are networked across the United States and are exchanging data on where people have been across the country, which is obviously not the intention of those devices.

Where is the line between voluntary and involuntary collection of data? Should you be informed, for example, if an ALPR picks up your licence plate while you pass it? If that's the case, should you have the right to opt out by locking your licence plate, which we know is not the intent at all of these things and it's illegal in a number of ways? Where are the lines on these things?

I have only about a minute.

Dr. Ann Cavoukian:

Licence plates are not supposed to be used for that purpose. They're not supposed to be used to track you coming and going. That's how surveillance and tracking grow enormously.

I have a quick, funny story. Steve Jobs, who, of course, was the creator of Apple, used to buy a new white Mercedes every six months less a day. Then he would take it in and buy the new model of exactly the same thing. Why? Because at that time in California you didn't have to have a licence plate on your car. You had six months after you bought a new car. He didn't want to be tracked. So six months minus a day, he took it in, bought another one, and that continued.

That's just to give you an example. People do not want to be tracked. That's not the purpose of licence plate numbers. We have to return the uses of personal information to the purposes for which they were intended. That's the goal.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

If we don't have some degree of centralization and we retain the siloing that we currently have in government, what's the purpose of moving to a smart government in the first place, if we don't add any convenience?

Dr. Ann Cavoukian:

Well, smart government doesn't mean you identify everybody and track what they're doing. With due respect, that's not what smart government means. If that's what it means, then it's no longer free. It's not a free and open society any longer. We have to oppose that. Smart means you can deliver smart services to lots of citizens without invading their privacy. We can do both, but that has to be the goal.

The Chair:

Thank you. That's it.

Next up, for another three minutes, is Mr. Angus.

Before you get going, we do have a bit of time. The bells don't start until 5:15 p.m., and we're going to push that to about the 5:05 p.m. range, so don't feel rushed. I think we have time to get everybody finished.

Go ahead, Mr. Angus.

(1650)

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Thank you.

One of the questions we've raised in opposition over the years is about giving police more tools, because if you give police tools, they use them. My colleague Mr. Erskine-Smith suggests that if we get everybody's data and information, government can help them by sending information to them.

I've been in opposition for 15 years and I've seen government often use those resources to say, “Hey, have we told you about our great climate change plan? Have we told you about the great child tax benefit?” To me, if you had everyone's data, the power you would have to send that out in the months leading up to an election is very disturbing.

I represent a rural region in which a lot of people have real difficulty obtaining the Internet, and yet seniors are told, “We're not taking your paper anymore. You're not filling this out. You're going to have to go online.”

We're forcing citizens to become digital. What protections do we need to have in place to say that citizens are being forced to use digital means to discuss with government, but they don't want to hear back from government, so that we limit the ability of government to use that massive amount of data to promote itself in ways that would certainly be disadvantageous to other political parties?

Dr. Michael Geist:

Maybe I'll start.

You've raised two separate issues. You've raised the issue of people being forced into digital, which we've talked a little bit about already. I think it's striking how this issue gets raised by members on this side and by members on that side, and that has been true for many years. I've been coming to committees and we have talked about this access issue. I must admit that to me it remains a bit of a puzzle how we haven't been able to move forward more effectively in ensuring we close the digital divide—

Mr. Charlie Angus:

It's still there.

Dr. Michael Geist:

—that continues to exist. Part of the solution is to say that everybody does need affordable access. That is the full stop of what we have to do, and we have to make the commitment to make sure that happens.

You've also essentially raised the question of what happens when data gets used for purposes that go well beyond what people would have otherwise expected or anticipated. On the private sector side, we would say that's a privacy violation. You collect the data. You tell me what you're going to use it for, and if you turn around and start using it for other purposes you haven't obtained appropriate consent for, then I, in theory, can try to take action against you or at least file a complaint.

Part of the shortcoming—and this comes back to even the exchange with Mr. Baylis—is that we still don't have good enough laws at the federal level to ensure that data isn't misused in certain ways. We have seen over many years, especially the years with debates around lawful access and the like, very often the notion that if we have the data, surely we need to use it. There is always going to be a reason for that. You need to establish both, I think, the rule sets and the frameworks to ensure there are the appropriate safeguards in place and there's the appropriate oversight on top of that. I think at the end of the day you need to ensure you have governments, just like companies, that recognize that where they become overly aggressive with using data, because they feel they can, they cause enormous harm to that information ecosystem, and ultimately undermine public confidence not only in them but also, I think, in governments more broadly.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

It's also a question of democracy, because even if they say they'll get consent, and 10% of the public decides to opt in, they are still obtaining information—good stuff, and good news stories, potentially—that can sway them democratically.

There is a whole different question that I think we haven't talked about in terms of the need to protect the democratic equality of citizens, both those who choose to opt in and those who choose not to. If they are dealing with government, it's because they have to deal with government and because they have to fix a problem with their SIN card or CRA. That's why they obtain it, not so they're receiving that information.

To me, it's like the consent boxes that we have for private business right now. If government used them, they'd be laughing all the way to the election.

Dr. Michael Geist:

I think you're right. I think consent remains very weak, but let's recognize—and I know this has been discussed before this committee as well—that we still don't have political parties subject to those sorts of privacy rules.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Do you want to put that on the record?

Voices: Oh, oh!

Dr. Michael Geist:

On the idea that we're going to say this is an issue of democracy, yes, it's an issue of democracy. It's a real problem when our political parties will collect data and aren't subject to the same kinds of privacy standards that they would subject any private company to.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Angus.

We have a couple of questioners left, which will take us to the end of our time.

We have Anita Vandenbeld and Monsieur Picard.

(1655)

Mr. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

I'll turn to Mona.

The Chair:

Go ahead. [Translation]

Mrs. Mona Fortier (Ottawa—Vanier, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I have two questions.

We touched on this briefly, but it's important that it be understood. Collecting data and having access to it is viewed in a negative light by part of the Canadian population. It's unfortunate that some of these tools, including some of the work undertaken by Statistics Canada, are used by political parties to frighten Canadians. I'm talking about third parties here.

How can we win the trust of Canadians, so as to be able to put some of these measures into effect, measures that are intended, ultimately, to allow Canadians to access the government and the services it provides? [English]

Dr. Ann Cavoukian:

I just want to say one thing. There are a variety of things, of course, that we can do, but you asked how we can regain the trust of the public in terms of what government is doing. With due respect, there was one thing that took place last year that further eroded that trust. Prime Minister Trudeau was asked by the federal Privacy Commissioner to include political parties under the privacy laws. Mr. Trudeau said no. He basically did not go in that direction.

That was a most disappointing thing. Why wouldn't political parties be subject to privacy laws just like businesses and other government departments are? Unfortunately, there is not a lot that is increasing trust in government. With due respect, I think that was a very negative point. I think these are the things....

Also, Mr. Trudeau defended Stats Canada in their pursuit of very sensitive financial data from the public. There was a huge push-back to that. This has not been really disclosed: the banks offered the chief statistician at Stats Canada.... They said, “Okay, we will de-identify the data and remove all personal identifiers and then we will give you the data. You can have the data you need but it will be privacy protected because we're going to strip the identifiers.” What did Stats Canada say to that? They said, “No, we want the data in identifiable form.” From what I heard confidentially, there were a lot of data linkages that Stats Canada wanted to make with the very sensitive financial data of citizens. That is completely unacceptable.

I just give you that, ma'am, as an example of things that are eroding trust as opposed to increasing trust.

Thank you. [Translation]

Mrs. Mona Fortier:

Mr. Geist, what would you do? [English]

Dr. Michael Geist:

It's hard to follow Ann in this regard. She has pointed to a couple of examples. I'll give you another one, which is very small and is not one that generates headlines.

I've been actively involved in the creation of legislation that created things like the do-not-call list and the anti-spam law. Political parties have consistently exempted themselves in the name of democracy. If you want to talk about how you ensure respect, stop exempting yourselves as political parties from annoying phone calls at dinner and the ability to spam people.

I think that respect starts with respecting the privacy of Canadians. It's fair to say that when presented with the prospect of real restrictions and the ability to use information, the political parties—and I think this needs to be absolutely clear: This has occurred under Conservative governments and under Liberal governments. This is not about this particular government. It is about the history of governments that, I think, have consistently said that when it comes to privacy-related issues, they are much more comfortable setting high standards for everybody other than themselves. We see that in the exemptions. We've seen that in the inability to get the Privacy Act updated in any meaningful way for decades, and we see it with some of the examples that Dr. Cavoukian just raised. [Translation]

Mrs. Mona Fortier:

Thank you.

Mr. Picard, do you want to ask the next question? [English]

The Chair:

Thank you. I think we're done for time.

Thank you very much, Dr. Cavoukian and Dr. Geist, for coming. This subject is a big one. We've stumbled upon this iceberg, as we've mentioned, many times, and it just seems to be growing, but thank you for your time today.

We're going to go in camera to do some committee business for five minutes.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de l'accès à l'information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l'éthique

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Bob Zimmer (Prince George—Peace River—Northern Rockies, PCC)):

Bonjour à tous. Nous sommes en 2019, donc je vous souhaite à nouveau la bienvenue au Comité permanent de l'accès à l'information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l'éthique dont c'est la réunion 132 .

Avant de nous tourner vers nos invités, nous avons quelques affaires du Comité à régler. Il n'est pas nécessaire de passer à huis clos.

La plupart d'entre nous connaissent le grand comité international et le travail que nous avons accompli à Londres. Charlie, Nathaniel et moi-même y sommes allés fin novembre pour en discuter avec les représentants de huit autres pays. Le Canada reprend le flambeau. Nous serons l'hôte de cette réunion, le 28 mai, à Ottawa; voilà ce que nous proposons. Nous avons cherché une date qui conviendrait à tout le monde, dans la mesure du possible, et cela semble être le 28 mai.

Je voulais la soumettre au Comité pour m'assurer que vous êtes d'accord avant de passer à la prochaine étape. Il s'agira d'une réunion d'une journée entière, semblable à celle de Londres. Elle commencera le matin. Nous tiendrons des réunions pendant toute la journée. Nous terminerons probablement vers 16 h 30. Ensuite, nous passerons à d'autres activités.

M. Raj Saini (Kitchener-Centre, Lib.):

Cela tombe quel jour de la semaine?

Le président:

Un mardi.

M. Raj Saini:

D'accord. C'est bien.

Le président:

Je voulais avoir de la rétroaction là-dessus. Peut-être que vous pourriez lever la main ou me dire « C'est bon. Nous pouvons procéder ».

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York, Lib.):

Oui, c'est bon. Nous pouvons procéder.

Le président:

Nate, vous vouliez en parler. Allez-y.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Dans la mesure où vous avez besoin de l'opinion du Comité, je dirais que votre mandat comme président est de décider en notre nom de prendre les arrangements nécessaires pour que la réunion se tienne au Canada, d'inviter les parlementaires et les pays qui ont participé au Royaume-Uni, à tout le moins, et si nous voulons élargir la réunion, de prendre les mesures nécessaires, pour ce faire.

Le président:

Parfait.

Est-ce que cela suffit?

Monsieur Kent.

L'hon. Peter Kent (Thornhill, PCC):

Monsieur le président, quelles sont les exigences concernant le soutien financier dans le cas d'une réunion comme celle-là? Faudrait-il faire appel au comité de liaison?

Le président:

C'est une bonne question. Il y a une limite d'environ 40 000 $, alors il faut rester en deçà de ce montant. Je ne pense pas que cela pose problème.

Mike.

Le greffier du Comité (M. Michael MacPherson):

En gros, c'est ce que nous chercherions à faire. Nous rembourserions les témoins qui ont témoigné devant le Comité comme nous le ferions dans le cadre d'une réunion régulière. Cependant, les députés d'ailleurs, par exemple ceux de la Chambre des communes en Angleterre ou en Australie, paieraient leur propre déplacement pour se rendre ici, comme nous avons assumé les coûts du nôtre lorsque nous avons assisté à la première réunion.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Qu'en est-il de l'utilisation de nos installations?

Le président:

Allez-y, Mike.

Le greffier:

Nous n'avons pas à nous inquiéter: nous aurons un budget pour tout couvrir.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

C'est bien.

Le président:

Nous allons travailler beaucoup avec Mike et les analystes à nous assurer que tout se réalise. Nous voulons que cet événement soit vraiment la prochaine étape de ce que nous avons déjà accompli. Nous nous réjouissons à cette perspective.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Oui.

Le président:

Avez-vous des commentaires, monsieur Angus?

M. Charlie Angus (Timmins—Baie James, NPD):

Non. Il est clair que nous voulons que les choses avancent, alors je dis que c'est à vous qu'il revient de prendre les mesures nécessaires. Nous pouvons discuter plus tard du thème et de ce dont la communauté internationale voudra parler. Nous pouvons le faire à une date ultérieure.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Peut-être que les analystes peuvent nous élaborer un modèle de proposition. J'aimerais simplement faire remarquer que Sheryl Sandberg fait une tournée pour s'excuser; alors voilà. Vous savez tout.

Le président:

Nous allons dresser une liste de témoins et vous tenir informés des personnes que nous inviterons à la réunion. Je pense que ce nom fera partie de ceux qui figureront sur la liste.

Les membres ont-ils quelque chose à ajouter concernant le grand comité international? Avons-nous suffisamment d'information pour prendre une décision?

Merci à tous. Nous allons poursuivre dans cette lancée.

Nous avons maintenant l'avis de motion. Nous en avons parlé brièvement.

Monsieur Angus, la parole est à vous.

M. Charlie Angus:

Les membres du sous-comité se sont réunis pour parler de l'orientation à suivre au cours des derniers mois. Nous avons notre étude sur la gouvernance numérique. Nous avons aussi discuté d'un certain nombre d'autres dossiers qui entreraient dans la rubrique des droits des citoyens à l'ère des mégadonnées. Il pourrait s'agir des questions d'éthique concernant l'intelligence artificielle ou des renseignements financiers des gens et ce qui se passe à cet égard. Je vais soulever ces sujets.

Nathaniel a dit qu'il voulait se pencher sur une partie de la terminologie. Je ne veux pas le faire aujourd'hui, mais je veux dire officiellement que nous envisageons de le faire. Une partie des questions que nous pourrions poser à M. Geist ou à Mme Cavoukian aujourd'hui, en ce qui concerne les droits des citoyens à l'ère des mégadonnées en général, pourrait s'y rapporter ainsi que les questions qu'ils pourraient vouloir aborder concernant la gouvernance numérique. Nous mènerons les deux études en parallèle, si bien que certains des témoignages pourraient être plus pertinents dans une étude que dans l'autre.

Je vais y revenir jeudi.

(1540)

Le président:

Vous allez mettre la question en veilleuse pour l'instant?

M. Charlie Angus:

Oui.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Angus.

Pour en revenir à l'ordre du jour régulier, aujourd'hui nous accueillons deux témoins: M. Geist, titulaire de la Chaire de recherche du Canada en droit d'Internet et du commerce électronique, Faculté de droit, Université d'Ottawa, à titre personnel; et par téléconférence, Ann Cavoukian, Privacy by Design Centre of Excellence, Université Ryerson.

Nous allons commencer par vous, madame Cavoukian.

Mme Ann Cavoukian (Privacy by Design Centre of Excellence, Ryerson University, à titre personnel):

Merci beaucoup.

Bonjour, mesdames et messieurs. Je suis ravie de pouvoir m'adresser à vous aujourd'hui. J'ai travaillé avec Michael pendant de nombreuses années, alors c'est merveilleux d'être ici avec lui pour parler de ces questions importantes.

Ce qui m'a frappée en ce qui concerne vos travaux — je vais simplement le lire à haute voix — est que votre comité doit « entreprendre une étude sur les services gouvernementaux numériques afin de comprendre comment le gouvernement peut améliorer les services offerts aux Canadiens tout en protégeant leur vie privée et leur sécurité ».

C'est d'une importance vitale. C'est ainsi que je veux aborder quelque chose que j'ai créé il y a des années et qu'on appelle la « privacy by design », soit la protection intégrée de la vie privée, qui vise à abandonner les modes de pensée à somme nulle qui dominent notre société. La somme nulle signifie qu'il est uniquement possible de réaliser des gains dans un secteur, la sécurité, mais toujours au détriment de l'autre, la protection de la vie privée, si bien que la somme des deux est nulle.

Ce modèle gagnant-perdant, fondé sur une solution au détriment d'une autre, est dépassé. J'aimerais aujourd'hui que vous adoptiez un modèle de somme positive. Une somme positive signifie simplement qu'on peut réaliser deux gains positifs dans deux secteurs en même temps. C'est une proposition gagnante sur toute la ligne.

Cela a commencé il y a des années. J'ai fait mon doctorat à l'Université de Toronto lorsque le père de la théorie du jeu, Anatol Rapoport, s'y trouvait. Nous avions l'habitude d'en discuter. Je me souviens d'avoir demandé pourquoi les gens optaient pour les sommes nulles. Je suis une éternelle optimiste. Je préfère nettement offrir de multiples solutions gagnantes que des compromis entre deux choses. Il m'a répondu que c'était simple, que les sommes nulles étaient la solution facile, car c'est beaucoup plus facile de donner une seule chose et d'ignorer tout le reste.

Je veux que vous en fassiez davantage et je pense que c'est ce que vous souhaitez. Vous voulez assurer le respect de la vie privée et la sécurité tout en améliorant les services gouvernementaux offerts aux Canadiens.

Mon cadre de protection intégrée de la vie privée est fondé sur l'intégration proactive de mesures de protection de la vie privée très nécessaires à l'élaboration de vos opérations et de vos politiques s'agissant de tous les nouveaux services que vous voulez élaborer ou de tout ce que vous voulez faire en matière d'utilité des données, mais nous le faisons en tenant compte des questions de protection de la vie privée et de sécurité. Il s'agit d'un modèle qui offre de multiples solutions gagnantes. Il fournit des services de protection de la vie privée et d'utilité des données aux particuliers. Vous pouvez remplir l'espace vide, mais il est inclusif et non exclusif. Un n'exclut pas l'autre. Mais comment faire les deux?

Je sais que je n'ai que 10 minutes et que j'en ai probablement déjà utilisé jusqu'à cinq, alors je serai brève pour la suite.

Dans le monde de la protection de la vie privée, il existe un concept clé appelé la minimisation des données, qui consiste à anonymiser les données pour pouvoir en tirer parti afin d'offrir aux Canadiens et aux particuliers des services très nécessaires dans d'autres secteurs d'intérêt sans qu'ils doivent renoncer à la protection de leur vie privée. Lorsqu'on anonymise des données personnelles identifiables, c'est-à-dire qu'on élimine les identifiants directs et indirects, on libère les données, si vous voulez, des restrictions en matière de protection de la vie privée, car c'est l'identifiabilité des données qui est à l'origine des questions de protection de la vie privée. Si les données ne peuvent être personnellement identifiées, d'autres questions pourraient y être associées, mais il ne s'agira pas de questions de protection de la vie privée.

La minimisation et l'anonymisation des données appuieront l'objectif d'obtenir ce que j'appelle de multiples gains simultanément, donc d'avoir une proposition gagnante sur toute la ligne. Je pense qu'elles accroîtront l'efficacité des gouvernements. Vous serez en mesure d'utiliser les données dont vous disposez tout en protégeant toujours les renseignements personnels des citoyens. C'est absolument essentiel.

Je serais ravie de vous en dire plus. Je pourrais parler sans fin de cette question, mais je tiens à respecter les limites de temps qui m'ont été imposées. Je me ferai un plaisir de répondre à vos questions.

(1545)

Le président:

Merci, madame Geist. Désolé, madame Cavoukian. Je me suis un peu emballé.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président: La parole est maintenant à M. Geist pour 10 minutes.

M. Michael Geist (titulaire de la Chaire de recherche du Canada en droit d'Internet et du commerce électronique, Faculté de droit, Université d'Ottawa, à titre personnel):

Très bien. C'est parfait. Je ne crois pas que ma femme nous écoute.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. Michael Geist: Bonjour à tous. Je m'appelle Michael Geist. Je suis professeur de droit à l'Université d'Ottawa, où j'occupe la Chaire de recherche du Canada en droit d'Internet et du commerce électronique. Je suis également membre du Centre de recherche en droit, technologie et société.

Mes domaines de spécialité sont, entre autres, la politique numérique, la propriété intellectuelle et la protection des renseignements personnels. J'ai siégé pendant de nombreuses années au conseil consultatif externe du Commissaire à la protection de la vie privée du Canada. J'ai eu le privilège de comparaître à maintes reprises devant des comités au sujet de questions liées à la protection des renseignements personnels, notamment en ce qui concerne la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les documents électroniques, ou LPRPDE, le projet de loi S-4, le projet de loi C-13, la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels, ainsi que l'étude réalisée par votre comité sur les médias sociaux et la protection de la vie privée. Je préside également le groupe consultatif sur la stratégie numérique de Waterfront Toronto, qui participe activement au processus de création d'une ville intelligente à Toronto, en collaboration avec Sidewalk Labs. Comme toujours, je suis venu témoigner à titre personnel, en tant qu'universitaire indépendant, et je ne représente que mes propres opinions.

L'étude menée par votre comité sur les services gouvernementaux et la protection des renseignements personnels offre une occasion exceptionnelle: celle de relever bon nombre des défis qui se posent aujourd'hui au chapitre des services gouvernementaux, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de la technologie. En effet, ce qui rend cette question si impérieuse, c'est qu'elle représente la convergence de plusieurs domaines: le droit relatif à la protection des renseignements personnels dans les secteurs public et privé, la gouvernance des données et les technologies émergentes. Le cas de Sidewalk Labs en est un bon exemple. Bien que ce projet ne concerne pas les services du gouvernement fédéral — il s'agit, bien entendu, d'un projet municipal —, les débats portent fondamentalement sur le rôle du secteur privé dans la prestation de services gouvernementaux, la collecte de données publiques et la surveillance ou l'engagement des gouvernements à tous les échelons. Ainsi, on ne sait pas encore tout à fait quelle est la loi applicable à ce projet. Est-ce la LPRPDE? Est-ce la loi provinciale sur la protection des renseignements personnels? Est-ce les deux? Comment pouvons-nous relever certains de ces nouveaux défis si le simple fait de déterminer la loi applicable nous donne toujours du fil à retordre?

Le message principal que je veux vous transmettre aujourd'hui est le suivant: l'étude des services gouvernementaux et de la protection des renseignements personnels exige plus qu'un examen étroit des mesures que prend le gouvernement fédéral pour fournir des services, évaluer les répercussions sur la protection des renseignements personnels et, par la suite, déterminer les règles ou règlements qui pourraient être modifiés ou adoptés en vue d'améliorer la prestation de services qui répondent aux besoins des Canadiens et qui s'accompagnent des garanties de confidentialité et de sécurité auxquelles les citoyens s'attendent à juste titre.

Selon moi, les services gouvernementaux de demain feront intervenir un écosystème beaucoup plus complexe qui s'étend au-delà des questions habituelles liées à la pertinence de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels à l'ère du numérique. En raison du chevauchement entre les régimes public et privé, entre le fédéral, le provincial et le municipal, ainsi qu'entre les affaires intérieures et étrangères, il nous faut plutôt une évaluation globale qui reconnaît que la prestation des services dans un monde numérique suppose nécessairement plus qu'une seule loi. Ces services porteront sur des questions concernant l'échange d'information au sein d'un gouvernement ou entre plusieurs gouvernements, l'endroit où les données sont stockées, le transfert d'information au-delà des frontières et l'utilisation de l'information par les gouvernements et le secteur privé pour, entre autres, l'analyse des données et l'intelligence artificielle.

En d'autres termes, cela comprend la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels, la LPRPDE, les accords commerciaux qui contiennent des règles sur la localisation et le transfert des données, le Règlement général sur la protection des données, les traités internationaux, notamment les travaux qui seront entrepris à l'OMC sur le commerce électronique, les fiducies de données communautaires, les politiques en matière de gouvernement ouvert, le droit d'auteur de la Couronne, les normes du secteur privé et les technologies émergentes. C'est un domaine complexe et difficile, mais non moins exaltant.

Je serai heureux de revenir sur bon nombre de ces sujets durant la période des questions, mais vu que le temps passe, je vais aborder un peu plus en profondeur la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels. Comme les membres du Comité le savent, il s'agit de la loi fondamentale pour la collecte et l'utilisation de renseignements personnels par le gouvernement. À l'instar de nombreux auteurs d'études, les commissaires fédéraux à la protection de la vie privée qui se sont succédé ont essayé de sonner l'alarme au sujet de cette loi, qui est jugée dépassée et inadéquate. Les Canadiens s'attendent avec raison à ce que les règles de protection des renseignements personnels qui régissent la collecte, l'utilisation et la communication de leurs renseignements personnels par le gouvernement fédéral répondent aux normes les plus strictes. Cependant, depuis des décennies, nous ne répondons pas à de telles normes. À mesure qu'augmente la pression pour de nouvelles utilisations des données recueillies par le gouvernement fédéral, il devient de plus en plus nécessaire d'instaurer une loi « adaptée aux fins visées ».

J'aimerais souligner trois problèmes en particulier concernant les règles fédérales régissant la protection des renseignements personnels et leurs répercussions. Le premier a trait au pouvoir d'établissement de rapports. L'incapacité de procéder à une véritable réforme de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels pourrait être attribuable, en partie, au manque de sensibilisation du public à la loi et à son importance. Les commissaires à la protection de la vie privée ont joué un rôle important pour ce qui est de sensibiliser la population à la LPRPDE et aux préoccupations générales en la matière. La Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels a désespérément besoin d'un mandat similaire pour l'éducation du public et la recherche.

De plus, l'idée de prévoir simplement un rapport annuel est vraiment le reflet d'une époque révolue. Dans notre contexte actuel où les nouvelles nous parviennent 24 heures sur 24 grâce aux médias sociaux, il n'y a pas lieu de restreindre la capacité de diffuser de l'information — de la vraie information, surtout celle qui touche la vie privée de millions de Canadiens — afin qu'elle demeure à l'abri du public tant qu'un rapport annuel n'est pas déposé. Si le commissaire juge qu'il est dans l'intérêt public de le faire, le Commissariat doit certes avoir le pouvoir de divulguer l'information en temps utile.

(1550)



Le deuxième point consiste à limiter la collecte de renseignements. Comme vous l'avez entendu à maintes reprises, la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels est malheureusement loin de répondre aux normes d'une loi moderne sur la protection des renseignements personnels. En fait, à une époque où le gouvernement est censé servir de modèle, il en demande beaucoup moins de lui-même que du secteur privé.

Toute réforme valable devrait, à mon sens, limiter la collecte de renseignements, ce qui caractérise les mesures législatives s'appliquant au secteur privé. Le gouvernement devrait, lui aussi, être tenu de ne recueillir que les renseignements qui sont strictement nécessaires à ses programmes et activités. C'est particulièrement pertinent en ce qui concerne les nouvelles technologies et l'intelligence artificielle.

Le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée du Canada — qui, je le sais, viendra comparaître plus tard cette semaine —, a récemment présenté un rapport sur le recours à l'analyse des données et à l'intelligence artificielle pour l'exécution de certains programmes. Le rapport fait mention de plusieurs exemples, dont le projet pilote d'analyse prédictive pour les visas de résident temporaire d'Immigration, Réfugiés et Citoyenneté Canada, qui utilise l'analyse prédictive et la prise de décision automatisée dans le cadre des processus d'approbation des visas; l'utilisation, par l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, de l'analyse avancée dans le cadre de son Programme national de ciblage afin d'évaluer l'information sur les passagers pour tous les voyageurs aériens arrivant au Canada; et l'utilisation croissante de l'analyse avancée par l'Agence du revenu du Canada pour trier, catégoriser et coupler les renseignements sur les contribuables en fonction des indicateurs perçus de risque de fraude.

Ces technologies offrent évidemment un énorme potentiel, mais elles peuvent aussi encourager une augmentation de la collecte, de l'échange et du couplage des données. Cela exige des évaluations rigoureuses des facteurs relatifs à la vie privée et des analyses des coûts-avantages connexes.

Enfin, il y a la question de la transparence en ce qui concerne les atteintes à la sécurité des données. Comme vous le savez sûrement, l'adoption de lois obligeant la notification en cas d'atteinte à la sécurité est devenue chose courante dans le domaine de la protection des renseignements personnels dans le secteur privé, et il est évident depuis longtemps qu'il faut exiger la même chose dans la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels. Malgré l'importance d'une telle mesure, il a fallu plus d'une décennie pour adopter et mettre en oeuvre, au Canada, des règles de notification en cas d'atteinte à la sécurité des données dans le secteur privé et, en dépit de cela, nous attendons toujours l'équivalent au niveau du gouvernement fédéral.

Encore une fois, comme vous n'êtes pas sans le savoir, les données révèlent que des centaines de milliers de Canadiens ont été touchés par des atteintes à la sécurité de leurs renseignements personnels. Le taux de signalement de ces cas demeure faible. Si nous tenons à ce que la population ait confiance en la sécurité de leurs renseignements personnels, il faut clairement des règles sur la notification obligatoire en cas d'atteinte au sein du gouvernement.

À cela s'ajoutent les règles et les politiques générales sur la transparence, un sujet qui est étroitement lié à la question des atteintes à la sécurité des données. En un sens, l'objectif stratégique consiste à favoriser la confiance des citoyens à l'égard de la collecte, de l'utilisation et de la communication de leurs renseignements grâce à l'adoption d'approches transparentes et ouvertes en matière de mesures de protection stratégiques et au recensement de cas où nous n'avons pas été à la hauteur.

Ces derniers temps, l'accent a été mis sur la production de rapports de transparence dans le secteur privé. Ainsi, les grandes sociétés Internet comme Google et Twitter ont publié des rapports de transparence, et d'importantes entreprises canadiennes de communications comme Rogers et Telus leur ont emboîté le pas. Toutefois, aussi étonnant que cela puisse paraître, il y a encore des entreprises récalcitrantes. Par exemple, Bell, le plus grand joueur parmi ce groupe, ne publie toujours pas de rapport de transparence en 2019.

Cependant, ces rapports ne représentent qu'un côté de la médaille. Les gens seraient bien mieux informés des demandes et des notifications si les gouvernements publiaient, eux aussi, des rapports de transparence. Il n'est pas nécessaire d'y inclure les enquêtes en cours, mais il n'y a pas vraiment de raison pour que le gouvernement ne soit pas tenu de répondre aux mêmes attentes que le secteur privé en matière de transparence.

Au bout du compte, nous avons besoin de règles qui favorisent la confiance de la population à l'égard des services gouvernementaux en veillant à ce qu'il y ait des mesures de protection adéquates et des mécanismes de transparence et de notification pour donner aux citoyens l'information dont ils ont besoin au sujet de l'état de leurs données et des niveaux d'accès appropriés afin de maximiser les avantages des services gouvernementaux.

Il n'y a là rien de nouveau. Le seul aspect qui est peut-être nouveau, c'est que ce travail doit se faire dans un contexte caractérisé par des technologies changeantes, des flux d'information à l'échelle mondiale et une ligne de démarcation de plus en plus floue entre les secteurs public et privé sur le plan de la prestation des services.

Je me ferai un plaisir de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci, madame Cavoukian et monsieur Geist.

Nous allons commencer par M. Saini. Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Raj Saini:

Bonjour, madame Cavoukian et monsieur Geist. C'est toujours un plaisir de recevoir ici d'éminents experts. Je ferai de mon mieux pour poser des questions succinctes.

Monsieur Geist, relativement à l'un des points que vous avez soulevés, vous avez parlé des différents ordres de gouvernement. Je viens d'une région du pays où il existe quatre paliers de gouvernement: fédéral, provincial, régional et municipal. Dans le modèle que nous avons étudié auparavant, soit le modèle estonien, il y a ce qu'on appelle le principe de la demande unique, par lequel tous les renseignements sont diffusés une seule fois, même s'il faut reconnaître que l'Estonie est un petit pays qui ne compte probablement que deux niveaux de gouvernement. Au Canada, dans certains cas, nous en comptons trois ou quatre.

Comment pouvons-nous protéger les renseignements personnels des Canadiens? Chaque ordre de gouvernement a une fonction différente et une responsabilité différente. Au lieu de fournir toute l'information une seule fois au gouvernement fédéral, puis au gouvernement provincial, puis au gouvernement régional et, enfin, à l'administration municipale — et, comme vous le savez, il est possible d'échanger les renseignements, qu'il s'agisse de dossiers d'impôt, de dossiers de santé ou de casiers judiciaires —, par quel moyen pouvons-nous protéger les renseignements personnels des Canadiens, tout en améliorant l'efficacité des services gouvernementaux?

(1555)

M. Michael Geist:

Vous soulevez là un point intéressant. À certains égards, cela fait ressortir un aspect — comme Ann s'en souviendra, et je suis sûr qu'elle aura des observations à faire là-dessus —, car lorsque nous nous apprêtions à créer une loi fédérale sur la protection des renseignements personnels dans le secteur privé au Canada, nous étions aux prises, en quelque sorte, avec presque la même question: comment faire en sorte que tous les Canadiens aient le même niveau de protection des renseignements personnels aux termes des lois, peu importe l'endroit où ils vivent et le palier de gouvernement en cause?

La triste réalité, c'est que, des décennies plus tard, cela n'est toujours pas le cas. Nous pouvons certes nous demander s'il y a lieu de trouver des mécanismes qui permettent aux gouvernements de collaborer plus activement pour régler ces questions. Il faut bien admettre pourtant, si nous voulons être sincères, que les provinces ont adopté différentes approches en ce qui concerne certaines des règles en matière de protection des renseignements personnels, et ce n'est là qu'un autre palier de gouvernement. Ainsi, la loi du Québec sur la protection des renseignements personnels dans le secteur privé a été adoptée avant la loi fédérale. Quelques provinces ont essayé d'établir des lois de nature semblable. D'autres ont instauré des lois portant sur des sujets plus précis. Le mécanisme prévu par la LPRPDE à cette fin consiste à déterminer si la loi est essentiellement similaire, mais dans la pratique, il y a encore de nombreux Canadiens qui, dans bien des cas, n'ont concrètement aucun moyen de protéger leurs renseignements personnels aujourd'hui, faute de lois provinciales ayant réussi à combler ces lacunes. C'est sans compter les autres paliers dont vous avez parlé. Il s'agit donc d'un enjeu constitutionnel épineux, qui soulève également diverses questions sur la teneur de certaines des dispositions.

M. Raj Saini:

Madame Cavoukian, la prochaine question s'adresse à vous.

Parmi les caractéristiques fondamentales du modèle estonien, outre le principe de la demande unique, mentionnons la présence d'une forte identité numérique, mais par-dessus tout, l'interopérabilité entre les différents ministères gouvernementaux. Le modèle estonien est structuré de telle sorte qu'au lieu de recourir à une seule base de données, on en utilise plusieurs qui contiennent des renseignements très précis auxquels il est possible d'accéder. Cette infrastructure est appelée X-Road. Est-ce un modèle que nous devrions chercher à reproduire?

Par ailleurs, quel est l'avantage ou le désavantage d'avoir des données éparpillées? Cela comporte certains avantages, mais il y a aussi des désavantages. Quel serait l'avantage ou le désavantage de répartir les données et, surtout, de permettre aux Canadiens d'accéder plus facilement à l'information dont ils ont besoin?

Mme Ann Cavoukian:

Je crois que c'est un excellent modèle, qui sera d'ailleurs de plus en plus répandu. C'est ce qu'on appelle un modèle de décentralisation: ainsi, toutes les données ne sont pas stockées dans une seule base de données centrale à laquelle peuvent accéder les diverses branches du gouvernement. Le problème avec la centralisation, c'est qu'elle présente un risque bien plus grand en ce qui concerne les atteintes à la sécurité des données et à la vie privée, l'accès non autorisé aux données par des employés curieux, les coups montés de l'intérieur, et j'en passe. Toutes les données seront exposées à un risque beaucoup plus élevé si elles sont entreposées dans un seul endroit central.

Vous vous souviendrez peut-être qu'il y a environ six mois, Tim Berners-Lee, l'inventeur du World Wide Web, s'était dit atterré et horrifié de voir que sa création soit devenue un modèle centralisé dans lequel tout le monde peut essentiellement s'introduire avec facilité et accéder sans autorisation aux données d'autrui. La centralisation prête également le flanc à la surveillance des activités et des mouvements des citoyens. Il y a donc plein de problèmes du point de vue de la protection des renseignements personnels et de la sécurité.

En Estonie, le modèle décentralisé est hors pair. On y trouve différentes grappes d'information. Chaque base de données contient des renseignements auxquels on peut accéder pour un but précis. C'est ce qu'on appelle souvent le but premier de la collecte des données, et les fonctionnaires sont astreints à des limites quant à l'utilisation des données. Ils doivent s'en servir aux fins prévues. Plus vous avez des grappes d'information décentralisées, plus il est probable que les données restent intactes et qu'elles soient conservées aux fins prévues, au lieu d'être utilisées systématiquement pour une foule de raisons qui n'avaient jamais été envisagées.

Vous avez ainsi beaucoup plus de contrôle, et les gens, c'est-à-dire les citoyens, peuvent être assurés de profiter d'un niveau accru de confidentialité et de sécurité relativement à ces données. C'est un modèle qui se répand, et vous en verrez beaucoup plus à l'avenir. Cela ne signifie pas que les autres branches du gouvernement ne peuvent pas accéder aux données. Elles ne peuvent tout simplement pas y accéder automatiquement et en faire ce que bon leur semble.

(1600)

M. Raj Saini:

C'est formidable. Merci.

J'ai une dernière question, monsieur Geist. Vous avez mentionné qu'il y aura une interface ou un lien entre le secteur privé et le secteur public. De toute évidence, les deux secteurs sont régis par deux régimes de protection des données personnelles différents. Plus important encore, lorsque nous examinons le modèle estonien, nous constatons qu'il s'agit de la technologie de la chaîne de blocs, une technologie sécuritaire et fiable.

Si l'on veut garder deux systèmes distincts, un pour le secteur public et un pour le secteur privé, la technologie doit être d'égale qualité de part et d'autre. Comme nous le savons, la technologie du secteur privé est parfois supérieure à celle du secteur public. Comment pouvons-nous transformer les deux afin de nous assurer que la fiabilité et l'efficacité de l'interface seront au rendez-vous pour le citoyen?

M. Michael Geist:

Selon moi, la fiabilité est un principe juridique plutôt que technologique, et elle a tout à voir avec la fiabilité des données qui sont recueillies.

Pour ce qui est de veiller à ce que les secteurs public et privé utilisent la meilleure sécurité possible, je pense que nous avons vu certains des mécanismes, du moins dans le secteur public, grâce auxquels nous pourrions viser cela en conjonction avec les efforts que déploie le gouvernement pour tenter d'intégrer différents services de l'informatique en nuage. C'est une bonne illustration de la façon dont le gouvernement a reconnu que l'informatique en nuage pouvait susciter certaines préoccupations en ce qui concerne l'endroit où les données sont stockées et d'autres problèmes de localisation semblables. Toutefois, selon le fournisseur, cette technologie peut aussi offrir certains des meilleurs mécanismes de sécurité concernant l'emplacement des données stockées. Alors, la question est de savoir comment il est possible de profiter de cela tout en mettant en place les mesures de protection nécessaires. Nous avons vu certains efforts à cet égard.

Cela se résume en partie à l'étiquetage des différents types de données ou peut-être, surtout au niveau du gouvernement fédéral, à la création de différents types de règles pour différents types de données. Par ailleurs, je pense qu'il faudra être prêt à brouiller ces lignes de démarcation de temps à autre, tout en reconnaissant la nécessité de veiller à ce que les règles canadiennes soient applicables.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Saini.

Nous avons maintenant M. Kent, pour sept minutes.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à vous deux d'être venus témoigner.

L'étude du gouvernement numérique est un vaste sujet. Nous l'avons amorcée l'an dernier, puis nous l'avons reléguée au second plan à cause de l'étude au sujet de Cambridge Analytica, Facebook et AggregateIQ.

Ma rencontre, l'année dernière, avec le premier ministre estonien, Juri Ratas a été une expérience fascinante. Il m'a montré la carte et la puce qu'elle contient. Essentiellement, ce sont à peu près toutes les informations d'une vie qui y sont stockées. Il y a eu quelques manquements et quelques pépins avec leur fabricant de puces, mais c'est un concept fascinant.

Ma question s'adresse à vous deux. Le modèle de gouvernement numérique estonien repose sur une démocratie naissante, compte tenu de l'effondrement relativement récent de l'Union soviétique. La société y est encore soumise, et elle a accepté la décision de ses nouveaux dirigeants d'imposer démocratiquement ce nouveau gouvernement numérique à la population. Or, ici, notre merveilleuse Confédération canadienne a été pendant plus de 150 ans le théâtre de remises en question démocratiques — non sans une certaine dose de scepticisme et de cynisme — à l'endroit du gouvernement relativement aux changements importants qu'il a tenté d'opérer et aux référendums qu'il a tenus sur diverses questions. Je me demande simplement, pour n'importe quel gouvernement, qu'il soit fédéral, provincial, régional ou municipal, et dans n'importe quel contexte, à quel point il est réaliste pour le Canada et les Canadiens de chercher à obtenir une seule carte à puce comme cela se fait en Estonie.

Madame Cavoukian, voulez-vous commencer?

Mme Ann Cavoukian:

Pardonnez-moi, je secouais la tête. L'Estonie est très respectée, cela ne fait aucun doute. Personnellement, je ne miserais pas sur une seule carte avec une seule puce où seraient stockées toutes vos données. C'est un modèle centralisé qui, à mon avis, va être très problématique — et qui l'est déjà —, surtout à long terme.

Il y a tant d'avancées. Vous avez peut-être entendu parler de ce qui se passe en Australie. Les Australiens viennent d'adopter une loi qui permet au gouvernement d'accéder par voie dérobée aux communications chiffrées. Pourquoi les gens cherchent-ils à chiffrer leurs échanges? C'est parce qu'ils veulent les protéger et les mettre à l'abri du gouvernement ou de tierces parties, de parties non autorisées. L'Australie a adopté une loi qui lui permet d'accéder par la porte de derrière et à votre insu à vos communications chiffrées, et personne ne pourra vous dire si cela s'est fait ou non. Pour moi, c'est une situation consternante.

Personnellement, je ne suis pas en faveur d'une carte d'identité unique, d'une puce unique, de n'importe quoi d'unique.

Cela dit, je pense que nous devons aller au-delà des lois existantes pour protéger nos données et trouver de nouveaux modèles, et je le dis avec beaucoup de respect. J'ai été commissaire à l'information et à la protection de la vie privée de l'Ontario pendant trois mandats, soit durant 17 ans. Bien sûr, nous avions beaucoup de lois et je les observais scrupuleusement, mais elles n'étaient jamais suffisantes. C'est trop peu, trop tard. Les lois semblent toujours à la traîne des technologies et des dernières découvertes. C'est pourquoi j'ai créé Privacy by Design, c'est-à-dire la protection de la vie privée à l'étape de la conception. Je voulais un moyen proactif de prévenir les préjudices, un peu comme un dispositif de prévention médical. La protection de la vie privée à l'étape de la conception a été adoptée de manière unanime comme norme internationale, en 2010. Ses préceptes ont été traduits en 40 langues et ils viennent d'être inclus dans la dernière mesure législative à être entrée en vigueur l'année dernière, en Union européenne, nommément le Règlement général sur la protection des données. Les préceptes de la protection de la vie privée à l'étape de la conception y sont enchâssés.

La raison pour laquelle j'insiste là-dessus, c'est qu'il y a des choses que nous pouvons faire pour protéger les données, pour permettre l'accès aux données — dont l'accès numérique par les gouvernements, au besoin —, mais pas de façon systématique. Il n'est pas nécessaire de créer un modèle de surveillance aux termes duquel toute l'information se retrouverait au même endroit — une carte d'identité —, endroit auquel le gouvernement ou la police pourrait avoir accès.

Vous pourriez me dire que la police n'y aurait pas accès à moins d'avoir un mandat. Malheureusement, je dois dire que cela est absurde. Ce n'est pas vrai. Nous avons des exemples de la façon dont la GRC, par exemple, a créé ce que l'on appelle des Stingrays, c'est-à-dire des capteurs d'IMSI, pour International Mobile Suscriber Identity. Ces tours de téléphonie mobile usurpent l'identité des personnes afin de permettre aux agents d'accéder aux communications cellulaires de tout le monde dans un secteur donné. C'est ce qu'ils font lorsqu'ils recherchent un « méchant ». Bien sûr, s'ils avaient un mandat, je leur dirais: « Je vous en prie, soyez les bienvenus. Allez le chercher. » Mais en ont-ils un? Non. C'est quelque chose qu'ils faisaient sans que personne le sache, mais la CBC les a exposés et ils ont finalement dû reconnaître qu'ils le faisaient.

Avec tout le respect que je vous dois et sans vouloir dénigrer l'Estonie de quelque façon que ce soit, sachez que ce n'est pas la direction que je voudrais que nous prenions ici, c'est-à-dire celle d'une plus grande centralisation. C'est quelque chose que j'éviterais.

(1605)

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Merci.

Monsieur Geist, nous vous écoutons.

M. Michael Geist:

Ann a soulevé un certain nombre de points très importants, notamment en ce qui concerne la centralisation.

En vous écoutant, je ne pouvais m'empêcher de penser à ce qui s'est passé jusqu'ici relativement au comité consultatif d'experts sur la stratégie numérique de Waterfront Toronto qui, je dois le reconnaître, a pris plus de place que ce à quoi je m'attendais. En tant que président de ce comité depuis la dernière année...

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Je suis convaincu que nous aurons l'occasion d'en reparler.

M. Michael Geist:

Je dois dire que lorsque l'on se penche là-dessus, il n'est pas question d'une carte d'identité unique. Il s'agit de prendre une parcelle de terrain relativement petite et de chercher à y intégrer certains types de technologies, des technologies émergentes, qui permettront la mise en oeuvre d'un « gouvernement intelligent ». La controverse qui en a découlé, et plus encore, le genre de discussion publique sur ce que nous sommes prêts à tolérer, sur les fournisseurs avec lesquels nous sommes à l'aise et sur le rôle que nous voulons que le gouvernement joue dans tout cela font ressortir certains des vrais défis. Il s'agit en un sens d'un petit projet pilote pour mettre à l'essai certaines technologies appuyant la notion de ville intelligente. L'évocation d'une carte unique pour toutes les données est un puissant catalyseur qui soulève toute une série de questions quant à notre environnement.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Je suis convaincu que dans les deux heures dont nous disposons, le Comité reviendra à la question plus générale du gouvernement numérique, mais pour l'instant, j'aimerais revenir à Sidewalk Labs. Il y a un peu de David et Goliath dans Sidewalk Labs, vu la façon dont Alphabet, la société mère de Google, a imposé sa façon de traiter avec la ville et les autres partenaires potentiels. Je pense que le départ de Mme Cavoukian témoigne de cela.

M. Michael Geist:

Bien sûr, elle a quitté son poste de conseillère chez Sidewalk Labs. J'ai siégé au comité consultatif de Waterfront Toronto, et j'ai l'impression qu'il est encore tôt pour essayer de déterminer précisément à quoi ressemblera le projet d'aménagement définitif et s'il sera approuvé. C'est vraiment le but de ce groupe consultatif: essayer de mieux comprendre quels types de technologie sont proposés, quel type de gouvernance des données nous avons au chapitre de la propriété intellectuelle et de la protection des renseignements personnels, et veiller à ce que les conditions ne soient pas dictées. L'objectif est plutôt de chercher à ce qu'elles reflètent mieux ce à quoi la communauté pense.

(1610)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Kent.

La parole est maintenant à M. Angus, pour sept minutes.

M. Charlie Angus:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais bien sûr commencer par une discussion sur Sidewalk Labs, car c'est une proposition très intéressante qui a assurément ouvert la porte à beaucoup de questions.

Madame Cavoukian, votre décision de quitter Sidewalk Labs a soulevé beaucoup de questions. Pouvez-vous expliquer pourquoi vous ne vouliez plus faire partie de ce projet?

Mme Ann Cavoukian:

Je n'ai pas démissionné à la légère. Je tiens à vous en assurer.

Sidewalk Labs m'a engagée comme consultante pour intégrer la protection de la vie privée à l'étape de la conception — mon bébé, dont je vous ai parlé — dans la ville intelligente qu'ils projetaient de réaliser. J'ai dit: « Je serais très heureuse de le faire, mais sachez que je pourrais être un caillou dans votre chaussure, parce que cela nécessitera le plus haut degré de protection, et que pour avoir cette protection dans une ville intelligente... » Dans une ville intelligente, les technologies, les capteurs et tout le reste doivent être en fonction 24 heures sur 24, 7 jours par semaine. Les citoyens n'ont pas la possibilité de consentir ou non à la collecte de leurs données. Cela se fait en permanence.

J'ai dit que dans ce modèle, nous devons toujours dépersonnaliser les données à la source, ce qui signifie que lorsque le capteur recueille vos données — sur votre voiture, sur vous-même, peu importe —, vous devez les purger de tous les identificateurs personnels, qu'ils soient directs ou indirects, de manière à les rendre neutres. Vous devez encore décider qui va faire quoi avec ces données. Il y a beaucoup d'enjeux à considérer, mais ils ne seront pas liés à la protection des renseignements personnels.

Ils ne m'ont pas repoussée, croyez-le ou non. Je ne l'ai pas fait non plus. Ils ont accepté ces conditions. Je leur ai expliqué tout cela dès l'embauche initiale.

Ce qui s'est passé, c'est qu'ils ont été critiqués par un certain nombre d'intervenants en ce qui concerne la gouvernance des données. On voulait aussi savoir qui allait contrôler l'utilisation des données, de ces énormes quantités de données. Qui exercera le contrôle? On arguait que ça ne devait pas être seulement Sidewalk Labs.

Ils ont répondu qu'ils allaient créer une « fiducie de données civiques », qui se composerait d'eux-mêmes et de membres de divers gouvernements — municipaux, provinciaux, etc. —, et que diverses sociétés s'occupant de propriété intellectuelle allaient participer à sa création. Par ailleurs, ils ont dit: « Nous ne pouvons pas garantir qu'ils vont dépersonnaliser complètement les données à la source. Nous les encouragerons à le faire, mais nous ne pouvons en donner l'assurance. »

Quand j'ai entendu cela, j'ai su que je devais me retirer. Cela a été fait lors d'une réunion du conseil d'administration, à l'automne. Je ne sais plus quand. Michael s'en souviendra. Le lendemain matin qui a suivi la réunion, j'ai remis ma démission. Voici la raison que j'ai donnée: si vous laissez cette question à la discrétion des entreprises, vous pouvez être certains que cela ne se fera pas. Quelqu'un dira: « Non, nous n'allons pas anonymiser les données à la source. »

Les données qui ne sont pas anonymisées ont une valeur énorme. C'est le nec plus ultra. Tout le monde veut des données sous une forme qui permet d'identifier les gens. En gros, vous devez dire ce que j'ai dit à Waterfront Toronto par la suite. Ils m'ont appelée juste après ma démission, cela va de soi, et je leur ai dit: « Vous devez faire la loi. S'il y a une fiducie de données civiques — et peu importe qui est sur le coup, je m'en fiche —, vous devez leur dire qu'ils doivent anonymiser les données à la source, point final. Ce sont les conditions de l'accord. » Waterfront Toronto ne m'a pas repoussée.

C'est pour cette raison que j'ai quitté Sidewalk Labs. Je travaille maintenant pour Waterfront Toronto pour faire avancer les choses, parce qu'ils sont d'accord avec moi lorsque j'affirme qu'il faut anonymiser les données à la source et protéger les renseignements personnels. Je voulais qu'on ait une ville intelligente sur le plan de la confidentialité, pas sur le plan de la surveillance. Je fais partie du conseil international des villes intelligentes — des villes intelligentes de partout dans le monde — et presque toutes sont des villes intelligentes de surveillance. Pensez à Dubaï, à Shanghai et d'autres municipalités. La confidentialité y est absente. Je voulais que nous nous mobilisions pour montrer qu'il est possible de créer une ville intelligente où la vie privée n'est pas menacée. Je crois toujours que nous pouvons le faire.

M. Charlie Angus:

Merci. Permettez-moi d'intervenir.

L'une des préoccupations que j'ai entendues de la part des citoyens de Toronto concerne la nécessité de protéger la vie privée dès la conception, certes, mais aussi celle d'avoir un engagement démocratique dès la conception. Dans le cas d'une ville, il s'agit d'avoir des espaces publics à l'intention des citoyens. Nous avons un problème. Nous avons un gouvernement provincial qui est en guerre avec la ville de Toronto et qui a supprimé un certain nombre de conseillers municipaux. Il y a donc un déficit sur le plan démocratique. Nous voyons Waterfront Toronto dans une situation intermédiaire, avec une province qui pourrait s'y opposer. Nous constatons que le gouvernement fédéral s'occupe continuellement de cette question par l'entremise des lobbyistes de Google, de sorte qu'il y a beaucoup de choses qui se passent en coulisse.

Quel est le rôle des citoyens en matière d'engagement? Si nous voulons aller de l'avant, nous avons besoin de voix démocratiques pour établir ce qui est public, ce qui est privé, ce qui devrait être protégé et ce qui est ouvert. Quant aux autres gros joueurs, nous avons affaire à la plus grande machine de données de l'univers. Cette société amasse de l'argent en recueillant les données des gens et c'est elle qui conçoit tout cela.

Madame Cavoukian, j'aimerais vous poser la question suivante — je n'ai pas beaucoup de temps, peut-être une minute — et j'aimerais ensuite entendre la réponse de M. Geist. Nous aurons peut-être une autre série de questions à ce sujet.

(1615)

Mme Ann Cavoukian:

Je tiens à m'assurer que je laisse à Michael du temps pour intervenir.

Nous avons besoin d'une grande transparence afin de déterminer au juste qui fait quoi et comment cette information est diffusée en ce qui concerne les données et les décisions prises par les divers ordres de gouvernement dont vous avez parlé, des ordres de gouvernement qui semblent toujours être à couteaux tirés. Je ne suis pas ici pour défendre les gouvernements, car il faut qu'il y ait un moyen d'interagir qui permet aux citoyens de participer et de comprendre ce qui peut bien se passer. C'est absolument essentiel. Je ne sous-entends pas que cette question n'est pas importante; je pense simplement que nous devrions nous soucier surtout des questions de protection de la vie privée afin de nous assurer qu'elles sont au moins cernées.

M. Charlie Angus:

Monsieur Geist, qu'en pensez-vous?

M. Michael Geist:

En réalité, je pourrais simplement formuler des observations à propos du rôle que joue mon groupe d'experts. Toutes nos réunions sont ouvertes au public. Le public peut avoir accès aux documents étudiés. En fait, d'un point de vue technologique, nous avons pris connaissance de certains des plans de Sidewalk Labs. Ils sont venus nous faire un exposé dans le cadre d'une réunion du groupe d'experts. Tout le monde peut assister à ces réunions, qui sont assidûment filmées. En fait, quelqu'un se présente à chaque réunion, filme son déroulement, puis affiche la vidéo sur YouTube. Des réunions supplémentaires ont été organisées. Le mois prochain, nous nous réunirons dans les locaux de MaRS, et la réunion portera précisément sur les fondations civiques.

Avec tout le respect que je vous dois, je dois admettre que la notion selon laquelle aucune discussion publique n'a lieu et aucun moyen d'avoir des discussions publiques n'existe contredit l'expérience que j'ai vécue jusqu'à maintenant au cours de la dernière année que j'ai passée ici, en ce sens que littéralement n'importe qui à Toronto peut assister à n'importe quelle réunion qui lui plaît.

M. Charlie Angus:

Monsieur Geist, je dois dire, avec tout le respect que je vous dois, qu'on m'a appris — j'ai appris cela de Google — que les gens étaient frustrés parce que Google souhaite parler de la quantité de bois utilisée pour construire l'édifice. Voyons donc! Eric Schmidt se préoccupe maintenant de l'utilisation des produits du bois à Toronto? Ils parlent des données. Voilà ce que me disent les gens. Ils reviennent de ces réunions sans avoir obtenu de réponses.

M. Michael Geist:

Voilà précisément ce dont nous parlons au cours des réunions de notre comité. Nous passons notre temps à parler des questions de gouvernance des données, de protection de la vie privée et de propriété intellectuelle. En fait, nous cherchons à déterminer les technologies qu'ils mettront en place, selon leurs dires, et les conséquences qu'elles auront sur la propriété intellectuelle, la protection de la vie privée et la gouvernance des données. Par exemple, l'idée de créer une fondation civique a été proposée à notre groupe en premier.

Comme je l'ai dit, est-ce que nous pourrions en faire davantage? Je suis certain que nous le pourrions mais, de mon point de vue, je peux dire que je vois les médias participer à nos réunions. Je vois des citoyens y assister. Je vois des articles publiés dans des blogues ou ailleurs qui découlent de ces réunions. Tout cela se déroule de façon complètement ouverte.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Angus.

Le prochain intervenant est M. Erskine-Smith, qui aura la parole pendant sept minutes.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Merci beaucoup.

Je vous remercie tous deux de votre présence.

Pour commencer, j'aimerais clarifier un léger malentendu qui s'est immiscé dans certaines des questions de M. Kent en ce qui concerne l'identité électronique en Estonie. Les renseignements personnels ne sont pas centralisés dans un mini-ordinateur. En fait, le fondement même du gouvernement numérique estonien est la décentralisation. L'identité numérique est une carte d'identité qui permet aux Estoniens d'accéder au système, mais elle ne contient pas une foule de renseignements personnels.

Là où je veux vraiment en venir, c'est qu'à mon avis, l'utilité de notre étude consiste à demander comment nous pourrions appliquer le cadre de protection de la vie privée dès la conception à un gouvernement numérique, afin que nous puissions en fait améliorer les services que nous offrons aux Canadiens.

D'emblée, je vous ferais remarquer que, selon l'information publique produite par l'Estonie, près de 5 000 services électroniques distincts permettent aux gens de faire quotidiennement leurs courses sans jamais quitter leur ordinateur à la maison. En ma qualité de Canadien qui souhaite recevoir de meilleurs services de la part de son gouvernement, je veux avoir accès à ces services. Comment pouvons-nous atténuer dès le début du processus les préoccupations relatives à la protection de la vie privée afin que nous puissions bénéficier de meilleurs services?

Si nous examinons le modèle estonien, nous voyons qu'il y a une identité numérique. Les renseignements dont disposent les ministères sont séparés au moyen d'X-Road et de la technologie des chaînes de blocs. Puis il y a une transparence en ce sens que, lorsqu'un employé du gouvernement consulte mes renseignements, je peux voir qui l'a fait et quand cela a été fait grâce à l'horodatage. Si l'on ajoutait ces niveaux de détail à un système d'un gouvernement numérique, cette mesure suffirait-elle à répondre aux préoccupations relatives à la protection de la vie privée? Y a-t-il d'autres mesures que nous devrions prendre si nous envisageons de passer à un gouvernement numérique?

Je vais commencer par interroger Mme Cavoukian, puis M. Geist.

Mme Ann Cavoukian:

Il y a un certain nombre d'éléments très positifs dans ce que vous avez décrit, dont la transparence associée à chaque service offert et la facilité avec laquelle les citoyens peuvent avoir accès à ces services en ligne.

Je tiens à formuler une observation à propos de la technologie des chaînes de blocs. Ne présumons pas qu'il s'agit là d'une merveilleuse technologie qui garantit l'anonymat, car ce n'est pas le cas. Cette technologie présente des avantages, mais elle peut aussi avoir des côtés négatifs. De plus, elle a été piratée. Je vais vous lire une phrase très courte tirée d'un texte portant sur le Règlement général sur la protection des données, le RGPD. Le RGPD est la nouvelle loi qui est entrée en vigueur en Union européenne. La phrase en question dit ce qui suit: « En particulier dans le cas de la technologie des chaînes de blocs, il n'y a pas d'autre solution que celle de mettre en oeuvre le cadre de protection de la vie privée dès la conception, étant donné que les ajouts habituels en matière d'amélioration et de protection de la vie privée ne satisferont pas aux exigences du RGPD ». Le RGPD a radicalement relevé la barre au chapitre de la protection des renseignements personnels. Les gens disent: « Utilisez bien entendu la technologie des chaînes de bloc, mais ne le faites pas sans mettre en oeuvre le cadre de protection de la vie privée dès la conception, car vous devez vous assurer que cette protection est intégrée dans la technologie des chaînes de blocs ». Certaines entreprises, comme Enigma, le font merveilleusement bien en prévoyant un niveau supplémentaire de protection des renseignements personnels.

Je tiens simplement à ce que nous fassions attention de ne pas adhérer à la technologie des chaînes de blocs ou à d'autres technologies sans regarder réellement sous le capot et sans observer ce qui se passe au chapitre de la protection des renseignements personnels.

(1620)

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Je crois comprendre qu'en Estonie, ils utilisaient cette technologie avant qu'on lui attribue le nom de technologie des chaînes de blocs, mais c'est en 2002 que les Estoniens ont mis en oeuvre un système. Ils ont eu l'idée d'utiliser cette technologie pour transférer l'information d'un ministère à l'autre en arrière-plan. En tant que citoyen, lorsque j'ouvre une session, je n'aperçois qu'un seul portail mais, en arrière-plan, mes renseignements sont hébergés dans un certain nombre de ministères. Si ces ministères souhaitent échanger des renseignements, les voies nécessaires sont ouvertes uniquement au moyen de la technologie des chaînes de blocs, afin de garantir le caractère privé des échanges. Si je travaille à l'ASFC, je ne serai pas en mesure de consulter les renseignements qui sont enregistrés par les services d'emploi... mais je prends bonne note de votre préoccupation concernant la technologie des chaînes de blocs.

Avec tout le respect que je vous dois, j'imagine, ma question fondamentale... J'ai des questions plus particulières à poser, mais voici ma question générale. Si nous élaborons une identité numérique, que nous garantissons l'anonymat des données échangées entre les ministères, que je peux, en tant qu'utilisateur, ouvrir une session et exercer un contrôle sur mes renseignements et que cela constitue les trois pierres d'assise du système, est-ce que quelque chose m'échappera? Quelque chose d'autre m'échappera-t-il?

Mme Ann Cavoukian:

Ce projet semble très positif. Vous intégrerez la sécurité dans [Difficultés techniques]

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Exactement. L'identité numérique est elle-même un dispositif de cryptage.

Mme Ann Cavoukian:

Oui.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Si j'ai bien compris, l'identité numérique en Estonie est elle-même un microprocesseur ainsi qu'un dispositif de cryptage. Elle vérifie donc mon identité.

Soit dit en passant, en ce qui concerne les Estoniens, le meilleur argument de vente — et je sais qu'il a peut-être inquiété M. Kent — qu'ils ont présenté à notre comité lors de leur visite était le fait qu'aucun vol d'identité n'était survenu depuis qu'ils avaient mis en oeuvre ce système — aucun vol d'identité. Pourquoi? Parce que s'ils perdent leur identité numérique, le certificat peut être révoqué facilement. Par conséquent, personne ne peut utiliser cette identité numérique pour avoir accès à des services en prétendant être quelqu'un d'autre.

Si ces éléments sont les trois pierres d'assise et si vous n'avez pas de réponses claires à donner à aucune... et vous dîtes que ces éléments semblent tous positifs, alors la question fondamentale est la suivante: Y a-t-il d'autres niveaux de sécurité que nous devrions prévoir pour nous assurer que le cadre de protection de la vie privée dès la conception est intégré dans les services du gouvernement numérique, comme l'Estonie le fait? quelque chose échappe-t-il à l'Estonie, ou devrions-nous faire comme elle?

Mme Ann Cavoukian:

L'initiative de l'Estonie est très, très positive...

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Le...

M. Michael Geist:

Si vous me permettez de répondre, je ne parlerai pas précisément de l'Estonie, mais je dirai qu'il y a deux éléments nécessaires. Pour un marteau, tout a l'air d'un clou. Pour un professeur de droit, tout a l'air d'un problème juridique. En ce qui concerne la question de décrire des normes principalement technologiques et d'affirmer que c'est la façon dont nous protégerons efficacement... Je comprends pourquoi cette idée est extrêmement attrayante, mais, à mon avis, il faudrait que vous mettiez aussi en place une loi correspondante.

Par ailleurs, un autre des enjeux dont je me soucie est bien entendu l'accès. Alors, qu'avez-vous besoin d'autre? Si vous voulez être en mesure d'adopter des services de ce genre, vous devez vous assurer que tous les Canadiens ont accès au réseau. Nous sommes encore aux prises avec un trop grand nombre de Canadiens qui ne bénéficient pas d'un accès à Internet abordable. Nous devons reconnaître qu'une partie de toute conversation concernant la façon dont nous pouvons offrir aux Canadiens des services de ce genre doit être consacrée à la question de savoir comment nous veillerons à ce que tous les Canadiens bénéficient d'un accès au réseau abordable.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Je vous suis reconnaissant de vos observations.

Comme je vais manquer de temps, la dernière question que je poserai concerne la minimisation des données. D'une part, je pense qu'en général, l'Estonie suit cette règle mais, lorsque nous examinons les services gouvernementaux, nous pourrions dire, comme les entreprises le font, qu'un surcroît de données nous permettra d'offrir de meilleurs services aux consommateurs. En tant que gouvernement, nous soutenons que, dans certains cas, il est préférable d'avoir accès à un plus grand nombre de données. Je souhaite vous donner un exemple.

Très peu de Canadiens souscrivent au Bon d'études canadien. Tout le monde est admissible à l'Allocation canadienne pour enfants parce que c'est automatique, à condition de produire une déclaration de revenus. Par ailleurs, si nous connaissions tous les particuliers qui reçoivent l'Allocation canadienne pour enfants, nous saurions également qu'ils sont admissibles au Bon d'études canadien. Pour pouvoir sensibiliser les citoyens de façon préventive et leur dire en passant qu'ils ont droit de recevoir gratuitement des fonds pour l'éducation de leurs enfants et qu'ils devraient donc présenter une demande à cet égard, s'ils ne l'ont pas déjà fait, nous devons utiliser leurs renseignements personnels, idéalement dans le but d'améliorer les services. Dans ce contexte, y a-t-il des risques dont je devrais me préoccuper?

(1625)

Mme Ann Cavoukian:

Je ne crois pas du tout qu'il soit préférable de disposer d'un plus grand nombre de données.

Vous donnez un exemple très valable. Vous souhaitez sensibiliser les gens, mais l'utilisation des données à des fins jamais prévues comporte de nombreux risques. En théorie, nous fournissons des données au gouvernement dans un but particulier. Nous payons nos impôts, ou nous prenons une mesure quelconque. C'est là notre intention, et c'est donc l'objectif principal de la collecte de données. Vous êtes censés utiliser ces données dans ce but et limiter votre utilisation à cela, à moins d'obtenir un consentement supplémentaire auprès du sujet des données, c'est-à-dire le citoyen.

Dès que vous commencez à vous écarter de cette démarche pour ce que vous croyez être le plus grand bien des Canadiens, et que vous pensez qu'il vaut mieux pour eux que vous ayez accès à toutes leurs données et que vous puissiez leur envoyer des renseignements supplémentaires ou leur fournir des services supplémentaires... Ils ne veulent peut-être pas que vous fassiez cela. Ils ne souhaitent peut-être pas... La protection de la vie privée est une question de contrôle, soit le contrôle personnel de l'utilisation de vos renseignements personnels. Dès que vous commencez à élargir la portée de votre action parce que vous estimez — je ne veux pas dire vous personnellement — que le gouvernement sait ce qu'il faut faire mieux que quiconque, cela vous entraîne dans une voie de surveillance et de suivi, qui est tout à fait inappropriée. Je vous dis cela avec le plus grand respect, car je sais que vos intentions sont louables, mais je n'irais pas... De plus, lorsque vous avez des données inactives, d'immenses quantités de données inactives, cela représente un véritable trésor.

Le président:

Merci, madame Cavoukian...

Mme Ann Cavoukian:

C'est un véritable trésor pour les pirates informatiques et, tôt ou tard, des gens pirateront ces données. Cela attirera simplement les malfaiteurs.

Le président:

Merci.

Comme des votes auront lieu à 17 h 30 et que le Comité doit prendre environ cinq minutes pour s'occuper de quelques travaux à huis clos, j'envisage que nous finissions si possible à environ 16 h 50.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Gourde, qui prendra la parole pendant cinq minutes. [Français]

M. Jacques Gourde (Lévis—Lotbinière, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les témoins d'être ici aujourd'hui.

Ma question est fort simple: est-il possible d'appliquer le modèle de l'Estonie au Canada, compte tenu de nos défis, des niveaux de gouvernance et de l'accessibilité à Internet sur un territoire aussi vaste?

Il y a des endroits au Canada où la connexion ne se fait pas. Si nous optons pour cela, il va tout de même falloir offrir deux niveaux de services aux Canadiens, pour ceux qui ne peuvent pas y accéder. Est-ce que cela vaut vraiment la peine?

Madame Cavoukian, vous pouvez répondre en premier. [Traduction]

Mme Ann Cavoukian:

Il est bien entendu extrêmement important d'améliorer le niveau des services offerts aux citoyens, et tout le monde, comme [Difficultés techniques], n'a pas un accès égal à Internet et à différents niveaux de technologie. Je pense que l'amélioration des services offerts aux particuliers, aux citoyens, est une entreprise très louable. Ce sont les moyens que vous employez pour le faire qui me préoccupent. Cela soulève toujours des interrogations. Comment pouvez-vous sensibiliser les gens et leur offrir davantage de services sans envahir leur vie privée, sans examiner les autres besoins qu'ils pourraient avoir? S'ils vous fournissent cette information, n'hésitez pas à agir, car cela constituera un consentement positif. Vous pourrez alors les faire bénéficier de services supplémentaires. Mais je ne veux pas que le gouvernement consulte les données dont il dispose déjà à propos des citoyens afin de déterminer si d'autres services pourraient leur être utiles.

Je pense que vous devez demander aux citoyens s'ils aimeraient se prévaloir de ces autres services. Ensuite, vous pourrez sans hésiter leur conseiller de travailler avec vous. Je ne crois pas que nous devrions faire cela en fouillant dans des bases de données à la dérive qui contiennent des renseignements sur nos citoyens.

M. Michael Geist:

Je suis heureux que vous ayez soulevé de nouveau la question de l'accès. Comme je l'écris depuis un certain temps, j'ai longtemps pensé que l'une des vraies raisons pour lesquelles les gouvernements... Ce n'est pas du tout une question de partisanerie, car les gouvernements successifs ont peiné à composer avec ce problème. L'une des raisons pour lesquelles il est nécessaire d'investir concrètement pour garantir un accès à Internet universel et abordable, c'est qu'à mon avis, la possibilité pour le gouvernement de passer à un nombre de plus en plus important de services électroniques, et d'économiser ainsi, dépend de la disponibilité de cet accès.

Selon moi, vous avez tout à fait raison de dire que, tant que ce stade n'aura pas été atteint, il faudra essentiellement assurer un ensemble de services parallèles pour garantir un accès universel. Effectivement, vous ne pouvez pas priver certaines personnes de certains types de services gouvernementaux parce qu'elles n'ont pas accès au réseau. Pour une foule de raisons, il est sensé que le gouvernement investisse là où le secteur privé n'a pas voulu le faire. L'une de ces raisons est que cet accès profite au gouvernement, parce qu'à mon avis, il lui permet de favoriser le passage à certains services électroniques plus efficaces.

Manifestement, nous n'avons pas encore atteint ce stade. Des études ont révélé à maintes reprises qu'en ce qui concerne les services à large bande, nous ne disposons pas d'un accès universel abordable et qu'en ce qui concerne les services sans fil, nous continuons de payer certains des frais les plus élevés de la planète pour nous en prévaloir. Cela nous indique que nos politiques en vue de garantir des moyens de communication abordables au Canada continuent d'être grandement déficientes.

(1630)

[Français]

M. Jacques Gourde:

Ma dernière question est aussi fort simple.

Au Canada, disposons-nous de l'expertise requise en matière de programmation? Il semble que l'industrie connaisse une crise, une pénurie de programmeurs. Nous devons nous tourner vers l'extérieur du Canada. Il semble que trouver des gens très compétents soit vraiment compliqué. La nouvelle génération n'aime pas nécessairement ce genre de métier.

Une mise en œuvre de ces services par et pour les Canadiens risque-t-elle d'être difficile à réaliser? [Traduction]

M. Michael Geist:

Eh bien, en tant que fier papa de deux enfants qui étudient en ingénierie à l'Université de Waterloo, je doute que ce soit vrai. Je crois que de plus en plus de gens choisissent cette voie. Sur le campus de l'Université d'Ottawa, où je travaille, et à vrai dire, sur des campus partout au pays, les domaines des sciences, des technologies, de l'ingénierie, des mathématiques, et j'en passe, suscitent un énorme intérêt. S'il y a une pénurie de spécialistes, cela montre à quel point la demande est élevée. Ce n'est pas que personne ne se dirige dans ce secteur. Je crois que c'est certainement le contraire.

Mme Ann Cavoukian:

Je suis d'accord avec Michael. Je pense que nous avons de très bonnes ressources au Canada. Elles seront peut-être insuffisantes demain, mais pour ce qui est de la jeune génération, je conseille de nombreux étudiants et je leur dis toujours qu'ils doivent s'assurer d'apprendre comment programmer. Ils n'ont pas à devenir des programmeurs, mais ils doivent comprendre comment les technologies fonctionnent. Il s'agit d'apprendre comment utiliser différentes techniques de programmation pour faire avancer ses intérêts dans des secteurs complètement différents, etc. Les fondements sont associés à la compréhension de certaines des nouvelles technologies. Je pense que c'est généralement reconnu maintenant.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Gourde.

C'est maintenant au tour de M. Baylis, qui dispose de cinq minutes.

M. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais tout d'abord revenir sur des précisions qu'a apportées Nate concernant la question de Peter sur l'Estonie. Je pense qu'il s'agit là de la base. Si nous passons à un gouvernement numérique, il nous faut une identité numérique.

Êtes-vous d'accord avec moi, madame Cavoukian? Avez-vous des réserves au sujet de l'idée de commencer avec une identité numérique?

Mme Ann Cavoukian:

Pardonnez-moi, mais je vais dire que cela dépend de la façon dont elle est conçue.

Si elle est bien protégée, unique et chiffrée et que l'accès est très restreint, une identité numérique peut améliorer l'accès aux services, par exemple, mais le vol d'identité est un problème de grande ampleur. C'est le type de fraude à la consommation qui connaît la croissance la plus rapide, une croissance rapide jamais connue. Une identité numérique peut aussi...

M. Frank Baylis:

Oui, mais concernant les nouvelles identités numériques, il y a la biométrie. Au bout du compte, on ne peut jamais empêcher un voleur d'agir, mais prenons l'exemple d'un individu qui trouve mon numéro d'assurance sociale. Si, plutôt, il constate que mon identité numérique est bien chiffrée, que des caractéristiques biométriques, le balayage oculaire, sont utilisés, par exemple, la probabilité qu'il vole cela est bien moindre que ce qu'il peut faire aujourd'hui. Je dirais que...

Mme Ann Cavoukian:

Tant que les moyens biométriques sont bons ou qu'on a recours au chiffrement biométrique; il s'agit de chiffrer les données automatiquement de sorte que seul l'individu peut les déchiffrer avec ses propres identificateurs biométriques... Malheureusement, bien des risques sont associés à la biométrie; ce n'est donc pas gagné d'avance que les données biométriques sont associées à l'identité numérique. Il faut utiliser le chiffrement biométrique et s'assurer que c'est bien tenu. Je ne suis pas en désaccord avec vous, monsieur. Je dis seulement que tout se complique quand on entre dans les détails, et c'est ce que nous devons répondre ici.

M. Frank Baylis:

Je comprends.

Voulez-vous intervenir là-dessus, monsieur Geist?

M. Michael Geist:

Oui. Je profite de l'occasion pour répéter qu'à mon avis, les cadres stratégiques sur la technologie sont aussi importants que la technologie dans certains cas. Même dans la façon de formuler votre question, vous avez dit de façon convaincante les raisons pour lesquelles ces technologies...

M. Frank Baylis:

Supposons que nous utiliserons la plus récente technologie. Cette technologie de pointe comprend toutes ces choses...

M. Michael Geist:

Exactement.

M. Frank Baylis:

..., comparativement à mon numéro d'assurance sociale, par exemple. Si je vous le donne, c'est fait.

M. Michael Geist:

Je comprends. L'idée d'utiliser les meilleures technologies est tout à fait sensée, mais cela s'accompagne de tout un volet de politiques. Je crois que nombreux seront ceux qui exprimeront des inquiétudes étant donné que d'après notre expérience, parfois on garantit que certains types de chiffrement ou d'autres technologies seront utilisés, et l'on dit « ne vous inquiétez pas, il n'y aura aucun accès possible », jusqu'à ce qu'on tombe sur un cas où l'on se dit que ce serait vraiment génial si les responsables de l'application de la loi y avaient accès seulement dans cette situation particulière...

(1635)

M. Frank Baylis:

Je crois que je comprends. Nous allons un peu loin.

Disons que nous commençons aujourd'hui. L'avantage de l'Estonie, c'est qu'il s'agissait d'un nouveau pays qui entreprenait quelque chose, de sorte qu'il n'a pas eu à transformer quoi que ce soit. On parle d'un petit pays peu peuplé, somme toute. Disons que nous commençons aujourd'hui. Il me semble que la première mesure à prendre... Je suis d'accord avec Mme Cavoukian: nous pouvons conserver cette séparation, et je conviens que c'est la démarche la plus sûre. Les Estoniens ont un élément central, de sorte qu'on a accès ici ou là, mais il ne s'agit pas d'une seule grande base de données.

Je crois également qu'il sera beaucoup plus facile de bâtir cela à partir de notre structure actuelle que d'essayer de... Je suis de cet avis, mais il me semble que si nous le faisons, nous devons commencer par un lien numérique, d'accord? Supposons que moi, Frank Baylis, j'utilise le système. On me demande de prouver que je suis bien Frank Baylis. À l'heure actuelle, on me demande de taper mon NAS, et c'est assez facile d'en faire l'exploitation frauduleuse, n'est-ce pas? En revanche, si l'on doit faire un balayage de mes yeux ou obtenir d'autres caractéristiques biométriques, et que je dois répondre à des questions, il me semble que, pour revenir à ce que vous disiez, on couvre la protection des renseignements personnels et la sécurité.

Je crois que c'est la première chose que vous avez déclarée, madame Cavoukian. Ne pouvons-nous pas partir de là et nous entendre là-dessus avant de passer à tout le reste?

Je vous redonne la parole. Je vous ai interrompu. Je m'en excuse.

M. Michael Geist:

Au risque de dire qu'il s'agit d'un cercle vicieux, fournir des renseignements biométriques me pose problème à moins qu'un cadre juridique en matière de protection des renseignements personnels répondant aux normes actuelles en la matière ne soit établi au Canada.

M. Frank Baylis:

D'accord. Alors vous dites qu'avant d'en arriver là, avant de nous engager dans cette voie, il vaudrait mieux que nous soyons absolument sûrs que la protection des renseignements personnels est assurée.

M. Michael Geist:

Il ne s'agit pas seulement de cela. Un ensemble de règles qui remontent à des décennies s'appliquent à ce système.

M. Frank Baylis:

Cela ne fonctionne pas.

M. Michael Geist:

Je ne crois pas qu'il est possible de dire qu'on se tourne vers les moyens les plus modernes possible et le numérique le plus possible si l'on s'appuie sur des lois qui remontent aux années 1980 pour protéger le système.

M. Frank Baylis:

Voulez-vous intervenir? Me reste-t-il du temps?

Le président:

Si elle pouvait répondre en 20 secondes, ce serait bien.

Mme Ann Cavoukian:

Monsieur Baylis, je veux seulement dire que je suis d'accord avec vous. Nous devons explorer les nouvelles technologies. Cela ne fait aucun doute. Pour ajouter à ce qu'a dit Michael, je dirais que nous devons seulement veiller à mettre nos lois à jour. Elles sont tellement dépassées. Nous devons nous assurer que la technologie nous permet vraiment de protéger l'information et que personne d'autre ne peut y avoir accès.

J'ai donné l'exemple du chiffrement biométrique. Les technologies de reconnaissance faciale qu'on voit un peu partout suscitent beaucoup d'inquiétudes à l'heure actuelle; on utilise la reconnaissance faciale à des fins jamais voulues. Je collabore avec une entreprise israélienne, D-ID, qui peut, en fait, masquer l'identificateur personnel de sorte qu'il soit impossible d'utiliser la reconnaissance faciale.

Il y a un certain nombre de difficultés. Je suis certaine que nous pouvons les régler pourvu que nous le fassions en amont afin de prévenir les préjudices.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Baylis.

C'est au tour de M. Kent. Il s'agit d'une autre intervention de cinq minutes.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

La conversation est très intéressante. Elle sera abrégée en raison des votes, et j'en suis désolé. Vous pouvez vous attendre à ce qu'on vous rappelle tous les deux dans les jours et les mois à venir.

Dans deux ou trois rapports, notre comité a recommandé au gouvernement d'examiner le Règlement général sur la protection des données et de renforcer et moderniser le Règlement sur la protection des renseignements personnels du Canada dans son ensemble et les pouvoirs du commissaire à la protection de la vie privée.

Je me demande si vous pouvez prendre les dernières minutes que nous avons pour faire des mises en garde. Le gouvernement semble indiquer que le gouvernement numérique s'en vient, que c'est sur le point d'être présenté sous une forme ou une autre. Je me demande si vous avez tous les deux des mises en garde à faire au gouvernement avant qu'il n'aille trop loin.

Madame Cavoukian.

Mme Ann Cavoukian:

J'appuie totalement le commissaire Daniel Therrien, qui demande au gouvernement fédéral une mise à jour de la LPRPDE, par exemple, qui remonte au début des années 2000. Il a dit également que nous devons ajouter à la nouvelle loi la protection de la vie privée dès l'étape de la conception, car après tout, elle a été intégrée dans le Règlement général sur la protection des données. Nous avons besoin de nouveaux outils. Nous devons agir en amont. Il nous faut déterminer les facteurs de risque et contrer les risques. Nous pouvons le faire.

Il est absolument essentiel de mettre les dispositions à jour. Il est indispensable de donner au commissaire les pouvoirs dont il a besoin, mais qu'il n'a pas présentement. J'ai été commissaire à la protection de la vie privée pendant trois mandats, et je peux dire que j'avais le pouvoir de rendre des ordonnances. J'y ai rarement eu recours, mais c'est ce qui me permettait d'arriver à une résolution informelle avec des organismes, des ministères qui ne respectaient pas les dispositions sur la protection de la vie privée. C'était une bien meilleure façon de travailler.

J'avais le bâton. Si je devais rendre une ordonnance, je pouvais le faire. C'est ce qu'il manque au commissaire Therrien. Nous devons lui donner ce pouvoir supplémentaire et intégrer dans la nouvelle loi la protection de la vie privée dès l'étape de la conception de sorte que le gouvernement ait des mesures supplémentaires lui permettant d'examiner de façon anticipée un modèle de prévention, un peu comme un modèle médical de prévention. Ce serait bien plus facile si nous avions cela. Alors, la tâche du commissaire à la protection de la vie privée serait grandement allégée.

Merci.

(1640)

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Monsieur Geist.

M. Michael Geist:

J'aimerais tout d'abord féliciter votre comité pour les rapports qu'il a produits au cours de la dernière année environ. Je crois qu'ils sont excellents et qu'ils ont alimenté bon nombre de discussions publiques à cet égard. Je crois que c'est vraiment utile.

J'ignore ce que pense le gouvernement à ce sujet. Je sais qu'il a tenu une consultation concernant une stratégie nationale sur les données. Je suppose qu'à certains égards, j'attends de voir ce qui en résultera. En ce qui concerne la stratégie nationale sur les données, pour revenir à ce que j'ai dit, si l'on adopte une approche holistique qui tient compte du fait qu'une partie de ce dont il est question dans ce contexte, inclut des questions liées à la gouvernance des données, à la LPRPDE, au secteur privé, au secteur public et à la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels — dont certaines des questions concernant l'application qu'a soulevées maintes fois le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée —, j'en conclus qu'on reconnaît qu'il est extrêmement important de procéder de la bonne façon pour un certain nombre de raisons, dont la possibilité d'utiliser certains des services en ligne que le gouvernement pourrait vouloir établir.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

À quel point le consentement est-il essentiel dans ce processus?

M. Michael Geist:

Le consentement est considéré comme un principe fondamental depuis longtemps. Je crois que l'une des raisons pour lesquelles nous sommes confrontés à certaines de ces questions nous ramène à la question de M. Erskine-Smith, soit pourquoi nous ne pouvons pas trouver un moyen d'informer quelqu'un et essayer de faire les choses de la bonne façon. Le problème, c'est en partie que théoriquement, nous pourrions déterminer si nous pouvons trouver un mécanisme qui permettrait aux citoyens de consentir à ce que le fournisseur de services — dans ce cas, le gouvernement — les informe des services auxquels ils ont droit. Je dirais que nos normes de consentement sont devenues tellement polluées par les normes peu élevées de la LPRPDE que peu de gens ont confiance en ce que signifie le consentement à ce moment-ci.

L'une des choses que nous devons, à mon avis, reprendre, c'est d'essayer de trouver des mécanismes pour que le consentement explicite soit vraiment explicite, éclairé. Nous nous sommes vraiment égarés sur ce plan. Le Règlement général sur la protection des données sera peut-être l'un des éléments moteurs à cet égard.

Le président:

Il vous reste 30 secondes, monsieur Kent.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Madame Cavoukian.

Mme Ann Cavoukian:

Je suis entièrement d'accord avec Michael. Il a tout à fait raison de dire que la notion de consentement n'existe presque pas tellement elle a été réduite.

Vous voyez, il est essentiel qu'il y ait un contrôle pour le consentement. La protection de la vie privée consiste à contrôler l'utilisation de ses données. Si une personne n'y consent pas de façon positive, affirmative, elle ne sait pas ce qu'il advient de ses données. On ne peut s'attendre à ce que les gens essaient de déchiffrer le jargon juridique contenu dans les conditions d'utilisation et les politiques de confidentialité pour trouver la disposition de non-participation leur permettant de refuser que les données soient utilisées à d'autres fins; la vie est trop courte. Personne ne le fait, mais ce n'est pas parce que les gens ne se soucient pas grandement de la protection de leur vie privée.

Au cours des deux dernières années, tous les sondages d'opinion publique de Pew Internet Research ont montré que la proportion des gens qui sont inquiets à propos de la protection de leur vie privée se situe dans les 90 %. Cela fait bien au-delà de 20 ans que je travaille dans le domaine, et c'est la première fois que je vois qu'une aussi grande proportion de gens se disent préoccupés à cet égard: 91 % des personnes sondées sont très inquiètes pour leur vie privée et 92 % craignent la perte de contrôle sur leurs données.

Un fort consentement positif est essentiel.

Le président:

Merci, madame Cavoukian.

C'est maintenant au tour de M. de Burgh Graham, qui dispose de cinq minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Anita voulait d'abord poser une question très brève. Je poserai mes questions par la suite.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Merci.

Puisque mon collègue m'a cédé une partie de son temps d'intervention, je vous serais reconnaissante de répondre brièvement.

Je veux signaler à quel point je suis heureuse que nous accueillions encore une fois un spécialiste qui représente l'Université d'Ottawa, qui se trouve ici, à Ottawa. C'est bien que M. Geist soit parmi nous.

Monsieur Geist, vous avez parlé de l'analyse prédictive à laquelle le gouvernement a déjà recours. Il y a l'exemple de la fraude à l'ARC et la capacité de prédire. Si nous devions opter pour la minimisation des données et l'utilisation des données uniquement aux fins pour lesquelles elles ont été recueillies, cela empêcherait-il le gouvernement d'utiliser ce type d'analyse prédictive?

(1645)

M. Michael Geist:

Pas nécessairement. Je vais commencer par cela. Pensez à la controverse qu’on a vue l’an dernier dans l’affaire de Statistique Canada et des données bancaires. J’ai pensé qu’une des véritables faiblesses de Statistique Canada était son incapacité à démontrer que l’organisme ne pourrait pas atteindre ses objectifs s’il ne collectait pas des quantités massives de données bancaires des Canadiens. De même, par rapport à votre question, je suppose que cela dépend. Si des preuves démontrent que la quantité de données actuelle ne permet pas une aussi grande efficacité qu'avec un plus grand volume de données, il faut alors en tenir compte dans l’analyse coûts-avantages. Il pourrait être sensé d’en collecter plus, dans certains cas, mais je pense qu’il vous incombe de faire cette analyse avant même de collecter des données en disant: « Plus nous avons de données, mieux c’est. »

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Merci.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Geist, je veux d’abord vous remercier de votre commentaire sur l’accès à Internet. Actuellement, dans ma circonscription, comme je l’ai indiqué à maintes reprises sur de nombreuses tribunes, moins de la moitié de la population a une connexion à 10 mégabits par seconde ou plus rapide. Encore aujourd’hui, dans ma circonscription, beaucoup ont un accès par satellite ou même par ligne commutée. Nous en avons assez d’être laissés pour compte dans ce dossier; je vous remercie d’avoir soulevé ce point.

En ce qui concerne la collecte de données, comment peut-on prévoir, définir et déclarer quelles données sont nécessaires ou non? On dit qu’on ne collecte que le nécessaire. Comment est-ce déterminé?

Mme Ann Cavoukian:

Puis-je prendre la parole?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

N’importe qui peut répondre.

Mme Ann Cavoukian:

Ce qu’il faut savoir, lorsqu’on collecte des données du public, c’est que les gens ne fournissent pas leurs renseignements personnels pour que vous les utilisiez à votre guise. Ils vous les donnent pour une raison précise. Ils doivent payer leurs impôts; c’est obligatoire. Ils en sont conscients. Ce sont des citoyens respectueux des lois. Ils vous donnent les renseignements nécessaires, mais cela ne veut pas dire pour autant que vous — le gouvernement — pouvez les utiliser comme vous voulez. Ils vous les donnent à des fins précises. C’est le principe de la spécification des finalités, de la limitation de l’utilisation. Vous êtes tenus d’utiliser les renseignements uniquement aux fins précisées. C’est un principe fondamental de la protection des renseignements personnels et des données. Les données à caractère personnel, qui sont de nature délicate, doivent servir aux fins prévues.

Michael a mentionné la débâcle lorsque Statistique Canada voulait obtenir les données financières de tout le monde auprès des banques. Vous plaisantez? Je suis certaine que vous êtes conscients de l’indignation que cela a suscitée. Ils voulaient collecter les données de 500 000 ménages. Multipliez cela par quatre. C’est totalement inacceptable.

Vous devez indiquer très clairement comment vous comptez utiliser les données et obtenir le consentement pour cette fin précise.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C’est exactement à cela que je voulais en venir.

Je veux revenir sur quelque chose qui s’est produit récemment aux États-Unis.

Récemment, l’Electronic Frontier Foundation — ou EFF — a découvert que les systèmes RAPI, les systèmes de reconnaissance automatique des plaques d’immatriculation, forment un réseau aux États-Unis et échangent des informations sur les déplacements des gens au pays, ce qui n’est manifestement pas ce à quoi ces appareils devaient servir.

Où se situe la limite entre collecte de données volontaire et involontaire? Par exemple, devriez-vous être informé si un système RAPI enregistre votre numéro de plaque d’immatriculation lors de votre passage? Si oui, devriez-vous avoir un droit de retrait en bloquant votre numéro de plaque, sachant que ce n’est pas la raison d’être de ce système et que c’est illégal, à bien des égards? Où se situe la limite pour ce genre de choses?

J’ai seulement une minute, environ.

Mme Ann Cavoukian:

Les plaques d’immatriculation ne sont pas censées être utilisées à cette fin. Elles ne sont pas censées servir à surveiller vos déplacements. C’est ainsi que la surveillance prend une ampleur considérable.

J’ai une petite histoire cocasse à raconter. Steve Jobs, le fondateur d’Apple, évidemment, avait l’habitude d’acheter une nouvelle Mercedes blanche tous les six mois, moins un jour. Il retournait alors son véhicule et en achetait un autre identique. Pourquoi? Parce qu'à l’époque, en Californie, la plaque d’immatriculation n’était pas obligatoire; les gens avaient six mois pour immatriculer leur véhicule. Il ne voulait pas être suivi. Donc, tous les six mois, moins un jour, il retournait le véhicule et en achetait un autre, et ainsi de suite.

Ce n’était qu’un exemple. Les gens ne veulent pas être suivis. Ce n’est pas la raison d’être des plaques d’immatriculation. Il faut recommencer à utiliser les renseignements personnels aux fins prévues. Voilà l’objectif.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D’accord.

Si on ne centralise pas, dans une certaine mesure, qu’on maintient le cloisonnement actuel qu’on voit au gouvernement et qu’on n’améliore pas la convivialité, quelle est l’utilité de tendre vers un gouvernement intelligent?

Mme Ann Cavoukian:

Eh bien, « gouvernement intelligent » ne signifie pas qu’il faut identifier tout le monde et suivre leurs activités. En tout respect, ce n’est pas ce qu’on entend par « gouvernement intelligent ». Si c’est la définition qu’on lui donne, alors il n’y a plus de liberté. Ce ne sera plus une société libre et ouverte. Il faut s’y opposer. On entend par là qu’il faut assurer la prestation de services modernes à un grand nombre de personnes tout en respectant leur droit à la vie privée. On peut faire les deux; cela doit être l’objectif.

Le président:

Merci. Le temps est écoulé.

Le prochain intervenant est M. Angus, pour trois minutes, encore une fois.

Avant que vous ne commenciez, je précise que nous avons un peu de temps. La sonnerie se fera seulement entendre à 17 h 15. Nous poursuivrons la réunion jusqu’à 17 h 5, environ. Donc, prenez votre temps. Je pense que nous avons assez de temps pour que tout le monde puisse terminer.

Allez-y, monsieur Angus.

(1650)

M. Charlie Angus:

Merci.

À l’opposition, une de nos préoccupations au fil des ans portait sur l’idée de donner plus d’outils à la police, car si on lui en fournit, elle les utilise. Mon collègue, M. Erskine-Smith, laisse entendre que si nous obtenons les données et les renseignements personnels de tout le monde, le gouvernement pourra les aider en leur envoyant de l’information.

Je siège à l’opposition depuis 15 ans, et j’ai souvent vu des gouvernements utiliser ces ressources pour faire la promotion d’un formidable plan de lutte contre les changements climatiques ou d’une excellente prestation fiscale pour enfants. Personnellement, je trouve très préoccupant que vous ayez les données de tout le monde, car cela vous donnerait la possibilité de diffuser de tels messages dans les mois précédant une élection.

Je représente une région rurale où beaucoup de gens ont très difficilement accès à Internet, mais on dit pourtant aux personnes âgées que les formulaires papier ne sont plus acceptés et qu’ils doivent présenter des demandes en ligne.

Nous obligeons les citoyens à prendre le virage numérique. Les citoyens sont obligés d’utiliser des moyens numériques pour communiquer avec le gouvernement, mais ils ne veulent pas que le gouvernement communique avec eux par la suite. Donc, quelles protections devons-nous mettre en place pour limiter la capacité d’un gouvernement d’utiliser cette quantité phénoménale de données pour faire de l’autopromotion au détriment, sans doute, des autres partis politiques?

M. Michael Geist:

Je peux commencer.

Vous avez soulevé deux enjeux distincts. D’abord, le fait qu’on oblige les gens à faire le virage numérique, un enjeu que nous avons déjà abordé brièvement. Je pense qu’il est frappant de voir que cet enjeu est soulevé par les députés des deux côtés, ce qui est le cas depuis de nombreuses années. J’ai comparu devant divers comités et nous avons discuté du problème de l’accès. Je dois avouer que je trouve toujours aussi mystérieux qu’on n’ait pas réussi à progresser plus efficacement pour combler le fossé numérique...

M. Charlie Angus:

Il existe toujours.

M. Michael Geist:

... qui perdure. Une partie de la solution consiste à affirmer que tous ont besoin d’un accès abordable. Voilà ce qu’il faut faire, et il faut prendre un engagement en ce sens.

En outre, essentiellement, vous avez parlé de ce qui se produit lorsque les données sont utilisées à des fins bien différentes des attentes des gens ou de ce qu’ils avaient prévu. Dans le secteur privé, on dirait que c’est une atteinte à la vie privée. Vous collectez les données en m’informant de l’usage que vous en ferez. Si vous les utilisez ensuite à des fins pour lesquelles vous n’avez pas obtenu le consentement adéquat, je peux alors, théoriquement, prendre des mesures contre vous ou porter plainte, à tout le moins.

Une partie du problème — et cela nous ramène même à la discussion avec M. Baylis —, c’est qu’à l’échelon fédéral, nous n’avons pas encore de lois assez étoffées pour empêcher que les données soient utilisées à mauvais escient. Au fil de nombreuses années, en particulier à l'époque où l’on discutait de l’accès légal et d’autres choses du genre, on revenait très souvent à l’idée qu’il faut absolument utiliser les données que nous avons. On trouvera toujours une raison pour le faire. Je pense qu’il faut à la fois établir un ensemble de règles et des cadres pour assurer la mise en place de mesures de protection appropriées accompagnées d’une surveillance adéquate. En fin de compte, je pense que vous devez veiller à ce que les gouvernements, comme les entreprises, reconnaissent qu’ils causent un tort considérable à l’écosystème de l’information lorsqu’ils utilisent les données de façon trop agressive, ce qui a pour effet, à terme, de saper la confiance du public, non seulement à leur égard, mais aussi à l’égard des gouvernements en général.

M. Charlie Angus:

C’est aussi une question de démocratie, parce que même s’ils disent avoir l’intention d’obtenir le consentement et que 10 % de la population le donne, ils obtiennent tout de même les informations, peut-être même de bons renseignements et de bonnes nouvelles qui pourraient être à leur avantage sur le plan démocratique.

Il y a un enjeu distinct dont nous n’avons pas parlé, je pense, soit la nécessité de protéger l’égalité démocratique des citoyens, tant ceux qui choisissent de donner leur consentement que ceux qui ne le donnent pas. S’ils ont affaire avec le gouvernement, c’est parce qu’ils n’ont pas le choix et parce qu’ils doivent régler un problème avec leur carte d’assurance sociale ou avec l’ARC, par exemple. Voilà pourquoi ils les obtiennent; l’information n'est pas fournie sans raison.

Pour moi, c’est semblable aux cases qu’il faut cocher pour donner son consentement avec les entreprises du secteur privé. Si le gouvernement utilisait cela, il s’en donnerait à coeur joie jusqu’à l’élection.

M. Michael Geist:

Je pense que vous avez raison. Je pense que le consentement demeure très faible, mais il convient de reconnaître — et je sais que le Comité a aussi discuté de cet aspect — que nos partis politiques ne sont toujours pas visés par de telles règles de protection des renseignements personnels.

M. Charlie Angus:

Voulez-vous que cela figure au compte rendu?

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. Michael Geist:

Quant à l’idée d’affirmer qu’il s’agit d’une question de démocratie, oui, c’est une question de démocratie. Cela pose véritablement problème que nos partis politiques puissent collecter des données sans être tenus de respecter des normes en matière de protection de la vie privée semblables à celles qu’on impose à toute société privée.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Angus.

Il nous reste deux intervenants, puis nous arrivons à la fin de la réunion.

Nous avons Mme Anita Vandenbeld et M. Picard.

(1655)

M. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Je cède la parole à Mona.

Le président:

Allez-y. [Français]

Mme Mona Fortier (Ottawa—Vanier, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'ai deux questions à poser.

Nous avons abordé ce point brièvement, mais il est important de le comprendre. La collecte de données et l'accès à celles-ci sont perçus négativement par certaines parties de la population canadienne. Il est dommage que certains de ces outils, dont des travaux mis en œuvre par Statistique Canada, soient utilisés par des partis politiques pour faire peur aux Canadiens et aux Canadiennes. Nous parlons ici des tiers partis.

Comment pouvons-nous gagner la confiance des Canadiens et des Canadiennes en vue de mettre en vigueur certaines de ces mesures qui ont comme but, ultimement, de permettre aux Canadiens d'accéder au gouvernement et de leur offrir des services? [Traduction]

Mme Ann Cavoukian:

J’aimerais seulement dire une chose. Il y a plusieurs choses que nous pouvons faire, évidemment, mais vous avez demandé comment nous pouvons regagner la confiance du public à l’égard des activités du gouvernement. Respectueusement, je dirais qu’il y a eu l’an dernier une chose qui a miné cette confiance encore plus. La commissaire fédérale à la protection de la vie privée a demandé au premier ministre Trudeau d’inclure les partis politiques dans les lois sur la protection de la vie privée, et il a refusé. Essentiellement, il a choisi de ne pas aller dans cette direction.

C’était extrêmement décevant. Pourquoi les partis politiques ne seraient-ils pas soumis aux lois en matière de protection de la vie privée, à l’instar des entreprises et des ministères? Malheureusement, peu de mesures sont prises pour accroître la confiance à l’égard du gouvernement. Je pense, respectueusement, que c’est un aspect très négatif. Je pense que c’est ce genre de choses...

En outre, M. Trudeau a appuyé Statistique Canada dans ses efforts pour obtenir les renseignements financiers très sensibles du public. Cela a suscité une forte opposition. Cela n’a pas été divulgué, mais les banques ont offert au statisticien en chef de Statistique Canada... Elles ont dit: « Nous allons analyser les données et vous les remettre après avoir retiré tous les renseignements qui permettent d’identifier les personnes. Vous pouvez avoir les données dont vous avez besoin, mais la confidentialité sera protégée puisque nous retirerons les identificateurs. » Quelle a été la réponse de Statistique Canada? « Non, nous voulons les données en format identifiable. » D’après ce qui m’a été dit en toute confidentialité, Statistique Canada voulait faire beaucoup de recoupements avec les données financières très sensibles de la population. C’est totalement inacceptable.

Madame, ce n’est qu’un exemple de ce qui contribue à éroder la confiance plutôt qu’à la renforcer.

Merci. [Français]

Mme Mona Fortier:

Monsieur Geist, que feriez-vous? [Traduction]

M. Michael Geist:

Il m’est difficile de suivre Ann sur ce point. Elle a donné deux exemples. Je vais vous en donner un autre, un très petit exemple qui ne fait pas les manchettes.

J’ai participé activement à l’élaboration de mesures législatives qui ont mené à la création de la liste des numéros de télécommunication exclus et de la loi antipourriel. Les partis politiques se sont toujours exclus eux-mêmes, au nom de la démocratie. Si vous voulez commencer à parler des façons d’assurer le respect, les partis politiques doivent d’abord cesser de s’exempter de l’interdiction de faire des appels indésirables à l’heure du souper et d’envoyer des pourriels.

Je pense que le respect commence par le respect de la vie privée des Canadiens. Il est juste de dire que lorsqu’il est question de restrictions réelles et de la capacité d’utiliser l’information, les partis politiques... Je pense qu’il faut que ce soit tout à fait clair: c’est arrivé sous des gouvernements conservateurs et sous des gouvernements libéraux. Cela ne se limite pas au gouvernement actuel. Je dirais qu’au fil de l’histoire, les gouvernements ont toujours été plus à l’aise, concernant les questions de protection de la vie privée, d’établir des normes élevées pour tout le monde sauf pour eux-mêmes. On le voit dans les exemptions, on le voit dans l’incapacité, pendant des décennies, de faire une véritable mise à jour de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels, et on le constate dans les exemples que Mme Cavoukian vient de donner. [Français]

Mme Mona Fortier:

Je vous remercie.

Monsieur Picard, voulez-vous poser l'autre question? [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci. Le temps est écoulé.

Madame Cavoukian, monsieur Geist, merci d’être venus. C’est un sujet important. Comme nous l’avons mentionné, nous nous sommes heurtés à cet iceberg à maintes reprises, et il semble prendre continuellement de l’ampleur. Merci du temps que vous nous avez accordé aujourd’hui.

Nous passons à huis clos pendant cinq minutes pour traiter de travaux du Comité.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on January 29, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.