header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-11-22 CHPC 86

Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage

(1535)

[English]

The Vice-Chair (Hon. Peter Van Loan (York—Simcoe, CPC)):

I would like to call the meeting to order.

The notice of meeting, as amended, reflects the chair's instructions. The chair, Madam Fry, is not here today, so I will be, as vice-chair, serving as chair today.

The notice of meeting indicates we are to meet for approximately an hour to discuss Bill S-232, an act respecting Canadian Jewish heritage month. We'll hear two witnesses on that particular issue. They are the Hon. Linda Frum, who is the proposer of this bill, and Michael Levitt, who is the sponsor in the House.

As the sponsor, I will ask Ms. Frum to proceed first.

Hon. Linda Frum (Senator, Ontario, C):

Thank you, Chair.

Good afternoon, and thank you for this opportunity to speak to your committee in support of Bill S-232, the Canadian Jewish heritage month act.

I would like to thank Michael Levitt, MP for York Centre, for his role as the driving force behind this bill that has been so warmly received by the Jewish community, and for his efforts moving it forward in the House of Commons. I had the privilege of sponsoring Bill S-232 in the Senate, and was gratified by the unanimous support it received there.

As a proud member of Canada's Jewish community, I enthusiastically support the purpose of Bill S-232, which is to formalize the month of May as a time to celebrate Canadian Jewish culture, and to honour the significant contributions made by Canadians of Jewish faith ever since the earliest days of colonial settlement. The story of the Jewish people in Canada has been, by and large, a story of acceptance, tolerance, and mutual embrace. While not without blemish, Canada has been a country where Jews have been able to enjoy religious freedom, safety, and prosperity.

Today, Canada is home to the fourth largest Jewish community in the world. Many of those are the descendants of the 35,000 Holocaust survivors whom Canada accepted after World War II.

The month of May was a thoughtful choice as the month to celebrate Jewish heritage. Jewish heritage month is already celebrated at that time in the province of Ontario. Since its adoption, in 2012, Ontario's Jewish heritage month has received widespread support among citizens, community organizations, and local governments across the province.

The month of May has also been proclaimed by the United States as a time to celebrate the contributions of the American Jewish community, and has been ever since 2006, when President George W. Bush and Congress passed a resolution deeming it such. May is also the month that Israel celebrates one of its more joyful holidays, Yom Ha'atzmaut, or Israeli Independence Day.

One of the key advantages of formally establishing Jewish heritage month into law is that it gives community organizations the inspiration and lead time they need to plan events. For example, in Toronto, the annual Jewish film festival is held during Ontario's Jewish heritage month to celebrate and showcase Jewish film-making from around the world. This is an example of the type of activity that can now become national in dimension.

Across the United States, you will find a wide range of activities during Jewish American Heritage Month, from lectures at the Library of Congress and National Archives, to cooking classes and klezmer music performances in American cities throughout the country.

During the Senate human rights committee hearing on Bill S-232, Senators heard from leaders of the Jewish community about the impact that Jewish heritage month will have on Canada. Shimon Fogel, CEO of the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs, said this about a Canadian Jewish heritage month: The concept of heritage months offer a proactive approach to peeling back the ignorance that really serves as the engine or driver of the kind of intolerance that all of us would wish to see diminish and eradicated. It is in this context that I think they play an important role in helping other Canadians appreciate the shared values of specific communities...They bring down that sense of suspicion and hostility that is born from a sense of ignorance about other faith communities.

Michael Mostyn, the CEO of B'nai Brith, agreed on the importance of a Canadian Jewish heritage month, saying: This act is most welcome. It will recognize the many achievements of Canada’s Jewish community, the members of which faced many hurdles from the outset of Canada’s original existence as a colony and yet were able to greatly contribute to the fabric of Canadian society. Despite facing systematic racism, our community has never seen ourselves as victims, viewing roadblocks as opportunities rather than obstacles. It is because of our perseverance and our willingness to stand up to adversity and better ourselves that the Jewish community was able to help build this country up, despite our small numbers.

Mr. Mostyn added that in order for Jewish Canadian heritage month to be successful, it cannot be an insular celebration, a Jewish community celebration only for the Jewish community. He said: ...there is no point in any community holding a celebration for itself. We are all part of Canada and the essence of any heritage day has to be how we communicate the contributions of our particular community to other communities....

Speaking for myself, it is my hope that with the establishment of the Canadian Jewish heritage month, all Canadians will have the opportunity to learn about the culture and history of Jewish Canadians, and appreciate the integral role that the Jewish community has played in shaping Canada, be it in the fields of education, medicine, the arts, politics, journalism, business, and many more.

I am proud that Canadian Jewish heritage month has received unanimous support so far. It is exciting to think that Canada will have a national Jewish heritage month starting as early as May 2018.

I look forward to any questions you may have.

(1540)

The Vice-Chair (Hon. Peter Van Loan):

Thank you, Senator.

Now we will move to Mr. Levitt, the sponsor in the House.

Mr. Michael Levitt (York Centre, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and colleagues from all parties for this opportunity to testify before you on Bill S-232, the Canadian Jewish heritage month act.

It's a different experience sitting on this side of the table, but it is a privilege to bring this bill before you along with its Senate sponsor, Senator Frum, who has worked closely with me to make the Canadian Jewish heritage month a reality.

The substance and intent behind this bill began as a motion in the previous Parliament presented by the Honourable Irwin Cotler, the former member for Mount Royal. While it unfortunately did not pass at the time, the overwhelming and multi-party support shown so far for Bill S-232 has been an uplifting experience. As I have stated previously, I have dedicated my efforts on this bill to Irwin Cotler.

To this end, in addition to Senator Frum, I want to particularly thank members of Parliament Peter Kent and Randall Garrison for their strong support of this initiative to recognize and celebrate the contributions of Jewish Canadians across Canada.

I believe this bill has come to the committee at an important time. I understand that you just concluded a study on systemic racism and religious discrimination. I had the opportunity to sit in on some of those meetings, in particular to hear from representatives of the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs and B'nai Brith Canada on the anti-Semitism Jewish Canadians face, and have long faced. As we know, Jewish Canadians are the most targeted group for hate crimes in Canada.

What we're seeking to achieve with this bill is to recognize and share the history and experiences of Jewish Canadians across the country. A Canadian Jewish heritage month would present the opportunity to educate and celebrate Canadian Jewish heritage with Canadians of all backgrounds and would further strengthen and preserve the diversity we pride ourselves on as Canadians.

Canada is home to approximately 400,000 Jews, the fourth largest Jewish community in the world, and the history of Jewish Canadians is long and storied. The early Jewish immigrants to Canada came mostly from western and central Europe, followed by eastern Europeans in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Following the Second World War and the shame of the MS St. Louis, approximately 20,000 Holocaust survivors made it to Canada, followed by refugees from the Middle East and north Africa. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, Jewish immigration from north Africa, particularly Morocco, brought many francophone Sephardic Jews to Quebec. Beginning in 1990, there was a significant Jewish immigration to Canada from the former Soviet Union, including a large Russian Jewish community.

This very brief history hides the incredible diversity of cultures and experiences that Jewish Canadians have brought with them. I have met Jewish Canadians from all corners of the world: South Africa, Russia, France, Israel, Morocco, India, Iran, Argentina. I'm proud that my own riding is a microcosm of this incredible diversity. In many ways, the diversity of Jewish Canadians mirrors the mosaic of our broader Canadian society, each of us bringing with us our own customs and traditions, making Canada stronger because of them.

I want to share with you my own Canadian Jewish experience. I was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, where there is a very small and very Scottish Jewish community. Many of you may have seen me in my kilt, proudly sporting the Jewish tartan.

In 1983, my mother, Edna, and I left Scotland to embark on what she called a “great adventure”. She brought me to Canada to build a better life and future for us both. Knowing barely a soul, we settled in Toronto because she knew there was a thriving Jewish community that would welcome us and provide us the support we needed. As part of that, we brought and integrated our own traditions to the local Jewish community and Canadian society as a whole. This is an experience I share with a great many Canadians who have found refuge or opportunity in this country.

I want to highlight an example. On July 1, 1946, Holocaust survivors Jacob and Fanny Silberman gave birth to a daughter in an IDP camp in Stuttgart in occupied Germany. Jacob Silberman held a law degree from a renowned Polish university. When he started, he faced a Jewish quota and was one of just a lucky handful of Jews accepted to the school. The classrooms even had segregated seating, known as the bench ghetto.

After surviving the Holocaust, Mr. Silberman applied to emigrate to Canada, but as a lawyer he was rejected by Canadian authorities.

(1545)



To our shame, Canada had largely closed its borders to Jews since 1933, and they remained closed until 1948, when a small number of tailors were allowed entry to the country. Jacob Silberman was finally given permission to emigrate as a tailoring cutter in 1950, but after arriving, despite his credentials, he was barred from practising law because he was not a citizen. The moment his then four-year-old daughter heard that, she made up her mind she would be a lawyer. In her own words she says: When people said, “What are you going to be when you grow up?”, I said, “A lawyer.” I knew no women who were lawyers. All I knew was he couldn’t be it, and he wanted to be it, and I would be it.

That daughter is Justice Rosalie Abella. She was appointed to Ontario's Family Court when she was 29. She was then the first Jewish woman appointed to the Supreme Court in 2004 and is now the second longest serving justice on the court.

As she tells it, she was: ...female, Jewish, and an immigrant, in a male profession… It can be a great advantage to understand that you’re different, you’re never going to be like everybody else, and that’s good. Enjoy the fact that you’re different.

Her story, struggles, hard work, and success are emblematic of the history of Jewish Canadians.

My own riding of York Centre became home to a large number of Holocaust survivors like Justice Abella's parents who built new lives here in Canada.

In September I joined Holocaust survivors and the Prime Minister to inaugurate the National Holocaust Monument in Ottawa, joining local memorials like the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial in my riding in Toronto and the Wheel of Conscience at the Canadian Museum of Immigration on Pier 21 in Halifax, which form part of the legacy of survivors and their families.

Their stories are our stories as Canadians and have played out in communities big and small across our country. I am certain every member of this committee can find a history of Jewish Canadians in their communities.

While the largest Canadian Jewish communities are in Montreal and Toronto, part of this bill's purpose is to recognize the role and tell the stories of Jewish Canadians in cities and towns from sea to sea to sea, whether Shefford, Longueuil, Winnipeg, Estevan, Chestermere, or Vancouver.

Each community has a rich history and a story to share, like Congregation Emanu-El in Victoria—Canada's oldest synagogue has been in continuous operation since 1863—or the Jewish community of St. John's, which is one of the oldest in Canada, having arrived in Newfoundland in the 1770s. Even the very small Jewish community in Iqaluit, numbering just 20 people according to the latest census, adds to the fabric of the Canadian Jewish experience.

The enactment of the Canadian Jewish heritage month would ensure that the rich history of Jewish Canadians is recognized, shared, and celebrated across this great country, inspiring all Canadians to build a better, more diverse, and more tolerant Canada for generations to come.

I want to thank you for your consideration of this bill, and I look forward to your questions.

(1550)

The Vice-Chair (Hon. Peter Van Loan):

Thank you very much.

We will now go to seven-minute rounds of questions.

We will start with Ms. Dabrusin for the Liberals.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Thank you, Senator Frum and Michael Levitt. I really appreciate that you brought forward this bill and that you took the time to come to talk to us about it today.

I'm Jewish, so I take a particular pride in seeing this bill passing and, as you mentioned, unanimously.

I was thinking back. I'm in the middle of reading a book called Clutch, written by one of my constituents. In fact, she just published it, and it's about the experience of a young Jewish boy growing up on rue de Bullion in Montreal. There are so many different stories like that and great culture and arts that come from distinctively Jewish stories, which I think are quite universal as well.

Thinking about the book I'm reading right now and those different types of stories, if you had your dream scenario of what we could do to promote our great Jewish arts and culture in Canada, what would you like see? How would you map that out?

I'll start with you, Senator Frum.

Hon. Linda Frum:

I know you're from Toronto, as am I, and as is Michael. I think we—

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

I'm from Montreal originally, but I do live in Toronto.

Hon. Linda Frum:

We are the beneficiaries of very rich Jewish culture in the two cities of Montreal and Toronto, so I think the value of something like this in the dream scenario is the broader range of what is possible.

I mentioned the Toronto Jewish Film Festival. I suppose it's not so much that events like that can grow, because they are already very successful where they are, but that they can move and that maybe more communities would take the initiative—because it's May and it's Jewish heritage month—and do something within their communities across Canada where there might be a smaller local Jewish population. This would be a way of opening doors of friendship and understanding in smaller communities.

Mr. Michael Levitt:

I agree with Senator Frum. One of the real values of having a national Canadian Jewish heritage month is that it will give the smaller communities, the ones that we don't hear from.... It's been amazing. I've had people writing in, emailing me, letting me know about communities in their small town in Canada that I'd never heard of before, and probably many people don't know these stories.

Arts and culture are a concern in particular. I was lucky enough to sit on the board of the Koffler Centre of the Arts prior to entering politics. Seeing the vibrancy of the Jewish arts scene and seeing again the depth, whether it's in visual arts or theatre or music, there was so much that can be shared.

I agree with the senator. This is going to be a platform, a podium, that people can rally around and use as an opportunity to be in the spotlight to share the stories. I think there's an incredible potential for the Canadian Jewish heritage month to act as a means to get those stories out from coast to coast to coast.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Thank you.

You mentioned klezmer music. In Montreal, the Flying Bulgar Klezmer Band was really popular, and I think it's popular in Toronto as well. We have the Ashkenaz Festival in Toronto, which is another great festival that gets to bring people out and celebrate and dance. That's an amazing thing.

I really like that you talked about the diversity of the Jewish community and the fact that we do come from so many different places and have different traditions. What opportunities do you see in having a Jewish heritage month, even within the Jewish community, to learn amongst ourselves about the diversity within our own community?

(1555)

Mr. Michael Levitt:

Being a member of Parliament gives you such an opportunity to engage with and learn more about your own community. I'll use the Moroccan Jewish community of Toronto—the Sephardic community in Toronto—as an example. I had never engaged nor had an opportunity to learn their celebrations, to attend and to hear about their culture. There are so many unique stories that exist in each of those.

There is the Russian Jewish community. Even in my riding alone, there are four or five different groups that each bring their own flavour to the way they experience the Jewish identity. Again, I think this is an opportunity to be able to focus on that.

I can picture in York Centre, but of course across all the rest of the country, that this will be an opportunity for people to learn and share their experiences outwardly. I think that will be a real advantage and will give us a lot better understanding of how other Jews celebrate, how other Jews live, and what their traditions are.

Hon. Linda Frum:

I agree. The Jewish community is very diverse. Of course, the Ashkenazi community has dominated the culture in most places. Yes, this is an opportunity to broaden that understanding within the Jewish community itself, of itself, and how diverse it is within itself.

Again, as I said, and I was quoting Michael Mostyn, this would be successful if it wasn't just Jews talking to each other, but if it was a way to really share with other communities and to connect with other communities, and part of that would be to show how diverse and broad we are as well.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

I have 40 seconds and I will pass that over to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

Mr. Levitt, I'm a Scottish Jew with an Irish passport and a Turkish grandfather and a Polish grandmother, all of Jewish descent. I look at Jewish heritage in an alternative way.

I want to quickly recognize the presence of the Honourable Irwin Cotler in the room today. I think it's very important to recognize that he's here for this. That is all the time I have.

Thank you.

Mr. Michael Levitt:

Thank you.

The Vice-Chair (Hon. Peter Van Loan):

We will now move to the Conservatives.

Mr. Kitchen.

Mr. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you both for coming today. I appreciate the opportunity.

I come from southeastern Saskatchewan. We do not have a big Jewish community, but I am very proud of the small community of Hirsch, where one of the first Jewish communities in Saskatchewan was founded. The reality that shows this is the Hirsch Community Jewish Cemetery. I bring that up because it was restored in 2000, thanks not only to the Saskatchewan Jewish Council but also the Jewish Community Foundation of Montreal. To me, that's a great thing to see communities helping communities. I think that's wonderful.

You mentioned heritage education. I support education. I think it's important. We cannot rewrite history. History is history and we need to educate people on that history. Would you expand on how you see this being of value to advance that?

Hon. Linda Frum:

I can respond to that, because you make me think of my own family on my mother's side, which settled in Niagara Falls, Ontario, when they first came to Canada as Jewish immigrants in the late 1800s. My great-grandparents and grandparents were part of the group that founded the Niagara Falls synagogue, but there is no longer a Jewish community in Niagara Falls, or rather, there's not enough people to sponsor a synagogue. The synagogue was shut down long ago. There is still a Jewish cemetery. There are still remnants of Jewish life there.

I think you make a good point. That's just one of many such communities across Canada. Cape Breton is famously also one of them. Preservation of Canadian Jewish history is also a potential focus of this, as is a remembrance of where people settled and the contributions they made, even if they are no longer there in significant numbers. This can also be a rich element of what can be done if prompted by a Jewish heritage month.

(1600)

Mr. Michael Levitt:

I think education is a key component of what a Canadian Jewish heritage month can help bring about. Education on issues like anti-Semitism and tolerance and diversity, and the value of those things in Canadian society, is increasingly necessary as we see the problematic behaviours that this committee has recently examined. I think there are a lot of things to celebrate during a Canadian Jewish heritage month, but there are also a lot of difficult things to reflect on, whether it's the treatment of Jews back in the thirties and forties or the rise in sustained anti-Semitism that exists across the country.

The Toronto board of education recently had an exhibit on the Holocaust, and it was quite a remarkable exhibit. It was staged at a school that has no Jewish presence. They had Holocaust survivors and Holocaust educators go in, train a number of students at the school who were not Jewish, and then they brought students in from across the city to experience it. Some of the facilitators had more of a formal background in Holocaust education, but the students also spoke to them about what they had learned and how it had opened their eyes. I sat in on one of these sessions. As I said, it was a group of kids from a school with no Jewish presence, and I don't think many of them had heard of or understood the impact of the Holocaust and what it was all about, what the lessons are, and the depths of the depravity that took place. Watching them get these lessons from other students and watching them relate to one another, many of them in tears, was quite a remarkable moment.

I think Canadian Jewish heritage month should be a celebration, but it should also be a time to reflect on the difficult lessons that Jewish Canadians have faced across the country. I think this is going to be a poignant element that will be reflected, whether in your community or in the larger communities of Montreal and Toronto.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

In Saskatchewan we talk about being advanced through immigration and through our Ukrainian background. We're quite proud of that in Saskatchewan. It's great to see we have all these communities and new immigrants coming to the region. It's wonderful.

Back in 2002, I believe, the Government of Canada declared May to be Asian Heritage Month, and now we're asking to do the same. Do you see an issue with having two months?

Mr. Michael Levitt:

No, I don't. There are 12 months in the year and there are very many more heritages and peoples to celebrate, so no, I don't see an issue. As Senator Frum commented, the reason we've selected May is that it will coordinate with the Ontario and the U.S, and also some significant dates.

As an anecdote on the Ukrainian connection to this Jewish heritage month, I had the pleasure of meeting the Ukrainian Prime Minister about a month ago. He was in Ottawa, and I went to a reception and was introduced to him, and the person who introduced me said something in Ukrainian, and all of a sudden he turned to me and said, “Shalom”, and put out his hand and embraced me. I didn't know the Ukrainian Prime Minister was Jewish. I went back and did a little bit of research and learned that he comes from a small town where he'd been active in re-establishing the synagogue. He's been active within the Jewish community in Ukraine.

This was new to me, but it just shows you that there are these stories that exist, and maybe there's some connection to that in your Ukrainian community as well. Who knows?

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Go ahead, Senator Frum.

Hon. Linda Frum:

Just from a logistical and practical point of view, it's true. There's probably a lot of other days and heritage months in May as well, not just the Asian and Jewish. I had a list at one point. I've now forgotten it. We'll be sharing this with other groups. That's fine. Frankly, that has potential to do things together because, as I keep trying to say, this is not just about doing things in silos. It really is about communities understanding each other and trying to break down barriers. Maybe it can be seen as a positive and not a negative.

(1605)

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you very much.

The Vice-Chair (Hon. Peter Van Loan):

Thank you.

Now, we will move to the NDP round with Ms. Malcolmson.

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson (Nanaimo—Ladysmith, NDP):

Thank you, Chair. Thank you to the witnesses.

I'm Sheila Malcolmson. I'm a member of Parliament for Nanaimo—Ladysmith. My dad's family was born and I was born in St. Catharines. Our families are close and around the same time. It's an honour to meet you, Senator. Thank you, especially for your very animated personal storytelling. It's a great example of the things to celebrate and about making the personal intervention into legislation, which we don't always remember to do.

The New Democrats support the legislation and thank you both for advancing it. Maybe if I could just head some things off at the pass, is there any impact on the federal government that we should air, to get it on the record and give you an opportunity to rebut?

Hon. Linda Frum:

No. There's no financial implications to this bill whatsoever, nor is it anticipated that there's any federal funding required or expected. This is something that the community itself would take on.

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

Are there any arguments that you've heard, in any realm, that would cause anybody in Parliament to vote no? Not that I'm recommending that at all, but just for the record I think it's always helpful to give witnesses the opportunity to reveal and rebut.

Mr. Michael Levitt:

On the contrary actually, I think the most wonderful thing about the experience of the senator and I joining together on this particular bill has been doing the outreach to members from the other parties to ensure that there was support. As I stated, working in the Commons with Peter Kent and Randall Garrison, it was great to have that multipartisan support and I think, from the perspective of the senator and I, that was key to our vision for this. This is everybody getting behind something that I think is maybe a little overdue and that we're thrilled to be able to spearhead and move forward.

No. I don't see that there should be any issues whatsoever in terms of any objections. I've certainly heard none at all in either chamber.

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

I appreciate the new fact that I've learned from the preamble that the Jewish population in Canada represents the fourth largest Jewish population in the world. Already your legislation is having impact, as far as education. I would not have guessed that.

Can you elaborate more on the impact for Canada, as a country, of knowing that everybody across the country is celebrating at the same time, as opposed to the approach we have right now, where there are different commemorations and celebrations that are more localized than at the regional level?

Hon. Linda Frum:

Right now, it's just Ontario that officially has a Jewish heritage month. It was important to ask that the national month be done in coordination with Ontario's month. It makes sense. There is a large Jewish community in Montreal and in Vancouver as well. There are Jewish communities in almost every major Canadian city. It gives those communities an opportunity to work together and to do something communal across the country. That's a very exciting experience as well.

I'm very involved in the Jewish community and in the Jewish federation in Toronto and we talk about this within our community. We have a national community as well as a local community and that, as the strongest and biggest community, the one that's in Toronto has a responsibility to make sure that the communities across the country are thriving and feel supported for projects like preserving cemeteries. Those are national projects that the national Jewish community has to think about. We have stakeholders all across the country.

Again, this could be a trigger to help us think about this on an annual basis. How can we do things together as a national community?

Mr. Michael Levitt:

I fully agree. I think it may even be an opportunity for some of the larger communities in the country, the bigger cities, to do some outreach to some of the smaller towns, to do some programming. Whether it's some of the arts and community cultural organizations, or some of the larger things like the UJA Federation, B'nai Brith, or the Simon Wiesenthal Center, this could be an opportunity for them to actually spread the message and do programming.

Again, when you have it in one month, it just shines a spotlight in a very positive way. It may be an impetus for these types of events to occur in places that they might not have before. I think it's only a net benefit. I really do. All the feedback that I've had—I think probably similarly to the senator—has all been very positive. I know that we've both been getting emails from the community at large and from other communities and other individuals, just saying that they've seen this and that it's a really positive step forward.

I think it's going to be embraced.

(1610)

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:

I appreciate the opportunity for the nation-building aspect of this, so that we know we're all pulling in the same direction.

Starting on Saturday, we're just about to begin the 16 days of activism against gender-based violence, which is a United Nations campaign that is very much embraced in Canada. That leads up to and includes the anniversary of the massacre, you might say, at the École polytechnique.

We have good examples of what happens when we're all commemorating at the same time. It kind of combats isolation as well. I appreciate your work.

There's nothing else I have to add. Thanks, Chair.

The Vice-Chair (Hon. Peter Van Loan):

Thank you.

We now will go to the next Liberal round, where I gather the time will be carved up among several people, starting with Mr. Virani.

Mr. Arif Virani (Parkdale—High Park, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

I wanted just to say thank you to both of you for this very important piece of legislation that you've introduced, Senator Frum, and that you've sponsored, Michael. Thank you for acknowledging two titans of the community, one of whom is the president in the back there, Mr. Cotler, and also Justice Abella, whom I've had the honour of appearing before. She is quite a titan.

In terms of personal anecdotes—since she was sharing them so liberally, Michael—a piece of Jewish heritage right in my own riding is that on Maria St., in the Junction, is the oldest synagogue in Ontario, which has a plaque outside of it. This is something that I learned only in terms of representing the community, but there's Jewish heritage everywhere and all around us.

I wanted to address my question briefly to you about something that you raised, Senator Frum, and then I'll turn it over to Dan Ruimy. I invite you both to comment.

You mentioned, Shimon Fogel, I think, in reference to this idea about a heritage month being an opportunity to peel back ignorance. I think that is the phrase you used. You also talked about overcoming suspicion and hostility. That's something that we have definitely heard a lot of. Michael referenced a study we just concluded on systemic racism and discrimination.

We talked a lot about breaking down barriers by improving dialogue. It prompted me to think about interfaith dialogue—having Jewish leaders engage with other leaders of different backgrounds.

Do you see this kind of bill as a springboard to promoting more of that kind of dialogue that is so pivotal to breaking down anti-Semitism and breaking down the types of discrimination that we're seeing right now?

Hon. Linda Frum:

If that were a by-product of this bill, it would obviously be a wonderful thing. I would welcome that. I don't see why that couldn't happen. Again, I am speaking to the outreach that would be associated with having a national Jewish heritage month. It would put the burden on the Jewish community to reach out to other communities to share, to try to interact with other communities, and to make this part of a national celebration, not just a local community celebration.

There is also a big educational component that could be part of this, as well. If we speak about ignorance and hostility, very often those things are born out of isolation, because, as we're acknowledging, there are only 400,000 Jews—I've heard 350,000. There are not very many of us in the country. Of course, there are many communities in Canada where people will grow up and never meet someone of Jewish background. That's not helpful if you want to create understanding.

There is an opportunity, maybe through the educational system where there is no local Jewish community itself, to talk about Jewish culture. If some enlightened teachers wanted to use a Jewish heritage month as a springboard in their communities to talk about the Jewish community, that could promote some interfaith understanding.

Mr. Arif Virani:

Michael.

Mr. Michael Levitt:

I'm going to focus on my own community for a second and talk about York Centre. I'm incredibly proud that under the leadership of four faith leaders, York Centre has established an interfaith dialogue. Rabbi Morrison at Beth Emeth Synagogue was the spearhead from the Jewish community. Working with faith leaders—Jewish, Christian, and Muslim—they've now had, I think, three events. I could totally see this interfaith council in York Centre, and I know there are other ones that exist in other parts of the city. Other cities could definitely embrace something like this.

To Senator Frum's point, I think if this were a springboard to more dialogue and better understanding, it would be a fantastic opportunity. We know how important those relationships are. We know the impact they can have on creating education and awareness of issues like anti-Semitism. I think it would be a wonderful outcome if the Canadian Jewish heritage month created a forum for increased interfaith or multi-faith dialogue—100%.

(1615)

Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.):

Thank you both for being here today. I don't have a lot of time, so I'm going to jump right into it.

My parents emigrated from Morocco to Montreal, where I was born and raised. I left Montreal years and years ago, and I moved to a little town, Maple Ridge, with a handful of Jewish people. I've owned a business there for the last six years. I didn't really have any connections to the Jewish community whatsoever. We don't have a Jewish community there.

One thing that happened after I was elected was that a gentleman had come in with an issue, and as he was leaving, he turned and said to me, “Why were you hiding the fact that you're Jewish?”

I said, “Excuse me?”

He said, “What do you think the newspaper would say if I called them up right now and told them you're a Jew?”

For me, that was the very first time that I'd ever encountered something to that extent, and having a month like this.... I mean, honestly, you don't go around shouting, “Hey everybody, I'm Jewish.” I mean, you live in the community that you live in.

Do you see Jewish heritage month as an opportunity to perhaps, for some of us folks, be able to shout out to our community, “Hey, look”? I'd like your thoughts on that.

Mr. Michael Levitt:

I see this month as being a source for great pride for Jewish communities across the country.

MP Ruimy, I think what you're saying is that in a smaller town where there's not a presence or probably an understanding—ignorance comes often from not understanding—it's a tremendous opportunity for Jews. If we can get the UJA equivalent in Vancouver, or some larger organization, to do some outreach into the surrounding communities that maybe don't have an infrastructure or a Jewish presence, I think it's a wonderful opportunity to enlighten and to give Jews in those communities a chance to say, “This is who I am. This is my heritage. This is what I come from. I am proud of it, and I want you to understand it. I want to talk to you about it.”

What better thing could come from that? Absolutely.

Hon. Linda Frum:

I don't know how much time you spend on Twitter. I spend too much time, I'm sure. If you're a Jewish person on Twitter, anti-Semitic attacks are almost a daily experience—really, truly.

I feel like anti-Semitism is part of my daily life. I feel lucky, though, because I am part of a large Jewish community, so I can take solace, comfort, and support from people in my community. If you're in a smaller community, I can see how frightening and intimidating it could be when confronted with the very real problem of anti-Semitism that exists in Canada on a daily basis.

It's making common cause, having a sense of community, and understanding why you should be proud to be Jewish. I do announce it. That's my solution to it. The more people think they might be able to hurt me with it, the more I make it clear to them how proud I am to be who I am, and what I am.

Is Jewish heritage month a helpful vehicle to help promote those feelings? I hope so. If so, it would be a great thing.

Mr. Dan Ruimy:

I do shout it out now. We did a Shabbat night with the centre in Vancouver. They came out to Maple Ridge, and it was a great night. That's where they first realized, “Oh, wait a minute, you're Jewish?”

It was a fantastic night. I look forward to supporting this in the House.

Thank you.

(1620)

The Vice-Chair (Hon. Peter Van Loan):

I want to thank you both very much for your evidence today.

I will just make some observations on some of the evidence from my own experience. I grew up in York Mills, where half the community is Jewish, and very much in the shadow of World War II. My family were refugees from Estonia who had a parallel experience. Many of those in my family and my community, the Estonian community from the Soviet gulag, lost their lives there. I was surrounded by kids who had families with similar experiences of the Holocaust, so there was a lot of sharing going on, and a lot in common there.

I heard, with interest, the comments about Rosalie Abella. My grandmother, who largely raised me, was actually a lawyer back in the 1920s in Estonia. She didn't practise here, but her grandmother was a Rosenberg, up the maternal line, and a straight maternal line to me, so you know what that means, at least according to the Lubavitchers, who keep trying to persuade me to put my poor, suffering son into Hebrew school. I'm just trying to get him to learn a bit of French. If I could get that done, that would make me happy.

In any event I've seen great things happen. I had a student staffer formerly with me who was from Saskatoon, and you see another great community there. She was not Jewish at all, but she started a klezmer band in her high school, which continues to this day.

My observation about the value of what you're doing is this. I look back to that time when I was growing up and we were coping with events that were pretty immediate. I've seen a lot of anti-Semitism disappear in the community, and in the communities that I've known since then.

At the same time, in parallel, I've seen new anti-Semitism arise in other places. While some understanding has grown, I've seen things here when we were elected, when the south Lebanon war took place and I was on the foreign affairs committee. Things were said that I thought were unthinkable and that we would never hear after the events of the Holocaust and World War II.

The work needs to be done. It appears that it perhaps never, ever will be complete. That is the way and the fate of the Jewish people, sadly, but this is a positive step towards doing that. I commend you both on bringing this forward, and thank you.

I think that completes our business for today.

Yes, Mr. Vandal.

Mr. Dan Vandal (Saint Boniface—Saint Vital, Lib.):

I understand that proper notice hasn't been given to study this clause by clause.

The Vice-Chair (Hon. Peter Van Loan):

That is correct. There hasn't been notice given—

Mr. Dan Vandal:

I'd like to move a motion that the clerk do all things necessary so that we can do a clause-by-clause review at our next meeting.

(Motion agreed to)

The Vice-Chair (Hon. Peter Van Loan):

I will now entertain a motion for adjournment.

Mr. Vandal.

Mr. Dan Vandal:

Before we do that, there is just a bit of committee business to do with M-103.

I understand that the report is going to be presented sometime in December and I think perhaps we could hear from the analyst as to when the report actually will be back for a discussion.

The Vice-Chair (Hon. Peter Van Loan):

They aren't here. The clerk will respond.

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Michael MacPherson):

Yes, basically we've had a production meeting with the various services that are involved in producing a report. The time estimate of the earliest time we can get the report back and distribute it to the committee would be December 8.

It is still being drafted now. After it's finished being drafted, it will go to translation services. They have a service standard that they meet. They can only do so many words a day, and this is a busy time of year. Every committee is trying to get a report in, basically. After translation services, it goes to publication services. Everything is in the proper channels and there really is nothing more to be done to speed it along at this point.

Mr. Dan Vandal:

I just find December 8 to be an incredibly long time. It's already been two weeks with the administration. The eighth is at least another two weeks. Is there any way we can get it back by December 1?

The Clerk:

It's really out of our hands. It's going to translation on Tuesday. My understanding is that the drafters are going to be working on it all weekend just to meet that deadline. Unless we instruct the analysts to stop drafting now and go with what has already been written, as an incomplete report...and you'd only gain a few days doing that.

Right now it's out of our hands. It's just that this is the process and this is just how long it takes to produce a report of that size.

(1625)

The Vice-Chair (Hon. Peter Van Loan):

It is what it is.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

May I inquire as to what that size is likely to be? That's why I think we really do have to go to Erin to answer.

Ms. Erin Virgint (Committee Researcher):

We're looking at around 40 to 50 pages.

Mr. Scott Reid:

This is exclusive of any recommendations.

Ms. Erin Virgint:

Exactly.

Mr. Scott Reid:

This is essentially a summary of testimony, major topics, laid out in the manner described in that meeting at which you proposed or laid out a possible outline, and then reviewed it. That's what we're talking about.

Ms. Erin Virgint:

Exactly, yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

If I might go back then to the clerk, did you say December 8 is the earliest date, or is an actual date we can be certain of?

The Clerk:

We can never say “guaranteed”, but when we had our production meeting that was our best estimate of when we could have it back. Everyone felt comfortable that December 8 would be doable.

Mr. Scott Reid:

All right. I just ask that for scheduling purposes. The eighth is what day of the week?

The Vice-Chair (Hon. Peter Van Loan):

It's a Friday.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's the Friday before the final week that we sit prior to rising.

The Vice-Chair (Hon. Peter Van Loan):

Correct.

Mr. Scott Reid:

We're likely to have two meetings at which we could deal with the content of the report, I would gather, assuming the House rises when anticipated. Is that correct?

Mr. Dan Vandal:

Yes, I'm looking at the calendar.

To clarify, it's going to translation on Tuesday the 28th. How long does it take to translate?

Ms. Erin Virgint:

They said five days for 40 pages.

Mr. Dan Vandal:

That brings you to beyond the first. Under these timelines, we're likely to be studying this into February, unless we can actually nail it—

Mr. Scott Reid:

Or debating it anyway.... The study portion is done. I'm not sure that's an unrealistic expectation.

Here's a question, if you don't mind.

Mr. Chair, I'm taking liberties. I should be—

The Vice-Chair (Hon. Peter Van Loan):

You are.

Mr. Scott Reid:

May I...?

The Vice-Chair (Hon. Peter Van Loan):

Yes. I'm trying to avoid.... The chair had encouraged us not to discuss committee business at this meeting. I'm trying to respect that but I will indulge you.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

The eighth is the best estimate. That's a Friday. If it was done, for the sake of argument, a couple of days earlier, we could then actually have a meeting on the sixth within our schedule. I don't want to put you in a position of.... I don't want to squeeze a promise out of you. I merely ask whether that is within the realm of possibility, as opposed to non-possibility. I guess I'm looking at the clerk for this because you're dealing with all the different things.

The Clerk:

I can go back to the services and ask them if that is a doable day, but then again, you'd be looking at having it distributed on the sixth, so there would be very little time for members to digest the contents of the report before we have the meeting.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's true.

The Clerk:

That's if we could get it by the sixth.

The Vice-Chair (Hon. Peter Van Loan):

I think it's clear to all those working and toiling on this that there's an anxiousness among committee members to get on with it as soon as possible and I think they've all heard that.

Ms. Erin Virgint:

Yes, we're aware.

Mr. Dan Vandal:

Can you make the request to.... Sorry, Mr. Chair, I'm taking liberties as well.

Would you, through the chair, be able to make the request to expedite this as quickly as we can?

The Clerk:

Yes, of course.

Hon. Peter Van Loan:

I need a motion to adjourn.

Thank you, Mr. Reid.

(Motion agreed to)

Comité permanent du patrimoine canadien

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le vice-président (L'hon. Peter Van Loan (York—Simcoe, PCC)):

Je déclare la séance ouverte.

L'avis de convocation révisé reflète les instructions de la présidente, Mme Fry, qui ne peut pas être avec nous aujourd'hui. Je présiderai donc la réunion en ma qualité de vice-président.

Selon l'avis de convocation, nous nous réunissons pour environ une heure afin de discuter du projet de loi S-232, Loi instituant le Mois du patrimoine juif canadien. Nous entendrons deux témoins, soit l'honorable Linda Frum, qui est la marraine du projet de loi, ainsi que Michael Levitt, son coparrain à la Chambre.

Je demanderai donc à la marraine du projet de loi, Mme Frum, de briser la glace.

L'hon. Linda Frum (sénatrice, Ontario, C):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Bonjour, je vous remercie de cette occasion de m'adresser au Comité pour appuyer le projet de loi S-232, Loi instituant le Mois du patrimoine juif canadien.

Je souhaite remercier Michael Levitt, député de York-Centre pour le rôle qu'il a joué dans le dépôt de ce projet de loi, qui a été chaleureusement accueilli par la communauté juive, et pour tout ce qu'il a fait pour le faire progresser à la Chambre des communes. J'ai le privilège de parrainer le projet de loi S-232 au Sénat et j'ai été ravie de l'appui unanime qu'il y a reçu.

À titre de fière membre de la communauté juive du Canada, j'appuie avec enthousiasme l'objectif du projet de loi S-232, qui est d'officialiser la désignation du mois de mai pour célébrer la culture juive canadienne et souligner les contributions considérables à la société canadienne des Canadiens de confession juive depuis le début de la colonisation. L'histoire du peuple juif au Canada en est essentiellement une d'acceptation, de tolérance et d'ouverture mutuelle. Bien que cette histoire ne soit pas sans tache, le Canada demeure un pays où les juifs jouissent de la liberté de religion, de la sécurité et de la prospérité.

Aujourd'hui, le Canada accueille la quatrième communauté juive en importance dans le monde. Beaucoup de ces personnes sont des descendants des 35 000 survivants de l'Holocauste que le Canada a accepté après la Seconde Guerre mondiale.

Il n'est pas fortuit que le mois de mai ait été choisi pour célébrer le patrimoine juif. Le Mois du patrimoine juif est déjà célébré en mai en Ontario. Depuis son adoption, en 2012, le Mois du patrimoine juif ontarien reçoit un vaste appui des citoyens, des organisations communautaires et des administrations locales de la province.

Les États-Unis ont également choisi le mois de mai pour célébrer les contributions de la communauté juive américaine aux États-Unis, et il en est ainsi depuis 2006, année où le Président George W. Bush et le Congrès ont adopté une résolution en ce sens. C'est également en mai qu'Israël célèbre l'une de ses fêtes les plus joyeuses, Yom Ha'atzmaut, soit la Journée de l'indépendance d'Israël.

L'un des principaux avantages à l'établissement officiel d'un mois du patrimoine juif par la voie législative sera de donner un élan aux organisations communautaires et le temps nécessaire pour planifier des événements. Par exemple, à Toronto, le festival annuel du film juif se tient pendant le Mois du patrimoine juif afin de célébrer et de montrer la production cinématographique juive dans le monde. C'est un bon exemple d'activité qui pourrait désormais prendre une dimension nationale.

Aux États-Unis, toutes sortes d'activités sont organisées pendant le Mois du patrimoine juif américain: des conférences à la Bibliothèque du Congrès et des Archives nationales, des cours de cuisine et des concerts de musique klezmer dans de nombreuses villes américaines.

Pendant la séance du Comité sénatorial permanent des droits de la personne sur le projet de loi S-232, les sénateurs ont entendu des leaders de la communauté juive sur l'incidence qu'aura le Mois du patrimoine juif sur le Canada. Shimon Fogel, président-directeur général du Centre consultatif des relations juives et israéliennes a affirmé ceci au sujet du Mois du patrimoine juif canadien: L’idée des mois du patrimoine est celle d’une approche proactive qui vise à faire reculer l’ignorance qui est au fond la source de l’intolérance que nous voudrions tous réprimer et éradiquer. C’est dans ce contexte que les mois du patrimoine jouent un rôle important, à mon sens, pour aider les autres Canadiens à prendre conscience des valeurs communes de communautés particulières, en l’espèce de celle à laquelle je suis fier d’appartenir. Ils atténuent la méfiance et l’hostilité qui découlent de l’ignorance où nous sommes des autres communautés confessionnelles.

Quant à lui, Michael Mostyn, chef de la direction de B'nai Brith Canada, a convenu de l'importance du Mois du patrimoine juif canadien en ces mots: La loi proposée est tout à fait la bienvenue. Elle reconnaîtra les nombreuses réalisations de la communauté juive canadienne, dont les membres ont dû surmonter maints obstacles dès les premières années du Canada comme colonie et qui ont malgré tout apporté une importante contribution au tissu de la société canadienne. En dépit du racisme systémique qui les visait, les membres de notre communauté ne se sont jamais considérés comme des victimes, préférant voir dans les embûches des occasions d’agir plutôt que des obstacles. C’est grâce à notre persévérance et à notre volonté d’affronter l’adversité et de nous améliorer que la communauté juive a pu aider à construire le Canada, même si elle était peu nombreuse.

Monsieur Mostyn a ajouté que pour que le Mois du patrimoine juif canadien soit un succès, il ne peut constituer une célébration isolée, une célébration de la communauté juive seulement, pour la communauté juive. Je le cite: ... il n’y a aucun intérêt à ce qu’une communauté tienne des célébrations toute seule. Nous faisons tous partie du Canada et l’essentiel de toute journée du patrimoine, c’est de faire connaître les contributions d’une communauté donnée aux autres communautés ....

Pour ma part, j'espère que grâce à l'établissement du Mois du patrimoine juif canadien, tous les Canadiens auront la chance de découvrir la culture et l'histoire des Canadiens juifs et de prendre la pleine mesure du rôle que la communauté juive a joué dans l'érection du Canada, dans des domaines comme l'éducation, la médecine, les arts, la politique, le journalisme, les affaires et bien d'autres.

Je suis fière de l'appui unanime qu'a reçu le Mois du patrimoine juif canadien jusqu'à maintenant. Il est emballant de penser que le Canada aura son mois du patrimoine juif dès mai 2018.

J'ai hâte de répondre aux questions que vous pourriez avoir à poser.

(1540)

Le vice-président (L'hon. Peter Van Loan):

Merci, sénatrice.

Nous entendrons maintenant M. Levitt, parrain du projet de loi à la Chambre.

M. Michael Levitt (York-Centre, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie le président et mes collègues de tous les partis de me donner l'occasion de témoigner devant eux afin de traiter du projet de loi S-232, Loi instituant le Mois du patrimoine juif canadien.

C'est différent de se tenir de ce côté-ci de la table, mais je considère que c'est un privilège de vous présenter ce projet de loi aux côtés de celle qui le parraine au Sénat, la sénatrice Frum, qui a collaboré étroitement avec moi pour faire du Mois du patrimoine juif canadien une réalité.

La substance et l'intention derrière cette mesure législative ont pris forme dans une motion présentée au cours de la législature précédente par l'honorable Irwin Cotler, ancien député de Mont-Royal. Même si cette motion n'a malheureusement pas été adoptée à l'époque, le soutien massif que le projet de loi S-232 recueille jusqu'à présent auprès de tous les partis est encourageant. Comme je l'ai indiqué précédemment, c'est à Irwin Cotler que je dédie les efforts que je déploie dans ce dossier.

Je tiens donc à remercier non seulement la sénatrice Frum, mais particulièrement les députés Peter Kent et Randall Garrison pour le solide soutien qu'ils ont accordé à cette initiative visant à reconnaître et à souligner les contributions que les Canadiens de confession juive ont faites au pays.

Je considère que vous êtes saisis de ce projet de loi à un moment important. Je crois comprendre que vous venez de terminer une étude sur le racisme systémique et la discrimination religieuse. J'ai eu l'occasion d'assister à des séances que vous avez tenues sur ce sujet, au cours de laquelle j'ai notamment entendu des représentants du Centre consultatif des relations juives et israéliennes et de B'nai Brith Canada, qui ont parlé de l'antisémitisme auquel les Juifs canadiens sont confrontés depuis des lustres. Nous savons que les Juifs canadiens constituent le groupe le plus ciblé par les crimes haineux au Canada.

Avec ce projet de loi, nous voulons souligner et faire connaître l'histoire et les expériences des Juifs canadiens dans toutes les régions du pays. Un Mois du patrimoine juif canadien permettrait de faire connaître ce patrimoine aux Canadiens de toutes origines, de célébrer le patrimoine juif canadien et de renforcer et de préserver la diversité dont nous sommes si fiers à titre de Canadiens.

Le Canada compte approximativement 400 000 Juifs, qui forment ainsi la quatrième communauté juive en importance du monde. L'histoire des Juifs canadiens est longue et riche. Les premiers immigrants juifs à arriver au Canada venaient principalement de l'Ouest et du centre de l'Europe; ils ont été suivis par des Juifs d'Europe de l'Est à la fin du XIXe siècle et au début du XXe siècle.

Après la Seconde Guerre mondiale et l'affaire honteuse du paquebot St. Louis, environ 20 000 survivants de l'Holocauste ont immigré au Canada, suivis par des réfugiés du Moyen-Orient et d'Afrique du Nord. Dans les années 1970 et 1980, l'immigration de Juifs en provenance du Nord de l'Afrique, particulièrement du Maroc, a fait en sorte que de nombreux Juifs séfarades francophones se sont installés au Québec. Au début des années 1990, un grand nombre de Juifs provenant de l'ancienne Union soviétique ont immigré au Canada, notamment une importante communauté de Juifs russes.

Ce rappel historique très bref ne témoigne pas de l'incroyable diversité des cultures et des expériences que les Juifs canadiens ont amenées avec eux. J'ai rencontré des Juifs canadiens des quatre coins du monde: d'Afrique du Sud, de Russie, de France, d'Israël, du Maroc, d'Inde, d'Iran et d'Argentine. Je suis fier que ma propre circonscription soit un microcosme de cette diversité. De bien des manières, la diversité des Juifs canadiens est le miroir de la mosaïque de la société canadienne en général, au sein de laquelle chacun d'entre nous apporte des coutumes et des traditions qui lui sont propres, rendant ainsi le Canada plus fort.

Je veux vous faire part de ma propre expérience de Juif canadien. Je suis né à Édimbourg, en Écosse, où est établie une toute petite communauté juive fort écossaise. Vous êtes nombreux à peut-être m'avoir vu arborant mon kilt, portant fièrement le tartan juif.

En 1983, ma mère, Edna, et moi avons quitté l'Écosse pour entreprendre ce qu'elle appelait une « grande aventure ». Elle m'a amené au Canada pour nous assurer une vie et un avenir meilleurs. Comme nous ne connaissions personne, nous nous sommes installés à Toronto, car elle savait qu'il s'y trouvait une communauté juive florissante qui nous accueillerait et nous fournirait le soutien dont nous avions besoin. Nous avons ainsi intégré nos propres traditions à la communauté locale et à la société canadienne en général. C'est là un vécu que je partage avec un grand nombre de Canadiens pour qui le Canada s'est révélé un refuge ou une terre riche en possibilités.

Je tiens à donner un exemple. Le 1er juillet 1946, les survivants de l'Holocauste Jacob et Fanny Silberman ont donné naissance à une fille dans un camp pour personnes déplacées de Stuttgart, en Allemagne occupée. Jacob Silberman était titulaire d'un diplôme en droit d'une université polonaise réputée. Au début de ses études, un quota de Juifs était imposé, mais il a eu la chance de faire partie de la poignée de Juifs qui a été admise à la faculté de droit. La salle de cours comprenait même une section réservée aux Juifs, appelée ghetto.

Après avoir survécu à l'Holocauste, M. Silberman a présenté une demande d'immigration au Canada, mais les autorités canadiennes l'ont rejetée en raison de son statut d'avocat.

(1545)



Honteusement, les frontières du Canada étaient fermées en grande partie aux Juifs depuis 1933, et elles resteraient ainsi jusqu'en 1948, quand un petit nombre de tailleurs ont été autorisés à entrer au pays. Jacob Silberman a enfin obtenu la permission d'immigrer à titre de tailleur en 1950, mais après son arrivée, malgré ses diplômes, il n'a pu exercer le droit parce qu'il n'était pas citoyen canadien. Quand sa fille, qui avait alors quatre ans, a entendu cela, elle a décidé qu'elle serait avocate. Voici ce qu'elle dit à ce propos: Quand on me demandait quel métier j'exercerais quand je serais grande, je leur répondais « avocate ». Je ne connaissais aucune femme qui était avocate. Tout ce que je savais, c'est que mon père ne pouvait pas être avocat même s'il voulait l'être, alors je serais avocate.

Cette enfant se trouve être la juge Rosalie Abella, qui a été nommée au tribunal de la famille de l'Ontario quand elle avait 29 ans. Elle a ensuite été la première femme juive nommée à la Cour suprême, où elle est entrée en 2004 et où aucun autre juge sauf un seul n'a accompli de mandat aussi long.

Elle explique ainsi sa situation: J'étais une femme, juive et immigrante dans une profession d'homme. Ce peut être un grand avantage de comprendre qu'on est différent, qu'on ne sera jamais comme les autres et que c'est une bonne chose. Profitez du fait que vous êtes différent.

Son histoire, ses difficultés, son labeur et sa réussite sont un symbole de l'histoire des Juifs canadiens.

À l'instar des parents de la juge Abella, un grand nombre de survivants de l'Holocauste ont fait leur nid dans ma circonscription de York-Centre afin de se bâtir une nouvelle vie ici, au Canada.

En septembre, je me suis joint aux survivants de l'Holocauste et au premier ministre pour inaugurer le Monument national de l'Holocauste à Ottawa, qui s'ajoute à des monuments commémoratifs locaux comme le Yad Vashem, qui commémore l'Holocauste à Toronto, dans ma circonscription, et la Roue de la conscience, au Musée canadien de l'immigration au Quai 21, à Halifax, lesquels font partie de l'héritage des survivants et de leurs familles.

Leurs histoires sont nos histoires à titre de Canadiens et ont eu une influence dans les communautés de toute taille de notre pays. Je suis convaincu que chaque membre du Comité peut trouver une histoire de Juifs canadiens dans sa communauté.

Même si les plus grandes communautés juives du Canada se trouvent à Montréal et à Toronto, le présent projet de loi vise en partie à faire connaître les histoires des Juifs canadiens et à souligner leur rôle dans les villes et les agglomérations des quatre coins du pays, que ce soit à Shefford, à Longueuil, à Winnipeg, à Estevan, à Chestermere ou à Vancouver.

Chaque communauté a une riche histoire et a quelque chose à raconter, comme la Congrégation Emanu-El de Victoria, la plus ancienne synagogue au pays qui est en activité depuis 1863, ou la communauté juive de St. John's, qui est une des plus anciennes au Canada, étant arrivé à Terre-Neuve dans les années 1770. Même la toute petite communauté juive d'Iqaluit, qui compte 20 personnes, selon le dernier recensement, ajoute quelque chose à la trame de l'expérience juive au Canada.

L'instauration du Mois du patrimoine juif canadien ferait en sorte que la riche histoire des Juifs du Canada soit reconnue, partagée et célébrée dans notre grand pays, incitant tous les Canadiens à édifier un Canada meilleur, plus diversifié et plus tolérant pour les générations à venir.

Je tiens à vous remercier d'examiner ce projet de loi. C'est avec plaisir que je répondrai à vos questions.

(1550)

Le vice-président (L'hon. Peter Van Loan):

Merci beaucoup.

Passons maintenant aux interventions de sept minutes.

Nous commencerons pas Mme Dabrusin, du Parti libéral.

Mme Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Je remercie la sénatrice Frum et Michael Levitt, à qui je suis reconnaissante d'avoir proposé ce projet de loi et d'avoir pris le temps de venir nous en parler aujourd'hui.

Je suis juive; je serais donc particulièrement fière de voir que ce projet de loi soit adopté, à l'unanimité, comme vous l'avez souligné.

Je pensais à quelque chose. Je suis en train de lire un livre intitulé Clutch, écrit par une de mes électrices. Ce livre, qui vient d'être publié, traite en fait de l'expérience d'un jeune Juif qui grandit sur la rue de Bullion, à Montréal. Or, il existe tout un éventail d'histoires comme celle-ci, une culture et des arts formidables inspirés d'histoires distinctement juives, lesquelles sont pour moi universelles.

En pensant au livre que je suis en train de lire et à ces différents genres de récits, s'il y avait une manière idéale de faire connaître la culture et les arts juifs au Canada, quelle serait-elle? Comment procéderiez-vous?

Je commencerai par vous, sénatrice Frum.

L'hon. Linda Frum:

Je sais que vous êtes originaire de Toronto, tout comme moi et Michael. Je pense que nous...

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Je suis née à Montréal, mais je vis maintenant à Toronto.

L'hon. Linda Frum:

La culture juive est très riche à Montréal et à Toronto; je pense donc qu'il faudrait lui conférer le plus grand rayonnement possible dans le cadre de cette initiative.

J'ai évoqué le Festival du film juif de Toronto. Je suppose que de telles activités ne peuvent pas tellement prendre de l'ampleur, puisqu'elles remportent déjà un grand succès à leur emplacement actuel, mais elles peuvent se répandre. Peut-être qu'un plus grand nombre de communautés peuvent prendre des initiatives, puisque le Mois du patrimoine juif a lieu en mai, et organiser quelque chose dans les communautés du pays où la population juive locale est peut-être plus restreinte. Voilà qui pourrait favoriser l'amitié et la compréhension dans les petites communautés.

M. Michael Levitt:

Je suis d'accord avec la sénatrice Frum. L'un des avantages d'avoir un Mois du patrimoine juif canadien, c'est que cette initiative donnera aux petites communautés, à celles dont on n'entend pas parler, l'occasion d'organiser quelque chose. C'est incroyable: des gens m'ont écrit des lettres et des courriels pour me parler de leurs petites villes, des patelins dont je n'avais jamais entendu parler, pour me raconter des histoires que bien des gens ne connaissent probablement pas.

Les arts et la culture m'intéressent particulièrement. J'ai eu la chance de faire partie du conseil d'administration du Koffler Centre of the Arts avant de me lancer en politique. Quand on voit le dynamisme de la scène artistique juive et la profondeur de ses arts visuels, de ses oeuvres théâtrales ou de sa musique, on se rend compte qu'il y a tant à partager.

Comme la sénatrice, je considère que le Mois du patrimoine juif canadien servira de plateforme, de tribune permettant aux gens de se réunir et d'être sous les feux de la rampe pour raconter leurs histoires. Cette initiative a le potentiel incroyable de permettre aux gens de connaître des histoires issues des quatre coins du pays.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Merci.

Vous avez parlé de la musique klezmer. Le Flying Bulgar Klezmer Band est fort populaire à Montréal, ainsi qu'à Toronto, il me semble. Toronto est l'hôte du Festival ashkénaze, un autre grand festival au cours duquel les gens sortent pour célébrer et danser. C'est une activité formidable.

J'aime beaucoup que vous parliez de la diversité de la communauté juive, et du fait que nous venons d'une multitude d'endroits et avons des traditions différentes. Comment pensez-vous que le Mois du patrimoine juif pourrait permettre d'en apprendre davantage sur la diversité au sein même de la communauté juive?

(1555)

M. Michael Levitt:

Le fait d'être député donne l'occasion de s'impliquer auprès de la communauté et d'en apprendre davantage à son sujet. Je prendrai la communauté juive marocaine de Toronto — la communauté séfarade — comme exemple. Jamais je n'avais eu l'occasion de m'impliquer auprès d'elle, d'apprendre ses coutumes ou d'entendre parler de la culture. Or, chaque communauté a un grand nombre d'histoires qui lui sont propres.

Prenez par exemple la communauté juive russe. Dans ma circonscription seulement, on compte quatre ou cinq groupes différents qui ont leur propre manière de vivre l'identité juive. Ici encore, je pense que le Mois du patrimoine juif nous donnerait l'occasion de mettre l'accent sur ces nuances.

J'imagine que dans York-Centre — et dans le reste du pays également, bien entendu —, les gens auront l'occasion d'apprendre et de faire connaître leurs expériences. Ce sera très avantageux, car nous pourrons bien mieux comprendre les célébrations, la vie et les traditions des autres Juifs.

L'hon. Linda Frum:

Je partage cette opinion. La communauté juive est très diversifiée. Bien entendu, c'est la communauté ashkénaze qui domine la culture dans la plupart des endroits. Nous avons donc effectivement une occasion d'améliorer la compréhension au sein même de la communauté juive afin d'en apprécier la diversité.

Comme je l'ai indiqué en citant Michael Mostyn, cette initiative sera un véritable succès si elle permet aux Juifs de non seulement se parler mutuellement, mais également de tendre la main aux autres communautés, notamment pour leur montrer à quel point leur culture est diversifiée et vaste.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Il me reste 40 secondes, que je céderai à M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Monsieur Levitt, je suis un Juif écossais titulaire d'un passeport irlandais, dont un grand-père est turc et une grand-mère est polonaise, tous deux étant de descendance juive. Je vois donc le patrimoine juif d'un autre oeil.

Je tiens à souligner brièvement la présence de l'honorable Irwin Cotler, qui est parmi nous aujourd'hui. Il est très important, selon moi, de faire remarquer qu'il est ici parce qu'il s'intéresse à ce projet de loi. C'est tout le temps que j'ai.

Merci.

M. Michael Levitt:

Merci.

Le vice-président (L'hon. Peter Van Loan):

Nous accorderons maintenant la parole aux conservateurs.

Monsieur Kitchen.

M. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie tous les deux de comparaître aujourd'hui. Je suis enchanté d'avoir l'occasion de vous parler.

Je viens du Sud-Est de la Saskatchewan, où il n'y a pas d'importante communauté juive. Je suis toutefois très fier de la petite communauté de Hirsch, où a été fondée une des premières communautés juives de la province. On y trouve d'ailleurs le cimetière juif communautaire de Hirsch. Si j'en parle, c'est parce qu'il a été rénové en 2000 grâce non seulement au Saskatchewan Jewish Council, mais aussi à la Fondation communautaire juive de Montréal. À mon avis, c'est formidable de voir des communautés s'entraider. C'est merveilleux.

Vous avez fait mention de l'éducation relative au patrimoine. Je suis favorable à l'éducation, que je juge importante. Nous ne pouvons réécrire l'histoire. L'histoire est ce qu'elle est et nous devons la faire connaître à la population. Pourriez-vous nous expliquer comment vous considérez que le Mois du patrimoine juif canadien pourrait nous aider à cet égard?

L'hon. Linda Frum:

Je peux répondre à cette question, car vous me faites penser à ma propre famille, du côté de ma mère, qui s'est installée à Niagara Falls, en Ontario, quand elle est arrivée au Canada à la fin des années 1800. Mes arrières-grands-parents et mes grands-parents faisaient partie du groupe qui a fondé la synagogue de Niagara Falls, où il n'y a plus de communauté juive. En fait, il n'y a plus assez de gens pour entretenir une synagogue. Le lieu de culte est donc fermé depuis longtemps. Il y a encore un cimetière juif et des vestiges de vie juive.

Je pense que vous soulevez un point pertinent. Il y a bien d'autres communautés comme cela au Canada, dont celle de Cap-Breton, qui est bien connue. La préservation de l'histoire juive canadienne pourrait elle aussi être au coeur de cette initiative pour que nous puissions nous souvenir des endroits où les gens se sont installés et des contributions qu'ils ont apportées, même s'ils ne sont plus nombreux. Cela peut constituer un riche élément des activités qui peuvent être entreprises dans le cadre d'un Mois du patrimoine juif.

(1600)

M. Michael Levitt:

Je pense que l'éducation est un élément important que le mois du patrimoine juif canadien pourrait apporter. Il devient de plus en plus important d'éduquer les gens sur des sujets comme l'antisémitisme, la tolérance et la diversité, et sur l'importance que nous leur accordons dans la société canadienne, surtout à la lumière des comportements problématiques sur lesquels le Comité s'est penché dernièrement. Il y aura beaucoup à célébrer pendant ce mois, mais il faudra aussi s'interroger sur des questions difficiles, comme le traitement réservé aux juifs dans les années 1930 et 1940, ou encore la montée de l'antisémitisme qui subsiste partout au pays.

Le Conseil scolaire de Toronto a organisé récemment une exposition assez impressionnante sur l'holocauste, qui s'est tenue dans une école où il n'y a pas de juifs. Les organisateurs ont invité des survivants et des experts à venir former des élèves, puis ils ont invité les élèves d'autres écoles de la ville à venir vivre l'expérience. Certains animateurs avaient une formation un peu plus officielle sur l'holocauste, mais les élèves leur ont aussi parlé de ce qu'ils ont appris et ont expliqué comment cela leur avait ouvert les yeux. J'ai assisté à une des séances. Comme je l'ai mentionné, il s'agissait d'un groupe d'élèves dans une école qui ne compte pas de juifs, et je ne pense pas que beaucoup d'entre eux avaient entendu parler de l'holocauste, de ses conséquences, des leçons qu'il faut en tirer et de la profonde perversion morale à laquelle il a donné lieu. Il était assez fascinant de les voir se faire enseigner cela par d'autres d'élèves et de voir les interactions entre les élèves. Beaucoup d'entre eux étaient en larmes.

Le mois du patrimoine juif canadien devrait être une célébration, mais il faudrait aussi que ce soit un moment pour réfléchir aux difficultés que les juifs canadiens ont connues au pays. Je pense que ce sera un élément émouvant qui stimulera la réflexion, que ce soit au sein de sa collectivité ou des plus grandes comme Montréal et Toronto.

M. Robert Kitchen:

En Saskatchewan, nous disons que l'immigration et nos origines ukrainiennes nous font progresser. Nous en sommes très fiers. Nous sommes heureux de voir toutes ces communautés et tous ces nouveaux immigrants venir s'installer dans la région. C'est merveilleux.

En 2002, je crois, le gouvernement du Canada a proclamé le mois de mai, Mois du patrimoine asiatique, et on demande maintenant la même chose. Voyez-vous un problème à avoir deux fois le même mois?

M. Michael Levitt:

Non, je n'en vois pas. Il y a 12 mois dans une année, et il y a beaucoup plus de patrimoines et de peuples à célébrer, alors non, je n'y vois pas de problème. Comme l'a mentionné la sénatrice, mai a été choisi pour aller de pair avec l'Ontario et les États-Unis et parce qu'on y trouve des dates importantes.

Je vais vous parler d'une anecdote au sujet du lien entre les Ukrainiens et le mois du patrimoine juif. J'ai eu le plaisir de rencontrer le premier ministre de l'Ukraine il y a environ un mois. Il était à Ottawa, et quelqu'un me l'a présenté lors d'une réception, et cette personne lui a dit quelques mots en ukrainien, et tout à coup, il s'est tourné vers moi et m'a dit « shalom » et il m'a tendu la main et m'a fait l'accolade. Je ne savais pas que le premier ministre ukrainien était juif. À mon retour, j'ai fait un peu de recherches et j'ai appris qu'il était originaire d'une petite ville où il a joué un rôle dans le rétablissement de la synagogue. Il est très engagé au sein de la communauté juive en Ukraine.

C'était nouveau pour moi, mais des histoires de ce genre existent, et il y a peut-être des liens similaires dans votre collectivité. Qui sait?

M. Robert Kitchen:

Allez-y, sénatrice.

L'hon. Linda Frum:

C'est vrai, simplement d'un point de vue pratique et logistique. Il existe probablement beaucoup d'autres jours et mois du patrimoine en mai, à part celui du patrimoine asiatique et du patrimoine juif. J'avais la liste à un moment donné, mais j'ai oublié. Nous partagerons ce mois avec d'autres groupes. C'est parfait. En fait, les gens auront ainsi l'occasion d'organiser des activités ensemble parce que, comme je le répète souvent, il ne s'agit pas de travailler en vase clos. Nous voulons que les communautés cherchent à mieux se comprendre et à abattre les barrières qui les séparent. C'est sans doute un élément positif, et non pas négatif.

(1605)

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci beaucoup.

Le vice-président (L'hon. Peter Van Loan):

Merci.

C'est maintenant au tour du NPD et de Mme Malcolmson.

Mme Sheila Malcolmson (Nanaimo—Ladysmith, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci à nos témoins.

Je m'appelle Sheila Malcolmson, et je suis la députée de Nanaimo—Ladysmith. La famille de mon père et moi sommes nés à St. Catharines. Nos familles sont proches et à peu près de la même époque. C'est un honneur de vous rencontrer, sénatrice. Je vous remercie, en particulier de votre récit personnel très animé. Nous avons là un excellent exemple de choses à célébrer, et d'initiatives législatives personnelles que nous pouvons entreprendre, et que nous oublions parfois.

Les néo-démocrates sont en faveur du projet de loi et vous remercient de l'avoir présenté. Pour parer à toute éventualité, y a-t-il des répercussions sur le gouvernement fédéral dont nous devrions parler, pour que ce soit noté et que vous ayez l'occasion d'y répondre?

L'hon. Linda Frum:

Non, ce projet de loi n'a aucune incidence financière, et il n'est pas prévu que des fonds fédéraux seront requis ou attendus. C'est la communauté qui s'en occupera.

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

Avez-vous entendu des arguments, sur un sujet quelconque, qui amèneraient des personnes au Parlement à voter contre? Loin de moi l'idée de recommander une telle chose, mais je pense qu'il est bon de donner l'occasion aux témoins de le mentionner et, le cas échéant, de répondre, pour que ce soit noté.

M. Michael Levitt:

C'est tout le contraire, en fait. La chose la plus merveilleuse dans l'aventure que nous avons entreprise la sénatrice et moi avec ce projet de loi a été nos rapports avec les membres de l'opposition pour nous assurer de leur soutien. Comme je l'ai mentionné, j'ai trouvé cela formidable de travailler aux Communes avec Peter Kent et Randall Garrison pour obtenir un appui multipartite, et pour la sénatrice et moi, c'était un aspect clé de notre vision des choses. Tous se rallient derrière cette initiative qui arrive un peu tard, mais que nous sommes très heureux de mettre de l'avant.

Non, je ne vois aucune objection. Je n'en ai entendu absolument aucune dans les deux chambres.

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

Je suis heureuse d'avoir appris dans le préambule que la population juive au Canada est la quatrième en importance dans le monde. Votre projet de loi nous enseigne déjà quelque chose, vous voyez. Je ne l'aurais pas deviné.

Pourriez-vous nous en dire un peu plus sur les avantages que cela aura pour le Canada que les gens célèbrent en même temps, partout au pays, plutôt que de façon plus locale, comme c'est le cas à l'heure actuelle?

L'hon. Linda Frum:

À l'heure actuelle, l'Ontario est la seule à avoir officiellement un mois du patrimoine juif. Il était important de demander que le mois national soit le même que celui en Ontario. C'est logique. On trouve d'importantes communautés juives à Montréal et Vancouver également. On trouve des communautés juives dans presque toutes les villes importantes au Canada. Ces communautés auront l'occasion de collaborer et de faire quelque chose ensemble partout au pays. C'est une aventure très excitante.

Je suis très engagée dans la communauté juive et dans la fédération juive à Toronto, et nous en discutons au sein de la communauté. Nous avons une communauté nationale et une communauté locale et, en tant que communauté la plus importante et la plus solide au pays, celle de Toronto a la responsabilité de s'assurer que les communautés ailleurs au pays sont florissantes et ont le sentiment d'être appuyées dans leurs projets, comme celui de la préservation des cimetières. Ce sont là des projets nationaux auxquels la communauté nationale doit réfléchir. Nous avons des partenaires partout au pays.

Encore une fois, ce projet de loi pourrait être un élément déclencheur pour nous amener à réfléchir à cela annuellement. Comment la communauté nationale peut-elle travailler ensemble?

M. Michael Levitt:

Je suis tout à fait d'accord. Il se pourrait même que cela donne l'occasion aux grandes communautés, aux grandes villes, de tendre la main aux plus petites, pour planifier la programmation. Qu'il s'agisse d'organisations artistiques ou culturelles communautaires, ou de plus grandes comme la UJA Federation, B'nai Brith, ou le Centre Simon Wiesenthal, cela pourrait être une occasion pour elles de diffuser l'information et d'organiser la programmation.

Encore une fois, quand les activités sont concentrées dans un mois, on attire l'attention d'une façon très positive. Il se pourrait que ce soit l'élan nécessaire pour organiser des activités à des endroits où il n'y en avait pas auparavant. Je n'y vois que des avantages. C'est vrai. Tous les commentaires que j'ai entendus étaient très positifs, et il en va probablement de même pour la sénatrice. Je sais que nous avons tous les deux reçu des courriels de la communauté dans son ensemble et d'autres communautés et personnes nous disant qu'ils ont vu le projet de loi et que c'est un excellent pas en avant.

Je pense qu'il sera très bien accueilli.

(1610)

Mme Sheila Malcolmson:

Je suis heureuse que ce soit une occasion de contribuer à l'unité nationale. On sait alors qu'on rame tous dans la même direction.

À compter de samedi, nous entreprendrons les 16 jours d'activisme contre la violence fondée sur le sexe, la campagne des Nations unies à laquelle beaucoup de gens participent au Canada, et qui comprend la date de commémoration de la tuerie, on peut dire, à l'École polytechnique.

Nous avons de bons exemples de ce qui se produit lorsque nous commémorons quelque chose tous en même temps. On combat aussi en quelque sorte l'isolement. Je vous félicite de votre travail.

Je n'ai rien d'autre à ajouter. Merci, monsieur le président.

Le vice-président (L'hon. Peter Van Loan):

Merci.

Nous allons entamer la deuxième série de questions du côté des libéraux, et si j'ai bien compris, le temps sera partagé entre plusieurs intervenants, en commençant par M. Virani.

M. Arif Virani (Parkdale—High Park, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je voulais simplement vous remercier tous les deux de ce très important projet de loi que vous avez présenté, sénatrice, et que vous avez parrainé, Michael. Merci également d'avoir rendu hommage à deux titans de la communauté, un qui est président ici à l'arrière, M. Cotler, et la juge Abella, que j'ai eu l'honneur d'entendre déjà. C'est un véritable titan.

Au chapitre des anecdotes personnelles — comme elle en a parlé si librement, Michael — il y a un élément du patrimoine juif dans ma circonscription, sur la rue Maria, à Junction, et c'est la plus vieille synagogue en Ontario, et elle a une plaque à l'extérieur. Je l'ai appris en représentant la communauté, mais il y a des éléments du patrimoine juif partout autour de nous.

Je voulais vous poser une question sur un point que vous avez soulevé, sénatrice, puis je vais céder la parole à Dan Ruimy. Je vous invite à répondre tous les deux.

Vous avez mentionné le nom de Shimon Fogel, je crois, en faisant référence à l'idée qu'un mois du patrimoine est une occasion de faire reculer l'ignorance. Je pense que ce sont les mots que vous avez utilisés. Vous avez aussi parlé de vaincre la méfiance et l'hostilité. Ce sont des commentaires que nous avons beaucoup entendus. Michael a parlé de l'étude que nous venons de terminer sur le racisme et la discrimination systémiques.

Nous avons beaucoup parlé de faire tomber les barrières en améliorant le dialogue. J'ai alors pensé au dialogue interconfessionnel — amener les dirigeants juifs à entamer le dialogue avec les dirigeants d'autres communautés religieuses.

Voyez-vous ce genre de projet de loi comme un tremplin pour promouvoir ce type de dialogue si indispensable pour vaincre l'antisémitisme et les différentes formes de discrimination dont nous sommes témoins à l'heure actuelle?

L'hon. Linda Frum:

Si c'était un sous-produit de ce projet de loi, ce serait évidemment merveilleux. J'approuverais l'idée. Je ne vois pas pourquoi cela ne pourrait pas se faire. Encore une fois, je vais parler de la sensibilisation qui découlerait d'un mois du patrimoine juif à l'échelle nationale. La communauté juive aurait la responsabilité de tendre la main aux autres communautés, d'interagir avec elles, pour en faire une célébration nationale et non pas seulement locale.

Il pourrait également y avoir tout un volet éducatif. Quand on parle d'ignorance et d'hostilité, elles proviennent souvent de l'isolement, car, comme nous le savons, les juifs ne sont que 400 000, et j'ai entendu 350 000, au pays. Nous ne sommes pas très nombreux. Bien entendu, dans bien des collectivités au Canada, les gens grandiront sans jamais rencontrer une personne d'origine juive. Ça complique les choses quand on veut amener les gens à mieux se comprendre.

Quand il n'y a pas de communauté juive locale, on pourrait parler, dans les établissements scolaires par exemple, de la culture juive. Si des enseignants éclairés voulaient profiter du mois du patrimoine juif dans leurs communautés pour parler de la communauté juive, cela pourrait accroître la sensibilisation interconfessionnelle.

M. Arif Virani:

Michael.

M. Michael Levitt:

Je vais me concentrer tout d'abord sur ma collectivité et parler de York Centre. Je suis incroyablement fier qu'à l'initiative de quatre chefs religieux, York Centre ait créé un dialogue interconfessionnel. Le rabbin Morrison de la Beth Emeth Synagogue a été l'initiateur au sein de la communauté juive. Les chefs religieux — juif, chrétien et musulman — ont travaillé de concert pour organiser, si je ne m'abuse, trois activités. On pourrait très certainement avoir un conseil interconfessionnel à York Centre, et je sais qu'il en existe d'autres ailleurs dans la ville. D'autres villes pourraient très certainement faire quelque chose du même genre.

Pour revenir au point soulevé par la sénatrice, si cela menait à plus de dialogue et de sensibilisation, ce serait merveilleux. Nous connaissons l'importance du dialogue. Nous savons les effets positifs qu'il peut avoir pour l'éducation et la sensibilisation sur des sujets comme l'antisémitisme. Ce serait merveilleux si le mois du patrimoine juif canadien menait à la création d'un forum pour accroître le dialogue interconfessionnel ou multiconfessionnel. Je suis tout à fait d'accord.

(1615)

M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.):

Merci à vous d'eux d'être ici aujourd'hui. Je n'ai pas beaucoup de temps, alors je me lance sans plus attendre.

Mes parents ont immigré du Maroc à Montréal, où je suis né et j'ai grandi. J'ai quitté Montréal il y a longtemps déjà pour aller vivre dans une petite ville, Maple Ridge, avec un petit groupe de juifs. J'y suis propriétaire d'un commerce depuis six ans. Je n'avais vraiment pas de lien avec la communauté juive. Il n'y en a pas là-bas.

Après mon élection, un homme est venu me voir pour discuter d'un problème, et avant de partir, il s'est tourné vers moi et m'a dit « Pourquoi cachiez-vous le fait que vous êtes juif? »

Je lui ai répondu « Pardon? »

Il m'a ensuite dit « Quelle réaction aurait-on au journal d'après vous si j'appelais, là, maintenant, pour dire que vous êtes juif? »

C'était la première fois que j'entendais un commentaire de cette nature, et je pense qu'avoir un mois... Honnêtement, on ne se promène pas en criant sur tous les toits qu'on est juif. On vit dans la communauté où on vit, et c'est tout.

Voyez-vous le mois du patrimoine juif comme une occasion pour certains d'entres nous, peut-être, d'annoncer aux membres de notre collectivité que nous aimerions connaître leurs idées?

M. Michael Levitt:

Je considère ce mois comme une source de grande fierté pour les communautés juives partout au pays.

Monsieur le député Ruimy, si je vous comprends bien, dans une petite ville où il n'y a pas de présence ou probablement pas de compréhension — l'ignorance découle souvent d'un manque de compréhension —, cela représente une excellente occasion pour les Juifs. Si nous pouvons amener l'équivalent de la fédération UJA à Vancouver, ou toute autre grande organisation, à mener des activités de sensibilisation dans les collectivités environnantes qui n'ont peut-être pas une infrastructure ou une présence juive, je crois qu'il s'agit d'une occasion merveilleuse d'éclairer les gens et de donner aux Juifs dans ces localités la chance de dire: « Voilà qui je suis. Voilà mon patrimoine. Voilà d'où je viens. J'en suis fier, et je veux que vous le compreniez. Je veux vous en parler. »

Quoi de plus beau qu'un tel dialogue? Oui, absolument.

L'hon. Linda Frum:

Je ne sais pas combien de temps vous passez sur Twitter. J'y consacre beaucoup trop de temps, j'en suis sûre. Quand on est une personne juive sur Twitter, on subit des attaques antisémites presque tous les jours — c'est la réalité.

J'ai l'impression que l'antisémitisme fait partie de ma vie quotidienne. Je me considère toutefois chanceuse, parce que j'appartiens à une grande communauté juive; je peux donc me sentir consolée, réconfortée et appuyée par les membres de ma communauté. Quand on vit dans une petite collectivité, je peux comprendre à quel point il pourrait être effrayant et intimidant de faire face au problème très réel de l'antisémitisme qui se manifeste tous les jours au Canada.

Il s'agit de faire cause commune, d'avoir un esprit de communauté et de comprendre pourquoi il faut être fier d'être juif. Je ne manque pas de l'annoncer. Voilà ma solution. Plus il y a de gens qui croient pouvoir me blesser, plus je leur fait clairement comprendre à quel point je suis fière de qui je suis et d'où je viens.

Le Mois du patrimoine juif est-il un moyen utile d'aider à promouvoir ces sentiments? Je l'espère bien. Le cas échéant, ce serait une excellente mesure.

M. Dan Ruimy:

J'en parle maintenant haut et fort. Nous avons organisé une soirée du sabbat en collaboration avec le centre de Vancouver. Les gens sont venus à Maple Ridge, et ils ont eu droit à une soirée magnifique. C'est alors qu'ils se sont rendu compte pour la première fois que les autres convives étaient juifs.

C'était une soirée fantastique. En tout cas, j'ai hâte d'appuyer le projet de loi à la Chambre.

Merci.

(1620)

Le vice-président (L'hon. Peter Van Loan):

Je tiens à vous remercier tous deux d'avoir témoigné aujourd'hui.

Je me contenterai de faire quelques observations sur ce qui a été dit, d'après ma propre expérience. J'ai grandi à York Mills, où la moitié des habitants sont de confession juive, et c'était, en grande partie, à l'ombre de la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Les membres de ma famille étaient des réfugiés de l'Estonie qui avaient connu une expérience parallèle. Bon nombre des membres de ma famille et de ma communauté — la communauté estonienne dans le goulag soviétique — ont perdu la vie là-bas. J'étais entouré d'enfants dont les familles avaient vécu des expériences similaires pendant l'Holocauste; il y avait donc un esprit de partage important, et nous avions beaucoup en commun.

J'ai écouté, avec intérêt, les commentaires sur Rosalie Abella. Ma grand-mère, qui m'a élevé en grande partie, était en fait une avocate dans les années 1920 en Estonie. Elle n'a pas pratiqué le droit ici, mais sa grand-mère était une Rosenberg, par la lignée maternelle, et il s'agit en l'occurrence d'une lignée maternelle directe; vous savez donc ce que cela signifie, du moins selon les loubavitchs, qui ne cessent de me persuader d'inscrire mon pauvre fils à une école juive. Pour l'instant, j'essaie simplement de l'amener à apprendre un peu de français. Si j'y parviens, j'en serai fort heureux.

En tout cas, j'ai vu des choses merveilleuses. J'ai déjà eu une stagiaire qui venait de Saskatoon, où l'on trouve une autre grande communauté. Elle n'était pas juive, mais elle avait créé un groupe de musiciens klezmer à son école secondaire, et ce groupe existe encore aujourd'hui.

Voici donc l'observation que j'aimerais faire sur la valeur du travail que vous accomplissez. Je songe à mon enfance, à une époque où nous devions surmonter des événements qui étaient assez immédiats. J'ai vu comment l'antisémitisme a largement disparu au sein de la collectivité et dans les autres localités que j'ai connues depuis.

En même temps, j'ai constaté l'émergence d'une nouvelle forme d'antisémitisme à d'autres endroits. Même s'il existe une plus grande compréhension, j'ai été témoin de différentes situations ici lorsque nous étions au pouvoir et que la guerre avait éclaté dans le sud du Liban; à l'époque, je siégeais au Comité des affaires étrangères. J'ai entendu des choses qui étaient, selon moi, impensables et que nous n'étions jamais censés entendre après les tragédies de l'Holocauste et de la Seconde Guerre mondiale.

Ce travail s'impose. On a parfois l'impression qu'il ne sera jamais terminé. Hélas, tel est le sort des Juifs, mais il s'agit d'un pas dans la bonne direction. Je vous félicite tous deux d'avoir présenté cette mesure législative, et je vous en remercie.

Je crois que cela met fin à notre séance d'aujourd'hui.

Oui, monsieur Vandal.

M. Dan Vandal (Saint-Boniface—Saint-Vital, Lib.):

Je crois comprendre que nous n'avons pas reçu un préavis suffisant pour l'étude du projet de loi article par article.

Le vice-président (L'hon. Peter Van Loan):

C'est exact. Il n'y a pas eu de préavis...

M. Dan Vandal:

J'aimerais proposer une motion demandant au greffier de faire tout le nécessaire pour que nous puissions procéder à une étude article par article à notre prochaine réunion.

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le vice-président (L'hon. Peter Van Loan):

Je suis maintenant prêt à accueillir une motion d'ajournement.

Monsieur Vandal.

M. Dan Vandal:

Mais avant, il y a quelques points à régler concernant la motion M-103.

Je sais que le rapport sera présenté au cours du mois de décembre, et je crois que nous pourrions peut-être demander à l'analyste de nous dire quand le rapport nous sera remis en vue de faire l'objet d'une discussion.

Le vice-président (L'hon. Peter Van Loan):

Les analystes ne sont pas ici. C'est le greffier qui répondra.

Le greffier du Comité (M. Michael MacPherson):

Oui, essentiellement, nous avons tenu une réunion de production avec les divers services qui participent à la production d'un rapport. Nous devrions être en mesure de recevoir le rapport et de le distribuer au Comité, au plus tôt, le 8 décembre.

Le rapport en est encore à l'étape de la rédaction. Une fois qu'il sera rédigé, nous le transmettrons aux services de traduction. Ces derniers ont une norme de service à respecter. Ils ne peuvent traduire qu'un certain nombre de mots par jour, et n'oublions pas qu'il s'agit d'une période occupée de l'année. Au fond, chaque comité essaie de faire publier un rapport. Après les services de traduction, le rapport est envoyé aux services de publication. Tout se déroule selon la procédure appropriée, et il n'y a vraiment rien d'autre à faire pour accélérer les choses à ce stade-ci.

M. Dan Vandal:

Je trouve tout simplement que le 8 décembre, c'est beaucoup trop loin. Il a déjà fallu deux semaines pour l'administration. Le 8, c'est au moins deux autres semaines. Y a-t-il moyen d'obtenir le rapport le 1er décembre?

Le greffier:

C'est vraiment indépendant de notre volonté. Le texte sera envoyé aux services de traduction le mardi. D'après ce que je crois comprendre, les rédacteurs y travailleront toute la fin de semaine afin de respecter ce délai. À moins que nous demandions aux analystes de ne plus poursuivre la rédaction et d'envoyer la version qui est déjà écrite, c'est-à-dire un rapport incomplet... et vous ne gagneriez que quelques jours en faisant cela.

Pour l'instant, cela échappe à notre contrôle. C'est tout simplement ainsi que se déroule le processus, et c'est le temps qu'il faut pour produire un rapport de cette longueur.

(1625)

Le vice-président (L'hon. Peter Van Loan):

Nous n'y pouvons rien.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Puis-je savoir quelle en sera la longueur approximative? C'est pourquoi je crois que nous devons vraiment demander à Erin de répondre.

Mme Erin Virgint (attachée de recherche auprès du comité):

Nous prévoyons entre 40 et 50 pages.

M. Scott Reid:

Cela exclut les recommandations.

Mme Erin Virgint:

Exactement.

M. Scott Reid:

Il s'agit essentiellement d'un résumé des témoignages, des principaux sujets, selon ce qui a été décrit lors de la réunion que vous avez tenue; vous avez proposé ou énoncé un plan éventuel, puis vous l'avez examiné. C'est ce dont il est question.

Mme Erin Virgint:

Oui, tout à fait.

M. Scott Reid:

Je reviens au greffier. Avez-vous dit que le plus tôt possible serait le 8 décembre, ou s'agit-il d'une date confirmée?

Le greffier:

Nous ne pouvons jamais dire que c'est garanti, mais quand nous avons tenu notre réunion de production, c'était la meilleure estimation de la date à laquelle nous pourrions obtenir le rapport. Tout le monde était d'accord pour dire que le 8 décembre serait un délai réaliste.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien. Je pose la question aux fins de planification. Le 8, c'est quel jour de la semaine?

Le vice-président (L'hon. Peter Van Loan):

C'est un vendredi.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est le vendredi avant la dernière semaine de séance précédant la relâche.

Le vice-président (L'hon. Peter Van Loan):

Voilà.

M. Scott Reid:

Nous tiendrons probablement deux réunions au cours desquelles nous pourrions étudier le contenu du rapport, si je comprends bien, à supposer que la Chambre s'ajourne à la date prévue. Est-ce exact?

M. Dan Vandal:

Oui, je regarde le calendrier.

À titre de précision, le rapport sera envoyé aux services de traduction, le mardi 28 novembre. Combien de temps faut-il pour le faire traduire?

Mme Erin Virgint:

On nous a dit qu'il faut 5 jours pour 40 pages.

M. Dan Vandal:

Nous en serons donc saisis après le 1er décembre. À voir ces échéances, nous risquons d'étudier le projet de loi en février, à moins que nous puissions réussir notre coup...

M. Scott Reid:

Ou en débattre à tout le moins... L'étude est déjà terminée. Ce n'est pas, me semble-t-il, une attente irréaliste.

Voici une question, si vous me le permettez.

Monsieur le président, je prends des libertés. Je devrais être...

Le vice-président (L'hon. Peter Van Loan):

En effet.

M. Scott Reid:

Puis-je...?

Le vice-président (L'hon. Peter Van Loan):

Oui. J'essaie d'éviter... La présidente nous a encouragés à discuter des travaux du Comité lors de cette réunion. J'essaie de respecter cela, mais je vais vous permettre de continuer.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

On nous propose le 8 décembre comme meilleur délai. C'est un vendredi. Supposons, pour les besoins de la cause, que le rapport soit prêt quelques jours plus tôt; nous pourrions alors organiser une réunion le 6 du mois, selon notre calendrier. Je ne veux pas vous mettre sur la sellette... Loin de moi l'idée de vous soutirer une promesse. Je cherche simplement à savoir si cela est possible ou non. Je suppose que ma question s'adresse au greffier puisqu'il s'occupe de tous les différents aspects.

Le greffier:

Je peux demander aux responsables des services si ce délai leur semble raisonnable, mais là encore, le rapport serait distribué le 6, ce qui signifie que les députés auraient très peu de temps pour en assimiler le contenu avant la tenue de la séance.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est vrai.

Le greffier:

Si tant est que nous le recevions le 6.

Le vice-président (L'hon. Peter Van Loan):

Je crois qu'il est clair pour tous ceux qui travaillent fort sur ce dossier que les membres du Comité sont impatients d'aller de l'avant le plus tôt possible, et je crois qu'on leur a fait passer le message.

Mme Erin Virgint:

Oui, nous en sommes bien conscients.

M. Dan Vandal:

Pouvez-vous demander... Désolé, monsieur le président, je prends des libertés, moi aussi.

Auriez-vous l'obligeance de demander, par l'entremise de la présidence, que le processus soit accéléré le plus possible?

Le greffier:

Oui, bien sûr.

L'hon. Peter Van Loan:

Il me faut une motion d'ajournement.

Merci, monsieur Reid.

(La motion est adoptée.)

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on November 22, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.