header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-05-28 ETHI 154

Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Bob Zimmer (Prince George—Peace River—Northern Rockies, CPC)):

We'll call to order the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics for meeting 154, an by extension, the international grand committee on big data, privacy and democracy.

I don't need to go through the list of countries that we have already mentioned, but I will go through our witnesses very briefly.

From the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada, we have Mr. Daniel Therrien, the Privacy Commissioner of Canada.

As an individual, we have Joseph A. Cannataci, special rapporteur on the right to privacy for the United Nations.

We are having some challenges with the live video feed from Malta. We'll keep working through that. I'm told by the clerk that we may have to go to an audio feed to get the conversation. We will do what we have to do.

Also we'd like to welcome the chair of the United States Federal Election Commission, Ellen Weintraub.

First of all, I would like to speak to the meeting's order and structure. It will be very similar to that of our first meeting this morning. We'll have one question per delegation. The Canadian group will have one from each party, and we'll go through until we run out of time with different representatives to speak to the issue.

I hope that makes sense. It will make sense more as we go along.

I would like to thank the members who came to our question period today. I personally thank the Speaker for recognizing the delegation.

I'll give Mr. Collins the opportunity for to open it up.

Mr. Collins.

Mr. Damian Collins (Chair, Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee, United Kingdom House of Commons):

Thank you.

Let me put my first question to all three of the witnesses.

The Chair:

Shall we have statements first?

Mr. Damian Collins:

Okay.

The Chair:

We'll have opening statements. We'll start with Mr. Therrien.

Go ahead for 10 minutes.

Mr. Daniel Therrien (Privacy Commissioner of Canada, Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Members of the grand committee, thank you for the invitation to address you today.

My remarks will address three points that I think go to the heart of your study: first, that freedom and democracy cannot exist without privacy and the protection of our personal information; second, that in meeting the risks posed by digital harms, such as disinformation campaigns, we need to strengthen our laws in order to better protect rights; lastly, I will share suggestions on what needs to be done in Canada, as I'm an expert in Canadian privacy regulation, so that we have 21st century laws in place to ensure that the privacy rights of Canadians are protected effectively.

I trust that these suggestions made in a Canadian context can also be relevant in an international context.

As you know, my U.K. counterpart, the Information Commissioner's Office, in its report on privacy and the political process, clearly found that lax privacy compliance and micro-targeting by political parties had exposed gaps in the regulatory landscape. These gaps in turn have been exploited to target voters via social media and to spread disinformation. [Translation]

The Cambridge Analytica scandal highlighted the unexpected uses to which personal information can be put and, as my office concluded in our Facebook investigation, uncovered a privacy framework that was actually an empty shell. It reminded citizens that privacy is a fundamental right and a necessary precondition for the exercise of other fundamental rights, including democracy. In fact, privacy is nothing less than a prerequisite for freedom: the freedom to live and develop independently as individuals, away from the watchful eye of surveillance by the state or commercial enterprises, while participating voluntarily and actively in the regular, day-to-day activities of a modern society.[English]

As members of this committee are gravely aware, the incidents and breaches that have now become all too common go well beyond matters of privacy as serious as I believe those to be. Beyond questions of privacy and data protection, democratic institutions' and citizens' very faith in our electoral process is now under a cloud of distrust and suspicion. The same digital tools like social networks, which public agencies like electoral regulators thought could be leveraged to effectively engage a new generation of citizens, are also being used to subvert, not strengthen, our democracies.

The interplay between data protection, micro-targeting and disinformation represents a real threat to our laws and institutions. Some parts of the world have started to mount a response to these risks with various forms of proposed regulation. I will note a few.

First, the recent U.K. white paper on digital harms proposes the creation of a digital regulatory body and offers a range of potential interventions with commercial organizations to regulate a whole spectrum of problems. The proposed model for the U.K. is to add a regulator agency for digital platforms that will help them develop specific codes of conduct to deal with child exploitation, hate propaganda, foreign election interference and other pernicious online harms.

Second, earlier this month, the Christchurch call to eliminate terrorist and violent extremist content online highlighted the need for effective enforcement, the application of ethical standards and appropriate co-operation.

Finally, just last week here in Canada, the government released a new proposal for an update to our federal commercial data protection law as well as an overarching digital charter meant to help protect privacy, counter misuse of data and help ensure companies are communicating clearly with users.

(1535)

[Translation]

Underlying all these approaches is the need to adapt our laws to the new realities of our digitally interconnected world. There is a growing realization that the age of self-regulation has come to an end. The solution is not to get people to turn off their computers or to stop using social media, search engines, or other digital services. Many of these services meet real needs. Rather, the ultimate goal is to allow individuals to benefit from digital services—to socialize, learn and generally develop as persons—while remaining safe and confident that their privacy rights will be respected.[English]

There are certain fundamental principles that I believe can guide government efforts to re-establish citizens' trust. Putting citizens and their rights at the centre of these discussions is vitally important, in my view, and legislators' work should focus on rights-based solutions.

In Canada, the starting point, in my view, should be to give the law a rights-based foundation worthy of privacy's quasi-constitutional status in this country. This rights-based foundation is applicable in many countries where their law frames certain privacy rights explicitly as such, as rights, with practices and processes that support and enforce this important right.

I think Canada should continue to have a law that is technologically neutral and principles based. Having a law that is based on internationally recognized principles, such as those of the OECD, is important for the interoperability of the legislation. Adopting an international treaty for privacy and data protection would be an excellent idea, but in the meantime, countries should aim to develop interoperable laws.

We also need a rights-based statute, meaning a law that confers enforceable rights to individuals while also allowing for responsible innovation. Such a law would define privacy in its broadest and truest sense, such as freedom from unjustified surveillance, recognizing its value in correlation to other fundamental rights.

Privacy is not limited to consent, access and transparency. These are important mechanisms, but they do not define the right itself. Codifying the right, in its broadest sense, along the principles-based and technologically neutral nature of the current Canadian law would ensure it can endure over time, despite the certainty of technological developments.

One final point I wish to make has to do with independent oversight. Privacy cannot be protected without independent regulators and the power to impose fines and to verify compliance proactively to ensure organizations are truly accountable for the protection of information.

This last notion, demonstrable accountability, is a needed response to today's world, where business models are opaque and information flows are increasingly complex. Individuals are unlikely to file a complaint when they are unaware of a practice that may harm them. This is why it is so important for the regulator to have the authority to proactively inspect the practices of organizations. Where consent is not practical or effective, which is a point made by many organizations in this day and age, and organizations are expected to fill the protective void through accountability, these organizations must be required to demonstrate true accountability upon request.

What I have presented today as solutions are not new concepts, but as this committee takes a global approach to the problem of disinformation, it's also an opportunity for domestic actors—regulators, government officials and elected representatives—to recognize what best practices and solutions are emerging and to take action to protect our citizens, our rights, and our institutions.

Thank you. I look forward to your questions.

(1540)

The Chair:

Thank you once again, Mr. Therrien.

We're going to double-check whether Mr. Cannataci is able to stream. No.

We'll go next to Ms. Weintraub for 10 minutes.

Ms. Ellen Weintraub (Chair, United States Federal Election Commission):

Thank you.

The Chair:

I'm sorry, Ms. Weintraub.

We just heard the comments. He's available to speak.

My apologies, Ms. Weintraub. I guess we have him on, so we'll go ahead.

Mr. Cannataci, go ahead for 10 minutes.

Professor Joseph A. Cannataci (Special Rapporteur on the Right to Privacy, United Nations, As an Individual):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair, and members of the grand committee, for the invitation to speak.

I will try to build on what Mr. Therrien has said in order to cover a few more points. I will also make some references to what other witnesses presented previously.

First, I will be trying to take a more international view, though the themes that are covered by the committee are very global in nature. That's why when it comes to global...the previous witness spoke about an international treaty. One of the reasons, as I will be explaining, that I have decided in my mandate at the United Nations to go through a number of priorities when it comes to privacy is that the general framework of privacy and data protection in law insofar as an international treaty is concerned, who regulates this, doesn't happen to be specifically a UN treaty. It happens to be convention 108 or convention 108+, which is already ratified by 55 nations across the world. Morocco was the latest one to present its document of ratification yesterday.

When people meet in Strasbourg or elsewhere to discuss the actions and interoperability within an international framework, there are already 70 countries, ratified states and observer states, that will discuss the framework afforded by that international legal instrument. I would indeed encourage Canada to consider adhering to this instrument. While I am not an expert on Canadian law, I have been following it since 1982. I think Canadian law is pretty close in most cases. I think it would be a welcome addition to that growing group of nations.

As for the second point that I wish to make, I'll be very brief on this, but I also share preoccupations about the facts on democracy and the fact that the Internet is being increasingly used in order to manipulate people's opinions through monitoring their profiles in a number of ways. The Cambridge Analytica case, of course, is the classic case we have for our consideration, but there are other cases too in a number of other countries around the world.

I should also explain that the six or seven priorities that I have set for my United Nations mandate to a certain extent summarize maybe not all, but many of the major problems that we are facing in the privacy and data protection field. The first priority should not surprise you, ladies and gentlemen, because it relates to the very reasons that my mandate was born, which is security and surveillance.

You would recall that my United Nations mandate was born in the aftermath of the Snowden revelations. It won't surprise you, therefore, that we have dedicated a great deal of attention internationally to security and surveillance. I am very pleased that Canada participates very actively in one of the fora, which is the International Intelligence Oversight Forum because, as the previous witness has just stated, oversight is a key element that should be addressed. I was also pleased to see some significant progress in the Canadian sphere over the past 12 to 24 months.

(1545)



There is a lot to be said about surveillance, but I don't have much left of my 10 minutes so I can perhaps respond to questions. What I will restrict myself to saying at this stage is that globally we see the same problems. In other words, we don't have a proper solution for jurisdiction. Issues of jurisdiction and definitions of offences remain some of the greatest problems we have, notwithstanding the existence of the Convention on Cybercrime. Security, surveillance and basically the growth of state-sponsored behaviour in cyberspace are still a glaring problem.

Some nations are not very comfortable talking about their espionage activities in cyberspace, and some treat it as their own backyard, but in reality, there is evidence that the privacy of hundreds of millions of people, not in just one country but around the world, has been subjected to intrusion by the state-sponsored services of one actor or another, including most of the permanent powers of the United Nations.

The problem remains one of jurisdiction and defining limits. We have prepared a draft legal instrument on security and surveillance in cyberspace, but the political mood across the world doesn't seem conducive to major discussions on those points. The result is that we have seen some unilateral action, for example, by the United States with its Cloud Act, which has not seen much take-up at this moment in time. However, regardless of whether unilateral action would work, I encourage discussion even on the principles of the Cloud Act. Even if it doesn't lead to immediate agreements, the very discussion will at least get people to focus on the problems that exist at that stage.

I will quickly pass to big data and open data. In the interests of the economy of time, I refer the committee to the report on big data and open data that I presented to the United Nations General Assembly in October 2018. Quite frankly, I would advise the committee to be very wary of joining the two in such a way that open data continues to be a bit like a mother with an apple pie when it comes to politicians proclaiming all the good it's going to do for the world. The truth is that in the principles of big data and open data, we are looking at key fundamental issues when it comes to privacy and data protection.

In Canadian law, as in the law of other countries, including the laws of all those countries that adhere to convention 108, the purpose specification principle that data should be collected and used only for a specified or compatible purpose lives on as a fundamental principle. It also lives on as a principle in the recent GDPR in Europe. However, we have to remember that in many cases, when one is using big data analytics, one is seeking to repurpose that data for a different purpose. Once again, I refer the committee to my report and the detailed recommendations there.

At this moment in time, I have out for consultation a document on health data. We are expecting to debate this document, together with recommendations, at a special meeting in France on June 11 and 12. I trust there will be a healthy Canadian presence at that meeting too. We've received many positive comments about the report. We're trying to build an existing consensus on health data, but I'd like to direct the committee's attention to how important health data is. Growing amounts of health data are being collected each and every day with the use of smart phones and Fitbits and other wearables, which are being used in a way that really wasn't thought about 15 or 20 years ago.

Another consultation paper I have out, which I would direct the committee's attention to, is on gender and privacy. I'm hoping to organize a public consultation. It has already started as an online consultation, but I am hoping to have a public meeting, probably in New York, on October 30 and 31. Gender and privacy continues to be a very important yet controversial topic, and it is one in which I would welcome continued Canadian contribution and participation.

(1550)



I think you would not be surprised if I were to say that among the five task forces I established, there is a task force on the use of personal data by corporations. I make it a point to meet with the major corporations, including Google, Facebook, Apple, Yahoo, but also some of the non-U.S. ones, including Deutsche Telekom, Huawei, etc., at least twice a year all together around a table in an effort to get their collaboration to find new safeguards and remedies for privacy, especially in cyberspace.

This brings me to the final point I'll mention for now. It's linked to the previous one on corporations and the use of personal data by corporations. It's the priority for privacy action.

I have been increasingly concerned about privacy issues, especially those affecting children as online citizens from a very early age. As the previous witness has borne witness, we are looking at some leading new and innovative legislation, such as that in the United Kingdom, not only the one on digital harms, but also one about age-appropriate behaviour and the liability of corporations. I am broaching these subjects formally next with the corporations at our September 2019 meeting. I look forward to being able to achieve some progress on the subject of privacy and children and on greater accountability and action from the corporations in a set of recommendations that we shall be devising during the next 12 to 18 months.

I'll stop here for now, Mr. Chair. I look forward to questions.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Cannataci.

We'll go now to Ms. Weintraub.

I just want to explain what the flashing lights are. In the Canadian Parliament the flashing lights signal that votes are to happen in about 30 minutes. We have an agreement among our parties that one member from each party will stay, and the rest are clear to go and vote. The meeting will continue with the rest of us. We won't stop. It isn't a fire alarm. We're good to go.

(1555)

Mr. Charlie Angus (Timmins—James Bay, NDP):

Being the only New Democrat, as The Clash would say, should I stay or should I go?

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

You probably should stay.

It's been cleared that we have one member for—

Mr. Charlie Angus:

If I leave, you're not taking one of my seats.

The Chair:

I just wanted to make it clear that's what's going on.

We'll go to Ms. Weintraub now for 10 minutes.

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

Thank you, Mr. Chair and members of the committee.

I am the chair of the Federal Election Commission in the United States. I represent a bipartisan body, but the views that I'm going to express are entirely my own.

I'm going to shift the topic from privacy concerns to influence campaigns.

In March of this year, special counsel Robert S. Mueller III completed his report on the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Its conclusions were chilling. The Russian government interfered in the 2016 presidential election in sweeping and systemic fashion. First, a Russian entity carried out a social media campaign that favoured one presidential candidate and disparaged the other. Second, a Russian intelligence service conducted computer intrusion operations against campaign entities, employees and volunteers, and then released stolen documents.

On April 26, 2019, at the Council on Foreign Relations, FBI director Christopher A. Wray warned of the aggressive, unabated, malign foreign influence campaign consisting of “the use of social media, fake news, propaganda, false personas, etc., to spin us up, pit us against each other, sow divisiveness and discord, and undermine Americans' faith in democracy. That is not just an election cycle threat; it's pretty much a 365-days-a-year threat. And that has absolutely continued.”

While he noted that “enormous strides have been made since 2016 by all different federal agencies, state and local election officials, the social media companies, etc.,” to protect the physical infrastructure of our elections, he said, “I think we recognize that our adversaries are going to keep adapting and upping their game. And so we're very much viewing 2018 as just kind of a dress rehearsal for the big show in 2020.”

Last week, at the House of Representatives, a representative of the Department of Homeland Security also emphasized that Russia and other foreign countries, including China and Iran, conducted influence activities in the 2018 mid-terms and messaging campaigns that targeted the United States to promote their strategic interests.

As you probably know, election administration in the United States is decentralized. It's handled at the state and local levels, so other officials in the United States are charged with protecting the physical infrastructure of our elections, the brick-and-mortar electoral apparatus run by state and local governments, and it is vital that they continue to do so.

However, from my seat on the Federal Election Commission, I work every day with another type of election infrastructure, the foundation of our democracy, the faith that citizens have that they know who's influencing our elections. That faith has been under malicious attack from our foreign foes through disinformation campaigns. That faith has been under assault by the corrupting influence of dark money that may be masking illegal foreign sources. That faith has been besieged by online political advertising from unknown sources. That faith has been damaged through cyber-attacks against political campaigns ill-equipped to defend themselves on their own.

That faith must be restored, but it cannot be restored by Silicon Valley. Rebuilding this part of our elections infrastructure is not something we can leave in the hands of the tech companies, the companies that built the platforms now being abused by our foreign rivals to attack our democracies.

In 2016, fake accounts originating in Russia generated content that was seen by 126 million Americans on Facebook, and another 20 million Americans on Instagram, for a total of 146 million Americans; and there were only 137 million voters in that election.

As recently as 2016, Facebook was accepting payment in rubles for political ads about the United States elections.

As recently as last year, in October 2018, journalists posing as every member of the United States Senate tried to place ads in their names on Facebook. Facebook accepted them all.

Therefore, when the guys on the other panel keep telling us they've got this, we know they don't.

By the way, I also invited Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey, all those guys, to come and testify at a hearing at my commission when we were talking about Internet disclosure of advertising, and once again, they didn't show up. They didn't even send a surrogate that time; they just sent us written comments, so I feel for you guys.

(1600)



This is plainly really important to all of us. In the United States, spending on digital political ads went up 260% from 2014 to 2018, from one mid-term election to the next, for a total of $900 million in digital advertising in the 2018 election. That was still less than was spent on broadcast advertising, but obviously digital is the wave of the future when it comes to political advertising.

There have been constructive suggestions and proposals in the United States to try to address this: the honest ads act, which would subject Internet ads to the same rules as broadcast ads; the Disclose Act, which would broaden the transparency and fight against dark money; and at my own agency I've been trying to advance a rule that would improve disclaimers on Internet advertising. All of those efforts so far have been stymied.

Now, we have been actually fortunate that the platforms have tried to do something. They have tried to step up, in part, I'm sure, to try to ward off regulation, but in part to respond to widespread dissatisfaction with the information and the disclosure they were providing. They have been improving, in the United States at least, the way they disclose who's behind their ads, but it's not enough. Questions keep coming up, such as about what triggers the requirement to post the disclaimer.

Can the disclaimers be relied upon to honestly identify the sources of the digital ads? Based on the study about the 100 senators ads, apparently they cannot, not all the time, anyway. Does the identifying information travel with the content when information is forwarded? How are the platforms dealing with the transmission of encrypted information? Peer-to-peer communication represents a burgeoning field for political activity, and it raises a whole new set of potential issues. Whatever measures are adopted today run the serious risk of targeting the problems of the last cycle, not the next one, and we know that our adversaries are constantly upping their game, as I said, and constantly improvising and changing their strategies.

I also have serious concerns about the risks of foreign money creeping into our election system, particularly through corporate sources. This is not a hypothetical concern. We recently closed an enforcement case that involved foreign nationals who managed to funnel $1.3 million into the coffers of a super PAC in the 2016 election. This is just one way that foreign nationals are making their presence and influence felt even at the highest levels of our political campaigns.

These kinds of cases are increasingly common, and these kinds of complaints are increasingly common in the United States. From September 2016 to April 2019, the number of matters before the commission that include alleged violations of the foreign national ban increased from 14 to 40, and there were 32 open matters as of April 1 of this year. This is again an ongoing concern when it comes to foreign influence.

As everything you've heard today demonstrates, serious thought has to be given to the impact of social media on our democracy. Facebook's originating philosophy of “move fast and break things”, cooked up 16 years ago in a college dorm room, has breathtaking consequences when the thing they're breaking could be our democracies themselves.

Facebook, Twitter, Google, these and other technology giants have revolutionized the way we access information and communicate with each other. Social media has the power to foster citizen activism, virally spread disinformation or hate speech and shape political discourse.

Government cannot avoid its responsibility to scrutinize this impact. That's why I so welcome the activities of this committee and appreciate very much everything you're doing, which has carryover effects in my country, even when we can't adopt our own regulations when you all adopt regulations in other countries. Sometimes the platforms maintain the same policies throughout the world, and that helps us. Thank you very much

Also, thank you very much for inviting me to participate in this event. I welcome your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Weintraub.

First of all we'll go to Mr. Collins.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Thank you. My first question is for Ellen Weintraub.

You mentioned dark money in your opening statement. How concerned are you about the ability of campaigns to use technology, particularly blockchain technology, to launder impermissible donations to campaigns by turning them into multiple, small micro-donations?

(1605)

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

I'm very concerned about it, in part because our entire system of regulation is based on the assumption that large sums of money are what we need to worry about and that this is where we should focus our regulatory activity. On the Internet, however, sometimes very small amounts of money can be used to have vast impact, and that doesn't even get into the possibility of Bitcoin and other technologies being used to entirely mask where the money is coming from.

So yes, I have deep concerns.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Have there been any particular examples that have come to the awareness of your commission?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

The problem with dark money is that you never really know who is behind it. There has been about a billion dollars in dark money spent on our elections in the last 10 years, and I cannot tell you who is behind it. That's the nature of the darkness.

Mr. Damian Collins:

I just wondered whether any particular allegations had been made, or whether there had been cause for any further investigation about what might be considered to be suspicious activity.

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

We have a constant stream of complaints about dark money. The case I just described to you is one of the foremost examples we've seen recently. It can be money that comes in through LLCs or 501(c)(4)s. In this case, it came in through the domestic subsidiary of a foreign corporation.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Do you have any concerns about the way technologies like PayPal could be used as well to bring money in from sources trying to hide their identity or even from abroad?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

PayPal, gift cards and all of those things are deeply concerning. If the money is going directly to a campaign, they can't accept more than a small amount of money without disclosing the source of it, and they're not allowed to accept anonymous contributions above a very small amount of money. However, once you get into the outside spending groups—super PACs and groups like that—they can accept money from corporations, which by definition are a shield against knowing who is really behind them.

Mr. Damian Collins:

I'd be interested in the comments of all three of the witnesses in response to my next question.

Ad transparency seems to be one of the most important things we should push for. Certainly in the U.K., and I think in other countries as well, our electoral law was based on understanding who the messenger was. People had to state who was paying for the advert and who the advert was there to promote. Those same rules didn't translate into social media.

Even though the platforms are saying they will require that transparency, it seems, particularly in the case of Facebook, quite easy to game. The person who claims to be the person responsible for the ads may not be the person who is the data controller or the funder. That information isn't really clear.

I wonder if you share our concerns about that, and if you have any thoughts about what sort of legislation we might need to make sure there is full, proper disclosure as to who is funding campaigns.

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

I absolutely share that concern. Part of the problem, as far as I know, is that they're not verifying who is behind the ad. If somebody says Mickey Mouse is the sponsor of this ad, that's what they're going to run on their platform.

Mr. Damian Collins:

I'd be interested in hearing from the other two panellists as well, whether they have any concern regarding how we would create a robust system of ad transparency online.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

I would add that to reduce the risk of misuse of information in the political process, you need to have a series of laws. In Canada and a number of other countries, such as the United States, political parties, at least federally in Canada, are not governed by privacy legislation. That's another gap in the laws of certain countries.

You need a series of measures, including transparency in advertising, data protection laws and other rules, to ensure that the ecosystem of companies and political parties is properly governed.

Mr. Damian Collins:

It sounds like the heart of it is having regulators who have statutory powers to go into the tech companies and investigate whether they feel the appropriate information is being disclosed.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

We can investigate companies in Canada, but we cannot investigate political parties. A proper regime would authorize a regulator to have oversight over both.

Mr. Damian Collins:

That would be both parties and the platforms that are providing the advertising.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

Yes.

Mr. Damian Collins:

I don't know if the audio feed to Malta is working.

Prof. Joseph A. Cannataci:

The audio feed is working, thank you, Mr. Collins. I thank you also for the work you've put in on your report, which I must say I found to be extremely useful for my mandate.

Very quickly, I share the concerns of both the previous witnesses. The importance of who the messenger was is very, very great when it comes to ad transparency. I share serious concerns about the use of blockchain and other distributed ledger technologies. Frankly, not enough research has been carried out at this moment in time to enable us to examine the issues concerned.

I happen to live in a country that has proclaimed itself the blockchain island, and we have some efforts going on with legislation on blockchain, but I'm afraid there is still a lot of work to be done around the world on this subject. If at all possible, I would suggest that the committee lend its name to some serious resources in studying the problem and coming up with proper recommendations.

(1610)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Cannataci.

We're over time and we have some members who need to go to a vote. Therefore, I need to get to Ms. Vandenbeld as soon as I can.

I will try to get back around if you need a more fulsome answer.

Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you very much for being here and for your very informative testimony.

I'd like to focus my questions on the foreign threats to democracy and what I call the enabling technologies: the social media platforms, the “data-opolies” that are allowing for those foreign threats to actually take hold.

I note that, as legislators, we are the front lines of democracy globally. If those of us who are elected representatives of the people are not able to tackle this and do something about these threats.... This is really up to us and that's why I'm so pleased that the grand committee is meeting today.

I also note the co-operation that even our committee was able to have with the U.K. committee on AggregateIQ, which was here in Canada when we were studying Cambridge Analytica and Facebook.

However, we do have a problem, which is that individual countries, especially smaller markets, are very easily ignored by these large platforms, because simply, they're so large that individually there is not much we can do. Therefore, we do need to work together.

Ms. Weintraub, do you believe that right now you have the tools you need to ensure that the 2020 U.S. election will be free, or as free as possible, of foreign influence?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

I hesitate to answer that question. As I said in my testimony, there are various laws that I wish Congress would pass. There are regulations that I wish I could persuade my colleagues on the commission to agree to pass.

I think we are not in as good shape as we could be, but I do know that the Department of Homeland Security and all the state and local governments have been working very hard on ensuring the physical infrastructure, to try to ensure that votes don't get changed, which of course is the biggest fear.

When it comes to foreign influence, as our FBI director said, we are expecting our adversaries to be changing up their game plan, and until we see it, we won't know whether we're ready for it.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

In Canada, one of the issues is that during an election campaign it's very hard to know who has the authority to be able to speak out, so we've put together the critical election incident public protocol, which is a group of senior civil servants who would be able to make public if it's known through the security agencies that there is, in fact, a foreign threat.

Has the U.S. looked at something such as that? Is it something that you think would work internationally?

Mr. Cannataci, I would ask you to also answer that in terms of the global context. I wonder if you're seeing things that could potentially, during an election period, allow for that type of authority to be able to speak out on that.

I'll start with Ms. Weintraub and then go to Mr. Cannataci.

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

I do think that authority is there. I think there are federal officials who are empowered to make that type of information public if they become aware of it, as they become aware of it. There are obviously national security and intelligence concerns that sometimes hamper that type of transparency.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Mr. Cannataci, you mentioned that there are international treaties of sorts on data and privacy protection, but is there a clearing house of sorts of international best practice?

We're finding in this committee alone that there are very good examples that we're sharing, but is there any place where these best practices are being shared and tested, and documented and disseminated?

(1615)

Prof. Joseph A. Cannataci:

Not to my knowledge. We have coming up two United Nations committees, at least one of which might be discussing ancillary subjects. There is the so-called open-ended working group inside the UN, which will start working probably in the autumn, where you might be tempted to broach the subject.

I would, however, be pleased to work together with the committee in order to devise any sets of mechanisms that can be shared on good practices, because most of the attempts we have seen in manipulating elections involve profiling individuals in one area or another and then targeting them in order to get their votes.

I'd be very pleased to carry out work, together with the committee, in that direction, and anybody who wishes to share good practices is very welcome to do so.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Vandenbeld. That's your time.

We'll go over to Mr. Angus for five minutes.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for appearing, Ms. Weintraub.

You Americans are like our first cousins, and we love you dearly, but we're a little smug, because we look over the border and see all this crazy stuff and say we'd never do that in Canada. I will therefore give you the entire history of electoral fraud and interference in Canada in the last 10 years.

We had a 20-year-old who was working for the Conservatives who got his hands on some phone numbers and sent out wrong information on voting day. He was jailed.

We had a member of this committee who got his cousins to help pay an electoral paying scheme. He lost his seat in Parliament and went to jail.

We had a cabinet minister who cheated on 8,000 dollars' worth of flights in an election and went over the limit. He lost his position in cabinet and lost his seat.

These situations have consequences, and yet we see wide open data interference now for which we don't seem to have any laws, or we're seemingly at a loss and are not sure how to tackle it.

I can tell you that in 2015 I began to see it in the federal election, and it was not noticed at all at the national level. It was intense anti-Muslim, anti-immigrant women material that up-ended the whole election discourse in our region. It was coming from Britain First, an extremist organization. How working-class people in my region were getting this stuff, I didn't understand.

I understand now, however, how fast the poison moves in the system, how easy it is to target individuals, how the profiles and the data profiles of our individual voters can be manipulated.

When the federal government has new electoral protection laws, they may be the greatest laws for the 2015 election, but that was like stage coach robberies compared with what we will see in our upcoming election, which will probably be testing some of the ground for the 2020 election.

In terms of this massive movement in the tools of undermining democratic elections, how do we put in in place the tools to take on these data mercenaries who can target us right down to individual voters each with their own individual fears?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

I don't even know how to begin to answer that question.

Obviously Canada has a different system from ours in the United States. I don't always agree with the way our Supreme Court interprets the First Amendment, but it has provided extremely strong protections for free speech rights, and that has ramifications in the area of technology, in the area of dark money, in the area of money and politics.

If it were up to me, I think they would veer a little bit more toward the Canadian model, but I don't have control over that.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Mr. Therrien, I will go to you.

It was your predecessor, Elizabeth Denham, who identified the Facebook weakness in 2008 and attempted to have them comply. If they had done so, we might have avoided so many issues. Now, in 2019, we have you making a finding in the rule of law under your jurisdiction that Facebook broke our information protection act.

What has been very disturbing is that Facebook has simply refused to recognize the jurisdiction of our country, based on our supposed necessity to prove to them whether or not harm was caused.

I'm not sure whether you heard Mr. Chan's testimony today, but in terms of the rights of democratic legislators to ensure that laws are protected, how do we address a company that believes it can pick and choose, opt in or opt out, among national laws?

(1620)

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

You refer to the findings of my predecessors 10 years ago. It's certainly disconcerting that practices that were identified 10 years ago and were said to have been corrected by better privacy policies and better information to users were not actually corrected. There were superficial improvements, in our view, but in effect, the privacy protections of Facebook 10 years after the investigation of the OPC are still very ineffective.

On the jurisdictional argument, I believe the argument of the company is that because Canadians were not personally affected in terms of the ultimate misuse of the information for political purposes, this somehow results in the lack of jurisdiction for my office. Actually, however, what we looked at was not limited to the impact of these privacy practices on the Canadian political process. We looked at the sum total of the privacy regulatory scheme of Facebook as it applies not only to one third party application but all third party applications, of which there are millions.

I'm certainly very concerned that Facebook is saying that we do not have jurisdiction, when we were looking at the way in which Facebook handled the personal information of Canadians vis-à-vis millions of applications and not only one application.

How do you ensure that Facebook or other companies heed the jurisdiction of Canada? Well, based on the legal regime that we have, we are left with the possibility of bringing Facebook to the Canadian Federal Court—and this is what we will do—to have a ruling on Facebook's practices, including whether it is subject to our jurisdiction. We don't have much doubt that they are subject to our jurisdiction, but it will take a court finding to decide that question.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Finally—

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Angus. You're out of time.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

My watch says it's four minutes and 53 seconds.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

We'll have some more time around the hop, so I'd better get going here.

We'll go next to Singapore for five minutes.

Mr. Tong.

Mr. Edwin Tong (Senior Minister of State, Ministry of Law and Ministry of Health, Parliament of Singapore):

Thank you.

Ms. Weintraub, thank you very much for being here. In September 2017 you wrote a letter to the then chairman of the FEC. I'll just quote one paragraph from it and ask you some questions. You said, “It is imperative that we update the Federal Election Commission's regulations to ensure that the American people know who is paying for the Internet political communications they see.”

Am I right to assume that your concerns arise from the fact that foreign activity influences, interferes with, and even corrupts political communication, not just in an election but in the everyday life of people in a democratic society, and that if left unchecked over time such activity would seek to undermine institutions and the government, subvert elections and ultimately destroy democracy?

Would I be right to say that?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

I share many of those concerns and I worry deeply that what is going on is not just election-oriented but is an attempt to sow discord, to sow chaos and to undermine democracy in many countries.

Mr. Edwin Tong:

In fact, would you agree that the typical modus operandi of such bad actors would be precisely to sow discord on socially decisive issues; to take up issues that split open fault lines in society so that institutions and ultimately governments are undermined?

(1625)

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

I believe that is so.

Mr. Edwin Tong:

You mentioned earlier the tech companies. I think you said that their answer to you was, “We've got this.” Obviously, that's far from the case. You also said it's obvious that they were not verifying the persons behind the advertisements and the donations.

Are you aware of the Campaign for Accountability, the CFA?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

I can't say that I am; I'm sorry.

Mr. Edwin Tong:

Sometime, I think, after you released Robert Mueller's findings, a non-profit organization called Campaign for Accountability posed as IRA operators, bought political ads and did so very easily. They were able to effectively get Google to run a whole series of advertisements and campaigns for a little less than $100 U.S. and they managed to get something like 20,000 views and more than 200 clicks with that kind of spending.

Is that something that would concern you, and should regulations deal with that kind of obvious foreign activity that also shows that media platforms cannot be trusted to police?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

I absolutely think there is a need for greater regulation to ensure that when people see things on social media, they can trust where it's coming from.

Mr. Edwin Tong:

Yes.

On the regulations that you spoke of, from the quote that I read to you, could you maybe, in 30 seconds, tell us what you think should be the core principles behind such regulations to stop the influence and corruption of foreign interference in democratic processes?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

Well, as I said, I think what we need is greater transparency. When people are reading something online, they need to be able to know where it's coming from.

We had this example of ads and information being placed, propaganda, coming from the Internet Research Agency in Russia. I don't know anybody who wants to get their news from a Russian troll farm. I think if they knew that was where it was coming from, that would tell them something about how much to believe it.

Mr. Edwin Tong:

Yes, because ultimately, false information is not free speech, is it?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

People need to know where the information is coming from, and then they can draw better conclusions.

Mr. Edwin Tong:

Yes. Thank you.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll go next to Ms. Naughton from Ireland.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton (Chair, Joint Committee on Communications, Climate Action and Environment, Houses of the Oireachtas):

My first question will be for Mr. Cannataci. It's in relation to legislation we're looking at in Ireland, which could ultimately apply at a European level. It's an online digital safety commissioner. One of the key challenges our committee is having in relation to drawing this legislation is the definition about what is harmful communication. I don't know if you could assist us. Is there a best practice or best way of going about that?

We're also legislating ultimately at a European level, and as we know, we need to protect freedom of speech and freedom of expression. Those issues have been raised here. Have you any comments to make in relation to that?

Prof. Joseph A. Cannataci:

The short answer is, yes, I would be happy to assist you. We are setting up a task force precisely on privacy and children and online harm. It's a very difficult subject, especially because some of the terminology that has been used is not very clear, including the use of words such as “age appropriate”.

For most kids around the world, there's no such thing as one age being associated with a given level of maturity. Kids develop at different ages. The type of harm that they can receive really needs to be better studied. In fact, there are very few studies, unfortunately, on this subject. There are some studies, but not enough.

I would certainly welcome a joint European, Irish, and indeed, international approach on the subject, because this is something that goes across borders, so thank you for that.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton:

Thank you very much. I think that's a common concern here around the table in relation to that definition.

I might ask the Privacy Commissioner, Mr. Therrien, in relation to GDPR, do you have any viewpoints on how that's working?

As you know, Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg has called for GDPR to be rolled out on a global level. I'd like your own comments, from your own professional background.

It is quite new. As you know, it has been rolled out at a European level. What are your viewpoints on that, how it's working, and Mr. Zuckerberg's call for that to be rolled out, even on a modified level, from country to country?

(1630)

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

The GDPR is still relatively new, so in terms of how it is working, I think we'll need to wait a bit longer to see what its impact is in practice. I certainly believe that the principles of the GDPR are good ones; they're good practices. I believe that individual countries obviously should seek to have the most effective privacy and data protection possible and borrow from other jurisdictions rules that have that impact.

In my opening statement, I mentioned interoperability. In addition, it's important that the national laws, although interoperable and borrowing from good principles such as the GDPR, are also aligned and informed by the culture and traditions of each country. There might be differences in certain jurisdictions, say, on the various weight or the relative weight of freedom of expression versus data protection, but GDPR is an excellent starting point.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton:

Okay, thank you.

I think those are my questions.

The Chair: You have one minute.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton: Do you want to ask a question?

Mr. James Lawless (Member, Joint Committee on Communications, Climate Action and Environment, Houses of the Oireachtas):

Thanks.

Chair, if it's okay, I'll just use the last minute, but I'll come in on the second round again for my five minutes.

The Chair:

Yes, you bet.

Mr. James Lawless:

Ms. Weintraub, it was interesting to listen to your analysis of what happened in the recent elections, and I suppose particularly of nation-states' influence.

One thing that I think is common is that it's not necessarily that they favour one candidate over another, but—it seems to be a common theme—that they favour dissent and, I suppose, weakening western democracies. I think we saw that arguably in Brexit as well as in the U.S. elections. How do we combat that?

I have drafted legislation similar to the honest ads act, the social media transparency act, with very similar objectives. One question, and I'll come back to it in the second round, is about how we actually enforce that type of legislation. Is the onus on the publishers or is it on the platform?

We heard somebody mention that they had successfully run fake ads from the 100 U.S. senators or members of the House of Representatives or whatever it was. Should it be the platforms that are liable for ensuring that the correct disclosure and disclaimers and verification are performed? They say back to us that they can't possibly do that. Do we, then, make the people who are running the ads liable, or do we make the people who are taking out the ads liable, if you understand the distinction?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

Historically what we do in the States is put the onus on whoever is placing the ads to make sure that their disclaimers and disclosure obligations are fulfilled. It seems to me, though, that we could take advantage of the vaunted machine learning AI capabilities of these platforms. If the machines can detect that the name on the ad bears no relation at all to the source of the payment, you would think they could have a human being take a look at it and say, “Hey, let's just make sure we have the right name here on the ad.”

It's not the way our laws work right now, though.

The Chair:

Next up for five minutes is Mr. Zimmermann from Germany.

Mr. Jens Zimmermann (Social Democratic Party, Parliament of the Federal Republic of Germany):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I would first start with Mr. Cannataci and would focus on international co-operation.

We brought up earlier here that on an international level, co-operation is needed. This is also the idea behind our meeting here. Where, though, do you see forums for co-operation in these areas? We'll have, for example, the Internet Governance Forum, which is a multi-stakeholder approach on the UN level, this year in Germany.

Do you see any other approaches?

(1635)

Prof. Joseph A. Cannataci:

Thank you for that question, Mr. Zimmermann.

The Internet Governance Forum is a useful place to meet and talk, but we must be very careful not to let it remain just a talking show. The problem is that it is a forum in which many interesting ideas are heard but very little governance takes place. At this moment in time, the states unfortunately tend to dodge the responsibility of providing actual governance.

I think what we're going to see, and I think the companies feel this coming—some of them have half-admitted it—is countries getting together, including the European Parliament that has just been elected, and increasingly using measures that will focus attention.

Nothing focuses attention like money. The GDPR approach, which has been referred to, has companies around the world paying close attention, because nobody wants to be stuck with a bill of 4% of their global turnover. I think that this is one measure that will help introduce liability and responsibility. To come to the previous question, I think it will also focus attention on platforms at least as much as publishers, because as somebody said, sometimes it's difficult to detect whether the publisher was the right person.

Mr. Jens Zimmermann:

Thank you very much.

The enforcement question would have been my follow-up, but you already answered. Thank you.

I would also ask Ms. Weintraub one question.

We have mentioned many times now trolls and troll farms, and we're focusing very much on advertisements. What about homegrown trolls? We've seen to a certain degree also in Germany that especially on the far right there are activists who are really trolls on steroids. You don't have to pay them; they do this because they want to support their political affiliates.

They're also using tools whereby, in the dark, they decide to focus on such-and-such member of Parliament, attacking him or her, or simply supporting every post done by a member of a party. They are simply making the most out of the algorithms, and they don't need any money for it

Do you have that also on the radar?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

I think you raise another very serious question. We have seen this in the States, that some of the techniques that were pioneered by foreign activists are now being adopted by domestic activists because they've seen that they work. It has the same kind of concerning effect as promoting discord, and hate speech sometimes, and gathering from the crevices of the community people who have views that in isolation might not have much power but that, when they are able to find each other online and promote these ideas, become much more concerning.

We don't have good tools to go after that, because it's easy to say, if it's foreigners, that they're trying to intervene in our election, and we know that's not a good thing. When it's our own people, though, it's a bigger challenge.

The Chair:

You have about 30 seconds.

Mr. Jens Zimmermann:

I'll raise maybe one last aspect.

We have a lot of regulation of the media, what is allowed for a TV station, for a radio station, but in Germany right now we have a lot of debate about YouTube, people who basically have more of an audience than many TV stations but are not regulated at all.

Is that something you are also seeing?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

We certainly have the phenomenon of influencers. I don't spend a lot of time on YouTube myself, and when I see some of these folks, I'm really not sure why they have this kind of influence and sway, but they do.

It goes back to the model that we have. The model of regulation in the United States is a money-based model. When we began to address political activity on the Internet, it was at a point when YouTube was in its infancy and the governing assumption was that of course somebody would have to pay to put these ads up in order for anybody to see them. Now we're dealing in a whole different world in which all this free content is up there and it goes viral. There are very few controls on that.

(1640)

The Chair:

Thank you.

We're going to get back to our parliamentarians, now that they've returned from voting.

We'll go to Mr. Kent for five minutes.

Hon. Peter Kent (Thornhill, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

My first question is for Commissioner Therrien and is related to the revelation in the government's response to an Order Paper question regarding discriminatory advertising for employment, on a number of platforms, it seems, but certainly Facebook was mentioned, in which a number of departments had requested micro-targeting advertising by sex and age.

Mr. Chan, the CEO of Facebook Canada, responded that yes, that was the case but protocols have changed, although there was a certain imprecision or ambiguity in his responses. He said that the Government of Canada has been advised that it is not only unacceptable but quite possibly illegal under various human rights legislation across the country.

Could I have your response, Commissioner?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

I think this shows the importance of having regulations that are human rights based. Here we have a practice that allegedly resulted or could result in discrimination. I think it's important that the regulations look at the net effect of a practice and deal with it from a human rights perspective.

In terms of privacy, we tend to look at privacy or data protection as rules around consent and specification of purpose and so forth. I think Cambridge Analytica raised the issue of the close relationship between privacy protection, data protection and the exercise of fundamental rights, including, in the case of your example, equality rights.

I think that for the types of laws for which I'm responsible in Canada, by defining privacy not with regard to important mechanisms such as consent, for instance, but with regard to the fundamental rights that are protected by privacy, we would have a more effective and more fulsome protection.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Okay.

The question for you, Ms. Weintraub, is on the discussion we had with Facebook this morning with regard to the Pelosi altered video and the statement that Facebook made to the Washington Post saying,“We don't have a policy that...the information you post on Facebook must be true.”

Clearly, this is a case of political maliciousness. It is not an election year, but certainly it is tainting the well of democracy and obviously targeting one political leader's reputation and political leadership. I'm wondering what your thoughts are with regard to the Facebook argument.

They will take down a video by someone posting the truth who is falsely posting, but they will leave up the video placed by someone who is obviously quite willing to say that they put the video up and simply to put an advisory that it doesn't seem to be the truth, even though, in the Pelosi case, that manipulated video has been seen by many millions of viewers since the controversy developed, which again feeds the business plan of Facebook with regard to clicks and number of views.

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

Well, I heard a lot of dissatisfaction voiced this morning about the answer that Facebook gave. I have to say that I also found their answer to be somewhat unsatisfactory, but it raises a really important question. I mean, in this case they know it's not true, but the broader question is, who is going to be the arbiter of truth?

Personally, I don't want that responsibility, and I think it's dangerous when government takes on that responsibility of deciding what is true and what isn't. That really veers more into the Orwellian, more authoritarian governance. I don't think I would feel comfortable either being that person or living in a regime where government had that power, but if government doesn't have that power, then the question is, who does? I'm also uncomfortable with the platforms having that much power over determining what is truth and what isn't.

(1645)

Hon. Peter Kent:

If that were to occur in an election cycle, what would your response be?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

In election cycles, we have various regulations that govern ads, if indeed it is paid advertising and if it mentions candidate names. Every member of the House of Representatives runs every two years. I suppose that for a member of the House of Representatives they are always in cycle, but we have stronger rules that govern once we get closer to the election. Within 30 days of a primary or 60 days of a general election, there are rules, again, that go to disclosure, though. We don't have any rules that would empower my agency to order a platform to take down an ad.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Weintraub.

Some of the membership of the committee are not going to ask questions, so we have a bit more time than you might expect. If you do want to ask another question, please signal the chair, and I'll add you in at the end of the sequence.

Next up, we have the member from Estonia.

Go ahead.

Ms. Keit Pentus-Rosimannus (Vice-Chairwoman, Reform Party, Parliament of the Republic of Estonia (Riigikogu)):

Thank you.

Ms. Weintraub, I have a question for you.

Disinformation is officially part of Russia's military doctrine. It has been so for some time already. They are using it as a strategy to divide the west, basically. It is also known that Russia uses 1.1 billion euros per year for their propaganda and spreading their narratives.

Your next presidential elections are practically tomorrow. Knowing the things we now know about the last campaigning period, are you ready today? If what happened during the previous campaign would reappear, and if all the same things would happen again, do you think that now you would be able to solve it?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

I'm not going to claim that I can personally solve the problem of disinformation in our elections. As I mentioned earlier, I think there are laws and regulations that have been drafted and should be adopted that would strengthen our position.

I also think that we, writ large, need to devote more attention to digital literacy. A lot of people believe all sorts of things that they see online and that they really shouldn't. My daughter tells me that this is generational, that her generation is much more skeptical of what they read online and that it's only my foolish generation that views the Internet as this novelty and assumes that everything they read is true.

I don't know that I entirely agree that it's entirely a generational problem, but I do think that we, as a whole, as the broader community of democracies, really need to look into what our resiliency is to the kind of disinformation that we know is going to be out there.

As I said, we're always fighting the last battle, so we can write laws to address what happened last time, but I'm quite sure that in the next election new techniques are going to be developed that nobody's even thinking about yet.

Ms. Keit Pentus-Rosimannus:

Can you say what are the two main threats you are preparing for?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

My agency is all about regulating money in politics. That is our focus, so we are trying to look at where the money is coming from. That is what we're always looking at. We're trying to get better transparency measures in place so that our voters and our electorate will better know where the money is coming from and who is trying to influence them. That's really my number one priority.

Ms. Keit Pentus-Rosimannus:

We just had elections in Europe, the European parliamentary elections. Do you see anything we went through that could be used to prepare for your next election? How closely do you co-operate with European colleagues?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

I'm always happy to get information from any source. That's why I'm here. It's a very educational event for me. As well, I'm happy to answer any questions that you all may have.

(1650)

Ms. Keit Pentus-Rosimannus:

Do you see already that there are some things from the European Parliament elections that you can find useful?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

We have not yet studied what went on in the European Parliament elections.

Ms. Keit Pentus-Rosimannus: All right.

The Chair:

You're good? Thank you.

We're going to start the cycle again, just so you know. We'll start with Nate, and then we'll go to the next parliamentarian, so it will be Nate, Ian and James.

Go ahead, Nate.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York, Lib.):

Thanks very much.

I was in Brussels recently and met with the EU data protection supervisor. There is great co-operation among the privacy commissioners in the EU. There are conferences for privacy commissioners where you get together and discuss these issues as a matter of co-operation amongst regulators.

Is there the same level of co-operation, Ms. Weintraub, with respect to elections?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

Our elections are run under our own unique rules. As I said before, I'm happy to have information from any source, but because our rules are different from other countries' rules, particularly when it comes to the transparency of money and politics and how we fund our elections, we kind of plow our own course.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

When I suggested to a friend from Colorado and a friend from Mississippi that I wanted to get involved in politics and said that the cap in my local district was $100,000 Canadian, they laughed at me for a long time.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

It's very different.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Before I move to Mr. Therrien, I completely respect that as an American you have stronger free speech rules than we have here in Canada. Still, when you say “arbiters of truth”, there are still standards councils and there are still, when it comes to broadcasters.... Surely, a broadcaster in an election.... Maybe I'm incorrect, but I would expect that there are standards councils and some ethics guidelines and some basic principles they would abide by, and they wouldn't just broadcast anything.

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

I think that's true of broadcasters, mostly out of a sense of professional responsibility. That is one of the conundrums that I think we all face. When we were living in a world where there was a small number of broadcasters and those were all professional journalists, and they had training and they exercised editorial control over what they were distributing and were doing a lot of fact-checking, that was a whole different world from the information that we get online, where everybody's a broadcaster, everyone is a content producer, and—

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

So sort of, right...? Because it's one thing for you and me to be friends on Facebook and you post something and I see it. It's a very different thing if the News Feed, the algorithm that Facebook employs, makes sure I see it because of a past history that I have online, or if the YouTube recommendation function ensures that I see a video that I wouldn't see otherwise because I didn't seek it out. Aren't they very akin to a broadcaster when they're employing algorithms to make sure I see something and they're increasing impressions and reach?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

You're discussing an entirely different topic. I was talking about individuals who are putting their own content out there. The way the platforms are regulated under current United States law is that they don't have those same responsibilities as broadcasters under section 230 that—

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

If they took their corporate social responsibility seriously, as broadcasters do, presumably they would join a standards council or create one.

With respect to ad transparency, we recommended at this committee.... I mean, the honest ads act would be a good start, but I think it would just be a first step.

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

Absolutely.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Does it make sense to you that if I'm receiving an ad online, especially in an election, that I would be able to click through and see who paid for it, obviously, but also the demographics for which I've been targeted, as well as a selection criteria on the back end that the advertiser has selected, whether it's Facebook or Google or whatever it might be, for example, if it has been directed to a particular postal code, or if it's because I'm between the ages of 25 and 35? Do you agree that there should be more detailed transparency?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

I do, but of course part of the problem with that, though, is that very few people would actually click through to find that information. One concern I have is that everybody says that as long as you can click through and find the information somewhere, that should be good enough. I think there has to be some information right on the face of the ad that tells you where it's coming from.

(1655)

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Right.

The last question I have is for Mr. Therrien.

We had a number of excellent witnesses last night and this morning who really highlighted the business model as the fundamental problem here, in that it encourages this never-ending accumulation of data.

I wonder if you have any comments on two ideas that I want to set out. One, how do we address that business model problem that was identified? Two, how do we address it in such a way that it also respects the real value of aggregate-level data in different ways?

If I look at Statistics Canada, for example, which publishes aggregate-level data, that is really helpful for informed public policy. When I use Google Maps on a daily basis, that is based upon user information that is fed into the system and, as a result, I don't need to know where I'm going all the time; I can use Google Maps. It's based on data that has been input, but in the public interest.

How do we address the business model but also protect the public interest use of aggregate-level data?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

I think an important part of the solution is to look at the purposes for which information is collected and used. It's one thing for an organization, a company, to collect and use data to provide a direct service to an individual. That is totally legitimate, and this is the type of practice that should be allowed. It's another for an organization to collect so much information, perhaps under the guise of some type of consent, that the end outcome is something very close to corporate surveillance.

I think it's important to distinguish between the two. There are a number of technical rules that are at play, but the idea that we should define privacy beyond mechanical issues like consent and so on and so forth and define it by regard to what is the right being protected, i.e., the freedom to engage in the digital economy without fear of being surveilled, is an important part of the solution.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I'm out of time, but I'll just say one final thing. When you think of privacy from a consumer protection perspective, it's a curious thing that when I buy a phone I don't have to read the terms and conditions. I know that if it's a defective phone I can take it back, because there are implied warranties that protect me, but for every app I use on my phone, in order to be protected, I have to read the terms and conditions. I think it's just a crazy thing.

Thanks very much.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Erskine-Smith.

I want to speak to the order of questions. This is what I have: Ian, James, David de Burgh Graham, Jo, Jacques, Charlie and Peter. To close out, we have Mr. Collins again, for some final words. That's what we have so far. If there is anybody else who wants to ask a question, please put your hand up. I'll try to get you added to that list, but it looks like we're tight for time.

Now we're going to Mr. Lucas for five minutes.

Mr. Ian Lucas (Member, Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee, United Kingdom House of Commons):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

I was very struck by something that Jim Balsillie said this morning. He said that the online business model of the platforms “subverts choice”, and choice is what democracy is essentially about. It occurred to me—you might find this quite amusing—that in the United Kingdom, broadcasters aren't allowed to do political advertising. In other words, we don't have the wonderful advertisements that I've seen in the United States, and I'm sure in other jurisdictions.

Do you think there's a case for banning paid-for political advertising online on these platforms?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

I don't see any way it would pass constitutional scrutiny on our Supreme Court.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

That's in the United States?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

Yes. It's my frame of reference.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

Yes.

If I can talk to you, Mr. Cannataci, is the use of political advertising through broadcasting worldwide nowadays? Are there jurisdictions where broadcast advertisements are not accepted?

Prof. Joseph A. Cannataci:

Thank you for the question, Mr. Lucas.

The answer is that national practices vary. Some countries go more towards the United States model. Others go towards the United Kingdom model. In truth, though, we are finding that in many countries where the law is more restrictive, in practice many individuals and political parties are using social media to get around the law in a way that was not properly envisaged in some of the actual legislation.

With the chair's permission, I'd like to take the opportunity, since I've been asked a question, to refer to something that I think is transversal across all the issues we have here. It goes back to the statement made by Ms. Weintraub regarding who is going to be the arbiter of truth. In a number of countries, that value is still very close to our hearts. It is a fundamental human right, which happens to reside in the same article 17 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, of which many of the countries around the table, if not all, are members.

In the same section that talks about privacy, we have the provision on reputation, and people [Technical difficulty—Editor] care a lot about their reputation. So in terms of the arbiter of truth, essentially, in many countries, including France—I believe there was some discussion in Canada too—people are looking at having an arbiter of truth. Call him the Internet commissioner or call him the Internet ombudsman, call him what you will, but in reality people want a remedy, and the remedy is that you want to go to somebody who is going to take things down if something is not true.

We have to remember—and this applies also to online harm, including radicalization—that a lot of the harm that is done on the Internet is done in the first 48 hours of publication, so timely takedown is the key practical remedy. Also, in many cases, while freedom of speech should be respected, privacy and reputation are best respected by timely takedown. Then, if the arbiter in the jurisdiction concerned deems that it was unfair to take something down, it can go back up. Otherwise, we need the remedy.

Thank you.

(1700)

Mr. Ian Lucas:

It occurs to me, going back to Mr. Erskine-Smith's point, that when I joined Facebook I didn't consent to agree to be targeted by political advertising from anywhere. I didn't know that was part of the deal. It's not why people join Facebook.

It seems to me that we've managed, give or take a few bad phases, to survive as a democracy in the U.K. without broadcast TV adverts, political adverts. It's a particular area of advertising that I'm seeking to restrict, and I'm supported because of the emphasis that was given this morning to the way the control of data is really removing choice from the individual in this process.

From an information regulation point of view, how clear do you think people are in that area? Do you think people understand that this is what's happening here?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

First of all, let me say that I think there are many people in the United States who would love a system where they didn't get political advertisements. It's not something that people actually enjoy all that much.

I think you're raising a nuance there that I think is important, and that is, it's not.... Our Supreme Court would never allow a sort of a flat-out ban on political advertising, but—

Mr. Ian Lucas:

Right. It's the position of the United States, but—

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

Right, but what you're talking about is the use of people's personal data to micro-target them, and that, it seems to me, does raise a very different issue. I'm not actually sure that it wouldn't pass constitutional scrutiny.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

That's exactly what's happening in terms of paid-for advertising at the moment.

The other issue—

The Chair:

Mr. Lucas, could you could make it real quick? I hate to cut you off. You've come a long way.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

Very quickly, I'll pick up on an issue that Jens mentioned. He talked about trolls. Closed groups are also a massive problem, in that we do not have the information, and I think we need to concentrate more on that as an issue, too.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Lucas.

Next up, we have James from Ireland.

Mr. James Lawless:

Thank you, Chair. I have another couple of questions and observations.

Just picking up on something that I think Nate was saying earlier in his other points, the question often is whether these platforms are legally publishers or dumb hosts, terminals that display the content that gets put in front of them. I think one argument to support the fact that they're publishers and therefore have greater legal responsibilities is that they have moderators and moderation policies, with people making live decisions about what should and shouldn't be shown. On top of that, of course, are the targeting algorithms. I think that's something that's of interest, just as an observation.

On my other point, before I get into questions, we were talking about nation-states and different hostile acts. One thing that's the topic of the moment, I suppose, is the most recent revelation in terms of the Chinese government and the Huawei ban, and the fact that Google, I think in the last few days, announced a ban on supporting Huawei handsets. But it strikes me that Google is tracking us through Google Maps and everything else as we walk about with our phones. I think I read that there are 72 million different data points in a typical year consumed just by walking about town with a phone in your hand or in your pocket. Maybe the difference is that somewhere Google has terms and conditions that we're supposed to take, and Huawei doesn't, but both are effectively doing the same thing, allegedly. That's just a thought.

On the legislative framework, again, as I mentioned earlier, I've been trying to draft some legislation and track some of this, and I came to the honest ads act. One of the issues we've come across, and one of the challenges, is balancing free speech with, I suppose, voter protection and protecting our democracies. I'm always loath to criminalize certain behaviours, but I'm wondering what the tipping point is.

I suppose that in the way I've drafted it initially what I've considered is that I think you can post whatever you whatever you want as long as you're transparent about who actually said it, who is behind it, who is running it or who is paying for it, particularly if it's a commercial, if it's a paid-for post. In terms of the bots and the fake accounts, and what I would call the industrial-scale fake accounts, where we have a bot farm or where we have multiple hundreds or thousands of users actually being manipulated by maybe a single user or single entity for their own ends, I think that probably strays into the criminal space.

That's one question for Ms. Weintraub.

I suppose another question, a related question, is something that we struggle with in Ireland and that I guess many jurisdictions might struggle with. Who is responsible for policing these areas? Is it an electoral commission? If so, does that electoral commission have its own powers of enforcement and powers of investigation? Do you have law enforcement resources available to you? Is it the plain and simple police force of the state? Is a data protection commissioner in the mix as well? We have different types of regulators, but it can be a bit of an alphabet soup, and it can be difficult to actually pin down who is in charge. Also, then, if we do have somebody in charge, it can be difficult; they don't always have the resources to follow through.

That's my first question. In terms of criminalization, is that a bridge too far? Where do you draw the line? Second, if there is criminalization and there's an investigation required, what kind of resourcing do you have or do you think is needed?

(1705)

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

Again, my expertise is in the U.S. system, so I can most effectively tell you about that. We are a law enforcement agency. We have jurisdiction over money and politics, and we have civil enforcement authority. We have subpoena authority. We can do investigations. I think that some of our enforcement tools could be strengthened, but we also have the ability to refer to our justice department if we think there are criminal violations, which are basically knowing and wilful violations of the law.

Going back to something that you said earlier, in terms of our regulatory system, I don't think bots have first amendment rights. They're not people, so I don't have any problem with.... I don't understand why these smart tech companies can't detect the bots and get them off the platforms. I don't think that would raise first amendment concerns, because they're not people.

Mr. James Lawless:

Actually, that's a great line. I'm going to use that again myself.

I think I still have time for my next question. There is another way around this that we've seen in Ireland and, I guess, around the world. We've heard it again today. Because of the avalanche of fake news and disinformation, there is a greater onus on supporting the—dare I say—traditional platforms, the news media, what we'd call independents, quality news media.

There is a difficulty in terms of who decides what's independent and what's quality, but one of the approaches that we've been looking at I think I heard it in the Canadian Parliament when we watched the question period a few hours ago. I heard similar debates. One solution we're toying with is the idea of giving state subsidies or state sponsorship to independent media, not to any particular news organization but maybe to a broadcasting committee or a fund that is available to indigenous current affairs coverage, independent coverage.

That could be online, or in the broadcast media, or in the print media. It's a way to promote and sustain the traditional fourth estate and the traditional checks and balances of democracy but in a way that I suppose has integrity and is supported, asks questions of us all, and acts as a foil to the fake news that's doing the rounds. However, it's a difficult one to get right, because who decides who's worthy of sponsorship and subsidy and who isn't? I guess if you can present as a bona fide, legitimate local platform, you should be entitled to it. That's an approach we're exploring, one that has worked elsewhere and has seemed to work in other jurisdictions.

(1710)

The Chair:

Thank you James.

Next we'll go to Mr. Graham.

Go ahead for five minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

Ms. Weintraub, to build on that, if bots don't have first amendment rights, why does money?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

Well, money doesn't have first amendment rights. It's the people who are spending the money who have first amendment rights.

Let me be clear about this. I'm not a big fan of our Supreme Court jurisprudence. I mean, I would adopt the Canadian jurisprudence on this stuff if I could, but it's a little bit above my pay grade.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fair enough. So you don't necessarily think the decision in Citizens United was a good one?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

It would be fair to say that I am not a fan of the Citizens United decision.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fair enough.

As you were saying, the elections commission's job is to oversee the financing of elections. If a company knowingly permits the use of its algorithm or platform to influence the outcome of an election, would you consider that to be a regulated non-monetary contribution?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

I think it could be an in-kind contribution.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Interesting. My next question is related to that.

The CEO of Facebook has a majority of voting shares in the company. He basically has absolute powers in that company. From a legal or regulatory point of view, what prevents that company from deciding to support or act in any way they feel like in an election?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

As a corporation, it can't give a donation directly to a candidate, and that would include an in-kind contribution.

A question was raised earlier—and forgive me as I can't recall if it was you who suggested it—about Mark Zuckerberg running for president and using all of the information that Facebook has accumulated to support his campaign. That would be a massive campaign finance violation because he doesn't own that information. Facebook, the corporation, owns it.

The wrinkle in that is that due to the decision of our Supreme Court, corporations can make contributions to super PACs, which supposedly act independently of the campaigns. If a super PAC were advancing the interests of a particular candidate, a corporation—including Facebook—could make an unlimited contribution to that super PAC to help them with their advocacy.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Understood.

I don't have much time, so I'll go to Mr. Therrien for a quick second.

To Mr. Lucas's point earlier, in the social media world, are we the client or are we the product?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

It is often said that when you do not pay with money, you are the product, and there is certainly a lot of truth to that phrase.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When a surveillance-based company adds tags to sites that do not belong to them, with the approval of the site owner—for example, Google Analytics is pervasive across the Internet and has the approval of the site owner but not of the end user—do you consider them to have implied consent to collect that data?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

Sorry, I did not get the end.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If I have website and have Google Analytics on it, I have approved Google's use of my website to collect data, but somebody coming to use my website doesn't know that Google is collecting data on my site. Is there implied consent, or is that illegal from your point of view?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

It is one of the flaws of consent, probably, that there is a term and condition somewhere that makes this consent. That's why I say that privacy is not only about the rules of consent; it's about the use of the information and the respect for rights. We should not be fixated on consent as the be-all and end-all of privacy and data protection.

The Chair:

We have Mr. Picard, who will share the rest of the time with—

Mr. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Ms. Weintraub, you said something very interesting, and I don't know whether we have established this notion before.

In the scenario where Zuckerberg would run for president, Facebook couldn't give the information because it would be a massive contribution in kind. Have we established the ownership of the information? No one has consented that this information be spread, and therefore does Facebook own this information?

(1715)

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

That is a very interesting question, but I'm not sure it's a campaign finance question, so it may be outside of my expertise.

Mr. Michel Picard:

What if it were in Canada, Mr. Therrien?

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

The rules around ownership of information are not very clear.

From a privacy and data protection perspective, I think the question is one of control, consent, but ownership is not a clearly cut question in Canada.

The Chair:

Thank you.

The last three are Jo, Jacques, Charlie, and then we'll finish up.

Ms. Jo Stevens (Member, Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee, United Kingdom House of Commons):

Thank you, Chair.

Ms. Weintraub, I want to ask you, as someone with an obvious professional interest and expertise in this area, do you think we in the U.K. would have more confidence in the integrity in our elections and referenda if we had a Mueller-type inquiry into the 2016 European Union referendum?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

You know your people better than I do. I think you're a better judge of what would give them greater confidence.

There were specific incidents that triggered the Mueller inquiry.

Ms. Jo Stevens:

Do you see any overlap between those incidents, or any trend in terms of what happened there and what you know about the European Union referendum?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

I haven't studied it carefully enough to wage an opinion.

Ms. Jo Stevens:

Okay, thank you.

In terms of the future for us, we potentially have a second referendum coming up soon. We may have another vote. We may even have a general election very shortly.

Are there any recommendations you would make, in terms of foreign interference through money to the U.K. and to our government? At the moment, our electoral laws, I think, are generally accepted to be unfit for purpose in the digital age.

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

As I said, I think a lot of it goes to transparency. Do you have the ability to know who is behind the information that you're seeing both digitally and in other media?

Ms. Jo Stevens:

Are there any jurisdictions that you would identify currently as having really good electoral laws that are fit for purpose, bearing in mind what we've all been talking about today around digital interference? Is there a country that you would hold up as a really good model?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

I keep looking for that. I go to international conferences, and I'm hoping that somebody out there has the perfect solution. However, I have to say that I haven't found it yet.

If you find it, let me know, because I would love to find that country that's figured this out.

Ms. Jo Stevens:

Perhaps I could ask Mr. Cannataci the same question.

Is there a jurisdiction you're aware of that you think we could all look to for best practice on electoral law encompassing the digital age?

Prof. Joseph A. Cannataci:

The short answer is no.

I share Ms. Weintraub's problem. I keep looking for the perfect solution and I only find, at best, half-baked attempts.

Ms. Stevens, we'll stay in touch about the matter, and the minute we find something, I'll be very happy to share it.

Ms. Jo Stevens:

Thank you.

The Chair:

You have two minutes, Jo.

Ms. Jo Stevens: That's good.

The Chair: Okay.

Next up, we have Monsieur Gourde.

Go ahead, for five minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Jacques Gourde (Lévis—Lotbinière, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

My question will focus on a word that seemed to me to be important just now, the word “responsibility”.

This morning, we heard from representatives from digital platforms. They seemed to brush away a major part of their responsibility.

That shocked me. I feel they have a responsibility for their platforms and for the services they provide. Despite very specific questions, they were not able to prove that they are in control of their platforms in terms of broadcasting fake news or hate propaganda that can really change the course of things and influence a huge number of people.

The users, those that buy advertising, also have a responsibility. When you buy advertising, it must be fair and accurate, in election campaigns especially, but also all the time.

If there was international regulation one day, how should we determine the responsibility of both parties, the digital platforms and the users, so they can be properly identified?

That question goes to anyone who wants to answer.

(1720)

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

In terms of protecting data or privacy, you have put your finger on concepts that are fundamental, in my opinion; they are responsibility and accountability. We live in a world where there is massive information gathering and where the information is used by companies for a number of purposes other than the first purpose for which they had been obtained.

The companies often tell us that the consent model is not effective in protecting the privacy of the public, the consumers. They are partly right. Their suggestion is to replace consent, when it is ineffective, by increased accountability for the companies. I feel that that proposal must come with a real demonstration that companies are responsible and they cannot simply claim to be. That is why it is important for regulatory organizations to ensure that companies are really responsible. [English]

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

It seems to me that they are occupying a sort of hybrid space. They say they're not broadcasters. They say they're just the platform and they're not responsible for any of the content, yet they do seem to feel that they have some responsibility, because they are taking steps. People may feel the steps are inadequate, but they are taking some steps to provide greater transparency.

Why are they doing that? I think it's because they know they can't quite get away with just ignoring this entire issue. They do bear some responsibility in a broader sense, if not in a particular legal sense in any particular jurisdiction. Whether they would have stronger responsibilities if particular jurisdictions, either on an individual basis or on a global basis, decided to say, “No, no, you really are broadcasters and you have to start acting like it”, that is a question for legislators, not regulators. [Translation]

Mr. Jacques Gourde:

Is there, anywhere in the world…

Mr. Cannataci, did you want to add a comment?

Prof. Joseph A. Cannataci:

Yes. Thank you.

I certainly share Mr. Therrien's opinion, but I would like to add something else.[English]

If I could in this questioning just pick out one thing, it is to say that for whoever is going to control whether something should be taken down or not, or whether it's true or not—whatever—it requires effort, and that requires resources. Resources need to be paid for, and who is collecting the money? It's largely the companies.

Of course, you can have somebody for whom you can genuinely say, “Okay, this was the party, or the sponsor, or whoever who paid for the ad.” Otherwise, when push comes to shove, I think we're going to see a growing argument and a growing agreement in a lot of jurisdictions, which will say that they think the companies are collecting the money and, therefore, they have the means to control things. We've seen that to be the case when, for example, Facebook needed to have people who spoke the language of Myanmar in order to control hate speech in that country. I think we're going to see an increasing lead in many national jurisdictions and potentially probably international agreements attributing accountability, responsibility and fiscal liability for what goes on the platforms to the people who collect the money, which is normally the platforms themselves, to a large extent.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll go to you, Mr. Angus, for five minutes, with Mr. Collins following you, and then me.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

We heard an extraordinary statement from Google today that they voluntarily stopped spying on our emails in 2017. They did that in such a magnanimous manner, but they wouldn't agree not to spy on us in the future because there may be nifty things they can do with it.

I can't even remember 2016—it's so long ago—but 2018 changed our lives forever. I remember our committee was looking at consent and whether the consent thing should be clear or it should be bigger with less gobbledygook.

I don't ever remember giving Google consent to spy on my emails or my underage daughters' emails. I don't ever remember that it came up on my phone that, if I wanted to put my tracking location on so I could find an address, they could permanently follow me wherever I went and knew whatever I did. I don't remember giving Google or any search engine the consent to track every single thing I do. Yet, as legislators, I think we've been suckered—Zuckered and suckered—while we all talked about what consent was, what consumers can opt in on, and if you don't like the service, don't use it.

Mr. Therrien, you said something very profound the last time you were here about the right of citizens to live free of surveillance. To me, this is where we need to bring this discussion. I think this discussion of consent is so 2016, and I think we have to say that they have no consent to obtain this. If there's no reason, they can't have it, and that should be the business model that we move forward on: the protection of privacy and the protection of our rights.

As for opt-in, opt-out, I couldn't trust them on anything on this.

We've heard from Mr. Balsillie, Ms. Zuboff, and a number of experts today and yesterday. Is it possible in Canada, with our little country of 30 million people, to put in a clear law that says you can't gather personal information unless there's an express, clear reason? It seems to me that's part of what's already in PIPEDA, our information privacy laws, but can we make it very clear with very clear financial consequences for companies that ignore that? Can we make decisions on behalf of our citizens and our private rights?

(1725)

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

Of course the answer to that is yes. I think there is a role for consent in certain circumstances where the relationship is bilateral between a company service provider and a consumer, where the consumer understands the information that is required to provide the service. With the current digital economy, we're way beyond that. There are many purposes for which the information is then used, often with the purported consent of the consumer.

While there is a place for consent, it has its limits, and that's why I say it is important that privacy legislation define privacy for what it is. It is not at all limited to the mechanical question of consent. It is a fundamental right linked to other fundamental rights. When the outcome of a practice of a company, despite purported consent, is to surveil a consumer in terms of data localization or in terms of the content of messages given by that person, then I think the law should say that consent or no consent, it doesn't matter. What is at play is a privacy violation, being the surveillance of the individual in question, and that is a violation per se that should lead to significant penalties. It is possible to do that.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Thank you.

My final question is on facial recognition technology. There's a story in the Toronto Star today that the police are using facial recognition technology. San Francisco has attempted to ban it, and other jurisdictions are at least putting a pause on it.

As for the right of a citizen to be able to walk in a public square without being surveilled and without having to bring photo ID, facial recognition technology changes all that. There are obviously legitimate uses. For example, if someone on a CCTV camera has committed a crime, and there's a database, we would maybe have judicial oversight that this is a fair use; however, what about a number of people in a crowd that you can just gather in? I'm sure Facebook and Google would be more than helpful because they have such massive facial recognition databases on us.

As a Canadian regulator, do you believe that we need to hit a pause button on facial recognition technology? How do we put the rules in place to protect citizens' rights with clear safeguards for police use and for commercial use prior to abuses?

(1730)

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

I think in terms of moratoria or outright prohibitions, I would distinguish between the use of a technology—the technology of facial recognition—and the uses to which the technology is put. I find it more likely that a ban or a moratorium would make sense for specific uses of a technology than for the technology per se, because for facial recognition there might be useful public purposes including in a law enforcement domain where, despite the privacy restrictions of facial recognition, the overall public good is in favour of using the technology. I would look at it in terms, again, of specific uses for technology. In that regard, yes, it would make sense to prohibit certain uses.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Angus.

Last, Mr. Collins, go ahead.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Thank you very much.

Ellen Weintraub, given what we've talked about this afternoon, dark money in politics and how difficult it is to have any kind of proper oversight of what happens on platforms like Facebook, are you frightened by the news reporting that Facebook is going to launch its own cryptocurrency?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

Yes.

Mr. Damian Collins:

You are. You're frightened by the prospect.

I think you're right to be frightened by the prospect. Given all the other problems we've talked about, this seems like a sort of political money launderer's charter.

Do you not think people will look back on this period of time and say we had sophisticated democracies and societies that have developed decades of rules and regulations on campaign finance, electoral law, personal rights about data and privacy, oversight of broadcast media and news and other forms of news as well, and that we were prepared to see all those decades of experience bypassed by a company like Facebook, simply because that's the way their business model works, and it's unsustainable, the position that we're in at the moment?

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

Whether it's unsustainable, whether it requires further regulation, I think is exactly why all of you are sitting around this table today.

Mr. Damian Collins:

But in some ways, listening to the discussion in this last session, we're tying ourselves in knots trying to solve a problem that's being caused by a company. Actually it may well be that the solution is, rather than having to abandon lots of things that we value because they've been put there to protect citizens and citizens' rights, we actually should say to these companies, “This is what we expect of you, and we will force this upon you if we can't be convinced there's any other way of doing it”, and we're not prepared to tolerate people being exposed to dark hats, elections being interfered with by bad actors, disinformation, hate speech spreading uncontrolled, and actually, these are not the standards we expect in a decent society. We say that recognizing that platforms like Facebook have become the main media channel in terms of how people get news and information, anywhere between a third and a half of Europeans and Americans.

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

I think there is a real risk trying to take a set of rules that evolved in the 20th century and assuming that they're going to be equally appropriate for the technologies of the 21st century.

Mr. Damian Collins:

The final comment from me is that I think that's right. Those rules have been demonstrated to be out of date because of new technology and the way people engage with content in the world. Surely, what should remain is the values that brought in those rules in the first place. Saying that those rules need to change because technology's changed is one thing. What we shouldn't say is that we should abandon those values simply because they've become harder to enforce.

Ms. Ellen Weintraub:

I absolutely agree with that.

The Chair:

Mr. Therrien.

Mr. Daniel Therrien:

I totally agree.

The Chair:

I would like to finish up with one thing. We've been talking about the subpoena to Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg for some time and, as chair of this committee, I will say we did our very best to make sure they attended today. We're limited by what's in this book and the laws of our country, and yet the platforms seem to operate in their own bubbles without any restriction within our jurisdictions, and that's the frustration for us as legislators in this place.

Again, thank you for appearing today and thank you for assisting us, especially Commissioner Therrien, for your work in assisting this committee. We look forward to keeping those conversations going in the future.

I have some housekeeping aspects of what's going to happen tonight. Dinner is going to be at 7 p.m., downstairs in room 035. This is room 225, so two floors down will be where dinner is. It's at 7 p.m.

Just to be clear, each delegation is to give a brief presentation on what your country has done and is looking at doing to fix this problem. I'll be talking with my vice-chairs about how we're going to deliver what we are doing in Canada, but I challenge you to have that ready. Again, it's going to be brief. It can be informal. It doesn't need to be a big written presentation. I see some very serious looks on faces wondering, “What did we just get ourselves into?”

More important, I see a lot of tired faces. I think we're all ready just to go back to the hotel for about an hour's rest and then we'll reconvene at 7 p.m. I think that's all I have to say for now, but again we'll see you back at 7 p.m.

(1735)

Mr. Charlie Angus:

I have a point of order, Mr. Chair, before you try to shut us all down.

I do want to commend the excellent work of the staff, our analysts who have put this together, and Mr. Collins for what was done in England. This goes above and beyond. I think we have really set a standard. I'm hoping that in the next Parliament, and maybe in other jurisdictions, we can maintain this conversation. You've done incredible work on this. We really commend you for it.

[Applause]

The Chair:

Thank you for that. For the record, we will be holding the other platforms to account tomorrow morning at 8:30.

We'll see you tonight at seven o'clock.

Comité permanent de l'accès à l'information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l'éthique

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Bob Zimmer (Prince George—Peace River—Northern Rockies, PCC)):

Je déclare ouverte la séance no 154 du Comité permanent de l'accès à l'information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l'éthique et, dans une plus large mesure, de notre Grand Comité international sur les mégadonnées, la protection des renseignements personnels et la démocratie.

Il n'est pas nécessaire de répéter la liste des pays que nous avons déjà mentionnés. Je vais présenter les témoins, rapidement.

Du Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée du Canada, nous accueillons M. Daniel Therrien, le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée du Canada.

Témoignant à titre personnel, nous avons M. Joseph A. Cannataci, rapporteur spécial sur le droit à la vie privée aux Nations unies.

Nous avons des problèmes avec la diffusion vidéo à partir de Malte. Nous poursuivrons malgré tout. Le greffier m'informe que nous devrons peut-être nous contenter de l'audio. Nous ferons le nécessaire.

Nous aimerions aussi accueillir la présidente de la Commission électorale fédérale des États-Unis, Mme Ellen Weintraub.

Tout d'abord, j'aimerais parler de l'ordre et de la structure de la réunion. Ce sera très semblable à celui de notre première réunion de ce matin. Nous aurons une question par délégation. Pour le groupe canadien, il y aura une question par parti, puis nous poursuivrons avec divers représentants jusqu'à ce que le temps alloué à la question soit écoulé.

J'espère que c'est assez clair. Vous verrez au fur et à mesure que nous procéderons.

Je tiens à remercier tous les membres qui ont assisté à la période de questions ce matin. Pour ma part, je remercie le Président de la Chambre d'avoir souligné la présence de la délégation.

Je donne à M. Collins l'occasion de commencer.

Allez-y, monsieur Collins.

M. Damian Collins (président, Comité sur le numérique, la culture, les médias et le sport, Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni):

Merci.

Ma première question s'adresse aux trois témoins.

Le président:

Ne devrait-on pas commencer par entendre les exposés?

M. Damian Collins:

Très bien.

Le président:

Nous allons entendre les déclarations, en commençant par M. Therrien.

Allez-y; vous avez 10 minutes.

M. Daniel Therrien (commissaire à la protection de la vie privée du Canada, Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée du Canada):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Mesdames et messieurs les membres du Grand Comité, je vous remercie de l'occasion de vous parler aujourd'hui.

Mon allocution portera sur trois points qui, à mon avis, sont des éléments essentiels de votre étude. Tout d’abord, la liberté et la démocratie ne peuvent exister sans la protection de la vie privée et de nos renseignements personnels. Ensuite, pour faire face aux risques posés par les préjudices numériques, comme les campagnes de désinformation, nous devrions renforcer nos lois afin de mieux protéger nos droits. Enfin, à titre d’expert de la réglementation canadienne en matière de protection de la vie privée, je ferai part de mes suggestions sur les mesures qui doivent être prises au Canada afin de mettre en place des lois modernes pour assurer la protection efficace du droit à la vie privée des Canadiens.

Je suis convaincu que ces suggestions formulées dans le contexte canadien ont aussi toute leur pertinence dans le contexte international.

Comme vous le savez, dans son rapport sur la protection des renseignements personnels et le processus politique, l'Information Commissioner's Office — le pendant de mon commissariat au Royaume-Uni — a clairement conclu que le laxisme en matière de respect de la vie privée et le microciblage par les partis politiques ont révélé des lacunes dans le paysage de la réglementation. Ces lacunes ont à leur tour été exploitées pour cibler les électeurs au moyen des médias sociaux et pour diffuser de la désinformation.[Français]

Le scandale de Cambridge Analytica a mis en lumière des pratiques inattendues en matière d'utilisation de renseignements personnels. En plus, mon enquête sur Facebook a révélé un cadre de protection de la vie privée qui était en fait une coquille vide. Cette affaire a rappelé aux citoyens que la vie privée est un droit fondamental et une condition préalable nécessaire à l'exercice d'autres droits fondamentaux, notamment la démocratie. En fait, la vie privée n'est rien de moins qu'une condition préalable à la liberté, c'est-à-dire la liberté de vivre et de se développer de façon autonome, à l'abri de la surveillance de l'État ou d'entreprises commerciales, tout en participant volontairement et activement aux activités courantes d'une société moderne.[Traduction]

Les membres de ce comité ne sont pas sans savoir que les incidents et les atteintes à la vie privée qui sont maintenant trop fréquents vont bien au-delà des questions de protection de la vie privée, aussi graves soient-elles. Outre les questions de protection de la vie privée et des données, les institutions démocratiques et la confiance même des citoyens dans notre processus électoral font maintenant l'objet de méfiance et de suspicion. Les organismes publics, notamment les organismes de réglementation électorale, souhaitaient que les outils numériques, comme les réseaux sociaux, puissent mobiliser une nouvelle génération de citoyens. Toutefois, ces outils sont aussi utilisés pour subvertir nos démocraties, et non les renforcer.

L'interaction entre la protection des données, le microciblage et la désinformation représente une menace réelle pour nos lois et nos institutions. Dans certaines parties du monde, on tente de répondre à ces risques en proposant différents types de règlements. Je vais en souligner quelques-uns.

Le Livre blanc du Royaume-Uni sur les préjudices numériques publié récemment propose la création d'un organisme de réglementation numérique et offre plusieurs interventions potentielles auprès des organisations commerciales pour réglementer un ensemble de problèmes. Le modèle proposé pour le Royaume-Uni consiste à ajouter un nouvel organisme de réglementation pour des plateformes numériques qui permettra d'élaborer des codes de conduite précis pour traiter des cas d'exploitation des enfants, de propagande haineuse, d'ingérence électorale étrangère et d'autres préjudices pernicieux en ligne.

En outre, plus tôt ce mois-ci, l'appel de Christchurch pour éliminer le contenu terroriste et extrémiste violent en ligne a souligné la nécessité d'assurer une application efficace des lois, une application des normes d'éthique et une coopération appropriée.

Enfin, il y a à peine une semaine, ici même au Canada, le gouvernement a publié une nouvelle proposition de mise à jour de notre loi fédérale sur la protection des données commerciales, ainsi qu'une charte numérique visant à protéger la vie privée, à contrer l'utilisation abusive des données et à assurer que les entreprises communiquent clairement avec les utilisateurs.

(1535)

[Français]

Toutes ces approches reposent sur la nécessité d'adapter nos lois aux nouvelles réalités de notre monde numérique interconnecté. De plus en plus de gens comprennent que l'ère de l'autoréglementation doit cesser. La solution n'est pas de faire en sorte que les gens éteignent leur ordinateur ou cessent d'utiliser les médias sociaux, les moteurs de recherche ou les autres services numériques. Un bon nombre de ces services répondent à des besoins réels. L'objectif ultime est plutôt de permettre aux individus de profiter des services numériques pour socialiser, apprendre et, de façon générale, se développer en tant que personnes tout en demeurant en sécurité et en étant confiants que leur droit à la vie privée sera respecté.[Traduction]

Certains principes fondamentaux peuvent, à mon avis, guider les efforts gouvernementaux visant à rétablir la confiance des citoyens. Mettre les citoyens et leurs droits au centre de ces discussions est d'une importance vitale selon moi, et le travail des législateurs devrait être axé sur des solutions fondées sur les droits.

Au Canada, le point de départ devrait être de conférer à la loi une base fondée sur les droits, conforme au statut quasi constitutionnel du droit à la vie privée. C'est le cas dans de nombreux pays, où la loi définit explicitement certains droits à la vie privée comme tels, avec des pratiques et des processus qui appuient et font appliquer ce droit important.

Je pense que le Canada devrait continuer d'avoir une loi neutre sur le plan technologique et axée sur des principes. Une loi fondée sur des principes reconnus internationalement, tels que ceux de l'OCDE, rejoint un objectif important, soit l'interopérabilité. Adopter un traité international pour la protection de la vie privée et la protection des données personnelles serait une excellente idée, mais d'ici là, les pays devraient viser l'adoption de lois interopérables.

Nous avons également besoin d'une loi fondée sur des droits, autrement dit une loi qui confère aux personnes des garanties juridiques, tout en permettant une innovation responsable. Une telle loi définirait la vie privée dans son sens le plus large et le plus véritable, par exemple le droit d'être libre de toute surveillance injustifiée, qui reconnaisse sa valeur et son lien avec les autres droits fondamentaux.

La vie privée ne se limite pas au consentement, à l'accès et à la transparence. Ces mécanismes sont importants, mais ils ne définissent pas le droit lui-même. La codification de ce droit, en plus de la nature fondée sur des principes et neutre sur le plan technologique de la législation canadienne actuelle, lui permettrait de perdurer, malgré les inexorables progrès technologiques.

Un dernier point que je souhaite soulever à cet égard est l'importance d'une surveillance indépendante. La protection de la vie privée ne peut être assurée sans la participation d'organismes de réglementation indépendants, habilités à imposer des amendes et à vérifier la conformité de façon proactive, afin de veiller à ce que les organisations soient véritablement responsables de la protection des renseignements.

Cette dernière notion de responsabilité démontrable est une mesure nécessaire dans le monde d'aujourd'hui, où les modèles d'affaires sont opaques et où les flux d'information sont de plus en plus complexes. Il est peu probable qu'une personne dépose une plainte si elle n'est pas au courant d'une pratique qui pourrait lui nuire. C'est pourquoi il est si important que les organismes de réglementation aient le pouvoir d'examiner de façon proactive les pratiques des organisations. Lorsqu'il n'est ni pratique ni efficace d'obtenir le consentement — un point soulevé par de nombreuses organisations à notre époque — et qu'on s'attend à ce que les organisations comblent les lacunes en matière de protection au moyen de la responsabilisation, ces organisations doivent être tenues de démontrer garder une responsabilité véritable.

Les solutions que je vous ai présentées aujourd'hui ne sont pas de nouveaux concepts. Cependant, comme ce comité adopte une approche globale pour faire face au problème de la désinformation, il s'agit aussi d'une occasion pour les acteurs nationaux, c'est-à-dire les organismes de réglementation, les représentants gouvernementaux et les représentants élus, de reconnaître les pratiques exemplaires et les solutions émergentes et de prendre des mesures pour protéger nos citoyens, nos droits et nos institutions.

Merci. Je répondrai maintenant à vos questions.

(1540)

Le président:

Merci encore, monsieur Therrien.

Vérifions si la connexion avec M. Cannataci fonctionne. Non.

Nous passons à Mme Weintraub pour 10 minutes.

Mme Ellen Weintraub (présidente, Commission électorale fédérale des États-unis):

Merci.

Le président:

Je suis désolé, madame Weintraub.

Nous venons d'entendre des commentaires. Il peut nous parler.

Je suis désolé, madame Weintraub. Nous allons l'écouter, puisque la communication est établie.

Monsieur Cannataci, la parole est à vous, pour 10 minutes.

M. Joseph A. Cannataci (rapporteur spécial sur le droit à la vie privée, Nations unies, à titre personnel):

Monsieur le président, membres du Grand Comité, merci beaucoup de l'invitation à comparaître.

Je vais essayer de m'appuyer sur les propos de M. Therrien afin d'aborder quelques points supplémentaires. Je reviendrai aussi sur certains propos tenus par d'autres témoins.

Premièrement, j'essaierai d'adopter une perspective plus internationale, même si les thèmes abordés par le Comité ont certainement une dimension mondiale. Voilà pourquoi, lorsqu'il est question d'un traité mondial... Le témoin précédent a parlé d'un traité international. Comme je vais l'expliquer, l'une des raisons pour lesquelles j'ai décidé d'examiner diverses priorités en matière de protection de la vie privée, dans le cadre de mon mandat aux Nations unies, c'est que le cadre juridique général de la protection de la vie privée et des données — un traité international à cet égard — ne relève pas spécifiquement de l'ONU. Il s'agit de la Convention 108 ou de la Convention 108+, qui a déjà été ratifiée par 55 pays. Le dernier pays à présenter un document de ratification est le Maroc, qui l'a fait hier.

Les rencontres tenues à Strasbourg ou ailleurs pour discuter des actions et de l'interopérabilité dans un cadre international comprennent déjà 70 pays, États signataires et observateurs. Les discussions portent sur le cadre offert par cet instrument juridique international. J'encourage d'ailleurs le Canada à envisager d'y adhérer. Bien que je ne sois pas un spécialiste du droit canadien, je l'étudie depuis 1982. Je pense que le droit canadien est très similaire dans la plupart des cas. Je pense que l'adhésion du Canada à ce groupe de pays de plus en plus nombreux serait un atout.

Pour ce qui est du deuxième point que je voudrais aborder, je serai bref. Je suis aussi préoccupé par la situation de la démocratie et le recours croissant à diverses méthodes de surveillance des profils sur Internet pour manipuler l'opinion des gens. L'exemple parfait qu'il faut examiner est celui de Cambridge Analytica, mais il y en a d'autres dans plusieurs autres pays du monde.

Je dois aussi préciser que les six ou sept priorités que je me suis fixées pour mon mandat à l'ONU résument dans une certaine mesure, certains des principaux enjeux de protection de la vie privée et des données auxquels nous sommes confrontés. La première priorité ne devrait pas vous surprendre, mesdames et messieurs, car elle est liée à la raison d'être de mon mandat. Il s'agit de la sécurité et de la surveillance.

Vous vous souviendrez que mon mandat à l'ONU m'a été confié dans la foulée des révélations de Snowden. Vous ne serez donc pas surpris d'apprendre que nous avons accordé une grande attention à la sécurité et à la surveillance à l'échelle internationale. Je suis très heureux que le Canada participe très activement à l'une des tribunes, le Forum international sur les mécanismes de contrôle des services de renseignement, car, comme le témoin précédent vient de le mentionner, la surveillance est un élément clé auquel nous devons accorder notre attention. J'ai également été ravi de constater les progrès importants réalisés au Canada au cours des 12 à 24 derniers mois.

(1545)



La surveillance est un vaste sujet, mais puisque mes 10 minutes sont presque écoulées, je pourrais répondre aux questions à ce sujet. Pour le moment, je dirai simplement que les problèmes sont les mêmes partout dans le monde. Autrement dit, nous n'avons pas de solution appropriée en matière de compétence. Les enjeux relatifs à la compétence et à la définition des infractions demeurent parmi nos plus importants problèmes, malgré l'existence de la Convention sur la cybercriminalité. La sécurité, la surveillance et, fondamentalement, le nombre accru d'actions dans le cyberespace qui sont parrainées par des États demeurent des problèmes flagrants.

Certains pays sont plutôt réticents à évoquer leurs activités d'espionnage dans le cyberespace, tandis que d'autres les considèrent comme leur propre cour. En réalité, il est évident que les intrusions à l'égard de la vie privée touchent des centaines de millions de personnes, pas dans un seul pays, mais dans le monde entier, et ces actions sont le fait de services parrainés par un acteur ou un autre, notamment la plupart des puissances permanentes des Nations unies.

Fondamentalement, il s'agit d'un problème de compétence et de définition des limites. Nous avons préparé une ébauche d'un instrument juridique sur la sécurité et la surveillance dans le cyberespace, mais le contexte politique mondial ne semble pas propice à de grandes discussions sur ces aspects. Cela a mené à des mesures unilatérales, notamment aux États-Unis, avec le Cloud Act, une mesure qui n'obtient pas un grand appui pour le moment. Toutefois, peu importe que des mesures unilatérales soient efficaces ou non, j'encourage la discussion, même sur les principes du Cloud Act. Même si les discussions ne mènent pas à des accords immédiats, elle amènera au moins les gens à se concentrer sur les problèmes actuels.

Je passe maintenant aux mégadonnées et aux données ouvertes. Comme nous avons peu de temps, je vous invite à consulter le rapport sur les mégadonnées et les données ouvertes que j'ai présenté à l'Assemblée générale des Nations unies en octobre 2018. En toute franchise, je vous invite à ne pas regrouper les deux enjeux et à éviter de considérer les données ouvertes comme une panacée, comme le font les politiciens qui ne cessent d'en vanter les avantages. La vérité, c'est que les principes des mégadonnées et des données ouvertes sous-tendent un examen des enjeux fondamentaux clés en matière de protection de la vie privée et des données.

En droit canadien, comme c'est le cas dans d'autres pays, notamment dans les lois de tous les pays qui adhèrent à la Convention 108, le principe de la spécification des finalités selon lequel les données ne devraient être recueillies et utilisées que pour une fin précise ou compatible demeure un principe fondamental. Ce principe est toujours d'actualité dans le règlement relatif à la protection des données récemment adopté en Europe. Il convient toutefois de garder à l'esprit que souvent, ceux qui ont recours à l'analyse des mégadonnées visent à utiliser ces données à d'autres fins. Je vous invite encore une fois à consulter mon rapport et les recommandations détaillées qui s'y trouvent.

J'ai présenté un document au sujet des données sur la santé, à des fins de consultation. Le document fera l'objet de discussions en vue de la présentation de recommandations lors d'une réunion spéciale qui aura lieu les 11 et 12 juin prochains, en France. J'espère que le Canada y sera bien représenté. Nous avons reçu de nombreux commentaires positifs au sujet du rapport. Nous essayons d'établir un consensus sur les données sur la santé. J'aimerais attirer l'attention du Comité sur l'importance de ces données. On collecte de plus en plus de données sur la santé chaque jour à l'aide de téléphones intelligents, de bracelets Fitbit et d'autres dispositifs portables. Ces appareils ne sont pas vraiment utilisés comme il était prévu il y a 15 ou 20 ans.

J'aimerais attirer l'attention du Comité sur un autre document de consultation. Il porte sur le genre et la protection de la vie privée. J'espère organiser une consultation publique. Une campagne de consultation a déjà été lancée en ligne, mais j'espère tenir une réunion publique, probablement à New York, les 30 et 31 octobre. Le genre et la protection de la vie privée demeurent des sujets très importants, mais controversés. Je serais heureux que le Canada continue de contribuer et de participer aux discussions à cet égard.

(1550)



À mon avis, vous ne serez pas surpris d'apprendre que parmi les cinq groupes de travail que j'ai créés, un groupe de travail étudie l'utilisation des données personnelles par les entreprises. Je me fais un point d'honneur de rencontrer les dirigeants de grandes entreprises, notamment Google, Facebook, Apple et Yahoo. Je rencontre aussi ceux de certaines entreprises non américaines, dont Deutsche Telekom, Huawei, etc. J'essaie de tenir au moins deux réunions par année. Je les réunis autour d'une table pour obtenir leur collaboration afin de trouver de nouvelles mesures de protection et de nouveaux recours en matière de protection de la vie privée, en particulier dans le cyberespace.

Cela m'amène au dernier point que je veux mentionner pour le moment. Il est lié à l'enjeu précédent concernant les entreprises et l'usage qu'elles font des données personnelles. C'est la priorité en matière de protection de la vie privée.

Les questions de protection de la vie privée me préoccupent de plus en plus, en particulier celles qui touchent les enfants, qui deviennent des citoyens numériques à un âge précoce. Comme l'a indiqué le témoin précédent, nous étudions certaines lois nouvelles et novatrices, comme celles du Royaume-Uni, non seulement la loi sur les préjudices numériques, mais aussi la loi sur les comportements adaptés à l'âge et sur la responsabilité des entreprises. J'aborderai officiellement ces questions avec les dirigeants d'entreprise lors de notre réunion de septembre 2019. J'ai hâte de pouvoir réaliser des progrès sur l'enjeu de la vie privée et des enfants, ainsi que sur celui de la responsabilisation et l'action des entreprises afin de préparer, dans les 12 à 18 prochains mois, une série de recommandations à cet égard.

C'est tout pour le moment, monsieur le président. C'est avec plaisir que je répondrai aux questions.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Cannataci.

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Weintraub.

Je veux simplement vous expliquer pourquoi les lumières clignotent. Au Parlement canadien, cela indique que des votes auront lieu dans environ 30 minutes. Les partis ont convenu qu'un député de chaque parti resterait ici et que les autres iraient voter. Nous poursuivrons la réunion avec ceux qui restent, sans nous arrêter. Ce n'est pas une alarme incendie. Poursuivons.

(1555)

M. Charlie Angus (Timmins—Baie James, NPD):

Puisque je suis le seul néo-démocrate, la question est de savoir, comme dirait le groupe The Clash: should I stay or should I go?

Des voix: Ha, ha!

Le président:

Vous devriez probablement rester.

Il est convenu qu'un député de...

M. Charlie Angus:

Si je pars, vous ne pouvez prendre aucun de mes sièges.

Le président:

Je voulais simplement que le fonctionnement soit clair.

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Weintraub, pour 10 minutes.

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Monsieur le président, membres du Comité, merci.

Je suis la présidente de la Commission électorale fédérale des États-Unis. Je représente un organisme bipartisan, mais les opinions que je vais exprimer sont entièrement les miennes.

Je vais passer du sujet de la protection de la vie privée aux campagnes d'influence.

En mars de cette année, le conseiller spécial Robert S. Mueller III a terminé son rapport d'enquête sur l'ingérence russe dans l'élection présidentielle de 2016. Ses conclusions donnaient froid dans le dos. Le gouvernement russe s'est ingéré dans l'élection présidentielle de 2016 de manière générale et systémique. Tout d'abord, une entité russe a mené une campagne dans les médias sociaux qui a favorisé un candidat à la présidence et dénigré l'autre. Deuxièmement, un service de renseignement russe a mené des opérations d'intrusion informatique contre des entités de la campagne, des employés et des bénévoles, puis a divulgué des documents volés.

Le 26 avril 2019, au Council on Foreign Relations, le directeur du FBI, Christopher A. Wray, a lancé une mise en garde contre une campagne d'influence étrangère agressive, malveillante et intensive consistant à « utiliser les médias sociaux, les fausses nouvelles, la propagande, les fausses personnalités, etc., pour nous monter les uns contre les autres, semer la discorde et la division, et saper la foi des Américains à l'égard de la démocratie. Il ne s'agit pas seulement d'une menace liée au cycle électoral; il s'agit plutôt d'une menace permanente, 365 jours par année. Et cela a manifestement continué. »

Bien qu'il ait noté que « d'énormes progrès ont été réalisés depuis 2016 par l'ensemble des organismes fédéraux, les responsables électoraux des États et des municipalités, les entreprises de médias sociaux, notamment, pour protéger l'infrastructure physique de nos élections », il a déclaré: « Je pense que nous reconnaissons que nos adversaires vont continuer à adapter et à améliorer leur jeu. Nous voyons donc 2018 comme une sorte de répétition générale pour le grand spectacle de 2020. »

La semaine dernière, à la Chambre des représentants, un représentant du département de la Sécurité intérieure a également souligné que la Russie et d'autres pays étrangers, dont la Chine et l'Iran, ont mené des activités d'influence lors des élections de mi-mandat de 2018 et des campagnes de communication qui visaient les États-Unis pour promouvoir leurs intérêts stratégiques.

Aux États-Unis, comme vous le savez probablement, l'administration des élections est décentralisée. Cela relève des États et des administrations locales. Cela signifie que la protection des infrastructures physiques des élections relève d'autres fonctionnaires. Je parle des installations physiques gérées par les gouvernements des États et les administrations locales. Il est essentiel qu'ils continuent d'assurer ce rôle.

Cependant, depuis mon siège à la Commission électorale fédérale, je travaille tous les jours avec un autre type d'infrastructure électorale, le fondement de notre démocratie: la conviction que les citoyens savent qui influence nos élections. Cette conviction a été la cible d'attaques malveillantes de la part de nos ennemis étrangers, par l'intermédiaire de campagnes de désinformation. Cette conviction a été minée par l'influence corruptrice de fonds occultes qui pourraient masquer des bailleurs de fonds étrangers illégaux. Cette conviction a subi les assauts répétés de campagnes de publicité politique en ligne de sources inconnues. Cette conviction a été ébranlée par des cyberattaques contre des responsables de campagnes politiques mal équipés pour se défendre par leurs propres moyens.

Cette conviction doit être restaurée, mais elle ne peut l'être par la Silicon Valley. Nous ne pouvons laisser la reconstruction de cet élément de notre infrastructure électorale aux sociétés de technologie, celles qui ont conçu les plateformes que nos rivaux étrangers utilisent à mauvais escient en ce moment même pour attaquer nos démocraties.

En 2016, le contenu généré par de faux comptes établis en Russie a été vu par 126 millions d'Américains sur Facebook et 20 millions d'Américains sur Instagram, pour un total de 146 millions d'Américains alors que pour cette élection, on comptait seulement 137 millions d'électeurs inscrits.

Aussi récemment qu'en 2016, Facebook acceptait le paiement en roubles pour des publicités politiques sur les élections américaines.

Pas plus tard que l'année dernière, en octobre 2018, des journalistes se faisant passer pour des sénateurs du Sénat des États-Unis — tous les sénateurs — ont tenté de placer des annonces en leur nom sur Facebook. Facebook a accepté dans tous les cas.

Par conséquent, lorsque ceux qui faisaient partie de l'autre groupe de témoins n'arrêtaient pas de nous dire qu'ils contrôlent la situation, nous savons que ce n'est pas le cas.

Je souligne au passage que j'ai aussi invité M. Mark Zuckerberg et M. Jack Dorsey, et d'autres, à venir témoigner lors des audiences de la Commission portant sur la divulgation de la publicité sur Internet. Encore une fois, ils ne se sont pas présentés, mais sans envoyer de représentant, cette fois. Ils se sont contentés d'envoyer des commentaires écrits. Donc, je compatis avec vous.

(1600)



C'est tout simplement très important pour nous tous. Aux États-Unis, les dépenses en publicité politique numérique ont augmenté de 260 % de 2014 à 2018, d'une élection de mi-mandat à l'autre, pour un total de 900 millions de dollars en publicité numérique lors des élections de 2018. C'était toujours moins que les dépenses pour la publicité radiodiffusée, mais en matière de publicité politique, le numérique est évidemment la voie de l'avenir.

Des propositions constructives ont été présentées aux États-Unis pour tenter de régler ce problème. Il y a la loi sur les publicités honnêtes, qui assujettirait les publicités sur Internet aux mêmes règles que les publicités radiodiffusées, ainsi que la Disclose Act, qui accroîtrait la transparence et la lutte contre les fonds occultes. Au sein de mon propre organisme, je tente de promouvoir une règle qui permettrait d'améliorer les avis de non-responsabilité pour toute publicité en ligne. Jusqu'à présent, tous ces efforts ont été contrecarrés.

Or, les plateformes ont heureusement tenté de faire quelque chose. Elles ont essayé d'aller plus loin en partie pour éviter la réglementation, j'en suis convaincue, mais aussi pour répondre à l'insatisfaction généralisée à l'égard de leurs pratiques en matière d'information et de divulgation. Elles ont amélioré, du moins aux États-Unis, leur processus de divulgation des commanditaires des publicités, mais ce n'est pas suffisant. Des questions reviennent sans cesse, par exemple sur les critères qui déclenchent l'obligation de publier un avis de non-responsabilité.

Peut-on se fier aux avis de non-responsabilité pour identifier correctement les sources des publicités numériques? Selon l'étude portant sur les 100 annonces des sénateurs, cela ne semble pas possible, du moins pas toujours. Lorsque le contenu est transmis, l'information d'identification est-elle transmise en même temps? Comment les plateformes gèrent-elles la transmission d'informations cryptées? La communication poste-à-poste est une avenue prometteuse pour l'activité politique, et elle soulève un lot d'enjeux potentiels. Quelles que soient les mesures adoptées aujourd'hui, elles risquent fort de cibler les problèmes du dernier cycle et non du prochain, et nous savons que nos adversaires ne cessent d'améliorer leur jeu, comme je l'ai dit, d'improviser et de modifier constamment leurs stratégies.

Je suis également très préoccupée par le risque d'un afflux de fonds étrangers dans notre système électoral, en particulier par l'intermédiaire des entreprises. Cette préoccupation n'a rien d'hypothétique. Nous avons récemment clos un cas d'application de la loi lié à des ressortissants étrangers qui ont réussi à verser 1,3 million de dollars dans les coffres d'un super PAC lors des élections de 2016. Ce n'est qu'une des méthodes employées par les ressortissants étrangers pour faire sentir leur présence et exercer une influence, même dans nos campagnes politiques au plus haut échelon.

Aux États-Unis, les cas et les plaintes de ce genre sont de plus en plus courants. De septembre 2016 à avril 2019, le nombre d'affaires dont la Commission a été saisie — ce qui comprend les violations présumées de l'interdiction visant les ressortissants étrangers — est passé de 14 à 40. Au 1er avril de cette année, 32 affaires étaient en instance. Il s'agit d'une autre préoccupation constante liée à l'influence étrangère.

Tout ce que vous avez entendu aujourd'hui indique qu'il faut réfléchir sérieusement à l'incidence des médias sociaux sur notre démocratie. La philosophie d'origine de Facebook, « bouger vite et bouleverser les choses », élaborée il y a 16 ans dans une chambre de résidence d'université, a des conséquences ahurissantes lorsque l'on considère que les médias sociaux sont peut-être en train de bouleverser nos démocraties elles-mêmes.

Facebook, Twitter, Google et autres géants de la technologie ont révolutionné notre façon d'accéder à l'information et de communiquer. Les médias sociaux ont le pouvoir de favoriser le militantisme citoyen, de diffuser de la désinformation ou des discours haineux de manière virale et de façonner le discours politique.

Le gouvernement ne peut se soustraire à sa responsabilité d'examiner les répercussions. Voilà pourquoi je me réjouis des travaux de ce comité et je suis très reconnaissante de tout ce que vous faites, car cela a des retombées dans mon pays, même lorsque nous sommes incapables d'adopter nos propres règlements alors que vous le faites, dans d'autres pays. Les plateformes ont parfois des politiques uniformes partout dans le monde, et cela nous aide. Merci beaucoup.

Je vous remercie aussi de l'invitation à participer à cette réunion. C'est avec plaisir que je répondrai à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci, madame Weintraub.

Nous commençons par M. Collins.

M. Damian Collins:

Merci. Ma première question s'adresse à Mme Ellen Weintraub.

Vous avez mentionné les fonds occultes dans votre déclaration préliminaire. Dans quelle mesure êtes-vous préoccupée par la capacité des organismes de campagne à utiliser la technologie, en particulier la technologie de la chaîne de bloc, pour blanchir les dons non admissibles aux campagnes en les transformant en une multitude de dons modestes?

(1605)

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Cela m'inquiète beaucoup, notamment parce que tout notre système de réglementation repose sur l'hypothèse que les grosses sommes d'argent doivent être la préoccupation et que la réglementation doit être axée là-dessus. Sur Internet, cependant, il arrive que de très petites sommes d'argent aient une incidence considérable. Là, on ne prend même pas en compte la possible utilisation de Bitcoin et d'autres technologies pour masquer entièrement la provenance de l'argent.

Donc oui, cela me préoccupe considérablement.

M. Damian Collins:

Votre commission a-t-elle été saisie d'autres cas particuliers?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Le problème avec les fonds occultes, c'est qu'on ne sait jamais vraiment qui est derrière tout cela. Au cours des 10 dernières années, environ 1 milliard de dollars en fonds occultes ont été dépensés dans le cadre de nos élections, et je ne peux pas vous dire qui est derrière tout cela. C'est la nature de la clandestinité.

M. Damian Collins:

Je me demandais simplement s'il y avait eu des allégations particulières ou s'il y avait lieu d'enquêter davantage sur ce qui pourrait être considéré comme une activité suspecte.

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Nous recevons constamment des plaintes au sujet de fonds occultes. Le cas que je viens de décrire est l'un des exemples les plus marquants que nous ayons vus récemment. Il peut s'agir d'argent qui entre par l'intermédiaire de sociétés par actions à responsabilité limitée ou d'organisations indépendantes en vertu de l’alinéa 501(c)(4). Dans ce cas précis, la partie en cause était une filiale nationale d'une société étrangère.

M. Damian Collins:

Avez-vous des préoccupations quant à la façon dont des technologies comme PayPal pourraient être utilisées pour obtenir de l'argent de sources qui tentent de cacher leur identité ou même de l'étranger?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

PayPal, les cartes-cadeaux et toutes ces choses suscitent d'importantes préoccupations. Si l'argent est versé directement à une campagne, les organisations ne peuvent accepter de sommes importantes sans en révéler la provenance, et elles ne sont pas autorisées à accepter des contributions anonymes importantes supérieures à un seuil par ailleurs très faible. Cependant, dès qu'il est question de groupes externes de bailleurs de fonds — les super PAC et autres groupes du genre —, elles peuvent accepter des dons de sociétés, ce qui, par définition, empêche d'en connaître la provenance exacte.

M. Damian Collins:

J'aimerais savoir ce que les trois témoins ont à répondre à ma prochaine question.

La transparence en matière de publicité semble être l'une des choses les plus importantes que nous devrions exiger. Au Royaume-Uni, certainement — et dans d'autres pays également, il me semble —, la loi électorale se fondait sur la compréhension de l'identité du messager. Les gens devaient révéler qui payait la publicité et qui cette dernière visait à faire connaître. Or, ces mêmes règles ne se sont pas appliquées dans les médias sociaux.

Même si les gestionnaires de plateforme affirment qu'ils exigeront la transparence, il semble que ces précautions soient faciles à déjouer, surtout dans le cas de Facebook. La personne qui se dit responsable des publicités n'est peut-être pas celle qui contrôle les données ou qui finance les campagnes. Ces renseignements ne sont vraiment pas clairs.

Je me demande si vous partagez nos préoccupations à cet égard et si vous avez une idée du genre de loi que nous pourrions devoir adopter afin d'assurer la divulgation pleine et entière de l'identité de ceux qui financent les campagnes.

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Je les partage certainement. À ma connaissance, le problème vient en partie du fait que les gestionnaires de plateforme ne vérifient pas qui est derrière la publicité. Si quelqu'un affirme que Mickey Mouse la parraine, c'est ce qu'ils indiquent sur leur plateforme.

M. Damian Collins:

J'aimerais aussi connaître l'avis des deux autres témoins pour savoir s'ils ont des préoccupations et s'ils considèrent que nous devrions instaurer un système solide au sujet de la transparence en matière de publicité en ligne.

M. Daniel Therrien:

J'ajouterais que pour réduire le risque de mauvais usage de l'information dans le cadre du processus politique, il faut disposer d'une série de lois. Au Canada et dans un certain nombre de pays, comme les États-Unis, les partis politiques ne sont pas assujettis à la loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels, à l'échelle fédérale canadienne, du moins. Voilà encore une lacune observée dans les lois de certains pays.

Il faut instaurer une série de mesures, en ce qui concerne notamment la transparence en matière de publicité et la protection des données, ainsi que d'autres règles pour que l'écosystème des compagnies et des partis politiques soit adéquatement réglementé.

M. Damian Collins:

Il semble que les organismes de réglementation doivent impérativement être autorisés par la loi à effectuer des vérifications auprès des entreprises de technologie pour s'assurer qu'elles divulguent les bons renseignements.

M. Daniel Therrien:

Au Canada, nous pouvons faire enquête sur les entreprises, mais pas sur les partis politiques. Un bon régime autoriserait un organisme de réglementation à mener des enquêtes sur les deux.

M. Damian Collins:

L'organisme pourrait faire enquête sur les partis et les plateformes qui font de la publicité.

M. Daniel Therrien:

Oui.

M. Damian Collins:

J'ignore si le signal audio fonctionne à Malte.

M. Joseph A. Cannataci:

Il fonctionne, merci, monsieur Collins. Je vous remercie également du travail que vous avez investi dans votre rapport, que j'ai — je dois dire — trouvé extrêmement utile dans le cadre de mon mandat.

Je dirai très brièvement que je partage les préoccupations des deux témoins précédents. Au chapitre de la transparence en matière de publicité, il est extrêmement important de connaître l'identité du messager. Je m'inquiète grandement du recours aux chaînes de blocs et à d'autres technologies de registre distribué. À dire vrai, il n'existe pas suffisamment de recherches en ce moment pour nous permettre d'examiner les problèmes concernés.

Il se trouve que le pays dans lequel je vis s'est proclamé l'île des chaînes de blocs, et nous déployons certains efforts pour légiférer en la matière, mais je crains qu'il faille effectuer encore bien du travail à ce sujet dans le monde. Si c'est possible, je proposerais au Comité de prêter son nom à des ressources sérieuses afin d'étudier le problème et de formuler des recommandations judicieuses.

(1610)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Cannataci.

Nous avons dépassé le temps prévu, et certains membres doivent aller voter. Je dois donc accorder la parole à Mme Vandenbeld le plus rapidement possible.

Je tenterai de vous accorder de nouveau la parole si vous avez besoin d'une réponse plus exhaustive.

Madame Vandenbeld, vous avez la parole.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie grandement d'être ici et de faire des témoignages très instructifs.

Je voudrais poser mes questions sur les menaces étrangères à la démocratie et sur ce que j'appelle les technologies habilitantes, comme les médias sociaux et les « donnéeopoles » qui permettent aux menaces étrangères de prendre pied.

Je considère qu'à titre de législateurs, nous nous trouvons aux premières lignes de la démocratie mondiale. Si ceux d'entre nous qui sont les représentants élus de la population ne sont pas capables de résoudre le problème et de contrer ces menaces, alors que c'est vraiment à nous qu'il revient de le faire... Voilà pourquoi j'étais enchantée que le Grand Comité se réunisse aujourd'hui.

Je souligne également la collaboration que même notre comité a pu avoir avec le comité du Royaume-Uni au sujet d'AggregateIQ, qui était ici, au Canada, lors de notre étude sur Cambridge Analytica et Facebook.

Nous avons toutefois un problème: les plateformes ont beau jeu d'ignorer les pays pris individuellement, particulièrement les petits marchés, car elles sont si grandes que nous ne pouvons pas faire grand-chose contre elles. Nous devons donc unir nos efforts.

Madame Weintraub, considérez-vous que vous disposez actuellement des outils nécessaires pour que les élections américaines de 2020 ne subissent aucune influence étrangère ou en subissent aussi peu que possible?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

J'hésite à répondre à cette question. Comme je l'ai souligné dans mon témoignage, je voudrais que le Congrès adopte diverses lois et j'aimerais persuader mes collègues de la commission d'accepter d'adopter certains règlements.

Je pense que nous ne sommes pas aussi solides que nous pourrions l'être, mais je sais que le département de la Sécurité intérieure, les États et les administrations locales travaillent d'arrache-pied afin de protéger les infrastructures physiques pour tenter d'éviter la manipulation des votes, laquelle constitue la plus grande crainte, bien entendu.

Sur le plan de l'influence étrangère, comme le directeur du FBI l'a indiqué, nous nous attendons à ce que nos adversaires modifient leur plan, et tant que nous ne verrons pas ce plan, nous ne saurons pas si nous sommes prêts à faire face à la menace.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Au Canada, le problème vient entre autres du fait qu'il est très difficile de savoir qui a le pouvoir de parler au cours d'une campagne électorale; nous avons donc instauré le Protocole public en cas d'incident électoral majeur. Il s'agit d'un groupe de hauts fonctionnaires qui seraient en mesure de rendre la chose publique si les organismes de sécurité décelaient une menace étrangère.

Les États-Unis ont-ils envisagé de mettre en place un protocole semblable? Est-ce une solution qui pourrait fonctionner à l'échelle mondiale?

Monsieur Cannataci, je vous demanderais de répondre également en ce qui concerne le contexte international. Je me demande si vous observez des initiatives qui pourraient, au cours d'élections, permettre à ce genre d'autorité de rendre la menace publique.

J'entendrai d'abord Mme Weintraub, puis M. Cannataci.

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Je pense que ce pouvoir existe. Certains fonctionnaires ont le pouvoir de rendre ce genre de renseignements publics s'ils sont informés de la situation. Ce genre de transparence est toutefois limité pour des questions de sécurité nationale et de renseignement, bien entendu.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Monsieur Cannataci, vous avez indiqué qu'il existe certains traités internationaux sur la protection des données et des renseignements personnels, mais y a-t-il une sorte de centre d'échange des pratiques exemplaires internationales?

À lui seul, notre comité trouve d'excellents exemples de pratiques qu'il s'emploie à faire connaître, mais existe-il quelque part un endroit où les pratiques exemplaires sont échangées, mises à l'épreuve, étudiées et diffusées?

(1615)

M. Joseph A. Cannataci:

Pas à ce que je sache. Deux comités des Nations unies doivent se former bientôt, dont au moins un pourrait discuter de sujets connexes. Vous pourriez aborder la question auprès de ce qui s'appelle le groupe de travail ouvert des Nations unies, qui commencera probablement ses travaux à l'automne.

Je serais toutefois ravi de travailler avec le Comité afin d'élaborer un ensemble de mécanismes pouvant être échangés sur le plan des pratiques exemplaires, car la plupart des tentatives de manipulation électorale que nous avons observées recouraient au profilage dans un domaine ou dans un autre afin de cibler des gens pour influencer leur vote.

Je me ferais un plaisir de réaliser des travaux dans ce domaine avec le Comité, et quiconque souhaite nous faire part de pratiques exemplaires est le bienvenu.

Le président:

Merci, madame Vandenbeld. Votre temps est écoulé.

Nous accorderons maintenant la parole à M. Angus pour cinq minutes.

M. Charlie Angus:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie de témoigner, madame Weintraub.

Les Américains sont comme nos cousins germains et nous les aimons beaucoup, mais nous sommes légèrement suffisants, car nous observons ce qu'il se passe par-delà la frontière et nous nous disons que toutes ces folies ne pourraient jamais se produire au Canada. Je vous relaterai donc toute l'histoire de la fraude et de l'ingérence électorales au Canada depuis 10 ans.

Un jeune de 20 ans travaillant pour les conservateurs a mis la main sur des numéros de téléphone et a envoyé des renseignements erronés le jour du scrutin. Il a fini en prison.

Un membre de notre comité a demandé à ses cousins de l'aider à payer un stratagème électoral. Il a perdu son siège au Parlement et trouvé une place en prison.

Un ministre du Cabinet qui avait caché des dépenses de 8 000 dollars en voyages aériens au cours d'élections a dépassé la limite, perdant ainsi son poste au Cabinet et son siège.

Ces situations ont des conséquences; pourtant, on manipule les données au grand jour, et il semble que nous ne dispositions pas de lois pour intervenir ou que nous ne soyons apparemment pas certains de la manière dont nous pourrions nous attaquer au problème.

Je peux vous dire qu'en 2015, j'ai commencé à remarquer le problème lors des élections fédérales, alors que la situation est passée totalement inaperçue au pays. Notre région a été la cible d'une campagne intense contre les musulmans et les immigrantes, qui y a complètement chamboulé le discours électoral. L'information était issue d'une organisation extrémiste de la Grande-Bretagne. Je ne comprenais pas comment les gens de la classe ouvrière de ma région recevaient ces renseignements.

Je comprends aujourd'hui avec quelle rapidité le poison se répand dans le système et à quel point il est facile de cibler des gens et de manipuler les profils de données d'électeurs.

Quand le gouvernement fédéral aura de nouvelles lois de protection des élections, il pourrait s'agir des meilleures lois pour les élections de 2015, mais l'ingérence observée alors s'apparente à un vol de diligence si on la compare à celle que vous verrons lors des prochaines élections, lesquelles feront probablement office de banc d'essai pour les élections de 2020.

Au regard du recours massif aux outils servant à influencer les élections démocratiques, comment pouvons-nous instaurer des mesures pour mettre des bâtons dans les roues des mercenaires de données qui peuvent cibler chaque électeur en en exploitant les craintes?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Je ne sais même pas comment commencer à répondre à cette question.

Le système canadien diffère manifestement du nôtre. Je n'approuve pas toujours la manière dont la Cour suprême interprète le Premier amendement, mais ce dernier assure une protection extrêmement solide de la liberté d'expression. Cela a une incidence dans les domaines de la technologie, de l'argent occulte et de la politique.

S'il n'en tenait qu'à moi, je pense que la Cour suprême devrait s'inspirer un peu plus du modèle canadien, mais je n’ai aucune incidence à ce sujet.

M. Charlie Angus:

Monsieur Therrien, je m'adresserai à vous.

C'est votre prédécesseure, Elizabeth Denham, qui a mis au jour la faiblesse de Facebook en 2008 et qui a tenté de forcer l'entreprise à se conformer. Si Facebook s'était exécutée, nous aurions peut-être évité bien des problèmes. Maintenant, en 2019, vous concluez qu'en vertu de la primauté du droit, dans votre champ de compétences, Facebook a violé la loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels.

Ce qui est très troublant, c'est que Facebook a tout bonnement refusé d'admettre nos compétences dans notre pays, affirmant que nous devions supposément lui prouver si des torts avaient été causés ou non.

Je ne suis pas certain si vous avez entendu le témoignage de M. Chan aujourd'hui, mais en ce qui concerne les droits des législateurs démocratiques d'assurer la protection des lois, comment pouvons-nous lutter contre une entreprise qui considère qu'elle peut choisir de respecter ou non les lois nationales?

(1620)

M. Daniel Therrien:

Vous faites référence aux conclusions tirées par mes prédécesseurs il y a 10 ans. Il est certainement déconcertant que les pratiques observées il y a 10 ans et qui sont censées avoir été corrigées grâce à l'amélioration des politiques en matière de protection des renseignements personnels et de l'information communiquée aux utilisateurs n'ont, de fait, pas été rectifiées. Des améliorations superficielles ont été apportées, selon, nous, mais dans les faits, les mesures de protection des renseignements personnels de Facebook s'avèrent encore très inefficaces 10 ans après l'enquête du Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée du Canada.

En ce qui concerne l'argument sur les compétences, je pense que la compagnie considère que puisque les citoyens canadiens n'ont pas été personnellement touchés par la manipulation de l'information à des fins politiques, le Commissariat n'a pas compétence en la matière. Nous ne nous sommes toutefois pas contentés d'examiner l'effet des pratiques de protection des renseignements personnels dans le processus politique canadien; nous avons étudié l'ensemble du régime de réglementation en matière de protection des renseignements personnels de Facebook lorsqu'il s'applique non seulement à une application de tierce partie, mais à toutes les applications semblables, lesquelles se comptent par millions.

Je me préoccupe certainement du fait que Facebook affirme que nous n'avons pas compétence en la matière, alors que nous nous sommes penchés sur la manière dont Facebook a traité les renseignements personnels de Canadiens et de Canadiennes au moyen de millions d'applications et non d'une seule.

Comment faire en sorte que Facebook ou d'autres entreprises respectent l'autorité du Canada? Eh bien, compte tenu du régime juridique qui est le nôtre, il nous reste la possibilité de les traîner devant la Cour fédérale du Canada — et c'est ce que nous ferons — pour qu'elle rende une décision sur les pratiques de Facebook, notamment en indiquant si l'entreprise doit respecter notre autorité. Nous ne doutons guère qu'elle doive la respecter, mais il faudra qu'un tribunal se prononce sur la question.

M. Charlie Angus:

Enfin...

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Angus. Votre temps est écoulé.

M. Charlie Angus:

Ma montre indique 4 minutes et 53 secondes.

Des voix: Ah, ah!

Le président:

Nous aurons encore du temps vers la fin de la séance; je ferais donc mieux de poursuivre.

Nous entendrons maintenant notre témoin de Singapour pour cinq minutes.

Monsieur Tong, nous vous cédons la parole.

M. Edwin Tong (ministre d'État principal, Ministère de la justice et Ministère de la santé, Parlement de Singapour):

Merci.

Madame Weintraub, merci beaucoup d'être là. En septembre 2017, vous avez écrit une lettre à la personne qui assumait alors la présidence de la Federal Election Commission, dans laquelle vous indiquiez qu'il fallait impérativement moderniser la réglementation de cet organisme pour que les Américains sachent qui paie les messages politiques qu'ils voient sur Internet.

Ai-je raison de présumer que vos inquiétudes découlent du fait que les activités étrangères influencent, voire corrompent les messages politiques, pas seulement lors d'élections, mais aussi dans la vie quotidienne des membres d'une société démocratique, et que si on leur laisse libre cours, ces activités chercheront à ébranler les institutions et le gouvernement, à influencer les élections et, au bout du compte, à renverser la démocratie?

Aurais-je raison de dire cela?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Je partage un grand nombre de ces préoccupations, et je crains vivement que ces activités visent non seulement à influencer les élections, mais aussi à semer la discorde et le chaos et à ébranler la démocratie dans de nombreux pays.

M. Edwin Tong:

En fait, conviendriez-vous que le mode opératoire typique de tels mauvais acteurs viserait à semer la discorde quant aux questions sociales primordiales et à provoquer des problèmes qui ouvrent des lignes de faille dans la société pour que les institutions et, au final, les gouvernements soient ébranlés?

(1625)

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Je pense que c'est le cas.

M. Edwin Tong:

Vous avez parlé précédemment des entreprises de technologie. Je pense que vous avez dit qu'elles vous ont répondu qu'elles s'occupaient du problème. De toute évidence, c'est loin d'être le cas. Vous avez également indiqué que les entreprises ne vérifiaient pas qui se trouve derrière les publicités et les dons.

Connaissez-vous la Campaign for Accountability, ou CFA?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Je ne peux pas dire que je la connais; je suis désolée.

M. Edwin Tong:

Après la diffusion des conclusions de Robert Mueller, je pense, une organisation sans but lucratif du nom de Campaign for Accountability s'est faite passer pour l'IRA et a très facilement acheté des publicités politiques. Elle a réussi à faire publier toute une série de publicités et de campagnes par Google pour un peu moins de 100 $US et a obtenu quelque 20 000 visionnements et plus de 200 clics avec ce genre de dépense.

Est-ce une situation qui vous préoccupe? Faudrait-il réglementer ce genre d'activité étrangère, qui montre également qu'on ne peut s'en remettre aux plateformes de médias sociaux pour surveiller la situation?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Je suis convaincue qu'il faut réglementer davantage le domaine pour que les gens puissent savoir qui est derrière les publicités qu'ils voient sur les médias sociaux.

M. Edwin Tong:

Oui.

En ce qui concerne les règlements dont il est question dans la lettre que vous avez écrite, pourriez-vous nous dire, en 30 secondes, quels devraient être, selon vous, les principes fondamentaux sous-jacents à ces règlements pour que nous puissions mettre fin à l'influence et à la corruption étrangères dans les processus démocratiques?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Eh bien, comme je l'ai indiqué, je pense qu'il faut assurer une meilleure transparence. Quand les gens lisent des informations en ligne, ils doivent pouvoir en connaître l'origine.

Par exemple, l'Internet Research Agency de Russie a diffusé des publicités et des renseignements aux fins de propagande. Je ne connais personne qui veuille que ses nouvelles viennent d'une usine de trolls russe. Je pense que si les gens savaient que c'est de là d'où vient l'information, ils sauraient à quel point ils peuvent s'y fier.

M. Edwin Tong:

Oui, car au bout du compte, la fausse information, ce n'est pas la liberté d'expression, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Les gens doivent savoir d'où vient l'information pour pouvoir tirer de meilleures conclusions.

M. Edwin Tong:

Oui. Merci.

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous accorderons maintenant la parole à Mme Naughton, de l'Irlande.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton (présidente, Comité mixte sur les communications, l'action sur le climat et l'environnement, Parlement de la République d'Irlande):

Ma première question s'adressera à M. Cannataci. Elle concerne les lois que nous envisageons d'adopter en Irlande, lois qui pourraient éventuellement s'appliquer à l'échelle de l'Europe. Nous voulons créer un poste de commissaire à la sécurité numérique en ligne. Dans le cadre de l'élaboration de cette loi, la définition de « communication préjudiciable » donne notamment du fil à retordre à notre comité. Je me demande si vous pourriez nous aider. Existe-t-il à cet égard une pratique exemplaire ou une manière optimale de procéder?

Nous voulons éventuellement légiférer à l'échelle de l'Europe et, comme nous le savons, il faut protéger la liberté d'expression. Ces questions ont été soulevées ici. Avez-vous des observations à formuler à ce sujet?

M. Joseph A. Cannataci:

La réponse brève est oui, je serais enchanté de vous aider. Nous sommes en train de mettre sur pied un groupe de travail précisément sur la protection des renseignements personnels, les enfants et les préjudices causés en ligne. C'est un sujet très difficile, car certains termes utilisés ne sont pas très clairs, notamment les mots « adapté à l'âge ».

Pour la plupart des enfants du monde, le niveau de maturité n'est pas lié à l'âge. Les enfants se développent à différents âges. Il faut vraiment mieux étudier le genre de préjudices dont ils peuvent être victimes en ligne. En fait, les études sur le sujet sont malheureusement rarissimes. Il en existe, mais pas suffisamment.

Je verrais certainement d’un œil favorable une approche irlandaise, européenne, voire internationale à ce sujet, car le problème transcende les frontières. Je vous remercie donc d'agir dans ce dossier.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton:

Merci beaucoup. Je pense que nous nous préoccupons tous ici de cette définition.

J'interrogerai peut-être le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée, M. Therrien, au sujet du Règlement général sur la protection des données. Avez-vous une opinion quant au fonctionnement de ce règlement?

Comme vous le savez, le président de Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, a demandé que le Règlement général sur la protection des données soit mis en application à l'échelle internationale. J'aimerais savoir ce que vous en pensez d'un point de vue professionnel.

Ce règlement est très récent et a été mis en oeuvre à l'échelle européenne, comme vous le savez. Que pensez-vous de ce règlement, de son fonctionnement et du fait que M. Zuckerberg en réclame l'application dans tous les pays, même s'il fallait pour cela le modifier?

(1630)

M. Daniel Therrien:

Le Règlement général sur la protection des données est encore relativement nouveau; je pense donc qu'il faudra attendre encore un peu pour en déterminer les effets dans la pratique. Je considère certainement que les principes de ce règlement sont bons. Il s'agit de saines pratiques. Je pense que les divers pays devraient évidemment chercher à protéger le plus efficacement possible les renseignements personnels et les données, et s'inspirer des règles d'autres pays pour y parvenir.

Dans mon exposé, j'ai parlé de l'interopérabilité. J'ajouterais qu'il importe que les lois internationales, bien qu'elles soient interopérables et qu'elles reposent sur de bons principes comme ceux du Règlement général sur la protection des données, soient adaptées à la culture et aux traditions de chaque pays. Par exemple, le poids relatif accordé à la liberté d'expression et à la protection des données peut varier dans certains pays, mais le Règlement général sur la protection des données constitue un excellent point de départ.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton:

D'accord, merci.

Je pense que ce sont toutes les questions que je voulais poser.

Le président: Vous disposez d'une minute.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton: Voulez-vous poser une question?

M. James Lawless (membre, Comité mixte sur les communications, l'action sur le climat et l'environnement, Parlement de la République d'Irlande):

Merci.

Monsieur le président, si vous le voulez bien, j'utiliserai la dernière minute, mais j'interviendrai de nouveau lors du deuxième tour pour utiliser mes cinq minutes.

Le président:

Oui, bien sûr.

M. James Lawless:

Madame Weintraub, votre analyse de ce qu'il s'est passé lors des dernières élections était intéressante, particulièrement en ce qui concerne l'influence des États-nations.

Ces derniers ont comme dénominateur commun le fait qu'ils ne favorisent pas nécessairement un candidat au détriment d'un autre, mais cherchent à semer la discorde et à affaiblir les démocraties occidentales. Cela semble être un thème commun. Je pense que c'est le phénomène que nous avons pu observer lors du Brexit et des élections américaines. Comment pouvons-nous lutter contre ces interventions?

J'ai élaboré des mesures législatives s'apparentant à la loi sur la publicité honnête et à la loi sur la transparence dans les médias sociaux, fort d'objectifs très semblables. J'ai une question, à laquelle je reviendrai lors du deuxième tour, sur la manière dont nous pouvons appliquer ce genre de loi. La responsabilité incombe-t-elle à ceux qui font de la publicité ou à la plateforme?

Quelqu'un a affirmé qu'un organisme avait réussi à diffuser de fausses publicités sur les 100 sénateurs ou membres de la Chambre des représentants. Les plateformes devraient-elles être responsables des divulgations, des avertissements et des vérifications d'usage? Elles nous ont affirmé qu'elles ne pouvaient pas le faire. Devons-nous faire porter cette responsabilité à ceux qui placent les publicités ou à ceux qui les publient, si vous saisissez la distinction?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Les États-Unis ont coutume d'imposer ces obligations à ceux qui placent les publicités. Il me semble toutefois que nous pourrions exploiter les fameuses capacités d'apprentissage machine de l'intelligence artificielle de ces plateformes. Si les machines peuvent s'apercevoir que le nom sur la publicité n'a aucun lien avec la source du paiement, elle pourrait avertir un humain qui entreprendrait de vérifier si le nom figurant dans la publicité est le bon.

Ce n'est toutefois pas ainsi que nos lois fonctionnent actuellement.

Le président:

M. Zimmermann, de l'Allemagne, aura la parole pour les cinq prochaines minutes.

M. Jens Zimmermann (Parti social-démocrate, Parlement de la République fédérale d'Allemagne):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je commencerais avec M. Cannataci pour traiter de la collaboration internationale.

Nous avons indiqué plus tôt qu'il fallait collaborer à l'échelle internationale. C'est d'ailleurs l'objectif derrière la présente séance. Mais où verriez-vous des forums propices à la collaboration dans ces domaines? Cette année, par exemple, l'Allemagne accueillera le Forum sur la gouvernance d'Internet, une approche plurilatérale des Nations unies.

Voyez-vous d'autres approches?

(1635)

M. Joseph A. Cannataci:

Je vous remercie de cette question, monsieur Zimmermann.

Le Forum sur la gouvernance d'Internet est un endroit utile pour se réunir et discuter, mais nous devons faire très attention de ne pas nous en tenir aux belles paroles. Le problème, c'est que ce forum offre un endroit où les bonnes idées abondent, mais où la gouvernance est bien mince. À l'heure actuelle, les États tendent malheureusement à éluder la responsabilité de la gouvernance.

Je pense que nous verrons des pays se réunir, y compris le Parlement européen nouvellement élu, pour appliquer des mesures qui susciteront l'attention. Selon moi, les entreprises sentent le vent tourner; certaines d'entre elles l'ont d'ailleurs admis à demi-mot.

Rien n'attire l'attention comme l'argent. L'approche du Règlement général sur la protection des données, à laquelle on a fait référence, suscite une vive attention de la part des entreprises du monde, car aucune ne veut être obligée de payer une facture équivalant à 4 % de son chiffre d'affaires mondial. Je pense que cette mesure favorisera la reddition de comptes et la responsabilité. Pour répondre à la question précédente, je pense que cette démarche fera porter l'attention sur les plateformes au moins autant que sur ceux qui placent les publicités, car, comme quelqu'un l'a fait remarquer, il est parfois difficile de savoir si ces derniers sont les véritables responsables.

M. Jens Zimmermann:

Merci beaucoup.

La question de l'application devait suivre, mais vous y avez déjà répondu. Merci.

Je poserais une question à Mme Weintraub également.

Nous avons maintes fois parlé des trolls et des usines de trolls, mettant beaucoup l'accent sur la publicité. Qu'en est-il des trolls à l'oeuvre au pays? Nous avons constaté que dans une certaine mesure, des activistes qui sont en fait des trolls surpuissants sont en activité en Allemagne, particulièrement dans le mouvement d'extrême droite. On n'a pas besoin de les payer; ils agissent parce qu'ils veulent soutenir leurs groupes politiques.

Cachés dans l'ombre, ils décident d'utiliser des outils pour s'attaquer à un ou à une députée ou ils appuient simplement chaque publication d'un membre d'un parti. Ils font une utilisation optimale des algorithmes, sans avoir besoin d'argent pour le faire.

Vous intéressez-vous aussi à ce problème?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Je pense que vous soulevez une autre question très sérieuse. Aux États-Unis, nous avons constaté que certaines techniques instaurées par des activistes étrangers sont maintenant adoptées par des activistes américains, car ils ont vu qu'elles fonctionnaient. Ces techniques ont le même genre d'effet préoccupant que les démarches visant à semer la discorde et à répandre parfois les discours haineux. Elles permettent d'aller chercher, dans les crevasses de la communauté, des gens qui ont des idées et qui, seuls, n'ont pas beaucoup de pouvoir, mais qui, lorsqu'ils se réunissent en ligne et diffusent ces idées, deviennent bien plus inquiétants.

Nous n'avons pas d'outils efficaces pour lutter contre eux, car quand ces trolls sont des étrangers, il est facile de dire qu'ils cherchent à s'ingérer dans nos élections, et nous savons que ce n'est pas une bonne chose; c'est toutefois une autre paire de manches quand il s'agit de nos propres citoyens.

Le président:

Il vous reste une trentaine de secondes.

M. Jens Zimmermann:

J'aborderai peut-être une dernière question.

Nous avons de nombreux règlements régissant les médias et stipulant ce qu'une station de télévision ou de radio peut faire, mais YouTube soulève actuellement tout un débat en Allemagne, car on y trouve des gens qui joignent essentiellement un auditoire plus vaste que celui de nombreuses stations de télévision, sans pour autant être soumis à la moindre réglementation.

Est-ce un problème que vous observez également?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Nous observons certainement le phénomène des influenceurs. Je ne passe pas moi-même beaucoup de temps sur YouTube, mais quand je vois certaines de ces personnes, je ne suis pas vraiment certaine de comprendre pourquoi elles ont autant d'influence, mais elles en ont.

Cela nous ramène au modèle qui est le nôtre. Le modèle de réglementation des États-Unis se fonde sur l'argent. Quand nous avons commencé à nous intéresser à l'activité politique sur Internet, YouTube en était à ses balbutiements, et la plupart des gens présumaient qu'il faudrait évidemment payer pour diffuser une publicité afin que le public la regarde. Nous évoluons maintenant dans un monde entièrement différent où tout ce contenu est diffusé gratuitement et devient viral. Il existe très peu de mesures de contrôle dans ce domaine.

(1640)

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons maintenant revenir aux parlementaires, de retour de leurs votes.

Nous accorderons la parole à M. Kent pour cinq minutes.

L'hon. Peter Kent (Thornhill, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Ma première question s'adresse au commissaire Therrien et concerne la révélation que le gouvernement a faite en réponse à une question inscrite au Feuilleton sur les annonces d'emplois discriminatoires publiées sur un certain nombre de plateformes, et Facebook a certainement été mentionnée. Un certain nombre de ministères auraient demandé que les annonces soient microciblées par sexe et par âge.

M. Chan, président et directeur général de Facebook Canada, a répondu que cela s'était effectivement produit, mais que les protocoles avaient changé, même si ses réponses étaient quelque peu imprécises ou ambiguës. Il a indiqué que le gouvernement fédéral avait été avisé que cette façon de faire était non seulement inacceptable, mais aussi potentiellement illégale en vertu des diverses lois relatives aux droits de la personne du pays.

Pourrais-je avoir votre réaction, monsieur le commissaire?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je pense que cette affaire fait ressortir l'importance d'avoir des lois fondées sur les droits de la personne. Nous sommes ici en présence d'une pratique qui aurait pu engendrer de la discrimination. Je pense qu'il importe que les règlements tiennent compte de l'effet net d'une pratique et règlent la question en application des droits de la personne.

Sur le plan de la protection de la vie privée, nous tendons à considérer que la protection des données et des renseignements personnels prend la forme de règles entourant le consentement, la divulgation de l'objectif et d'autres facteurs. Je pense que l'affaire Cambridge Analytica a soulevé la question de la relation étroite entre la protection de la vie privée, la protection des données et l'exercice des droits fondamentaux, y compris, dans le cas de votre exemple, les droits à l'égalité.

Je pense que pour le genre de lois dont je suis responsable au Canada, nous assurerions une protection plus efficace et plus exhaustive en définissant la protection de la vie privée en fonction non pas des mécanismes importants comme le consentement, par exemple, mais des droits fondamentaux qui sont préservés grâce à la protection des renseignements personnels.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

D'accord.

Madame Weintraub, la question que je vous poserai concerne les échanges que nous avons eus ce matin concernant Facebook au sujet de la vidéo falsifiée de Mme Pelosi et de la déclaration que Facebook a faite au Washington Post, selon laquelle l'entreprise n'avait pas de politique exigeant que les publications sur sa plateforme soient véridiques.

Il s'agit manifestement d'un cas de malveillance politique. Ce n'est pas une année électorale, mais de pareils actes entachent le processus démocratique et ciblent de manière évidente la réputation d'un dirigeant politique et le leadership politique. Je me demande ce que vous pensez de l'argument de Facebook.

La plateforme retirera une vidéo publiée par quelqu'un qui révèle la vérité sous une fausse représentation, mais laissera celle publiée par quelqu'un qui est manifestement prêt à dire que c'est une falsification, se contentant de publier un avertissement indiquant que le contenu ne semble pas véridique, même si, dans le cas de la vidéo de Mme Pelosi, la vidéo a été vue par des millions de personnes depuis le déclenchement de la controverse, laquelle sert le plan d'affaires de Facebook au sujet des clics et du nombre de visionnements.

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Eh bien, ce matin, j'ai entendu un grand nombre de commentaires qualifiant d'insatisfaisante la réponse donnée par Facebook. Je dois dire que j'ai aussi trouvé cette réponse insatisfaisante, mais cela soulève une question très importante, c'est-à-dire que dans ce cas-ci, ils savent que l'information est fausse, mais de façon plus générale, on peut se demander qui sera responsable de discerner le vrai du faux.

Personnellement, je ne veux pas assumer cette responsabilité, et je crois que c'est dangereux lorsque le gouvernement assume la responsabilité de décider ce qui est vrai et ce qui ne l’est pas. En effet, cela ressemble plutôt au type de gouvernance autoritaire qu'on retrouve dans un roman orwellien. Je ne crois pas que je serais à l'aise d'être la personne responsable de cela ou de vivre dans un régime où le gouvernement a ce pouvoir, mais si le gouvernement n’a pas ce pouvoir, on peut se demander à qui il revient. De plus, je ne suis pas à l'aise avec le fait que des plateformes ont le pouvoir de décider ce qui est vrai et ce qui est faux.

(1645)

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Si cela devait se produire en période d'élections, quelle serait votre réponse?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Dans les cycles électoraux, nous avons divers règlements qui régissent la publicité, s'il s'agit de publicité payée et si cette publicité mentionne le nom des candidats. Tous les membres de la Chambre des représentants doivent se faire réélire tous les deux ans. Je présume que les membres de la Chambre des représentants sont toujours au milieu d'un cycle, mais nous avons des règlements plus sévères qui régissent cela lorsque nous approchons d'une élection. En effet, dans les 30 jours précédant une élection primaire et dans les 60 jours précédant une élection générale, encore une fois, des règlements encadrent la divulgation. Toutefois, aucun règlement n'autorise mon organisme à ordonner à une plateforme de retirer une publicité.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, madame Weintraub.

Certains des membres du Comité ne poseront pas de questions, et nous avons donc un peu plus de temps que nous le pensions. Si vous souhaitez poser une autre question, veuillez en aviser le président, et j'ajouterai votre nom à la fin de la série de questions.

Nous entendrons maintenant la représentante de l'Estonie.

Allez-y.

Mme Keit Pentus-Rosimannus (vice-présidente, Parti réformateur, Parlement de la République d'Estonie (Riigikogu)):

Merci.

Madame Weintraub, j'aimerais vous poser une question.

La désinformation fait officiellement partie de la doctrine militaire de la Russie depuis un certain temps. On l'utilise essentiellement comme stratégie pour diviser l'Occident. On sait également que les Russes investissent 1,1 milliard d'euros par année dans la propagande et la diffusion de leur version des faits.

Vous êtes sur le point d'avoir des élections présidentielles. En sachant ce que nous savons au sujet de la dernière période électorale, êtes-vous prête maintenant? Si les événements de la dernière campagne électorale devaient se reproduire, pensez-vous que vous seriez maintenant en mesure de régler ces problèmes?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Je ne prétendrai pas que je peux personnellement résoudre le problème de la désinformation dans nos élections. Comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, je crois que des lois et des règlements ont été rédigés et qu'ils seront adoptés pour renforcer notre position.

Je crois également que, dans l'ensemble, nous devons accorder plus d'attention aux compétences numériques. En effet, un grand nombre de personnes croient toutes sortes de choses qu'elles voient en ligne et qu'elles ne devraient vraiment pas croire. Ma fille me dit que c'est une question de génération, car les gens de sa génération sont beaucoup plus sceptiques à l'égard de ce qu'ils lisent en ligne et que ce sont seulement les gens de ma génération, qui sont un peu crédules, qui considèrent qu'Internet est une nouveauté et qui présument que tout ce qu’ils lisent est vrai.

Je ne sais pas si je suis tout à fait d'accord avec elle sur le fait que cet enjeu se résume à une question de génération, mais je crois que dans l'ensemble, la communauté des démocraties doit réellement déterminer quelle est sa résilience face à la désinformation qui, nous le savons, sera diffusée un peu partout.

Comme je l'ai dit, nous menons toujours la dernière bataille, et nous pouvons donc rédiger des lois pour encadrer ce qui s'est produit la dernière fois, mais je suis certaine que lors des prochaines élections, de nouvelles techniques auxquelles personne n'a encore pensé seront mises au point.

Mme Keit Pentus-Rosimannus:

Pouvez-vous nommer les deux principales menaces contre lesquelles vous vous préparez?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Mon organisme s'occupe de réglementer les fonds dans la sphère politique. C'est notre priorité, et nous essayons de déterminer d'où proviennent ces fonds. C'est ce que nous surveillons en tout temps. Nous tentons de mettre en œuvre des mesures plus efficaces en matière de transparence, afin que nos électeurs comprennent mieux d'où viennent les fonds et qu'ils connaissent l'identité des intervenants qui tentent de les influencer. C'est réellement ma priorité.

Mme Keit Pentus-Rosimannus:

Nous venons tout juste d'avoir les élections parlementaires européennes. Selon vous, avons-nous fait face à certains enjeux que vous pourriez utiliser pour vous préparer à votre prochaine élection? Dans quelle mesure coopérez-vous avec vos collègues européens?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Je suis toujours heureuse d'obtenir des renseignements de n'importe quelle source. C'est la raison pour laquelle je suis ici. En effet, c'est un événement très enrichissant pour moi. De plus, je serai heureuse de répondre à toutes vos questions.

(1650)

Mme Keit Pentus-Rosimannus:

Observez-vous déjà certaines choses liées aux élections parlementaires européennes que vous trouvez utiles?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Nous n'avons pas encore étudié le déroulement des élections parlementaires européennes.

Mme Keit Pentus-Rosimannus: D'accord.

Le président:

Avez-vous terminé? Merci.

À titre d'information, nous allons recommencer le cycle. Nous entendrons d’abord M. Erskine-Smith, et nous donnerons ensuite la parole au parlementaire suivant. Nous entendrons donc M. Erskine-Smith, M. Lucas et M. Lawless.

Allez-y, monsieur Erskine-Smith.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Je suis récemment allé à Bruxelles, où j'ai rencontré le contrôleur européen de la protection des données. Il y a une excellente coopération entre les commissaires à la protection de la vie privée au sein de l'Union européenne. En effet, des conférences sont organisées pour leur permettre de se rencontrer et de discuter de ces enjeux, afin de favoriser la coopération entre les organismes de réglementation.

Madame Weintraub, le même niveau de coopération a-t-il été observé dans le cadre des élections?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Nos élections sont régies par nos propres règlements. Comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, je suis heureuse d'obtenir des renseignements de toutes les sources, mais étant donné que nos règlements diffèrent de ceux d'autres pays, surtout lorsqu'il s'agit de la transparence en matière de fonds et de politique et de la façon dont nous finançons nos élections, nous utilisons notre propre processus.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Lorsque j'ai laissé entendre à un ami du Colorado et à un autre ami du Mississippi que je voulais faire de la politique et que je leur ai dit que le plafond de mon district local était de 100 000 $ canadiens, ils ont ri un bon coup.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

C'est très différent.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Avant de m'adresser à M. Therrien, je tiens à préciser que je respecte absolument le fait que les règlements américains en matière de liberté d'expression sont beaucoup plus stricts que les règlements canadiens en la matière. Toutefois, lorsque vous parlez des gens responsables « de discerner le vrai du faux », il y a tout de même des conseils sur les normes et il y a toujours, dans le cas des radiodiffuseurs… Certainement, un radiodiffuseur, lors d'une élection… Je me trompe peut-être, mais je m'attends à ce qu'il y ait des conseils sur les normes et des lignes directrices en matière d'éthique et certains principes fondamentaux qu'ils seraient tenus de respecter, et qu'ils ne diffuseraient pas n'importe quoi.

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Je crois que c'est vrai dans le cas des radiodiffuseurs, surtout pour des raisons de responsabilité professionnelle. Je pense que c'est l'un des dilemmes auxquels nous faisons tous face. Lorsque nous vivions dans un monde où il y avait moins de radiodiffuseurs et qu’ils étaient tous des journalistes professionnels, qu'ils avaient reçu la formation appropriée, qu'ils exerçaient un contrôle rédactionnel sur le contenu qu’ils diffusaient et qu’ils vérifiaient plus souvent les faits, ce monde était complètement différent de celui des renseignements que nous obtenons en ligne, où tout le monde est radiodiffuseur et même producteur de contenu, et…

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Donc, c'est un peu…? Car c'est une chose que nous soyons amis sur Facebook et que vous publiez quelque chose et que je voie cette publication. Toutefois, c'est très différent si mon fil d'actualité, c'est-à-dire l'algorithme employé par Facebook, s’assure que je voie cette publication en raison de mes habitudes précédentes en ligne, ou si le système de recommandations de YouTube veille à ce que je voie une vidéo que je n'aurais pas vue autrement, car je ne l'aurais pas cherchée. Ces plateformes n'agissent-elles pas grandement comme des radiodiffuseurs lorsqu'elles utilisent des algorithmes pour veiller à ce que je voie une publication et qu'elles augmentent ainsi leur impact et leur portée?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Vous parlez de quelque chose de complètement différent. Je parlais des individus qui publient leur propre contenu. En effet, en raison de la façon dont les plateformes sont régies par les lois en vigueur aux États-Unis, ces gens n'ont pas les mêmes responsabilités que les radiodiffuseurs en vertu de l'article 230 qui…

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

S’ils prenaient leur responsabilité sociale d'entreprise au sérieux, comme le font les radiodiffuseurs, on peut présumer qu’ils deviendraient membres d'un conseil des normes ou qu'ils créeraient un tel conseil.

En ce qui concerne la transparence en matière de publicité, notre comité a recommandé… En fait, la loi sur les publicités honnêtes serait un bon point de départ, mais je crois que ce serait seulement la première étape.

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Certainement.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Cela vous semble-t-il logique que si je reçois une publicité en ligne, surtout en période d'élection, je puisse cliquer sur l'annonce pour vérifier qui l'a payée, manifestement, mais également pour vérifier les données démographiques selon lesquelles j'ai été ciblé, ainsi que les critères de sélection choisis par l'annonceur, que ce soit Facebook ou Google ou une autre plateforme, par exemple si la publicité a ciblé un code postal particulier ou si c'est parce que je suis âgé de 25 à 35 ans? Convenez-vous que la transparence devrait être plus détaillée?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

J'en conviens, mais évidemment, une partie de ce problème est liée au fait que très peu de personnes cliqueraient sur l'annonce pour trouver ces renseignements. L'une de mes préoccupations, c'est que tout le monde affirme que pourvu qu'il soit possible de cliquer sur une annonce et de trouver les renseignements quelque part, cela devrait être suffisant. Toutefois, je crois que certains renseignements devraient être affichés bien en vue sur l'annonce pour expliquer sa provenance.

(1655)

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

D'accord.

Ma dernière question s'adresse à M. Therrien.

Hier soir et ce matin, nous avons entendu d'excellents témoins qui ont insisté sur le fait que le modèle opérationnel était le problème fondamental dans ce cas-ci, car il encourage cette accumulation sans limites de données.

J'aimerais avoir vos commentaires sur deux idées que je vais vous présenter. Tout d'abord, comment pouvons-nous régler le problème lié au modèle opérationnel qui a été cerné? Deuxièmement, comment pouvons-nous le régler tout en respectant aussi la valeur réelle des données agrégées de différentes façons?

Par exemple, les données agrégées publiées par Statistique Canada sont très utiles pour éclairer la politique publique. Lorsque j'utilise Google Maps chaque jour, comme les renseignements sur les utilisateurs sont intégrés au système, je n'ai pas besoin de savoir où je vais en tout temps; je peux utiliser Google Maps. Ce système utilise des données qui y ont été entrées, mais dans l'intérêt public.

Comment pouvons-nous régler les problèmes posés par le modèle opérationnel tout en protégeant l'utilisation des données agrégées dans l'intérêt public?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je crois qu'une partie importante de la solution consiste à examiner les raisons pour lesquelles les renseignements sont recueillis et utilisés. C'est une chose qu'un organisme ou une entreprise collecte et utilise des données pour fournir un service direct à une personne. Cette utilisation est tout à fait légitime, et c'est le type de pratique qui devrait être autorisé. Toutefois, c'est une autre chose lorsqu'un organisme collecte autant de renseignements, peut-être sous le couvert d'un certain type de consentement, et que le résultat final ressemble énormément à une surveillance opérationnelle.

Je crois qu'il est important d'établir une distinction entre ces deux situations. Plusieurs règles techniques entrent en jeu, mais l'idée selon laquelle nous devrions définir la confidentialité au-delà des questions mécaniques tels le consentement et d'autres questions semblables, et la définir dans le contexte du droit protégé, c'est-à-dire la liberté de participer à l'économie numérique sans craindre de faire l’objet d'une surveillance, est une partie importante de la solution.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Mon temps est écoulé, mais j'aimerais ajouter une dernière chose. Lorsqu'il s'agit de la confidentialité du point de vue de la protection des consommateurs, il est curieux que lorsque j'achète un téléphone, je n'ai pas besoin de lire les modalités d'utilisation. En effet, je sais que si le téléphone est défectueux, je peux le retourner, car des garanties tacites me protègent. Toutefois, si je veux profiter de la même protection pour chaque application que j'utilise sur ce téléphone, je dois lire les modalités. Je crois que c'est insensé.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Erskine-Smith.

J'aimerais parler de l'ordre des questions. Voici la liste des intervenants, dans l'ordre: M. Lucas, M. Lawless, M. de Burgh Graham, Mme Stevens, M. Gourde, M. Angus et M. Kent. Pour terminer, nous entendrons M. Collins, car il aura le mot de la fin. C'est la liste que nous avons pour le moment. Si quelqu'un d’autre souhaite poser une question, veuillez lever la main. Je tenterai d'ajouter votre nom à la liste, mais il ne reste plus beaucoup de temps.

La parole est maintenant à M. Lucas. Il a cinq minutes.

M. Ian Lucas (membre, Comité sur le numérique, la culture, les médias et le sport, Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'ai été frappé par quelque chose qu’a dit M. Balsillie ce matin. En effet, il a dit que le modèle opérationnel des plateformes en ligne « subvertit le libre-choix » — et le libre-choix est essentiellement le fondement de la démocratie. Je me suis souvenu — il se peut que vous trouviez cela très amusant — qu’au Royaume-Uni, les radiodiffuseurs n'ont pas le droit de faire de la publicité politique. Autrement dit, nous n'avons pas les merveilleuses publicités que j'ai vues aux États-Unis, et qui sont également présentes dans d'autres pays, j'en suis sûr.

Croyez-vous qu'il y a lieu d'interdire les publicités politiques payantes en ligne sur ces plateformes?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Je ne vois pas du tout comment une telle mesure pourrait résister à un examen constitutionnel de notre Cour suprême.

M. Ian Lucas:

Est-ce aux États-Unis?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Oui. C'est mon cadre de référence.

M. Ian Lucas:

Oui.

Monsieur Cannataci, si vous me permettez de vous poser une question, de nos jours, la publicité politique utilise-t-elle la radiodiffusion partout dans le monde? Y a-t-il des pays dans lesquels les radiodiffuseurs n'ont pas le droit de diffuser de telles publicités?

M. Joseph A. Cannataci:

Je vous remercie de votre question, monsieur Lucas.

Je dois répondre que les pratiques varient selon les pays. Certains pays ont adopté un modèle qui ressemble plus à celui des États-Unis. D'autres ont adopté un modèle qui ressemble à celui du Royaume-Uni. Toutefois, nous constatons que dans un grand nombre de pays qui ont des lois plus restrictives, de nombreuses personnes et de nombreux partis politiques utilisent en réalité les médias sociaux pour contourner ces lois d'une façon qui n'a pas été prévue adéquatement dans le cadre de certaines lois.

Avec la permission du président, j'aimerais profiter de l'occasion, puisqu'on m'a posé une question, de mentionner une notion qui, selon moi, touche à tous les enjeux que nous avons abordés ici. Cela revient à la déclaration faite par Mme Weintraub sur les personnes qui seront responsables de discerner le vrai du faux. Dans plusieurs pays, cette valeur est toujours très importante. C'est un droit de la personne fondamental qui se trouve à l'article 17 du Pacte international relatif aux droits civils et politiques, auquel un grand nombre des pays représentés autour de la table, sinon tous, ont adhéré.

Dans le même article qui parle de la confidentialité, il y a une disposition sur la réputation, et les gens [Difficultés techniques] se soucient énormément de leur réputation. Il s'ensuit que dans de nombreux pays, y compris la France — je crois qu'on a également eu cette discussion au Canada —, les gens cherchent essentiellement à nommer une personne responsable d'établir la vérité. Cette personne peut porter le titre de commissaire d'Internet ou d'ombudsman d'Internet — on peut lui donner le nom que l'on veut —, mais en réalité, les gens veulent un recours, et ce recours consiste à s'adresser à une personne qui supprimera les publications qui contiennent de fausses informations.

Mais nous ne devons pas oublier — et cela s'applique également aux préjudices en ligne, notamment la radicalisation — qu'une grande partie des préjudices sur Internet sont causés pendant les 48 heures qui suivent la publication, et la suppression rapide d'une publication est donc le recours concret le plus important. De plus, dans de nombreux cas, même si on devrait respecter la liberté d'expression, on peut mieux respecter la vie privée et la réputation d'une personne si une publication est rapidement supprimée. Ensuite, si la personne responsable dans l'instance concernée juge que la publication a été injustement supprimée, elle pourra être rétablie. Autrement, il nous faut un recours.

Merci.

(1700)

M. Ian Lucas:

Je me rends compte, pour revenir au point que faisait valoir M. Smith, que lorsque j'ai créé un compte sur Facebook, je n'ai pas consenti à recevoir des publicités politiques ciblées, peu importe leur source. Je ne savais pas que cela faisait partie de l'entente. Ce n'est pas la raison pour laquelle les gens créent un compte sur Facebook.

Il me semble qu’au Royaume-Uni, nous avons réussi, à l'exception de quelques mauvais moments, à survivre comme démocratie sans la présence de publicités politiques à la télévision. Je cherche à restreindre un domaine particulier de la publicité, et je suis appuyé par le fait qu'on a insisté, ce matin, sur la façon dont le contrôle des données élimine réellement le libre-choix des gens dans ce processus.

À votre avis, dans quelle mesure les gens comprennent-ils la réglementation de l'information? Selon vous, comprennent-ils que c'est ce qui se passe actuellement?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Tout d'abord, permettez-moi de dire que de nombreuses personnes, aux États-Unis, adoreraient avoir un système dans lequel elles ne reçoivent pas de publicités politiques. Les gens n'aiment pas vraiment ce type de publicité.

Je crois que vous avez apporté une nuance très importante, et c'est que ce n'est pas… Notre Cour suprême n'autoriserait jamais une interdiction complète de la publicité politique, mais…

M. Ian Lucas:

D'accord. C'est la position des États-Unis, mais…

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

D'accord, mais vous parlez de l'utilisation des données personnelles des gens pour les microcibler, et il me semble que c'est un problème complètement différent. Je ne suis pas tout à fait certaine que cela ne résisterait pas à un examen constitutionnel.

M. Ian Lucas:

C'est exactement ce qui se produit actuellement avec les publicités payantes.

L'autre problème…

Le président:

Monsieur Lucas, pourriez-vous terminer très rapidement? Je déteste vous interrompre, car vous avez parcouru beaucoup de chemin.

M. Ian Lucas:

Très brièvement, j'aimerais revenir sur un enjeu mentionné par M. Zimmermann. Il a parlé des trolls sur Internet. Les groupes fermés représentent aussi un énorme problème, car nous n'avons pas les renseignements nécessaires, et je pense que nous devons nous concentrer davantage sur ce problème.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Lucas.

Nous entendrons maintenant M. Lawless, qui représente l'Irlande.

M. James Lawless:

Merci, monsieur le président. J'ai deux ou trois autres questions et observations.

Pour revenir sur quelque chose que disait, je pense, M. Erskine plus tôt, il s'agit souvent de savoir si ces plateformes sont des éditeurs autorisés ou des hôtes passifs qui affichent le contenu qui est placé devant eux. Je crois que l'un des arguments qui appuient le fait qu'il s'agit d'éditeurs et qu'ils ont ainsi une responsabilité juridique plus importante, c'est que ces plateformes ont des modérateurs et des politiques en matière de modération, et des gens prennent donc des décisions en temps réel sur ce qui devrait et ne devrait pas être publié. De plus, il y a manifestement des algorithmes de ciblage. Je crois que c'est une question intéressante, et c'est une observation que je tenais à formuler.

En ce qui concerne l’autre point que je ferai valoir, nous parlions plus tôt d’Etats-nations et de différents actes d'hostilité. Je présume que le sujet qui fait actuellement les manchettes, c'est la révélation la plus récente sur le gouvernement chinois et l’interdiction qui frappe Huawei, et le fait qu'au cours des derniers jours, Google a annoncé, je crois, une interdiction d'appuyer les combinés téléphoniques d’Huawei. Mais je trouve cela frappant, car je pense que Google nous suit dans nos déplacements par l'entremise de Google Maps et de toutes les autres applications grâce à nos téléphones. Je crois que j'ai lu quelque part qu'une personne qui marche en ville avec son téléphone dans la main ou dans la poche consomme habituellement, chaque année, 72 millions différents points de données. La différence réside peut-être dans le fait que Google a des modalités que nous sommes censés accepter, et que ce n'est pas le cas pour Huawei, mais les deux entreprises font la même chose, au bout du compte. Je tenais seulement à faire cette réflexion.

En ce qui concerne le cadre législatif, encore une fois, comme je l'ai mentionné plus tôt, j'ai tenté de rédiger des mesures législatives et de faire un suivi de certains de ces enjeux, et je suis arrivé à la loi sur les publicités honnêtes. L'un des enjeux et l'un des défis auxquels nous faisons face consiste à atteindre un équilibre entre la liberté d'expression et, je présume, la protection des électeurs et de la démocratie. Je déteste toujours criminaliser certains comportements, mais je me demande à quel moment il est nécessaire de le faire.

Je suppose qu'au départ, lorsque j'ai rédigé cette mesure, j'ai tenu compte du fait que selon moi, on peut publier ce que l'on souhaite, pourvu qu'on fasse preuve de transparence au sujet de l’auteur des paroles publiées, et des entités qui soutiennent, gèrent ou paient la publication, surtout s'il s'agit d'une publication commerciale payante. En ce qui concerne les robots Web et les faux comptes, et ce que j'appellerais les faux comptes à l'échelle industrielle, où de nombreux robots Web ou plusieurs centaines ou milliers d'utilisateurs sont manipulés par un seul utilisateur ou une seule entité pour ses propres fins, je crois qu'il s'agit probablement d'activités criminelles.

C'est donc une question pour Mme Weintraub.

Je suppose qu’une question connexe concerne un problème avec lequel nous sommes aux prises en Irlande et avec lequel sont aux prises de nombreux autres pays, je présume. Qui est responsable de maintenir l'ordre dans ce domaine? Est-ce la responsabilité d'une commission électorale? Si oui, cette commission électorale dispose-t-elle des pouvoirs nécessaires pour appliquer la loi et mener des enquêtes? Avez-vous des ressources en matière d'application de la loi à votre disposition? S’agit-il simplement des services de police de l’État? Ajoute-t-on à cela un commissaire à la protection des données? Nous avons différents types d'organismes de réglementation, mais cela peut devenir une véritable soupe à l'alphabet, et il peut être difficile de déterminer avec précision les personnes responsables. De plus, même si nous avons une personne responsable, cela peut être difficile, car cette personne n’a pas toujours les ressources nécessaires pour prendre les mesures qui s'imposent.

Ma première question est donc la suivante: la criminalisation est-elle un pas de trop? Où établit-on les limites? Deuxièmement, s'il y a criminalisation et qu'une enquête est exigée, quels types de ressources avez-vous à votre disposition ou quels types de ressources sont nécessaires, à votre avis?

(1705)

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Je répète que je me spécialise dans le système américain; je peux donc me prononcer en ce sens. Nous sommes un organisme d'application de la loi. Nos champs de compétences sont l'argent et la politique, et nous avons des pouvoirs d'exécution civile. Nous avons le pouvoir d'envoyer une assignation à témoigner. Nous pouvons mener des enquêtes. J'estime que certains de nos outils d'application de la loi pourraient être renforcés, mais nous avons aussi la capacité de saisir d'un dossier le département américain de la Justice si nous pensons qu'il y a des infractions criminelles, qui sont en gros des violations de la loi commises de manière délibérée et en connaissance de cause.

Pour revenir à quelque chose que vous avez dit plus tôt, en ce qui concerne notre système de réglementation, je ne crois pas que les droits garantis par le premier amendement s'appliquent aux robots. Ce ne sont pas des personnes. Je n'ai donc aucun problème avec... Je ne comprends pas pourquoi ces entreprises axées sur les technologies intelligentes ne sont pas en mesure de détecter les robots et de les retirer de leurs plateformes. Je ne crois pas que cela soulèverait d'inquiétudes par rapport au premier amendement, parce que ce ne sont pas des personnes.

M. James Lawless:

En fait, c'est un bon point. Je vais le retenir pour l'utiliser plus tard.

Je crois que j'ai le temps de poser ma prochaine question. Il y a une autre facette de la question que nous voyons en Irlande et partout dans le monde, je présume. Nous l'avons aussi entendu aujourd'hui. En raison du raz-de-marée de fausses nouvelles et de désinformation, nous avons encore plus la responsabilité de soutenir — j'ose dire — les plateformes traditionnelles et les médias d'information, soit ceux que nous pourrions qualifier de médias d'information indépendants et de qualité.

Il y a un problème concernant la manière d'établir ceux qui décident ce qu'est un média indépendant et ce qu'est la qualité, mais je crois avoir entendu parler au Parlement canadien lorsque nous avons regardé la période des questions il y a quelques heures de l'une des approches que nous examinons. J'ai entendu des échanges similaires. L'une des solutions que nous envisageons, c'est que l'État subventionne ou parraine les médias indépendants. Cela ne viserait pas un média d'information en particulier, mais cela pourrait servir à un comité de diffuseurs ou à la création d'un fonds pour soutenir la couverture des affaires qui touchent les Autochtones ou une couverture médiatique indépendante.

Il peut s'agir de médias en ligne, de médias radiotélévisés ou de la presse écrite. C'est une manière d'assurer la présence et la promotion du quatrième pouvoir traditionnel et des freins et des contrepoids traditionnels de la démocratie, mais j'estime que cela permettra de le faire de manière intègre et soutenue, de nous demander à tous des comptes et de faire contrepoids aux fausses nouvelles qui nous inondent. Toutefois, c'est difficile à mettre en place, parce qu'il faut établir ceux qui déterminent si un média mérite d'être parrainé et subventionné ou s'il ne le mérite pas. Si vous pouvez démontrer que vous avez une véritable plateforme locale et légitime, je présume que vous y serez admissible. C'est une approche que nous examinons; cette option a fonctionné ailleurs, et elle semble fonctionner dans d'autres endroits dans le monde.

(1710)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Lawless.

La parole est maintenant à M. Graham.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Madame Weintraub, pour donner suite à votre commentaire, si les droits garantis par le premier amendement ne s'appliquent pas aux robots, pourquoi est-ce le cas pour l'argent?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Eh bien, l'argent n'a pas de droits garantis par le premier amendement. Ce sont les gens qui dépensent cet argent qui ont des droits garantis par le premier amendement.

J'aimerais qu'une chose soit bien claire. Je n'aime pas vraiment la jurisprudence de la Cour suprême des États-Unis. J'adopterais volontiers la jurisprudence canadienne à cet égard, si je le pouvais, mais ce n'est pas du tout de mon ressort.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Bref, dois-je comprendre que vous n'êtes pas nécessairement d'avis que l'arrêt Citizens United était une bonne décision?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Je crois qu'il serait juste de dire que je ne suis pas folle de l'arrêt Citizens United.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Comme vous l'avez mentionné, le travail d'une commission électorale est de surveiller le financement des élections. Si une entreprise permet délibérément l'utilisation de son algorithme ou de sa plateforme pour influer sur les résultats des élections, considérerez-vous cela comme une contribution non monétaire réglementée?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Je crois qu'il pourrait s'agir d'une contribution en nature.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est intéressant. Ma prochaine question est liée à cela.

Le PDG de Facebook détient la majorité des actions avec droit de vote de la société. Il détient donc les pouvoirs absolus au sein de cette entreprise. Sur le plan juridique ou réglementaire, qu'est-ce qui empêche cette entreprise de décider d'accorder son soutien ou d'intervenir comme elle l'entend lors d'élections?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Une société ne peut pas directement faire de contributions à un candidat, et cela inclut les contributions en nature.

Je m'excuse, mais je ne me rappelle plus la personne qui a lancé cette hypothèse. Une question a été soulevée plus tôt concernant la possibilité que Mark Zuckerberg brigue la présidence américaine et qu'il utilise tous les renseignements qu'a accumulés Facebook pour l'aider dans sa campagne. Ce serait une terrible infraction aux lois encadrant le financement électoral, parce que ces renseignements ne lui appartiennent pas. C'est à la société Facebook qu'appartiennent ces renseignements.

Le problème à cet égard est qu'en raison d'un jugement de la Cour suprême des États-Unis les sociétés peuvent faire des contributions à des supercomités d'action politique, ou les Super PAC, qui sont censés agir de manière indépendante des campagnes électorales. Si un Super PAC servait les intérêts d'un certain candidat, une société, comme Facebook, pourrait faire des contributions illimitées à ce supercomité pour l'aider dans son travail.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vois.

Je n'ai pas beaucoup de temps. J'aimerais poser une petite question à M. Therrien.

Par rapport au point soulevé plus tôt par M. Lucas, dans le monde des médias sociaux, sommes-nous des clients ou sommes-nous le produit?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Nous entendons souvent dire que, si c'est gratuit, vous êtes le produit, et cet adage a certainement un bon fond de vérité.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Lorsqu'une entreprise de surveillance ajoute des balises à un site qui ne lui appartient pas, avec le consentement du propriétaire du site — par exemple, Google Analytics est omniprésent sur Internet et a le consentement du propriétaire du site, mais pas celui des utilisateurs finaux —, considérez-vous que l'entreprise a le consentement implicite de recueillir ces données?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je m'excuse; je n'ai pas compris la fin.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si j'ai un site Web et que j'utilise Google Analytics, je consens à ce que Google utilise mon site Web pour recueillir des données, mais les utilisateurs de mon site Web ne savent pas que Google recueille des données sur mon site Web. Y a-t-il un consentement implicite ou est-ce illégal de ce point de vue?

M. Daniel Therrien:

C'est probablement l'une des lacunes du consentement; les conditions d'utilisation font en sorte que l'utilisateur y consente. Voilà pourquoi je dis que la protection de la vie privée ne se limite pas aux règles encadrant le consentement; cela vise aussi l'utilisation des renseignements et le respect des droits. Nous ne devrions pas considérer le consentement comme la panacée de la protection de la vie privée et des données.

Le président:

Nous avons M. Picard, qui partagera le reste du temps avec...

M. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Madame Weintraub, vous avez dit quelque chose de très intéressant, et je ne sais pas si nous avons déjà établi cette notion auparavant.

Dans l'hypothèse où M. Zuckerberg briguerait la présidence américaine, Facebook ne pourrait pas lui donner accès aux renseignements, parce que ce serait une immense contribution en nature. Avons-nous établi qui est le propriétaire de ces renseignements? Personne n'a consenti à la diffusion de ces renseignements, et je me demande donc si ces renseignements appartiennent à Facebook.

(1715)

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

C'est une question très intéressante, mais je ne suis pas certaine que ce soit lié au financement des campagnes. Cela dépasse peut-être mon expertise.

M. Michel Picard:

Qu'en serait-il si cela se passait au Canada, monsieur Therrien?

M. Daniel Therrien:

Les règles concernant la propriété des renseignements ne sont pas très claires.

Du point de vue de la protection de la vie privée et des données, je crois que cela vise le contrôle et le consentement, mais la question de la propriété de ces renseignements n'est pas très claire au Canada.

Le président:

Merci.

Les trois derniers intervenants sont Mme Stevens, M. Gourde et M. Angus, puis nous pourrons conclure la réunion.

Mme Jo Stevens (membre, Comité sur le numérique, la culture, les médias et le sport, Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame Weintraub, comme vous avez évidemment une expertise et un intérêt professionnels dans ce domaine, croyez-vous que les habitants du Royaume-Uni auraient davantage confiance en l'intégrité de nos élections et de nos référendums si nous avions une enquête, comme celle réalisée par M. Mueller, concernant le référendum de 2016 sur l'Union européenne?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Vous connaissez vos compatriotes mieux que moi. Je crois que vous êtes bien placée pour juger de ce qui contribuerait à renforcer leur confiance.

Ce sont des événements particuliers qui ont mené au déclenchement de l'enquête Mueller.

Mme Jo Stevens:

Voyez-vous des chevauchements entre ces événements ou des tendances qui se dégagent concernant ce qui s'est passé aux États-Unis et ce que vous savez du référendum sur l'Union européenne?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Je n'ai pas examiné suffisamment soigneusement la question pour donner mon opinion.

Mme Jo Stevens:

D'accord. Merci.

Nous aurons peut-être dans un avenir proche un deuxième référendum ici. Nous aurons peut-être un autre vote. Nous aurons peut-être même très bientôt des élections générales.

Quelles seraient vos recommandations concernant l'ingérence étrangère au Royaume-Uni et au gouvernement par le biais de contributions financières? À l'heure actuelle, je crois que nous reconnaissons de manière générale que nos lois électorales ne sont pas adaptées au monde numérique.

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Comme je l'ai mentionné, je crois que cela concerne en grande partie la transparence. Avez-vous la capacité de savoir ceux qui se cachent derrière l'information que vous voyez en ligne et dans les autres médias?

Mme Jo Stevens:

Y a-t-il des endroits dans le monde où vous estimez que les lois électorales sont actuellement vraiment bonnes et adaptées aux fins voulues, compte tenu de tout ce dont nous avons parlé aujourd'hui par rapport à l'ingérence numérique? Y a-t-il un pays dans le monde qui serait un vrai bon modèle?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Je continue de chercher. J'assiste à des conférences à l'étranger, et j'espère y trouver quelqu'un qui aura la solution parfaite. Toutefois, je dois dire que je ne l'ai pas encore trouvée.

Si vous la trouvez, faites-le-moi savoir, parce que je serais aux anges de trouver enfin un pays qui a trouvé une solution.

Mme Jo Stevens:

J'aimerais poser la même question à M. Cannataci.

Connaissez-vous un endroit dans le monde que nous pourrions examiner pour en tirer des pratiques exemplaires en matière de lois électorales adaptées au monde numérique?

M. Joseph A. Cannataci:

La réponse courte est non.

Je suis dans le même bateau que Mme Weintraub. Je cherche toujours la solution parfaite, mais je trouve seulement, au mieux, des demi-mesures.

Madame Stevens, nous resterons en contact à ce sujet, et je serai très heureux de vous communiquer l'information dès que nous trouverons quelque chose.

Mme Jo Stevens:

Merci.

Le président:

Vous avez deux minutes, madame Stevens.

Mme Jo Stevens: Ce sera tout.

Le président: D'accord.

La parole est maintenant à M. Gourde.

Vous avez cinq minutes. [Français]

M. Jacques Gourde (Lévis—Lotbinière, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Ma question va porter sur un mot qui m'a semblé important tout à l'heure, soit le mot « responsabilité ».

Ce matin, nous avons reçu des représentants de plateformes numériques. Ils semblaient balayer du revers de la main une grande part de leur responsabilité.

Cela m'a choqué. Je pense qu'ils ont une responsabilité quant à leurs plateformes et aux services qu'ils offrent. Ils n'ont pas été capables de prouver, malgré des questions très précises, qu'ils ont le contrôle de leurs plateformes, dans le cas de diffusion par les utilisateurs de fausses nouvelles ou propagande haineuse qui peuvent vraiment changer le cours des choses et influencer énormément de personnes.

Les utilisateurs, ceux qui achètent une publicité, ont aussi une responsabilité. Quand on achète de la publicité, il faut que celle-ci soit juste et correcte, surtout en campagne électorale, mais également en tout temps.

Si, un jour, il y a une réglementation internationale, comment devrait-on déterminer la responsabilité des deux parties, soit celle des plateformes numériques et celle des utilisateurs, pour bien les encadrer?

Je pose la question à quiconque veut répondre.

(1720)

M. Daniel Therrien:

Pour ce qui est de la protection des données ou de la vie privée, vous mettez le doigt sur un concept qui, à mon avis, est fondamental, soit celui de la responsabilité ou de la responsabilisation. Nous vivons dans un monde où la collecte de renseignements est massive et où les renseignements sont utilisés par les compagnies dans plusieurs buts autres que le but premier pour lequel ils ont été obtenus.

Les compagnies nous disent souvent, en partie avec raison, que le modèle de consentement ne protège pas efficacement la vie privée des citoyens ou des consommateurs. Leur suggestion consiste à remplacer le consentement, lorsqu'il est inefficace, par une responsabilisation accrue des entreprises. Je pense que cette proposition doit être accompagnée d'une véritable démonstration du fait que les entreprises sont responsables et qu'elles ne font pas simplement prétendre l'être. C'est pourquoi il est important que les organismes de réglementation s'assurent que les compagnies sont véritablement responsables. [Traduction]

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

J'ai l'impression que ces plateformes occupent un secteur hybride. Ces entreprises affirment ne pas être des diffuseurs. Elles affirment qu'elles offrent seulement la plateforme et qu'elles ne sont pas responsables du contenu. Or, elles semblent croire qu'elles ont une certaine responsabilité, parce qu'elles prennent des mesures. Certains peuvent se dire que ces mesures sont inadéquates, mais ces entreprises prennent des mesures pour assurer une meilleure transparence.

Pourquoi le font-elles? Je crois que c'est parce qu'elles savent qu'elles ne peuvent pas s'en tirer en faisant tout simplement fi de ce problème. Ces entreprises ont une certaine part de responsabilité dans un sens plus général, voire dans un sens juridique, indépendamment du pays. Nous pouvons nous demander si ces entreprises auraient une plus grande part de responsabilité si des endroits dans le monde, individuellement ou globalement, décidaient que ces entreprises sont véritablement des diffuseurs et qu'elles doivent maintenant se comporter comme des diffuseurs. C'est une question pour les législateurs et non les organismes de réglementation. [Français]

M. Jacques Gourde:

Existe-t-il dans ce monde...

Monsieur Cannataci, vouliez-vous ajouter un commentaire?

M. Joseph A. Cannataci:

Oui, merci.

Je partage tout à fait l'avis de M. Therrien, mais j'aimerais ajouter quelque chose.[Traduction]

Si je devais dire une chose par rapport à cet aspect, je dirais que, indépendamment du groupe qui décidera si quelque chose doit être retiré ou pas ou si c'est vrai ou faux, cela demandera de l'énergie et des ressources. Par ailleurs, ces ressources ne sont pas gratuites, et je regarde qui reçoit l'argent. Ce sont en grande partie les entreprises.

Il y aura bien entendu des cas où nous pourrons facilement dire que c'était le parti ou le commanditaire ou un autre qui a acheté cette publicité. Autrement, au bout du compte, je crois qu'un nombre croissant d'endroits dans le monde s'entendront pour dire qu'ils estiment que ce sont les entreprises qui reçoivent l'argent et qu'elles ont donc les moyens d'assurer un certain contrôle. Nous l'avons vu lorsque, par exemple, Facebook a eu besoin de personnes parlant la langue du Myanmar pour assurer un contrôle sur les propos haineux dans ce pays. Je crois que nous verrons de plus en plus d'endroits dans le monde et peut-être d'ententes internationales qui attribueront la responsabilité et l'obligation financière par rapport à ce qui se passe sur les plateformes aux individus qui reçoivent l'argent, soit normalement les plateformes elles-mêmes dans une large mesure.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci.

La parole est à vous, monsieur Angus. Vous avez cinq minutes, et nous entendrons ensuite M. Collins, et je prendrai aussi la parole.

M. Charlie Angus:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Nous avons entendu une déclaration extraordinaire de Google aujourd'hui. Nous avons appris que la société a décidé de manière volontaire en 2017 de cesser d'espionner nos boîtes courriel. Elle a fait tout un geste magnanime, mais elle n'était pas prête à s'engager à ne plus nous espionner dans l'avenir, parce qu'elle peut s'en servir pour faire toute sorte de choses.

Je ne me souviens même plus de 2016; c'est très loin, mais l'année 2018 a changé nos vies à jamais. Je me rappelle que le Comité étudiait le consentement et que nous nous demandions si le consentement devrait être clair ou s'il devrait être renforcé et inclure moins de charabia.

Je ne me rappelle pas avoir donné mon consentement à Google pour espionner ma boîte courriel ou celle de mes jeunes filles. Je ne me rappelle pas avoir reçu une quelconque notification sur mon téléphone pour m'expliquer que, si j'activais la localisation sur mon appareil pour trouver une adresse, Google pourrait me suivre en permanence partout où j'irais et que l'entreprise serait au courant de tout ce que j'ai fait. Je ne me souviens pas d'avoir consenti à ce que Google ou tout autre moteur de recherche surveille tout ce que je fais. Or, à mon avis, à titre de législateurs, nous nous sommes fait embobiner par Zuckerberg pendant que nous débattions du consentement et des choses auxquelles les consommateurs peuvent consentir et que nous faisions valoir qu'il suffit de ne pas utiliser un service si vous ne l'aimez pas.

Monsieur Therrien, vous avez dit quelque chose de très profond la dernière fois que vous avez témoigné devant le Comité au sujet du droit des citoyens de mener leur vie sans être surveillés. C'est de cet aspect dont nous devons discuter. Je crois que les échanges sur le consentement ne sont plus à propos depuis 2016, je crois que nous devons affirmer que nous ne consentons pas à le donner aux entreprises. S'il n’y a aucune raison pour ce faire, elles ne peuvent pas l'avoir. Il faut que ce soit le modèle d'affaires de l'avenir: la protection de la vie privée et de nos droits.

Pour ce qui est de la question d'inclusion ou d'exclusion, je ne fais aucunement confiance à ces entreprises à cet égard.

Nous avons entendu M. Balsillie, Mme Zuboff et d'autres spécialistes aujourd'hui et hier. Est-ce possible au Canada, avec notre petit pays de 30 millions d'habitants, d'adopter une loi claire qui prévoit qu'une entreprise ne peut pas recueillir de renseignements personnels à moins d'avoir une raison claire et expresse de le faire? J'ai l'impression que c'est en partie ce que prévoit déjà la LPRPDE, soit notre loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels, mais je me demande si nous pouvons adopter de très graves conséquences financières pour les entreprises qui dérogent à cette règle. Pouvons-nous prendre des décisions au nom de nos citoyens et des droits privés?

(1725)

M. Daniel Therrien:

Bien sûr, la réponse à cette question est oui. Je pense que le consentement a sa place dans certaines circonstances où la relation est bilatérale entre un fournisseur de services et un consommateur, où le consommateur comprend l'information nécessaire pour que le service soit offert. Dans le contexte de l'économie numérique actuelle, nous sommes allés bien plus loin. L'information est alors utilisée à bien des fins, souvent avec le consentement réputé du consommateur.

Bien que le consentement ait sa place, il a ses limites, et c'est pourquoi je dis qu'il est important que la loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels définisse la protection des renseignements personnels pour ce qu'elle est. Elle n'est pas du tout limitée à la question de forme du consentement. C'est un droit fondamental lié à d'autres droits fondamentaux. Quand, malgré le consentement réputé, la pratique d'une entreprise a pour effet de traquer le consommateur en vue de connaître la localisation de ses données ou le contenu des messages qu'il envoie, je pense que la loi devrait stipuler qu'il est sans importance qu'il y ait ou non consentement. Ce qui est en jeu est le non-respect de la vie privée des gens, soit la surveillance de la personne en question, et c'est une violation en tant que telle qui devrait entraîner des sanctions importantes. C'est possible de le faire.

M. Charlie Angus:

Merci.

Ma dernière question porte sur la technologie de reconnaissance faciale. Un article publié dans le Toronto Star aujourd'hui rapporte que les services de police utilisent cette technologie. San Francisco a essayé de l'interdire, et d'autres administrations essaient au moins de la mettre en veilleuse.

La technologie de reconnaissance faciale vient enfreindre le droit d'un citoyen de pouvoir se rendre dans un lieu public sans être surveillé et sans devoir apporter une carte d'identité avec photo. Elle a, évidemment, des utilisations légitimes. Par exemple, si quelqu'un dont l'image est captée par une caméra de surveillance a commis un crime et qu'il y a une base de données, les tribunaux détermineraient peut-être qu'il s'agit d'une utilisation équitable; cependant, qu'arrive-t-il quand on se retrouve simplement au milieu d'une foule avec un certain nombre de personnes? Je suis sûr que Facebook et Google seraient plus qu'utiles, car ils ont des bases de données de reconnaissance faciale tellement importantes sur nous.

Vous qui travaillez au sein d'un organisme de réglementation canadien, croyez-vous que nous devions mettre en veilleuse la technologie de reconnaissance faciale? Comment faire pour appliquer les règles afin de protéger les droits des citoyens avec des garanties claires en matière d'utilisations policière et commerciale avant que des violations ne soient commises?

(1730)

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je pense qu'en ce qui concerne les moratoires ou les strictes interdictions, je ferais la distinction entre l'utilisation d'une technologie — la technologie de reconnaissance faciale — et les utilisations qu'on en fait. Je pense qu'il est plus probable qu'une interdiction ou un moratoire soit judicieux pour des utilisations précises de la technologie plutôt que pour la technologie en tant que telle, car la reconnaissance faciale pourrait être utile à des fins publiques, y compris au chapitre de l'application de loi dans lequel, malgré les restrictions relatives à la protection des renseignements personnels concernant la reconnaissance faciale, on estime généralement que l'utilisation de cette technologie est pour le bien du public. J'envisagerais la question, encore une fois, en fait d'utilisations précises de la technologie. À cet égard, oui, il y aurait lieu d'interdire certaines utilisations.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Angus.

Notre dernier intervenant est M. Collins. Allez-y, je vous prie.

M. Damian Collins:

Merci beaucoup.

Ellen Weintraub, compte tenu de ce dont nous avons parlé cet après-midi, de l'argent douteux en politique et de la difficulté d'assurer un quelconque type de surveillance adéquate de ce qui se passe sur des plateformes comme Facebook, est-ce que la nouvelle selon laquelle Facebook va lancer sa propre cryptomonnaie vous effraie?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Oui.

M. Damian Collins:

Vous avez peur. Cette perspective vous effraie.

Je pense que vous avez raison d'être effrayée par cette perspective. Compte tenu de tous les autres problèmes dont nous avons discuté, cela semble une sorte de charte du blanchiment d'argent politique.

Ne pensez-vous pas que les gens repenseront un jour à cette période et diront que nous avions des démocraties et des sociétés avancées qui avaient élaboré, pendant des décennies, des règles et des règlements sur le financement électoral, la loi électorale, les droits individuels concernant les données et les renseignements personnels, la surveillance des médias et des médias d'information et d'autres sources d'informations, et que nous étions préparés à laisser une société comme Facebook contourner toutes ces décennies d'expérience, simplement parce que c'est ainsi que fonctionne son modèle d'affaires, et que notre position actuelle n'est pas viable?

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

La question de savoir si notre position est viable ou si elle doit être réglementée davantage est, selon moi, la raison précise pour laquelle vous êtes assis autour de cette table aujourd'hui.

M. Damian Collins:

Mais, de certaines façons, si on en juge par la discussion qu'on a tenue au cours de cette dernière séance, nous cherchons par tous les moyens à résoudre un problème causé par une société. En fait, il se pourrait que, au lieu de devoir abandonner bien des choses auxquelles nous attachons de l'importance parce qu'elles ont été mises en place pour protéger les citoyens et leurs droits, la solution soit de vraiment dire à ces sociétés ce que nous attendons d'elles et que nous allons le leur imposer si nous n'arrivons pas à être convaincus qu'il y a une autre façon de procéder. Et d'affirmer que nous ne sommes pas prêts à tolérer que les gens soient exposés à des chapeaux noirs, à l'ingérence d'acteurs malveillants dans les élections, à la désinformation, à la propagation non contrôlée du discours haineux, et qu'en fait, ce ne sont pas les normes auxquelles nous nous attendons dans une société décente. Nous le disons en reconnaissant que des plateformes comme Facebook sont devenues les principaux médias par lesquels les gens — soit entre le tiers et la moitié des Européens et des Américains — obtiennent des nouvelles et des informations.

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Je crois qu'il est réellement risqué de prendre une série de règles qui ont évolué au cours du XXe siècle et de présumer qu'elles conviendront autant aux technologies du XXIe siècle.

M. Damian Collins:

Mon dernier commentaire est que je pense que c'est juste. Ces règles se sont révélées être dépassées en raison des nouvelles technologies et de la façon dont les gens dans le monde utilisent le contenu de l'information. Il devrait sûrement nous rester les valeurs qui ont justifié l'adoption de ces règles au départ. C'est une chose de dire qu'il faut modifier les règles pour les adapter aux changements technologiques. Nous ne devrions cependant pas dire que nous devrions abandonner ces valeurs simplement parce qu'elles sont devenues plus difficiles à appliquer.

Mme Ellen Weintraub:

Je suis tout à fait d'accord avec cela.

Le président:

Monsieur Therrien, je vous prie.

M. Daniel Therrien:

Je suis entièrement d'accord.

Le président:

J'aimerais terminer en soulevant un point. Nous parlons de la citation à comparaître de Mark Zuckerberg et Sheryl Sandberg depuis un certain temps et, à titre de président de ce comité, j'affirme que nous avons fait tout ce qui était en notre pouvoir pour nous assurer qu'ils soient présents aujourd'hui. Nous sommes limités par ce qui se trouve dans ce livre et les lois de notre pays, alors que les plateformes semblent exister dans leur propre bulle sans restriction dans nos administrations, et c'est frustrant pour nous, les législateurs.

Encore une fois, merci d'être venus témoigner aujourd'hui et merci de nous avoir aidés, surtout le commissaire Therrien. Merci d'avoir aidé le Comité, monsieur le commissaire. Nous nous réjouissons à la perspective de poursuivre ces discussions.

J'ai des questions administratives concernant l'horaire de ce soir. Le repas sera à 19 heures, en bas, dans la pièce 035. Nous sommes dans la pièce 225, alors le souper aura lieu deux étages plus bas, à 19 heures.

Pour être bien clair, chaque délégation doit donner un bref exposé sur ce que son pays a fait et compte faire pour régler ce problème. Je vais m'entretenir avec mes vice-présidents sur la façon dont nous allons présenter les mesures que nous prenons au Canada, mais je vous mets au défi de les préparer à l'avance. Encore une fois, l'exposé sera bref et peut être informel. Nul besoin d'un grand exposé écrit. Je vois des expressions très sérieuses, des gens qui semblent se dire « Dans quoi nous sommes-nous embarqués? »

Plus important encore, je vois beaucoup de visages fatigués. Je pense que nous sommes tous prêts à retourner à l'hôtel pour nous reposer pendant environ une heure avant de nous réunir à nouveau à 19 heures. Je pense que c'est tout ce que j'ai à dire pour l'instant, mais encore une fois, nous nous reverrons à 19 heures.

(1735)

M. Charlie Angus:

J'invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président, avant que vous tentiez de tous nous faire taire.

Je tiens à féliciter le personnel pour son excellent travail, nos analystes qui ont tout organisé, et M. Collins pour les travaux qui ont été réalisés en Angleterre. Vous vous êtes surpassés. Je pense que nous avons vraiment établi une norme. J'espère que dans le cadre de la prochaine législature, et peut-être dans d'autres administrations, nous pourrons poursuivre cette discussion. Vous avez accompli un travail extraordinaire dans ce dossier. Nous vous en félicitons sincèrement.

[Applaudissements]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Je précise que nous demanderons aux autres plateformes de rendre des comptes demain matin à 8 h 30.

À ce soir, 19 heures.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 28, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.